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Sample records for non-neoplasia colorectal lesions

  1. MALIGNANCY IN LARGE COLORECTAL LESIONS

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    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira dos SANTOS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context The size of colorectal lesions, besides a risk factor for malignancy, is a predictor for deeper invasion Objectives To evaluate the malignancy of colorectal lesions ≥20 mm. Methods Between 2007 and 2011, 76 neoplasms ≥20 mm in 70 patients were analyzed Results The mean age of the patients was 67.4 years, and 41 were women. Mean lesion size was 24.7 mm ± 6.2 mm (range: 20 to 50 mm. Half of the neoplasms were polypoid and the other half were non-polypoid. Forty-two (55.3% lesions were located in the left colon, and 34 in the right colon. There was a high prevalence of III L (39.5% and IV (53.9% pit patterns. There were 72 adenomas and 4 adenocarcinomas. Malignancy was observed in 5.3% of the lesions. Thirty-three lesions presented advanced histology (adenomas with high-grade dysplasia or early adenocarcinoma, with no difference in morphology and site. Only one lesion (1.3% invaded the submucosa. Lesions larger than 30 mm had advanced histology (P = 0.001. The primary treatment was endoscopic resection, and invasive carcinoma was referred to surgery. Recurrence rate was 10.6%. Conclusions Large colorectal neoplasms showed a low rate of malignancy. Endoscopic treatment is an effective therapy for these lesions.

  2. Digital Chromoendoscopy for Diagnosis of Diminutive Colorectal Lesions

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    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. To compare the accuracy of digital and real-time chromoendoscopy for the differential diagnosis of diminutive (<5 mm neoplastic and nonneoplastic colorectal lesions. Materials and Methods. This is a prospective randomized study comparing the Fujinon intelligent color enhancement (FICE system (65 patients/95 lesions and indigo carmine (69 patients/120 lesions in the analysis of capillary meshwork and pit pattern, respectively. All lesions were less than 5 mm in diameter, and magnification was used in both groups. Histopathology was the gold standard examination. Results. Of 215 colorectal lesions, 153 (71.2% were adenomas, and 62 were hyperplastic polyps (28.8%. Morphological analysis revealed 132 (61.4% superficial lesions, with 7 (3.3% depressed lesions, and 83 (38.6% protruding lesions. Vascular meshwork analysis using FICE and magnification resulted in 91.7% sensitivity, 95.7% specificity, and 92.6% accuracy in differentiating neoplastic from nonneoplastic lesions. Pit pattern analysis with indigo carmine and magnification showed 96.5% sensitivity, 88.2% specificity, and 94.2% accuracy for the same purpose. Conclusion. Both magnifying virtual chromoendoscopy and indigo carmine chromoendoscopy showed high accuracy in the histopathological diagnosis of colorectal lesions less than 5 mm in diameter.

  3. The Immune Landscapes of Polypoid and Nonpolypoid Precancerous Colorectal Lesions

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    Staiano, Teresa; Bertoni, Ramona; Ancona, Nicola; Marra, Giancarlo; Resta, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the immunoediting process in precancerous lesions. We explored this aspect of benign colorectal adenomas with a descriptive analysis of the immune pathways and immune cells whose regulation is linked to the morphology and size of these lesions. Two series of polypoid and nonpolypoid colorectal adenomas were used in this study: 1) 84 samples (42 lesions, each with matched samples of normal mucosa) whose gene expression data were used to quantify the tumor morphology- and size-related dysregulation of immune pathways collected in the Molecular Signature Database, using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis; 2) 40 other lesions examined with immunohistochemistry to quantify the presence of immune cells in the stromal compartment. In the analysis of transcriptomic data, 429 immune pathways displayed significant differential regulation in neoplasms of different morphology and size. Most pathways were significantly upregulated or downregulated in polypoid lesions versus nonpolypoid lesions (regardless of size). Differential pathway regulation associated with lesion size was observed only in polypoid neoplasms. These findings were mirrored by tissue immunostaining with CD4, CD8, FOXP3, MHC-I, CD68, and CD163 antibodies: stromal immune cell counts (mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages) were significantly higher in polypoid lesions. Certain markers displayed significant size-related differences regardless of lesion morphology. Multivariate analysis of variance showed that the marker panel clearly discriminated between precancerous lesions of different morphologies and sizes. Statistical analysis of immunostained cell counts fully support the results of the transcriptomic data analysis: the density of infiltration of most immune cells in the stroma of polypoid precancerous lesions was significantly higher than that observed in nonpolypoid lesions. Large neoplasms also have more immune cells in their stroma than small lesions. Immunoediting in precancerous

  4. CT colonography for synchronous colorectal lesions in patients with colorectal cancer: initial experience

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    McArthur, D.R.; Karandikar, S.S. [Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust (Teaching), Department of Surgery, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mehrzad, H.; Patel, R.; Dadds, J.; Pallan, A.; Roy-Choudhury, S. [Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust (Teaching), Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    To assess accuracy of CT colonography (CTC) in identifying synchronous lesions in patients with colorectal carcinoma. This study included 174 consecutive patients undergoing CTC as part of staging or primary investigation where a colorectal cancer was diagnosed between 2004 and 2007. Prone unenhanced and portal phase enhanced supine series with air or CO{sub 2} distension were acquired using 4- or 16-slice CT (Toshiba) and read by 2D {+-} 3D formats. Synchronous lesions were classified according to American College of Radiology's (ACR) polyp classification. Segmental gold standard was flexible sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy within 1 year and/or histology of colonic resection supplemented by follow-up. Nine patients without gold standard were excluded. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated on a per polyp, per patient and per segment basis and discrepancies analysed. Direct comparable data were available for 764/990 colonic segments from 165 patients. Of 41 (C2-C4) synchronous lesions on ''gold standard'', 33 were correctly identified on virtual colonoscopy (VC), overall per polyp sensitivity was 80.5%, with detection rates of 20/24 C3 (83.3%) and 3/3 C4 (100%) with per patient and per segment specificity of 95.4% and 99.2%, respectively. CTC is an accurate technique to assess for significant synchronous lesions in patients with colorectal cancer and is applicable for total pre-operative colonic visualisation. (orig.)

  5. Improved Detection of Microsatellite Instability in Early Colorectal Lesions.

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    Jeffery W Bacher

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability (MSI occurs in over 90% of Lynch syndrome cancers and is considered a hallmark of the disease. MSI is an early event in colon tumor development, but screening polyps for MSI remains controversial because of reduced sensitivity compared to more advanced neoplasms. To increase sensitivity, we investigated the use of a novel type of marker consisting of long mononucleotide repeat (LMR tracts. Adenomas from 160 patients, ranging in age from 29-55 years old, were screened for MSI using the new markers and compared with current marker panels and immunohistochemistry standards. Overall, 15 tumors were scored as MSI-High using the LMRs compared to 9 for the NCI panel and 8 for the MSI Analysis System (Promega. This difference represents at least a 1.7-fold increase in detection of MSI-High lesions over currently available markers. Moreover, the number of MSI-positive markers per sample and the size of allelic changes were significantly greater with the LMRs (p = 0.001, which increased confidence in MSI classification. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the LMR panel for detection of mismatch repair deficient lesions were 100% and 96%, respectively. In comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of the MSI Analysis System were 67% and 100%; and for the NCI panel, 75% and 97%. The difference in sensitivity between the LMR panel and the other panels was statistically significant (p<0.001. The increased sensitivity for detection of MSI-High phenotype in early colorectal lesions with the new LMR markers indicates that MSI screening for the early detection of Lynch syndrome might be feasible.

  6. Detection and treatment of synchronous lesions in colorectal cancer: The clinical implication of perioperative colonoscopy

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    Min Sun Kim; Young Jin Park

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical significance of pre-and intra-operative colonoscopy for the detection of synchronous lesions in colon cancer.METHODS: Two hundred and sixty-five pre-operative and 51 intra-operative colonoscopic evaluations were performed in 316 colorectal cancer patients who underwent curative resection from January 2001 to June 2006. The incidence and characteristics of synchronous lesions and their influence on surgery were evaluated.RESULTS: Two hundred and eighty-two synchronous lesions were detected in 124 (39.2%) of 316 patients including all lesions regardless of their histologic type.True adenomatous polyps were found in 91 (28.8%)of 316 patients, and 17 (5.4% of all patients) patients had synchronous colon cancers. The preoperative identification of synchronous lesions altered the planned surgery in 37 (14.0%) of 265 patients. In 18 patients among the surgically removed cases, the lesions were removed by extending the resection range.Further segmental resection or polypectomy through enterotomy was necessary in 19 patients. Nineteen (37.2%) of 51 intraoperative colonoscopy cases had synchronous lesions. Additional surgical procedures including segmental bowel resection and polypectomy with enterotomy were necessary in 7 (13.7%) of 51 intraoperative colonoscopy cases to remove the lesions.CONCLUSION: Synchronous colorectal polyps or cancer are frequent and their preoperative detection is important for optimal surgical planning and treatment.Intraoperative colonoscopy is a useful option in cases where a preoperative colonoscopy is not feasible.

  7. Identification of preneoplastic lesions as mucin-depleted foci in patients with sporadic colorectal cancer.

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    Sakai, Eiji; Morioka, Takamitsu; Yamada, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Higurashi, Takuma; Hosono, Kunihiro; Endo, Hiroki; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Takamatsu, Reika; Cui, Changxu; Shiozawa, Manabu; Akaike, Makoto; Samura, Hironori; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    In experimental models, mucin-depleted foci (MDF), formed by dysplastic crypts devoid of mucin production have been recognized to be correlated with colorectal carcinogenesis and to serve as preneoplastic lesions of colorectal cancer (CRC). In humans, there is only one report of identification of MDF in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and CRC; however, the histological characteristics of human MDF are not discussed extensively in the report. In the present study, colonic samples from 53 patients with sporadic CRC were stained with Alcian blue and examined for the presence of MDF. Subsequently, the samples were examined for the presence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) by methylene blue staining. We classified MDF into two categories: flat-MDF and protruded-MDF (having the characteristics of both ACF and MDF). We found a total of 354, 41 and 19 colonic mucosal lesions with a mean multiplicity of 44, 38.9 and 66.9 crypts (ACF, flat-MDF and protruded-MDF, respectively). The density of MDF was 0.0082 lesions/cm(2) . The ACF identified in sporadic CRC patients corresponded to hyperplastic or non-dysplasic lesions. However, MDF identified in these patients corresponded to low-grade dysplasia. In addition, we found that Paneth cell metaplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration were specific histological features of MDF. These histological characteristics are reported to be associated with the development of CRC. Therefore, our results indicate that MDF might represent preneoplastic lesions in human colorectal carcinogenesis. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. CT attenuation of colorectal polypoid lesions: evaluation of contrast enhancement in CT colonography

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    Oto, Aytekin [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Department of Radiology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, 301 University Boulevard, 77555-0709, Galveston, TX (United States); Gelebek, Veli; Oguz, Berna Sayan; Deger, Ahmet; Akhan, Okan; Besim, Aytekin [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Sivri, Buelent [Department of Gastroenterology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate pre- and postcontrast CT attenuation values of benign colorectal polyp and carcinoma lesions detected by virtual colonoscopy, and to investigate whether contrast enhancement of these lesions can be potentially used for differentiation from residual fluid in the colon. Fifteen benign polyps and 21 colorectal carcinoma lesions detected by virtual colonoscopy in 18 patients were included in our study. All of the polyps and carcinoma lesions were confirmed by colonoscopic biopsy. Measurement of CT attenuation values was performed in precontrast (supine) and postcontrast (prone) scans for each polyp and carcinoma. The CT attenuation values of residual fluid in the colon was also measured from the same location before and after intravenous contrast administration. On unenhanced CT scan mean attenuation values of benign polyps and colorectal carcinomas were 32.4 and 42.6 HU, respectively. Following contrast enhancement, mean attenuation value increased to 78.9 HU for polyps and 90.7 HU for carcinomas. Increase in the CT attenuation values of these lesions was significant (p <0.0001). Mean CT attenuation value of residual fluid before and after administration of IV contrast were 14.6 and 13.8 HU, respectively. The difference between CT attenuation value of residual fluid in the colon before and after contrast material was not significant (p =0.29). Colorectal benign polyps and carcinomas demonstrate significant enhancement following contrast administration and use of intravenous contrast material during virtual colonoscopy may help in some cases in differentiating these solid lesions from residual colonic fluid that does not enhance. (orig.)

  9. Detection of flat colorectal polyps at screening CT colonography in comparison with conventional polypoid lesions

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    Sakamoto, Takashi; Urata, Joji [Diagnostic Imaging Center, Saiseikai Kumamoto Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan); Mitsuzaki, Katsuhiko; Matsuda, Katsuhiko; Kawakami, Megumi [Medical Examination Center, Saiseikai Kumamoto Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan); Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yamamura, Sadahiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)], e-mail: utsunomi@kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-09-15

    Background: Although the screening of small, flat polyps is clinically important, the role of CT colonography (CTC) screening in their detection has not been thoroughly investigated. Purpose: To evaluate the detection capability and usefulness of CTC in the screening of flat and polypoid lesions by comparing CTC with optic colonoscopy findings as the gold standard. Material and Methods: We evaluated the CTC detection capability for flat colorectal polyps with a flat surface and a height not exceeding 3 mm (n = 42) by comparing to conventional polypoid lesions (n = 418) according to the polyp diameter. Four types of reconstruction images including multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, virtual gross pathology, and virtual endoscopic images were used for visual analysis. We compared the abilities of the four reconstructions for polyp visualization. Results: Detection sensitivity for flat polyps was 31.3 %, 44.4 %, and 87.5 % for lesions measuring 2-3 mm, 4-5 mm, and {>=}6 mm, respectively; the corresponding sensitivity for polypoid lesions was 47.6 %, 79.0 %, and 91.7 %. The overall sensitivity for flat lesions (47.6%) was significantly lower than polypoid lesions (64.1%). Virtual endoscopic imaging showed best visualization among the four reconstructions. Colon cancers were detected in eight patients by optic colonoscopy, and CTC detected colon cancers in all eight patients. Conclusion: CTC using 64-row multidetector CT is useful for colon cancer screening to detect colorectal polyps while the detection of small, flat lesions is still challenging.

  10. Assessment of epigenetic alterations in early colorectal lesions containing BRAF mutations

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    Nojima, Masanori; Harada, Taku; Maruyama, Reo; Ashida, Masami; Aoki, Hironori; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Wakita, Shigenori; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Eizuka, Makoto; Sugai, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the molecular and clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal serrated lesions, we assessed the DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes in a cohort of BRAF-mutant precancerous lesions from 94 individuals. We then compared those results with the lesions' clinicopathological features, especially colorectal subsites. The lesions included hyperplastic polyps (n = 16), traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) (n = 15), TSAs with sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs) (n = 6), SSAs (n = 49) and SSAs with dysplasia (n = 16). The prevalence of lesions exhibiting the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was lower in the sigmoid colon and rectum than in other bowel subsites, including the cecum, ascending, transverse and descending colon. In addition, several cancer-associated genes showed higher methylation levels within lesions in the proximal to sigmoid colon than in the sigmoid colon and rectum. These results indicate that the methylation status of lesions with BRAF mutation is strongly associated with their location, histological findings and neoplastic pathways. By contrast, no difference in aberrant DNA methylation was observed in normal-appearing background colonic mucosa along the bowel subsites, which may indicate the absence of an epigenetic field defect. PMID:27145369

  11. Comparison of 64-Detector CT Colonography and Conventional Colonoscopy in the Detection of Colorectal Lesions

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    Devir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Colon cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The early detection of colorectal cancer using screening programs is important for managing early-stage colorectal cancers and polyps. Modalities that allow examination of the entire colon are conventional colonoscopy, double contrast barium enema examination and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT colonography. Objectives To compare CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy results and to evaluate the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting colorectal lesions. Patients and Methods In a prospective study performed at Gastroenterology and Radiology Departments of Medical Faculty of Eskisehir Osmangazi University, CT colonography and colonoscopy results of 31 patients with family history of colorectal carcinoma, personal or family history of colorectal polyps, lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, change in bowel habits, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain were compared. Regardless of the size, CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy findings for all the lesions were cross - tabulated and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. To assess the agreement between CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy examinations, the Kappa coefficient of agreementt was used. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS ver 15.0. Results Regardless of the size, MDCT colonography showed 83% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 95% and a negative predictive value of 83% for the detection of colorectal polyps and masses. MDCT colonography displayed 92% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 92% and a negative predictive value of 95% for polyps ≥ 10 mm. For polyps between 6mm and 9 mm, MDCT colonography displayed 75% sensitivity and 100% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 90%. For polyps

  12. Prevalence and features of colorectal lesions among Hispanics: A hospital-based study.

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    Ashktorab, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O; Lee, Edward; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Ghuman, Amita; Nouraie, Mehdi; Brim, Hassan

    2015-12-14

    To evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of colorectal adenoma and carcinoma in an inner city Hispanic population. We reviewed the reports of 1628 Hispanic patients who underwent colonoscopy at Howard University from 2000 to 2010. Advanced adenoma was defined as adenoma ≥ 1 cm in size, adenomas with villous histology, high grade dysplasia and/or invasive cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using χ(2) statistics and t-test. The median age of the patients was 54 years, 64.2% were females. Polyps were observed in 489 (30.0%) of patients. Adenoma prevalence was 16.8% (n = 273), advanced adenoma 2.4% (n = 39), and colorectal cancer 0.4% (n = 7). Hyperplastic polyps were seen in 6.6% of the cohort (n = 107). Adenomas predominantly exhibited a proximal colonic distribution (53.7%, n = 144); while hyperplastic polyps were mostly located in the distal colon (70%, n = 75). Among 11.7% (n = 191) patients who underwent screening colonoscopy, the prevalence of colorectal lesions was 21.4% adenoma, 2.6% advanced adenoma; and 8.3% hyperplastic polyps. Our data showed low colorectal cancer prevalence among Hispanics in the Washington DC area. However, the pre-neoplastic pattern of colonic lesions in Hispanics likely points toward a shift in this population that needs to be monitored closely through large epidemiological studies.

  13. Can semiquantitative measurements of SUVmax and cut-off values differentiate colorectal malignant from benign lesions?

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    Nguyen, Tram; Hess, Søren; Petersen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and cut-off values for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions in colorectal cancer (CC) as multiple studies have questioned their validity. We also investigated more extended indices using common semi-quantification an......OBJECTIVE: We investigated maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and cut-off values for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions in colorectal cancer (CC) as multiple studies have questioned their validity. We also investigated more extended indices using common semi...... lesions, SUVmax was >5 and SUVmean≥2.7. Malignant SUVmax values (mean±SD: 16.5±6.2) were overall significantly higher than benign levels (9.8±3.6). There was a substantial overlap with values in polyps/adenomas (14.4±7.7). Both SUVpeak and SUVmean showed similar characteristics. Malignant MAV and TLG...... showed more distinct levels. Though different segmentation methods introduced variations, largest in MAV (-58.6%-141.5%), and PVC generally increased measures significantly by a factor of 1.2-2.7, neither changed relative levels much. SUVmax values were inadequate for aetiological differentiation of ICF...

  14. Efficacy of Transarterial Chemoembolization on Lesion Reduction in Colorectal Liver Metastases

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    Hossein Ghanaati

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Following failure of systemic chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE is an available method to control unresectable liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma (CRC. The aim of present study was to evaluate the efficacy of chemoembolization for inoperable metastatic liver lesions from CRC. Forty-five CRC patients with liver metastases resistant to systemic chemotherapy were enrolled in our study. For each patient, three session of TACE were conducted with 45 days interval. A combination of mitomycin, doxorubicin, and lipiodol were used for TACE. A tri-phasic computed tomography scan and biochemical laboratory tests were performed for all patients at baseline and 30 days after each TACE. Image analysis included measurement of lesion diameters as well as contrast enhancement. Eleven patients deceased before completing three session and the final analyses were performed on the remaining 34 patients. Evaluation of a total 93 lesions in all patients after chemoembolization sessions revealed a 25.88% reduction in anteroposterior (AP diameter, 33.92% transverse (T diameter, and 42.22% in product of APxT diameter of lesions (P<0.001 for all instances. CT scan showed a total disappearance of 33% of lesions and evident reduction in contrast enhancement in 16% of them. There were no changes in contrast enhancement in 51% of lesions. Evaluation of single largest lesion in each patient revealed 57.32% reduction in AP diameter, 59.66% in T diameter, and 62.17% in product of APxT diameters (P<0.001 for all diameters. TACE offers a viable option for CRC patients with unresectable liver metastases by significantly reducing lesion size and contrast enhancement.

  15. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

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    Wang, Zhiqi; Li, Sai; Cao, Yu; Tian, Xuefei; Zeng, Rong; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion free radical (O2 ∙−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (HO∙), are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS). In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC. PMID:26823956

  16. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

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    Zhiqi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC, but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide anion free radical (O2∙-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and hydroxyl radical (HO∙, are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS. In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC.

  17. Endoscopic mucosal resection in colorectal lesion: a safe and effective procedure even in lesions larger than 2 cm and in carcinomas

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    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Endoscopic mucosal resection is a minimally invasive technique used in the treatment of colorectal neoplasms, including early carcinomas of different size and morphology. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate procedure safety, efficacy, outcomes, and recurrence rate in endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal lesions. METHODS: A total of 172 lesions in 156 patients were analyzed between May 2003 and May 2009. All lesions showed pit pattern suggestive of neoplasia (Kudo types III-V at high-magnification chromocolonoscopy with indigo carmine. The lesions were evaluated for macroscopic classification, size, location, and histopathology. Lesions 20 mm or smaller were resected en bloc and lesions larger than 20 mm were removed using the piecemeal technique. Complications and recurrence were analyzed. Patients were followed up for 18 months. RESULTS: There were 83 (48.2% superficial lesions, 57 (33.1% depressed lesions, 44 (25.6% laterally spreading tumors, and 45 (26.2% protruding lesions. Mean lesion size was 11.5 mm ± 9.6 mm (2 mm-60 mm. Patients' mean age was 61.6 ± 12.5 years (34-93 years. Regarding lesion site, 24 (14.0% lesions were located in the rectum, 68 (39.5% in the left colon, and 80 (46.5% in the right colon (transverse, ascending, and cecum. There were 167 (97.1% neoplasms: 142 (82.5% adenomatous lesions, 24 (14.0% intramucosal carcinomas, and 1 (0.6% invasive carcinoma. En bloc resection was performed in 158 (91.9% cases and piecemeal resection in 14 (8.1%. Bleeding occurred in 5 (2.9% cases. Recurrence was observed in 4.1% (5/122 of cases and was associated with lesions larger than 20 mm (P<0.01, piecemeal resection (P<0.01, advanced neoplasm (P = 0.01, and carcinoma compared to adenoma (P = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal lesions is a safe and effective procedure, with low complication and local recurrence rates. Recurrence is associated with lesions larger than 20 mm and carcinomas.

  18. Magnetic resonance (MR) colonography in the detection of colorectal lesions: a systematic review of prospective studies

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    Zijta, Frank M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR-colonography for the detection of colorectal lesions. A comprehensive literature search was performed for comparative MR-colonography studies, published between May 1997 and February 2009, using the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. We included studies if MR-colonography findings were prospectively compared with conventional colonoscopy in (a)symptomatic patients. Two reviewers independently extracted study design characteristics and data for summarising sensitivity and specificity. Heterogeneity in findings between studies was tested using I{sup 2} test statistics. Sensitivity and specificity estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated on per patient basis and summary sensitivity on per polyp basis, using bivariate and univariate statistical models. Thirty-seven studies were found to be potentially relevant and 13 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The study population comprised 1,285 patients with a mean disease prevalence of 44% (range 22-63%). Sensitivity for the detection of CRC was 100%. Significant heterogeneity was found for overall per patient sensitivity and specificity. For polyps with a size of 10 mm or larger, per patient sensitivity and specificity estimates were 88% (95% CI 63-97%; I{sup 2} = 37%) and 99% (95% CI 95-100%; I {sup 2} = 60%). On a per polyp basis, polyps of 10 mm or larger were detected with a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI 66-94%; I {sup 2} = 51%). The data were too heterogeneous for polyps smaller than 6 mm and 6-9 mm. MR-colonography can accurately detect colorectal polyps more than 10 mm in size. (orig.)

  19. Effectiveness of computer-aided diagnosis of colorectal lesions using novel software for magnifying narrow-band imaging: a pilot study.

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    Tamai, Naoto; Saito, Yutaka; Sakamoto, Taku; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Sumiyama, Kazuki; Tajiri, Hisao; Koyama, Ryosuke; Kido, Shoji

    2017-08-01

     Magnifying narrow-band imaging (M-NBI) enables detailed observation of microvascular architecture and can be used in endoscopic diagnosis of colorectal lesion. However, in clinical practice, differential diagnosis and estimation of invasion depth of colorectal lesions based on M-NBI findings require experience. Therefore, developing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for M-NBI would be beneficial for clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of software for CAD of colorectal lesions. In collaboration with Yamaguchi University, we developed novel software that enables CAD of colorectal lesions using M-NBI images. This software for CAD further specifically divides original Sano's colorectal M-NBI classification into 3 groups (group A, capillary pattern [CP] type I; group B, CP type II + CP type IIIA; group C, CP type IIIB), which describe hyperplastic polyps (HPs), adenoma/adenocarcinoma (intramucosal [IM] to submucosal [SM]-superficial) lesions, and SM-deep lesions, respectively. We retrospectively reviewed 121 lesions evaluated using M-NBI. The 121 reviewed lesions included 21 HP, 80 adenoma/adenocarcinoma (IM to SM-superficial), and 20 SM-deep lesions. The concordance rate between the CAD and the diagnosis of the experienced endoscopists was 90.9 %. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of the CAD for neoplastic lesions were 83.9 %, 82.6 %, 53.1 %, 95.6 %, and 82.8 %, respectively. The values for SM-deep lesions were 83.9 %, 82.6 %, 53.1 %, 95.6 %, and 82.8 %, respectively.  Relatively high diagnostic values were obtained using CAD. This software for CAD could possibly lead to a wider use of M-NBI in the endoscopic diagnosis of colorectal lesions.

  20. CLINICAL CASE OF A MASSIVE ISOLA TED METASTATIC ADRENAL LESION IN COLORECT AL CANCER

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    I. P. Moshurov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe liver, lungs, parietal and visceral peritoneum have traditionally been considered to be the main target organs of metastatic colorectal cancer. The isolated adrenal metastasis in colorectal cancer is rare, in the literature there are single observations of clinical cases of successful surgical treatment of such patients. This article presents the clinical observation of successful surgical treatment of patients with colorectal cancer with massive isolated adrenal metastases.

  1. Fecal-tagging CT colonography with structure-analysis electronic cleansing for detection of colorectal flat lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yonghua, E-mail: howardyonghua@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuhui Central Hospital of Shanghai and China Academy of Sciences Shanghai Medical Center, 966 Huai Hai Central Road, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Cai, Wenli; Nappi, Janne; Yoshida, Hiro [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 25 New Chardon Street 400C, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and sensitivity of the 3D-reading of fecal-tagging CT colonography (CTC) with a novel structure-analysis electronic cleansing (SAEC) in detecting colorectal flat lesions in comparison with a cleansed 3D reading with Viatronix V3D Colon system (V3D) and primary uncleansed 2D reading (2D). Materials and methods: Forty CTC cases with flat lesions were retrospectively observed. The Subjects from a multicenter clinical trial underwent cathartic bowel preparation with orally administrated barium-based fecal-tagging. Sixty-nine flat lesions were confirmed using colonoscopy and histopathology as a reference standard. The results from SAEC reading were compared with those of prospective V3D and 2D readings. Results: Overall detection sensitivity with SAEC was 52% (36/69), which was statistically higher than that of 32% (22/69) and 29% (20/69) with V3D and 2D readings, respectively (p < 0.05). The sensitivities in detecting not-on-fold flat lesions were 63% (24/38), 45% (17/38), and 42% (16/38) with SAEC, V3D, and 2D readings, respectively; whereas those of on-fold flat lesions were 39% (12/31), 16% (5/31), and 13% (4/31), respectively. None of the eight flat lesions (2-9 mm) at cecum was detected by any of the three reading methods. Excluding the flat lesions at cecum, the sensitivity with SAEC for detecting flat lesion {>=}4 mm increased to 84% (31/37). Conclusions: The fecal-tagging CTC with structure-analysis electronic cleansing could yield a high sensitivity for detecting flat lesions {>=}4 mm. The not-on-fold flat lesions were detected with higher sensitivity than on-fold flat lesions.

  2. Genomic lesions and colorectal carcinogenesis: the effects of protein-calorie restriction and inulin supplementation on deficiency statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, W B; Takahachi, N A; Mauro, M O; Pesarini, J R; Rabacow, A P M; Antoniolli, A C M B; Oliveira, R J

    2015-03-27

    The present study investigated the effects of restricting protein and calories and supplementation of inulin, a fiber comprising a linear type of polydisperse carbohydrates composed primarily of fructil-fructose bonds (β-(2→1), on the deficiency statuses of animals in which genomic lesion development and colorectal carcinogenesis had been induced. This experiment involved adult male Swiss mice (N = 11/group). The experimental groups were as follows: Negative Control (vehicle), Positive Control, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), Inulin, and Associate. DMH, which promoted colorectal cancer, was administered intraperitoneally in 4 20-mg/kg body weight (bw) doses during a 2-week period; inulin was administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg/kg bw. Each group was bifurcated; half of each group was fed a normal protein diet and the other half was fed a low-protein diet. The results indicated that a correlation existed between malnutrition and an increased frequency of genomic lesions but that malnutrition did not predispose animals to colorectal cancer development. Inulin exhibited genotoxic activity, which requires further investigation, and low anti-genotoxic activity. Moreover, inulin reduced the levels of intestinal carcinogenesis biomarkers in both malnourished and healthy animals. These data suggest that inulin holds therapeutic potential and is a strong candidate for inclusion among the functional foods used for cancer prevention in both properly nourished and malnourished individuals.

  3. The diagnostic value of indeterminate lung lesions on staging chest computed tomographies in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette Williaume; Bulut, Orhan; Jess, Per

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Selection of pulmonary staging modality in colorectal cancer surgery is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) clearly outperforms x-ray in terms of sensitivity, but findings of indeterminate lung lesions remain a problem. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance...... indeterminate lung findings. Four died postoperatively. The remaining 22 were followed for a median period of 26 months. RESULTS: In eight of the 22 patients (36%) lesions progressed. In one patient, the lesion turned out to be a primary lung cancer, in another a lymphoma. In the last six patients (27...... tenth into other lung malignancies, which were most often diagnosed in the second year after surgery. The development of lung metastases was significantly related to positive nodal disease and postoperative CEA elevation....

  4. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as an imaging biomarker in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with regorafenib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yoojoo; Lee, Kyung-Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Ji-In; Paeng, Jin Chul [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sae-Won [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Geyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Gyeong Hoon [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-You [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This study was performed to evaluate whether fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) could predict treatment outcome of regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Previously treated refractory mCRC patients were enrolled into a prospective biomarker study of regorafenib. For this sub-study, the results of FDG PET/CT scans at baseline and after two cycles of treatment were analyzed. Various metabolic parameters obtained from PET images were analyzed in relation to treatment outcome. A total of 40 patients were evaluable for PET image analysis. Among various PET parameters, total lesion glycolysis (TLG) measured in the same target lesions for RECIST 1.1 analysis were the most significant in predicting prognosis, with the lowest p-value observed in TLG calculated using the margin threshold of 40 % (TLG{sub 40} {sub %}). Further analysis using TLG{sub 40} {sub %} showed significantly longer overall survival (OS) in patients with lower baseline TLG{sub 40} {sub %} (<151.8) (p = 0.003, median 14.2 vs. 9.1 months in <151.8 and ≥151.8, respectively). Patients showing higher decrease in TLG{sub 40} {sub %} after treatment showed significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.001, median 8.0 vs. 2.4 months in % ΔTLG{sub 40} {sub %} < -9.6 % and ≥ -9.6 %, respectively) and OS (p = 0.002, median 16.4 vs. 9.1 months in % ΔTLG{sub 40} {sub %} < -9.6 % and ≥ -9.6 %, respectively). The same cutoff could discriminate patients with longer survival among the patients who were under the stable disease category according to RECIST 1.1 (median PFS 8.4 vs. 6.8 months, p = 0.020; median OS 18.3 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.049). Measurement of TLG can predict treatment outcome of regorafenib in mCRC. (orig.)

  5. Serum retinol level in patients with colorectal premalignant and malignant lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrowski, J; Janik, P.; Nowacki, M.; Janczewska, I; Przybyszewska, M.; Szaniawska, B.; Bartnik, W.; Butruk, E

    1987-01-01

    Serum retinol levels were determined by a fluorometric method in patients with colorectal cancer or polyps and those with inflammatory bowel disease. Serum retinol levels in patients with benign or malignant colorectal polyps and stage B cancer (modified Dukes' classification) were similar to those found in controls. By contrast, serum retinol levels were significantly lower in patients with Dukes' stage C or D. Among cancer patients that were followed after surgical treatment serum retinol l...

  6. Contribution of Computed Tomography Enema and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Diagnose Multifocal and Multicentric Bowel Lesions in Patients With Colorectal Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belghiti, Jeremie; Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Zacharopoulou, Chrysoula; Zilberman, Sonia; Jarboui, Lamia; Bazot, Marc; Ballester, Marcos; Daraï, Emile

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic contribution of the computed tomography (CT) enema and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for multifocal (multiple lesions affecting the same segment) and multicentric (multiple lesions affecting several digestive segments) bowel endometriosis. Prospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Eighty-five patients. Tenon University Hospital, Paris, France. All patients received a preoperative CT enema and underwent MRI interpreted by 2 radiologists. Patients underwent colorectal resection for colorectal endometriosis from February 2009 to November 2012. Nineteen patients (22%) had multifocal lesions, and 11 patients (13%) had multicentric lesions. Six patients (7%) had both multifocal and multicentric lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) of MRI for the diagnosis of multifocal lesions were 0.58, 0.84, 3.55, and 0.5, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative LRs of the CT enema for the diagnosis of multifocal lesions were 0.64, 0.86, 4.56, and 0.4, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive LR of MRI for the diagnosis of multicentric lesions were 1, 0.88, and 8.4, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative LRs of MRI for the diagnosis of multicentric lesions were 0.46, 0.92, 5.6, and 0.59, respectively. No difference was observed between MRI and the CT enema for the diagnosis of multifocal and multicentric colorectal endometriosis. The interobserver agreement was good for MRI and the CT enema (κ = 0.45 and 0.45) for multifocality, and it was poor for both MRI and the CT enema (κ = 0.32 and 0.34) for multicentricity. Both MRI and the CT enema were able to diagnose multifocal and multicentric bowel endometriosis with similar accuracy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF BETA CATENIN IN COLORECTAL NON NEOPLASTIC AND NEOPLASTIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Rini Handjari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC function is typically an early event in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC pathogenesis. The key tumor suppressor function of the APC protein lies in its ability to destabilize free cytoplasmic beta catenin. This lead to the accumulation of nuclear beta catenin, and together with the DNA binding protein Tcf-4, function as a transcriptional activator. Accumulation of stabilized free β-catenin is considered as an early event and perhaps initiating the process in intestinal tumorigenesis. Neoplastic transformation in the CRC associated chronic colitis is considered similar to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence in sporadic CRC. The distinguish feature from the CRC-related colitis is the difference in time and frequency changes. Loss of APC function, regarded as the beginning of a very common event in sporadic CRC, but the CRC associated chronic colitis generally occurs at the end of thedysplasia-carcinoma sequence. This research was conducted to determine the subcellular location of beta catenin expression in chronic colitis, colorectal adenomas and carcinomas that were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. It can be concluded that beta-catenin is a component that plays a role in the development of the CRC and the subcellular location of beta-catenin can describe its oncogenic activity.

  8. A Robust and Fast System for CTC Computer-Aided Detection of Colorectal Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We present a complete, end-to-end computer-aided detection (CAD) system for identifying lesions in the colon, imaged with computed tomography (CT). This system includes facilities for colon segmentation, candidate generation, feature analysis, and classification. The algorithms have been designed to offer robust performance to variation in image data and patient preparation. By utilizing efficient 2D and 3D processing, software optimizations, multi-threading, feature selection, and an optimiz...

  9. Estudio de las lesiones neoplásicas metacrónicas en el carcinoma colorrectal Study of colorectal metachronous neoplastic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Borda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. Analizar la frecuencia y las características de las lesiones neoplásicas metacrónicas, carcinomas y adenomas, tras la resección de un cáncer colo-rectal (CCR. Pacientes y métodos. Revisamos 382 CCR operados y seguidos mediante colonoscopias completas en dos hospitales de nuestra comunidad. Analizamos las lesiones metacrónicas registradas valorando su localización, momento del diagnóstico, histología, número y tamaño. Estudiamos la frecuencia de adenomas de aparición precoz (12 meses, comparando su tamaño con respecto al resto de lesiones. Resultados. La mediana de seguimiento fue de 48 meses (12-112, con 2,74±1,47 colonoscopias/caso. Diagnosticamos 7 cánceres metacrónicos (1,8%, 4 de ellos en estadio I. La mediana de tiempo hasta su diagnóstico fue de 24 meses (13-54. Registramos adenomas metacrónicos en 162 casos (42,4%, sin diferencias entre los dos hospitales: 42,1% vs. 43,8% (p=0,88. Un 6,3% de los pacientes presentaron adenomas avanzados. En 164 casos en que el primer control se efectuó a los 12 meses, la incidencia de adenomas fue del 24%. Los adenomas fueron mayoritariamente únicos (60,8% y menores de 5 mm (68,5%. En un 55,5% de los casos con pólipos, alguno tenía una localización proximal. El diagnóstico se realizó en la 1ª exploración (56,2%, 2ª (27,8% ó 3ª (9%. La mediana de tiempo hasta el diagnóstico fue de 21 meses (12-112 para el adenoma simple y de 35 (12-112 para el avanzado. Conclusiones. Nuestro seguimiento permitió aplicar un tratamiento teóricamente curativo en la mayoría de los carcinomas metacrónicos diagnosticados. La alta incidencia de adenomas y su frecuente localización proximal hacen necesario un seguimiento con colonoscopias completas, que debería iniciarse al año de la operación y podría pasar a ser menos estricto tras tres exploraciones consecutivas sin pólipos.Background. To analyse the frequency and characteristics of metachronous neoplastic lesions, carcinomas

  10. Lesion-based detection of early chemosensitivity using serial static FDG PET/CT in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buvat, Irene; Necib, Hatem [IMNC UMR 8165 CNRS - Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay cedex (France); Garcia, Camilo; Wagner, Antoine; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Flamen, Patrick [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Nuclear Medicine Department, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Emonts, Patrick [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Radiology Department, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Hendlisz, Alain [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Digestive Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Medical oncology needs early identification of patients that are not responding to systemic therapy. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) performed before and early during treatment has been proposed for this purpose. However, the best way to assess the change in FDG uptake between two scans has not been identified. We studied cutoff thresholds to identify responding tumours as a function of the method used to measure tumour uptake. The study included 28 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients who underwent 2 FDG PET/CT scans (baseline and at day 14 of the first course of polychemotherapy). For 78 tumour lesions, 4 standardized uptake value (SUV) indices were measured: maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) and mean SUV in a region obtained using an isocontour (SUV{sub 40} {sub %}), with each of these SUV normalized either by the patient body weight (BW) or body surface area (BSA). The per cent change and absolute change in tumour uptake between the baseline and the early PET scans were measured based on these four indices. These changes were correlated to the RECIST 1.0-based response using contrast-enhanced CT at baseline and at 6-8 weeks on treatment. The 78 tumours were classified as non-responding (NRL, n = 58) and responding lesions (RL, n = 20). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves characterizing the performance in NRL/RL classification using early FDG PET uptake had areas under the curve between 0.75 and 0.84, without significant difference between the indices. The cutoff threshold in FDG uptake per cent change to get a 95 % sensitivity of RL detection depended on the way uptake was measured: -14 % (specificity of 53 %) and -22 % (specificity of 64 %) for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub 40} {sub %}, respectively. Thresholds expressed as absolute SUV decrease instead of per cent change were less sensitive to the SUV definition: an SUV decline by 1.2 yielded a sensitivity of RL detection of 95 % for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub 40

  11. A Robust and Fast System for CTC Computer-Aided Detection of Colorectal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Beddoe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a complete, end-to-end computer-aided detection (CAD system for identifying lesions in the colon, imaged with computed tomography (CT. This system includes facilities for colon segmentation, candidate generation, feature analysis, and classification. The algorithms have been designed to offer robust performance to variation in image data and patient preparation. By utilizing efficient 2D and 3D processing, software optimizations, multi-threading, feature selection, and an optimized cascade classifier, the CAD system quickly determines a set of detection marks. The colon CAD system has been validated on the largest set of data to date, and demonstrates excellent performance, in terms of its high sensitivity, low false positive rate, and computational efficiency.

  12. Added value of arterial enhancement fraction color maps for the characterization of small hepatic low-attenuating lesions in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Park

    Full Text Available To assess the added value of arterial enhancement fraction (AEF color maps for the differentiation of small metastases from hepatic benign lesions.We retrospectively analyzed 46 patients with colorectal cancer who underwent multiphasic liver CT imaging and had low-attenuating liver lesions smaller than 3 cm (123 total lesions; metastasis: benign = 32:91. AEF color maps of the liver were created from multiphasic liver CT images using dedicated software. Two radiologists independently reviewed multiphasic CT image sets alone and in combination with image sets with AEF color maps using a five-point scale. The additional diagnostic value of the color maps was assessed by means of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC analysis.The area under the ROC curve (Az increased when multiphasic CT images were combined with AEF color map analysis as compared with evaluation based only on multiphasic CT images (from 0.698 to 0.897 for reader 1, and from 0.825 to 0.945 for reader 2; P < 0.001 and 0.002, respectively. The increase Az was especially significant for lesions less than 1 cm (from 0.702 to 0.888 for reader 1, and from 0.768 to 0.958 for reader 2; P = 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively. The mean AEF of tumor-adjacent parenchyma (35.07 ± 27.2 was significantly higher than that of tumor-free liver parenchyma (27.3 ± 20.6 (P = 0.04.AEF color mapping can improve the diagnostic performance for small hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and may allow for the elimination of additional examinations.

  13. FDG PET/CT Is Superior to Enhanced CT in Detecting Recurrent Subcentimeter Lesions in the Abdominopelvic Cavity in Colorectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai Jeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Jin [Asan Medical Center, Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    This study aims to compare the performance of contrast enhanced computed tomography (CeCT) and 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in detecting small tumor implants and metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in the abdominopelvic cavity in patients with colorectal cancer. We enrolled 16 patients who were clinically suspected of experiencing a recurrences (6 male, 10 female; mean age 61{+-}14 years). All subjects underwent CeCT and PET/CT, and the performance of these methods was compared with regard to detecting recurrences. The final diagnosis of a recurrence was made clinically. CeCT identified 38 lesions in 12 patients, all of which were detected by PET/CT. PET/CT found 27 additional lesions in 8 patients, comprising 9 seeding nodules (2 in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen and 7 in the pelvic cavity) and 18 LNs (2 celiac, 2 paraaortic, 2 hepatic hilar, 11 common iliac, 1 external iliac). Most additional lesions were located in the pelvic cavity (approximately 78% of seeding nodules that were detected solely by PET/CT was significantly higher compared with the CeCT and PET/CT confirmed nodules (5.5{+-}4.2 vs. 2.9{+-}2.5, p=0.03). The seeding nodules that were detected only by PET/CT were significantly smaller than the CeCT and PET/CT confirmed nodules (long axis:1.0{+-}0.3cm vs. 2.0{+-}1.1cm, p=0.001; short axis: 0.8{+-}0.3cm vs. 1.7{+-}0.9cm, p=0.001). Similarly, PET/CT only detected LNs were significantly smaller than CeCT and PET/CT identified LNs (0.7{+-}0.1cm vs. 2.3{+-}1.2cm, p<0.0001). PET/CT is superior to CeCT in detecting seeding nodules and metastatic LNs in patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Specifically, PET/CT detects subcentimeter lesions in anatomically deformed pelvic cavities.

  14. Drawing up an individual risk index for development of metachronous neoplastic lesions in resected colorectal cancer Elaboración de un índice individual del riesgo para el desarrollo de lesiones neoplásicas metacrónicas en el cáncer colorrectal resecado

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Borda; José María Martínez-Peñuela; Fernando Borda; Miguel Muñoz-Navas; Francisco Javier Jiménez; Cristina Carretero

    2012-01-01

    Aim: to identify possible risk factors for the development of metachronous lesions in colorectal cancer (CRC) which would allow to establish a post-surgical individual prognostic index. Patients and methods: three hundred eighty-two surgically treated CRC were reviewed. We compared the incidence of metachronous lesions in 40 variables concerning patient clinical data and initial neoplastic findings. An individual risk index for metachronicity was drawn up including those variables which prese...

  15. Alcohol Intake, Smoking, and Colorectal Adenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yeong Mi; Cho, Chang Ho; Kim, Sung Hi; Lee, Jung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Korea. Because colorectal adenoma is a precursor lesion of colorectal cancer, primary prevention of colorectal adenomas may be important for reducing morbidity and mortality from the disease. The aim of this study is to examine the association of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking in relation with colorectal adenoma in a cross-sectional study of Korean adults. Methods: A total of 366 participants who underwent colonoscopy...

  16. Qualities of sessile serrated adenoma/polyp/lesion and its borderline variant in the context of synchronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Mahin; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Although much data have accumulated on sessile serrated adenoma/polyp/lesion (SSA/P/L) in general, its characteristics in specified contexts are less well elucidated. This lack of knowledge is even more conspicuous concerning its borderline counterpart, referred to as BSSA/P/L. The previous histo...

  17. Prevalence of colorectal cancer and its precursor lesions in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients undergoing total colonoscopy: results of a large prospective, multicenter, controlled endoscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Irina; Tacke, Wolfgang; Bock, Herbert; Filmann, Natalie; Lieber, Elena; Zeuzem, Stefan; Trojan, Jörg; Herrmann, Eva; Schröder, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Germany. Screening colonoscopies have been offered in Germany since 2002. However, validation of screening programs for CRC relies on estimates up to date. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the risk factor tumor-suspicious symptoms on the prevalence of CRC and its precursor lesions in patients at least 55 years of age undergoing colonoscopy in comparison with an age-matched and sex-matched control population undergoing screening colonoscopy. Multicenter, prospective, controlled colonoscopy study. Integrated care program of 49 gastroenterological practices in collaboration with a health insurance company and the screening colonoscopy program in Hesse, Germany. In total, 1075 symptomatic and 5375 asymptomatic participants were matched for age and sex (1 : 5) from 1 October 2008 to 30 September 2010. Detection of CRC and its precursor lesions. Overall, the prevalence of CRC was significantly equivalent in both the symptomatic (n=13/1075, 1.21%) and the control group [n=55/5375, 1.02%, 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference: [-0.46%, 0.83%], P=0.0002, equivalence test with δ=1.5%], respectively. Advanced adenomas were observed in significantly fewer symptomatic patients (61/1075, 5.67%) compared with 432/5375 matched asymptomatic screening participants (8.03%, 95% CI for the difference: [-3.98%, -0.74%], P=0.0094, difference test). Finally, polyps were found significantly less often in symptomatic patients (n=269/1075, 25.0%) than in matched screening participants (n=1807/5375, 33.6%, 95% CI for the difference: [-11.53%, -5.66%], P<0.0001, difference test). The results underline the importance of screening the symptom-free population at least 55 years of age to prevent CRC.

  18. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochem, Carmen; Leitzmann, Michael

    There is strong evidence that modifiable lifestyle factors such as obesity play a key role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic data have consistently reported a positive association between obesity and colorectal cancer. The relative risk associated with general obesity (as assessed by BMI) is higher in men than in women and for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Abdominal obesity (as assessed by waist circumference (WC) or waist-to-hip ratio) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in both sexes, with stronger associations for cancer of the colon than for cancer of the rectum. Plausible biological mechanisms include insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, chronic inflammation, altered levels of growth factors, adipocytokines and steroid hormones. In addition to its effect on colorectal cancer incidence, obesity may play a role in colorectal cancer recurrence, treatment outcomes and survival. Understanding the effects of childhood and adolescent obesity and weight change over the life course in relation to future risk of colorectal cancer is incomplete but essential for targeted preventive recommendations. This chapter summarizes the current evidence on the relationship between obesity and colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma, a common precursor lesion.

