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Sample records for non-negligible defect densities

  1. Residual Defect Density in Random Disks Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Nikola; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A C

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the residual distribution of structural defects in very tall packings of disks deposited randomly in large channels. By performing simulations involving the sedimentation of up to 50 × 10(9) particles we find all deposits to consistently show a non-zero residual density of defects obeying a characteristic power-law as a function of the channel width. This remarkable finding corrects the widespread belief that the density of defects should vanish algebraically with growing height. A non-zero residual density of defects implies a type of long-range spatial order in the packing, as opposed to only local ordering. In addition, we find deposits of particles to involve considerably less randomness than generally presumed.

  2. Perturbed Newtonian description of the Lemaître model with non-negligible pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-hiroshima, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, 739-8526 (Japan); Marra, Valerio [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Av. F. Ferrari, 514, 29075-910, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Mukhanov, Viatcheslav [Theoretical Physics, Ludwig Maxmillians University, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Sasaki, Misao, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com, E-mail: Viatcheslav.Mukhanov@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwakecho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2016-03-01

    We study the validity of the Newtonian description of cosmological perturbations using the Lemaître model, an exact spherically symmetric solution of Einstein's equation. This problem has been investigated in the past for the case of a dust fluid. Here, we extend the previous analysis to the more general case of a fluid with non-negligible pressure, and, for the numerical examples, we consider the case of radiation (P=ρ/3). We find that, even when the density contrast has a nonlinear amplitude, the Newtonian description of the cosmological perturbations using the gravitational potential ψ and the curvature potential φ is valid as long as we consider sub-horizon inhomogeneities. However, the relation ψ+φ=O(φ{sup 2})—which holds for the case of a dust fluid—is not valid for a relativistic fluid, and an effective anisotropic stress is generated. This demonstrates the usefulness of the Lemaître model which allows us to study in an exact nonlinear fashion the onset of anisotropic stress in fluids with non-negligible pressure. We show that this happens when the characteristic scale of the inhomogeneity is smaller than the sound horizon and that the deviation is caused by the nonlinear effect of the fluid's fast motion. We also find that ψ+φ= [O(φ{sup 2}),O(c{sub s}{sup 2φ} δ)] for an inhomogeneity with density contrast δ whose characteristic scale is smaller than the sound horizon, unless w is close to −1, where w and c{sub s} are the equation of state parameter and the sound speed of the fluid, respectively. On the other hand, we expect ψ+φ=O(φ{sup 2}) to hold for an inhomogeneity whose characteristic scale is larger than the sound horizon, unless the amplitude of the inhomogeneity is large and w is close to −1.

  3. Perturbed Newtonian description of the Lemaître model with non-negligible pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Marra, Valerio; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-01-01

    We study the validity of the Newtonian description of cosmological perturbations using the Lemaître model, an exact spherically symmetric solution of Einstein's equation. This problem has been investigated in the past for the case of a dust fluid. Here, we extend the previous analysis to the more general case of a fluid with non-negligible pressure, and, for the numerical examples, we consider the case of radiation (P=ρ/3). We find that, even when the density contrast has a nonlinear amplitude, the Newtonian description of the cosmological perturbations using the gravitational potential ψ and the curvature potential φ is valid as long as we consider sub-horizon inhomogeneities. However, the relation ψ+φ=O(φ 2 )—which holds for the case of a dust fluid—is not valid for a relativistic fluid, and an effective anisotropic stress is generated. This demonstrates the usefulness of the Lemaître model which allows us to study in an exact nonlinear fashion the onset of anisotropic stress in fluids with non-negligible pressure. We show that this happens when the characteristic scale of the inhomogeneity is smaller than the sound horizon and that the deviation is caused by the nonlinear effect of the fluid's fast motion. We also find that ψ+φ= [O(φ 2 ),O(c s 2φ  δ)] for an inhomogeneity with density contrast δ whose characteristic scale is smaller than the sound horizon, unless w is close to −1, where w and c s are the equation of state parameter and the sound speed of the fluid, respectively. On the other hand, we expect ψ+φ=O(φ 2 ) to hold for an inhomogeneity whose characteristic scale is larger than the sound horizon, unless the amplitude of the inhomogeneity is large and w is close to −1