  19. The prognostic value of functional tumor volume and total lesion glycolysis in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases undergoing {sup 90}Y selective internal radiation therapy plus chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Seza A.; Suthar, Rekha R.; Barot, Tushar C. [Jackson North Medical Center, Florida International University College of Medicine, North Miami Beach, FL (United States); Pennington, Kenneth [Center for Cancer Care, Goshen, IN (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Functional tumor volume (FTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) are measures of metabolic activity of tumors determined by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images. These parameters could potentially have clinical value in response to treatment evaluation and disease prognostication. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between functional tumor parameters (FTV and TLG) and clinical outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) undergoing {sup 90}Y-resin microsphere selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) (SIR-Spheres {sup registered}, Sirtex Medical Limited, Lane Cove, NSW, Australia). FDG PET/CT studies of 20 patients with unresectable CRCLM who underwent {sup 90}Y SIRT under a phase II clinical trial were analyzed. FTV and TLG were calculated using PET VCAR (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) on pretreatment and 4-week posttreatment scans. The effects of pretreatment and posttreatment functional tumor activity on patient survival were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The median survival in the study group was 14.8 months (range 2.0-27.7 months). The median survival for patients with pretreatment FTV values of above and below 200 cc were 11.2 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). The median survival for patients with 4-week posttreatment FTV values of above and below 30 cc were 10.9 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). The median survival for patients with pretreatment TLG values of above and below 600 g were 11.2 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). The median survival for patients with 4-week posttreatment TLG values of above and below 100 g were 10.9 and 26.9 months, respectively (p < 0.05). Pretreatment and posttreatment FTV and TLG showed very strong association with survival. These values can be useful quantitative criteria for patient selection and disease prognostication when {sup 90}Y SIRT is contemplated in patients with CRCLM. (orig.)

  20. What Is Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research? Colorectal Cancer About Colorectal Cancer What Is Colorectal Cancer? Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? How does colorectal cancer start? Most colorectal cancers begin as a growth ...

  1. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  2. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  3. Diabetes Mellitus and Colorectal Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; Diaz, Yaritza; Perez, Cynthia M.; Garau, Maria; Baron, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have provided evidence for an association between obesity, physical inactivity, and western diet as risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC). Few studies directly address the association between type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and the risk of colorectal lesions at specific anatomic locations. Methods 2,663 subjects with a previous history of adenoma(s) and removal of all current adenomas at study entry were followed for a mean time of three years across three different chemoprevention clinical trials. The primary endpoint was colorectal adenoma recurrence and number of lesions during the treatment phase; the secondary endpoints were presence of advanced colorectal neoplasia (CRN) and location of CRN. Using log linear regression, the effect of DM status on the relative risk (RR) of CRN recurrence, advanced CRN, and location of CRN was assessed. Results DM status was not significantly associated with incidence of colorectal adenomas, incidence of advanced colorectal lesions, or left-sided colorectal neoplastic lesions. Subjects with DM had a marginally increased risk of right-sided (p= 0.06) colorectal adenomas and a significant increased risk of multiple right-sided adenomas (p=0.03) in the unadjusted model; this association was not significant after adjusting for age and other potential confounders (RR=1.22, 95% CI: 0.85–1.76). Conclusion We did not observe a statistically significant increased risk in CRN recurrence for overall neoplasia, advanced neoplasia or location of neoplasia in individuals with DM compared to non-DM individuals. However, given the patterns observed in this investigation, future studies with longer follow-up time and longer DM exposure, incorporating objective measurements of type 2 DM might help elucidate the risk of CRN among individuals with DM. PMID:23560242

  4. Expression of trefoil factor family-3 and β-catenin in different types of colorectal mucosal lesions%TFF3和β-catenin在不同大肠黏膜组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于大中; 于亚男; 田字彬; 赵清喜; 孔心涓; 张翠萍; 魏良洲

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究三叶因子3(TFF3)和β-catenin在不同大肠黏膜组织中的表达及其相互关系,探讨其在大肠腺癌及腺瘤发生、发展中的作用.方法:采用免疫组织化学PV6000法检测20例正常大肠黏膜、30例非腺瘤性息肉、20例大肠腺瘤、20例大肠腺瘤伴不典型增生和40例大肠腺癌组织中TFF3和β-catenin的表达,分析二者表达的差异及其相关性.结果:TFF3在大肠腺瘤、不典型增生组织表达下降(P<0.05),腺癌表达增加.β-catenin的异常表达率随腺瘤→腺瘤伴不典型增生→腺癌逐渐增加,腺癌组的膜表达缺失及异位表达均高于非腺癌性息肉和腺瘤组(60.00%vs 0.00%,15.00%;75.00%vs 0.00%,40.00%,均P<0.05).TFF3在腺癌中的表达与部位、分化程度无关,与淋巴结转移和Duke's分期密切相关(均P<0.05);β-catenin异常表达与部位、淋巴结转移无关,与肿瘤分化程度相关,异位表达尚与Duke's分期相关(均P<0.05).TFF3在腺癌中的表达与β-catenin膜表达缺失、异位表达均呈显著正相关(r=0.427,P=0.006;r=0.577,P=0.000),腺瘤中无相关(r=0.015,P=0.951:r=0.385,P=0.094);腺癌和腺瘤中β-catenin的膜表达缺失、异位表达两者间均呈显著正相关(r =0.638,P=0.000;r=0.514,P=0.020).结论:TFF3和β-catenin的表达与大肠腺癌的发生、发展密切相关,是肿瘤发生的早期分子事件.TFF3与β-catenin的异常表达相关,可能在大肠腺癌的发生、发展中存在共同作用.%AIM: To analyze the expression of trefoil factor family-3 (TFF3) and β-catenin in different types of colorectal mucosal lesions and to explore their role in the development and progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adenoma.METHODS: The expression of TFF3 and β-catenin was detected by immunohistochemistry in 20 normal colorectal mucosa spectrnens, 30 colorectal polyp specimens, 20 colorectal adenoma (CRA)specimens, 20 colorectal adenoma (with atypical hyperplasia, CRAAH) specimens, and 40

  5. Staging colorectal cancer with the TNM 7(th)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puppa, Giacomo; Poston, Graeme; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    lesions encountered, in particular, during radiological staging of patients with colorectal cancer. In this article the diagnosis of these lesions with multiple imaging modalities, their frequency, significance and relevance to staging and disease management are described in a multidisciplinary way...

  6. The Influence of Screening for Precancerous Lesions on Family-Based Genetic Association Tests: An Example of Colorectal Polyps and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Figueiredo, Jane C; Cortessis, Victoria K; Thomas, Duncan C

    2015-10-15

    Unintended consequences of secondary prevention include potential introduction of bias into epidemiologic studies estimating genotype-disease associations. To better understand such bias, we simulated a family-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), which can be prevented by resecting screen-detected polyps. We simulated genes related to CRC development through risk of polyps (G1), risk of CRC but not polyps (G2), and progression from polyp to CRC (G3). Then, we examined 4 analytical strategies for studying diseases subject to secondary prevention, comparing the following: 1) CRC cases with all controls, without adjusting for polyp history; 2) CRC cases with controls, adjusting for polyp history; 3) CRC cases with only polyp-free controls; and 4) cases with either CRC or polyps with controls having neither. Strategy 1 yielded estimates of association between CRC and each G that were not substantially biased. Strategies 2-4 yielded biased estimates varying in direction according to analysis strategy and gene type. Type I errors were correct, but strategy 1 provided greater power for estimating associations with G2 and G3. We also applied each strategy to case-control data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (1997-2007). Generally, the best analytical option balancing bias and power is to compare all CRC cases with all controls, ignoring polyps. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prevalence and incidence of hyperplastic polyps and adenomas in familial colorectal cancer: correlation between the two types of colon polyps

    OpenAIRE

    Liljegren, A.; Lindblom, A; Rotstein, S; Nilsson, B; Rubio, C; Jaramillo, E

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Colorectal adenomas are recognised as precursors of colorectal carcinomas. The significance of hyperplastic (metaplastic) colorectal polyps is unknown. The relationship between hyperplastic polyps and adenomas, and the prevalence and incidence of these lesions were evaluated in individuals predisposed to familial colorectal cancer.

  8. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  9. Alcohol intake, smoking, and colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeong Mi; Cho, Chang Ho; Kim, Sung Hi; Lee, Jung Eun

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Korea. Because colorectal adenoma is a precursor lesion of colorectal cancer, primary prevention of colorectal adenomas may be important for reducing morbidity and mortality from the disease. The aim of this study is to examine the association of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking in relation with colorectal adenoma in a cross-sectional study of Korean adults. A total of 366 participants who underwent colonoscopy were included (113 cases and 255 controls) in this study. Information on alcohol intake and cigarette smoking was collected from structured questionnaires. The odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the multivariate logistic regression models. Alcohol intake was associated with a higher prevalence of colorectal adenoma in men; compared to non-drinkers, ORs (95% CIs) were 11.49 (2.55-51.89) for 10-20 g/day of alcohol intake and 14.15 (3.31-60.59) for â 20 g/day of alcohol intake (P for trend = 0.003). There was a weaker association of alcohol intake for women than men; however, there was a suggestive increase in the prevalence of colorectal cancer in women. Cigarette smoking was not associated with colorectal adenoma, but we cannot rule out the possibility that this was due to low statistical power. Our study provides evidence to suggest that alcohol intake may contribute to colorectal adenoma in the Korean population. Our study results demonstrate that a larger epidemiologic study is needed.

  10. BRAF mutation in colorectal serrated lesions%结直肠锯齿状病变BRAF基因变异的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周智勇; 韩英; 王鲁平

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutation frequency in serrated colorectal adenocarcinoma (Sca), and to verify the existence of a new serrated pathway indirectly.Methods 75 paraffin-embedded tissue samples, including 15 cases of Sca, 20 cases of traditional serrated adenoma (TSR), 20 cases of non-serrated adenocarcinoma (NS-ca), and 20 cases of villous adenoma, were reviewed .Nest-PCR was used to amplify the exon 15 fragment of BRAF gene.RFLP assay was used to detect the BRAF V600E mutation.The positive samples were verified by direct sequencing.Results Four of the 11 successfully amplified Sea specimens(4/11,36.4%), and 4 of the 15 TSA samples(4/15, 26.7%) harbored BRAF V600E mutation.However, no BRAF V6OOE mutation was found in the 14 NS-ca samples and the 11 villous adenoma specimens .The BRAF V6OOE mutation frequencies of the villous adenoma group and NS-ca group were significantly lower than those of the TSA group and Sca group (P = 0.0084) ;however, there was no statistical difference in the frequency of BRAF V6OOE mutation between the Sca and TSA groups (P 0.05).Conclusion BRAF V600E mutation frequency is significantly higher in the Sca and TSA patients than in the NS-ca and villous adenoma patients.There is actually a new serrated neoplasia pathway different from the traditional adenoma-carcinoma carcinogenesis pathway.%目的 比较结直肠锯齿状病变与传统腺瘤、腺癌的鼠类肉瘤滤过性毒菌致癌基因同源体B1(BRAF基因)是否发生热点变异,间接验证传统型锯齿状通路是否存在.方法 收集北京军区总医院病理科保存的蜡块,其中锯齿状腺癌(SCa)15例,传统型锯齿状腺瘤(TSA)20例,非锯齿状腺癌(NS-Ca)20例,绒毛状腺瘤(AD)20例.抽提组织DNA,扩增BRAF基因外显子15片段,产物行限制性酶切筛查BRAF V600E变异,对阳性标本测序验证,最后对结果进行统计分析.结果 11例SCa中4例发生BRAF V600E变异(36.4%);15例TSA中4例发生BRAF V

  11. Drawing up an individual risk index for development of metachronous neoplastic lesions in resected colorectal cancer Elaboración de un índice individual del riesgo para el desarrollo de lesiones neoplásicas metacrónicas en el cáncer colorrectal resecado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Borda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify possible risk factors for the development of metachronous lesions in colorectal cancer (CRC which would allow to establish a post-surgical individual prognostic index. Patients and methods: three hundred eighty-two surgically treated CRC were reviewed. We compared the incidence of metachronous lesions in 40 variables concerning patient clinical data and initial neoplastic findings. An individual risk index for metachronicity was drawn up including those variables which presented significant differences in multivariate logistic regression, dividing patients into three groups. Results: variables with prognostic value for metachronicity were distal cancer location: OR= 2.30 (1.03-5.13, alcohol intake: OR = 2.20 (1.08-4.48, presence of synchronous adenomas: isolated: OR = 2.47 (1.03-4.48, multiple: OR = 4.26 (1.78-10.17, and presence of synchronous advanced adenoma: OR= 2.91 (1.52-12.60. Tumor MUC-5 expression proved to have a protective role: OR = 0.23 (0.08-0.66. An individual risk score was established considering these variables and patients could be classified into three groups, with a discrimination power for metachronicity of pObjetivo: identificar posibles factores de riesgo para desarrollar lesiones metacrónicas en el cáncer colorrectal, elaborando un índice pronóstico individual del riesgo. Material y métodos: revisamos 382 cánceres colorrectales resecados. Comparamos la diferente incidencia de lesiones metacrónicas en 40 variables referentes al paciente y a las lesiones neoplásicas iniciales. Con aquellas que mostraron diferencias significativas en el análisis estadístico multivariable, elaboramos un índice individual de riesgo, clasificando los pacientes en 3 grupos de riesgo de metacronicidad. Resultados: las variables con valor pronóstico para la metacronicidad fueron: localización distal del cáncer: OR = 2,30 IC 95% (1,03-5,13; consumo de alcohol: OR = 2,20 IC 95% (1,08-4,48; presencia de adenoma sincr

  12. Clinicopathologic features and proliferative status of colorectal serrated lesions:a study of 104 cases%结直肠锯齿状病变104例形态学及细胞增殖活性的观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鲁平; 杨光之; 周志勇; 李琳; 高宝琳; 陈健

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the elinieopathologie features and proliferative status of colorectal hyperplastic polyp(HP),sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) and traditional serrated adenoma (TSA). Methods One hundred and four cases colorectal serrated lesions were collected from 2628 cases of coloreetal polyps during the period from November,2002 to December,2007.The clinieopathologic features and expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 were studied.Results On the basis of morphologic examination,60 cases were classified as HP,20 cases as TSA,11 cases as SSA,7 cases 88 mixed HP/ SSA/TSA.and 6 cases as mixed serrated polyp/adenoma and tubular adenoma.Immunohistochemical study for Ki-67 showed that 40 cases(78%) of the 51 cases of HP were either mostly negative or rarely(50%pesitivity).Moat of the positive cells were located in mid portion of crypts.The number and distribution of Ki-67 positive cells in SSA were similar to those in TSA but were significantly different from those in tubular adenoma and adenocarcinoma(χ2= 34.601,P=0.000;)(χ2=63.077,P=0.000,respectively).Conclusions HP,SSA and TSA have their morphologic characteristics,with some overlapping features noted.The distinction between SSA and HP can be difficult.Diagnosis of SSA relies mostly on architectural rather than cytologic features.The distinction between TSA and SSA depends mainly on the presence of dysplasia. Ectopic crypt formation is almost exclusively Been in TSA. The distribution and percentage of Ki-67-positive cells are also helpful in subtyping of various colorectal serrated lesions.In general,the prolifera6ve index is lower in serrated adenoma(TSA or SSA)than in tubular adenoma.%目的 探讨结直肠锯齿状病变增生性息肉(HP)、广基锯齿状腺瘤(SSA)、传统锯齿状腺瘤(TSA)的临床特征,组织病理学诊断,鉴别诊断及细胞增殖状况.方法 复习北京军区总医院2002年11月至2007年12月2628例病理诊断为结直肠息肉/腺瘤的病理切片,从中收集104例结

  13. [Colorectal adenomas: postpolypectomy surveillance strategies and chemoprevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2008-10-01

    Colorectal adenomas are the most fully characterized premalignant lesions in the development of colorectal cancer. Consequently, the identification and resolution of these lesions, as well as the follow-up of affected patients, are a priority in the prevention of this neoplasm. The studies presented in the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association 2008 show that the results of current surveillance strategies can be improved with a view to reducing the rate of interval neoplasia. Improvement of these results includes optimization of the endoscopic technique (colonic preparation, cecal intubation, withdrawal time, etc.) as well as the incorporation of new diagnostic methods and the possible administration of chemopreventive drugs.

  14. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Tests for Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is often found after symptoms appear, ... Report: Colon Pathology. Imaging tests to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic ...

  15. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF COLORECTAL MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer in men and in women worldwide. Incidence rates of colorectal cancer vary 10 - fold in both sexes worldwide, Within Asia, the incidence rates vary widely and are uniformly low in all south Asian countries and high i n all developed Asian countries. Fortunately, the age adjusted incidence rates of colorectal cancer in all the Indian cancer registries are very close to the lowest rates in the world. The present study is under taken to study the prevalence and types of c olorectal cancer among the patients in the rural population in and around Chidambaram. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of malignant colorectal neoplasms among the speci mens received in the Department of Pathology and the gross and histomorphological pa ttern of the lesions and finally to correlate the findings with clinical data. METHOD: The materials consisted of 68 specimens who were submitted to the Department of Pathology, during the period of Jan 2008 - Dec 2012. Data collected and entered in MS - Excel and were analyzed using SPSS - 16. RESULTS : Out of 8454 colonoscopic specimens, 68(0.8% showed colorectal malignancy. A higher frequency of colorectal was seen in 6 th decade. Out of 68 specimens of malignant neoplasms majority were Carcinoma of the Rectum (79.41% followed in decreasing order of frequency by malignant lesions of descending colon(8.82%, ascending and Sigmoid colon (4.41% each, recto - sigmoid (2.94% and cecum (2.63%, and transverse colon (2.63%. Youngest patient was 19 years old and the o ldest patient was 80 years old with a mean age of 49.5 years and median age of 50 years. CONCLUSION: Colorectal cancer is a common and lethal disease. The adenoma carcinoma. S equence offers a window of opportunity in which the precursor lesion or early car cinoma can be removed endoscopically to prevent systematic disease. The result of a careful and systematic examination of surgical specimens from patients with

  16. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Randall W; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Jasperson, Kory; Klapman, Jason B; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Provenzale, Dawn; Rao, M Sambasiva; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described.

  17. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview What to Expect ... section Overview 2 of 6 sections The Basics: Colorectal Cancer What is colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer is a ...

  18. Colorectal neoplasm characterization based on swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Wei; Chiu, Han-Mo; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2009-07-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. In this paper, the various adenoma/carcinoma in-vitro samples are monitored by our swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. The significant results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas based on the SS-OCT imaging.

  19. Postprocessing techniques of CT colonography in detection of colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Yue Luo; Hong Shan; Li-Qing Yao; Kang-Rong Zhou; Wen-Wei Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of postprocessing techniques of CT colonography, including multiplanar reformation (MPR),virtual colonoscopy (VC), shaded surface display (SSD) and Raysum, in detection of colorectal carcinomas.METHODS: Sixty-four patients with colorectal carcinoma underwent volume scanning with spiral CT. MPR, VC, SSD and Raysum images were obtained by using four kinds of postprocessing techniques in workstation. The results were comparatively analyzed according to circumferential extent,lesion length and pathology pattern of colorectal carcinomas.All diagnoses were proved pathologically and surgically.RESULTS: The accuracy of circumferential extent of colorectal carcinoma determined by MPR, VC, SSD and Raysum was 100.0%, 82.8%, 79.7% and 79.7%,respectively. There was a significant statistical difference between MPR and VC. The consistent rate of lesion length was 89.1%, 76.6%, 95.3% and 100.0%, respectively.There was a statistical difference between VC and SSD.The accuracy of discriminating pathology pattern was 81.3%,92.2%, 71.9% and 71.9%, respectively. There was a statistical difference between VC and SSD. MPR could determine accurately the circumference of colorectal carcinoma, Raysum could determine the length of lesion more precisely than SSD, VC was helpful in discriminating pathology patterns.CONCLUSION: MPR, VC, SSD and Raysum have advantage and disadvantage in detection of colorectal carcinoma, use of these methods in combination can disclose the lesion more accurately.

  20. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcoholic beverages per day increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Drinking alcohol is also linked to the risk of forming large colorectal adenomas (benign tumors). Cigarette smoking Cigarette smoking is ...

  1. Continuous quality improvement of colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariusz; Madalinski

    2013-01-01

    Quality assurance is a key issue in colorectal cancer screening, because effective screening is able to improve primary prevention of the cancer. The quality measure may be described in terms:how well the screening test tells who truly has a disease (sensitivity) and who truly does not have a disease (specificity). This paper raises concerns about identification of the optimal screening test for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy vs flexible sigmoidoscopy in colorectal cancer screening has been a source of ongoing debate. A multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing flexible sigmoidoscopy with usual care showed that flexible sigmoidoscopy screening is able to diminish the incidence of distal and proximal colorectal cancer, and also mortality related to the distal colorectal cancer. However, colonoscopy provides a more complete examination and remains the more sensitive exam than flexible sigmoidoscopy. Moreover, colonoscopy with polypectomy significantly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer-related mortality in the general population. The article considers the relative merits of both methods and stresses an ethical aspect of patient’s involvement in decision-making. Patients should be informed not only about tests tolerability and risk of endoscopy complications, but also that different screening tests for bowel cancer have different strength to exclude colonic cancer and polyps. The authorities calculate effectiveness and costs of the screening tests, but patients may not be interested in statistics regarding flexible sigmoidoscopy screening and from an ethical point of view, they have the right to chose colonoscopy, which is able to exclude a cancer and precancerous lesions in the whole large bowel.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  3. Choroidal and skin metastases from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Joo Young; Oh, Edward Hynseung; Jung, Moon Ki; Park, Song Ee; Kim, Ji Tak; Hwang, In Gyu

    2016-11-21

    Choroidal and skin metastasis of colon cancer is rare. In women, the frequency of cutaneous metastasis from colon cancer as the primary lesion in is 9% and skin metastasis occurs in 0.81% of all colorectal cancers. We report a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in her right eye and scalp pain as her initial symptoms. Contrast-enhance orbital magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression revealed an infrabulbar mass, and skin biopsy of the posterior parietal scalp confirmed adenocarcinoma. These symptoms were diagnosed as being caused by choroidal and skin metastases of colonic adenocarcinoma. We started palliative chemotherapy with oral capecitabine (1000 mg/m(2), twice a day, on days 1-14) every 3 wk, which was effective at shrinking the brain masses and improving the visual disorder. This is the first report that capecitabine is effective at reducing a choroidal and cutaneous metastatic lesion from right-sided colorectal cancer.

  4. MRI of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain. Differential diagnosis of colorectal and pulmonary cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukusumi, Akio; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Katsutoshi [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)] [and others

    1998-02-01

    To clarify the characteristic features of MR imagings of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain and search for differential points between the lesions from colorectal cancer and those of lung cancer, we evaluated retrospectively intraparenchymal metastatic lesions of 13 colorectal origins and 13 pulmonary origins on MR imagings, compared with resected specimens. Metastatic lesions from colorectal cancer showed marked hypointense solid components on T2WI, which correspond to the dense tumor cells and coagulated necrosis pathologically. Metastatic lesions from lung cancers showed mixed intensity and various components on T2WI, which correspond to various histological components, such as solid tumor cell`s nests, hemorrhage, necrosis and cystic fluid collection. Pathological specimens suggested that the low signal intensity on T2WI of MRI derived from concentration of tumor cells and coagulated necrosis including macrophages and lymphocytes. This study may contribute to make the differential diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain from colorectal and pulmonary cancers. (author)

  5. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table ... Carmen Marc Valvo is an outspoken voice for colorectal cancer screening. Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Designer ...

  6. Colorectal cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Frederico Ferreira Novaes de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the world, and mortality has remained the same for the past 50 years, despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. Because significant numbers of patients present with advanced or incurable stages, patients with pre-malignant lesions (adenomatous polyps that occur as result of genetic inheritance or age should be screened, and patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease should undergo surveillance. There are different risk groups for CRC, as well as different screening strategies. It remains to be determined which screening protocol is the most cost-effective for each risk catagory. The objective of screening is to reduce morbidity and mortality in a target population. The purpose of this review is to analyze the results of the published CRC screening studies, with regard to the measured reduction of morbidity and mortality, due to CRC in the studied populations, following various screening procedures. The main screening techniques, used in combination or alone, include fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy. Evidence from the published literature on screening methods for specific risk groups is scanty and frequently does not arise from controlled studies. Nevertheless, data from these studies, combined with recent advances in molecular genetics, certainly lead the way to greater efficacy and lower cost of CRC screening.

  7. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  8. Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms: gender differences in prevalence and malignant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondagh, Eveline J A; Masclee, Ad A M; van der Valk, Mirthe E; Winkens, Bjorn; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Soetikno, Roy M; Sanduleanu, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Colonoscopy may fail to prevent colorectal cancer, especially in the proximal colon and in women. Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms may potentially explain some of these post-colonoscopy cancers. In the present study, we aimed to examine the prevalence and malignant potential of nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms in a large population, with special attention to gender and location. We performed a cross-sectional study of all consecutive patients undergoing elective colonoscopy at a single academic medical center. The endoscopists were familiarized on the detection and treatment of nonpolypoid lesions. Advanced histology was defined by the presence of high-grade dysplasia or early cancer. We included 2310 patients (53.9% women, mean age 58.4 years) with 2143 colorectal polyps. Prevalences of colorectal neoplasms and nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms were lower in women than in men (20.9% vs. 33.7%, p colorectal neoplasms were significantly more likely to contain advanced histology than polypoid ones (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.24-6.74, p = 0.01), while this was not the case in men (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.40-2.06, p = 0.83). Proximal neoplasms with advanced histology were more likely to be nonpolypoid than distal ones (OR 4.68, 95% CI 1.54-14.2, p = 0.006). Nonpolypoid mechanisms may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, in both women and men. Although women have fewer colorectal neoplasms than men, they have nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms, which frequently contain advanced histology.

  9. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  10. Lesiones laborales

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Las lesiones laborales se producen por un esfuerzo repetitivo, cuando un exceso de presión se ejerce sobre una parte del cuerpo provocando lesiones óseas, articulares, musculares y daños en los tejidos. Los accidentes laborales también pueden producir una lesión en el organismo y esto sumado a diversos factores es un problema para la reinserción laboral de los trabajadores de la energía eléctrica. Objetivo: Establecer cuáles son las lesiones más frecuentes que afectan a los ...

  11. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed 8 cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA, hs...

  12. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  13. Colorectal cancers choosing sides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albuquerque, Cristina; Bakker, Elvira R. M.; van Veelen, Wendy; Smits, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of sporadic colorectal cancer which predominantly occur in the distal colon, most mismatch repair deficient tumours arise at the proximal side. At present, these regional preferences have not been explained properly. Recently, we have screened colorectal tumours for mutat

  14. Peroxiredoxins in colorectal neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, X.Y.; Fu, X.Z.; Wang, X. H.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are novel group proteins with efficient antioxidant capacity, and some of them also have effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Altogether six distinct Prxs expressions were investigated in histological samples of colorectal neoplasm and the distant normal tissues and investigated associatedly with parameters such as clinical stage and lymphnodes metastasis. Normal colorectal tis...

  15. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  16. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Taku; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has expanded the application of endoscopic treatment, which can be used for lesions with a low metastatic potential regardless of their size. ESD has the advantage of achieving en bloc resection with a lower local recurrence rate compared with that of piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection. Moreover, in the past, surgery was indicated in patients with large lesions spreading to almost the entire circumference of the rectum, regardless of the depth of invasion, as endoscopic resection of these lesions was technically difficult. Therefore, a prime benefit of ESD is significant improvement in the quality of life for patients who have large rectal lesions. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in the treatment of colorectal neoplasms as it is in gastric cancers owing to the associated technical difficulty, longer procedural duration, and increased risk of perforation. To diversify the available endoscopic treatment strategies for superficial colorectal neoplasms, endoscopists performing ESD need to recognize its indications, the technical issues involved in its application, and the associated complications. This review outlines the methods and type of devices used for colorectal ESD, and the training required by endoscopists to perform this procedure. PMID:25473168

  17. Colorectal cancer surveillance in Hodgkin lymphoma survivors at increased risk of therapy-related colorectal cancer: study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigter, Lisanne S; Spaander, Manon C W; Moons, Leon M; Bisseling, Tanya M; Aleman, Berthe M P; de Boer, Jan Paul; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Janus, Cecile P M; Petersen, Eefke J; Roesink, Judith M; Raemaekers, John M M; van der Maazen, Richard W M; Cats, Annemieke; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Carvalho, Beatriz; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Jóźwiak, Katarzyna; Te Riele, Hein; Meijer, Gerrit A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; van Leerdam, Monique E

    2017-02-07

    Second primary malignancies are a major cause of excess morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who were treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or high-dose procarbazine have an increased risk to develop colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy surveillance plays an important role in colorectal cancer prevention by removal of the precursor lesions (adenomas) and early detection of cancer, resulting in improved survival rates. Therefore, Hodgkin lymphoma survivors treated with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or high-dose procarbazine could benefit from colonoscopy, or other surveillance modalities, which are expected to reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Current knowledge on clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of therapy-related colorectal cancer is limited. The pathogenesis of such colorectal cancers might be different from the pathogenesis in the general population and therefore these patients might require a different clinical approach. We designed a study with the primary aim to assess the diagnostic yield of a first surveillance colonoscopy among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors at increased risk of colorectal cancer and to compare these results with different screening modalities in the general population. Secondary aims include assessment of the test characteristics of stool tests and evaluation of burden, acceptance and satisfaction of CRC surveillance through two questionnaires. This prospective multicenter cohort study will include Hodgkin lymphoma survivors who survived ≥8 years after treatment with infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy and/or procarbazine (planned inclusion of 259 participants). Study procedures will consist of a surveillance colonoscopy with removal of precursor lesions (adenomas) and 6-8 normal colonic tissue biopsies, a fecal immunochemical test and a stool DNA test. All neoplastic lesions encountered will be classified using relevant histomorphological, immunohistochemical and

  18. Living as a Colorectal Cancer Survivor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Living as a Colorectal Cancer Survivor For many people with colorectal cancer, treatment ... cancer screening tests. Typical follow-up schedules after colorectal cancer Even if you have completed treatment, you will ...

  19. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J; Jakobsen, Karen V; Christensen, Ib J

    2011-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among...... procedures for colorectal cancer. Therefore, results of present research, validating RAE tests, are awaited with interest....

  20. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pak Wo Webber; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, which is the leading cancer in Singapore, can be prevented by increased use of screening and polypectomy. A range of screening strategies such as stool-based tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy and computed tomography colonography are available, each with different strengths and limitations. Primary care physicians should discuss appropriate screening modalities with their patients, tailored to their individual needs. Physicians, patients and the government should work in partnership to improve uptake of colorectal cancer screening to reduce the morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  1. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-07-21

    To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ (2) test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population.

  2. Pink lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomel, Jason; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy or surface microscopy) is an ancillary dermatologic tool that in experienced hands can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of a variety of benign and malignant pigmented skin tumors. The early and more accurate diagnosis of nonpigmented, or pink, tumors can also be assisted by dermoscopy. This review focuses on the dermoscopic diagnosis of pink lesions, with emphasis on blood vessel morphology and pattern. A 3-step algorithm is presented, which facilitates the timely and more accurate diagnosis of pink tumors and subsequently guides the management for such lesions.

  3. [Colorectal diseases in AIDS patients and endoscopic findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbach, M; Cutait, R; Corrêa, P; Duarte, M I; Leite, K; Borges, J L

    1998-01-01

    In order to establish which are the most frequent endoscopic detectable colorectal disorders in AIDS patients with intestinal complaints we analysed 236 colonoscopies in a series of 186 patients. The colonoscopic procedure was always followed by biopsies, even in the absence of macroscopic lesions. The most frequent diagnosis was colitis due to citomegalovirus infection observed in 64 exams (27.1%) and presented with an inflammatory pattern with ulcers, followed by Cryptosporidium sp., found in 31 exams (13.1%). This infection, conversely, presented as an inflammatory non-ulcerative lesion. Others pathogens found in lower frequency were: Mycobacterium sp., Histoplasma capsulatum, Herpes simplex, Isospora sp., Giardia sp., Candida sp. and Campilobacter sp.. Neoplastic lesions, mostly Kaposy's sarcoma, were detected in 10 of the colonoscopies (4.2%). The most frequent colorectal disorders in AIDS patients detected by endoscopic procedures are citomegalovirus and Cryptosporidium infection. Biopsies are always necessary to confirm the endoscopic diagnosis and to identify the presence of associated pathogens.

  4. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  5. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1.......59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship....

  6. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies.

  7. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  8. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  9. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  10. Obesity and Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gribovskaja-Rupp, Irena; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer based on its molecular and metabolic effects on insulin and IGF-1, leptin, adipocytokines, and sex hormones. Obese men have a higher risk of colorectal cancer compared with normal weight men, but the association between obesity and rectal cancer is weaker than with colon cancer. There is a weaker association between obesity and colon cancer in women than in men, and no appreciable association between obesity and rectal cancer in women. Although o...

  11. Malignant colorectal polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis; Bujanda; Angel; Cosme; Ines; Gil; Juan; I; Arenas-Mirave

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the number of cases in which malignant colorectal polyps are removed is increasing due to colorectal cancer screening programmes. Cancerous polyps are classified into non-invasive high grade neoplasia (NHGN), when the cancer has not reached the muscularis mucosa, and malignant polyps, classed as T1, when they have invaded the submucosa. NHGN is considered cured with polypectomy, while the prognosis for malignant polyps depends on various morphological and histological factors. The prognostic facto...

  12. Techniques for colorectal anastomosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yik-Hong; Ho; Mohamed; Ahmed; Tawfi; k; Ashour

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leak remains one of the most feared post-operative complications, particularly after anterior resection of the rectum with, the shift from abdomino-peritoneal resections to total mesorectal excision and primary anastomosis. The literature fails to demonstrate superiority of stapled over hand-sewn techniques in colorectal anastomosis, regardless of the level of anastomosis, although a high stricture rate was noted in the former technique. Thus, improvements in safety aspects of anastom...

  13. Clinical experience with intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Takahashi, Masaharu; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    1988-10-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was performed on 20 patients with colorectal cancer. IORT with a single dose of 20 to 40 Gy was delivered to the residual tumor, tumor bed, and/or lymphnode regions. Although most of the patients had advanced lesions, local control was achieved in 67 % of the patients when IORT was combined with tumor resection, and 4 patients survived more than 5 years. There were no serious complications, except for contracture or atrophy of the psoas muscle seen in 2 patients. IORT combined with external beam radiotherapy should be a useful adjuvant therapy to surgery for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

  14. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too.

  15. Adiponectin and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Kensuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is an obesity-related malignancy. Adiponectin is an adipokine produced exclusively by adipose tissue, and its concentration in the serum is reduced in obesity. A low serum level of adiponectin is associated with an increased risk of various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer. These facts suggest that the epidemiological link between obesity and cancer may have a significant association with adiponectin. Although numerous studies of colorectal cancer have been reported, the results are conflicting about the anti-cancer effect of adiponectin, and how adiponectin affects carcinogenesis or cancer development remains controversial. Because adiponectin has multiple systemic effects and exists as a high serum concentration protein, the main role of adiponectin should be regulation of homeostasis, and it would not likely act as an anti-cancerous hormone. However, as epidemiological evidence shows, a low adiponectin level may be a basic risk factor for colorectal cancer. We speculate that when the colonic epithelium is stimulated or damaged by another carcinogen under the condition of a low adiponectin level, carcinogenesis is promoted and cancer development is facilitated. In this report, we summarize recent findings of the correlation between adiponectin and colorectal cancer and investigate the effect of adiponectin on colorectal cancer.

  16. Cytogenetic findings in metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardi, G; Parada, L A; Bomme, L;

    1997-01-01

    Eighteen tumor samples from 11 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were cytogenetically analyzed after short-term culturing. Of the 13 metastases examined, 11 were from lymph nodes, 1 from the peritoneum and 1 from the lung. In 5 of the 11 patients, matched samples from the primary tumor...... and lymph node metastases were analyzed. Cytogenetic similarities between the primary and secondary lesions were found in all 5 cases, indicating that many of the chromosomal aberrations presumably occurred before disease spreading took place. Compared with the primaries, the metastases appeared to exhibit...

  17. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aga Syed Sameer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a third most common epithelial carcinoma. CRC is known to develop from the early precancerous lesion to full blown malignancy via definite phases due to cumulative mutations and aberrant methylation of number of genes. The use of serum biomarkers that is non-invasive to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons will prove to be an important tool to improve the early diagnosis of CRC. This will serve as the boon to the clinical management of the disease.

  18. Cancer immunology and colorectal cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Luca

    2011-06-01

    The recurrence of a cancer - local or distant (metastasis) - is manifested by the persistence of cancer cells in the organism after the ablation of the primary lesion, an ineffective anticancer immune response, and by the activity of biological/immunological factors that can stimulate and sustain its development. This review focuses on colorectal carcinoma and discusses some aspects of cancer immunology regarding cancer development and its recurrence. It is addressed also to the clinician to provide new insights helpful for designing better therapeutic strategies and patient's follow up. Therapeutic approaches used during and after surgical treatments, found capable of modulating immunity (differently affecting disease outcome), will also be described.

  19. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  20. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. ... patients know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  1. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  2. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  3. Parasellar lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscalleda, J. [Hospital Sant Pau, Radiology Department, Neuroradiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    The sellar and parasellar region is an anatomically complex area that represents a crucial crossroad of important adjacent structures, e.g. orbits, cavernous sinus and its content, polygon of Willis, hypothalamus through the pituitary stalk and dural reflections forming the diaphragm sellae and the walls of the cavernous sinuses. Although the cavernous sinus represents the most relevant parasellar structure, from the practical and clinical point of view all the structures that surround the sella turcica can be included in the parasellar region. CT and, mainly, MRI are the imaging modalities to study and characterise the normal anatomy and the majority of processes in this region. We present a practical short review of the most relevant CT and MRI characteristics, such as location, nature of contrast enhancement and presence of cystic components, together with clinical findings, which permit differentiation of the most frequent and less common lesions found in the parasellar region. Learning objectives: A short review of the anatomy and clinical symptoms related to the parasellar region. Radiological characterisation, mainly by MRI, of the many lesions that alter the structure and function of sellar and parasellar anatomy. Description of the MRI features that permit differentiation among less common lesions. (orig.)

  4. Laparoscopic reintervention in colorectal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, RP Ten; Goor, H. van

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery has developed in the 1990's and beginning of 2000. The favourable results and great progress in the development of laparoscopic techniques have expanded the indications of laparoscopic colorectal surgery. More and more complicated colorectal cases are treated laparosc

  5. AMACR is associated with advanced pathologic risk factors in sporadic colorectal adenomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sotiris; Lakis; Theodora; Papamitsou; Constantina; Pana

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze α-methylacyl CoA racemase (AMACR) expression in relation to various dysplasia phenotypes and clinicopathological parameters of sporadic colorectal adenomas.METHODS: Fifty-f ive cases of sporadic colorectal adenomas were categorized according to the Vienna classif ication for Gastrointestinal Neoplasia.These corresponded to a total of 98 different intra-lesion microscopic f ields that were further independently assigned a histological grade based on the old nomenclature (mild,moderate,severe ...

  6. Therapeutic effect of orally administered microencapsulated oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Guajardo, Gonzalo; Langer, Robert S; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other Western countries. Oral delivery of therapeutics remains the most patient accepted form of medication. The development of an oral delivery formulation for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the gastrointestinal tract can potentially alleviate the adverse side effects including systemic cytotoxicity, as well as focus therapy to the lesions. Here we develop an oral formulation of the chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin was encapsulated in pH sensitive, mucoadhesive chitosan-coated alginate microspheres. The microparticles were formulated to release the chemotherapeutics after passing through the acidic gastric environment thus targeting the intestinal tract. In vivo, these particles substantially reduced the tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer, and reduced mortality.

  7. Synchronous colorectal and lung cancer:Report of three cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of synchronous colorectal and lung cancer is relatively rare.We report three cases of patients with tumors located in the rectum,ascending colon,the lower lobe of the left lung,and the upper lobe of the right lung.Synchronous curative resection of the two lesions was performed in two patients,whereas colectomy was performed in an elderly patient with a poor lung function.Pathological examination showed the colorectal cancer was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and the lung cancer was a squamous cell carcinoma.Surgical treatment and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for the lung cancer were different from those for colorectal cancer with pulmonary metastasis.If possible,radical resection should be performed for each cancer when synchronicity is found.

  8. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context.......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...

  9. Obstructive Colitis Proximal to Obstructive Colorectal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Kyung Chang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “obstructive colitis” refers to ulceroinflammatory lesions occurring in the colon proximal to a completely or partially obstructing lesion. It has been referred to by various terms in the literature. This entity differs from the carcinoma of the colon that complicates true ulcerative colitis where there is involvement distal to the neoplasm as well as proximal to it. Although it has appeared in the literature over several decades, it remains an uncommon and troublesome disease. In Yonsei University Medical Center, for 11 years from January 1996 to December 2006 we encountered seven patients with obstructing colorectal carcinoma complicated by obstructive colitis. Here we report our cases to share our experience and to review the literature to facilitate the recognition and proper management of this rare disease entity.

  10. DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellows CF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Gagliardi1, Monica Goswami1, Roberto Passera2, Charles F Bellows11Department of Surgery and Pathology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Division of Nuclear Medicine Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Battista, Turin, ItalyIntroduction: Microtubule-associated doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCLK1 is a novel candidate marker for intestinal stem cells. The aim of our study was to assess DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal carcinogenesis and its correlation with prognosis.Methods: DCLK1 immunostaining was performed in colorectal tissue from 71 patients, including 18 adenomatous polyps, 40 primary adenocarcinomas, and 14 metastatic lesions. Each case was evaluated by a combined scoring method based on the intensity of staining (score 0–3 and the percentage of tissue staining positive (score 0–3. Immunoexpression for DCLK1 was considered as positive when the combined score was 2–6 and negative with a score of 0–1.Results: Overall, 14/18 (78% of polyps, 30/40 (75% of primary adenocarcinomas, and 7/14 (50% of distant metastases were positive for DCLK1. In adenomatous polyps and primary cancer there was no association between DCLK1 staining score and tumor pathology. However, after curative colorectal cancer resection, patients whose tumor had a high (≥5 combined staining score had increased cancer-specific mortality compared to patients with low (0–4 staining score (hazard ratio 5.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–28.47; P = 0.027.Conclusion: We found that DCLK1 is frequently expressed in colorectal neoplasia and may be associated with poor prognosis. Further studies are necessary to validate the use of DCLK1 as a prognostic marker.Keywords: DCLK1, DCAMKL-1, gastrointestinal stem cell, cancer stem cell, adenomatous polyps, liver metastasis, immunohistochemistry

  11. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramona M McLoughlin; Colm A O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden worldwide.There is clear-cut evidence that screening will reduce colorectal cancer mortality and the only contentious issue is which screening tool to use.Most evidence points towards screening with fecal occult blood testing.The immunochemical fecal occult blood tests have a higher sensitivity than the guaiac-based tests.In addition,their automation and haemoglobin quantification allows a threshold for colonoscopy to be selected that can be accommodated within individual health care systems.

  13. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 IIIc as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Hagio, Masahito; Seya, Tomoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    A high percentage of colorectal carcinomas overexpress a lot of growth factors and their receptors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor (FGFR). We previously reported that FGFR2 overexpression was associated with distant metastasis and that FGFR2 inhibition suppressed cell growth, migration, and invasion. The FGFR2 splicing isoform FGFR2IIIb is associated with well-differentiated histologic type, tumor angiogenesis, and adhesion to extracellular matrices. Another isoform, FGFR2IIIc, correlates with the aggressiveness of various types of cancer. In the present study, we examined the expression and roles of FGFR2IIIc in colorectal carcinoma to determine the effectiveness of FGFR2IIIc-targeting therapy. In normal colorectal tissues, FGFR2IIIc expression was weakly detected in superficial colorectal epithelial cells and was not detected in proliferative zone cells. FGFR2IIIc-positive cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in the following lesions, listed in the order of increasing percentage: hyperplastic polyps growth, soft agar colony formation, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased adhesion to extracellular matrices. Furthermore, FGFR2IIIc-transfected colorectal carcinoma cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous tissues and the cecum of nude mice. Fully human anti-FGFR2IIIc monoclonal antibody inhibited the growth and migration of colorectal carcinoma cells through alterations in cell migration, cell death, and development-related genes. In conclusion, FGFR2IIIc plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Monoclonal antibody against FGFR2IIIc has promising potential in colorectal carcinoma therapy.

  14. Stromal myofibroblasts predict disease recurrence for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Tadashi; Seshimo, Iwao; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Ngan, Chew Yee; Ezumi, Koji; Takemasa, Ichiro; Ikeda, Masataka; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Matsuura, Nariaki; Monden, Morito

    2007-04-01

    Myofibroblasts, which are specifically differentiated fibroblasts, are thought to play a central role in the desmoplastic reaction, a dynamic stromal change closely associated with cancer development. Although fundamental studies suggest that myofibroblasts may either facilitate or inhibit cancer progression, cumulative evidence supports their role in promoting tumor progression. The aim of this study was to assess the value of myofibroblasts in the cancer stroma as an indicator of disease recurrence after colorectal cancer surgery. Using computer-assisted image analysis, we quantified myofibroblasts in the cancer-associated stroma of 192 colorectal cancers using alpha-smooth muscle actin as a marker. The cancer-associated stroma contained various numbers of myofibroblasts (0.35-19.0%; mean, 5.55 +/- 3.85%). Tumors with abundant myofibroblasts were associated with shorter disease-free survival rate (P = 0.001) for stage II and III colorectal cancer. Multivariate analysis indicated that alpha-smooth muscle actin was a significant prognostic factor comparable with lymph node metastasis and superior to other tumor and stromal components, including histology of the tumor invasive front, peritumoral lymphocytic infiltration, and Crohn's-like lymphoid reaction. Moreover, colorectal cancers with synchronous liver metastasis generally displayed an active desmoplastic reaction, which was retained in the metastatic lesion to a similar extent. The results suggest that the abundance of myofibroblasts in cancer-associated stroma may be a useful indicator of disease recurrence after curative colorectal cancer surgery.

  15. Anal metastasis originating from colorectal cancer: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Min; Lim, Joon Seok; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Mi Suk; Kim, Myeong Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Taek; Kim, Ho Guen [Dept. of Pathology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Anal metastasis from colorectal cancer rarely occurs, but it severely impairs the patient's quality of life, often requiring wide resection including the anal sphincter with permanent colostomy. This lesion can be misdiagnosed as a perianal fistula or an abscess, and it can be overlooked at the time of surgery because it is not included in the routine surgical extent of low anterior resection. We report two rare cases of anal metastasis from colorectal cancer. In both cases, perianal nodules with an internal solid portion were detected on preoperative rectal magnetic resonance imaging and additional local excisions of the anal lesions were performed during the process of treatment. Anal metastasis was pathologically confirmed by histology and immunohistochemical staining.

  16. Strain Assessment in Surgically Resected Inflammatory and Neoplastic Bowel Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havre, R F; Leh, S; Gilja, O H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether ultrasound-based strain imaging can discriminate between colorectal adenocarcinomas and stenotic Crohn's lesions in newly resected surgical specimens.Materials and Methods: Resected surgical specimens from 27 patients electively operated for colorectal tumors...... or stenotic lesions from Crohn's disease were prospectively examined with ultrasonography using a Hitachi HV 900 US scanner with real-time elastography (RTE). Three different methods were applied to assess tissue strain: A four-level categorical visual classification, a continuous visual analog scale (VAS, 0...... - 100) and a strain ratio (SR) measurement between the lesion and surrounding reference tissue. The imaged sections were marked and subsequently examined by a pathologist. Results from RTE were evaluated according to diagnosis, degree of fibrosis, inflammatory parameters, tumor stage and grade...

  17. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race ...

  18. Epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jia; Mingzhou Guo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes frequently occur in human colorectal cancer.Genomic global hypomethylation,gene promoter region hypermethylation,histone modifications,and alteration of miRNA patterns are major epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer.Loss of imprinting (LOI) is associated with colorectal neoplasia.Folate deficiency may cause colorectal carcinogenesis by inducing gene-specific hypermethylation and genomic global hypomethylation.HDAC inhibitors and demethylating agents have been approved by the FDA for myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia treatment.Non-coding RNA is regarded as another kind of epigenetic marker in colorectal cancer.This review is mainly focused on DNA methylation,histone modification,and microRNA changes in colorectal cancer.

  19. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer.

  20. Hyperplastic Polyps Are Innocuous Lesions in Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Speake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To compare methylation profiles, protein expression, and microsatellite instability (MSI of sporadic, HNPCC, and familial hyperplastic polyps (HPs. Methods. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP and pyrosequencing assessed p16, MGMT, hMLH-1, MINT 1, and MINT 31 methylation. IHC (Immunohistochemistry assessed Ki67, CK20, hMLH-1, hMSH-2, and hMSH-6 protein expression. MSI analysis was performed on those polyps with adequate DNA remaining. Results. 124 HPs were identified 78 sporadic, 21 HNPCC, 25 familial, and the HNPCC group demonstrated no significant differences in overall methylation (P=.186 Chi2. The familial group demonstrated significantly less over all methylation levels (P=.004 Chi2. Conclusions. HPs that occur in HNPCC have no more worrying features at a molecular level than those patients with HPs in a sporadic setting.

  1. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  2. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE LIVER METASTASES FROM COLORECTAL CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eloy; Celis, Juan; Berrospi, Francisco; Payet, Eduardo

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the absence of extra hepatic disease, the hepatic resection is the treatment of choice for liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma, but a no treatment attitude or the use of chemotherapy still persists in some health centers. This study was done to evaluate the peri operative morbi-mortality and survival after resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer in our institution.METHODS: Clinical, pathologic and outcome data of patients undergoing liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer at the Instituto de Enfermedades Neoplasicas de Lima Peru between January 1986 and July 2000 was examined.RESULTS: Of 300 liver resections, 24 were performed in patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer; 17 patients were men and 7 women, who ranged in age from 21 to 79 years ( a mean of 52.66 years), the site of primary disease was the rectum in 7 and colon in 17, 20 patients were Dukes C and 4 Dukes B.Synchronous secondary disease were found in 9 patients and metachronous lesions were found in 15 patients Forty nine metastases were resected (Mean size 4.5 cm, range 1.5 cm 24 cm)Seven patients underwent right hepatectomy, one right hepatectomy plus non anatomic wedge resection, two right trisegmentectomy, 4 left lobectomy and ten a non anatomical resection.The overall post operative morbidity was 8% and the 30 day post operative mortality rate was 0% Estimated three and five year survival rates using Kaplan-Meier method was 50 % and 20% respectively.CONCLUSION: Hepatic resection for a secondary malignant liver growth from colorectal cancer is relatively safe with low morbidity and mortality rates, an remains the only potentially curative treatment. We continue to recommend an aggressive surgical approach to hepatic metastases of colorectal origin in the abscense of extra hepatic disease.

  3. Colorectal carcinogenesis: Review of human and experimental animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a comprehensive overview of cancer development and links it to the current understanding of tumorigenesis and malignant progression in colorectal cancer. The focus is on human and murine colorectal carcinogenesis and the histogenesis of this malignant disorder. A summary of a model of colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis (an AOM/DSS model will also be presented. The earliest phases of colorectal oncogenesis occur in the normal mucosa, with a disorder of cell replication. The large majority of colorectal malignancies develop from an adenomatous polyp (adenoma. These can be defined as well-demarcated masses of epithelial dysplasia, with uncontrolled crypt cell proliferation. When neoplastic cells pass through the muscularis mucosa and infiltrate the submucosa, they are malignant. Carcinomas usually originate from pre-existing adenomas, but this does not imply that all polyps undergo malignant changes and does not exclude de novo oncogenesis. Besides adenomas, there are other types of pre-neoplasia, which include hyperplastic polyps, serrated adenomas, flat adenomas and dysplasia that occurs in the inflamed colon in associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal neoplasms cover a wide range of pre-malignant and malignant lesions, many of which can easily be removed during endoscopy if they are small. Colorectal neoplasms and/or pre-neoplasms can be prevented by interfering with the various steps of oncogenesis, which begins with uncontrolled epithelial cell replication, continues with the formation of adenomas and eventually evolves into malignancy. The knowledge described herein will help to reduce and prevent this malignancy, which is one of the most frequent neoplasms in some Western and developed countries.

  4. Prevalence of colorectal adenomatous polyps in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun Mi; Kim, Seo Woo; Lim, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyps are precancerous lesions of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of colorectal adenomatous polyps in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and determine whether COPD is associated with colorectal malignant potential. Subjects who had undergone post-bronchodilator spirometry and colonoscopy and were 40 years or older were selected from the hospital database. COPD was defined as a spirometry in which the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) is prevalence of colorectal adenomatous polyps was 39% (98/251) in the non-COPD group and 66% (54/82) in the COPD group. Among 54 patients with adenomatous polyps in the COPD group, 47 had tubular adenoma and seven had villous adenoma. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that only COPD patients whom matched to the criteria of COPD by pulmonary function test (odds ratio 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-3.8; P=0.019) were independently associated with colorectal malignant potential. The risk of colorectal malignant potential in the COPD group was higher than in the non-COPD group. We may suggest that COPD patients should consider regular colonoscopic evaluation to screen for premalignant colon polyps regardless of smoking.

  5. Definition and scope of the surgical treatment in patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Ahmedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in lungs is a relatively new trend of modern oncology. In this connection, still there are no clearly formulated criteria for patient selection for this type of intervention, approaches to repeated resections and scope of the surgical operation in case of multiple lesions. Established key prognostic factors include lesion of intrathoracic lymph nodes, timing of the development of metastatic disease, baseline level of carcinoembryonic antigen, number of foci and the volume of metastatic lesion, stage of the disease. Options for surgical access include lateral thoracotomy, sternotomy, thoracoscopy and thoracoscopy combined with additional minithoracotomy.If a patient has a single peripheral metastatic lesions, physician should prefer thoracoscopic operations. One of their advantages include minimum development of adhesions and possibility of subsequent re-thoracoscopy. Resection of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (R0 resection rate allows to achieve persistent healing of the tumor process in a significant number of patients.

  6. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after colorectal cancer. To help maintain good health, colorectal cancer survivors should also: Get to and stay at a healthy weight Keep physically active Eat a healthy diet , with an emphasis on plant foods Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink per day ...

  7. Endoscopic detection and treatment of colorectal polyps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderbos, TDG

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide. Most colorectal cancers arise form premalignant colorectal polyps. Colorectal polyps can be roughly subdivided into hyperplastic, non-malignant polyps and

  8. Cytogenetic comparisons of synchronous carcinomas and polyps in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardi, G; Parada, L A; Bomme, L;

    1997-01-01

    Thirty tumorous lesions from seven patients with colorectal cancer were short-term cultured and cytogenetically analysed: 16 non-adenomatous polyps, six adenomas, seven carcinomas, including one in polyp, and one lymph node metastasis. Clonal chromosome aberrations were found in 20 samples in 100...

  9. Efficacy of the revised Vienna Classification for diagnosing colorectal epithelial neoplasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kenji; Fujinuma, Sumio; Endo, Takuro; Saida, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Kei; Maetani, Iruru

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively investigate the efficacy of the revised Vienna Classification for diagnosing colorectal epithelial neoplastic lesions in cold biopsy specimens. METHODS: Patients were selected for inclusion if they had colorectal epithelial lesions that were not considered suitable for direct endoscopic resection. These included colorectal polyps ≥ 10 mm and lesions suspected of being carcinomas capable of invading the colorectal submucosa or beyond, including strictures, based on the cold biopsies obtained from each lesion prior to resection. We investigated the relationship between diagnoses based on cold biopsy samples using the revised Vienna Classification and resected specimens of the same lesions, and the therapeutic implications of diagnoses made using the revised Vienna Classification. The same cold biopsy specimens were also examined using the Japanese Group Classification guidelines, and compared with the resected specimens of the same lesions for reference. RESULTS: A total of 179 lesions were identified. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the revised Vienna Classification for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and submucosal invasive carcinomas in cold biopsy specimens was 22.2%, 100%, 100%, and 71.4%, respectively, and for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and those invading the submucosa or beyond was 59.7%, 100%, 100%, and 37.6%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the Japanese Group Classification for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and submucosal invasive carcinomas in cold biopsy specimens was 83.3%, 91.4%, 83.3%, and 91.4%, respectively, and for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and those invading the submucosa or beyond was 95.1%, 91.4%, 97.9%, and 82.1%, respectively. A total of 137 of 144 carcinomas that had invaded the submucosa or beyond and three high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias were diagnosed as

  10. Efficacy of the revised Vienna Classification for diagnosing colorectal epithelial neoplasias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji Tominaga; Sumio Fujinuma; Takuro Endo; Yoshihisa Saida; Kei Takahashi; Iruru Maetani

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively investigate the efficacy of the revised Vienna Classification for diagnosing colorectal epithelial neoplastic lesions in cold biopsy specimens. METHODS: Patients were selected for inclusion if they had colorectal epithelial lesions that were not considered suitable for direct endoscopic resection.These included colorectal polyps ≥ 10 mm and lesions suspected of being carcinomas capable of invading the colorectal submucosa or beyond, including strictures, based on the cold biopsies obtained from each lesion prior to resection. We investigated the relationship between diagnoses based on cold biopsy samples using the revised Vienna Classification and resected specimens of the same lesions, and the therapeutic implications of diagnoses made using the revised Vienna Classification. The same cold biopsy specimens were also examined using the Japanese Group Classification guidelines, and compared with the resected specimens of the same lesions for reference. RESULTS: A total of 179 lesions were identified. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the revised Vienna Classification for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and submucosal invasive carcinomas in cold biopsy specimens was 22.2%, 100%, 100%, and 71.4%, respec t ively, and for di s t ingui shing between intramucosal lesions and those invading the submucosa or beyond was 59.7%, 100%, 100%, and 37.6%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the Japanese Group Classification for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and submucosal invasive carcinomas in cold biopsy specimens was 83.3%, 91.4%, 83.3%, and 91.4%, respectively, and for distinguishing between intramucosal lesions and those invading the submucosa or beyond was 95.1%, 91.4%, 97.9%, and 82.1%, respectively. A total of 137 of 144 carcinomas that had invaded the submucosa or beyond and three high-grade intraepithelial neoplasias were diagnosed

  11. Complications in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischer, Jason S; Rymeski, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal pediatric surgery is a diverse field that encompasses many different procedures. The pullthrough for Hirschsprung disease, the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty for anorectal malformations including complex cloaca reconstructions and the ileal pouch anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis present some of the most technically challenging procedures pediatric surgeons undertake. Many children prevail successfully following these surgical interventions, however, a small number of patients suffer from complications following these procedures. Anticipated postoperative problems are discussed along with medical and surgical strategies for managing these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, J; Rockall, T; Darzi, A

    2004-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been shown to offer many advantages to general surgical patients but has not been widely adopted for colorectal disease. Initial fears surrounding the oncological safety of laparoscopic colectomies have largely subsided but the technical challenges still remain. Surgical robots or telemanipulators present the laparoscopic surgeon with unrivaled dexterity and vision, which may allow colonic resections to be completed with greater ease. Although initial studies suggest promising results using currently available systems, it will take further time for patient benefits to be proven, therefore justifying the greater expense of operating with this new technology.

  13. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  14. Scrotal metastases from colorectal carcinoma: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWeeney, Doireann M

    2012-01-31

    ABSTRACT: A 72-year-old man presented with a two month history of rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy demonstrated synchronous lesions at 3 cm and 40 cm with histological analysis confirming synchronous adenocarcinomata. He developed bilobar hepatic metastases while undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Treatment was complicated by Fournier\\'s gangrene of the right hemiscrotum which required surgical debridement. Eight months later he re-presented with an ulcerating lesion on the right hemiscrotum. An en-bloc resection of the ulcerating scrotal lesion and underlying testis was performed. Immunohistological analysis revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma of large bowel origin. Colorectal metastasis to the urogenital tract is rare and here we report a case of rectal carcinoma metastasizing to scrotal skin.

  15. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer.

  16. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  17. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal...... on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes...... adenocarcinomas from adenomas, while inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes can be distinguished based on the strain ratio calculation. Among EUS-guided therapies, the drainage of abdominal and pelvic collections has been regarded as a safe and effective procedure to be used as an alternative...

  18. Selumetinib and Cyclosporine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-04

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  19. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    , and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal......-term survivals since it started in 2001 for both patients with colon and rectal cancers.......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed...

  20. Helicobacter Pylori Associated Gastritis Increases Risk of Colorectal Polyps: a Hospital Based-Cross-Sectional Study in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are common in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. The present study aimed to determine any correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and colorectal polyps in the Thai population. A total of 303 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy with colonoscopy for investigation of chronic abdominal pain participated in this study from November 2014 to October 2015. A diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis was made if the bacteria were seen on histopathological examination and a rapid urease test was positive. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. Patient demographic data were analyzed for correlations. The prevalence of colorectal polyps was 77 (25.4%), lesions being found more frequently in Helicobacter pylori infected patients than non-infected subjects [38.4% vs. 12.5%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 2.26 (1.32 - 3.86), p gastritis were at high risk of having adenomas featuring dysplasia [OR (95% CI): 1.15 (1.16 - 7.99); P = 0.02]. There was no varaition in location of polyps, age group, sex and gastric lesions with respect to Helicobacter pylori status. This study showed that Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps, especially adenomas with dysplasia in the Thai population. Patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis may benefit from concurrent colonoscopy for diagnosis of colorectal polyps as a preventive and early treatment for colorectal cancer.

  1. Study on image feature extraction and classification for human colorectal cancer using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Shan-Yi; Huang, Wei-Cheng; Chiu, Han-Mo; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Most of the colorectal cancer has grown from the adenomatous polyp. Adenomatous lesions have a well-documented relationship to colorectal cancer in previous studies. Thus, to detect the morphological changes between polyp and tumor can allow early diagnosis of colorectal cancer and simultaneous removal of lesions. OCT (Optical coherence tomography) has been several advantages including high resolution and non-invasive cross-sectional image in vivo. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the B-scan OCT image features and histology of malignant human colorectal tissues, also en-face OCT image and the endoscopic image pattern. The in-vitro experiments were performed by a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system; the swept source has a center wavelength at 1310 nm and 160nm in wavelength scanning range which produced 6 um axial resolution. In the study, the en-face images were reconstructed by integrating the axial values in 3D OCT images. The reconstructed en-face images show the same roundish or gyrus-like pattern with endoscopy images. The pattern of en-face images relate to the stages of colon cancer. Endoscopic OCT technique would provide three-dimensional imaging and rapidly reconstruct en-face images which can increase the speed of colon cancer diagnosis. Our results indicate a great potential for early detection of colorectal adenomas by using the OCT imaging.

  2. Colorectal cancers with aneuploids show high CD133 expression and poor prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongdong Yu; Yonghong Zhang; You Zou; Ming Tian; Deding Tao; Junbo Hu; Jianping Gong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of DNA ploidy status in colorectal cancers with patients' prognosis and also the relationship of DNA ploidy status with expression of the colorectal cancer stem cell marker CD133.Methods:The DNA ploidy status and CD133 expression in colorectal cancers were detected by flow cytometry.The clinicopathological characteristics and progression-free survival analysis of patients was evaluated based on the clinical data.Results:DNA ploidy pattern did not correlated with gender,age,lesion diameter,histological type,depth of tumor invasion,lymphatic invasion and Dukes stage.Only primary lesion cite showed significant correlation with DNA ploidy pattern,more aneuploids were observed in colonic cancer than rectal cancer,P < 0.05.The 2-year progression-free survival rate and total progression-free time in patients with aneuploids were lower than that with diploids,P < 0.05.Tumors contained aneuploids showed higher expression of CD133 than tumors of only diploids,P < 0.05.Conclusion:Tumor DNA ploidy status is a significant prognostic factor in patients with colorectal cancer and also associated with the existence of CD133 positive colorectal cancer stem cells.

  3. Laparoscopy-assisted combined resection for synchronous gastric and colorectal cancer: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideo; Okamoto, Yuichi; Ishii, Akiko; Ishizu, Kazuhiro; Kondoh, Yasumasa; Igarashi, Naoki; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2009-01-01

    In gastric cancer patients, the most common form of synchronous cancer is colorectal cancer. To reduce the invasiveness of the resection, a laparoscopy-assisted combined resection was performed in three patients with synchronous gastric and colorectal cancer. Although all gastric lesions were in the early stages, two colorectal lesions were advanced cases. In all cases, the laparoscopic gastric resection and reconstruction was performed first, followed by the colorectal resection. In the case of right-side colon cancer in addition to gastric cancer, it was relatively easy to perform the combined resection with lymph node dissection sharing the same ports used for the gastrectomy, although we needed an additional port. In one case, in which rectal cancer was present in addition to gastric cancer located in the upper portion of the stomach, a totally laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy was combined with a laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection, leaving only a lower abdominal minilaparotomy wound. All patients quickly returned to normal activity without remarkable complications, with the exception of a wound infection in one patient. With a mean follow-up of 30.7 months, all patients survived without any sign of recurrence. This procedure represents a feasible option for minimally invasive treatment of synchronous gastric and colorectal cancer.

  4. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-07

    The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI tract the main application of EUS has been in staging rectal cancer, as a complementary technique to other cross-sectional imaging methods. EUS can provide highly accurate in-depth assessments of tumour infiltration, performing best in the diagnosis of early rectal tumours. In the light of recent developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal method for the evaluation of subepithelial lesions. Their differential diagnosis is possible by imaging the originating wall layer and the associated echostructure, and cytological and histological confirmation can be obtained through EUS-guided fine needle aspiration or trucut biopsy. However, reports on the use of EUS in colorectal subepithelial lesions are currently limited. EUS allows detailed examination of perirectal and perianal complications in Crohn's disease and, as a safe and less expensive investigation, can be used to monitor therapeutic response of fistulae, which seems to improve outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgery. Furthermore, EUS image enhancement techniques, such as the use of contrast agents or elastography, have recently been evaluated for colorectal indications as well. Possible applications of contrast enhancement include the assessment of tumour angiogenesis in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and

  5. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase 9 as an early surrogate biomarker of advanced colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Triñanes, Javier; Quintero, Enrique; Salido, Eduardo; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Adrián-de-Ganzo, Zaida; Alarcón-Fernández, Onofre; Abrante, Beatriz; Romero, Rafael; Carrillo, Marta; Ramos, Laura; Alonso, Inmaculada; Ortega, Juan; Jiménez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are overexpressed at different stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and could serve as early surrogate biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. To assess the utility of plasma MMP2 and MMP9 levels in the detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia and their correlation with tissue levels. We analysed blood and tissue samples from patients with non-advanced adenomas (n=25), advanced adenomas (n=25), colorectal cancer (n=25) and healthy controls (n=75). Plasma and tissue gelatinase levels were determined by Luminex XMAP technology and gelatin zymography. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to calculate the optimum cut-off for the detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia. Plasma MMP2 levels were similar between groups whatever the type of lesion. Plasma MMP9 levels were significantly higher in patients with neoplastic lesions than in healthy controls (median 292.3ng/ml vs. 139.08ng/ml, P<0.001). MMP9 levels were also higher in colorectal cancer than in non-advanced adenomas (median 314.6ng/ml vs. 274.3ng/ml, P=0.03). There was a significant correlation between plasma and tissue levels of MMP9 (r=0.5, P<0.001). The plasma MMP9 cut-off range with the highest diagnostic accuracy was between 173ng/ml and 204ng/ml (AUC=0.80 [95% CI: 0.72-0.86], P<0.001; sensitivity, 80-86% and specificity, 57-67%). Plasma MMP9 could be a surrogate biomarker for the early detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia, although its diagnostic performance could be increased by combination with other biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  6. Biliary carcinoembryonic antigen levels in diagnosis of occult hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaques Waisberg; Rog(e)rio T. Palma; Lu(i)s Contim Neto; Lourdes C. Martins; Maur(i)cio S. L. Oliveira; Carlos A. Nagashima; Antonio C. Godoy; Fabio S. Goffi

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively explore the role of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in gallbladder bile in patients with colorectal carcinoma and the morphological and clinical features of neoplasia and the occurrence of hepatic metastases.METHODS: CEA levels in the gallbladder and peripheral blood were studied in 44 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 10 patients with uncomplicated cholelithiasis. CEA samples were collected from the gallbladder bile and peripheral blood during the operation, immediately before extirpating the colorectal neoplasia or cholecystectomy.Values of up to 5 ng/ml were considered normal for bile and serum CEA.RESULTS: In the 44 patients with colorectal carcinoma who underwent operation with curative intent, the average level of serum CEA was 8.5 ng/ml (range: 0.1 to 111.0 ng/ml) and for bile CEA it was 74.5 ng/ml (range: 0.2 to 571.0ng/ml). In the patients with uncomplicated cholelithiasis who underwent cholecystectomy, the average level of serum CEA was 1.9 ng/ml (range: 1.0 to 3.5 ng/ml) and for bile CEA it was 1.2 ng/ml (range: 0.3 to 2.9 ng/ml).The average duration of follow-up time was 16.5 months (range: 6 to 48 months). Four patients who underwent extirpation of the colorectal carcinoma without evidence of hepatic metastasis and with an average bile CEA value of 213.2 ng/ml presented hepatic metastases between three and seventeen months after removal of the primary colorectal neoplasia. Three of them successfully underwent extirpation of the hepatic lesions.CONCLUSION: High CEA levels in gallbladders of patients undergoing curative operation for colorectal carcinoma may indicate the presence of hepatic metastases. Such patients must be followed up with special attention to the diagnosis of such lesions.

  7. Involvement of Activated Cdc42 Kinase1 in Colitis and Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chaolan; Zhao, Xinmei; Gu, Hongxiang; Huang, Liyun; Zhou, Sanxi; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-12-07

    BACKGROUND Activated Cdc42 kinase1 (ACK1) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase which is critical for cell survival, proliferation, and migration. Genomic amplification of ACK1 has been reported in multiple human cancers. We aimed to investigate ACK1 protein expression in colorectal mucosa with inflammation and neoplasm, and to evaluate its correlation with disease activity and severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 250 individuals who underwent total colonoscopy were collected randomly from January 2007 to May 2013 in Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, China. Colorectal mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained by endoscopy from 78 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 22 with Crohn's disease (CD), 20 with infectious colitis, 26 with non-IBD and noninfectious colitis, 16 with sporadic adenomas, 4 with dysplasia-associated lesions or masses, 10 with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), 4 with UC-related CRC, 10 with hyperplastic polyps, and 60 without colonic abnormalities. ACK1 protein levels were determined immunohistochemically. The correlations of ACK1 expression with disease activity and severity were also evaluated. RESULTS Significantly increased ACK1 expression was observed in epithelial cells of colorectal mucosa with inflammation and dysplasia compared to controls (P0.05). CONCLUSIONS ACK1 protein is increased extensively in colitis and colorectal dysplasia. ACK1 overexpression may play a role in colorectal inflammation and neoplasms.

  8. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastric Adenoma and Gastric Cancer in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Hyun Tak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. To evaluate the incidence of gastric adenoma and gastric cancer in colorectal cancer patients, as well as the clinicopathological features that affect their incidence. Methods. Among patients who underwent surgery after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer between January 2004 and December 2013 at Chungnam National University Hospital, 142 patients who underwent follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were assigned to the patient group. The control group included 426 subjects randomly selected. The patient group was subdivided into two: one that developed gastric adenoma or cancer and one that did not. Clinicopathological characteristics were compared between these groups. Results. In total, 35 (24.6% colorectal cancer patients developed a gastric adenoma or gastric cancer, which was higher than the number in the control group (20 [4.7%] patients; p<0.001. Age, alcohol history, and differentiation of colorectal cancer were associated with higher risks of gastric adenoma or gastric cancer, with odds ratios of 1.062, 6.506, and 5.901, respectively. Conclusions. In colorectal cancer patients, screening with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is important, even if no lesions are noted in the upper gastrointestinal tract at colorectal cancer diagnosis. Endoscopic screening is particularly important with increasing age, history of alcohol consumption, and poor cancer differentiation.

  9. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  10. Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage: New perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Daams (Freek)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis provides new perspectives on colorectal anastomotic leakages. In both experimental and clinical studies, aspects of prevention, early identification, treatment and consequences of anastomotic leakage are discussed.

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... the United States, it is the third most common cancer in men and women. Caught early, it ...

  12. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...... features, and the genetic and epigenetic profiles of the familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) syndrome with the aim to delineate tumor characteristics that may contribute to refined diagnostics and optimized tumor prevention....

  13. Focal liver lesions found incidentally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdullah; A; Algarni; Abdullah; H; Alshuhri; Majed; M; Alonazi; Moustafa; Mabrouk; Mourad; Simon; R; Bramhal

    2016-01-01

    Incidentally found focal liver lesions are a commonfinding and a reason for referral to hepatobiliary service.They are often discovered in patients with history of liver cirrhosis,colorectal cancer,incidentally during work up for abdominal pain or in a trauma setting.Specific points should considered during history taking such as risk factors of liver cirrhosis;hepatitis,alcohol consumption,substance exposure or use of oral con-traceptive pills and metabolic syndromes.Full blood count,liver function test and tumor markers can act as a guide to minimize the differential diagnosis and to categorize the degree of liver disease.Imaging should start with B-mode ultrasound.If available,contrast enhanced ultrasound is a feasible,safe,cost effective option and increases the ability to reach a diagnosis.Contrast enhanced computed tomography should be considered next.It is more accurate in diagnosis and better to study anatomy for possible operation.Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is the gold standard with the highest sensitivity.If doubt still remains,the options are biopsy or surgical excision.

  14. Prevalence of colorectal adenomatous polyps in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun EM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eun Mi Chun, Seo Woo Kim, So Yeon Lim Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: Colorectal adenomatous polyps are precancerous lesions of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of colorectal adenomatous polyps in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients and determine whether COPD is associated with colorectal malignant potential.Methods: Subjects who had undergone post-bronchodilator spirometry and colonoscopy and were 40 years or older were selected from the hospital database. COPD was defined as a spirometry in which the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC is <0.7 in post-bronchodilator spirometry. The non-COPD group was matched for both age and sex, and were defined as having an FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ≥0.7 in spirometry. Finally, 333 patients were retrospectively reviewed; of this group, 82 patients had COPD.Results: Among the subjects, 201 patients (60% were nonsmokers, while 78 (23% were current smokers. The prevalence of colorectal adenomatous polyps was 39% (98/251 in the non-COPD group and 66% (54/82 in the COPD group. Among 54 patients with adenomatous polyps in the COPD group, 47 had tubular adenoma and seven had villous adenoma. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that only COPD patients whom matched to the criteria of COPD by pulmonary function test (odds ratio 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.1–3.8; P=0.019 were independently associated with colorectal malignant potential.Conclusion: The risk of colorectal malignant potential in the COPD group was higher than in the non-COPD group. We may suggest that COPD patients should consider regular colonoscopic evaluation to screen for premalignant colon polyps regardless of smoking. Keywords: COPD, colorectal adenomatous polyp, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary

  15. [Expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblast of cancerized or recurrent colorectal adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Zhu, Yin; Li, Changshui; Li, Yinya; Nie, Qianqian; Zhu, Ziling; Deng, Hong

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD10 in tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF) in colorectal adenomas and its relation to cancerization and recurrence of adenoma. Methods: Tissue samples of low-grade adenoma (n=50), high-grade adenoma (n=50) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (n=50) were collected, and tissue samples at the distal margin of corresponding colorectal lesions were taken as controls. The expression of CD10 in the stromal TAFs, and the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemistry (Envision). The correlation of CD10 expression in stromal TAFs with the expressions of β-catenin, Ki-67, p53 and CyclinD1 in tumor cells was analyzed by Spearmen. One hundred samples of low-grade colorectal adenoma were collected, including 57 non-recurrent cases and 43 recurrent cases (16 cases of recurrent adenoma and 27 cases of recurrent adenocarcinoma); the expression of stromal TAF CD10 were determined and compared among groups. Results: There was no TAF in normal colorectal mucosa. The expression rates of TAF CD10 in low-grade adenoma, high-grade adenoma and colorectal adenocarcinoma were 22%, 50% and 78%, respectively (all P0.05). The expression of p53 in colorectal adenocarcinoma and high-grade adenoma was higher than that in low grade adenoma (all P0.05). The TAF CD10 level was significantly higher in low-grade adenoma with recurrence than that in those without recurrence (Pcancer, indicating that it may play an important role in the canceration of adenoma. Adenomas with high expression of CD10 TAF are likely to be recurrent and cancerized, and detection of TAF CD10 combined with p53, Ki-67 and β-catenin may be of value in predicting canceration or recurrence of colorectal adenoma.

  16. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  17. Unique psoriatic lesion versus multiple lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Chiriac

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the number of lesions of psoriasis and to find risk factors for multiple lesions. Material and Methods: 1,236 patients (male 54.13%, female 45.87% with psoriasis were seen over a period of 8 years in an Outpatient Clinic. Patients filled out questionnaires containing age at onset, number of lesions and location at the beginning of the disease, gender, type and localization of psoriasis at the time of clinical examination, psoriasis family history, previous treatment, comorbidities, and social status. Results: The number of psoriasis lesions correlates with: onset age of psoriasis (F=8.902, p=0.0029; age at the moment of clinical examination (F=8.902, p=0.0029; residence in rural area (χ2=8.589, p=0.00338, 95%CI; alcohol intake (χ2=16.47, p=0.00005, 95%CI; smoking (χ2=8.408, p=0.00373, 95%CI; occupation: workers/pupils/students (χ2=14.11, p=0.0069, 95%CI. Conclusions: There is a correlation between number of psoriatic lesions and some factors. Multiple lesions were observed in older patients, smokers and drinkers, coming from rural area and social active (workers and pupils/students. No correlation was statistically proved between number of lesions and gender, comorbidities and family history of psoriasis.

  18. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: patient selection and special considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Andrew; Gulati, Shraddha; Burt, Margaret; Hayee, Bu’Hussain; Haji, Amyn

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) enables en bloc resection of large complex colorectal superficial neoplastic lesions, resulting in very low rates of local recurrence, high-quality pathologic specimens for accurate histopathologic diagnosis and potentially curative treatment of early adenocarcinoma without resorting to major surgical resection. The safety and efficacy of the technique, which was pioneered in the upper gastrointestinal tract, has been established by the consistently impressive outcomes from expert centers in Japan and some other eastern countries. However, ESD is challenging to perform in the colorectum and there is a significant risk of complications, particularly in the early stages of the learning curve. Early studies from western centers raised concerns about the high complication rates, and the impressive results from Japanese centers were not replicated. As a result, many western endoscopists are skeptical about the role of ESD and few centers have incorporated the technique into their practice. Nevertheless, although the distribution of expertise, referral centers and modes of practice may differ in Japan and western countries, ESD has an important role and can be safely and effectively incorporated into western practice. Key to achieving this is meticulous lesion assessment and selection, appropriate referral to centers with the necessary expertise and experience and application of the appropriate technique individualized to the patient. This review discusses the advantages, risks and benefits of ESD to treat colorectal lesions and the importance of preprocedure lesion assessment and in vivo diagnosis and outlines a pragmatic rationale for appropriate lesion selection as well as the patient, technical and institutional factors that should be considered. PMID:28761366

  19. Advances in pediatric colorectal surgical techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, S.J.; Blaauw, I. de

    2010-01-01

    The operative management of pediatric colorectal diseases has improved significantly in recent years through the development of innovative approaches for operative exposure and a better understanding of colorectal anatomy. Advances in transanal and minimal access techniques have formed the

  20. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emails Have You or a Family Member Had Colorectal (Colon) Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer can make you more likely to get colorectal cancer yourself. If you have close family members with ...

  1. Loss of heterozygosity in colorectal cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... adenocarcinoma (Grady, 2005). CRC occurs ... risk of getting colorectal cancer increases with age. ..... pancreas, ovarian, lung and liver tumours (Wan et al.,. 2006). Wan et ... independent prognostic factor of colorectal cancer.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy and tolerability of contrast enhanced CT colonoscopy in symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozsunar, Yelda [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin (Turkey)], E-mail: yozsunar@adu.edu.tr; Coskun, Guelten [Izmir Ataturk Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, Izmir (Turkey); Delibas, Naciye; Uz, Burcin [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin (Turkey); Yuekselen, Vahit [Department of Gastroenterology, School of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Objective: We compared the accuracy and tolerability of intravenous contrast enhanced spiral computed tomography colonography (CTC) and optical colonoscopy (OC) for the detection of colorectal neoplasia in symptomatic patients for colorectal neoplasia. Methods: A prospective study was performed in 48 patients with symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer. Spiral CTC was performed in supine and prone positions after colonic cleansing. The axial, 2D MPR and virtual endoluminal views were analyzed. Results of spiral CTC were compared with OC which was done within 15 days. The psychometric tolerance test was asked to be performed for both CTC and colonoscopy after the procedure. Results: Ten lesions in 9 of 48 patients were found in CTC and confirmed with OC. Two masses and eight polyps, consisted of 1 tubulovillous, 1 tubular, 2 villous adenoma, 4 adenomatous polyp, 4 adenocarcinoma, were identified. Lesion prevalence was 21%. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values were found 100%, 87%, 89%, 67% and 100%, respectively. Psychometric tolerance test showed that CTC significantly more comfortable comparing with OC (p = 0.00). CTC was the preferred method in 37% while OC was preferred in 6% of patients. In both techniques, the most unpleasant part was bowel cleansing. Conclusion: Contrast enhanced CTC is a highly accurate method in detecting colorectal lesions. Since the technique was found to be more comfortable and less time consuming compare to OE, it may be preferable in management of symptomatic patients with increased risk for colorectal cancer.

  3. Treatment of metastatic brain lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zaytsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Increasing survival in patients with secondary brain damage, and identifying the factors of favorable and adverse prognosis.Material and method. In P. A. Hertsen Moscow Oncology Research Institute from 2007 to 2013 there were treated 268 patients with brain metastases. The mean age was 55.8 years (from 24 to 81 years. Metastases of colorectal cancer identified in 7.8%, cases of lung cancer in 34%, melanoma 9.3 %, breast cancer in 26%, kidney cancer in 11%, with non-identified primary tumor in 4.5%, other tumors accounted for 6.7%. Solitary metastasis was diagnosed in 164 (61,19% patients, oligometastasis (2-3 - 72 (26,87% patients with polymetastasis (more than 3 – 32 (11,94% patients. In 106 (39,55% of patients with brain metastases it was the only manifestation of the generalization process. To control the radical removal of the tumor in 93 (34,7% patients we used the method of fluorescence navigation (FN with the drug Alasens. In 66 (24,6% patients intraoperatively was held a session of photodynamic therapy (PDT. In 212 (79,1% cases, the removal of metastasis performed totally, 55 (20,9% patients stated Subtotal removal.Results. The observation period for the patients ranged from 3 to 79 months. Survival median among the entire group of patients with metastatic brain lesion was 12 months. Overall survival was significantly dependent on RPA class, the volume of postoperative treatment, histological type of primary tumor, number of intracerebral metastases and the timing of the relapse-free period.Conclusions. Factors that affects the overall survival are the features of the histology of the primary lesion, multiplicity of metastatic lesions, RPA class and the synchronous nature of the metastasis. The median of overall survival of patients who did not receive after surgical treatment of a particular type of therapy was only 4 months. If to use the combined treatment (surgical treatment with the irradiation of the whole brain median

  4. Metastasis of Colorectal Adenocarcinoma to the Thyroid: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Goatman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We present a rare case of colorectal metastasis to the thyroid five years following primary colonic resection. This case highlights the need to be cognisant of unusual sites of metastasis from colorectal neoplasms. Case Report. An 82-year-old male patient had a panproctocolectomy for synchronous colorectal tumours. Five years later he was found to have lung and thyroid metastases found incidentally on imaging for an acute presentation with small bowel obstruction. Conclusion. Metastases to the thyroid should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the thyroid lesion with any history of malignancy, particularly with increasing patient age and when renal cell carcinoma or lung, colon, or breast primaries are involved.

  5. Differences in characteristics of colorectal neoplasm between young and elderly Thais

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rungsun Rerknimitr; Winudda Ratanapanich; Pradermchai Kongkam; Pinit Kullavanijaya

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the differences of clinical characteristics of colorectal neoplasm including polyps between the elderly and young Thai patients.METHODS: Colonoscopy database from December 2000 to October 2004 was retrospectively analyzed. There were 1822 eligible patients who underwent colonoscopy (with a mean age of 56.6 years). Patients were classified into two groups: the older age group (aged ≥ 60 years;n = 989) and the younger age group (aged < 60 years;n = 833). Data were recorded on age, colonoscopic indications, tumor location, colonoscopic findings and their related histological findings.RESULTS: Colorectal malignancy related lesions were more often found in the older age group (21%) than in the younger age group (12%). Left-sided lesions were detected more commonly than right-sided in both age groups in approximately two-thirds of all cases.Hematochezia showed greater association with left-sided lesions in the elderly. No relationship was found between age and neoplasm staging and severity.CONCLUSION: The chance of detecting colorectal neoplasm by colonoscopy was higher in the elderly than in the young Thais. However, both groups had the lesions predominantly located in the left side.

  6. Clinical features of upper gastrointestinal serrated lesions: An endoscopy database analysis of 98746 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hai-Long; Dong, Wen-Xiao; Xu, Meng-Que; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Si-Nan; Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2016-12-07

    To analyse the clinical features of patients with the serrated lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (UPGI) tract. Patients who underwent routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) at the Digestive Endoscopy Centre of General Hospital, Tianjin Medical University between January 2011 and December 2015 were consecutively recruited. Patients with UPGI serrated lesions were consecutively identified. The patients' demographics and histopathology were recorded. The colorectal findings for patients who underwent colonoscopy simultaneously or within six months were also extracted from the colonoscopy database. In addition, we analysed differences in colorectal neoplasia detection between the study patients and randomly selected patients matched for age and gender who did not exhibit serrated lesions and who also underwent colonoscopy in the same period. A total of 21 patients out of 98746 patients (0.02%) who underwent EGD were confirmed to have serrated lesions with predominantly crenated, sawtooth-like configurations. The mean age of the 21 patients was (55.3 ± 17.2) years, and 11 patients were male (52.4%). In terms of the locations of the serrated lesions, 17 were found in the stomach (including 3 in the cardia, 9 in the corpus and 5 in the antrum), 3 were found in the duodenum, and 1 was found in the esophagus. Serrated lesions were found in different mucosal lesions, with 14 lesions were detected in polyps (8 hyperplastic polyps and 6 serrated adenomas with low grade dysplasia), 3 detected in Ménétrier gastropathy, 3 detected in an area of inflammation or ulcer, and 1 detected in the intramucosal carcinoma of the duodenum. In addition, colonoscopy data were available for 18 patients, and a significantly higher colorectal adenoma detection rate was observed in the UPGI serrated lesions group than in the randomly selected age- and gender-matched group without serrated lesions who also underwent colonoscopy in the same period (38.9% vs 11.1%, OR = 5.091, 95%CI: 1

  7. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Colorectal Neoplasms: Clinical Experience in a Tertiary Medical Center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yu Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is a promising technique to treat early colorectal neoplasms by facilitating en bloc resection without size limitations. Although ESD for early gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasms has been popular in Japan, clinical experience with colorectal ESD has been rarely reported in Taiwan. Methods. From March 2006 to December 2011, 92 consecutive patients with early colorectal neoplasms resected by ESD at Tri-Service General Hospital were included. ESD was performed for colorectal epithelial neoplasms with a noninvasive pit pattern which had the following criteria: (1 lesions difficult to remove en bloc with a snare, such as laterally spreading tumors-nongranular type (LST-NG ≧20 mm and laterally spreading tumors-granular type (LST-G ≧30 mm; (2 lesions with fibrosis or which had recurred after endoscopic mucosal resection with a nonlifting sign. Results. The mean age of the patients was 66.3±12.9 years, and the male-female ratio was 1.8 : 1. The mean tumor size was 37.2±17.9 mm. The en bloc resection rate was 90.2% and the R0 resection rate was 89.1%. Perforations during ESD occurred in 11 patients (12.0% and all of them were effectively treated by endoscopic closure with hemoclips. No delayed perforation or postoperative bleeding was recorded. There were no procedure-related morbidities or mortalities. Conclusion. ESD is an effective method for en bloc resection of large early colorectal neoplasms and those with a nonlifting sign. An endoscopic technique to close perforations is essential for colorectal ESD.

  8. Familial colorectal cancer screening: When and what to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Paoluzi, Omero Alessandro; Sileri, Pierpaolo; Rossi, Piero; Sica, Giuseppe; Pallone, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of death worldwide and represents a clinical challenge. Family members of patients affected by CRC have an increased risk of CRC development. In these individuals, screening is strongly recommended and should be started earlier than in the population with average risk, in order to detect neoplastic precursors, such as adenoma, advanced adenoma, and nonpolypoid adenomatous lesions of the colon. Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) is a non invasive, widespread screening method that can reduce CRC-related mortality. Sigmoidoscopy, alone or in addition to FOBT, represents another screening strategy that reduces CRC mortality. Colonoscopy is the best choice for screening high-risk populations, as it allows simultaneous detection and removal of preneoplastic lesions. The choice of test depends on local health policy and varies among countries. PMID:26185367

  9. Diagnostic Ultrasound in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARYBackground and purpose Colorectal cancer is a common disease in Denmark with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although survival in recent years has improved, Denmark still has the lowest 5-year survival compared to the other Nordic countries. The treatment of patients depends on local...... the potential to contribute to the staging of colorectal cancer. The purpose of these studies was to determine the usefulness of ultrasound diagnostics in patients with colorectal cancer.The purpose of the TRUS studies was to compare staging of rectal carcinomas using digital rectal exploration...... with the resulting pathological examination in relation to differentiating benign from malignant polyps and determining tumour stage and lymph node status. In this context we also performed an observer comparison using both TRUS and MRI. Consistency of tumour outgrowth of rectal cancer rated by TRUS and MRI...

  10. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  11. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  12. Subnuclear proteomics in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers...... for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we...

  13. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Mahmoud El-Tawil

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  14. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  15. Ghost cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms.

  16. Hypermethylation of the TPEF/HPP1 Gene in Primary, Metastatic Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias P.A. Ebert

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of promoter methylation in the process of cancer cell metastasis has not yet been studied. Recently, methylation of the TPEF (transmembrane protein containing epidermal growth factor, follistatin domain gene was reported in human colon, gastric, bladder cancer cells. Using the Methylight assay, TPEF/HPP1 gene methylation was assessed in primary colorectal cancers (n = 47, matched normal colon mucosa, as well as in the liver metastasis of 24 patients with colorectal cancer, compared to the methylation status of the TIMP-3, APC, DAPK, caveolin-2, p16 genes. TPEF was frequently methylated in primary colorectal cancers (36 of 47 compared to the normal colon mucosa (1 of 21 (P < .0001. Interestingly, promoter methylation was significantly more frequent in proximal nonrectal cancers (P < .05. Furthermore, a high degree of methylation of the TPEF gene was also observed in liver metastasis. (19 of 24. In summary, we observed frequent TPEF methylation in primary colorectal cancers, liver metastases, indicating that epigenetic alterations are not only present in the early phases of carcinogenesis, but are also common in metastatic lesions. The high frequency of TPEF methylation in this series of colorectal cancers underscores the importance of epigenetic changes as targets for the development of molecular tests for cancer diagnosis.

  17. Role of surgery in colorectal liver metastases: too early or too late?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Troupis, Theodore; Patsouras, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2010-07-28

    As colorectal cancer and colorectal liver metastases become a serious public health problem, new treatment modalities are needed in order to achieve better results. In the last decade there has been very important progress in oncology, with new and more effective chemotherapeutic agents administered alone or in combination improving the resectability rate in up to 40% of patients with colorectal liver metastases. Advances in interventional radiology, in particular, with the use of portal vein embolization and radiofrequency thermal ablation are new strategies allowing major liver resections and treatment of small liver metastases or early recurrences. Surgery, however, remains the gold standard strategy with intention to treat. In this review article we will describe the advanced role of surgery in the multidisciplinary approach to colorectal liver metastases, and the clinical problems the liver surgeon has to deal with, such as the resectability of the metastases, the presence of bilobar liver lesions and extrahepatic disease, the impact of chemotherapy in already resectable liver metastases, the problem of vanishing metastases after chemotherapy and the dilemma of staged or combined liver and colon operations and which organ first in the clinical scenario of synchronous colorectal liver metastases.

  18. Evaluation of contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography in detection of local recurrent colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yau-Tong You; Chung-Rong Chang Chien; Jeng-Yi Wang; Koon-Kwan Ng; Jinn-Shiun Chen; Reiping Tang; Jy-Ming Chiang; Chien-Yuh Yeh; Pao-Shiu Hsieh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity,specificity of contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography in detecting local recurrence of colorectal cancer.METHODS: From January 2000 to December 2004,434 patients after potentially curative resection for invasive colorectal cancer were followed up for a period ranging from 20 to 55 mo. Eighty of the four hundred and thirty-four patients showing strong clinical evidence for recurring colorectal cancer during the last followup were enrolled in this study. Each patient underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography and colonoscopy on the same day. Any lesions, biopsies,identified during the colonoscopic examination, immediate complications and the duration of the procedure were recorded. The results of contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography were evaluated by comparing to those of colonoscopy, surgical finding, and clinical follow-up.RESULTS: Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic colonography had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 83% and an overall accuracy of 94% in detecting local recurrent colorectal cancer.CONCLUSION: Conventional colonoscopy and contrastenhanced tomographic colonography can complement each other in detecting local recurrence of colorectal cancer.

  19. Lesion activity assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, K R; Zero, D T; Martignon, S

    2009-01-01

    in response to cariogenic plaque as well as lesion arrest. Based on this understanding, different clinical scoring systems have been developed to assess the severity/depth and activity of lesions. A recent system has been devised by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System Committee...... the activity of primary coronal and root lesions reliably and accurately at one examination by using the combined information obtained from a range of indicators--such as visual appearance, location of the lesion, tactile sensation during probing and gingival health....

  20. Prevalence of colorectal polyps in a group of subjects at average-risk of colorectal cancer undergoing colonoscopic screening in Tehran, Iran between 2008 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Zamani, Farhad; Ajdarkosh, Hossien; Rakhshani, Naser; Ameli, Mitra; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Kabir, Ali; Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Khonsari, Mahmoudreza; Motamed, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the prime causes of mortality around the globe, with a significantly rising incidence in the Middle East region in recent decades. Since detection of CRC in the early stages is an important issue, and also since to date there are no comprehensive epidemiologic studies depicting the Middle East region with special attention to the average risk group, further investigation is of significant necessity in this regard. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the colon in an average risk population. A total of 1,208 eligible asymptomatic, average- risk adults older than 40 years of age, referred to Firuzgar Hospotal in the years 2008-2012, were enrolled. They underwent colonoscopy screening and all polypoid lesions were removed and examined by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist. The lesions were classified by size, location, numbers and pathologic findings. Size of lesions was measured objectively by endoscopists. The mean age of participants was 56.5±9.59 and 51.6% were male. The overall polyp detection rate was 199/1208 (16.5 %), 26 subjects having non-neoplastic polyps, including hyperplastic lesions, and 173/1208 (14.3%) having neoplastic polyps, of which 26 (2.15%) were advanced neoplasms .The prevalence of colorectal neoplasia was more common among the 50-59 age group. Advanced adenoma was more frequent among the 60-69 age group. The majority of adenomas were detected in the distal colon, but a quarter of advanced adenomas were found in the proximal colon; advance age and male gender was associated with the presence of adenoma. It seems that CRC screening among average-risk population might be recommended in countries such as Iran. However, sigmioidoscopy alone would miss many colorectal adenomas. Furthermore, the 50-59 age group could be considered as an appropriate target population for this purpose in Iran.

  1. Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-06

    An oncologist (cancer doctor) shares her medical and personal advice for people between the ages of 50 and 75 about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/6/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2017.

  2. Costs of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    A health economist talks about studies on figuring out the costs of running a colorectal cancer screening program, and how this can lead to better screening.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  3. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. [The colorectal carcinoma risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wawrzyn-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria

    2005-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma constitutes the second, as for the rate, death cause due to a malignant disease both in the western countries and in Poland. Despite deep knowledge concerning morphogenesis and spread of colorectal carcinoma as well as vast achievements in surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy, the percentage of 5-year-survivals still reaches 40%. According to most authors there are 4 risk factor categories: epidemiological, intestinal, dietetic, and mixed. It is well-known that colorectal carcinoma, like neoplasms localized in other organs and systems, is a disease, in which genetic mutations of somatic cells are the molecular base/source of the disease. The inner innervation of the colon seems to play an important role in carcinoma pathogenesis and spread. At present, 80% of colorectal carcinomas are diagnosed in the advanced stage, with infiltration exceeding the intestinal wall or spreading to neighboring organs, which gives full clinical symptoms. The prognosis as to survival and disease progression is usually poor. Therefore, the ways of early diagnosis, monitoring, and the knowledge of etiological factors are so important in medical practice.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. COLORECTAL-CARCINOMA - AN UPDATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINNIGE, HAM; MULDER, NH

    1991-01-01

    During the last decade important advances have occurred in the fields of understanding genesis, molecular biology, detection of "precancerous data", intervention, and metastatic behaviour of colorectal cancer. An important step forward has been made in adjuvant therapy. Better understanding of 5-flu

  7. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and processed meat you eat. If you drink alcohol, limit the amount to 1 drink per day for women, 2 per day for men. Don’t use tobacco in any form. Myth: African Americans are not at risk for colorectal cancer. Truth: African-American men and women are diagnosed ...