  4. Nitrotyrosine adsorption on defective graphene: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2015-06-01

    We have applied density functional theory to study adsorption of nitrotyrosine on perfect and defective graphene sheets. The graphene sheets with Stone-Wales (SW) defect, pentagon-nonagon (5-9) single vacancy, and pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) double vacancy were considered. The calculations of adsorption energy showed that nitrotyrosine presents a more strong interaction with defective graphene rather than with perfect graphene sheet. The order of interaction strength is: SW>5-9>5-8-5>perfect graphene. It is found that the electronic properties of perfect and defective graphene are sensitive to the presence of nitrotyrosine. Hence, graphene sheets can be considered as a good sensor for detection of nitrotyrosine molecule which is observed in connection with several human disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Modeling charged defects inside density functional theory band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Peter A.; Edwards, Arthur H.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has emerged as an important tool to probe microscopic behavior in materials. The fundamental band gap defines the energy scale for charge transition energy levels of point defects in ionic and covalent materials. The eigenvalue gap between occupied and unoccupied states in conventional DFT, the Kohn–Sham gap, is often half or less of the experimental band gap, seemingly precluding quantitative studies of charged defects. Applying explicit and rigorous control of charge boundary conditions in supercells, we find that calculations of defect energy levels derived from total energy differences give accurate predictions of charge transition energy levels in Si and GaAs, unhampered by a band gap problem. The GaAs system provides a good theoretical laboratory for investigating band gap effects in defect level calculations: depending on the functional and pseudopotential, the Kohn–Sham gap can be as large as 1.1 eV or as small as 0.1 eV. We find that the effective defect band gap, the computed range in defect levels, is mostly insensitive to the Kohn–Sham gap, demonstrating it is often possible to use conventional DFT for quantitative studies of defect chemistry governing interesting materials behavior in semiconductors and oxides despite a band gap problem

  6. Reactive evaporation of low-defect density hafnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, R.; Falabella, S.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.; Stolz, C.J.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Motivation for this work includes observations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of a correlation between laser damage thresholds and both the absorption and the nodular-defect density of coatings. Activated oxygen is used to increase the metal-oxidation kinetics at the coated surface during electron-beam deposition. A series of hafnia layers are made with various conditions: two μ-wave configuations, two sources (hafnium and hafnia), and two reactive oxygen pressures. Laser damage thresholds (1064-nm, 10-ns pulses), absorption (at 511 nm), and nodular-defect densities from these coatings are reported. The damage thresholds are observed to increase as the absorption of the coatings decreases. However, no significant increase in damage thresholds are observed with the coatings made from a low nodular-defect density source material (hafnium). Hafnia coatings can be made from hafnium sources that have lower nodular-defect densities, lower absorption, and damage thresholds that are comparable with coatings made from a conventional hafnia source

  7. A comparative study of density functional and density functional tight binding calculations of defects in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, Alberto [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris Sud, CNRS UMR, Orsay (France); Ivanovskaya, Viktoria; Wagner, Philipp; Yaya, Abu; Ewels, Chris P. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), CNRS UMR, University of Nantes (France); Suarez-Martinez, Irene [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2012-02-15

    The density functional tight binding approach (DFTB) is well adapted for the study of point and line defects in graphene based systems. After briefly reviewing the use of DFTB in this area, we present a comparative study of defect structures, energies, and dynamics between DFTB results obtained using the dftb+ code, and density functional results using the localized Gaussian orbital code, AIMPRO. DFTB accurately reproduces structures and energies for a range of point defect structures such as vacancies and Stone-Wales defects in graphene, as well as various unfunctionalized and hydroxylated graphene sheet edges. Migration barriers for the vacancy and Stone-Wales defect formation barriers are accurately reproduced using a nudged elastic band approach. Finally we explore the potential for dynamic defect simulations using DFTB, taking as an example electron irradiation damage in graphene. DFTB-MD derived sputtering energy threshold map for a carbon atom in a graphene plane. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Driving down defect density in composite EUV patterning film stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, Luciana; Petrillo, Karen; De Silva, Anuja; Arnold, John; Felix, Nelson; Johnson, Richard; Murray, Cody; Hubbard, Alex; Durrant, Danielle; Hontake, Koichi; Huli, Lior; Lemley, Corey; Hetzer, Dave; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Matsunaga, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology is one of the leading candidates for enabling the next generation devices, for 7nm node and beyond. As the technology matures, further improvement is required in the area of blanket film defectivity, pattern defectivity, CD uniformity, and LWR/LER. As EUV pitch scaling approaches sub 20 nm, new techniques and methods must be developed to reduce the overall defectivity, mitigate pattern collapse and eliminate film related defect. IBM Corporation and Tokyo Electron Limited (TELTM) are continuously collaborating to develop manufacturing quality processes for EUVL. In this paper, we review key defectivity learning required to enable 7nm node and beyond technology. We will describe ongoing progress in addressing these challenges through track-based processes (coating, developer, baking), highlighting the limitations of common defect detection strategies and outlining methodologies necessary for accurate characterization and mitigation of blanket defectivity in EUV patterning stacks. We will further discuss defects related to pattern collapse and thinning of underlayer films.

  9. Auto-oscillations of temperature and defect density in impure crystals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selishchev, P.A.; Sugakov, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    Appearance of auto-oscillations in temperature and defect density of impurity crystals under irradiation is studied. It is shown that at certain critical parameters stationary distribution of temperature and defect density of the sample irradiated becomes unstable as regards the formation of temporal dissipative structures: auto-oscillations of temperature and defect density. Critical parameters are determined (the rate of defect formation, temperature of crystal environment, etc.) and the frequency of appearing auto-oscillations, its dependence on irradiation conditions and crystal properties are found

  10. Non destructive defect detection by spectral density analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejcar, Ondrej; Frischer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The potential nondestructive diagnostics of solid objects is discussed in this article. The whole process is accomplished by consecutive steps involving software analysis of the vibration power spectrum (eventually acoustic emissions) created during the normal operation of the diagnosed device or under unexpected situations. Another option is to create an artificial pulse, which can help us to determine the actual state of the diagnosed device. The main idea of this method is based on the analysis of the current power spectrum density of the received signal and its postprocessing in the Matlab environment with a following sample comparison in the Statistica software environment. The last step, which is comparison of samples, is the most important, because it is possible to determine the status of the examined object at a given time. Nowadays samples are compared only visually, but this method can't produce good results. Further the presented filter can choose relevant data from a huge group of data, which originate from applying FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). On the other hand, using this approach they can be subjected to analysis with the assistance of a neural network. If correct and high-quality starting data are provided to the initial network, we are able to analyze other samples and state in which condition a certain object is. The success rate of this approximation, based on our testing of the solution, is now 85.7%. With further improvement of the filter, it could be even greater. Finally it is possible to detect defective conditions or upcoming limiting states of examined objects/materials by using only one device which contains HW and SW parts. This kind of detection can provide significant financial savings in certain cases (such as continuous casting of iron where it could save hundreds of thousands of USD).

  11. Dissociation and diffusion of hydrogen on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Zongying [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Union Research Center of Fuel Cell, School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Haipeng [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Zhou, Shixue, E-mail: zhoushixue66@163.com [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Clarify the effect of vacancy defect on H{sub 2} dissociation on Mg (0001) surface. • Demonstrate the effects of vacancy defect on H atom diffusion. • Reveal the minimum energy diffusion path of H atom from magnesium surface into bulk. - Abstract: First-principles calculations with the density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to study dissociation and diffusion of hydrogen on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces. Results show that energy barriers of 1.42 eV and 1.28 eV require to be overcome for H{sub 2} dissociation on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces respectively, indicating that reactivity of Mg (0001) surface is moderately increased due to vacancy defect. Besides, the existence of vacancy defect changes the preferential H atom diffusion entrance to the subsurface and reduces the diffusion energy barrier. An interesting remark is that the minimum energy diffusion path of H atom from magnesium surface into bulk is a spiral channel formed by staggered octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. The diffusion barriers computed for H atom penetration from the surface into inner-layers are all less than 0.70 eV, which is much smaller than the activation energy for H{sub 2} dissociation on the Mg (0001) surface. This suggests that H{sub 2} dissociation is more likely than H diffusion to be rate-limiting step for magnesium hydrogenation.