  8. [Intraoperative staging of colorectal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurakhmonov, Iu B; Mel'nikov, O R; Egorenkov, V V; Moiseenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of intraoperative staging of tumor by sentinel node staining with lymphotropic dyes was evaluated in 60 patients with colorectal tumors (colon carcinoma -39, rectal cancer- 21). High sensitivity (84.6% and 87.5%, respectively) and specificity (100% and 100%, respectively) for regional lymph node assessment were identified for both colonic and rectal cancer.

  9. [Systemic therapy for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2005-06-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to the traditional 5-fluorouracil, newer anticancer drugs are available including irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Monoclonal antibodies like bevacizumab and cetuximab have been integrated into modern treatment regimens. Based on randomized clinical trials we can formulate rational treatment strategies as outlined in this article.

  10. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with comorbiditie

  11. Effectiveness of narrow-band imaging magnification for invasion depth in early colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masakatsu; Fukuzawa; Yutaka; Saito; Takahisa; Matsuda; Toshio; Uraoka; Takao; Itoi; Fuminori; Moriyasu

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the surface microvascular patterns of early colorectal cancer (ECC) using narrow-band imaging (NBI) with magnification and its effectiveness for invasion depth diagnosis. METHODS: We studied 112 ECC lesions [mucosal/ submucosal superficial (m/sm-s), 69; sm-deep (sm-d), 43] ≥ 10 mm that subsequently underwent endoscopic or surgical treatment at our hospital. We compared microvascular architecture revealed by NBI with magnification to histological findings and then to magnifi- cation colonosc...

  12. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability...

  13. Diet, lifestyle, and molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors have been repeatedly implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer, and much is known about the molecular events involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The relationships between environmental risk factors and the molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis are

  14. Colonoscopic evaluation of minimal rectal bleeding in average-risk patients for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahriar Nikpour; All All Asgari

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of clinically significant lesions in patients with minimal bright red bleeding per rectum (BRBPR). METHODS: Consecutive outpatients prospectively underwent colonoscopy at Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran. Minimal BRBPR was defined as small amounts of red blood after wiping or in the toilet bowl. Patients with the following alarm signs were excluded: Positive personal history of colorectal neoplasms or inflamma-tory bowel disease (IBD), positive first degree family history of colorectal neoplasms, history of altered bow-el habits, recent significant weight loss, and presence of iron deficiency anemia. Neoplastic polyps, colorectal carcinoma, and IBD were defined as significant lesions. RESULTS: A total of 402 patients (183 female and 219 male, aged 43.6±15.7 years) were studied. Hemorrhoids (54.2%), anal fissures (14.2%) and ul-cerative colitis (14.2%) were the most common lesions and colonoscopy was normal in 8.0%. Significant le-sions were found in 121 (30.1%) patients, including 26 patients (6.5%) with adenocarcinoma and 30 (7.5%) with adenomatous polyps. Almost all patients with significant lesions had at least one lesion in the distal colon, an adenocarcinoma and an adenomatous polyp in the proximal colon were found in 2 patients with hemorrhoids. CONCLUSION: Flexible sigmoidoscopy appears to be sufficient for the evaluation of average risk patients with minimal BRBPR. Rigid sigmoidoscopy may be used as an alternative in patients less than 40 years of age in settings where the former is not available. The choice of colonoscopy over flexible sigmoidoscopy in patients aged over 50 years should be individualized.

  15. New era of colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maysaa El Zoghbi; Linda C Cummings

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer(CRC) is the 2nd most common cancer in women and 3rd most common cancer in men worldwide. Most CRCs develop from adenomatous polyps arising from glandular epithelium. Tumor growth is initiated by mutation of the tumor suppressor gene APC and involves other genetic mutations in a stepwise process over years. Both hereditary and environmental factors contribute to the development of CRC. Screening has been proven to reduce the incidence of CRC. Screening has also contributed to the decrease in CRC mortality in the United States. However,CRC incidence and/or mortality remain on the rise in some parts of the world(Eastern Europe,Asia,and South America),likely due to factors including westernized diet,lifestyle,and lack of healthcare infrastructure. Multiple screening options are available,ranging from direct radiologic or endoscopic visualization tests that primarily detect premalignant or malignant lesions such as flexible sigmoidoscopy,optical colonoscopy,colon capsule endoscopy,computed tomographic colonography,and double contrast barium enema- to stool based tests which primarily detect cancers,including fecal DNA,fecal immunochemical test,and fecal occult blood test. The availability of some of these tests is limited to areas with high economic resources. This article will discuss CRC epidemiology,pathogenesis,risk factors,and screening modalities with a particular focus on new technologies.

  16. Endoscopic discrimination of sessile serrated adenomas from other serrated lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shin; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Kawano, Hiroshi; Arita, Keiko; Maeyama, Yasuhiko; Akagi, Yoshito; Watanabe, Yasutomo; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Tsuruta, Osamu; Sata, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Sessile serrated adenoma (SSA) is a proposed precursor of colorectal carcinogenesis. This study aimed to analyze the potential of endoscopy to discriminate SSA from other serrated lesions, specifically traditional serrated adenoma (TSA) and hyperplastic polyp (HP). Of 145 serrated lesions, 111 sessile serrated lesions including 32 TSAs, 25 SSAs and 54 HPs were analyzed for size, color, location and morphologic features using conventional endoscopy and magnifying chromoendoscopy. SSA was preferentially located in the right colon, whereas TSA and HP were located in the left colon. The sizes of SSA and TSA were larger than those of HP. The lesion color was indistinguishable among TSA, SSA and HP. Macroscopically, a pinecone-like or two-tier raised appearance were found more frequently in TSA than in SAA and HP. Under magnified chromoendoscopic observation, the stellar IIIL pit pattern and fern-like appearance were observed more frequently in TSA than in SAA and HP. In conclusion, endoscopic discrimination between SSA and other sessile serrated lesions based on morphological features was difficult. However, size and location of the lesions facilitated diagnosis. PMID:22866127

  17. Modifiable risk factors and colorectal adenomas among those at high risk of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified several modifiable risk factors for colorectal neoplasms in the general population. However, associations between modifiable risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol consumption and dietary patterns, and colorectal neoplasms in two

  18. Prevalence and characteristics of colorectal polyps in symptomatic and asymptomatic Iranian patients undergoing colonoscopy from 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iravani, Shahrokh; Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Lashkari, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer in males and the second in females in Iran. Males are more likely to develop CRC than women and age is considered as a main risk factor for colorectal cancer. Prevalence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in Asian countries. The object of this study was to determine the clinical and pathology characteristics of colorectal polyps in Iranian patients and to investigate the variation between our populations with other populations. A total of 167 patients with colorectal polyps were included in our study. All underwent colonoscopy during 2009-2013 and specimens were taken through polypectomy and transferred to pathology. All data in patient files including pathology reports were collected and analyzed by SPSS 16 software. A two-tailed test was used and a P-value of prevalent type of lesion was adenomatous polyps detected in 78 (34.7%). Mixed hyperplastic adenomatous type observed in 70 (31.1%). This high prevalence of adenomatous polyps in Iranian patients implies the urgent need for screening plans to prevent further healthcare problems with colorectal cancer in the Iranian population.

  19. Genetic characteristics of mitochondrial DNA was associated with colorectal carcinogenesis and its prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical value of mitochondrial DNA has been described in colorectal cancer (CRC. To clarify its role in colorectal carcinogenesis, mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI and other markers were investigated in CRCs and their precancerous lesions, as a multitier genetic study. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 78 tubular adenomas (TAs, 34 serrated polyps (SPs, and 100 CRCs. mtMSI, nucleus microsatellite instability (nMSI, KRAS mutation, and BRAF mutation were investigated in these tumors and their statistical analysis was performed. mtMSI was found in 30% of CRCs and 21.4% of precancerous lesions. Mitochondrial copy number was higher in SPs than TAs and it was associated with mtMSI in low grade TAs. KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive in TAs and SPs. CRCs with mtMSI showed shorter overall survival times than the patients without mtMSI. In CRCs without nMSI or BRAF mutation, mtMSI was a more accurate marker for predicting prognosis. The genetic change of mitochondrial DNA is an early and independent event in colorectal precancerous lesions and mtMSI and mitochondrial contents are associated with the tubular adenoma-carcinoma sequence, resulting in poor prognosis. This result suggested that the genetic change in mitochondrial DNA appears to be a possible prognosis marker in CRC.

  20. Intraosseous osteolytic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.P.; Wenz, W.

    1981-10-01

    Any pathological damage occurring in a bone will produce either an osteolytic or osteosclerotic lesion which can be seen in the macroscopic specimen as well as in the roentgenogram. Various bone lesions may lead to local destructions of the bone. An osteoma or osteoplastic osteosarcoma produces an osteosclerotic lesion showing a dense mass in the roentgenogram; a chondroblastoma or an osteoclastoma, on the other hand, induces an osteolytic focal lesion. This paper presents examples of different osteolytic lesions of the humerus. An osteolytic lesion seen in the roentgenogram may be either produced by an underlying non-ossifying fibroma of the bone, by fibrous dysplasia, osteomyelitis or Ewing's sarcoma. Differential diagnostic considerations based on the radiological picture include eosinophilic bone granuloma, juvenile or aneurysmal bone cyst, multiple myeloma or bone metastases. Serious differential diagnostic problems may be involved in case of osteolytic lesions occurring in the humerus. Cases of this type involving complications have been reported and include the presence of an teleangiectatic osteosarcoma as well as that of a hemangiosarcoma of the bone.

  1. DECAY ACCELERATING FACTOR AND COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高雪芹; 鲁艳芹; 韩金祥

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the significance of decay accelerating factor (DAF) in the eolorectal cancer, we searched the data from PubMed and selected the related articles for review. It was found that DAF were expressed in the adenomas and adenocarcinoma of colorectal tissues. The release of DAF in the stool of the patients was also detectable. It increased more significantly in the stool of patients with colorectal cancer than other gastrointestinal cancer. Its detection by ELISA method may render a good test for the noninvasive diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It can be concluded that DAF is expressed extensively in colorectal cancer. And the detection of DAF released in the stool of colorectal cancer patients may be a good noninvasive method for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  2. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  3. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  4. Watchful waiting versus colorectal resection after polypectomy for malignant colorectal polyps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, Katarina; Kjær, Monica; Bulut, Orhan;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Unexpected malignancy in removed colorectal polyps is reported in up to 9% of cases. The introduction of screening for colorectal cancer will inevitably increase the number of removed colorectal polyps and therefore also the incidence of malignant polyps. The treatment strategy is e...

  5. Coffee intake and the risk of colorectal adenoma: The colorectal adenoma study in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhathoki, Sanjeev; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2015-07-15

    Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage which contains several potential anticarcinogenic and chemopreventive compounds, and has been hypothesized to have protective effects in colorectal neoplasia. However, the limited available data on coffee consumption in relation to colorectal adenoma (CRA), a precursor lesion to most colorectal cancers, remain largely inconsistent. In this study, we evaluated the association of coffee intake with the risk of CRA in a middle-aged Japanese population. Study subjects were selected from examinees who underwent total colonoscopy as part of a cancer screening program and responded to self-administered dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. A total of 738 patients with adenoma and 697 controls were included in the study. Coffee intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and divided into quartiles based on the distribution among controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of CRA, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. High coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of CRA, with a multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quartile of coffee intake of 0.67 (95% CI = 0.48-0.93; ptrend  = 0.02). The inverse association of coffee intake was limited to proximal (OR = 0.64; 95%CI = 0.44-0.95; ptrend  = 0.04) and distal colon adenoma (OR = 0.62; 95%CI = 0.39-0.99; ptrend  = 0.06), and appeared to be more evident with small (OR = 0.68; 95%CI = 0.49-0.96; ptrend  = 0.04) and single adenomas (OR = 0.65; 95%CI = 0.44-0.95; ptrend  = 0.02). Green tea intake was not found to be associated with CRA risk. This study provides support for the protective effect of coffee drinking on colon adenomas, a precursor of colon cancer.

  6. Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in rats with DMH induced carcinogenesis by means of urine autofluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šteffeková, Zuzana; Birková, Anna; Bomba, Alojz; Mareková, Mária

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most highlighted topics of current research. Early detection of this disease allows more effective therapy, hence higher chance of cure. Application of fluorescence spectral techniques into oncological diagnostic is one of the potential alternatives. Chemically induced carcinogenesis in rats is widely used model for exploration of various aspects of colorectal cancer. This study shows value of discriminate analysis of urine fluorescent fingerprint between healthy control group of rats and those with dimethylhydrazine induced early lesions of colorectal cancer. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, significant difference (P < 0.05) between both of group was achieved.

  7. Robotic Colorectal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sami AlAsari; Byung Soh Min

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Robotic colorectal surgery may be a way to overcome the limitations of laparoscopic surgery. It is an emerging field; so, we aim in this paper to provide a comprehensive and data analysis of the available literature on the use of robotic technology in colorectal surgery. Method. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was completed for the period from 2000 to 2011. Studies reporting outcomes of robotic colorectal surgery were identified and analyzed. Results. 41 studies...

  8. Extended resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ping; SONG Xin-ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ Colorectal cancer is a common cause of cancer-related mortality.1 In China, it is one of eight cancers in the cancer control blueprint, which are suggested to have comprehensive treatment.Some patients with colorectal cancer presented no symptoms when they were diagnosed, yet the tumor had already penetrated the intestinal wall and involved adjacent organs. If the tumor is localized at time of diagnosis without distant metastases, it is termed locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACC)regardless of whether there is lymph node metastasis. LACC commonly encountered in clinical practice accounts for 5%-10% of all colorectal cancers.2

  9. Common conjunctival lesions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ocular appearance. is discussion does not attempt to classify lesions, but only highlights ... magnifying glass. Examine what you can see and evert the upper ... look at the cornea and feel for pre-auricular and submandibular lymph nodes.

  10. Oropharynx lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003850.htm Oropharynx lesion biopsy To use the sharing features on this ... Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX. ...

  11. Managing Carious Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, F; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L

    2016-01-01

    caries and control activity of existing cavitated lesions to preserve hard tissues and retain teeth long-term. Entering the restorative cycle should be avoided as far as possible. Controlling the disease in cavitated carious lesions should be attempted using methods which are aimed at biofilm removal...... or control first. Only when cavitated carious lesions either are noncleansable or can no longer be sealed are restorative interventions indicated. When a restoration is indicated, the priorities are as follows: preserving healthy and remineralizable tissue, achieving a restorative seal, maintaining pulpal...... health, and maximizing restoration success. Carious tissue is removed purely to create conditions for long-lasting restorations. Bacterially contaminated or demineralized tissues close to the pulp do not need to be removed. In deeper lesions in teeth with sensible (vital) pulps, preserving pulpal health...

  12. Unusual benign breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.J.R. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gporter@ncht.trent.nhs.uk; Evans, A.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); Lee, A.H.S. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); Hamilton, L.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); James, J.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this article is to show examples of the radiological (mammography and/or ultrasound) and pathological appearances of unusual benign breast lesions. The conditions covered are granular cell tumours, fibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, myofibroblastomas, haemangiomas, neurofibromas, and leiomyomas. The article includes the first published description of the ultrasound appearance of a myofibroblastoma. Knowledge of these appearances may help confirm or refute radiological-pathological concordance of percutaneous biopsy results during multidisciplinary assessment of these lesions and aid patient management.

  13. Andersson Lesion in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manimegalai N, KrishnanKutty K, Panchapakesa Rajendran C, Rukmangatharajan S, Rajeswari S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Andersson lesions are destructive foci that appear at the discovertebral junction in ankylosingspondylitis. We report three cases of ankylosing spondylitis with such lesions. These lesions simulatean infection and in our country, mimic spinal tuberculosis.

  14. Clinical significance of subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and metastatic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Guo; Masatoshi Makuuchi; Wei Tang; Yoshinori Inagaki; Yutaka Midorikawa; Norihiro Kokudo; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Munehiro Nakata; Toshiro Konishi; Hirokazu Nagawa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin and its clinicopathological significance in colorectal carcinoma as well as metastatic lymph node and liver tissues.METHODS: Colorectal carcinoma tissues as well as metastatic lymph node and liver tissues were collected from 82 patients who underwent colorectomy or hepatectomy. Tissues were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using KL-6 antibody.RESULTS: Of the 82 colorectal carcinoma patients, 6showed no staining, 29 showed positive staining only in the apical membrane, and 47 showed positive staining in the circumferential membrane and/or cytoplasm.Positive staining was not observed in non-cancerous colorectal epithelial cells surrounding the tumor tissues.The five-year survival rate was significantly lower in cases showing positive staining in the circumferential membrane and/or cytoplasm (63.0%) than those showing positive staining only in the apical membrane (85.7%) and those showing no staining (100%).Statistical analysis between clinicopathological factors and subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin showed that KL-6 localization in the circumferential membrane and/or cytoplasm was significantly associated with the presence of venous invasion (P=0.0003), lymphatic invasion (P<0.0001), lymph node metastasis (P<0.0001),liver metastasis (P=0.058), and advanced histological stage (P<0.0001). Positive staining was observed in all metastatic lesions tested as well as in the primary colorectal carcinoma tissues.CONCLUSION: The subcellular staining pattern of KL-6 in colorectal adenocarcinoma may be an important indicator for unfavorable behaviors such as lymph node and liver metastasis, as well as for the prognosis of patients.

  15. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  16. Adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The management of colon and rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last 25 years. The use of adjuvant therapies has become standard practice in locally advanced (stage Ⅲ and selected stage Ⅱ) colorectal cancer. Improved surgical techniques, chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy are resulting in higher cure rates and the development of agents targeting proliferative and angiogenic pathways offer further promise. Here we explore risk factors for local and distant recurrence after resection of colon and rectal cancer, and the role of adjuvant treatments. Discussion will focus on the evidence base for adjuvant therapies utilised in colorectal cancer, and the treatment of sub-groups such as the elderly and stage Ⅱ disease. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer in reduction of recurrence will be explored and the role and optimal methods for surveillance post-curative resection with or without adjuvant therapy will also be addressed.

  17. Evaluation of dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence imaging of colorectal tumours with a high-sensitivity CMOS imager: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Tanaka, Shinji; Miyaki, Rie; Sanomura, Yoji; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Yamada, Kenji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-09-02

    It is important to devise efficient and easy methods of detecting colorectal tumours to reduce mortality from colorectal cancer. Dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence intensity can be used to visualize colorectal tumours. Therefore, we evaluated dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence images of colorectal tumours obtained with a newly developed, high-sensitivity complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) imager. A total 107 colorectal tumours (44 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas with intramucosal invasion, and 20 sessile serrated adenoma/polyps [SSA/Ps]) in 98 patients who underwent endoscopic tumour resection were included. The specimens were irradiated with excitation light at 365 nm and 405 nm, and autofluorescence images measured with a 475 ± 25-nm band pass filter were obtained using a new, high-sensitivity CMOS imager. Ratio images (F365ex/F405ex) were created to evaluate the lesion brightness compared with that of normal mucosa, and specimens were categorized into a no signal or high signal group. Adenomas and adenocarcinomas were depicted in 87 ratio images, with 86.2% (n = 75) in the High signal group. SSA/P was depicted in 20 ratio images, with 70.0% (n = 14) in the High signal group. Dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence images of colorectal tumours can be acquired using our high-sensitivity CMOS imager, and are useful in detecting colorectal tumours.

  18. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  19. Syncytin immunoreactivity in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Mou; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    monoclonal syncytin antibody we have assessed syncytin expression in a retrospective series of 140 colorectal cancer patients. Variable degrees of syncytin expression were detected in both colonic and rectal tumors and the prognostic impact of such expression was analysed with the Kaplan-Meier method...... and the Cox proportional hazard model. Interestingly, increased syncytin expression was associated with decreased overall survival in rectal but not in colonic cancer patients. Thus, the prognostic impact of syncytin expression appears to vary with the tumor type....

  20. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  1. Treatment of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the word. Liver metastasis is the most common site of colorectal metastases. The prognosis of resectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM was improved in the recent years with the consideration of chemotherapy and surgical resection as part of the multidisciplinary management of the disease; the current 5-year survival rates after resection of liver metastases are 25% to 40%. Resectable synchronous or metachronous liver metastases should be treated with perioperative chemotherapy based on three months of FOLFOX4 (5-fluorouracil [5FU], folinic acid [LV], and oxaliplatin chemotherapy before surgery and three months after surgery. In the case of primary surgery, pseudo-adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months, based on 5FU/LV, FOLFOX4, XELOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin or FOLFIRI (5FU/LV and irinotecan, should be indicated. In potentially resectable disease, primary chemotherapy based on more intensive regimens such as FOLFIRINOX (5FU/LV, irinotecan and oxaliplatin should be considered to enhance the chance of cure. The palliative chemotherapy based on FOLFIRI, or FOLFOX4/XELOX with or without targeted therapies, is the mainstay treatment of unresectable disease. This review would provide additional insight into the problem of optimal integration of chemotherapy and surgery in the management of CRLM.

  2. Automatic colonic lesion detection and tracking in endoscopic videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Gustafsson, Ulf; A-Rahim, Yoursif

    2011-03-01

    The biology of colorectal cancer offers an opportunity for both early detection and prevention. Compared with other imaging modalities, optical colonoscopy is the procedure of choice for simultaneous detection and removal of colonic polyps. Computer assisted screening makes it possible to assist physicians and potentially improve the accuracy of the diagnostic decision during the exam. This paper presents an unsupervised method to detect and track colonic lesions in endoscopic videos. The aim of the lesion screening and tracking is to facilitate detection of polyps and abnormal mucosa in real time as the physician is performing the procedure. For colonic lesion detection, the conventional marker controlled watershed based segmentation is used to segment the colonic lesions, followed by an adaptive ellipse fitting strategy to further validate the shape. For colonic lesion tracking, a mean shift tracker with background modeling is used to track the target region from the detection phase. The approach has been tested on colonoscopy videos acquired during regular colonoscopic procedures and demonstrated promising results.

  3. The impact of new technology on surgery for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregory B Makin; David J Breen; John RT Monson

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology continue at a rapid pace and affect all aspects of life, including surgery. We have reviewed some of these advances and the impact they are having on the investigation and management of colorectal cancer. Modern endoscopes, with magnifying, variable stiffness and Iocalisation capabilities are making the primary investigation of colonic cancer easier and more acceptable for patients. Imaging investigations looking at primary, metastatic and recurrent disease are shifting to digital data sets. which can he stored, reviewed remotely, potentially fused with other modalities and reconstructed as 3 dimensional (3D) images for the purposes of advanced diagnostic interpretation and computer assisted surgery. They include virtual colonoscopy, trans-rectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy. Once a colorectal carcinoma is diagnosed, the treatment options available are expanding.Colonic stents are being used to relieve large bowel obstruction, either as a palliative measure or to improve the patient's overall condition before definitive surgery.Transenal endoscopic microsurgery and minimally invasive techniques are being used with similar outcomes and a lower mortality, morbidity and hospital stay than open trans-abdominal surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery allows precise excision of both benign and early malignant lesions in the mid and upper rectum.Survival of patients with inoperable hepatic metastases following radiofrequency ablation is encouraging.Robotics and telemedicine are taking surgery well into the 21st century. Artificial neural networks are being developed to enable us to predict the outcome for individual patients. New technology has a major impact on the way we practice surgery for colorectal cancer.``

  4. ATRA AS A POTENTIAL ANTIMETASTATIC AGENT IN COLORECTAL ADENOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Edwards

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The family of Retinoic acid compounds have long been the subject of intense study and interest as chemo prophylactic agents. This dates back to their therapeutic effect in leukoplakia Where ATRA was shown to lead to the reversal of premalignant lesions and Subsequent reports on their use in metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and a vast array of other malignant disorders as well as adjuvant treatment of loco regional head and neck and colorectal adenocarcinoma. All-trans retinoic acid has transformed the treatment and outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia by differentiating leukemic promyelocytes into mature cells. Retinoid Receptor knock out mouse models also serve as excellent proof for the critical role of retinoids in embryogenesis, specifically their vital role in heart and blood vessel development, CNS specification, fetal lung development and proper limb morphogenesis. Here we show the results of our first phase of in vitro studies of the interaction of ATRA with the Gut homing Receptor, CCR9. Hypoxia up regulates CCR9 expression in CCIC, while ATRA down regulates CCR9 expression in hypoxic CCIC. In contrast, HT29 cells express significantly less CCR9 which is up regulated by hypoxia and further enhanced by ATRA treatment. We conclude that CCIC (representing a colon cancer stem-like line respond differently to ATRA treatment Vs. a less stem-like, more differentiated cancer cell line such as HT-29. These results support a potential clinical use of ATRA early in the natural history of CRC in order to abort or slow down the process of metastasis in colorectal adenocarcinoma which is the ultimate killer of such patients. They also signify the critical significance of the time window and intratumoral heterogeneity in the final outcome of our intervention with ATRA in the treatment of CRC.

  5. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeholm P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Ingeholm,1,2 Ismail Gögenur,1,3 Lene H Iversen1,4 1Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database, Copenhagen, 2Department of Pathology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, 3Department of Surgery, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, 4Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables: The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion: The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period

  6. Extent of prevalence and size of flat neoplasms in a heterogeneous population undergoing routine colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Rami, P; O'Toole, J; Llor, X; Carroll, R E; Benya, R V

    2010-05-01

    The importance of identifying flat colorectal neoplasms is increasingly appreciated, although the extent of prevalence of these lesions in a general population is not known. To determine the extent of prevalence of flat neoplasms in a diverse population undergoing routine endoscopic screening for colorectal cancer. Patients referred to the Colorectal Cancer Screening Clinic over a 12-month period (n = 642). The patient population was 56% African American and 21% Caucasian; with a mean age of 59 + or - 9 years. Flat neoplasms were detected in 5.5% of all patients, similar to that reported elsewhere, with extent of prevalence being similar regardless of gender or race. Average size of flat neoplasms was of 2.8 + or - 2.3 mm (range 1-20 mm). However, there was no evidence of advanced pathology in any of the flat neoplasms identified. Flat neoplasms are common but may not be associated with advanced pathology in a population undergoing routine screening.

  7. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  8. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  9. Economic burden of colorectal cancer in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ju-Young; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan; Kim, Young Ae; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Yo-Han

    2014-03-01

    The incidence and survival rate of colorectal cancer in Korea are increasing because of improved screening, treatment technologies, and lifestyle changes. In this aging population, increases in economic cost result. This study was conducted to estimate the economic burden of colorectal cancer utilizing claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Economic burdens of colorectal cancer were estimated using prevalence data and patients were defined as those who received ambulatory treatment from medical institutions or who had been hospitalized due to colorectal cancer under the International Classification of Disease 10th revision codes from C18-C21. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer were calculated as direct costs and indirect costs. The prevalence rate (per 100 000 people) of those who were treated for colorectal cancer during 2010 was 165.48. The economic burdens of colorectal cancer in 2010 were 3 trillion and 100 billion Korean won (KRW), respectively. Direct costs included 1 trillion and 960 billion KRW (62.85%), respectively and indirect costs were 1 trillion and 160 billion (37.15%), respectively. Colorectal cancer has a large economic burden. Efforts should be made to reduce the economic burden of the disease through primary and secondary prevention.

  10. Vitamin D, inflammation, and colorectal cancer progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harten-Gerritsen, van Suzanne; Balvers, Michiel G.J.; Witkamp, Renger F.; Kampman, Ellen; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Survival from colorectal cancer is positively associated with vitamin D status. However, whether this association is causal remains unclear. Inflammatory processes may link vitamin D to colorectal cancer survival, and therefore investigating inflammatory markers as potential mediators may be a

  11. Diet and colorectal cancer risk and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary and other lifestyle factors account for 20–45% of all colorectal cancer cases. Being overweight or obese, having a high intake of red and processed meat and alcohol increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables, foods containin

  12. Increased hepcidin expression in colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Douglas G Ward; Keith Roberts; Matthew J Brookes; Howard Joy; Ashley Martin; Tariq Ismail; Robert Spychal; Tariq Iqbal; Chris Tselepis

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether the iron stores regulator hepcidin is implicated in colon cancer-associated anae-mia and whether it might have a role in colorectal car-cinogenesis.METHODS:Mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and SELDI-TOF MS) was employed to measure hepcidin in urine collected from 56 patients with colorectal cancer.Quantitative Real Time RT-PCR was utilised to determine hepcidin mRNA expression in colorectal cancer tissue.Hepcidin cellular localisation was determined using im-munohistochemistry.RESULTS:We demonstrate that whilst urinary hepcidin expression was not correlated with anaemia it was posi-tively associated with increasing T-stage of colorectal cancer (P<0.05).Furthermore,we report that hepcidin mRNA is expressed in 34% of colorectal cancer tissue specimens and was correlated with ferroportin repres-sion.This was supported by hepcidin immunoreactivity in colorectal cancer tissue.CONCLUSION:We demonstrate that systemic hepcidin expression is unlikely to be the cause of the systemic anaemia associated with colorectal cancer.However,we demonstrate for the first time that hepcidin is expressed by colorectal cancer tissue and that this may represent a novel oncogenic signalling mechanism.

  13. Best practice in colorectal cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claire

    Nurses need up-to-date knowledge of colorectal cancer. This article provides an overview of the aetiology and risk factors for this disease, diagnostic and staging investigations, treatment options and future care. Managing colorectal cancer is complex. Patients can have a range of healthcare needs. Nurses play an increasingly important role in informing, supporting and coordinating care to improve patients' quality of life.

  14. Diet and colorectal cancer risk and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary and other lifestyle factors account for 20–45% of all colorectal cancer cases. Being overweight or obese, having a high intake of red and processed meat and alcohol increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables, foods

  15. Optimizing Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.S. Meester (Reinier)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractColorectal cancer screening is a leading cause of cancer deaths. Screening for colorectal cancer is implemented in an increasing number of settings, but performance of programs is often suboptimal. In this thesis, advanced modeling, informed by empirical data, was used to identify ar

  16. Optimizing Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.S. Meester (Reinier)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractColorectal cancer screening is a leading cause of cancer deaths. Screening for colorectal cancer is implemented in an increasing number of settings, but performance of programs is often suboptimal. In this thesis, advanced modeling, informed by empirical data, was used to identify

  17. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  18. Aberrant crypt foci as microscopic precursors of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Cheng; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Since the first detection of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in carcinogen-treated mice, there have been numerous studies focusing on these microscopically visible lesions both in rodents and in humans. ACF have been generally accepted as precancerous lesions in regard to histopathological characteristics, biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations, and genetic and epigenetic alterations. ACF show variable histological features, ranging from hyperplasia to dysplasia. ACF in human colon are more frequently located in the distal parts than in the proximal parts, which is in accordance with those in colorectal cancer (CRC). The immunohistochemical expressions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), β-catenin, placental cadherin (P-cadherin),epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and P16INK4a are found to be altered. Genetic mutations of K-ras, APC and p53, and the epigenetic alterations of CpG island methylation of ACF have also been demonstrated. Genomic instabilities due to the defect of mismatch repair (MMR) system are detectable in ACF Two hypotheses have been proposed.One is the "dysplasia ACF-adenoma-carcinoma sequence",the other is "heteroplastic ACF-adenoma-carcinoma sequence". The malignant potential of ACF, especially dyspiastic ACF, makes it necessary to reveal the nature of these lesions, and to prevent CRC from the earliest possible stage. The technique of magnifying chromoscope makes it possible to detect "in vivo' ACF, which is beneficial to colon cancer research, identifying high-risk populations for CRC,and developing preventive procedures.

  19. Prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in young, average risk individuals: A turning tide between East and West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshno, Ari; Moshkowitz, Menachem; David, Maayan; Galazan, Lior; Neugut, Alfred I; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2016-08-28

    To determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in average risk persons 40-59 years of age in Israel and to compare the results with other populations. We reviewed the results of asymptomatic average-risk subjects, aged 40 to 59 years, undergoing their first screening colonoscopy between April 1994 and January 2014. The detection rates of adenoma, advanced adenoma (AA) and colorectal cancer (CRC) were determined in the 40's and 50's age groups by gender. The prevalence of lesions was compared between age groups. After meticulous review of the literature, these results were compared to published studies addressing the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in similar patient groups, in a variety of geographical locations. We included first screening colonoscopy results of 1750 individuals. The prevalence of adenomas, AA and CRC was 8.3%, 1.0% and 0.2% in the 40-49 age group and 13.7%, 2.4% and 0.2% in the 50-59 age group, respectively. Age-dependent differences in adenoma and AA rates were significant only among men (P colorectal neoplasia in Asian populations requires further investigation and reconsideration as to the starting age of screening in that population.

  20. Diagnostic Performance of CT Colonography for the Detection of Colorectal Polyps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Ro, Hee Jeong; Choi, Jung Bin; Chung, Ji Eun; Kim, Yong Jin; Suh, Won Hyuck; Lee, Jong Kyun [Song-Do Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Beom [East- West Neo Medical Center, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    To investigate the diagnostic value of CT colonography for the detection of colorectal polyps. From December 2004 to December 2005, 399 patients underwent CT colonography and follow-up conventional colonoscopy. We excluded cases of advanced colorectal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the CT colonography findings and follow-up conventional colonoscopy findings of 113 patients who had polyps more than 6 mm in diameter. Radiologists using 3D and 2D computer generated displays interpreted the CT colonography images. The colonoscopists were aware of the CT colonography findings before the procedure. CT colonography detected 132 polyps in 107 of the 113 patients and conventional colonoscopy detected 114 colorectal polyps more than 6 mm in diameter in 87 of the 113 patients. The sensitivity of CT colonography analyzed per polyp was 91% (41/45) for polyps more than 10 mm in diameter and 89% (101/114) for polyps more than 6 mm in diameter. Thirteen polyps were missed by CT colonography and were detected on follow-up conventional colonoscopy. CT colonography is a sensitive diagnostic tool for the detection of colorectal polyps and adequate bowel preparation, optimal bowel distention and clinical experience are needed to reduce the rate of missing appropriate lesions.

  1. Five year colorectal cancer outcomes in a large negative CT colonography screening cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, David H.; Pooler, B.D.; Pickhardt, Perry J. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Weiss, Jennifer M. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Section of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    To assess the 5-year incidence of clinically presenting colorectal cancers following a negative CT colonography (CTC) screening examination, as few patient outcome data regarding a negative CTC screening result exist. Negative CTC screening patients (n = 1,050) in the University of Wisconsin Health system over a 14-month period were included. An electronic medical record (EMR) review was undertaken, encompassing provider, colonoscopy, imaging and histopathology reports. Incident colorectal cancers and other important GI tumours were recorded. Of the 1,050 cohort (mean [{+-}SD] age 56.9 {+-} 7.4 years), 39 (3.7%) patients were excluded owing to lack of follow-up within our system beyond the initial screening CTC. The remaining 1,011 patients were followed for an average of 4.73 {+-} 1.15 years. One incident colorectal adenocarcinoma represented a crude cancer incidence of 0.2 cancers per 1,000 patient years. EMR revealed 14 additional patients with clinically important GI tumours including: advanced adenomas (n = 11), appendiceal goblet cell carcinoid (n = 1), appendiceal mucinous adenoma (n = 1) and metastatic ileocolonic carcinoid (n = 1). All positive patients including the incident carcinoma are alive at the time of review. Clinically presenting colorectal adenocarcinoma is rare in the 5 years following negative screening CTC, suggesting that current strategies, including non-reporting of diminutive lesions, are appropriate. (orig.)

  2. Oncogenic role of clusterin overexpression in multistage colorectal tumorigenesis and progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Xie; Liang Hu; Xin-Yuan Guan; Jonathan S.T. Sham; Wei-Fen Zeng; Li-Hong Che; Meng Zhang; Hui-Xi Wu; Han-Liang Lin; Jian-Ming Wen; Sze Hang Lau

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression pattern of clusterin in colorectal adenoma-carcinoma-metastasis series, and to explore the potential role of dusterin in multistage colorectal tumorigenesis and progression.METHOD:S: A colorectal carcinoma (CRC)-tissue microarray (TMA), which contained 85 advanced CRCs including 43 cases of Dukes B, 21 of Dukes C and 21 of Dukes D tumors, were used for assessing the expression of clusterin (clone 41D) and tumor cell apoptotic index (AI) by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay, respectively. Moreover the potential correlation of dusterin expression with the patient'sclinical-pathological features were also examined. RESULTS: The positive staining of clusterin in different colorectal tissues was primarily a cytoplasmic pattern. Cytoplasmic overexpression of clusterin was detected in none of the normal coloredal mucosa, 17% of the adenomas, 46% of the primary CRCs, and 57% of the CRC metastatic lesions. In addition, a significant positive correlation between overexpression of clusterin and advanced clinical (Dukes) stage was observed (P<0.01). Overexpression of cytoplasmic clusterin in CRCs was inversely correlated with tumor apoptotic index (P<0.01), indicating the anti apoptotic function of cytoplasmic clusterin in CRCs.CONCLUSION: These data suggests that overexpression of cytoplasmic dustin might be involved in the tumorigenesis and/or progression of CRCs. The anti-apoptotic function of cytoplasmic dusterin may be responsible, at least in part, for the development and biologically aggressive behavior of CRC.

  3. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  4. Managing Carious Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Innes, N P T; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L

    2016-01-01

    Variation in the terminology used to describe clinical management of carious lesions has contributed to a lack of clarity in the scientific literature and beyond. In this article, the International Caries Consensus Collaboration presents 1) issues around terminology, a scoping review of current...... managementshould be limited to situations involving control of the disease through preventive and noninvasive means at a patient level, whereascarious lesion managementcontrols the disease symptoms at the tooth level. While it is not possible to directly relate the visual appearance of carious lesions' clinical...... manifestations to the histopathology, we have based the terminology around the clinical consequences of disease (soft, leathery, firm, and hard dentine). Approaches to carious tissue removal are defined: 1)selective removal of carious tissue-includingselective removal to soft dentineandselective removal to firm...

  5. Preoperative evaluation of colorectal liver metastases: comparison between gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3.0-T MRI and contrast-enhanced MDCT with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharitzer, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Ringl, H.; Koelblinger, C.; Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Gruenberger, T. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Schima, W. [Department of Radiology, KH Goettlicher Heiland, KH der Barmherzigen Schwestern and St Josef-Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the diagnostic performance of 64-row MDCT and gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T in patients with colorectal liver metastases in correlation with histopathological findings. Lesions detected at MDCT and MRI were interpreted by three blinded readers and compared with histopathological workup as the term of reference. Two subgroups of lesions were additionally evaluated: (1) metastases smaller than 10 mm and (2) lesions in patients with and without steatosis of the liver, assessed histopathologically. Surgery and histopathological workup revealed 81 colorectal liver metastases in 35 patients and diffuse metastatic involvement in 3 patients. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, significant sensitivity differences could only be found for reader 1 (P = 0.035) and reader 3 (P = 0.003). For segment-based evaluation, MRI was more sensitive only for reader 3 (P = 0.012). The number of false-positive results ranged from 3 to 12 for MDCT and 8 to 11 for MRI evaluation. In the group of small lesions, the sensitivity differed significantly between both methods (P = 0.003). In patients with hepatic steatosis, MRI showed a trend toward better performance than MDCT, but without statistical performance. The 3.0-T MRI with liver-specific contrast agents is the preferred investigation in the preoperative setting, especially for the assessment of small colorectal liver metastases. (orig.)

  6. Lesiones deportivas Sports injuries

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    El estrés generado por la práctica deportiva ha originado una mayor probabilidad de que los atletas presenten lesiones agudas y crónicas. En el ámbito mundial existen diferentes investigaciones acerca de la incidencia de lesiones deportivas. La comparación de sus resultados es difícil por las diferencias en las características de la población y en la forma de reportar los datos, que varía ampliamente entre los estudios (proporciones o tasas de incidencia o tasas por cada 100 ó 1.000 participa...

  7. How significant is the association between metabolic syndrome and prevalence of colorectal neoplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanek, Stepan; Grega, Tomas; Ngo, Ondrej; Vojtechova, Gabriela; Majek, Ondrej; Minarikova, Petra; Brogyuk, Nagyija; Bunganic, Bohus; Seifert, Bohumil; Dusek, Ladislav; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-09-28

    The incidence and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been rising in developed countries. The association between these two diseases has been widely studied and reported. Less evidence is available about the relationship between MS and CRC precancerous lesions (adenomatous polyps, adenomas). The aim of this paper is to present an overview of our scientific understanding of that topic and its implication in clinical practice. One of the principal goals of current CRC secondary prevention efforts is to detect and remove the precancerous lesions in individuals with an average CRC risk to prevent the development of invasive cancer. MS is not currently considered a high-risk CRC factor and is therefore not included in the guidelines of organized screening programs. However, in light of growing scientific evidence, the approach to patients with MS should be changed. Metabolic risk factors for the development of adenomas and cancers are the same - obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Therefore, the key issue in the near future is the development of a simple scoring system, easy to use in clinical practice, which would identify individuals with high metabolic risk of colorectal neoplasia and would be used for individual CRC secondary prevention strategies. Currently, such scoring systems have been published based on Asian (Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening Score; APCS) and Polish populations.

  8. Alcohol drinking and the risk of colorectal adenoma: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Qiwen; Wang, Lifu; Liu, Jun; Qian, Aihua; Wang, Qi; Yuan, Yaozong

    2015-07-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that alcohol consumption was positively related to colorectal cancer. However, the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal adenoma (CRA), the established precancerous lesion of colorectal cancer, remains unclear. We identified studies from a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science through 31 October 2013, and by searching reference lists of pertinent articles. Summary relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a random-effects model. A total of 30 studies with 26,145 incident CRA cases were included. Overall, an increase of 25 g (two drinks) per day of alcohol consumption was related to an increased risk of CRA (summary relative risk=1.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.17-1.37). There was considerable heterogeneity between studies not explained by study design, sex, geographic location, publication year, site or size of the lesions, type of adenoma, number of cases, endoscopic assessment, or adjustment for main confounders. The positive association was evident for both men and women and for colonic adenoma, but not for rectal adenoma. Increased alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of CRA for both men and women and for adenoma in the colon, but not in the rectum.

  9. The discrimination of incidental focal hypermetabolic colorectal lesions identified by 18 F-flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography%18F-FDG PET/CT 偶发直结肠局灶性高代谢灶良恶性判断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志忠; 王钦媛; 苏家贵; 欧阳晓辉; 刘晓飞; 何宝明

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because colonic focal is predilection site of malignant tumors and inflammatory disease ,the pur-pose of this study was to investigate the discrimination of PET/CT detection of incidental colonic focal hypermetabolism . Methods 34 unexpected colonic focal uptake of 18 F-FDG localized by PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed ,and then semi-quantitatively analyzed the extent of radioactive uptake in colonic foci .After PET/CT ,the etiology of the findings was confirmed histological by surgery or endoscopic .All the data were assessed for statistical significance using one-way ANOVA .Results Among the 34 patients who underwent colonoscopy ,positive malignant or premalignant lesions were noted in 22 patients (64 .7% ) with the lesions coinciding with the location described in the PET/CT report .Adenomatous polyps were detected in 8 patients ,whereas in 14 patients ,malignant lesions were confirmed (adenocarcinoma n = 9 ,o-varian cancer metastatic ,n=2 ,Malignant Mesothelioma metastatic n=2 ,borderline tumor metastatic n=1) .The mean standardized uptake valuemax (SUVmax) for premalignant lesions was 7 .55 ± 2 .1 and for malignant lesions was 7 .62 ± 4.87 .4 patients (11 .8% ) colonic uptake was diagnosed as inflammatory ,the mean SUVmax was 9 .35 ± 4 .9 .8 patients (23 .5% )had normal findings ,the mean SUVmax was 7 .4 ± 1 .75 .The difference in mean SUVmax between the premalig-nant adenomatous polyps and the malignant lesions was not statistically significant ( P =0 .968) .Conclusion Our study shows that a significant proportion of patients showing an incidental focal FDG uptake will harbor premalignant (adenoma-tous polyps) or malignant lesions ,and further evaluation with colonoscopy and biopsy is warranted in such cases .%目的:探讨PET/CT意外发现直结肠FDG局灶性高代谢灶的临床意义。方法回顾性分析34例PET/CT意外探测到直结肠局灶性高放射性摄取灶的病例,半定量分析局部病灶

  10. Genetic polymorphism of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and colorectal adenomas: Self Defense Forces Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Shinji; Yin, Guang; Ogawa, Shinsaku; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Mineshita, Masamichi; Kono, Suminori

    2006-05-01

    Bile acids have long been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, but epidemiological evidence is limited. Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme producing bile acids from cholesterol. A recent case-control study showed a decreased risk of proximal colon cancer associated with the CC genotype of the CYP7A1 A-203C polymorphism. The present study examined the relationship between the CYP7A1 A-203C polymorphism and colorectal adenoma, which is a well-established precursor lesion of colorectal cancer. The study subjects comprised 446 cases of colorectal adenomas and 914 controls of normal total colonoscopy among men receiving a preretirement health examination at two hospitals of the Self Defense Forces (SDF). The CYP7A1 genotype was determined by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical adjustment was made for age, hospital, rank in the SDF, smoking, alcohol use, body mass index, physical activity and parental history of colorectal cancer. The CYP7A1 polymorphism was not measurably related to the overall risk of colorectal adenomas. However, the CC genotype was associated with a decreased risk of proximal colon adenomas, but not of distal colon and rectal adenomas. Adjusted odds ratios of proximal colon adenomas (95% confidence intervals) for the AC and CC genotype versus AA genotype were 0.82 (0.54-1.24) and 0.56 (0.34-0.95), respectively. The findings add to evidence for the role of bile acids in colorectal carcinogenesis. The CC genotype of the CYP7A1 A-203C polymorphism probably renders lower activity of the enzyme synthesizing bile acids.

  11. Estrogen and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavasani, Sayeh; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross L; Kato, Ikuko; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Johnson, Karen C; Young, Alicia; Rodabough, Rebecca; Hubbell, F Allan; Mahinbakht, Ali; Simon, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    The preponderance of observational studies describe an association between the use of estrogen alone and a lower incidence of colorectal cancer. In contrast, no difference in the incidence of colorectal cancer was seen in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial with estrogen alone after a mean intervention of 7.1 years and cumulative follow-up of 13.2 years. This study extends these findings by providing detailed analyses of the effects of estrogen alone on the histology, grade, and stage of colorectal cancer, relevant subgroups, and deaths from and after colorectal cancer. The WHI study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 10,739 postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy. Participants were assigned to conjugated equine estrogen at 0.625 mg/d (n = 5279) or a matching placebo (n = 5409). Rates of colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths from and after colorectal cancer were assessed throughout the study. Colorectal cancer rates in the estrogen-alone and placebo groups were comparable: 0.14% and 0.12% per year, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.58; P = .43). Bowel screening examinations were comparable between the 2 groups throughout the study. The grade, stage, and location of colorectal cancer did not differ between the randomization groups. There were more colorectal cancer deaths in the estrogen-alone group (34 [0.05%] vs 24 [0.03%]; HR, 1.46, 95% CI, 0.86-2.46; P = .16), but the difference was not statistically significant. The colorectal cancer incidence was higher for participants with a history of colon polyp removal in the estrogen-alone group (0.23% vs 0.02%; HR, 13.47; nominal 95% CI, 1.76-103.0; P colorectal cancer or deaths from or after colorectal cancer. A possibly higher risk of colorectal cancer in women with prior colon polyp removal who use estrogen alone requires confirmation. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. Intraoperative Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging using indocyanine green in colorectal carcinomatosis surgery: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabino, G; Klein, J P; Porcheron, J; Grichine, A; Coll, J-L; Cottier, M

    2016-12-01

    This study assesses the value of using Intraoperative Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging and Indocyanine green to detect colorectal carcinomatosis during oncological surgery. In colorectal carcinomatosis cancer, two of the most important prognostic factors are completeness of staging and completeness of cytoreductive surgery. Presently, intraoperative assessment of tumoral margins relies on palpation and visual inspection. The recent introduction of Near Infrared fluorescence image guidance provides new opportunities for surgical roles, particularly in cancer surgery. The study was a non-randomized, monocentric, pilot "ex vivo" blinded clinical trial validated by the ethical committee of University Hospital of Saint Etienne. Ten patients with colorectal carcinomatosis cancer scheduled for cytoreductive surgery were included. Patients received 0.25 mg/kg of Indocyanine green intravenously 24 h before surgery. A Near Infrared camera was used to detect "ex-vivo" fluorescent lesions. There was no surgical mortality. Each analysis was done blindly. In a total of 88 lesions analyzed, 58 were classified by a pathologist as cancerous and 30 as non-cancerous. Among the 58 cancerous lesions, 42 were correctly classified by the Intraoperative Near-Infrared camera (sensitivity of 72.4%). Among the 30 non-cancerous lesions, 18 were correctly classified by the Intraoperative Near-Infrared camera (specificity of 60.0%). Near Infrared fluorescence imaging is a promising technique for intraoperative tumor identification. It could help the surgeon to determine resection margins and reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  13. Lower Extremity Cutaneous Lesions as the Initial Presentation of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhyan Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from colorectal cancers are rare and are usually present on the abdominal wall or previous surgical incision sites. Remote cutaneous lesions have been reported, however, often occur in the setting of widespread metastatic disease including other visceral secondaries. We present a case of lower extremity cutaneous metastases as the first sign of metastatic disease in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the colon. This case illustrates that new skin lesions may be the initial presentation of metastatic disease in a patient with a history of cancer.