  12. Ion beam deposition system for depositing low defect density extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, V.; Kearney, P.; Sohn, J.; Harris-Jones, J.; John, A.; Godwin, M.; Antohe, A.; Teki, R.; Ma, A.; Goodwin, F.; Weaver, A.; Teora, P.

    2012-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is the leading next-generation lithography (NGL) technology to succeed optical lithography at the 22 nm node and beyond. EUVL requires a low defect density reflective mask blank, which is considered to be one of the top two critical technology gaps for commercialization of the technology. At the SEMATECH Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC), research on defect reduction in EUV mask blanks is being pursued using the Veeco Nexus deposition tool. The defect performance of this tool is one of the factors limiting the availability of defect-free EUVL mask blanks. SEMATECH identified the key components in the ion beam deposition system that is currently impeding the reduction of defect density and the yield of EUV mask blanks. SEMATECH's current research is focused on in-house tool components to reduce their contributions to mask blank defects. SEMATECH is also working closely with the supplier to incorporate this learning into a next-generation deposition tool. This paper will describe requirements for the next-generation tool that are essential to realize low defect density EUV mask blanks. The goal of our work is to enable model-based predictions of defect performance and defect improvement for targeted process improvement and component learning to feed into the new deposition tool design. This paper will also highlight the defect reduction resulting from process improvements and the restrictions inherent in the current tool geometry and components that are an impediment to meeting HVM quality EUV mask blanks will be outlined.

  13. Topological defect densities in type-I superconducting phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramos, J.; Bertolami, O.; Girard, T.A.; Valko, P.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the consequences of a cubic term added to the mean-field potential of Ginzburg-Landau theory to describe first-order superconducting phase transitions. Constraints on its existence are obtained from experiment, which are used to assess its impact on topological defect creation. We find no fundamental changes in either the Kibble-Zurek or Hindmarsh-Rajantie predictions

  14. Characterization of the nitrogen split interstitial defect in wurtzite aluminum nitride using density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szállás, A.; Szász, K.; Trinh, X. T.; Son, N. T.; Janzén, E.; Gali, A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional theory plane wave supercell calculations in wurtzite aluminum nitride in order to characterize the geometry, formation energies, transition levels, and hyperfine tensors of the nitrogen split interstitial defect. The calculated hyperfine tensors may provide useful fingerprint of this defect for electron paramagnetic resonance measurement.

  15. Characterization of the nitrogen split interstitial defect in wurtzite aluminum nitride using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szállás, A., E-mail: szallas.attila@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szász, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Institute of Physics, Eötvös University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Trinh, X. T.; Son, N. T.; Janzén, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Gali, A., E-mail: gali.adam@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-09-21

    We carried out Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional theory plane wave supercell calculations in wurtzite aluminum nitride in order to characterize the geometry, formation energies, transition levels, and hyperfine tensors of the nitrogen split interstitial defect. The calculated hyperfine tensors may provide useful fingerprint of this defect for electron paramagnetic resonance measurement.

  16. Correlating defect density with growth time in continuous graphene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cheong; Jung, Da Hee; Nam, Ji Eun; Lee, Jin Seok

    2014-12-01

    We report that graphene flakes and films which were synthesized by copper-catalyzed atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method using a mixture of Ar, H2, and CH4 gases. It was found that variations in the reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature, annealing time, and growth time, influenced the domain size of as-grown graphene. Besides, the reaction parameters influenced the number of layers, degree of defects and uniformity of the graphene films. The increase in growth temperature and annealing time tends to accelerate the graphene growth rate and increase the diffusion length, respectively, thereby increasing the average size of graphene domains. In addition, we confirmed that the number of pinholes reduced with increase in the growth time. Micro-Raman analysis of the as-grown graphene films confirmed that the continuous graphene monolayer film with low defects and high uniformity could be obtained with prolonged reaction time, under the appropriate annealing time and growth temperature.