  14. Traumatic plexus lesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, R.T.M. van; Cohen, S.P.; Kleef, M. van; Mekhail, N.; Huygen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Pain, motor, and sensory deficits characterize patients with a traumatic lesion of the brachial plexus. Frequently, more severe injuries co-exist that require immediate surgical attention. Early rehabilitation and physical therapy are the cornerstones of treatment. Pharmacological management can be

  15. Immunopathology of skin lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Nazoora

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted on 130 patients suffering from skin lesions which included psoriasis, lichen planus, DLE, pemphigus, vitiligo and alopecia areata. Forty age-and-sex-matched healthy individuals served as control. Serum IgG, IgM, and circulating immune complexes (CIC were estimated. Significant increase in serum IgG (1937.2 ± 1030.43 mg% and IgM (232.12 ± 136.98 mg% was observed in all the skin lesions when compared with controls except in lichen planus where they were significantly lowered, values being 580.61± 77.35 mg% and 66.88 ± 6.59mg% respectively. CIC levels were significantly raised (P<0.00 1 in various skin lesions (40.49±23.29 when compared with controls (17.68± 3.21, but no significance was observed in lichen planus( 17.72 ± 4.28. Serum IgG, IgM and CIC were statistically significantly altered depending on the extent of the lesion and lowered significantly to almost normal values following treatment, thereby confirming the role of immunity in the pathogenesis of these skin disorders.

  16. Genital lesions following bestiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution.

  17. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...

  18. The Dutch surgical colorectal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leersum, N J; Snijders, H S; Henneman, D; Kolfschoten, N E; Gooiker, G A; ten Berge, M G; Eddes, E H; Wouters, M W J M; Tollenaar, R A E M; Bemelman, W A; van Dam, R M; Elferink, M A; Karsten, Th M; van Krieken, J H J M; Lemmens, V E P P; Rutten, H J T; Manusama, E R; van de Velde, C J H; Meijerink, W J H J; Wiggers, Th; van der Harst, E; Dekker, J W T; Boerma, D

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated by the Dutch Institute for Clinical Auditing (DICA). This article illustrates key elements of the DSCA and results of three years of auditing. Key elements include: a leading role of the professional association with integration of the audit in the national quality assurance policy; web-based registration by medical specialists; weekly updated online feedback to participants; annual external data verification with other data sources; improvement projects. In two years, all Dutch hospitals participated in the audit. Case-ascertainment was 92% in 2010 and 95% in 2011. External data verification by comparison with the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) showed high concordance of data items. Within three years, guideline compliance for diagnostics, preoperative multidisciplinary meetings and standardised reporting increased; complication-, re-intervention and postoperative mortality rates decreased significantly. The success of the DSCA is the result of effective surgical collaboration. The leading role of the ASN in conducting the audit resulted in full participation of all colorectal surgeons in the Netherlands. By integrating the audit into the ASNs' quality assurance policy, it could be used to set national quality standards. Future challenges include reduction of administrative burden; expansion to a multidisciplinary registration; and addition of financial information and patient reported outcomes to the audit data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Red meat and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Faruk Aykan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  20. Morel-Lavallee lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hui; Zhang Fangjie; Lei Guanghua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review current knowledge of the Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) to help clinicians become familiar with this entity.Familiarization may decrease missed diagnoses and misdiagnoses.It could also help steer the clinician to the proper treatment choice.Data sources A search was performed via PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 to July 2013 using the following keywords:Morel-Lavallee lesion,closed degloving injury,concealed degloving injury,Morel-Lavallee effusion,Morel-Lavallee hematoma,posttraumatic pseudocyst,posttraumatic soft tissue cyst.Study selection Chinese and English language literatures relevant to the subject were collected.Their references were also reviewed.Results Morel-Lavallee lesion is a relatively rare condition involving a closed degloving injury.It is characterized by a filled cystic cavity created by separation of the subcutaneous tissue from the underlying fascia.Apart from the classic location over the region of the greater trochanter,MLLs have been described in other parts of the body.The natural history of MLL has not yet been established.The lesion may decrease in volume,remain stable,enlarge progressively or show a recurrent pattern.Diagnosis of MLL was often missed or delayed.Ultrasonography,computed tomography,and magnetic resonance imaging have great value in the diagnosis of MLL.Treatment of MLL has included compression,local aspiration,open debridement,and sclerodesis.No standard treatment has been established.Conclusions A diagnosis of MLL should be suspected when a soft,fluctuant area of skin or chronic recurrent fluid collection is found in a region exposed to a previous shear injury.Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of both the acute and chronic appearances to make the correct diagnosis.Treatment decisions should base on association with fractures,the condition of the lesion,symptom and desire of the patient.

  1. Efficacy of capillary pattern type IIIA/IIIB by magnifying narrow band imaging for estimating depth of invasion of early colorectal neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Kuang-I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capillary patterns (CP observed by magnifying Narrow Band Imaging (NBI are useful for differentiating non-adenomatous from adenomatous colorectal polyps. However, there are few studies concerning the effectiveness of magnifying NBI for determining the depth of invasion in early colorectal neoplasms. We aimed to determine whether CP type IIIA/IIIB identified by magnifying NBI is effective for estimating the depth of invasion in early colorectal neoplasms. Methods A series of 127 consecutive patients with 130 colorectal lesions were evaluated from October 2005 to October 2007 at the National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. Lesions were classified as CP type IIIA or type IIIB according to the NBI CP classification. Lesions were histopathologically evaluated. Inter and intraobserver variabilities were assessed by three colonoscopists experienced in NBI. Results There were 15 adenomas, 66 intramucosal cancers (pM and 49 submucosal cancers (pSM: 16 pSM superficial (pSM1 and 33 pSM deep cancers (pSM2-3. Among lesions diagnosed as CP IIIA 86 out of 91 (94.5% were adenomas, pM-ca, or pSM1; among lesions diagnosed as CP IIIB 28 out of 39 (72% were pSM2-3. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of the CP type III for differentiating pM-ca or pSM1 ( Conclusion Identification of CP type IIIA/IIIB by magnifying NBI is useful for estimating the depth of invasion of early colorectal neoplasms.

  2. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  3. Knowledge of colorectal cancer among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, S P; Weinrich, M C; Boyd, M D; Johnson, E; Frank-Stromborg, M

    1992-10-01

    Cancer screening is a national health priority, especially for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. The researchers measured colorectal cancer knowledge among 211 older Americans. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest two-by-two factorial design was used to test the effect of knowledge on participation in fecal occult blood screening. The American Cancer Society's colorectal cancer educational slide-tape presentation served as the basis for all of the educational programs. Hemoccult II kits were distributed at no cost to the participants. Descriptive statistics, chi 2, and logistic regressions were used to analyze data. One-half of the participants had incomes below the poverty level. Almost one-half the subjects in the study sample stated that they had not received any information about colorectal cancer within the past year. Caucasians had more knowledge of colorectal cancer than African Americans [F(1, 78) = 7.92, p < 0.01] and persons with higher income had more knowledge than persons with less income [F(2, 76) = 3.01, p = 0.05]. Subjects showed significant increases in colorectal cancer knowledge 6 days after the colorectal cancer education program [t(79) = 2.59, p = 0.01] and this increased knowledge was a predictor of participation in free fecal occult blood screening [chi 2(1, n = 164) = 5.34, p = 0.02].

  4. Colorectal smartphone apps: opportunities and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, S; Brady, R R W

    2012-09-01

    The increased utilization of smartphones within the clinical environment together with connected applications (apps) provides opportunity for doctors, including coloproctologists, to integrate such technology into clinical practice. However, the reliability of unregulated medical apps has recently been called into question. Here, we review contemporary medical apps specifically themed towards colorectal diseases and assess levels of medical professional involvement in their design and content. The most popular smartphone app stores (iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows and Samsung) were searched for colorectal disease themed apps, using the disease terms colorectal cancer, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, haemorrhoids, anal fissure, bowel incontinence and irritable bowel syndrome. A total of 68 individual colorectal themed apps were identified, amongst which there were five duplicates. Only 29% of colorectal apps had had customer satisfaction ratings and 32% had named medical professional involvement in their development or content. The benefits of apps are offset by lack of colorectal specification. There is little medical professional involvement in their design. Increased regulation is required to improve accountability of app content. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Vascular map combined with CT colonography for evaluating candidates for laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flor, Nicola; Ceretti, Andrea Pisani; Maroni, Nirvana; Opocher, Enrico; Cornalba, Gianpaolo [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo, Milan (Italy); Campari, Alessandro; Ravelli, Anna; Lombardi, Maria Antonietta [University degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography colonography (CE-CTC) is a useful guide for the laparoscopic surgeon to avoid incorrectly removing the colonic segment and the failure to diagnose of synchronous colonic and extra-colonic lesions. Lymph node dissection and vessel ligation under a laparoscopic approach can be time-consuming and can damage vessels and organs. Moreover, mesenteric vessels have extreme variations in terms of their courses and numbers. We describe the benefit of using an abdominal vascular map created by CE-CTC in laparoscopic colorectal surgery candidates. We describe patients with different diseases (colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease) who underwent CE-CTC just prior to laparoscopic surgery.

  6. Growth pattern of colorectal liver metastasis as a marker of recurrence risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eefsen, R L; Vermeulen, P B; Christensen, I J

    2015-01-01

    free survival (RFS) than patients resected for non-desmoplastic liver metastases (p=0.05). When patients were stratified according to neo-adjuvant treatment in the multivariate Cox regression model, hazard ratios for RFS compared to desmoplastic were: pushing (HR=1.37, 95% CI 0.93-2.02, p=0......Despite improved therapy of advanced colorectal cancer, the median overall survival (OS) is still low. A surgical removal has significantly improved survival, if lesions are entirely removed. The purpose of this retrospective explorative study was to evaluate the prognostic value of histological...... growth patterns (GP) in chemonaive and patients receiving neo-adjuvant therapy. Two-hundred-fifty-four patients who underwent liver resection of colorectal liver metastases between 2007 and 2011 were included in the study. Clinicopathological data and information on neo-adjuvant treatment were retrieved...

  7. Vascular Map Combined with CT Colonography for Evaluating Candidates for Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campari, Alessandro; Ravelli, Anna; Lombardi, Maria Antonietta; Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Maroni, Nirvana; Opocher, Enrico; Cornalba, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography colonography (CE-CTC) is a useful guide for the laparoscopic surgeon to avoid incorrectly removing the colonic segment and the failure to diagnose of synchronous colonic and extra-colonic lesions. Lymph node dissection and vessel ligation under a laparoscopic approach can be time-consuming and can damage vessels and organs. Moreover, mesenteric vessels have extreme variations in terms of their courses and numbers. We describe the benefit of using an abdominal vascular map created by CE-CTC in laparoscopic colorectal surgery candidates. We describe patients with different diseases (colorectal cancer, diverticular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease) who underwent CE-CTC just prior to laparoscopic surgery. PMID:26175581

  8. Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection in the Obese Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sean T.; Stocchi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an accepted alternative to conventional open resection in the surgical approach of both benign and malignant diseases of the colon and rectum. Well-described benefits of laparoscopic surgery include accelerated recovery of bowel function, decreased post-operative pain and shorter hospital stay; these advantages could be particularly beneficial to high-risk patient groups, such as obese patients. At present, data regarding the application of the laparoscopic approach to colorectal resection in the obese is equivocal. We evaluate the available evidence to support laparoscopic colorectal resection in the obese patient population. PMID:23204942

  9. Cigarette smoking, genetic polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nisa, Hoirun; Kono, Suminori; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2010-01-01

    .... We investigated the relation of cigarette smoking and related genetic polymorphisms to colorectal cancer risk, with special reference to the interaction between smoking and genetic polymorphism...

  10. [Managing focal incidental renal lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, C; Paño, B; Sebastià, C

    2016-01-01

    Incidental renal lesions are relatively common in daily radiological practice. It is important to know the different diagnostic possibilities for incidentally detected lesions, depending on whether they are cystic or solid. The management of cystic lesions is guided by the Bosniak classification. In solid lesions, the goal is to differentiate between renal cancer and benign tumors such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. Radiologists need to know the recommendations for the management of these lesions and the usefulness of the different imaging techniques and interventional procedures in function of the characteristics of the incidental lesion and the patient's life expectancy.

  11. Confocal Endomicroscopy of Colorectal Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Ussui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is one of several novel methods that provide real-time, high-resolution imaging at a micron scale via endoscopes. CLE has the potential to be a disruptive technology in that it can change the current algorithms that depend on biopsy to perform surveillance of high-risk conditions. Furthermore, it allows on-table decision making that has the potential to guide therapy in real time and reduce the need for repeated procedures. CLE and related technologies are often termed “virtual biopsy” as they simulate the images seen in traditional histology. However, the imaging of living tissue allows more than just pragmatic convenience; it also allows imaging of living tissue such as active capillary circulation, cellular death, and vascular and endothelial translocation, thus extending beyond what is capable in traditional biopsy. Immediate potential applications of CLE are to guide biopsy sampling in Barrett's esophagus and inflammatory bowel disease surveillance, evaluation of colorectal polyps, and intraductal imaging of the pancreas and bile duct. Data on these applications is rapidly emerging, and more is needed to clearly demonstrate the optimal applications of CLE. In this paper, we will focus on the role of CLE as applied to colorectal polyps detected during colonoscopy.

  12. Simultaneous laparoscopic multi-organ resection combined with colorectal cancer: Comparison with non-combined surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye Jin Kim; Gyu-Seog Choi; Jun Seok Park; Soo Yeun Park; Soo Han Jun

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To access the short-term outcomes of simultaneous laparoscopic surgery combined with resection for synchronous lesions in patients with colorectal cancer.METHODS:Between March 1996 and April 2010 prospectively collected data were reviewed from 93 consecutive patients who had colorectal cancer and underwent simultaneous multiple organ resection (combined group) and 1090 patients who underwent conventional laparoscopic right hemicolectomy or laparoscopic low/anterior resection for colorectal cancer (non-combined group).In the combined group,there were nine gastric resections,three nephrectomies,nine adrenalectomies,56 cholecystectomies,and 21 gynecologic resections.In addition,five patients underwent simultaneous laparoscopic resection for three organs.The patient demographics,intra-operative outcomes,surgical morbidity,and short-term outcomes were compared between the two groups (the combined and non-combined groups).RESULTS:There were no significant differences in the clinicopathological variables between the two groups.The operating time was significantly longer in the combined group than in the non-combined group,regardless of tumor location (laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and laparoscopic low/anterior resection groups; P =0.048 and P < 0.001,respectively).The other intraoperative outcomes,such as the complications and open conversion rate,were similar in both groups.The rate of post-operative morbidity in the combined group was similar to the non-combined group (combined vs non-combined,15.1% vs 13.5%,P =0.667).Oncological safety for the colon and synchronous lesions were obtained in the combined group.CONCLUSION:Simultaneous laparoscopic multiple organ resection combined with colorectal cancer is a safe and feasible option in selected patients.

  13. Computer-aided colorectal tumor classification in NBI endoscopy using local features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Toru; Yoshimuta, Junki; Kawakami, Misato; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Takemura, Yoshito; Onji, Keiichi; Miyaki, Rie; Tanaka, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    An early detection of colorectal cancer through colorectal endoscopy is important and widely used in hospitals as a standard medical procedure. During colonoscopy, the lesions of colorectal tumors on the colon surface are visually inspected by a Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) zoom-videoendoscope. By using the visual appearance of colorectal tumors in endoscopic images, histological diagnosis is presumed based on classification schemes for NBI magnification findings. In this paper, we report on the performance of a recognition system for classifying NBI images of colorectal tumors into three types (A, B, and C3) based on the NBI magnification findings. To deal with the problem of computer-aided classification of NBI images, we explore a local feature-based recognition method, bag-of-visual-words (BoW), and provide extensive experiments on a variety of technical aspects. The proposed prototype system, used in the experiments, consists of a bag-of-visual-words representation of local features followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. A number of local features are extracted by using sampling schemes such as Difference-of-Gaussians and grid sampling. In addition, in this paper we propose a new combination of local features and sampling schemes. Extensive experiments with varying the parameters for each component are carried out, for the performance of the system is usually affected by those parameters, e.g. the sampling strategy for the local features, the representation of the local feature histograms, the kernel types of the SVM classifiers, the number of classes to be considered, etc. The recognition results are compared in terms of recognition rates, precision/recall, and F-measure for different numbers of visual words. The proposed system achieves a recognition rate of 96% for 10-fold cross validation on a real dataset of 908 NBI images collected during actual colonoscopy, and 93% for a separate test dataset.

  14. Down-regulation of CDH1 is associated with expression of SNAI1 in colorectal adenomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Kroepil

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Down-regulation of E-cadherin (CDH1 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT are considered critical events for invasion and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. Here we tested whether the important regulators of E-cadherin expression SNAI1 and TWIST1 are already detectable in human colorectal adenomas. METHODS: RNA was extracted from a set of randomly selected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE colorectal adenomas (n = 41 and normal colon mucosa (n = 10. Subsequently mRNA expression of CDH1, CDH2, SNAI1 and TWIST1 was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. CDH1 as well as SNAI1 protein expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC. RESULTS: SNAI1 mRNA was expressed in 78% (n = 32/41, TWIST1 mRNA in 41% (n = 17/41 and CDH2 mRNA in 41% (n = 17/41 of the colorectal adenoma tissue, while normal colon mucosa was negative for these transcription factors. We found a significant correlation between reduced CDH1 and the presence of SNAI1 mRNA expression and for combined SNAI1 and TWIST1 mRNA expression, respectively. A correlation between CDH2 mRNA expression and reduced CDH1 expression was not observed. We confirmed the relationship between SNAI1 expression and reduced E-cadherin expression on the protein level via IHC. CONCLUSION: Our data show that SNAI1 and Twist1 are already expressed in benign precursor lesions of colorectal cancer and that SNAI1 expression was significantly correlated with lower expression of CDH1. Whether these findings reflect true EMT and/or are a sign of a more aggressive biology need to be investigated in further studies.

  15. p53 Mutations and Protein Overexpression in Primary Colorectal Cancer and its Liver Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To compare p53 status in primary and hepatic metastatic colorectal cancer in 34 patients. Methods: p53 gene status (exons 5- 9) was examined by PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and automated sequencing. P53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody DO-7. Results: p53 mutations were found in exons 5 through 9 in 21 of 34 patients (61.8%). Among them, 5 patients had mutation in liver metastasis but not in their primary tumors while in the other patients the same mutations were found in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. In no patients was p53 mutation exclusively found in the primary colorectal tumors. Moreover, additional mutation was detected in the metastatic lesions in two cases. Of the 37 mutations within the exons examined, 73% was missense mutation and 16% was nonsense mutation. There were 4 microinsertions. P53 protein was overexpressed in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers with p53 gene mutations. The presence of p53 mutation significantly correlated with p53 protein accumulation (r=0.96, p< 0.001). However, in 4 patients with p53 nonsense mutation, immunohistochemical staining was negative. In three patients who showed no p53 mutation of the primary tumor, p53 protein was consistently overexpressed. Conclusion: In colorectal cancers, p53 gene mutation usually appears first in the primary tumor and maintains as such but is more prominent when metastasized to the liver. However, p53 gene mutation may occur only after being metastasized.Although p53 gene mutation and p53 protein overexpression correlate with each other, either parameter examined alone may lead to false positive or negative results.

  16. Lesiones en el deporte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio Gimeno, Silvio

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    El incremento de la actividad física y del deporte, en las sociedades llamadas desarrolladas, ha traído consigo beneficios claros para la salud, reflejados en diferentes indicadores de salud. Simultáneamente, el deporte de competición obliga a una dedicación diaria a intensidad de entrenamiento, con objeto de obtener los elevados requerimientos físicos que exige la competición. Todo ello ha traído consigo la aparición de numerosas lesiones, fundamentalmente del sistema músculo- esquelético.
    Se exponen en este trabajo consideraciones históricas, la epidemiología de la lesión deportiva y se describen, concisamente, algunas de las lesiones más habituales y significativas que afectan a músculos, tendones y sistema esquelético.

  17. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, ...

  18. Multitarget stool DNA tests increases colorectal cancer screening among previously noncompliant Medicare patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Mark; Lester, Lynn; Chiniwala, Rupal; Berger, Barry

    2017-01-21

    To determine the uptake of noninvasive multitarget stool DNA (mt-sDNA) in a cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening non-compliant average-risk Medicare patients. This cross sectional primary care office-based study examined mt-sDNA uptake in routine clinical practice among 393 colorectal cancer screening non-compliant Medicare patients ages 50-85 ordered by 77 physicians in a multispecialty group practice (USMD Physician Services, Dallas, TX) from October, 2014-September, 2015. Investigators performed a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective review of electronic health records to identify mt-sDNA use in patients who were either > 10 years since last colonoscopy and/or > 1 year since last fecal occult blood test. Test positive patients were advised to get diagnostic colonoscopy and thereafter patients were characterized by the most clinically significant lesion documented on histopathology of biopsies or excisional tissue. Descriptive statistics were employed. Key outcome measures included mt-sDNA compliance and diagnostic colonoscopy compliance on positive cases. Over 12 mo, 77 providers ordered 393 mt-sDNA studies with 347 completed (88.3% compliance). Patient mean age was 69.8 (50-85) and patients were 64% female. Mt-sDNA was negative in 85.3% (296/347) and positive in 14.7% (51/347). Follow-up colonoscopy was performed in 49 positive patients (96.1% colonoscopy compliance) with two patients lost to follow up. Index findings included: colon cancer (4/49, 8.2%), advanced adenomas (21/49, 42.9%), non-advanced adenomas (15/49, 30.6%), and negative results (9/49, 18.4%). The positive predictive value for advanced colorectal lesions was 51.0% and for any colorectal neoplasia was 81.6%. The mean age of patients with colorectal cancer was 70.3 and all CRC's were localized Stage I (2) and Stage II (2), three were located in the proximal colon and one was located in the distal colon. Mt-sDNA provided medical benefit to screening

  19. An unexpected lumbar lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report details an interesting case of suspected spinal bifida in an obstetric patient who presented for an elective cesarean section. A large scarred/dimpled area, surrounded by significant hair growth in the region of the lumbar spine had been missed in multiple antenatal and preoperative assessments and was recognized on the day of the surgery as the patient was being prepared for spinal anesthesia. The patient was uncertain regarding the pathology of the lesion, and all investigations relating to this had been undertaken in Pakistan where she lived as a child. General anesthesia was undertaken because magnetic resonance imaging had not been performed and tethering of the spinal cord could not be ruled out clinically. The patient suffered from significant blood loss intra and postoperatively, requiring a two unit blood transfusion. She was discharged after 5 days in the hospital. This case highlights the need for thorough examination in all obstetric patients presenting to the preoperative clinic, focusing on the airway, vascular access, and lumbar spine. Patients may not always disclose certain information due to a lack of understanding, embarrassment, forgetfulness, or language barriers. Significant aspects of their care may have been undertaken abroad and access to these notes is often limited. Preoperative detection of the lesion would have allowed further investigation and imaging of the lesion and enabled more comprehensive discussions with the patient regarding anesthetic options and risk.

  20. Acute periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute

  1. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner-Blazek, Mirja; Rovira, Alex; Fillipp, Massimo;

    2013-01-01

    Atypical lesions of a presumably idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating origin present quite variably and may pose diagnostic problems. The subsequent clinical course is also uncertain. We, therefore, wanted to clarify if atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (AIIDLs) can be class...

  2. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  3. An overview of laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Laparoscopic skills has been widely applied in colorectal surgery. The definition, indications and contraindications, the oncologic principles, port side recurrence, and the newer advances are reported in this article .

  4. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  5. Does case selection and outcome following laparoscopic colorectal resection change after initial learning curve? Analysis of 235 consecutive elective laparoscopic colorectal resections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurumboor Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is being widely practiced with an excellent short-term and equal long-term results for colorectal diseases including cancer. However, it is widely believed that as the experience of the surgeon/unit improves the results get better. This study aims to assess the pattern of case selection and short-term results of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in a high volume centre in two different time frames. Materials and Methods: This study was done from the prospective data of 265 elective laparoscopic colorectal resections performed in a single unit from December 2005 to April 2011. The group was subdivided into initial 132 patients (Group 1 from December 2005 to December 2008 and next 133 patients (Group 2 between December 2008 and April 2011 who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resections for cancer. The groups were compared for intraoperative and perioperative parameters, type of surgery, and the stage of the disease. Results: The age of patients was similar in Groups 1 and 2 (57.7 and 56.9, respectively. Patients with co-morbid illness were significantly more in Group 2 than in Group 1 (63.2% vs. 32.5%, respectively, P≤0.001. There were significantly more cases of right colonic cancers in Group 1 than in Group 2 (21.9% vs. 11.3%, respectively, P<0.02 and less number of low rectal lesions (20.4% vs. 33.8%, respectively, P≤0.02. The conversion rates were 3.7% and 2.2% in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The operating time and blood loss were significantly more in Group 1 than in Group 2. The ICU stay was significantly different in Groups 1 and 2 (31.2± 19.1 vs. 24.7± 18.7 h, P≤0.005. The time for removal of the nasogastric tube was significantly earlier (P=0.005 in Group 2 compared to Group 1 (1.37± 1.1 vs. 2.63±1.01 days. The time to pass first flatus, resumption of oral liquids, semisolid diet, and complications were similar in both groups. The hospital stay was more in Group 1 than in Group 2

  6. Metformin efficacy and safety for colorectal polyps: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higurashi Takuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the major neoplasms and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and new preventive strategies are needed to lower the burden of this disease. Metformin, a biguanide, which is widely used for treating diabetes mellitus, has recently been suggestive to have a suppressive effect on tumorigenesis and cancer cell growth. In a previous study conducted in non-diabetic subjects, we showed that oral short-term low-dose metformin suppressed the development of colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF. ACF have been considered as a useful surrogate biomarker of CRC, although the biological significance of these lesions remains controversial. We devised a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of metformin against metachronous colorectal polyps and the safety of this drug in non-diabetic post-polypectomy patients. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to be conducted in non-diabetic patients with a recent history of undergoing colorectal polypectomy. All adult patients visiting the Yokohama City University hospital or affiliated hospitals for polypectomy shall be recruited for the study. Eligible patients will then be allocated randomly into either one of two groups: the metformin group and the placebo group. Patients in the metformin group shall receive oral metformin at 250 mg per day, and those in the placebo group shall receive an oral placebo tablet. At the end of 1 year of administration of metformin/placebo, colonoscopy will be performed to evaluate the polyp formation. Discussion This is the first study proposed to explore the effect of metformin against colorectal polyp formation. Metformin activates AMPK, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. The mTOR pathway plays an important role in the cellular protein translational machinery and cell proliferation. Patients with

  7. Colorectal cancer: lifestyle and dietary factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Corrêa Lima

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the most common tumor in the developed countries, and the number of new cases annualy is aproximately equal for men and women. Several environmental factors can interact in all steps of carcinogenesis. Lately the balance between genetic predisposition and these factors, including nutritional components and lifestyle behaviors, determines individual susceptibility to develop colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to revise the references about lifestyle include diet, physical exercise, tobacco smoking and use of alcohol, and the risk of colorectal cancer in databases published during 1994-2004. Dietary factors: According to the reports high intake of red meat, and particularly of processed meat and positive energetic balance (high intake of total fat and carbohydrate was associated with a moderate but significant increase in colorectal cancer risk. Convincing preventive factors include increase consumption of a wide variety of fruit and vegetable, particularly, dark-green leafy, cruciferous, a deep-yellow on tones, and fibre. Lifestyle: Physical activity as a means for the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. There is a probable synergic effect among physical inactivity, high energy intake and obesity and incidence of colorectal cancer. A growing body of evidence supports that avoidance overweight and the use of tobacco and alcohol is recommended to prevent colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Current data suggest that lifestyle modification including proper diet such as the ones rich in vegetable and poor in red meat and fat, regular physical activity and maintaining an appropriate body weight and avoiding the use of tobacco and alcohol may lead to reduce colorectal cancer risk.

  8. Use of Bevacizumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser-Sierra, Juan W.; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Saúl; Villalobos-Valencia, Ricardo; Ramírez-Márquez, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and although associated mortality rates in South American countries are generally among the lowest in the world, they are on the rise. The prognosis of patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer has improved markedly over the last 12 years, increasing from 5 months with best supportive care to almost 2 years with combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. New prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been identified to g...

  9. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  10. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  11. A disappearing neonatal skin lesion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, Colin Patrick

    2012-01-31

    A preterm baby girl was noted at birth to have a firm, raised, non-tender skin lesion located over her right hip. She developed three similar smaller lesions on her ear, buttock and right knee. All lesions had resolved by 2 months of age.

  12. The current role of radiotherapy in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gunderson, L.L. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    During the last two decades, radiotherapy has become an integral part of the multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Currently, radiotherapy is seen mainly as an adjuvant therapy, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy, in a pre- or post-operative setting. Adjuvant radiotherapy alone leads to a significant reduction of local recurrence rates, but an impact on survival is seen only in subset analyses. Combined modality treatment can reduce local recurrence rates even further, and can also reduce the rate of distant relapses and increase survival. The acute toxicity of combined modality is considerably higher. Local radiation can also be used as a component of organ conserving local treatment for selected early lesions. Radiotherapy has been an important palliative treatment modality, diminishing symptoms in cases of inoperable primary rectal cancers or pelvic recurrences. The timing of radiation, surgery and chemotherapy has been under evaluation for years. For patients with locally advanced primary or recurrent malignancies (unresectable due to fixation), the preferred sequence is pre-operative irradiation with or without chemotherapy, followed by surgical resection. For mobile resectable lesions, sequencing issues are being tested in phase III randomised trials. (author).

  13. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  14. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  15. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-14

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies.

  16. High prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia in the Thai population: a prospective screening colonoscopy of 1,404 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripongpreeda, Bunchorn; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Dusitanond, Navara; Sriprayoon, Tassanee; Muyphuag, Bunlung; Sricharunrat, Thaniya; Teerayatanakul, Narongchai; Chaiwong, Watanya; Worasawate, Wipra; Sattayarungsee, Prassanee; Sangthongdee, Juthamas; Prarom, Jirapa; Sornsamdang, Gaidganok; Soonklang, Kamonwan; Wittayasak, Kasiruck; Auewarakul, Chirayu U

    2016-08-23

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer is evident in recent years in the developing Asian nations. Particularly in Thailand and most neighbouring low-income countries, screening colonoscopy is not yet recommended nor implemented at the national policy level. Screening colonoscopy was offered to 1,500 healthy volunteers aged 50-65 years old who were registered into the program between July 2009 and June 2010. Biopsy and surgery was performed depending on the identified lesions. Fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) were additionally performed for comparison with colonoscopy. There were 1,404 participants who underwent colonoscopy. The mean age of the cohort was 56.9 ± 4.2 years and 69.4 % were females. About 30 % (411 cases) of all colonoscopies had abnormal colonoscopic findings, and of these, 256 cases had adenomatous polyps. High risk adenomas (villous or tubulovillous or high grade dysplasia or size > 1 cm or > 3 adenomatous polyps) were found in 98 cases (7 %), low risk adenoma in 158 cases (11.3 %), and hyperplastic polyps in 119 cases (8.5 %). Eighteen cases (1.3 %) had colorectal cancer and 90 % of them (16 cases) were non-metastatic including five stage 0 cases, seven stage I cases, and four stage IIA cases. Only two cases had metastasis: one to regional lymph nodes (stage IIIB) and another to other organs (stage IVA). The most common cancer site was the distal intestine including rectum (7 cases, 38.9 %) and sigmoid colon (7 cases, 38.9 %). Ten colorectal cancer cases had positive FIT whereas 8 colorectal cancer cases were FIT-negative. The sensitivity and specificity of FIT was 55.6 % and 96.2 %, respectively, while the positive predictive value was 16.4 % and negative predictive value was 99.4 %. The overall survival of colorectal cancer cases at 5-year was 83.3 %. High prevalence of colorectal cancer and high-risk adenoma was found in the Thai population aged 50-65 years old by screening colonoscopy. FIT was

  17. Survival of MUTYH-associated polyposis patients with colorectal cancer and matched control colorectal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Nielsen (Maartje); L.N. van Steenbergen (Liza); N. Jones (Natalie); S. Vogt (Stefanie); H.F. Vasen (Hans); H. Morreau (Hans); S. Aretz (Stefan); J. Sampson (Julian); O.M. Dekkers (Olaf); M.L.G. Janssen-Heijnen (Maryska); F.J. Hes (Frederik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground MUTYH-associated polyposis is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by a lifetime risk of colorectal cancer that is up to 100%. Because specific histological and molecular genetic features of MUTYH-associated polyposis colorectal cancers might influence tumor behavior

  18. Lesiones deportivas Sports injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Gallego Ching

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El estrés generado por la práctica deportiva ha originado una mayor probabilidad de que los atletas presenten lesiones agudas y crónicas. En el ámbito mundial existen diferentes investigaciones acerca de la incidencia de lesiones deportivas. La comparación de sus resultados es difícil por las diferencias en las características de la población y en la forma de reportar los datos, que varía ampliamente entre los estudios (proporciones o tasas de incidencia o tasas por cada 100 ó 1.000 participantes o tasas por horas de juego o por número de partidos jugados. Las tasas varían entre 1,7 y 53 lesiones por 1.000 horas de práctica deportiva, entre 0,8 y 90,9 por 1.000 horas de entrenamiento, entre 3,1 y 54,8 por 1.000 horas de competición y de 6,1 a 10,9 por 100 juegos. La gran variación entre las tasas de incidencia se explica por las diferencias existentes entre los deportes, los países, el nivel competitivo, las edades y la metodología empleada en los estudios. Se ha definido la lesión deportiva como la que ocurre cuando los atletas están expuestos a la práctica del deporte y se produce alteración o daño de un tejido, afectando el funcionamiento de la estructura. Los deportes de contacto generan mayor riesgo de presentar lesiones; se destacan al respecto los siguientes: fútbol, rugby, baloncesto, balonmano, artes marciales y jockey. Las lesiones ocurren con mayor probabilidad en las competencias que en el entrenamiento. Stress generated by sports practice has increased the probability that athletes suffer from acute and chronic injuries. Worldwide, there have been many different investigations concerning the incidence of sport injuries. The different ways in which results have been presented makes it difficult to compare among them. Rates of sports injuries vary between 1.7 and 53 per 1.000 hours of sports practice; 0.8 and 90.9 per 1.000 hours of training; 3.1 and 54.8 per 1.000 hours of competition, and 6.1 and 10.9 per 100

  19. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...... take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective...... delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs....

  20. Klatskin-Like Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Senthil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hilar cholangiocarcinoma, also known as Klatskin tumour, is the commonest type of cholangiocarcinoma. It poses unique problems in the diagnosis and management because of its anatomical location. Curative surgery in the form of major hepatic resection entails significant morbidity. About 5–15% of specimens resected for presumed Klatskin tumour prove not to be cholangiocarcinomas. There are a number of inflammatory, infective, vascular, and other pathologies, which have overlapping clinical and radiological features with a Klatskin tumour, leading to misinterpretation. This paper aims to summarise the features of such Klatskin-like lesions that have been reported in surgical literature.

  1. Klatskin-like lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, M P; Marudanayagam, R

    2012-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma, also known as Klatskin tumour, is the commonest type of cholangiocarcinoma. It poses unique problems in the diagnosis and management because of its anatomical location. Curative surgery in the form of major hepatic resection entails significant morbidity. About 5-15% of specimens resected for presumed Klatskin tumour prove not to be cholangiocarcinomas. There are a number of inflammatory, infective, vascular, and other pathologies, which have overlapping clinical and radiological features with a Klatskin tumour, leading to misinterpretation. This paper aims to summarise the features of such Klatskin-like lesions that have been reported in surgical literature.

  2. Lesiones en el deporte

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Not available

    El incremento de la actividad física y del deporte, en las sociedades llamadas desarrolladas, ha traído consigo beneficios claros para la salud, reflejados en diferentes indicadores de salud. Simultáneamente, el deporte de competición obliga a una dedicación diaria a intensidad de entrenamiento, con objeto de obtener los elevados requerimientos físicos que exige la competición. Todo ello ha traído consigo la aparición de numerosas lesiones, fundamentalmen...

  3. Atrichia with Papular Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Manish; Manchanda, Kajal; Lamba, Sachin; Pandey, SS

    2011-01-01

    Atrichia with papular lesions (APL) is a rare autosomal recessive form of irreversible alopecia with onset at few months of age with papular keratin cysts over the body. It is associated with mutation in the Zinc finger domain of the human hairless gene on chromosome region 8p12. An eleven-year-old male presented with extensive alopecia starting at six months of age refractory to the treatment along with keratotic papules on the face and trunk. Biopsy from a papule showed mid-dermal keratin c...

  4. Lesiones en corredores amateurs

    OpenAIRE

    Natale, Vanesa

    2011-01-01

    Se realizó un estudio tomando como muestra a 100 corredores amateurs de la ciudad de Mar del Plata, en la cual el objetivo general fue determinar cuáles son las patologías más frecuentes en corredores. Correr no es solo un deporte en si mismo sino que tiene elementos de otras actividades deportivas, es decir, que las lesiones de los corredores también son comunes en otros tipos de deportes. El número de deportistas aumenta diariamente y al mismo tiempo aumentan el número de per...

  5. Prevalence of colorectal adenoma in an average-risk population aged 40-50 versus 50-60 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Zamani, Farhad; Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Rakhshani, Naser; Khoonsari, Mahmoodreza; Ameli, Mitra; Hatami, Khadijeh

    2015-09-01

    According to current guidelines, screening colonoscopy begins at 50 years for the average-risk population, although there are not enough data on the incidence of precancerous lesions of individuals in the preceding decades. To evaluate the prevalence of colorectal polyps including potentially premalignant lesions in asymptomatic, average-risk individuals aged 40-49 versus 50-59 years, we offered total colonoscopy screening to individuals without any lower gastrointestinal symptoms. The primary end point was the prevalence of colorectal adenoma in two age groups. Of a total of 737 studies, 333 participants were 40-49 years old and 407 participants were 50-59 years old. The overall prevalence of adenomas was 11.2 and 16.4% in the group of 40-49 and 50-59 year olds, respectively. Advanced adenoma was more common in 50-59 year olds (1.2 vs. 2.9%). Malignancy was not reported in these groups. Furthermore, 77.5 and 68.6% of adenomas were observed in the distal colon in the groups of 40-49 year olds and 50-59 year olds, whereas in the proximal colon, 22.2 and 57.1% of adenomas in the groups of 40-49 year olds and 50-59 year olds, respectively, were advanced adenomas. In our study, male sex showed an association with adenoma. However, importantly, there was no significant association between age and colorectal adenoma. Although the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was similar in the two age groups investigated, the rate of advanced adenoma was higher in the group of individuals who were 50-59 years old, suggesting that colorectal cancer screening could be recommended at an age younger than 50 years.

  6. Evaluation of 1p Losses in Primary Carcinomas, Local Recurrences and Peripheral Metastases from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Thorstensen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas have shown that loss of the distal part of chromosome arm 1p is common, particularly in tumors of the left colon. Because the importance of 1p loss in colorectal cancer metastases is unknown, we compared the frequency, exact site and extent of ip deletions in primary carcinomas (n=28, local recurrences (n=19 and metastases (n=33 from 67 colorectal cancer patients using 14 markers in an allelic imbalance study. Loss of 1p was found in 50% of the primary carcinomas, 33% of the local recurrences, and 64% of the metastases, revealing a significant difference between the local recurrences and the metastases (P=.04. The smallest region of 1p deletion overlap (SRO defined separately for each group of lesions had the region between markers Di S2647 and D1 S2644, at 1 p35-36, in common. The genes PLA2G2A (1p35.1-36 and TP73 (1p36.3 were shown to lie outside this consistently lost region, suggesting that neither of them are targets for the 1p loss. In the second part of the study, microdissected primary carcinomas and distant metastases from the same colorectal cancer patients (n=18 were analyzed, and the same 1p genotype was found in the majority of patients (12/18, 67%. The finding that primary carcinoma cells with metastatic ability usually contain 1p deletions, and that some cases lacking 1p alterations in the primary tumor acquire such changes during growth of a metastatic lesion, supports the notion that 1p loss may be important both early and late in colorectal carcinogenesis, with the apparent exception of local recurrences.

  7. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses.

  8. Comparison of blood neoangiogenesis and lymphatic vascularization in colorectal adenomas from patients with and without concomitant colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Moreira

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood and lymphatic vessel proliferation is essential for tumor growth and progression. Most colorectal carcinomas develop from adenomas (adenoma-carcinoma sequence in a process due to accumulation of molecular genetic alterations. About 5% of adenomatous polyps are expected to become malignant, but data on the differential angiogenic patterns of these lesions in patients with and without concomitant cancer are missing. The aim of the present study is to compare the angiogenic and lymphatic patterns of adenomatous polyps from patients with and without sporadic cancer. Thirty adenomatous polyps (15 from patients with another principal malignant lesion, and 15 from patients without cancer were submitted to immunohistochemical staining for CD105 (marker for neoangiogenesis and D2-40 (marker for lymphatic endothelium. Microvessel density and total vascular area were determined by computer image analysis to quantify the immunostained and total areas, and to assess the number of microvessels. Adenomas from patients with carcinoma showed significantly higher values of total vascular area determined by immunostaining for CD105 (cutoff value = 4386 µm²; P = 0.019 and of lymphatic microvessel density determined by immunostaining with D2-40 (cutoff value = 11.5; P = 0.041 when compared with those from patients without cancer. The present data indicate a significant increase in blood microvascular area and in lymphatic microvascular counts in adenomas removed from patients with cancer.

  9. Accuracy of Colon Capsule Endoscopy in Detecting Colorectal Polyps in Individuals with Familial Colorectal Cancer: Could We Avoid Colonoscopies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Ibáñez, Inés Ana; Rodríguez De Miguel, Cristina; Dedeu, Josep Maria; Bessa, Xavier; Córdova, Henry; Pellisé, Maria; Balaguer, Francesc; Ginés, Angels; Barranco, Luis; Araujo, Isis K.; Andreu, Montserrat; Llach, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Background. Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) have an increased risk of CRC. We evaluated the diagnostic yield of CCE in the detection of lesions and also two different colon preparations. Methods. A prospective multicenter study was designed to assess CCE diagnostic yield in a cohort of asymptomatic individuals with a family history of CRC. CCE and colonoscopy were performed on the same day by 2 endoscopists who were blinded to the results of the other procedure. Results. Fifty-three participants were enrolled. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of CCE for detecting advanced adenomas were 100%, 98%, 67%, and 100%. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of CCE for the diagnosis of individuals with polyps were 87%, 97%, 93%, and 88%, respectively. CCE identify 100% of individuals with significant or advanced lesions. Overall cleanliness was adequate by 60.7% of them. The PEG-ascorbic boost seems to improve colon cleanliness, with similar colonic transit time. Conclusion. CCE is a promising tool, but it has to be considered as an alternative technique in this population in order to reduce the number of colonoscopies performed. More studies are needed to understand appropriate screening follow-up intervals and optimize the bowel preparation regimen. PMID:28265285

  10. Response assessment of colorectal liver metastases with contrast enhanced CT/18F-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Vicente, Ana María, E-mail: angarvice@yahoo.es [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Domínguez Ferreras, Esther [Department of Radiology, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Sánchez Pérez, Victoria [Department of Oncology, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Poblete García, Víctor Manuel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Villa Guzmán, José Carlos [Department of Oncology, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Jiménez Aragón, Fátima [Department of Radiology, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Pineda Pineda, Maria Dolores [Department of Oncology, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Molino Trinidad, Ceferino [Department of Radiology, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain); Soriano Castrejón, Ángel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University General Hospital, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Evaluate the diagnostic performance of contrast enhanced CT/PET (ceCT/PET) in the response assessment of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases. Methods: 33 ce CT/PET studies of 19 patients with colorectal liver metastases were prospectively evaluated. All of them, 13 (68.4%) were males and 6 (31.6%) females. Mean age and range were 63 [42–78]. All patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In all cases post-therapy diagnostic confirmation of liver lesions was obtained. A ce CT PET/was obtained 1 h after the injection of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG. Metabolic and morphologic studies were evaluated by two blinded nuclear physicians and radiologists respectively to assess the location, size and suspected diagnosis of lesions (benign or malignant). A combined assessment of both techniques was performed. The final diagnosis was established by histopathology or clinical/radiological follow-up greater than 6 months. Results: A total of 120 liver lesions were identified, 115 were malignant and 5 benign. From the malignant lesions, 105 were identified with the ceCT, 44 with the PET and 109 with ceCT/PET. All of the benign lesions were correctly classified with any of the three imaging techniques. The sensitivity of PET, ceCT and ceCT/PET were of 38%, 91% and 95% respectively and the specificity was 100% in all three of the diagnostic studies. Conclusion: Administration of intravenous contrast in the PET/CT is mandatory to evaluate treatment response rate of liver metastases due to the limitations of isolated metabolic images in these cases.

  11. I BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON MULTIMODAL TREATMENT OF COLORECTAL LIVER METASTASES. MODULE 2: APPROACH TO RESECTABLE METASTASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIBEIRO, Héber Salvador de Castro; TORRES, Orlando Jorge Martins; MARQUES, Márcio Carmona; HERMAN, Paulo; KALIL, Antonio Nocchi; FERNANDES, Eduardo de Souza Martins; de OLIVEIRA, Fábio Ferreira; CASTRO, Leonaldson dos Santos; HANRIOT, Rodrigo; OLIVEIRA, Suilane Coelho Ribeiro; BOFF, Marcio Fernando; da COSTA, Wilson Luiz; GIL, Roberto de Almeida; PFIFFER, Tulio Eduardo Flesch; MAKDISSI, Fabio Ferrari; ROCHA, Manoel de Souza; do AMARAL, Paulo Cezar Galvão; COSTA, Leonardo Atem Gonçalves de Araújo; ALOIA, Tomas A.; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; COIMBRA, Felipe José Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver metastases of colorectal cancer are frequent and potentially fatal event in the evolution of patients. Aim: In the second module of this consensus, management of resectable liver metastases was discussed. Method: Concept of synchronous and metachronous metastases was determined, and both scenarius were discussed separately according its prognostic and therapeutic peculiarities. Results: Special attention was given to the missing metastases due to systemic preoperative treatment response, with emphasis in strategies to avoid its reccurrence and how to manage disappeared lesions. Conclusion: Were presented validated ressectional strategies, to be taken into account in clinical practice. PMID:27120731

  12. Colorectal cancer manifesting with metastasis to prolactinoma: report of a case involving symptoms mimicking pituitary apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Siwanuwatn, Rungsak; Sunthornyothin, Sarat

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary metastasis is an uncommon first presentation of systemic malignancy. The most common presenting symptom of pituitary metastasis is diabetes insipidus reflecting involvement of the stalk and/or posterior pituitary. We herein present a unique case of the coexistence of both a functioning pituitary adenoma (prolactinoma) and pituitary metastasis of advanced colorectal cancer with pituitary apoplexy as the first manifestation of underlying malignancy. The present case emphasizes the need to consider pituitary metastasis as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with pituitary lesions and be aware that tumor-to-tumor metastasis can occur unexpectedly in those with pituitary metastases.

  13. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  14. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Engeland, M. van; Lüchtenborg, M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between

  15. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions with ... these questions: When you’re told you have colorectal cancer Where is the cancer located? Has the cancer ...

  16. Adipokines linking obesity with colorectal cancer risk in postmenopausal women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Gloria Y F; Wang, Tao; Gunter, Marc J; Strickler, Howard D; Cushman, Mary; Kaplan, Robert C; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Xue, Xiaonan; Rajpathak, Swapnil N; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Vitolins, Mara Z; Scherer, Philipp E; Rohan, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Mechanistic associations between obesity and colorectal cancer remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether adipokines are risk factors for colorectal cancer and whether they may mediate its association with obesity...

  17. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  18. Accuracy of single phase contrast enhanced multidetector CT colonography in the preoperative staging of colo-rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo [IBB CNR, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy) and Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: pierpamainenti@hotmail.com; Cirillo, Luigi Carlo [Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Hospital ' dei Pellegrini' , ASLNA 1, Via Portamedina 41, 80100 Naples (Italy); Camera, Luigi [Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Persico, Francesco [Department of General Surgery, Geriatry and Endoscopy, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Cantalupo, Teresa [Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Pace, Leonardo [Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Palma, Giovanni Domenico De [Department of General Surgery, Geriatry and Endoscopy, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Persico, Giovanni [Department of General Surgery, Geriatry and Endoscopy, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Aim: The optimal acquisition time for staging colo-rectal carcinoma with a contrast enhanced multidetector CT colonography (CE CTC) has not yet been established. A dual phase with both arterial and portal venous acquisition has been proposed. The purpose of our study is to assess the value of single portal venous phase CE CTC in the preoperative staging of colo-rectal carcinoma. Materials and methods: Fifty two (30 M, 22 F; aged 35-82 years) consecutive patients with a histologically proven diagnosis of colo-rectal adenocarcinoma or a highly suspected colo-rectal cancer on conventional colonoscopy underwent a four-slice CE CTC. The procedure was performed 70 s (portal phase) after the intravenous bolus (3 ml/s) administration of 120 ml iodinated non-ionic contrast agent (370 mg iodine/ml). Scans were performed using the following parameters: 2.5 mm beam collimation, pitch 1.25, 120 kV, 200 mAs, rotation time 0.75 s. Images were reconstructed with an effective thickness of 3.2 mm at intervals of 1.6 mm. Two radiologists independently evaluated the depth of tumour invasion into the colo-rectal wall (T), regional lymph node involvement (N), and extracolonic metastases (M). Disagreement was resolved by means of a consensus decision. The pathological results served as the standard of reference. Assessment was made of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, as well as positive and negative predictive values were assessed. Results: CE CTC correctly staged the pT of 52/56 (93%) and the N of 40/56 (71%) lesions, as well as properly identifying 13/14 (93%) extracolonic findings. Conclusion: The single portal venous phase CE CTC scanning protocol enables satisfactory preoperative assessment of T, N and M staging in patients with colo-rectal cancer.

  19. [Bony Bankart lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, U J; Braun, S; Euler, S A; Warth, R J; Millett, P J

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the anteroinferior glenoid rim, termed bony Bankart lesions, have been reported to occur in up to 22% of first time anterior shoulder dislocations. The primary goal of treatment is to create a stable glenohumeral joint and a good shoulder function. Options for therapeutic intervention are largely dependent on the chronicity of the lesion, the activity level of the patient and postreduction fracture characteristics, such as the size, location and number of fracture fragments. Non-operative treatment can be successful for small, acute fractures, which are anatomically reduced after shoulder reduction. However, in patients with a high risk profile for recurrent instability initial Bankart repair is recommended. Additionally, bony fixation is recommended for acute fractures that involve more than 15-20% of the inferior glenoid diameter. On the other hand chronic fractures are generally managed on a case-by-case basis depending on the amount of fragment resorption and bony erosion of the anterior glenoid with high recurrence rates under conservative therapy. When significant bone loss of the anterior glenoid is present, anatomical (e.g. iliac crest bone graft and osteoarticular allograft) or non-anatomical (e.g. Latarjet and Bristow) reconstruction of the anterior glenoid is often indicated.

  20. Sequential metastases of colorectal cancer: Immunophenotypes and spatial distributions of infiltrating immune cells in relation to time and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Sophia; Zoernig, Inka; Spille, Anna; Lahrmann, Bernd; Brand, Karsten; Herpel, Esther; Grabe, Niels; Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels

    2012-08-01

    The role of the immune system in the course of colorectal cancer has been elucidated in the last decade. While quantification of immune cell infiltrates within the resected specimen at diagnosis has a clear power to estimate the prognosis of the patient, the role of infiltrating immune cells within the metastatic situation and especially within the metastatic lesion itself requires further detailed analyses. Recent analyses of infiltrates in colorectal cancer liver metastases revealed a role for the infiltrate density not only for prognosis but also in the prediction of treatment response. This not only broadens the view on these infiltrates and indicates a systematic role of the local immunological microenvironment, but also raises the question how these infiltrates change during repeated courses of treatment (i.e., resection, chemotherapy, etc.). To address this question, sequential lung or sequential liver metastases of colorectal cancer patients were analyzed using whole slide image quantification after immunohistochemical staining against CD3, CD8, FOXP3, CD68 and Granzyme B. The clinical data and interventions were associated with each individual patient and the metastatic lesions. The resulting cell densities reveal a heterogeneous profile: after successful treatment of a metastatic lesion, the recurrent lesion can still have the same immunophenotype with similar cell distributions. In a situation of a favorable immune cell profile, this profile can return and apparently convey a similar favorable course throughout the disease. But also the opposite was found: the recurrent metastatic lesion could have a different profile with alterations in specific immune cell subsets over time. Further analyses are required to elucidate the different patterns and their associations to the treatment, the tumor cell phenotype and other dynamic factors. However, it is clear from this data however, that there is an immune cell plasticity that needs to be analyzed for

  1. Synchronous colorectal cancer: Clinical, pathological and molecular implications

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Alfred King-yin; Chan, Sally Sze-Yan; Leung, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal carcinoma refers to more than one primary colorectal carcinoma detected in a single patient at initial presentation. A literature review has shown that the prevalence of the disease is approximately 3.5% of all colorectal carcinomas. This disease has a male to female ratio of 1.8:1. The mean age at presentation of patients with synchronous colorectal cancer is in the early half of the seventh decade. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Croh...

  2. Rak debelega črevesa in danke: Colorectal cancer:

    OpenAIRE

    Potrč, Stojan; Krebs, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in Europe and also the second most common cause of cancer death. In Slovenia, the incidence of colorectal cancer is high and is still increasing. The survival rate of our patients operated for colorectal cancer is improving and slowly approaches the survival rate of patients operated on the western world. There is still a problem of late diagnosis, usually when the disease is already disseminated. The approach to the treatment of colorect...

  3. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Enrique; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at <60 or ≥60 y, respectively. However, studies on the risk of neoplastic lesions are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of advanced neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). Methods and Findings This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer (“familial-risk group”) and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer (“average-risk group”). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at <60 y (n = 831), and as two FDR, with two family members diagnosed with colorectal cancer at any age (n = 300). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for between-group comparisons after adjusting for potential confounders (age, gender, and center). Compared with the average-risk group, advanced neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–2.66, p < 0.001), but not in those having one FDR with colorectal cancer diagnosed at ≥60 y (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.83–1.27, p = 0.77) and <60 y (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.90–1.58, p = 0.20). After the age of 50 y, men developed advanced

  4. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  5. Aberrant gene promoter methylation associated with sporadic multiple colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gonzalo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC multiplicity has been mainly related to polyposis and non-polyposis hereditary syndromes. In sporadic CRC, aberrant gene promoter methylation has been shown to play a key role in carcinogenesis, although little is known about its involvement in multiplicity. To assess the effect of methylation in tumor multiplicity in sporadic CRC, hypermethylation of key tumor suppressor genes was evaluated in patients with both multiple and solitary tumors, as a proof-of-concept of an underlying epigenetic defect. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined a total of 47 synchronous/metachronous primary CRC from 41 patients, and 41 gender, age (5-year intervals and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors. Exclusion criteria were polyposis syndromes, Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. DNA methylation at the promoter region of the MGMT, CDKN2A, SFRP1, TMEFF2, HS3ST2 (3OST2, RASSF1A and GATA4 genes was evaluated by quantitative methylation specific PCR in both tumor and corresponding normal appearing colorectal mucosa samples. Overall, patients with multiple lesions exhibited a higher degree of methylation in tumor samples than those with solitary tumors regarding all evaluated genes. After adjusting for age and gender, binomial logistic regression analysis identified methylation of MGMT2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.97; p = 0.008 and RASSF1A (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.01 to 4.13; p = 0.047 as variables independently associated with tumor multiplicity, being the risk related to methylation of any of these two genes 4.57 (95% CI, 1.53 to 13.61; p = 0.006. Moreover, in six patients in whom both tumors were available, we found a correlation in the methylation levels of MGMT2 (r = 0.64, p = 0.17, SFRP1 (r = 0.83, 0.06, HPP1 (r = 0.64, p = 0.17, 3OST2 (r = 0.83, p = 0.06 and GATA4 (r = 0.6, p = 0.24. Methylation in normal appearing colorectal mucosa from patients with multiple and solitary CRC showed no relevant

  6. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  7. The value of auditing negative lower GI investigations preceding a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasekar, A; James, L; Stephenson, B M; Thompson, I W; Vellacott, K D; Allison, M C

    2009-09-01

    To review all preceding 'negative' large bowel investigations in patients with a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer, and to examine whether delayed diagnosis was associated with worse outcome. Details were gathered on all patients with a new diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma presenting over 4.5 years. For each patient the hospital's clinical workstation and radiology and endoscopy databases were interrogated for all flexible sigmoidoscopies, colonoscopies and barium enemas during the 5 years prior to diagnosis. Among the 570 patients, 28 (5%) had undergone colonoscopy and/or flexible sigmoidoscopy that had not shown colorectal cancer during the 5 years preceding final diagnosis, and a further 28 (5%) had undergone 'negative' barium enemas. Polyp surveillance might have missed four lesions destined to become malignant. Correspondingly there were three patients undergoing IBD surveillance found to have CRC, having had a negative complete colonoscopy within the preceding 5 years. Among patients undergoing de novo colonoscopy for diagnosis the true miss rate was only one patient per year. At August 2007, 29 (58%) of those with delayed diagnosis were still alive, compared with 216 (42%) of those diagnosed during initial investigation (chi2 = 5.04, P auditing the quality assurance of lower gastrointestinal diagnostic services. Despite the delay, late diagnosis was found to be associated with improved survival and a lower likelihood of metastatic disease.

  8. Expression and clinical significance of colorectal cancer stem cell marker EpCAMhigh/CD44+ in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dan; Sun, Jinghua; Zhu, Jinming; Zhou, Huan; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells are considered the source of recurrence, metastasis and drug resistance in colorectal tumors. Therefore, the identification and targeting of cancer stem cells facilitates the elimination of tumors. Although epithelial cell adhesion molecule-high (EpCAMhigh)/cluster of differentiation (CD)44+ cells are thought to act as a marker of colorectal cancer stem cells, the clinical significance of these cells in colorectal cancer remains unclear. The aim of the present stu...

  9. The impact of fluor-18-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in the management of colorectal liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiering, Bastiaan; Krabbe, Paul F M; Jager, Gerrit J; Oyen, Wim J G; Ruers, Theo J M

    2005-12-15

    Fluor-18-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has emerged as a promising diagnostic modality in recurrent colorectal carcinoma. Whole-body FDG-PET may be an accurate diagnostic modality to determine whether patients with recurrent hepatic disease are suitable candidates for curative resection. Reports on the use of FDG-PET in patients with recurrent colorectal carcinoma are scarce, especially those on colorectal liver metastases. To assess the usefulness of this emerging modality for the selection of patients to undergo resection for colorectal liver metastases, a systematic (meta)-analysis of the current literature was conducted. In the absence of randomized controlled clinical trials, a traditional meta-analysis could not be performed. An alternative strategy was designed to evaluate the current literature. After a literature search, an index score was devised to evaluate the articles with regard to the impact of FDG-PET in patients with colorectal liver metastases. The index scored articles on several items and, as such, could be considered an objective approach for the assessment of diagnostic, nonrandomized clinical trials. The proposed index proved to be an independent instrument for judging several research questions and was used systematically to address the sensitivity, specificity, and clinical impact of FDG-PET in patients with colorectal liver metastases. For FDG-PET, the pooled sensitivity and specificity results were 88.0% and 96.1%, respectively, for hepatic disease and 91.5% and 95.4%, respectively, for extrahepatic disease. For the 6 articles that reported the highest scores on the index, the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for hepatic metastatic disease were 79.9% and 92.3%, respectively, and 91.2% and 98.4%, respectively, for extrahepatic disease, respectively. For computed tomography, the pooled sensitivity and specificity results were 82.7% and 84.1%, respectively, for hepatic lesions and 60.9% and 91.1%, respectively, for

  10. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL SPECTRUM OF BREAST LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran H. S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cancer of the breast is the second most common cause of cancer in women. Benign or malignant lesions presenting as mass in the breast causes anxiety to the patients and the family members. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 1. To classify different types of lesions of breast, both benign and malignant. 2. Histomorphological study of various types of benign and malignant breast lesions. 3. To study spectrum of lesions associated with benign and malignant breast diseases. SETTING AND DESIGN All the breast biopsies, lumpectomies, and mastectomy specimens presenting to Department of Pathology of our institution between June 2012 to June 2014. MATERIALS AND METHODS A sample size of 100 cases are included in this study. Clinical details are taken from records. The specimens of breast sent to the Department of Pathology are processed by routine histopathological techniques. Histopathological features are studied on haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Statistically, the test of proportion is used to obtain the frequency of all lesions. Chi-square test, which is used to find the association between the spectrum of lesions showed a p value of 0.0438 and hence the study was considered significant. RESULTS In our study, out of 100 cases, malignant breast lesions constituted the majority of the lesions comprising of 49 cases (49%, followed by benign lesions comprising 46 cases (46% and the inflammatory lesions comprising 5 cases (5%. Among benign lesions, fibrocystic disease was the predominant lesion comprising of 39 cases (41%, followed by fibroadenoma comprising 26 cases (28%, which is followed by 13 cases (14% of fibrocystic disease with columnar cell change and 8 cases (9% of sclerosing adenosis. Among malignant lesions, invasive ductal carcinoma (NST type was the most common lesion comprising 31 cases (61% followed by 11 cases (21% of invasive lobular carcinoma. Invasive papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma

  11. Orbital Apex Syndrome Caused by Invasive Aspergillosis as an Adverse Effect of Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Ohuchi, Mayuko; Tokunaga, Ryuma; Shigaki, Hironobu; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Continuous therapy with cytotoxic drugs suppresses humoral immune function and may result in local infection. We present a case of orbital apex syndrome caused by Aspergillus infection during chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. A 74-year-old man with colorectal liver metastases under long-term continuous systemic chemotherapy presented with painful, progressive orbital apex syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a small enhancing lesion around the right ethmoid sinus. We initially diagnosed colorectal cancer metastasis and he underwent biopsy via the endoscopic endonasal transethmoid approach. However, pathological examination of the cultured specimen revealed Aspergillus fumigatus. The patient was treated with voriconazole and the orbital apex syndrome resolved after 1 month. Orbital aspergillosis is a life-threatening disease and should be listed as a differential diagnosis of uncommon local infections during continuous chemotherapy.

  12. Usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant solid pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Kyoung; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Kwon, Hee Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Noh, Myung Hwan; Nam, Kyung Jin [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tissue stiffness of solid pancreatic lesions by using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography to differentiate benign from malignant pancreatic lesions. ARFI elastography was performed in 26 patients who had 27 focal solid pancreatic lesions, including 8 benign lesions (mass-forming pancreatitis, 5; autoimmune pancreatitis, 3) and 19 malignant lesions (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 16; metastasis from colorectal cancer, 2; malignant neuroendocrine tumor, 1). On the elastographic images of virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI), the echogenicity of the mass was categorized on a 5-grade scale. On the elastographic image of virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ), the shear wave velocities (SWVs) of the lesion and surrounding parenchyma were measured. On the VTI images, the mean echogenicity score of the malignant lesions (3.7±1.0) was higher than that of the benign lesions (3.1±0.4; P=0.023). On the VTQ images, there were no statistical differences in the mean SWV between the benign (2.4±1.1 m/sec) and malignant (3.3±1.0 m/sec) lesions (P=0.101). However, the mean SWV difference values between the lesion and background parenchyma of the malignant lesions (1.5±0.8 m/sec) were higher than those of the benign lesions (0.4±0.3 m/sec; P=0.011). ARFI elastography can determine the relative stiffness between a lesion and the background pancreatic parenchyma using VTI and VTQ, which is helpful in the differentiation between benign and malignant solid pancreatic lesions.

  13. PIK3CA in colorectal cancer

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    Gieri eCathomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PIK3CA, the catalytic subunit of PI3K, is mutated in many different tumours, including colorectal cancer. Mutations of PIK3CA have been reported in 10 – 20% of colorectal cancer, about 80% of mutations found in two hot spots in exon 9 and exon 20. In RAS wild-type colorectal cancers, PIK3CA mutations have been associated with a worse clinical outcome and with a negative prediction of a response to targeted therapy by anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, these findings have not been confirmed in all studies and subsequent more detailed analysis has revealed that these effects may be restricted to mutations in Exon 20. Finally, mutations in PIK3CA may be the long sought biomarker for successful adjuvant therapy with aspirin in patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, PIK3CA mutations appear to be a promising predictive biomarker; however, further data are needed to conclusively define the impact of somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene for the management of patients with colorectal cancer.

  14. Colorectal cancer, one entity or three

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-ying LI; Mao-de LAI

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the mechanism ofcolorectal carcinogenesis has been gaining momentum for some years on account of its high incidence and impact on the lives of individuals affected. Different genetic abnormalities have been found in colorectal cancers from different sites. For example, proximal colon cancer is usually related to the nucleotide instability pathway, as mi-crosatellite instability (MSI). However, distal colon cancer is usually associated with specific chromosomal instability (CIN). The development of cancer at the rectum, though similar to that at the colon, displays its own unique features. These differences might be partially attributed to different embryological development and physiological circumstances. Environmental factors such as diet and alcohol intake also differ in their role in the development of tumors in the three segments, proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum. "Proximal shift" of colon cancer has been known for some time, and survival rates of colorectal cancer are higher when rectal cancers are excluded, both of which emphasize the three different segments of colorectal cancer and their different proper-ties. Meanwhile, colonic and rectal cancers are distinctive therapeutic entities. The concept of three entities of colorectal cancer may be important in designing clinical trails or therapeutic strategies. However, the dispute about the inconsistency of data con-ceming the site-specific mechanism of colorectal carcinoma does exist, and more evidence about molecular events of carcino-genesis and targeted therapy needs to be collected to definitely confirm the conception.

  15. Thalamic Lesions: A Radiological Review

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    Dimitri Renard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thalamic lesions are seen in a multitude of disorders including vascular diseases, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, trauma, tumours, and infections. In some diseases, thalamic involvement is typical and sometimes isolated, while in other diseases thalamic lesions are observed only occasionally (often in the presence of other typical extrathalamic lesions. Summary. In this review, we will mainly discuss the MRI characteristics of thalamic lesions. Identification of the origin of the thalamic lesion depends on the exact localisation inside the thalamus, the presence of extrathalamic lesions, the signal changes on different MRI sequences, the evolution of the radiological abnormalities over time, the history and clinical state of the patient, and other radiological and nonradiological examinations.

  16. Calcium remodeling in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2017-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Basic and clinical data indicate that aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent colon cancer but mechanisms remain unknown. Aspirin metabolite salicylate and other NSAIDs may inhibit tumor cell growth acting on store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), suggesting an important role for this pathway in CRC. Consistently, SOCE is emerging as a novel player in different forms of cancer, including CRC. SOCE and store-operated currents (SOCs) are dramatically enhanced in CRC while Ca(2+) stores are partially empty in CRC cells. These features may contribute to CRC hallmarks including enhanced cell proliferation, migration, invasion and survival. At the molecular level, enhanced SOCE and depleted stores are mediated by overexpression of Orai1, Stromal interaction protein 1 (STIM1) and Transient receptor protein channel 1 (TRPC1) and downregulation of STIM2. In normal colonic cells, SOCE is mediated by Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels made of STIM1, STIM2 and Orai1. In CRC cells, SOCE is mediated by different store-operated currents (SOCs) driven by STIM1, Orai1 and TRPC1. Loss of STIM2 contributes to depletion of Ca(2+) stores and enhanced resistance to cell death in CRC cells. Thus, SOCE is a novel key player in CRC and inhibition by salicylate and other NSAIDs may contribute to explain chemoprevention activity. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent form of cancer worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling may contribute to cancer hallmarks. In addition, aspirin and other NSAIDs might prevent CRC acting on remodeled Ca(2+) entry pathways. In this review, we will briefly describe 1) the players involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis with a particular emphasis on the mechanisms involved in SOCE activation and inactivation, 2) the evidence that aspirin

  17. Short-term Survival of Patients with Lung Metastases from Colorectal and Non-colorectal Cancer Who Underwent Pulmonary Metastasectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumachi, Franco; Mazza, Francesco; Del Conte, Alessandro; Lo Re, Giovanni; Ermani, Mario; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2015-06-01

    The lung is a common site of metastases, whose prevalence varies as a function of the primary tumor site, which is usually colorectal cancer (CRC), breast carcinoma, or genitourinary cancers, such as ovary, urinary bladder and renal cell carcinomas. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the site of primitive tumor affects overall survival (OS) of patients with lung metastases (LMs) who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy. The data of 41 patients with surgically treated CRC (Group A=22 patients) and non-colorectal carcinomas (Group B=19 patients), who developed matachronous LMs and underwent pulmonary metastasectomy with curative intent, were analyzed. The origin of non-colorectal LMs was genitourinary cancer in nine and breast cancer in 10 patients. Overall, there were 22 men and 19 women, with a median age of 65 years (range=31-80); 18 patients had a solitary metastatic tumor, while 23 had two or more LMs. Twenty-nine patients underwent wedge resection, through thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracic surgery, while 12 underwent pulmonary lobectomy. Seventy-five LMs were resected with a 5-tear OS of 48.8%. No difference was found between elderly (≥65 year-old) and younger patients (p=0.26), and between those with solitary or multiple LMs (p=0.62) in terms of survival rate. The female patients had a worse OS (31.6% vs. 63.6%; odds ratio (OR)=3.79, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.03-13.91, p=0.003) compared to males, independent of the origin of primary cancer. There was no difference in the cumulative survival rates (OR=1.65, 95%CI=0.48-5.69, p=0.42) between Groups and the log-rank test (p=0.75) was not significant. In conclusion, the main pathological characteristics of metastatic lesions and advanced age do not appear to be associated with a poor prognosis in patients with LMs, while the female gender is a negative prognostic factor. Thus, the primary tumor site should not be considered a major criterion in selecting patients for pulmonary

  18. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer Genética molecular del cáncer colorrectal

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    D. Cruz-Bustillo Clarens

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal tumours constitute an excellent system to study carcinogenesis and the molecular events implicated in the development of cancer. Attending to the way it is transmitted, colorectal cancer may appear in one of three forms: sporadic, familial, and hereditary. The sporadic form is most common and has no familial or hereditary associated factor thus far, while familial and hereditary forms show the same inheritance pattern. Hereditary colorectal cancers develop by means of defined stages that go from lesions in the crypt of the colon through adenomas to manifest cancer. They are characterised by the accumulation of multiple mutations in tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes that affect the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. The colorectal carcinogenesis pathway is not unique and there are probably several ways for the initiation, development and progression of colorectal tumours.Los tumores colorrectales constituyen un excelente sistema para estudiar la carcinogénesis y los eventos moleculares involucrados en el desarrollo de un tumor. El cáncer colorrectal puede presentarse en tres formas, según su forma de transmisión: esporádico, familiar y hereditario. La forma esporádica que es la mayoritaria, no tiene hasta el momento ningún factor familiar o hereditario asociado, mientras que las formas familiares y hereditarias siguen un patrón de herencia en la propensión familiar a padecerlo. Los cánceres colorrectales hereditarios se desarrollan mediante etapas definidas que van desde lesiones en la cripta del colon a través de adenomas hasta manifestar el cáncer y se caracterizan por la acumulación de múltiples mutaciones en genes supresores de tumor y oncogenes que afectan el balance entre la proliferación celular y la apoptosis. La vía de carcinogénesis colorrectal no es una sola y probablemente existan varios caminos para el inicio, desarrollo y progresión de un tumor colorrectal.

  19. Sugars, sucrose and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjie; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Morita, Makiko; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2014-05-01

    A diet high in sugars may promote colorectal carcinogenesis, but it remains uncertain whether high intake of sugars or sucrose confers increased risk of colorectal cancer. The authors investigated the associations of sugars and sucrose intake with colorectal cancer risk in a community-based case-control study in Japan. The study subjects comprised 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Consumption frequencies and portion sizes of 148 food and beverage items were ascertained by a computer-assisted interview. The authors used the consumption of 29 food items to estimate sugars and sucrose intake. The odds ratios of colorectal cancer risk according to intake categories were obtained using a logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding variables. Overall, intakes of sugars and sucrose were not related to colorectal cancer risk either in men or women. The association between sugars intake and colorectal cancer risk differed by smoking status and alcohol use in men, but not in women. In men, sugars intake tended to be associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely among never-smokers and positively among male ever-smokers (interaction p=0.01). Sugars intake was associated with an increased risk among men with no alcohol consumption, but was unrelated to the risk among male alcohol drinkers (interaction p=0.02). Body mass index did not modify the association with sugars intake in either men or women. Sugars intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer among smokers and non-alcohol drinkers in men selectively.

  20. Beclin 1 Expression is Closely Linked to Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Distant Metastasis of Colorectal Carcinoma

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    Mei-Ying Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 participates in development, autophagy, differentiation, anti- apoptosis, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The roles of Beclin 1 in colorectal carcinogenesis and its subsequent progression are still unclear. Here, the mRNA and protein expression of Beclin 1 were determined in colorectal carcinoma and matched mucosa by Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (ISH were performed on tissue microarryer with colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and mucosa. The expression of Beclin 1 mRNA and protein was found to be higher in colorectal carcinoma than matched mucosa by real-time PCR and Western blot (p < 0.05. According to the ISH data, Beclin 1 expression was lower in colorectal non-neoplastic mucosa (NNM than adenoma and carcinoma (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, primary carcinoma showed stronger Beclin 1 expression than NNM and metastatic carcinoma in the liver (p < 0.05. Beclin 1 protein expression was negatively related to liver and distant metastasis (p < 0.05, but not correlated with age, sex, depth of invasion, lymphatic or venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging, differentiation or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA concentration (p > 0.05. Survival analysis indicated that Beclin 1 expression was not linked to favorable prognosis of the patients with colorectal carcinoma (p > 0.05. Cox’s model indicated that depth of invasion and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for colorectal carcinomas (p < 0.05. It was suggested that Beclin 1 expression is closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

  1. Increased Detection of Colorectal Polyps in Screening Colonoscopy Using High Definition i-SCAN Compared with Standard White Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Sang Young; Park, Iksoo; Lee, Wook Jin; Park, Jaechan; Chon, Nuri; Oh, Tak Geun; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high definition (HD) i-SCAN for colorectal polyp detection in screening colonoscopy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 501 patients who had undergone screening colonoscopy performed by three endoscopists with either HD i-SCAN (n=149) or standard white light (n=352) from January 2, 2014 through June 30, 2014. Patient information and inter-endoscopist variation as well as polyp number, endoscopic findings, and pathologic characteristics were reviewed. Results: The detection rates of colorectal and neoplastic polyps were significantly higher using HD i-SCAN than standard white light colonoscopy (52% vs. 38.1%, p=0.004 for colorectal polyps; and 37.2% vs. 27.9%, p=0.041 for neoplastic polyps). Analysis of endoscopic findings revealed no difference in detected polyp size between HD i-SCAN and standard white light colonoscopy (4.59±2.35 mm vs. 4.82±2.81 mm, p=0.739), but non-protruding polyps were more commonly detected by i-SCAN than by standard white light colonoscopy (24.6% vs. 13.5%, p=0.007). Conclusions: Colonoscopy using HD i-SCAN had a significantly higher detection rate of colorectal polyps, including neoplastic polyps, because of improved sensitivity for detecting non-protruding lesions. PMID:26855927

  2. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Mika Ruohonen; Katri Palo; Jarmo Alander

    2013-01-01

    Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS) was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted h...

  3. Radio-induced brain lesions

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    Gorgan Mircea Radu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Radiotherapy, an important tool in multimodal oncologic treatment, can cause radio-induced brain lesion development after a long period of time following irradiation.

  4. Comparison of methodologies for the in vivo assessment of {sup 18}FLT utilisation in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); INSERM ERM0102, Laboratoire de Traitement d' Information Medicale, Equipe ' Quantification en Tomographie d' Emission' , CHU Morvan, 5 avenue Foch, 29609, Brest (France); Francis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Department of Surgery, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Mulligan, R.; Costa, D.C.; Croasdale, I.; Ell, P.J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Luthra, S.K. [IRSL Cyclotron Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, I. [Department of Surgery, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    Fluorine-18 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ({sup 18}FLT) is a tissue proliferation marker which has been suggested as a new tumour-specific imaging tracer in positron emission tomography (PET). The objectives of this study were to investigate the pharmacokinetics of {sup 18}FLT in patients with colorectal cancer, defining methodologies for the quantitative analysis of the in vivo {sup 18}FLT uptake and subsequently assessing the accuracy of semi-quantitative measures. Dynamic acquisitions over a single field of view of interest identified by computed tomography were carried out for up to 60 min following injection of {sup 18}FLT (360{+-}25 MBq). Dynamic arterial blood sampling was carried out in order to provide a blood input function. Simultaneous venous samples were also taken in order to investigate their potential utilisation in deriving a hybrid input function. Arterial and venous blood samples at 5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 min p.i. were used for metabolite analysis. Eleven patients with primary and/or metastatic colorectal cancer were studied on a lesion by lesion basis (n=21). All acquired images were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximisation and segmented attenuation correction. Time-activity curves were derived by image region of interest (ROI) analysis and image-based input functions were obtained using abdominal or thoracic aorta ROIs. Standardised uptake values (SUVs) were calculated to provide semi-quantitative indices of uptake, while non-linear regression (NLR) methodology in association with a three-compartment model and Patlak analysis were carried out to derive the net influx constant K{sub i}. The metabolite analysis revealed two radioactive metabolites, with the parent compound representing 80% of the total radioactivity in the 30-min plasma sample. In the case of NLR, better fits were obtained with a 3k model (i.e. k{sub 4}=0) for both lesion and bone marrow time-activity curves. For the same lesions, a high correlation was

  5. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Guide to the Guidelines

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    Douglas K Rex

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most recent guidelines for colorectal cancer screening are those of the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research, and the American Cancer Society. The guidelines are similar in many regards and reflect current literature, consensus opinion and compromise between members of multidisciplinary panels. The emphasis of both guidelines is to increase the options available for colorectal cancer screening. Increasing choice should expand the attractiveness of colorectal cancer screening to more patients and physicians, and the development of guidelines should help compel payers to provide reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening. These guidelines are summarized and evaluated as they pertain to colorectal cancer screening.

  6. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Zang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A further understanding of these mechanisms will help us to propose better strategies for colorectal cancer patients with brain metastasis and improve their life quality.

  7. Molecular pathogenesis ofsporadic colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HidetsuguYamagishi; HajimeKuroda; YasuoImai; HideyukiHiraishi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classiifed into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identiifed by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the ifrst half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a lim-ited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research ifeld and discuss its prospects.

  8. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  9. Mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Gen Zeng; Zhi-Xiang Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have been extensively used for the surgical management of colorectal cancer during the last two decades. Accumulating data have demonstrated that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncologic outcomes when compared with open surgery. However, some controversies regarding the oncologic quality of mini-invasive surgery for rectal cancer exist. Meanwhile, some progresses in colorectal surgery, such as robotic technology, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, natural orifice specimen extraction, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, have been made in recent years. In this article, we review the published data and mainly focus on the current status and latest advances of mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer.

  10. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  11. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokhan; Cipe; Ufuk; Oguz; Idiz; Deniz; Firat; Huseyin; Bektasoglu

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complexand vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota.

  12. Novel translational strategies in colorectal cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Defining translational research is still a complex task. In oncology, translational research implies using our basic knowledge learnt from in vitro and in vivo experiments to directly improve diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches in cancer patients. Moreover, the better understanding of human cancer and its use to design more reliable tumor models and more accurate experimental systems also has to be considered a good example of translational research. The identification and characterization of new molecular markers and the discovery of novel targeted therapies are two main goals in colorectal cancer translational research. However, the straightforward translation of basic research findings, specifically into colorectal cancer treatment and vice versa is still underway. In the present paper, a summarized view of some of the new available approaches on colorectal cancer translational research is provided. Pros and cons are discussed for every approach exposed.

  13. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  14. Peptide Vaccine Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yu Yang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer in the western world. High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy. Considering the limited success of the past clinical trials involving peptide vaccine therapy to treat colorectal cancer, it is necessary to revise our knowledge of the immune system and its potential use in tackling cancer. This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer. We review recent clinical trials and the strategies for immunologic monitoring of responses to peptide vaccine therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying the therapy and potential molecular targets in colon cancer.

  15. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

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    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  16. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  17. Colorectal neoplasm: Magnetic resonance colonography with fat enema-initial clinical experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess Magnetic resonance colonography with fat enema as a method for detection of colorectal neoplasm. METHODS: Consecutive twenty-two patients underwent MR colonography with fat enema before colonoscopy. T1-weighted three-dimensional fast spoiled gradientecho with inversion recovery sequence was acquired with the patient in the supine position before and 75 s after Gadopentetate Dimelumine administration. Where by, pre and post MR coronal images were obtained with a single breath hold for about 20 s to cover the entire colon. The quality of MR colonographs and patients' tolerance to fat contrast medium was investigated. Colorectal neoplasms identified by MR colonography were compared with those identified on colonoscopy and sensitivity of detecting the lesions was calculated accordingly. RESULTS: MR colonography with fat enema was well tolerated without sedation and analgesia. 120 out of 132 (90.9%) colonic segments were well distended and only 1 (0.8%) colonic segment was poor distension. After contrast enhancement scan, mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) value between the normal colonic wall and lumen was 18.5 ± 2.9 while mean CNR value between colorectal neoplasm and lumen was 20.2 ± 3.1. By Magnetic resonance colonography, 26 of 35 neoplasms (sensitivity 74.3%) were detected. However, sensitivity of MRC was 95.5% (21 of 22) for neoplasm larger than 10 mm and 55.6% (5 of 9) for 5-10 mm neoplasm. CONCLUSION: MR colonography with fat enema and T1-weighted three-dimensional fast spoiled gradientecho with inversion recovery sequence is feasible in detecting colorectal neoplasm larger than 10 mm.

  18. Loss of the Association between Telomere Length and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Contribute to Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunsu; Cho, Ji-Hyoung; Park, Won-Jin; Jung, Soo-Jung; Choi, In-Jang; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2017-05-09

    Positive association between telomere length and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number were introduced in healthy and patients with psychiatric disorder. Based on frequent genetic changes of telomere and mitochondria in colorectal carcinomas (CRC), we studied their clinical characteristics and their association in colorectal carcinogenesis. DNA was extracted from 109 CRCs, 64 colorectal tubular adenomas (TAs), and 28 serrated polyps (SPs), and then, telomere length and mtDNA copy number were analyzed in these legions by using a real-time PCR assay. Telomere length and mtDNA copy number (mean ± S.D) in CRCs was 1.87 ± 1.52 and 1.61 ± 1.37, respectively. In TAs and SPs, relative mtDNA copy number was 0.92 ± 0.71 and 1.84 ± 1.06, respectively, shoing statistical difference (p = 0.017). However, telomere length was similar in these precancerous legions. Telomere length and mtDNA copy number did not show clinical and prognostic values in CRCs, however, positive correlation between telomere length and mitochondrial DNA copy number were found in CRC (r = 0.408, p < 0.001). However, this association was not shown in precancerous lesions (r = -0.031, p = 0.765). This result suggests that loss of co-regulation between telomeres and mitochondrial function may induce the initiation or play a role as trigger factor of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases 15 and 19 are stromal regulators of colorectal cancer development from the early stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Paola; Mariani, Francesco; Marzona, Laura; Benincasa, Marta; Ponz de Leon, Maurizio; Palumbo, Carla; Roncucci, Luca

    2012-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been well characterized for their ability to degrade extracellular matrix proteins and, thus, they have been studied to elucidate their involvement in both tumor development and progression. In the present study, attention was focused on MMP-15 and MMP-19, two less known members of the MMP family. The expression profile of MMP-15 and -19 was assayed in samples of normal colorectal mucosa, microadenomas and cancer using confocal analysis, western blotting and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Both qRT-PCR and western blotting showed that MMP-15 and MMP-19 appeared to be upregulated during colorectal tumorigenesis, with different expression patterns: MMP-15 expression level increases from normal mucosa to microadenomas, with a reduced level in cancer with respect to microadenomas; the semiquantitative immunofluorescence analysis showed a stromal localization of this protein in the early phases of neoplastic transformation. Increasing amount of MMP-19 mRNA and protein levels were observed in the progression of colonic lesions; MMP-19 staining increased in the normal mucosa-microadenoma-carcinoma sequence. Such different expression patterns, are probably due to the different roles played in colorectal tumorigenesis by these two molecules. Conflicting data on the role of these proteins in tumor progression have been reported, thus, an improved understanding of the biological roles of MMPs, in particular the lesser known members such as MMP-15 and 19, in colorectal cancer may lead to a re-evaluation of the use of MMP inhibitors and suggests the need of integrated translational studies on MMP expression patterns.

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound of Colorectal Liver Metastases as an Imaging Modality for Early Response Prediction to Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Benzon Mogensen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to investigate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US can detect early changes in perfusion of colorectal liver metastases after initiation of chemotherapy. Newly diagnosed patients with colorectal cancer with liver metastases were enrolled in this explorative prospective study. Patients were treated with capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. DCE-US was performed before therapy (baseline and again 10 days after initiation of treatment. Change in contrast-enhancement in one liver metastasis (indicator lesion was measured. Treatment response was evaluated with a computed tomography (CT scan after three cycles of treatment and the initially observed DCE-US change of the indicator lesion was related to the observed CT response. Eighteen patients were included. Six did not complete three series of chemotherapy and the evaluation CT scan, leaving twelve patients for analysis. Early changes in perfusion parameters using DCE-US did not correlate well with subsequent CT changes. A subgroup analysis of eight patients receiving bevacizumab, however, demonstrated a statistically significant correlation (p = 0.045 between early changes in perfusion measures of peak enhancement at DCE-US and tumor shrinkage at CT scan. The study indicates that early changes in DCE-US perfusion measures may predict subsequent treatment response of colorectal liver metastases in patients receiving bevacizumab.

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in the Treatment of Hepatic Metastases from Colorectal Cancer of 18 Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiZhu; WenzhiChen; FengWu; KequanLi; JianzhongZou; ZhibiaoWang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). METHODS Thirty-one lesions in 18 patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer after colectomy were treated with HIFU therapy. The vital signs, function of the vital organs, complications and pathological outcome were studied using imaging examinations such as CT or MRI. RESULTS The vital signs of all patients remained stable and their liver and kidney functions normal. Two of the 18 patients were not followed-up. After a mean follow-up of 16.1 months (6-38 months), 13 survived. The survival rates at the 12th and 18th months were 83.3% and 66.7%, respectively. The median survival rate was 16 months. Among the 25 lesions followed-up, 17 shrank over 50%, 5 grew new metastases and superficial degree II skin injury occurred in 8. CONCLUSION HIFU is a safe, effective and non-invasive option for the treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.

  2. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo In [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Pil [Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Eun [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Colorectal cancer is currently the second most common cancer among Korean males and the fourth most common among females. Since the majority of colorectal cancer case present following the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are vital methods in its prevention. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The proposed guidelines have been developed by the Korean Multi-Society Task Force using evidence-based methods. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been used to form the statements contained in the guidelines. This paper discusses the epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea as well as optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations.

  3. MicroRNA regulation network in colorectal cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-Jiao; Zhou; Shu; Zheng; Li-Feng; Sun; Lei; Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Metastasis is a major cause of colorectal cancer-related death. Mechanisms of metastasis remain largely obscure. MicroRNA is one of the most important epigenetic regulators by targeting mRNAs posttranscriptionally. Accumulated evidence has supported its significant role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis. Dissecting microRNAome potentially identifies specific microRNAs as biomarkers of colorectal cancer metastasis. Better understanding of the complex network of microRNAs in colorectal cancer metastasis provide new insights in the biological process of metastasis and in the potential targets for colorectal cancer therapies and for diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-05

    This podcast is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/5/2011.

  5. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  6. Evaluation of CT in identifying colorectal carcinoma in the frail and disabled patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.S.; Dixon, A.K. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s NHS Trust and the University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Doyle, T.C.; Courtney, H.M.; Bull, R.K.; Freeman, A.H. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pinto, E.M.; Prevost, A.T. [Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Campbell, G.A. [Department of Medicine for the Elderly, Addenbrooke' s NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    Frail and physically or mentally disabled patients frequently have difficulty in tolerating formal colonic investigations. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of minimal-preparation CT in identifying colorectal carcinoma in this population and to determine the clinical indications and radiological signs with the highest yield for tumour. The CT technique involved helical acquisition (10-mm collimation, 1.5 pitch) following 2 days of preparation with oral contrast medium only. The outcome of 4 years of experience was retrospectively reviewed. The gold standards were pathological and cancer registration records, together with colonoscopy and barium enema when undertaken, with a minimum of 15 months follow-up. One thousand seventy-seven CT studies in 1031 patients (median age 80 years) were evaluated. CT correctly identified 83 of the 98 colorectal carcinomas in this group but missed 15 cases; sensitivity and specificity (with 95% confidence interval) 85% (78-92%) and 91% (90-93%), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified: (a) a palpable abdominal mass and anaemia to be the strongest clinical indications, particularly in combination (p<0.0025); and (b) lesion width and blurring of the serosal margin of lesions to be associated with tumours (p<0.0001). Computed tomography has a valuable role in the investigation of frail and otherwise disabled patients with symptoms suspicious for a colonic neoplasm. Although interpretation can be difficult, the technique is able to exclude malignancy with good accuracy. (orig.)

  7. Long-term outcomes of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshifumi; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Takahashi, Kazuya; Sato, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Satoru; Takeuchi, Manabu; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Yokoyama, Junji; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2017-04-01

    The safety and efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in elderly patients remain unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify the short- and long-term outcomes of colorectal ESD in elderly patients. A total of 482 consecutive patients with 501 colorectal lesions treated with ESD from February 2005 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: an elderly group (≥ 75 years of age) and a non-elderly group (Short-term outcomes of interest were procedure time, complication rate, hospital stay, en bloc resection rate, and non-curative resection rate. Long-term outcomes of interest were disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates in the elderly group (51 patients) and non-elderly group (92 patients) were also analyzed. No significant differences were observed between the groups with respect to short-term outcomes. Two patients in each group required emergency surgery. Of the patients who underwent non-curative resection, 7/12 (58%) in the elderly group and 15/23 (65%) in the non-elderly group underwent additional surgery. The 5-year disease-specific survival rates in the elderly and non-elderly groups were both 100%, and the corresponding 5-year overall survival rates were 86.3 and 93.5%, respectively (p = 0.026). Short-term outcomes after colorectal ESD were equivalent in both groups, and all patients showed favorable long-term outcomes. Considering the benign prognosis of lesions resected with ESD, preoperative screening of comorbidities is essential to improve overall survival.

  8. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or robotic radiosurgery (RRS) for salvage treatment of colorectal liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stintzing, Sebastian; Hendrich, Saskia; Heinemann, Volker [Dept. of Medical Oncology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Klinikum Grosshadern, LMU, Munich (Germany)], E-mail: sebastian.stintzing@med.uni-muenchen.de; Grothe, Alexander; Trumm, Christoph G. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten [Dept. and Policlinics of Diagnostic Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus Dresden (Germany); Rentsch, Markus [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital Grosshadern, LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Fuerweger, Christoph; Muacevic, Alexander [European Cyberknife Center Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Background. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an evolving modality to treat otherwise unresectable liver metastases. In this analysis, two local therapies: 1) single session robotic radiosurgery (RRS) and 2) percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) were compared in a total of 60 heavily pretreated colorectal cancer patients. Methods. Thirty patients with a total of 35 colorectal liver metastases not qualifying for surgery that were treated in curative intent with RRS were prospectively followed. To compare efficacy of both treatment modalities, patients treated with RFA during the same period of time were matched according to number and size of the treated lesions. Local tumor control, local disease free survival (DFS), and freedom from distant recurrence (FFDR) were analyzed for effi cacy. Treatment-related side effects were recorded for comparison. Results. The median diameter of the treated lesions was 33 mm (7-53 mm). Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between the groups. One- and two-year local control rates showed no signifi cant difference but favored RRS (85% vs. 65% and 80% vs. 61%, respectively). A signifi cantly longer local DFS of patients treated with RRS compared to RFA (34.4 months vs. 6.0 months; p 0.001) was found. Both, median FFDR (11.4 months for RRS vs. 7.1 months for RFA p=0.25) and the recurrence rate (67% for RRS and 63% for RFA, p>0.99) were comparable. Conclusion. Single session RRS is a safe and effective method to treat colorectal liver metastases. In this analysis, a trend towards longer DFS was seen in patients treated with RRS when compared to RFA.

  9. Location of colorectal cancer: colonoscopy versus surgery. Yield of colonoscopy in predicting actual location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum-Guzman, Juan Pablo; Wanderley de Melo, Silvio

    2017-07-01

     Recent studies suggest that differences in biological characteristics and risk factors across cancer site within the colon and rectum may translate to differences in survival. It can be challenging at times to determine the precise anatomical location of a lesion with a luminal view during colonoscopy. The aim of this study is to determine if there is a significant difference between the location of colorectal cancers described by gastroenterologists in colonoscopies and the actual anatomical location noted on operative and pathology reports after colon surgery.  A single-center retrospective analysis of colonoscopies of patient with reported colonic masses from January 2005 to April 2014 (n = 380) was carried. Assessed data included demography, operative and pathology reports. Findings were compared: between the location of colorectal cancers described by gastroenterologists in colonoscopies and the actual anatomical location noted on operative reports or pathology samples.  We identified 380 colonic masses, 158 were confirmed adenocarcinomas. Of these 123 underwent surgical resection, 27 had to be excluded since no specific location was reported on their operative or pathology report. An absolute difference between endoscopic and surgical location was found in 32 cases (33 %). Of these, 22 (23 %) differed by 1 colonic segment, 8 (8 %) differed by 2 colonic segments and 2 (2 %) differed by 3 colonic segments.  There is a significant difference between the location of colorectal cancers reported by gastroenterologists during endoscopy and the actual anatomical location noted on operative or pathology reports after colon surgery. Endoscopic tattooing should be used when faced with any luminal lesions of interest.

  10. Clinical impact of FDG PET-CT in patients with potentially operable metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.H. [Department of Radiology, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Chowdhury, F.U. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Lodge, J.P.A. [HPB and Transplant Unit, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarsbrook, A.F., E-mail: andrew.scarsbrook@leedsth.nhs.uk [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the clinical impact of 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Materials and methods: One hundred and two patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer underwent FDG PET-CT in addition to conventional imaging over an 18-month period. The findings were compared to conventional imaging, with histological or clinico-radiological validation. The impact on subsequent management was evaluated using information from clinico-radiological databases. Results: Of 102 patients (mean age 67 years, range 27-85 years), 94 had liver, five had isolated lung, and three had limited peritoneal metastases. In 31 patients (30%) PET-CT had a major impact on subsequent management, by correctly clarifying indeterminate lesions on conventional imaging as inoperable metastatic disease in 16 patients, detecting previously unsuspected metastatic disease in nine patients, identifying occult second primary tumours in three patients, and correctly down-staging three patients. PET-CT had a minor impact in 12 patients (12%), no impact in 49 cases (48%), and a potentially negative impact in 10 cases (10%). Following PET-CT, 36 (35%) patients were no longer considered for surgery. Of those remaining operative 45 of 66 (68%) underwent potentially curative metastatic surgery. In this cohort PET-CT saved 16 futile laparotomies. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT has a valuable role in selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by improving staging accuracy and characterizing indeterminate lesions and helps triage patients to the appropriate treatment.

  11. Colorectal cancer and 18FDG-PET/CT: What about adding the T to the N parameter in loco-regional staging?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pier Paolo Mainenti; Delfina Iodice; Sabrina Segreto; Giovanni Storto; Mario Magliulo; Giovanni Domenico De Palma; Marco Salvatore; Leonardo Pace

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) may be an accurate technique in the assessment of the T stage in patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: Thirty four consecutive patients (20 men and 14 women; mean age: 63 years) with a histologically proven diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma and scheduled for surgery in our hospital were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT preoperatively. The primary tumor site and extent were evaluated on PET/CT images. Colorectal wall invasion was analysed according to a modified T classification that considers only three stages (≤ T2, T3, T4). Assessment of accuracy was carried out using 95% confidence intervals for T. RESULTS: Thirty five/37 (94.6%) adenocarcinomas were identified and correctly located on PET/CT images. PET/CT correctly staged the T of 33/35 lesions identified showing an accuracy of 94.3% (95% CI: 87%-100%). All T1, T3 and T4 lesions were correctly staged, while two T2 neoplasms were overstated as T3. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that FDG-PET/CT may be an accurate modality for identifying primary tumor and defining its local extent in patients with colorectal cancer.