  17. Relationship between defect density and charge carrier transport in amorphous and microcrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhov, Oleksandr; Carius, Reinhard; Finger, Friedhelm; Petrusenko, Yuri; Borysenko, Valery; Barankov, Dmytro

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dangling-bond defects and the position of the Fermi level on the charge carrier transport properties in undoped and phosphorous doped thin-film silicon with structure compositions all the way from highly crystalline to amorphous is investigated. The dangling-bond density is varied reproducibly over several orders of magnitude by electron bombardment and subsequent annealing. The defects are investigated by electron-spin-resonance and photoconductivity spectroscopies. Comparing intrinsic amorphous and microcrystalline silicon, it is found that the relationship between defect density and photoconductivity is different in both undoped materials, while a similar strong influence of the position of the Fermi level on photoconductivity via the charge carrier lifetime is found in the doped materials. The latter allows a quantitative determination of the value of the transport gap energy in microcrystalline silicon. The photoconductivity in intrinsic microcrystalline silicon is, on one hand, considerably less affected by the bombardment but, on the other hand, does not generally recover with annealing of the defects and is independent from the spin density which itself can be annealed back to the as-deposited level. For amorphous silicon and material prepared close to the crystalline growth regime, the results for nonequilibrium transport fit perfectly to a recombination model based on direct capture into neutral dangling bonds over a wide range of defect densities. For the heterogeneous microcrystalline silicon, this model fails completely. The application of photoconductivity spectroscopy in the constant photocurrent mode (CPM) is explored for the entire structure composition range over a wide variation in defect densities. For amorphous silicon previously reported linear correlation between the spin density and the subgap absorption is confirmed for defect densities below 10 18 cm -3 . Beyond this defect level, a sublinear relation is found i.e., not

  18. Density Functional Theory Study on Defect Feature of AsGaGaAs in Gallium Arsenide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deming Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the defect feature of AsGaGaAs defect in gallium arsenide clusters in detail by using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT. Our calculations reveal that the lowest donor level of AsGaGaAs defect on the gallium arsenide crystal surface is 0.85 eV below the conduction band minimum, while the lowest donor level of the AsGaGaAs defect inside the gallium arsenide bulk is 0.83 eV below the bottom of the conduction band, consistent with gallium arsenide EL2 defect level of experimental value (Ec-0.82 eV. This suggests that AsGaGaAs defect is one of the possible gallium arsenide EL2 deep-level defects. Moreover, our results also indicate that the formation energies of internal AsGaGaAs and surface AsGaGaAs defects are predicted to be around 2.36 eV and 5.54 eV, respectively. This implies that formation of AsGaGaAs defect within the crystal is easier than that of surface. Our results offer assistance in discussing the structure of gallium arsenide deep-level defect and its effect on the material.

  19. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Hao, Huilian; Wang, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k"0) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k"0 values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k"0 valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  20. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yanzhang@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hao, Huilian, E-mail: huilian.hao@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Linlin, E-mail: wlinlin@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k{sup 0}) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k{sup 0} values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k{sup 0} valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  1. Weld defect identification in friction stir welding using power spectral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bipul; Pal, Sukhomay; Bag, Swarup

    2018-04-01

    Power spectral density estimates are powerful in extraction of useful information retained in signal. In the current research work classical periodogram and Welch periodogram algorithms are used for the estimation of power spectral density for vertical force signal and transverse force signal acquired during friction stir welding process. The estimated spectral densities reveal notable insight in identification of defects in friction stir welded samples. It was observed that higher spectral density against each process signals is a key indication in identifying the presence of possible internal defects in the welded samples. The developed methodology can offer preliminary information regarding presence of internal defects in friction stir welded samples can be best accepted as first level of safeguard in monitoring the friction stir welding process.