  12. "Hybrid" lesion of the maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sankaranarayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign but aggressive fibroosseous lesion that affects the craniofacial skeleton. Their distinct clinical and histopathological features warrant the lesion to be considered as a separate entity from other fibro-osseous group of lesions such as fibrous dysplasia and cemento ossifying fibroma. Concomitant development of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst may rarely occur, which makes the lesion more aggressive and difficult to treat. We report a case of a 6 year old girl who was diagnosed with aneurysmal bone cyst during her earlier presentation at a private hospital and was treated for the same. The lesion recurred within 6 months. The second incisional biopsy specimen revealed features of trabecular variant of juvenile ossifying fibroma along with areas of aneurysmal bone cyst.

  13. Detection of up to 65% of Precancerous Lesions of the Human Colon and Rectum by Mutation Analysis of APC, K-Ras, B-Raf and CTNNB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Mandy; Scholtka, Bettina, E-mail: scholtka@uni-potsdam.de [Chair of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur- Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Gottschalk, Uwe [Maria Heimsuchung Caritas-Klinik Pankow, Breite Straße 46/47, 13187 Berlin (Germany); Faiss, Siegbert [III. Medizinische Abteilung - Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Asklepios Klinik Barmbek, Rubenkamp 220, 22291 Hamburg (Germany); Schatz, Daniela; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia [BIOTECON Diagnostics GmbH, Hermannswerder Haus 17, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Steinberg, Pablo, E-mail: scholtka@uni-potsdam.de [Chair of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur- Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Institute for Food Toxicology and Analytical Chemistry, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover (Germany)

    2010-12-29

    In the present study a recently conceived 4-gene marker panel covering the Wnt and Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathways was used to analyze 20 colorectal serrated lesions and 41 colorectal adenoma samples and to determine the percentage of each of the above-mentioned potentially precancerous lesions carrying at least one of the four above-mentioned genes in a mutated form. CTNNB1 and B-Raf were screened by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, K-Ras by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and the APC gene mutation cluster region (codons 1243–1567) by direct DNA sequencing. APC mutations were only detected in 10% of the serrated lesions but in 34% of the adenomas. Twenty percent of the serrated lesions and 14% of the adenomas carried a mutated K-Ras. B-Raf was found to be mutated in 50% of the serrated lesions and in 22% of the adenomas. CTNNB1 was altered in 12% of the adenomas, but not in serrated lesions. By using the above gene marker panel it could be shown that 65% of the serrated lesions and 61% of the adenomas carried at least one of the four genes in a mutated form. Based on its excellent performance in detecting mutations in sporadic preneoplastic (in this study) and neoplastic lesions (in a previous study) of the human colon and rectum, this primer combination might also be suited to efficiently and non-invasively detect genetic alterations in stool DNA of patients with early colorectal cancer.

  14. Detection of up to 65% of Precancerous Lesions of the Human Colon and Rectum by Mutation Analysis of APC, K-Ras, B-Raf and CTNNB1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schatz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a recently conceived 4-gene marker panel covering the Wnt and Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathways was used to analyze 20 colorectal serrated lesions and 41 colorectal adenoma samples and to determine the percentage of each of the above-mentioned potentially precancerous lesions carrying at least one of the four above-mentioned genes in a mutated form. CTNNB1 and B-Raf were screened by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, K-Ras by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and the APC gene mutation cluster region (codons 1243–1567 by direct DNA sequencing. APC mutations were only detected in 10% of the serrated lesions but in 34% of the adenomas. Twenty percent of the serrated lesions and 14% of the adenomas carried a mutated K-Ras. B-Raf was found to be mutated in 50% of the serrated lesions and in 22% of the adenomas. CTNNB1 was altered in 12% of the adenomas, but not in serrated lesions. By using the above gene marker panel it could be shown that 65% of the serrated lesions and 61% of the adenomas carried at least one of the four genes in a mutated form. Based on its excellent performance in detecting mutations in sporadic preneoplastic (in this study and neoplastic lesions (in a previous study of the human colon and rectum, this primer combination might also be suited to efficiently and non-invasively detect genetic alterations in stool DNA of patients with early colorectal cancer.

  15. Pain in osteochondral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiewiorski, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Rasch, Helmut; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Valderrabano, Victor

    2011-04-01

    Pain is the key symptom of patients suffering from osteochondral lesions (OCLs) of the ankle joint. Routine radiographic imaging methods for diagnosis and staging of OCL fail to visualize the pain-inducing focus within the joint. SPECT-CT (Single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography) is a new hybrid imaging technique allowing exact digital fusion of scintigraphic and computer tomographic images. This allows precise localization and size determination of an OCL within the joint. Using this novel imaging method, we conducted a study to evaluate the correlation between pathological uptake within an OCL and pain experienced by patients suffering from this condition; 15 patients were assessed in the orthopaedic ambulatory clinic for unilateral OCL of the ankle joint. Pain status was measured with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A SPECT-CT was performed. All patients underwent CT-guided ankle injection with a local anesthetic and iodine contrast medium. The VAS score assessed immediately postinfiltration was compared with the preinterventional VAS score obtained in the outpatient clinic. Pain relief was defined as a reduction of the VAS score to ≤50% of the preinterventional score, if expected immediately after infiltration. Pain relief was found in all 15 patients. The results of our study show that there is a highly significant correlation between pain and pathological uptake seen on SPECT-CT, indicating that pathologically remodeled bone tissue is an important contributor to pain in OCL. Adequate addressing of involved bone tissue needs to be taken into consideration when choosing a surgical treatment method.

  16. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize the spora......Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize...... the FCF, were considered examples of probable SSP. None of the 41 cases coded as adenoma possessed a morphology that qualified as SSP. The prevalence of SSP was not increased as compared to the background population and thus, this serrated lesion does not appear to play a tumorigenic role in Lynch...

  17. Can contrast-enhanced ultrasonography replace multidetector-computed tomography in the detection of liver metastases from colorectal cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars P.S.; Rosenkilde, Mona; Christensen, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients referred to the Department of Colorectal Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital with primary or local recurrence of CRC. The patients underwent liver ultrasonography (US), CEUS, MDCT and intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS). Fine-needle biopsy was performed on all suspicious lesions......PURPOSE: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and 4-slice multidetector-computed tomography (MDCT) in the detection of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Candidates for this prospective study were 461....... The examinations were interpreted blindly and the combination of US, CEUS, biphasic MDCT, IOUS, follow up and biopsy was the gold standard. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty-five patients were included. All patients had undergone preoperative US, CEUS and MDCT and 65.5% had received IOUS. The gold standard found...

  18. Foco de criptas aberrantes e câncer da junção colorretal: análise da presença de lesões precoces microscópicas na periferia do câncer colorretal e correlação com a expressão da β-catenina e Ki-67 Aberrant crypt foci and cancer of the colorectal junction: the correlation between β-catenin/Ki-67 expression and the occurrence of early microscopic secondary lesions surrounding periphery colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cury Ogata

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a presença de foco de criptas aberrantes (FCA em mucosa macroscopicamente normal, localizada na periferia de um câncer colorretal (CCR e correlacionar a progressão tumoral destes FCA para o CCR, por meio da expressão da β-catenina e o Ki-67. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se 21 espécimes cirúrgicos contendo adenocarcinoma de junção retossigmóide. Foram coletadas amostras localizadas a 1 e 5 cm proximal e distal ao tumor, quando possível, bem como um fragmento da neoplasia. Os FCA foram selecionados. Subseqüentemente foi realizado estudo imunoistoquímico com os anticorpos β-catenina e o Ki-67. RESULTADOS: A expressão nuclear da β-catenina nos adenocarcinomas, revelou freqüência de 81%. O Ki-67 apresentou a mesma freqüência. Apesar disso o coeficiente Kappa revelou fraca concordância entre estes anticorpos. Foram observados 20 FCA, sendo que 13 destes focos localizavam-se nas proximidades do tumor. Nenhum dos FCA apresentou expressão da β-catenina nuclear, tampouco para o Ki-67. CONCLUSÃO: Nas áreas situadas a 1 cm da neoplasia colorretal, foi observada maior concentração de FCA em relação às áreas situadas a 5 cm do tumor. No entanto, não se observou correlação entre a expressão da β-catenina e ki-67 nos colonócitos das criptas aberrantes das áreas estudadas, com as células neoplásicas do adenocarcinoma.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF in macroscopic normal mucosa surrounding colorectal cancers (CRC; additionally, analyze tumor progression from ACF to CRC by means of β-catenin and Ki-67 expression. METHODS: Twenty-one surgical specimens showing colorectal junction adenocarcinoma were included. Macroscopic normal mucosa proximal and distal to the primary tumor was sampled at a distance of 1 and 5 cm in both sides. A primary tumor sample was also retrieved. Eventually, ACF's were selected and immunohistochemical analysis of β-catenin and Ki-67 were carried out. RESULTS

  19. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and transvagi

  20. Automated spectroscopic tissue classification in colorectal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, R.M.; Alic, L.; Beets, G.L.; Breukink, S.O.; Wieringa, F.P.; Stassen, L.P.S.

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal surgery, detecting ureters and mesenteric arteries is of utmost importance to prevent iatrogenic injury and to facilitate intraoperative decision making. A tool enabling ureter- and artery-specific image enhancement within (and possibly through) surrounding adipose tissue would facilit

  1. Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Anthony; Collins, Andrew; Fuller, Zoë; Hillman, Kevin; Ratcliffe, Brian

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Apoptosis;Brassicaceae;chemically induced;chemistry;Cell Division;Colorectal Neoplasms;drug effects;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Evaluation;Food Handling;Glucosinolates;Glycoside Hydrolases;Humans;Hydrolases;Isothiocyanates;metabolism;methods;pharmacology;prevention & control;Research. Cruciferous vegetables have been studied extensively for their chemoprotective effects. Although they contain ma...

  2. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt, M.F.P. van der; Wobbes, T.; Strobbe, L.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In additio

  3. Why I Got Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-29

    CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why she got tested for colorectal cancer when she turned 50 years old. .  Created: 2/29/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/29/2016.

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves colorectal anastomotic healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S.A. Boersema (Geesien); Z. Wu (Zhouqiao); L.F. Kroese; S. Vennix (Sandra); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne); J.W. van Neck (Han); K.H. Lam; G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J. Jeekel (Johannes); J.F. Lange (Johan F.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) has been found to improve the healing of poorly oxygenated tissues. This study aimed to investigate the influence of HBOT on the healing in ischemic colorectal anastomosis. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were randomly divided into a treatment group

  5. Systemic treatment of advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Punt, C.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    For advanced colorectal cancer (ACC), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy has been the standard for some decades. Attempts have been made to improve its results by biochemical modulation and schedule modulation of 5-FU which, in combination with leucovorin (LV), has been regarded as standard ch

  6. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  7. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  8. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNy in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  9. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MULTIPLE GENETIC TUMOR MARKER ASSAY BY QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME PCR TO PREDICT RECURRENCE IN COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe correlation between multiple genetic tumor markers,carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA),cytokeratin 20 (CK20),and Survivin,and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer (CRC) and to assess prognostic diagnosis value in cancer recurrence and metastasis.Methods A total of 92 patients with CRC,68 patients with precancerous lesions,and 29 control volunteers were collected for the detection of CEA,CK20,and Survivin expressions by using quantitative Real-Time PCR technology.Associations am...

  10. Presence of a TA haplotype in the APC gene containing the common 1822 polymorphism and colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Jan B; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Martínez, María Elena; Gerner, Eugene W; Jurutka, Peter W; Thompson, Patricia A

    2008-07-15

    Acquired or inherited mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene are causally linked to colorectal cancer. Given the significance of APC in colorectal cancer, we investigated the association between common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the APC gene and the odds of developing metachronous colorectal adenomas as a surrogate measure of colorectal cancer risk. Coding SNPs at codons 486, 1678, 1822, 1960, and 2502 were analyzed in a total of 1,399 subjects who participated in two randomized clinical trials for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. No association was found for any single SNP and the odds of metachronous adenoma. In contrast, a TA haplotype (codons 486 and 1822) was associated with a statistically significant 27% and 26% reduction in the odds of any and nonadvanced metachronous adenoma after adjustment for baseline adenoma characteristics [odds ratio (OR), 0.73; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.59-0.91 and OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.57-0.94], respectively. No significant reduction in odds was observed for advanced metachronous lesions. Diplotype analysis revealed a strong gene dose effect with carriers of two alleles containing TT-AA (codons 486 and 1822, respectively) having an 89% lower odds for advanced metachronous adenomas (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.01-0.80) when compared with the common CC-AA diplotype (codons 486 and 1822, respectively). Our findings support an important role for germ-line allele sequence in the APC gene and individual risk of metachronous adenomatous polyps.

  11. Re-laparoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of postoperative complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Riordan, J M

    2013-08-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery has increasingly become the standard of care in the management of both benign and malignant colorectal disease. We herein describe our experience with laparoscopy in the management of complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

  12. Thrombospondin-1 in a Murine Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Colorectal Cancer (CRC is one of the late complications observed in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Carcinogenesis is promoted by persistent chronic inflammation occurring in IBD. Understanding the mechanisms involved is essential in order to ameliorate inflammation and prevent CRC. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1 is a multidomain glycoprotein with important roles in angiogenesis. The effects of TSP-1 in colonic tumor formation and growth were analyzed in a model of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. WT and TSP-1 deficient mice (TSP-1-/- of the C57BL/6 strain received a single injection of azoxymethane (AOM and multiple cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS to induce chronic inflammation-related cancers. Proliferation and angiogenesis were histologically analyzed in tumors. The intestinal transcriptome was also analyzed using a gene microarray approach. When the area containing tumors was compared with the entire colonic area of each mouse, the tumor burden was decreased in AOM/DSS-treated TSP-1-/- versus wild type (WT mice. However, these lesions displayed more angiogenesis and proliferation rates when compared with the WT tumors. AOM-DSS treatment of TSP-1-/- mice resulted in significant deregulation of genes involved in transcription, canonical Wnt signaling, transport, defense response, regulation of epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism. Microarray analyses of these tumors showed down-regulation of 18 microRNAs in TSP-1-/- tumors. These results contribute new insights on the controversial role of TSP-1 in cancer and offer a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of CRC.

  13. Clinico-pathological aspects of colorectal serrated adenomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashish Chandra; Adnan A Sheikh; Anton Cerar; Ian C Talbot

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the association of colorectal serrated adenomas (SAs) with invasive carcinoma, local recurrence, synchronicity and metachronicity of lesions.METHODS: A total of 4536 polyps from 1096patients over an eight-year period (1987-1995) were retrospectively examined. Adenomas showing at least 50% of serrated architecture were called SAs by three reviewing pathologists.RESULTS: Ninety-one (2%) of all polyps were called SAs, which were found in 46 patients. Invasive carcinomas were seen in 3 out of 46 (6.4%) patients, of whom one was a case of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). A male preponderance was noted and features of a mild degree of dysplasia were seen in majority (n=75,83%) of serrated adenomas. Follow-up ranged 1-12years with a mean time of 5.75 years. Recurrences of SAs were seen in 3 (6.4%) cases, synchronous SAs in 16 (34.8%) cases and metachronous SAs in 9 (19.6%)cases.CONCLUSION: Invasive carcinoma arising in serrated adenoma is rare, accounting for 2 (4.3%) cases studied in this series.

  14. Lesiones debido a un rayo

    OpenAIRE

    Soraia Oliveira; Andriy Bal

    2012-01-01

    Lesiones debido a un rayo Mujer de 72 años, fue admitida en urgências con dolor abdominal y lipotimia después de ser golpeada por un rayo mientras abría una ventana. En la exploracion presentaba lesiones, localizadas en el tronco, dolorosas a la palpación. Las lesiones abdominales en forma de estrella eran muy sugestivas de imágenes de Lichtenberg (figura A), mientras en la región pélvica (figura B) y en la nalga derecha (figura C) eran más lineales y compatibles con quemaduras de pri...

  15. Factitious lesions of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Kaempf de Oliveira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The presence of a lesion with atypical presentation, obscure clinical history, which does not improve with classic treatments, shall raise the red flag of the medical team. In such cases, the hypothesis of a factitious lesion shall be considered. Many times the correct diagnosis on the initial assessment may avoid high-cost diagnostic tests, unnecessary treatments, and time consumption of the medical team. We present here two classic cases of factitious lesions that, similar to those described in the literature, is difficult to diagnose and difficult to treat.

  16. PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS: CUTANEOUS, SUBCUTANEOUS, NASOPHARYNGEAL LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasoolinejad

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is an amalgam of clinical diseases caused by a wide variety of dematiaceous fungi. We are reporting on a 16 year-old patient from Amol with subcutaneous cervical nodes and nasopharyngeal lesions of phaeohypho"nmycosis that were confirmed by pathological examination, direct smear, and culture. After treatment with an oral triazole (Itraconazole for 4 months, all nodes and lesions disappeared and treatment was stopped A new lesion appeared on his chest wall 8 months, therapy with itraconazole was restarted and commuted for a long time.

  17. An Electrosurgical Endoknife with a Water-Jet Function (Flushknife) Proves Its Merits in Colorectal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Especially for the Cases Which Should Be Removed En Bloc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoji; Ishihara, Ryu; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Hanaoka, Noboru; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya

    2013-01-01

    Background. Previously, we reported that the Flushknife (electrosurgical endoknife with a water-jet function) could reduce the operation time of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) however, suitable situation for the Flushknife was obscure. This subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial was aimed to investigate the suitable situation for the Flushknife. Methods. A total of 48 superficial colorectal neoplasms that underwent ESD using either the Flexknife or the Flushknife in a referral center were enrolled. The differences of operation time between the Flexknife and the Flushknife groups in each subgroup (tumor size, location, and macroscopic type) were analyzed. Results. Median (95% CI) operation time calculated using survival curves was significantly shorter in the Flushknife group than in the Flexknife group (55.5 min [41, 78] versus 74.0 [57, 90] min; P = 0.039, Hazard Ratio HR: 0.53; 95% CI (0.29–0.97)). In particular, the HR in patients with laterally spreading tumors-nongranular type (LST-NG) in the Flushknife group was significantly smaller than in the Flexknife group (HR: 0.165→0.17; 95% CI (0.04–0.66)). There was a trend of decreasing HRs according to larger lesion size. Conclusions. The Flushknife proved its merits in colorectal ESD especially for the lesions which should be removed en bloc (LST-NG and large lesion). PMID:24174933

  18. An Electrosurgical Endoknife with a Water-Jet Function (Flushknife Proves Its Merits in Colorectal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Especially for the Cases Which Should Be Removed En Bloc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Takeuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previously, we reported that the Flushknife (electrosurgical endoknife with a water-jet function could reduce the operation time of colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD however, suitable situation for the Flushknife was obscure. This subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial was aimed to investigate the suitable situation for the Flushknife. Methods. A total of 48 superficial colorectal neoplasms that underwent ESD using either the Flexknife or the Flushknife in a referral center were enrolled. The differences of operation time between the Flexknife and the Flushknife groups in each subgroup (tumor size, location, and macroscopic type were analyzed. Results. Median (95% CI operation time calculated using survival curves was significantly shorter in the Flushknife group than in the Flexknife group (55.5 min [41, 78] versus 74.0 [57, 90] min; , Hazard Ratio HR: 0.53; 95% CI (0.29–0.97. In particular, the HR in patients with laterally spreading tumors-nongranular type (LST-NG in the Flushknife group was significantly smaller than in the Flexknife group (HR: 0.1650.17; 95% CI (0.04–0.66. There was a trend of decreasing HRs according to larger lesion size. Conclusions. The Flushknife proved its merits in colorectal ESD especially for the lesions which should be removed en bloc (LST-NG and large lesion.

  19. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal can...

  20. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas;

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  1. Benign breast lesions in Kano

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background; Non-malignant diseases of the breast have assumed increased importance ... This was followed by fibroadenoma accounting for 28.8% with a mean age of 21 ... relevance of this study. ... benign breast lesion in Kano accounting.

  2. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  3. Lesions of the avian pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E; Reavill, Drury R

    2014-01-01

    Although not well described, occasional reports of avian exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease are available. This article describes the lesions associated with common diseases of the avian pancreas reported in the literature and/or seen by the authors.

  4. [Analysis of risk factors for bone metastasis after radical resection of colorectal cancer within 5 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Tan, Zhen; Fu, Chuangang; Wang, Hao; Yuan, Jie

    2017-01-25

    To investigate the risk factors of metachronous bone metastasis after radical resection of colorectal cancer within 5 years. Clinical data of 1 749 patients with colorectal cancer, of whom 50(2.8%) patients developed metastasis to bone after operation, in the Department of Colorectal Surgery, Changhai Hospital of The Second Military Medical University from January 2001 to December 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to find the risk factors of metachronous bone metastasis from colorectal cancer using Chi square test and Logistic regression, respectively. Of 50 colorectal cancer cases with bone metastasis, 29 were male and 21 were female. The age was ≥ 60 years old in 28 cases. Tumors of 36 cases were located in the rectum and of 14 cases located in the colon. Pathology examination showed 43 cases were adenocarcinomas, 7 cases were mucinous adenocarcinoma. Forty-two cases had T3-4 stage lesions, 30 cases had lymph node metastasis, 14 cases had pulmonary metastasis, and 5 cases had liver metastasis. Univariate Chi square test indicated that factors associated with the metachronous bone metastasis of colorectal cancer within 5 years were tumor site (χ(2)=4.932, P=0.026), preoperative carbohydrate antigen 199 (CA199) level (χ(2)=4.266, P=0.039), lymph node metastasis (χ(2)=13.054, P=0.000) and pulmonary metastasis(χ(2)=35.524, P=0.000). The incidence of bone metastasis in patients with rectal cancer (3.6%, 36/991) was higher compared to those with colon cancer (1.8%, 14/758). The incidence of bone metastasis in patients with higher(> 37 kU/L) preoperative serum CA199 level (4.9%, 12/245) was higher compared to those with lower serum CA199 level (2.5%, 38/1504). The incidence of bone metastasis in patients with lymph node metastasis(4.8%,30/627) and pulmonary metastasis (11.6%, 14/121) was significantly higher compared to those without lymph node metastasis (1.8%, 20/1122) and pulmonary metastasis(2.2%, 36

  5. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA efficacy for colorectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higurashi Takuma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most commonly occurring neoplasms and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and new preventive strategies are needed to lower the burden of this disease. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that is widely used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease, has recently been suggested to have a suppressive effect on tumorigenesis and cancer cell growth. In CRC chemoprevention trials, in general, the incidence of polyps or of the cancer itself is set as the study endpoint. Although the incidence rate of CRC would be the most reliable endpoint, use of this endpoint would be unsuitable for chemoprevention trials, because of the relatively low occurrence rate of CRC in the general population and the long-term observation period that it would necessitate. Moreover, there is an ethical problem in conducting long-term trials to determine whether a test drug might be effective or harmful. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF, defined as lesions containing crypts that are larger in diameter and stain more darkly with methylene blue than normal crypts, are considered as a reliable surrogate biomarker of CRC. Thus, we devised a prospective randomized controlled trial as a preliminary study prior to a CRC chemoprevention trial to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of EPA against colorectal ACF formation and the safety of this drug, in patients scheduled for polypectomy. Methods This study is a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized controlled trial to be conducted in patients with both colorectal ACF and colorectal polyps scheduled for polypectomy. Eligible patients shall be recruited for the study and the number of ACF in the rectum counted at the baseline colonoscopy. Then, the participants shall be allocated randomly to either one of two groups, the EPA group and the placebo group. Patients in the EPA group shall receive oral

  6. Pediatric sellar and suprasellar lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jason W; Vezina, L Gilbert

    2011-03-01

    Masses arising in the sella turcica and the suprasellar region are common in children. The type and frequency of the various lesions encountered in childhood differ from the adult presentation. This article reviews the embryology of the pituitary gland and its normal appearance in childhood as well as the imaging and clinical findings of the common and some of the uncommon lesions arising in the sella turcica, the pituitary stalk, the suprasellar cistern and the lower third ventricle in the pediatric population.

  7. Toward standardization of laparoscopic resection for colorectal cancer in developing countries: A step by step module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mostafa Ahmed Mahmoud

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery for colorectal cancer is safe and oncologically sound, standardized well-structured laparoscopic technique masters the procedure even in early learning curve setting.

  8. Lesions of the clitoris: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debra S

    2015-01-01

    The clitoris may become involved by vulvar lesions. There are also lesions arising from the clitoris. A familiarity with these lesions is necessary for the high index of suspicion needed for their diagnosis.

  9. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  10. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  11. Border preserving skin lesion segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Mostafa; Samei, Golnoosh

    2008-03-01

    Melanoma is a fatal cancer with a growing incident rate. However it could be cured if diagnosed in early stages. The first step in detecting melanoma is the separation of skin lesion from healthy skin. There are particular features associated with a malignant lesion whose successful detection relies upon accurately extracted borders. We propose a two step approach. First, we apply K-means clustering method (to 3D RGB space) that extracts relatively accurate borders. In the second step we perform an extra refining step for detecting the fading area around some lesions as accurately as possible. Our method has a number of novelties. Firstly as the clustering method is directly applied to the 3D color space, we do not overlook the dependencies between different color channels. In addition, it is capable of extracting fine lesion borders up to pixel level in spite of the difficulties associated with fading areas around the lesion. Performing clustering in different color spaces reveals that 3D RGB color space is preferred. The application of the proposed algorithm to an extensive data-base of skin lesions shows that its performance is superior to that of existing methods both in terms of accuracy and computational complexity.

  12. Premalignant Lesions in the Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziva Kirkali

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most malignant urologic disease. Different lesions, such as dysplasia in the tubules adjacent to RCC, atypical hyperplasia in the cyst epithelium of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and adenoma have been described for a number of years as possible premalignant changes or precursor lesions of RCC. In two recent papers, kidneys adjacent to RCC or removed from other causes were analyzed, and dysplastic lesions were identified and defined in detail. Currently renal intraepithelial neoplasia (RIN is the proposed term for classification. The criteria for a lesion to be defined as premalignant are (1 morphological similarity; (2 spatial association; (3 development of microinvasive carcinoma; (4 higher frequency, severity, and extent then invasive carcinoma; (5 progression to invasive cancer; and (6 similar genetic alterations. RIN resembles the neoplastic cells of RCC. There is spatial association. Progression to invasive carcinoma is described in experimental cancer models, and in some human renal tumors. Similar molecular alterations are found in some putative premalignant changes. The treatment for RCC is radical or partial nephrectomy. Preneoplastic lesions may remain in the renal remnant in patients treated by partial nephrectomy and may be the source of local recurrences. RIN seems to be a biologic precursor of some RCCs and warrants further investigation. Interpretation and reporting of these lesions would reveal important resources for the biological nature and clinical significance. The management of RIN diagnosed in a renal biopsy and partial nephrectomy needs to be answered.

  13. Unusual lesions of the mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Shamsuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study unusual lesions in the mediastinum, which do not originate from the thymus, lymph nodes, neural tissues or germ cells, and tissues that normally engender pathologic lesions in the mediastinum. Materials and Methods: Of the 65 cases seen, 12 unusual lesion were encountered in a 5½ year period from 2006 to 2011. Results: Two cases of nodular colloid goiter and one each of the mediastinal cyst, undifferentiated carcinoma, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH affected the anterosuperior mediastinum. In the middle mediastinum, one case each of the mesothelioma, malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, solitary fibrous tumor (SFT, and pleomorphic sarcoma (PS was seen. One case of meningeal melanocytoma (Mme and primary pleural liposarcoma (PL involved the posterior mediastinum. Persistent disease was seen in LCH after 2 years. Of all the cases with malignant lesions, only the patient with SCC was alive after 1 year. Conclusion: The cases of primary and SCC, LCH, melanocytoma, liposarcoma and PS, and GIST are unexpected and very rarely have paradigms in the mediastinum. Radiologic impression and knowledge of the compartment where these lesions arose from hardly assisted in arriving at a definitive opinion as the lesions were not typical of this location. A high index of suspicion and the immunohistochemical profile facilitated the final diagnosis.

  14. Colonoscopic evaluation of hematochezia in low and average risk patients for colorectal cancer: A prospective study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Puglisi Carlo; Russo Francesco Paolo; Barbera Carmelo; Incarbone Salvatore; Aprile Giuseppe; Bonanno Giacomo; Russo Antonio

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To relate the endoscopic findings in patients with hematochezia with regard to age in "low and average risk" for colorectal cancer (CRC) and to localize significant lesions in order to identify patients who need sigmoidoscopy or total colonoscopy.METHODS: This prospective study was performed in an open access GI endoscopy unit. Out of 4322 consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy, 918 reported hematochezia. The final study group comprized 180 patients aged below 45 and 237 over 45. Main exclusion criteria were a 1st-degree family history of colorectal carcinoma,patients reporting blood mixed with stools and/or progressive colonic symptoms, or patients who had undergone colon surgery for neoplastic lesions.RESULTS: Total colonoscopy could be performed in 96% of patients. Abnormal findings were observed in 34.3% of the younger and in 65.7% of the older ones.Findings were the presence of polyps in the distal colon (n = 2) and IBD in the proximal colon (n = 29) in the group of the younger patients, and polyps (n = 15), IBD (n = 13), and carcinoma (n = 6, 4 of the lesions were located proximal to the splenic flexure) in the elderly.Our findings suggest that the diagnostic potential of total colonoscopy in patients younger than 45 referring scant hematochezia, is not mandatory. By exploring only the distal tract of the colon we have misdiagnosed two cases of IBD located in the ascending colon. In this group of patients additional risk factors must be identified before performing a total colonoscopy. Regarding the patients older than 45 yr, the exploration of the distal colon would have led to our overlooking a carcinoma, two neoplastic polyps and one IBD located in the proximal colon.CONCLUSION: Young patients with scant hematochezia but without risk factors for neoplasia do not need a total colonoscopy, whereas is mandatory performing a total colonoscopy in older patients even in the presence of anal pathology.

  15. Feasibility and response of helical tomotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun yun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Shin, Eung Jin; Lee, Moon Sung; Ryu, Chang Beom; Ko, Bong Min; Yun, Ji Na [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the treatment outcome and the toxicity of helical tomotherapy (HT) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We retrospectively reviewed 18 patients with 31 lesions from mCRC treated with HT between 2009 and 2013. The liver (9 lesions) and lymph nodes (9 lesions) were the most frequent sites. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 12 to 1,110 mL (median, 114 mL). The total doses ranged from 30 to 70 Gy in 10-30 fractions. When the alpha/beta value for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED), the total doses ranged from 39 to 119 Gy{sub 10} (median, 55 Gy{sub 10}). Nineteen lesions were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCRT). With a median follow-up time of 16 months, the median overall survival for 18 patients was 33 months. Eight lesions (26%) achieved complete response. The 1- and 3-year local progression free survival (LPFS) rates for 31 lesions were 45% and 34%, respectively. On univariate analysis, significant parameters influencing LPFS rates were chemotherapy response before HT, aim of HT, CCRT, PTV, BED, and adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, PTV < or =113 mL and BED >48 Gy{sub 10} were associated with a statistically significant improvement in LFPS. During HT, four patients experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicities, each of whom had also received CCRT. The current study demonstrates the efficacy and tolerability of HT for mCRC. To define optimal RT dose according to tumor size of mCRC, further study should be needed.

  16. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3.0 T MRI for the evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Metastasis is not always seen as a “defect” on the hepatobiliary phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Aram, E-mail: arkim.rad@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hee, E-mail: chlee86@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Baek Hui, E-mail: maelstrom@naver.com [Department of Pathology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jongmee, E-mail: leejongmee@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Woong, E-mail: cooljay@korea.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yang Shin, E-mail: pys797979@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Ah, E-mail: kahkim@korea.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Cheol Min, E-mail: chlee86@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine specific imaging features of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer, focusing on the hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI. Materials and methods: Over a 2-year period, 79 hepatic metastatic lesions were identified from 32 patients (22 men and 10 women) who proven colorectal cancer and underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced 3.0 T MRI. Hepatic metastases were proven pathologically in 16 patients: by surgical liver resection (n = 14) and by US-guided biopsy (n = 2). The remaining 16 patients were considered to have hepatic metastasis based on imaging studies and clinical information. Two radiologists evaluated the imaging features of each MRI sequence, including high resolution T2WI, dynamic contrast enhancement study with hepatobiliary phase, and diffusion weighted image. We also compared SI of the lesions on T2WI and HBP. Results: T2WI showed homogeneous high SI (n = 25; 31.7%), target appearance (n = 3; 3.8%), reversed target appearance (n = 2; 2.6%), and heterogeneously high SI (n = 49; 62%). On HBP, homogeneous defect were seen in 22 lesions (27.9%), target appearance in five lesions (6.4%), reversed target appearance in two lesions (2.5%), and heterogeneous defect in 50 lesions (63.3%); including reticular (70%), partially globular (26%), and diffuse GGO-like (4%) patterns. According to the imaging features on HBP, the homogeneous defect and heterogeneous defect groups had a mean ADC value of 0.99 × 10{sup −3} and 1.07 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, respectively, without statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer usually showed as a heterogeneous defect on HBP and a heterogeneous high SI on T2WI. The generally accepted “true defect” was not a common finding in hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer.

  17. The Role of Smoking in the Development of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dénes Márton István

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Smoking is an important public health issue nowadays. It causes a lot of diseases and represents also a source of carcinogenic substances. Recent studies showed an increased incidence of colorectal cancer in smokers. The aim of our study is to assess the association between smoking and colorectal cancer and to establish the prevalence of heavy smokers among the patients operated on for colorectal cancer.

  18. Mandibular osteomas in sporadic colorectal carcinoma. A genetic marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, J O; Rasmussen, M S; Videbaek, H;

    1993-01-01

    Pantomography of the mandible was performed in 98 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinoma. Twenty-eight patients (29%) had osteomas versus 5% in a control group (P osteomas are found in most patients with the premalignant dominant syndrome familial adenomatous...... polyposis. Sporadic colorectal cancer examinations of married couples have shown that diet has only a moderate influence on the development of colorectal cancer, whereas pedigree studies indicate a genetic component. On this basis we conclude that mandibular osteomas are probably genetic markers...

  19. Nurses' attitudes towards the sexuality of colorectal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Justham, D

    This article reviews the literature on nurses' attitudes towards sexuality and highlights a range of studies carried out on functional outcomes following colorectal surgery. The article provides nurses with an insight into colorectal cancer, the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in men and women following colorectal surgery and the importance of addressing the various aspects of sexuality in a sensitive manner to provide patients with holistic care.

  20. Analysis of different components in the peritumoral tissue microenvironment of colorectal cancer: A potential prospect in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Liu, Hong; Gong, Xiuli; Wen, Bin; Chen, Dan; Liu, Jinyuan; Hu, Fengliang

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to observe the varying expression of biomarkers in the microenvironment adjacent to colorectal cancer lesions to provide additional insight into the functions of microenvironment components in carcinogenesis and present a novel or improved indicator for early diagnosis of cancer. A total of 144 human samples from three different locations in 48 patients were collected, these locations were 10, 5 and 2 cm from the colorectal cancer lesion, respectively. The biomarkers analyzed included E‑cadherin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18), hyaluronidase‑1 (Hyal‑1), collagen type I (Col‑I), Crumbs3 (CRB3), vimentin, proteinase activated receptor 3 (PAR‑3), α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA), cyclin D1 (CD1) and cluster of differentiation (CD)133. In addition, crypt architecture was observed. Related functional analysis of proteins was performed using hierarchical index cluster analysis. More severe destroyed crypt architecture closer to the cancer lesions was observed compared with the 10 cm sites, with certain crypts degraded entirely. Expression levels of E‑cadherin, CK18, CRB3 and PAR‑3 were lower in 2 cm sites compared with the 10 cm sites (all P0.05 and P=0.0001, respectively), while the expression of vimentin, α‑SMA, CD1 and CD133 were not. Hyal‑1 and Col‑I may be independently important in cancer initiation in the tumor microenvironment. The results of the present study suggest that the biomarkers in the tissue microenvironment are associated with early tumorigenesis and may contribute to the development of carcinomas. These observations may be useful for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  1. Adenoma, advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer prevalence in asymptomatic 40- to 49-year-old subjects with a first-degree family history of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio Blanco, G; Cretella, M; Paoluzi, O A; Caruso, A; Mannisi, E; Servadei, F; Romeo, S; Grasso, E; Sileri, P; Giannelli, M; Biancone, L; Palmieri, G; Pallone, F

    2013-09-01

    First-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have an increased CRC risk. Few studies have addressed if adenoma and advanced adenoma risk is increased among individuals, 40-49 years of age, with a family history of CRC. Therefore, the aim of the study was to define the prevalence and location of adenoma, advanced adenoma and CRC, according to age, in asymptomatic individuals with a family history of CRC. Retrospective study of asymptomatic FDRs, 40 to ≥70 years of age undergoing first screening colonoscopy over a 3-year period, of CRC patients. Among 464 individuals studied, the prevalence of adenoma and advanced adenoma was 18.1% and 6.4%, respectively. According to age intervals, the prevalences of adenoma and advanced adenoma were 14% and 3.5%, respectively, in subjects 40-49 years of age; 14.4% and 6.3%, respectively, in subjects 50-59 years of age; 27% and 8%, respectively, in subjects 60-69 years of age; and 25% and 14%, respectively, in subjects ≥70 years of age; no significant difference was found among the four groups. No difference in lesion location was found, with similar numbers of preneoplastic lesions being present in the right colon and the left colon. CRC was diagnosed in three (0.64%) subjects, one of whom was in the 40-49 years age group. In our population of FDRs of CRC patients, 40-49 years of age, the prevalences of adenoma and advanced adenoma were similar to those observed in older subjects with the same CRC risk. Our data support the current indication to perform screening colonoscopy earlier than 45 years of age in subjects at high CRC risk. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Evaluating the agreement between tumour volumetry and the estimated volumes of tumour lesions using an algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubender, Ruediger P. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lynghjem, Julia; D' Anastasi, Melvin; Graser, Anno [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker; Modest, Dominik P. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Department of Medical Oncology, Munich (Germany); Mansmann, Ulrich R. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); Sartorius, Ute; Schlichting, Michael [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the agreement between tumour volume derived from semiautomated volumetry (SaV) and tumor volume defined by spherical volume using longest lesion diameter (LD) according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or ellipsoid volume using LD and longest orthogonal diameter (LOD) according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Twenty patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the CIOX trial were included. A total of 151 target lesions were defined by baseline computed tomography and followed until disease progression. All assessments were performed by a single reader. A variance component model was used to compare the three volume versions. There was a significant difference between the SaV and RECIST-based tumour volumes. The same model showed no significant difference between the SaV and WHO-based volumes. Scatter plots showed that the RECIST-based volumes overestimate lesion volume. The agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume, evaluated by intraclass correlation, showed nearly perfect agreement. Estimating the volume of metastatic lesions using both the LD and LOD (WHO) is more accurate than those based on LD only (RECIST), which overestimates lesion volume. The good agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume enables a reasonable approximation of three-dimensional tumour burden. (orig.)

  3. Significance of carbohydrate antigen 50 expression in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the significance of carbohydrate antigen 50(CA50)expression in colorectal carcinoma.Methods Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect CA50 expression in 10 cases of normal colorectal mucosa and 40 cases of cancer mucosa.Results The expression of CA50 increased in normal colorectal mucosa,cancer distant mucosa,cancer adjacent mucosa and cancer mucosa,and there were significant differences among them(P<0.05).The expression of CA50 in colorectal carcinoma was correlated with the deg...

  4. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Connie; Chow, Christopher; Rothenberger, David

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training...

  5. Assessment of quality in screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves AR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ana Rita Gonçalves, Carlos Ferreira, António Marques, Luís Carrilho Ribeiro, José VelosaDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hospital Santa Maria-CHLN, Lisboa 1068, PortugalIntroduction: The effectiveness of screening colonoscopy in decreasing the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC is largely dependent on the detection of polyps and the quality of the procedure. Several key quality measures have been proposed to improve the effectiveness of screening colonoscopies.Aim: To evaluate quality indicators of screening colonoscopy in a tertiary hospital.Methods: All CRC screening colonoscopies performed between 2005 and 2009 in a single tertiary center were reviewed for internationally accepted quality measures.Results: Of the 1545 individuals who underwent first-time screening colonoscopy 38% were male and 62% were female. The mean age of the patients was 60.4 years and the mean difference in ages was ± 10.3 years. Cecal intubation rate was 91% (1336, however ileocecal valve photo documentation was performed in only 81% (1248 colonoscopies. The quality of bowel preparation was classified as: good 76% (1171, reasonable 11% (174, and poor 13% (200. Polyp detection rate (PDR was 33% (503. The prevalence of polyps ≥1 cm in size was 5% (82. PDR was significantly higher in men than in women (44% [260] vs 25% [243], P = 0.0001. Other factors significantly influencing PDR were quality of bowel preparation (odds ratio [OR]: 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9–1.6 and age over 50 (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3–2.9. Left colonic polyps were associated with a risk ratio of 2.3 (95% CI: 1.8–2.9 of lesions in the other colonic segments compared to no polyps in the left colon. None of the colonoscopists reported withdrawal time.Conclusion: Cecal intubation rate and quality of bowel preparation were suboptimal. The polyp detection rate compares favorably to accepted standards and its main determinants are male sex, age >50 years, quality of bowel

  6. Clinical significance of incidental focal bowel uptake on (18)F-FDG PET/CT as related to colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltau, Sofus Rønne; Hess, Søren; Nguyen, Tram

    2016-01-01

    with this finding in the clinic. Due to the non-specific appearance of such lesions and a certain rate of false positive findings, patients may by subjected to unnecessary invasive procedures or, conversely, cancers may be overlooked if the risk of malignancy is downplayed. The purpose of this study was to examine...... based cut-off values could not reliably discriminate benign from premalignant or malignant disease. CONCLUSION: It is the opinion of the authors that (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan may identify incidentally sites of colorectal carcinoma but cannot discriminate them from polyps/adenomas. Nevertheless, incidental...

  7. Nodular lesions and mesangiolysis in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Yoshio; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure all over the world. Advanced human diabetic nephropathy is characterized by the presence of specific lesions including nodular lesions, doughnut lesions, and exudative lesions. Thus far, animal models precisely mimicking advanced human diabetic nephropathy, especially nodular lesions, remain to be fully established. Animal models with spontaneous diabetic kidney diseases or with inducible kidney lesions may be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Based on pathological features, we previously reported that diabetic glomerular nodular-like lesions were formed during the reconstruction process of mesangiolysis. Recently, we established nodular-like lesions resembling those seen in advanced human diabetic nephropathy through vascular endothelial injury and mesangiolysis by administration of monocrotaline. Here, in this review, we discuss diabetic nodular lesions and its animal models resembling human diabetic kidney lesions, with our hypothesis that endothelial cell injury and mesangiolysis might be required for nodular lesions.

  8. The performance of three-sample qualitative immunochemical fecal test to detect colorectal adenoma and cancer in gastrointestinal outpatients: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repeated qualitative fecal immunochemical test (qlFIT is a clinical strategy widely used to detect lower gastrointestinal lesions, but its diagnostic power has not been assessed in opportunistic screening for colorectal neoplasia. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the performance of three-sample qlFIT in screening for colorectal cancer and its precursors in high-risk participants. METHODS: 513 gastrointestinal outpatients yielded three qlFITs before a standard colonoscopy. We evaluated the diagnostic value of one, two, and three positive qlFITs serving as the positivity threshold. The risk factors of colorectal neoplasia to yield positive qlFITs were also determined. RESULTS: 52 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer and 70 with advanced adenomatous polyp. For colorectal cancer, the sensitivity and specificity of one positive qlFIT were 90.4% and 53.8%, of two were 80.8% and 75.1%, and of three were 53.9% and 88.5%, respectively. For advanced adenomatous polyp, the sensitivity and specificity of one positive qlFIT were 81.4% and 54.2%, of two were 50.0% and 72.5%, and of three were 28.6% and 86.2%. Left-sided location (OR 2.50, 95%CI 1.26-4.95 and advanced histology of tumors (OR 3.08, 95%CI 1.58-6.01 were independently associated with positive qlFITs. CONCLUSIONS: Three-sample qlFIT is a reasonably good method to detect colorectal neoplasia in high-risk population. Tumors in the left side or with advanced pathological features are more likely to produce positive qlFITs.

  9. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules in Colorectal-Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPN) at staging computed tomography (CT) for colorectal cancer (CRC), and the optimal diagnostic approach, are debated. This study aimed to analyse variability in radiologists' detection of IPN at staging CT for CRC. METHODS......: All patients with CRC referred to our center between 2006 and 2011 were included. Primary staging CT scans were re-evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist whose findings were entered into a dedicated database and merged with data from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database, the National...... Patient Registry, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the primary CT evaluation. Inter-reader agreement was calculated by Kappa statistics, and associations between variables and malignancy of pulmonary nodules were analyzed with χ (2) and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon tests. Multivariable logistic regression...

  10. Colorectal carcinogenesis-update and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raskov, Hans; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    . The major genetic pathways of CRC are the Chromosome Instability Pathway representing the pathway of sporadic CRC through the K-ras, APC, and P53 mutations, and the Microsatellite Instability Pathway representing the pathway of hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer through mutations in mismatch repair genes......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very common malignancy in the Western World and despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and screening, it is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths in this part of the world. Numerous factors are found important in the development of CRC including colonocyte....... To identify early cancers, screening programs have been initiated, and the leading strategy has been the use of faecal occult blood testing followed by colonoscopy in positive cases. Regarding the treatment of colorectal cancer, significant advances have been made in the recent decade. The molecular targets...

  11. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  12. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F;

    2002-01-01

    by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance......BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  13. Current treatment for colorectal liver metastases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evangelos P Misiakos; Nikolaos P Karidis; Gregoryr Kouraklis

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection offers the best opportunity for survival in patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver, with five-year survival rates up to 58% in selected cases. However, only a minority are resectable at the time of diagnosis. Continuous research in this field aims at increasing the percentage of patients eligible for resection, refining the indications and contraindications for surgery , and improving overall survival. The use of surgical innovations, such as staged resection, portal vein embolization, and repeat resection has allowed higher resection rates in patients with bilobar disease. The use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows up to 38% of patients previously considered unresectable to be significantly downstaged and eligible for hepatic resection. Ablative techniques have gained wide acceptance as an adjunct to surgical resection and in the management of patients who are not surgical candidates. Curent management of colorectal liver metastases requires a multidisciplinary approach, which should be individu alized in each case.

  14. Prevalence of colorectal diseases in immunological fecal occult blood test (I-FOBT) positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, S H; Roy, P K; Bhuiyan, M R; Mia, A R; Alam, M S; Mollick, K A; Pervin, S; Hassan, M Q

    2014-10-01

    Bleeding lesion anywhere in the GI tract can cause positive reaction to Immunological Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT). Although any colonic lesion can cause occult lower GI bleeding, relative frequency of this lesion not known. Guaic based tests require prior preparation and dietary restriction and less sensitive and specific than IFOBT for detection of occult bleeding .IFOBT is specific for human hemoglobin and is more sensitive and specific for detection of occult bleeding from any colonic lesion. Aim of this study was to diagnose occult gastrointestinal bleeding with positive IFOBT and the prevalence of colorectal disease in IFOBT positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Bangladesh. This was a prospective cross sectional study conducted in Department of gastroenterology in collaboration with clinical pathology, BSMMU, Dhaka during the period of January 2009 to December 2009. In this study 200 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Detailed clinical history and physical findings were recorded; FOBT was done on single stool specimen. Positive occult bleeding was confirmed in 90 patients of whom 80 patients underwent colonoscopy. The mean age of study population was 36.73±13.64 (range 16 to 72) years. At colonoscopy lesion were identified in 46(57.50%) patients, of which colonic polyp in12 (15%), colorectal cancer in 11(13.7%), inflammatory bowel disease in 3(3.75%), hemorrhoids and anal fissure in 7(8.75%), tuberculosis in 5(6.25%), and proctitis in 1(1.25%) cases. A positive IFOBT is more sensitive and specific test than other FOBT for detection of occult lower GI bleeding of colonic origin. In this study colorectal diseases were detected in 57.50% of the IFOBT positive patients, so IOBT can be used as an important diagnostic tool for detection of occult lower GI bleeding.

  15. Cytokeratins and carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luís C. Fernandes; Su B. Kim; Delcio Matos

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the serum levels of cytokeratins and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma.METHODS: The sample consisted of 169 patients. One hundred blood donors formed the control group. Radical surgery was performed on 120 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 22.3 mo. Relapses occurred in 23individuals after an average of 18.09 mo. CEA was assayed via the Delfia(R) method with a limit of 5 ng/mL. Cytokeratins were assayed via the LIA-mat(R) TPA-M Prolifigen(R) method with a limit of 72 U/L.RESULTS: In the diagnosis of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma, CEA showed a sensitivity of 56%, a specificity of 95%, a positive predictive value of 94%, a negative predictive value of 50% and an accuracy of 76.8%.TPA-M had a sensitivity of 70%, a specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 97%, a negative predictive value of 66% and an accuracy of 93.6%. The elevation of one of the markers was shown to have a sensitivity of 76.9%, a specificity of 91%, a positive predictive value of 93.5%, a negative predictive value of 70% and an accuracy of 83.6%.There was no variation in the levels of the markers according to the degree of cell differentiation while there was an elevation in their concentrations in accordance with the increase in neoplastic dissemination. There was a statistically significant difference between the patients with stage Ⅳ lesions and those with stages Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ tumors.With regard to CEA, the averagelevel was 14.2 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅰ lesions, 8.5 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅱ lesions, 8.0 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅲ lesions and 87.7 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅳ lesions. In relation to TPA-M, the levels were 153.1 U/L in patients with stage Ⅰtumors, 106.5 U/L in patients with stage Ⅱ tumors, 136.3 U/L in patients with stage Ⅲ tumors and 464.3 U/L in patients with stage Ⅳ tumors. There was a statistical difference in

  16. [Percutaneous diagnostic angioscopy. Primary lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, C; Foucart, H; Baudrillard, J C; Cécile, J P

    1993-01-01

    Efficacy of percutaneous treatments of arterial affections requires the correct choice of indications, necessitating precise knowledge of elementary arterial lesions. Arterial endoscopy appears to be more specific than angiography for this use, since it allows direct vision in vivo of the lesion, a histopathologic approach compared with the non univocal images produced by angiography (for example, an arterial obstruction can result from varied causes). Different accidents to the endothelial surface can be observed: golden yellow atheromatous elevations on a straw yellow background, intimal flaps, mobile intra-luminal vegetations. Established atheromatous stenosis are smooth and regular, or on the contrary ulcerated and edged with irregular flaps capable of provoking an eccentric residual lumen. The vegetating atheromatous lesions may project into the lumen, often as calcified and thus pearly white scales adhering to the wall, or as larger occlusive lesions. When capable of being isolated, a thrombus often completes the stenosis: its recognition is therefore fundamental since its removal exposes the subjacent lesions to be treated. The fresh clot is coral shaped, bright red and mobile in the blood flow. Established clots are compact and greenish brown. At an advanced stage of atheroma the surface of the occluding clot is covered with a regular straw yellow endothelium. In the presence of a dissecting vessel the fibroscope may be introduced into the false channel, no longer showing typical endothelium but a coagulated mass interspersed with fibrous bands. Prosthetic stenosis result from either intimal hyperplasia or a suturing fault with plication.

  17. Oropharyngeal lesions in pityriasis rosea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Giulia; Broccolo, Francesco; Rebora, Alfredo; Parodi, Aurora; Drago, Francesco

    2017-07-17

    Pityriasis rosea (PR) is an exanthematous disease associated with the endogenous systemic reactivation of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7). Oropharyngeal lesions may be associated with the exanthema, but anecdotal evidence suggests that few dermatologists are aware of their occurrence. Classifying oropharyngeal lesions in PR, establishing their prevalence, and assessing their possible association with different PR forms. The records of all PR cases diagnosed in the Dermatology Clinic of Genoa University between 2003 and 2016 were retrospectively reviewed to examine sex and age of the patients, PR type, presence of enanthema, systemic symptoms, specific anti-HHV-6 and or HHV-7 serology, and HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 DNA loads. The oropharyngeal mucosa was carefully examined in 527 patients with PR. Painless oropharyngeal lesions were observed in 149 patients with PR (28%) and classified as erythematomacular, macular and papular, erythematovesicular, and petechial lesions. The petechial and macular and papular patterns were those most frequently observed. There was no statistically significant difference in the levels of HHV-6 and HHV-7 viremia in the plasma of patients with enanthema and those without. Because this was a retrospective study, biopsies on mucosal lesions were not performed. Our findings showed that enanthemas are frequently associated with forms of PR different from the classic form. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectroscopic Detection of Caries Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ruohonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A caries lesion causes changes in the optical properties of the affected tissue. Currently a caries lesion can be detected only at a relatively late stage of development. Caries diagnosis also suffers from high interobserver variance. Methods. This is a pilot study to test the suitability of an optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for caries diagnosis. Reflectance visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/NIRS was used to measure caries lesions and healthy enamel on extracted human teeth. The results were analysed with a computational algorithm in order to find a rule-based classification method to detect caries lesions. Results. The classification indicated that the measured points of enamel could be assigned to one of three classes: healthy enamel, a caries lesion, and stained healthy enamel. The features that enabled this were consistent with theory. Conclusions. It seems that spectroscopic measurements can help to reduce false positives at in vitro setting. However, further research is required to evaluate the strength of the evidence for the method’s performance.

  19. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before...... the rectal surgery to clean the rectum and facilitate the manipulation for the mechanical anastomosis is used for many surgeons. This is analysed separately...

  20. APC and chromosome instability in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Cabrera

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a common disease that can be sporadic or familial. An inactivated adenomatous polyposis coli (APC suppressor gene is found in over 80% of colorectal tumors, this being an early alteration in the development of adenomatous polyps. APC function is not only critical for tumor initiation and progression, and chromosome instability (CIN is another characteristic dependent at least partly on APC mutations.

  1. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Jagt, Michel F P; Wobbes, Theo; Strobbe, Luc J A; Sweep, Fred C G J; Span, Paul N

    2010-03-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In addition, micro-RNAs are found to be relevant for both MP expression levels and CRC prognostication. Both MPs and their regulators could be potential targets for intervention and therapy in CRC.

  2. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individual...

  3. Pathologic research update of colorectal neuroendocrine tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originate from neuroendocrine cells in the intestinal tract, and represent a small area within oncology, but one which has provided increasing new data during the past years. Although the World Health Organization has determined clinical and histological features to predict prognosis for such tumors, they may not be valid on an individual basis. We aim to give an overview of the recent findings with regard to pathology, molecular genetics and diagnosis of NETs.

  4. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before the r...... the rectal surgery to clean the rectum and facilitate the manipulation for the mechanical anastomosis is used for many surgeons. This is analysed separately...

  5. Prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal cancer in Iran: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Esmaeilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and hereditary factors and family history are responsible for the incidence and development of the disease in 20 to 30% of cases. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, is the most common hereditary form of CRC that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This study consisted of a systematic literature review of research articles that described the prevalence of HNPCC in Iranian patients with CRC. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Scopus, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases to identify relevant articles that describe HNPCC or Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC in Iran. For this purpose, a keyword search of the following terms was employed: (((Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer OR HNPCC OR Lynch syndrome AND (colorectal cancer OR familial colorectal cancer OR colon cancer OR rectal cancer OR bowel cancer AND IRAN. All eligible documents were collected, and the desired data were qualitatively analyzed.Result: Of the 67 articles that were found via the initial database search, only 12 were deemed to be of relevance to the current study. These articles included a total population of 3237 and this sample was selected and qualitatively analyzed. The findings of the review revealed that the frequency of mutation in MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6 genes varied between 23.1% and 62.5% among the studied families. This indicated that HNPCC is linked with up to 5.5% of the total cases of colorectal cancers in Iran.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the hereditary form of HNPCC or Lynch syndrome is significantly high among patients with CRC in Iran

  6. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF RER+ COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ning; DING Yan-Qing; XU LI; Qiu Hong-ming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Replication errors (RER) is related to initiation and development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC).To investigate the different biological behavior of RER+ and RER- CRC. Methods: Silver staining PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods were used to detect microsatellite instability (MSI) at 4 loci on chromosome 2, 5, 17 in paraffin-embedded specimens of 60 colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and their paired normal tissue.RER+ was scored if 2 or more loci behaved as gaining extra bands. Results: The results showed that RER+ was found in 19/60 CRC, among which 7 cases had a family history.According to the criteria of Amsterdam, 4 were diagnosed as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and of which 3 cases were RER+. The ratio RER+ in HNPCC (75%) was significantly higher than that among sporadic CRC (28.5%). Most of the RER+ CRC have the feature of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (P<0.01), the tendency to involve the right side of the colon (P<0.05), a higher proportion with a family history (P<0.05), Duckes' A and B stage (P<0.05). Conclusion: The results indicated that RER+ is a relatively common molecular event in CRC.There are different clinico-pathological features and behavior between RER+ and RER- CPC.

  7. Colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    There is recognized increased risk for colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis. There also appears to be an increased rate of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease, including both colon and small bowel sites. In Crohn's disease, evidence suggests that detection of colorectal cancer may be delayed with a worse progno sis. Some risk factors for cancer in Crohn's disease include the extent of inflammatory change within the colon and the presence of bypassed or excluded segments, inclu ding rectal "stump" cancer. In addition, the risk for other types of intestinal neoplasms may be increased in Crohn's disease, including lymphoma and carcinoid tumors. Earlier detection of colorectal cancer based on colonoscopy scre ening and surveillance may be achieved but, to date, this has not translated into a positive survival benefit. Moreo ver, newer staining methods and evolving micro-endos copic techniques show promise, but have not significantly altered management. Future research should focus on development of molecular or other bio-markers that might predict future dysplasia or cancer development in Crohn's disease.

  8. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monica; Millan; Sandra; Merino; Aleidis; Caro; Francesc; Feliu; Jordi; Escuder; Tani; Francesch

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approxi-mately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients(> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are underrepresented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population.

  9. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  10. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Truong; Mark H Hanna; Zhobin Moghadamyeghaneh; Michael J Stamos

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient’s chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery.

  11. Abfraction lesions reviewed: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-carious cervical lesions are characterized by structural loss near the cementoenamel junction, without the presence of caries. Anumber of theories have arisen to explain the etiology of such lesions, although the real causes remain obscure, as is reflected by the contradictory terminology used in the literature. In addition to describing acidic and abrasive processes documented as etiological factors, attention is given to the role of mechanical stress from occlusal load, which is the most accepted theory for the development of abfraction lesions. Considering that tensile stress leads to the failure of restorations in the cervical region and that this is a fruitful area for future research, the present study has highlighted diagnosis, prognosis and the criteria for treatment.

  12. Preventive Effects of Pentoxifylline on the Development of Colonic Premalignant Lesions in Obese and Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Fukuta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including enhanced oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, are closely related to colorectal tumorigenesis. Pentoxifylline (PTX, a methylxanthine derivative, has been reported to suppress the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and possess anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of PTX on the development of carcinogen-induced colorectal premalignant lesions in obese and diabetic mice. Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice, which are severely obese and diabetic, were administered weekly subcutaneous injections of the colonic carcinogen azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight for four weeks and then received drinking water containing 125 or 500 ppm PTX for eight weeks. At the time of sacrifice, PTX administration markedly suppressed the development of premalignant lesions in the colorectum. The levels of oxidative stress markers were significantly decreased in the PTX-treated group compared with those in the untreated control group. In PTX-administered mice, the mRNA expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX-2, interleukin (IL-6, and TNF-α, and the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-positive cells in the colonic mucosa, were significantly reduced. These observations suggest that PTX attenuated chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, and prevented the development of colonic tumorigenesis in an obesity-related colon cancer model.

  13. Preventive Effects of Pentoxifylline on the Development of Colonic Premalignant Lesions in Obese and Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Kazufumi; Shirakami, Yohei; Maruta, Akinori; Obara, Koki; Iritani, Soichi; Nakamura, Nobuhiko; Kochi, Takahiro; Kubota, Masaya; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including enhanced oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, are closely related to colorectal tumorigenesis. Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative, has been reported to suppress the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and possess anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of PTX on the development of carcinogen-induced colorectal premalignant lesions in obese and diabetic mice. Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice, which are severely obese and diabetic, were administered weekly subcutaneous injections of the colonic carcinogen azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight) for four weeks and then received drinking water containing 125 or 500 ppm PTX for eight weeks. At the time of sacrifice, PTX administration markedly suppressed the development of premalignant lesions in the colorectum. The levels of oxidative stress markers were significantly decreased in the PTX-treated group compared with those in the untreated control group. In PTX-administered mice, the mRNA expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-6, and TNF-α, and the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in the colonic mucosa, were significantly reduced. These observations suggest that PTX attenuated chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, and prevented the development of colonic tumorigenesis in an obesity-related colon cancer model. PMID:28212276

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation for Treating Liver Metastases from a Non-Colorectal Origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Lee, Jeong Min; Baek, Ji Hyun; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jae Young; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    We wanted to assess the safety and efficacy of performing radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with non-colorectal liver metastases. In this retrospective study, 25 patients with 40 hepatic metastases (M:F = 17:8; mean age, 57 years; tumor size, 0.5-5.0 cm) from a non-colorectal origin (stomach, biliary, breast, pancreas, kidney and skin) were treated with RFA. The RFA procedures were performed using either an internally cooled electrode or a clustered electrode under ultrasound or CT guidance. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained immediately after RFA and follow-up CT scans were performed within three months after ablation and subsequently at least every six months. The intrahepatic disease-free interval was estimated and the overall survival from the time of the initial RFA was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. No intraprocedural deaths occurred, but four major complications developed, including abscesses (n = 3) and pneumothorax (n 1). Technical effectiveness was determined on the initial follow-up images. During the follow-up period (range, 5.9-68.6 months; median time, 18.8 months) for 37 tumors in 22 patients where technical effectiveness was achieved, 12 lesions (32%, 12 of 37) showed local tumor progression and new intrahepatic metastases occurred in 13 patients (59%, 13 of 22). The median intrahepatic disease-free interval was 10.1 months. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA were 86%, 39% and 19%, respectively RFA showed intermediate therapeutic effectiveness for the treatment of non-colorectal origin liver metastases.

  15. A prediction model for advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Noh; Son, Hee Jung; Choi, Sun Kyu; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Jung, Sin-Ho; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2017-01-01

    An electronic medical record (EMR) database of a large unselected population who received screening colonoscopies may minimize sampling error and represent real-world estimates of risk for screening target lesions of advanced colorectal neoplasia (CRN). Our aim was to develop and validate a prediction model for assessing the probability of advanced CRN using a clinical data warehouse. A total of 49,450 screenees underwent their first colonoscopy as part of a health check-up from 2002 to 2012 at Samsung Medical Center, and the dataset was constructed by means of natural language processing from the computerized EMR system. The screenees were randomized into training and validation sets. The prediction model was developed using logistic regression. The model performance was validated and compared with existing models using area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. In the training set, age, gender, smoking duration, drinking frequency, and aspirin use were identified as independent predictors for advanced CRN (adjusted P < .01). The developed model had good discrimination (AUC = 0.726) and was internally validated (AUC = 0.713). The high-risk group had a 3.7-fold increased risk of advanced CRN compared to the low-risk group (1.1% vs. 4.0%, P < .001). The discrimination performance of the present model for high-risk patients with advanced CRN was better than that of the Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening score (AUC = 0.678, P < .001) and Schroy's CAN index (AUC = 0.672, P < .001). The present 5-item risk model can be calculated readily using a simple questionnaire and can identify the low- and high-risk groups of advanced CRN at the first screening colonoscopy. This model may increase colorectal cancer risk awareness and assist healthcare providers in encouraging the high-risk group to undergo a colonoscopy.

  16. Photodynamic therapy in colorectal cancer treatment--The state of the art in preclinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawczyk-Krupka, Aleksandra; Bugaj, Andrzej M; Latos, Wojciech; Zaremba, Katarzyna; Wawrzyniec, Katarzyna; Kucharzewski, Marek; Sieroń, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in many different oncologic fields. Also in gastroenterology, where have been a few attempts to treat both the premalignant lesion and advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). This review aims to give a general overview of preclinical photodynamic studies related to CRC cells and animal studies of photodynamic effects related to CRC treatment to emphasize their potential in study of PDT mechanism, safety and efficiency to translate these results into clinical benefit in CRC treatment. Literature on in vitro preclinical photodynamic studies related to CRC cells and animal studies of photodynamic effects related to CRC treatment with the fallowing medical subject headings search terms: colorectal cancer, photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer(s), in vitro, cell culture(s), in vivo, animal experiment(s). The articles were selected by their relevance to the topic. The majority of preclinical studies concerning possibility of PDT application in colon and rectal cancer is focused on phototoxic action of photosensitizers toward cultured colorectal tumor cells in vitro. The purposes of animal experiments are usually elucidation of mechanisms of observed photodynamic effects in scale of organism, estimation of PDT safety and efficiency and translation of these results into clinical benefit. In vitro photodynamic studies and animal experiments can be useful for studies of mechanisms and efficiency of photodynamic method as a start point on PDT clinical research. The primary disadvantage of in vitro experiments is a risk of over-interpretation of their results during extrapolation to the entire CRC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aristides I; Shea, Kevin G; Ganley, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) can cause knee pain and dysfunction in children. The etiology of OCD remains unclear; theories on causes include inflammation, ischemia, ossification abnormalities, genetic factors, and repetitive microtrauma. Most OCD lesions in skeletally immature patients will heal with nonoperative treatment. The success of nonoperative treatment decreases once patients reach skeletal maturity. The goals of surgical treatment include maintenance of articular cartilage congruity, rigid fixation of unstable fragments, and repair of osteochondral defects with cells or tissues that can adequately replace lost or deficient cartilage. Unsalvageable OCD lesions can be treated with various surgical techniques.

  18. Lesiones frecuentes en atletas profesionales

    OpenAIRE

    Doyel, Crevecoer

    2015-01-01

    Durante la práctica del atletismo frecuentemente ocurren lesiones, afectando principalmente a los miembros inferiores. Las causas que las originan son muy diversas y tienen diferentes características de acuerdo al tipo de modalidad realizada dentro del atletismo. Objetivo: Analizar las características de las lesiones más frecuentes en miembros inferiores, en atletas corredores profesionales, de diferentes distancias, de ambos sexos, de entre 18 y 40 años de edad, que practican atletismo en...

  19. Lesiones frecuentes en atletas profesionales

    OpenAIRE

    Doyel, Crevecoer

    2015-01-01

    Durante la práctica del atletismo frecuentemente ocurren lesiones, afectando principalmente a los miembros inferiores. Las causas que las originan son muy diversas y tienen diferentes características de acuerdo al tipo de modalidad realizada dentro del atletismo. Objetivo: Analizar las características de las lesiones más frecuentes en miembros inferiores, en atletas corredores profesionales, de diferentes distancias, de ambos sexos, de entre 18 y 40 años de edad, que practican atletismo en...

  20. Surgical treatment of synchronous colorectal liver and lung metastases:the usefulness of thoracophrenolaparotomy for single stage resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniele Del Fabbro; Marco Alloisio; Fabio Procopio; Matteo Cimino; Matteo Donadon; Angela Palmisano; Luca Viganò; Guido Torzilli

    2016-01-01

    When suitable, surgery still remains the therapeu-tic option to be preferred for patients carrier of colorectal liver and lung metastases. Since thoracophrenolaparotomy should be helpful during liver resection for some of these patients, si-multaneous removal of right lung metastases can be proposed through this approach. Eleven consecutive patients (median age of 53 years) carrier of colorectal liver and lung metastases, underwent single session surgical resection of both liver and right lung lesions by means of J-shaped thoracophrenolapa-rotomy. The median number of liver metastases removed was 5 (range 2-30) and of lung metastases removed was 2 (range 1-3). Lung metastases were located in the upper lobe in 1 pa-tient, in the middle lobe in 2, in the lower lobe in 6, and in the upper and lower lobe in 2. Mortality and major morbidity were nil. Two patients had a minor morbidity: one had wound infection and bile leakage treated conservatively and the other had transient fever. Mean overall survival was 24.4 months. An aggressive surgical approach should be undertaken for colorectal metastases: in case of multifocal liver disease with complex presentations, J-shaped thoracophrenolaparotomy could be considered as safe approach for combined liver and right lung metastasectomies.

  1. Prospective investigation of body mass index, colorectal adenoma, and colorectal cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I; de González, Amy Berrington; Coleman, Helen G; Schoen, Robert E; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Obesity has consistently been linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancer, particularly among men. Whether body mass index (BMI) differentially influences the risk across the stages of colorectal cancer development remains unclear. We evaluated the associations of BMI with colorectal adenoma incidence, adenoma recurrence, and cancer in the context of a large screening trial, in which cases and controls had an equal chance for disease detection. We prospectively evaluated the association between baseline BMI and the risk of incident distal adenoma (1,213 cases), recurrent adenoma (752 cases), and incident colorectal cancer (966 cases) among men and women, ages 55 to 74 years, randomly assigned to receive flexible sigmoidoscopy screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for adenoma incidence and recurrence, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for colorectal cancer incidence, using multivariable-adjusted models. Compared with normal-weight men (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m(2)), obese men (≥ 30 kg/m(2)) had significantly higher risk of incident adenoma (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.65) and colorectal cancer (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.89) and a borderline increased risk of recurrent adenoma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.98 to 2.30). No associations were observed for either adenoma or cancer in women. Data from this large prospective study suggest that obesity is important throughout the natural history of colorectal cancer, at least in men, and colorectal cancer prevention efforts should encourage the achievement and maintenance of a healthy body weight in addition to regular screenings.

  2. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  3. Colorectal cancer screening awareness among physicians in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzimichalis Georgios

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data comparison between SEER and EUROCARE database provided evidence that colorectal cancer survival in USA is higher than in European countries. Since adjustment for stage at diagnosis markedly reduces the survival differences, a screening bias was hypothesized. Considering the important role of primary care in screening activities, the purpose of the study was to investigate the colorectal cancer screening awareness among Hellenic physicians. Methods 211 primary care physicians were surveyed by mean of a self-reported prescription-habits questionnaire. Both physicians' colorectal cancer screening behaviors and colorectal cancer screening recommendations during usual check-up visits were analyzed. Results Only 50% of physicians were found to recommend screening for colorectal cancer during usual check-up visits, and only 25% prescribed cost-effective procedures. The percentage of physicians recommending stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy was 24% and 4% respectively. Only 48% and 23% of physicians recognized a cancer screening value for stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy. Colorectal screening recommendations were statistically lower among physicians aged 30 or less (p = 0.012. No differences were found when gender, level and type of specialization were analyzed, even though specialists in general practice showed a trend for better prescription (p = 0.054. Conclusion Contemporary recommendations for colorectal cancer screening are not followed by implementation in primary care setting. Education on presymptomatic control and screening practice monitoring are required if primary care is to make a major impact on colorectal cancer mortality.

  4. Barriers to colorectal cancer screening in Asia: A systematic review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Article Inclusion criteria for based on year of publication from year 2008 till 2015, has been ... Results: It was found that major barriers of colorectal cancer screening are; poor education/knowledge, negative ... including 8 articles from Malaysia, 3 from Hong ..... Knowledge and practice of Iranians toward colorectal.

  5. The prevalence of human papillomavirus in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Louise; Thomsen, Louise T; Olesen, Tina Bech

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal cancer has been widely studied with conflicting results. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in colorectal adenocarcinomas and adenomas, and test the potential association....

  6. Low Penetrance Alleles in Colorectal Cancer: the arachidonic acid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.E. Siezen

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, we can conclude that we have successfully identified low penetrance alleles in the PPAR., PLA2G2A and ALOX15 genes, conferring differential colorectal adenoma risk, and two such alleles in the PTGS2 gene, one of which is also involved in colorectal cancer risk. These resul

  7. Workload and surgeon's specialty for outcome after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archampong, David; Borowski, David; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    A large body of research has focused on investigating the effects of healthcare provider volume and specialization on patient outcomes including outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery. However there is conflicting evidence about the role of such healthcare provider characteristics in the management...... of colorectal cancer....

  8. Quality of life after surgical treatment of colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhoff, B S; Krabbe, P F M; Peerenboom, L; Wobbes, T; Ruers, T J M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical approach to colorectal liver metastases is becoming increasingly aggressive. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of surgery on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with colorectal liver metastases. METHODS: HRQoL data from 97 patients w

  9. Urinary nucleosides as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fang Zheng; Jun Yang; Xin-Jie Zhao; Bo Feng; Hong-Wei Kong; Ying-Jie Chen; Shen Lv; Min-Hua Zheng; Guo-Wang Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Fourteen urinary nucleosides, primary degradation products of tRNA, were evaluated to know the potential as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer.METHODS: The concentrations of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides from 52 patients with colorectal cancer, 10patients with intestinal villous adenoma and 60 healthy adults were determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method.RESULTS: The mean levels of 12 kinds of urinary nucleosides (except uridine and guanosine) in the patients with colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with intestinal villous adenoma or the healthy adults. Using the levels of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides as the data vectors for principal component analysis, 71% (37/52) patients with colorectal cancer were correctly classified from healthy adults, in which the identification rate was much higher than that of CEA method (29%).Only 10% (1/10) of patients with intestinal villous adenoma were indistinguishable from patients with colorectal cancer. The levels of m1G, Pseu and m1A were positively related with tumor size and Duke's stages of colorectal cancer. When monitoring the changes in urinary nucleoside concentrations of patients with colorectal cancer associated with surgery, it was found that the overall correlations with clinical assessment were 84% (27/32)and 91% (10/11) in response group and progressive group, respectively.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that urinary nucleosides determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method may be useful as biological markers for colorectal cancer.

  10. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, acromegaly, and colorectal neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobi, M; Cats, A; Maliakkal, BJ; Kinzie, JL; Maliakkal, R; Dullaart, RPF; Luk, GD

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) and acromegaly are two hypersecretory states in which colorectal neoplasia has been described, but the incidence in the former condition may not be increased. We describe four patients with colorectal neoplasia associated with the ZES and review other published

  11. Intake of dietary folate vitamers and risk of colorectal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Several studies have reported inverse associations between folate intake and colorectal carcinoma risk. Few were prospective studies and none evaluated the association between the intake of individual folate vitamers and colorectal carcinoma risk. METHODS. The aim of the current study wa

  12. Colorectal Cancer Epidemiology: Incidence, Mortality, Survival, and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Haggar, Fatima A.; Robin P Boushey

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the incidence, mortality, and survival rates for colorectal cancer are reviewed, with attention paid to regional variations and changes over time. A concise overview of known risk factors associated with colorectal cancer is provided, including familial and hereditary factors, as well as environmental lifestyle-related risk factors such as physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

  13. Alcohol consumption, alcohol dehydrogenase 3 polymorphism, and colorectal adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, E.W.; Wark, P.A.; Ocké, M.C.; Bunschoten, A.; Otten, M.H.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is a probable risk factor with regard to colorectal neoplasm and is metabolized to the carcinogen acetaldehyde by the genetically polymorphic alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) enzyme. We evaluated whether the association between alcohol and colorectal adenomas is modified by ADH3 polymorphism.

  14. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, acromegaly, and colorectal neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobi, M; Cats, A; Maliakkal, BJ; Kinzie, JL; Maliakkal, R; Dullaart, RPF; Luk, GD

    1997-01-01

    Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) and acromegaly are two hypersecretory states in which colorectal neoplasia has been described, but the incidence in the former condition may not be increased. We describe four patients with colorectal neoplasia associated with the ZES and review other published cases

  15. Correlation between expression and differentiation of endocan in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zuo; Su-Mei Zhang; Ruo-Lei Hu; Hua-Qing Zhu; Qing Zhou; Shu-Yu Gui; Qiang Wu; Yuan Wang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression frequency of endocan in colorectal cancer and analyze the relationship between endocan expression and clinical parameters and to study the role of endocan in colorectal carcinogenesis.METHODS: Expression of endocan in 72 tumor tissue samples of colorectal cancer as well as in 27 normal mucous membrane tissue samples was analyzed using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray, Western blot and reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: The expression of endocan was higher in normal colon and rectum tissue samples than in cancerous tissue samples (mRNA = 92.6%, protein= 36%), and was lower in colorectal cancer tissuesamples (mRNA = 70.4%, protein = 36.1%). No correlation was found between staining intensity and clinical parameters such as sex, age, tumor size and TNM stage. However, the expression of endocan was positively correlated with the tissue differentiation in colorectal cancer.CONCLUSION: The expression of endocan is down-regulated in colorectal cancer and is positively correlated with the tissue differentiation in colorectal cancer, suggesting that the expression of endocan is associated with development and differentiation of colorectal cancer.

  16. Role of chance in familial aggregaton of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, N.; Bentzen, S.M.; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    A prospective population-based study recorded family trees of 77 colorectal cancer patients younger than 50 years of age. Using mathematical modeling of population age-incidence data, we estimate that 1 (95% confidence limits 0 and 3) of these families is expected to meet the Amsterdam criteria I...... for HNPCC due to chance clustering of colorectal cancer. Copyright 2001 Cancer Research Campaign....

  17. Social inequality in breast, lung and colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo;

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether family factors shared by siblings explained the association between education and risk of lung, colorectal and breast cancer.......To examine whether family factors shared by siblings explained the association between education and risk of lung, colorectal and breast cancer....

  18. Predicting postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery : a novel clinical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, F. J.; Espin, E.; Vallribera, F.; de Bock, G. H.; Hoekstra, H. J.; van Leeuwen, B. L.; Engel, A. F.

    Aim The aim of this study was to develop and externally validate a clinically, practical and discriminative prediction model designed to estimate in-hospital mortality of patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Method All consecutive patients who underwent elective or emergency colorectal surgery

  19. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  20. Expression of the phosphorylated MEK5 protein is associated with TNM staging of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of MEK5 in many cancers is associated with carcinogenesis through aberrant cell proliferation. In this study, we determined the level of phosphorylated MEK5 (pMEK5 expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC tissues and correlated it with clinicopathologic data. Methods pMEK5 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA containing 335 clinicopathologic characterized CRC cases and 80 cases of nontumor colorectal tissues. pMEK5 expression of 19 cases of primary CRC lesions and paired with normal mucosa was examined by Western blotting. The relationship between pMEK5 expression in CRC and clinicopathologic parameters, and the association of pMEK5 expression with CRC survival were analyzed respectively. Results pMEK5 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues (185 out of 335, 55.2% than in normal tissues (6 out of 80, 7.5%; P P = 0.001, lymph node metastasis (P P P P P = 0.002 and 5-year overall survival rate (P P = 0.139; OS: P = 0.071. Conclusions pMEK5 expression is correlated with the staging of CRC and its expression might be helpful to the TNM staging system of CRC.

  1. Nomogram including pretherapeutic parameters for prediction of survival after SIRT of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, Wolfgang Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Munich (Germany); Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Paprottka, Philipp M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Jakobs, Tobias F. [Hospital Barmherzige Brueder, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter; Haug, Alexander R. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Khalaf, Feras [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Vienna General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    Pre-therapeutic prediction of outcome is important for clinicians and patients in determining whether selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is indicated for hepatic metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). Pre-therapeutic characteristics of 100 patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) treated by radioembolization were analyzed to develop a nomogram for predicting survival. Prognostic factors were selected by univariate Cox regression analysis and subsequent tested by multivariate analysis for predicting patient survival. The nomogram was validated with reference to an external patient cohort (n = 25) from the Bonn University Department of Nuclear Medicine. Of the 13 parameters tested, four were independently associated with reduced patient survival in multivariate analysis. These parameters included no liver surgery before SIRT (HR:1.81, p = 0.014), CEA serum level ≥ 150 ng/ml (HR:2.08, p = 0.001), transaminase toxicity level ≥2.5 x upper limit of normal (HR:2.82, p = 0.001), and summed computed tomography (CT) size of the largest two liver lesions ≥10 cm (HR:2.31, p < 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for our prediction model was 0.83 for the external patient cohort, indicating superior performance of our multivariate model compared to a model ignoring covariates. The nomogram developed in our study entailing four pre-therapeutic parameters gives good prediction of patient survival post SIRT. (orig.)

  2. Choosing the optimal method in programmatic colorectal cancer screening: current evidence and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important health problem all over the world, being the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. The most important strategy for CRC prevention is screening (i.e. secondary prevention). Since it is widely accepted that adenomas and serrated polyps are the precursors of the vast majority of CRC, early detection and removal of these lesions is associated with a reduction of CRC incidence and, consequently, mortality. Moreover, cancers detected by screening are usually diagnosed at early stages and, therefore, curable by endoscopic or surgical procedures. This review will be address CRC screening strategies in average-risk population, which is defined by those individuals, men and women, 50 years of age or older, without any additional personal or familial predisposing risk factor. In order to maximize the impact of screening and ensure high coverage and equity of access, only organized screening programs (i.e. programmatic screening) should be implemented, as opposed to case-finding or opportunistic screening. For that reason and considering that the optimal approach for colorectal screening may differ depending on the scenario, this review will be focused on the advantages and limitations of each screening strategy in an organized setting.

  3. Indium-111 oxine-labeled autologous leukocyte scans in the management of colorectal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crystal, R.F.; Palace, F.

    1984-04-01

    The accuracy and usefulness of indium-111 oxine-labeled autologous leukocyte scans in the management of infectious complications of colon and rectal surgery and of inflammatory diseases of the colon have been studied by review of the records of all patients undergoing such scans at Morristown Memorial Hospital during the first six months such scans were performed there. A total of 20 scans was performed on 18 patients. Twelve scans were performed on 11 patients being treated for diseases of the colon and rectum. Of these 12 scans, one was normal, four demonstrated intra-abdominal abscesses, three demonstrated wound infections (two abdominal, one perineal), one was positive for granulomatous colitis, one for pseudomembranous colitis, one for chronic diverticulitis, and one for enterocutaneous fistula. One allergic reaction to the labeled leukocytes occurred. Comparisons with other corroborative localizing diagnostic tests were made. Subsequent treatment was reviewed. Analysis of these cases indicates that the majority of all scans were performed to evaluate complications of colorectal surgery or inflammatory diseases of the colon and that these scans were highly accurate. In all instances where appropriate, delineation of a lesion in the colorectal cases was followed by corrective treatment.

  4. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer by targeting obesity-related metabolic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakami, Yohei; Shimizu, Masahito; Kubota, Masaya; Araki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Takuji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2014-07-21

    Obesity and its related metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). This observation suggests that the metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity can be effective targets for preventing the development of CRC in obese individuals. In recent years, many studies using obese and diabetic animal models have been conducted to investigate the chemoprevention of CRC using pharmaceutical or nutritional interventions. Pitavastatin, a medicine used to treat hyperlipidemia, prevents the development of obesity-related colorectal carcinogenesis by attenuating chronic inflammation. Anti-hypertensive medicines, such as captopril and telmisartan, also suppress the formation of colonic preneoplastic lesions in obese and diabetic mice. In addition, several phytochemicals, including green tea catechins, have been reported to improve metabolic disorders and prevent the development of various cancers, including CRC. Moreover, the administration of branched-chain amino acids, which improves protein malnutrition and prevents the progression of hepatic failure, is effective for suppressing obesity-related colon carcinogenesis, which is thought to be associated with improvements in insulin resistance. In the present article, we summarize the detailed relationship between metabolic abnormalities and the development of CRC. This review also outlines recent evidence, in particular drawing from basic and clinical examinations using either pharmaceutical or nutritional intervention that suggests that targeting metabolic alterations may be an effective strategy for preventing the development of CRC in obese individuals.

  5. A Brief Review of Viral and Bacterial Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Colorectal Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs are a common source of presentation to colorectal surgeons. Clinicians need to remain mindful of the possibility of STDs when faced with atypical clinical presentations. This article aims to provide surgeons with a synopsis of common pathogens, their clinical presentations, diagnostic investigations and treatment regimens. Evidence Acquisition The most common bacterial pathogens include Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea with synchronous infections at presentation occurring frequently. Patients often present with proctitis. Gonorrhea patients can also experience bloody purulent perianal discharge. Less common bacterial pathogens include syphilis, chancroid and donovanosis. The commonest STD worldwide remains human papillomavirus. Given its vast array of subtypes its manifestations include benign hyperproliferative lesions like perianal warts and extend to anal intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma. Other important viral infections of the anorectum include human immunodeficiency virus and subsequent acquired immune deficiency disease as well as herpes simplex virus and molluscum contangiosum. Results Debate exists whether the increasing incidence of STDs affecting the anorectum reported in western literature represents a real increase or a reflection of greater patient and clinician recognition and reporting. Conclusions Regardless, a broad understanding of common bacterial and viral pathogens remains important part of modern colorectal practice. Remaining mindful of the manifestations of these common pathogens, options for diagnosis and management are important in disease control to limit the impact of these pathogens across the wider community.

  6. Biochemical imaging of normal, adenoma, and colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and morphological correlation by histopathological analysis: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Aparecida de Almeida Chaves Piva

    Full Text Available Introduction The colorectal cancer is a major health problem worldwide. Histology is considered the gold standard for differential diagnosis. However, it depends on the observer's experience, which can lead to discrepancies and poor results. Spectroscopic imaging by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR is a technique that may be able to improve the diagnosis, because it is based on biochemical differences of the structural constituents of tissue. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to explore the use of FTIR imaging technique in normal colon tissue, colorectal adenoma, and adenocarcinoma in order to correlate their morphological structures with their biochemical imaging. Methods Samples were collected from normal (n = 4, adenoma (n = 4, and adenocarcinoma human colorectal tissue (n = 4 from patients undergoing colonoscopy or surgical resection of colon lesions. The samples were sectioned with a cryostat in sequential sections; the first slice was placed on CaF2 slide and the second slice was placed on glass slide for histological analysis (HE staining. The cluster analyses were performed by the software Cytospec (1.4.02®. Results In normal samples, biochemical analysis classified six different structures, namely the lamina propria of mucous glands (epithelial cells and goblet cells, central lumen of the gland, mucin, and conjunctive tissue. In samples with adenoma and adenocarcinoma, altered regions could also be identified with high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the potential and viability of using infrared spectroscopy to identify and classify colorectal tissues.

  7. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  8. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  9. Self-inflicted skin lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Hans Christian; Smith, Matthias Nybro; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on the management of self-inflicted skin lesions points to an overall paucity of treatments with a high level of evidence (randomized controlled trials, controlled trials, or meta-analyses). In order to improve the communication between dermatologists and mental health...

  10. Focal lesions of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayati, B. [Royal national Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore, Brockley Hill Stanmore, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lewisham Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal national Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore, Brockley Hill Stanmore, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Focal lesions of the patella may be identified during the investigation of anterior knee pain or as an incidental finding on radiological images. This pictorial review describes the radiographic appearances of a wide range of conditions that have been seen in this sesamoid bone. Where appropriate, computed tomography and magnetic resonance features have been included. (orig.)

  11. Significance of carbohydrate antigen 50 expression in colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-hua Ma; Kang Wang; Wei-hua Shang; Si-guang Li; Mao Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the significance of carbohydrate antigen 50 (CA50) expression in colorectal carcinoma. Methods Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect CA50 expression in 10 cases of normal colorectal mucosa and 40 cases of cancer mucosa. Results The expression of CA50 increased in normal colorectal mucosa, cancer distant mucosa, cancer adjacent mucosa and cancer mucosa, and there were significant differences among them (P<0.05). The expression of CA50 in colorectal carcinoma was correlated with the degree of differentiation, Duke's stage and lymphatic metastases (P<0.05). Conclusion The expression of CA50 can be used as a valuable index in evaluating the biological characteristics and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma.

  12. The Prognostic Significance of Metabolic Response Heterogeneity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Hendlisz

    Full Text Available Tumoral heterogeneity is a major determinant of resistance in solid tumors. FDG-PET/CT can identify early during chemotherapy non-responsive lesions within the whole body tumor load. This prospective multicentric proof-of-concept study explores intra-individual metabolic response (mR heterogeneity as a treatment efficacy biomarker in chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC.Standardized FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline and after the first cycle of combined sorafenib (600mg/day for 21 days, then 800mg/day and capecitabine (1700 mg/m²/day administered D1-14 every 21 days. MR assessment was categorized according to the proportion of metabolically non-responding (non-mR lesions (stable FDG uptake with SUVmax decrease <15% among all measurable lesions.Ninety-two patients were included. The median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 8.2 months (95% CI: 6.8-10.5 and 4.2 months (95% CI: 3.4-4.8 respectively. In the 79 assessable patients, early PET-CT showed no metabolically refractory lesion in 47%, a heterogeneous mR with at least one non-mR lesion in 32%, and a consistent non-mR or early disease progression in 21%. On exploratory analysis, patients without any non-mR lesion showed a significantly longer PFS (HR 0.34; 95% CI: 0.21-0.56, P-value <0.001 and OS (HR 0.58; 95% CI: 0.36-0.92, P-value 0.02 compared to the other patients. The proportion of non-mR lesions within the tumor load did not impact PFS/OS.The presence of at least one metabolically refractory lesion is associated with a poorer outcome in advanced mCRC patients treated with combined sorafenib-capecitabine. Early detection of treatment-induced mR heterogeneity may represent an important predictive efficacy biomarker in mCRC.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01290926.

  13. SLAP lesions: a treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Tompkins, Marc; Kohn, Dieter M; Lorbach, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Tears of the superior labrum involving the biceps anchor are a common entity, especially in athletes, and may highly impair shoulder function. If conservative treatment fails, successful arthroscopic repair of symptomatic SLAP lesions has been described in the literature particularly for young athletes. However, the results in throwing athletes are less successful with a significant amount of patients who will not regain their pre-injury level of performance. The clinical results of SLAP repairs in middle-aged and older patients are mixed, with worse results and higher revision rates as compared to younger patients. In this population, tenotomy or tenodesis of the biceps tendon is a viable alternative to SLAP repairs in order to improve clinical outcomes. The present article introduces a treatment algorithm for SLAP lesions based upon the recent literature as well as the authors' clinical experience. The type of lesion, age of patient, concomitant lesions, and functional requirements, as well as sport activity level of the patient, need to be considered. Moreover, normal variations and degenerative changes in the SLAP complex have to be distinguished from "true" SLAP lesions in order to improve results and avoid overtreatment. The suggestion for a treatment algorithm includes: type I: conservative treatment or arthroscopic debridement, type II: SLAP repair or biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, type III: resection of the instable bucket-handle tear, type IV: SLAP repair (biceps tenotomy/tenodesis if >50 % of biceps tendon is affected), type V: Bankart repair and SLAP repair, type VI: resection of the flap and SLAP repair, and type VII: refixation of the anterosuperior labrum and SLAP repair.

  14. A cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal screening of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; van Ballegooijen, M; Buskens, E; Kleibeuker, JK; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; Menko, FH; Khan, PM

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It has been estimated that the prevalence of carriers of a mutated mismatch repair (MMR) gene among the general population in Western countries is between 5 and 50 per 10,000. These carriers have a risk of >85% of developing colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and therefore need careful

  15. A cost-effectiveness analysis of colorectal screening of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; van Ballegooijen, M; Buskens, E; Kleibeuker, JK; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; Menko, FH; Khan, PM

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It has been estimated that the prevalence of carriers of a mutated mismatch repair (MMR) gene among the general population in Western countries is between 5 and 50 per 10,000. These carriers have a risk of >85% of developing colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and therefore need careful follow-up

  16. The Association Between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated Polyps and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    determine the association between high-risk HPV infection and tumor and personal characteristics. Contracting Officer: Amy Connolly, National Cancer...Grady will review all materials and data collection instruments to be appropriate and relevant for families with a case of colorectal cancer, both

  17. Quantitative analysis of anti-CEA antibody accumulation in human colorectal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bares, R. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Fass, J. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Hauptmann, S. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology); Braun, J. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Grehl, O. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Reinartz, R. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Buell, U. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Schumpelick, V. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Surgery); Mittermayer, C. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology)

    1993-04-01

    In order to obtain quantitative data on intratumoral anitbody accumulation we analyzed resected colorectal adenocarcinomas of 25 patients who had undergone immunoscintigraphy 4-14 days earlier. All had been injected with 0.5-1.0 mg intact anti-CEA antibody (BW 431/26) labelled with 70-80 MBq [sup 131]I. Correlation of tissue radioactivity concentrations with tumor characteristics revealed significantly higher values in necrotic compared to viable as well as in CEA-positive compared to CEA-negative viable tumor tissue indicating action of both specific and unspecific uptake mechanisms. In contrast, diagnostic results of immunoscintigraphy were influenced by tumor size only. 11 of 12 falsenegative findings were obtained in tumors <4 cm in diameter. Since ex-vivo scintigraphy of resected specimens correctly visualized all but one of these lesions, it is concluded that technical limitations of scintigraphy are the main cause of negative results of radioimmunoimaging with [sup 131]I-labelled antibodies. (orig.)

  18. Multiple primary colorectal cancer: Individual or familial predisposition?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José; A; Pajares; José; Perea

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma(CRC) is one of the most frequent cancers. Along the surface of the large bowel, several foci of CRC may appear simultaneously or over the time. The development of at least two different tumours has been defined as multiple primary CRC(MPCRC):When more than one tumour is diagnosed at the same time, it is known as synchronous CRC(SCRC), while when a second neoplasm is diagnosed some time after the resection and/or diagnosis of the first lesion, it is called metachronous CRC(MCRC). Multiple issues can promote the development of MPCRC, ranging from different personal factors, such as environmental exposure, to familial predisposition due to hereditary factors. However, most studies do not distinguish this dichotomy. High- and low-pentrance genetic variants are involved in MPCRC. An increased risk for MPCRC has been described in Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and serrated polyposis. Non-syndromic familial CRCs should also be considered as risk factors for MPCRC. Environmental factors can promote damage to colon mucosae that enable the concurrence of MPCRC. Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of sporadic MPCRC. The methylation state of the DNA depends on multiple environmental factors(e.g., smoking and eating foods cooked at high temperatures), and this can contribute to increasing the MPCRC rate. Certain clinical features may also suggest individual predisposition for MPCRC. Different etiopathogenic factors are suspected to be involved in SCRC and MCRC, and different familial vs individual factors may be implicated. MCRC seems to follow a familial pattern, whereas individual factors are more important in SCRC. Further studies must be carried out to know the molecular basis of risks for MPCRC in order to modify, if necessary, its clinical management, especially from a preventive point of view.

  19. [Epidemiologic trend of and strategies for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, De-Sen

    2009-09-01

    The incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) show increasing tendency worldwide. It was predicted that the new cases in 2007 would be approximate 1,200,000 and the death cases would be 630,000, a total increase of 27% and 28% and an annual increase of 3.9% and 4.0%, respectively, compared with the figures in 2000. In addition, the incidence of CRC varies regionally and changes over the time. In previously identified high-incidence areas, there are three tendencies: one is to keep rising such as in UK, one is to be stable such as in New Zealand, and the third one is to decrease such as in US and Western Europe. In previously identified low-incidence areas, the incidence of CRC is increasing, such as in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Hungary, Poland, Israel, and Puerto-Rico, especially in Japan, where the incidence increases the fastest. Similarly, the incidence of CRC is increased by 4.2% annually in Shanghai, China, which is faster than the average increasing rate of the world. Since 1991, the average increase in mortality of CRC is 4.7% every year. The increasing number of female patients and the shift of the tumor location to the right side are also noticed for CRC in recent years. We summarized that CRC is a disease caused by synergism of environment and diet, life style and heredity. It was suggested that CRC can be prevented effectively through developing a regular life style, having proper diet, actively participating in the screening for cancers, and removing the pre-cancer lesions.

  20. Prognostic value of innate and adaptive immunity in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzi, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo; Malesci, Alberto; Laghi, Luigi

    2013-01-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major public health problems throughout the world. Originally depicted as a multi-step dynamical disease, CRC develops slowly over several years and progresses through cytologically distinct benign and malignant states, from single crypt lesions through adenoma, to malignant carcinoma with the potential for invasion and metastasis. Moving from histological observations since a long time, it has been recognized that inflammation and immunity actively participate in the pathogenesis, surveillance and progression of CRC. The advent of immunohistochemical techniques and of animal models has improved our understanding of the immune dynamical system in CRC. It is well known that immune cells have variable behavior controlled by complex interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Advances in immunology and molecular biology have shown that CRC is immunogenic and that host immune responses influence survival. Several lines of evidence support the concept that tumor stromal cells, are not merely a scaffold, but rather they influence growth, survival, and invasiveness of cancer cells, dynamically contributing to the tumor microenvironment, together with immune cells. Different types of immune cells infiltrate CRC, comprising cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. A relevant issue is to unravel the discrepancy between the inhibitory effects on cancer growth exerted by the local immune response and the promoting effects on cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination induced by some types of inflammatory cells. Here, we sought to discuss the role played by innate and adaptive immune system in the local progression and metastasis of CRC, and the prognostic information that we can currently understand and exploit.