  2. VV and VO2 defects in silicon studied with hybrid density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Christopoulos, Stavros Richard G

    2014-12-07

    The formation of VO (A-center), VV and VO2 defects in irradiated Czochralski-grown silicon (Si) is of technological importance. Recent theoretical studies have examined the formation and charge states of the A-center in detail. Here we use density functional theory employing hybrid functionals to analyze the formation of VV and VO2 defects. The formation energy as a function of the Fermi energy is calculated for all possible charge states. For the VV and VO2 defects double negatively charged and neutral states dominate, respectively.

  3. Deterministic Role of Collision Cascade Density in Radiation Defect Dynamics in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. B.; Aji, L. B. Bayu; Shao, L.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2018-05-01

    The formation of stable radiation damage in solids often proceeds via complex dynamic annealing (DA) processes, involving point defect migration and interaction. The dependence of DA on irradiation conditions remains poorly understood even for Si. Here, we use a pulsed ion beam method to study defect interaction dynamics in Si bombarded in the temperature range from ˜-30 ° C to 210 °C with ions in a wide range of masses, from Ne to Xe, creating collision cascades with different densities. We demonstrate that the complexity of the influence of irradiation conditions on defect dynamics can be reduced to a deterministic effect of a single parameter, the average cascade density, calculated by taking into account the fractal nature of collision cascades. For each ion species, the DA rate exhibits two well-defined Arrhenius regions where different DA mechanisms dominate. These two regions intersect at a critical temperature, which depends linearly on the cascade density. The low-temperature DA regime is characterized by an activation energy of ˜0.1 eV , independent of the cascade density. The high-temperature regime, however, exhibits a change in the dominant DA process for cascade densities above ˜0.04 at.%, evidenced by an increase in the activation energy. These results clearly demonstrate a crucial role of the collision cascade density and can be used to predict radiation defect dynamics in Si.

  4. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100: low density lipoproteins with abnormal receptor binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innerarity, T.L.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Arnold, K.S.; Mahley, R.W.; Krauss, R.M.; Vega, G.L.; Grundy, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Previous in vivo turnover studies suggested that retarded clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) from the plasma of some hypercholesterolemic patients is due to LDL with defective receptor binding. The present study examined this postulate directly by receptor binding experiments. The LDL from a hypercholesterolemic patient (G.R.) displayed a reduced ability to bind to the LDL receptors on normal human fibroblasts. The G.R. LDL possessed 32% of normal receptor binding activity. Likewise, the G.R. LDL were much less effective than normal LDL in competing with 125 I-labeled normal LDL for cellular uptake and degradation and in stimulating intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. The defect in LDL binding appears to be due to a genetic abnormality of apolipoprotein B-100: two brothers of the proband possess LDL defective in receptor binding, whereas a third brother and the proband's son have normally binding LDL. Further, the defect in receptor binding does not appear to be associated wit an abnormal lipid composition or structure of the LDL. Normal and abnormal LDL subpopulations were partially separated from plasma of two subjects by density-gradient ultracentrifugation, a finding consistent with the presence of a normal and a mutant allele. The affected family members appear to be heterozygous for this disorder, which has been designated familial defective apolipoprotein B-100. These studies indicate that the defective receptor binding results in inefficient clearance of LDL and the hypercholesterolemia observed in these patients

  5. Density functional study the interaction of oxygen molecule with defect sites of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi Xuejun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Wuhan 430074 (China); Guo Xin, E-mail: guoxin@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zheng Chuguang [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The defect sites existed on the graphite surface create active sites and enhance the reactivity of carbonaceous material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen molecule more favor chemisorbed on the graphene surface contains defect sites than the perfect surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single active oxygen atom adsorbed on the defect surfaces, it completely insert into the surface. - Abstract: The present article reports a theoretical study of oxygen interacted with graphene surface containing defect sites on the atomic level by employing the density functional theory combined with the graphene cluster model. It was founded that oxygen molecule prefers to be chemisorbed on the graphene surface containing defect sites compared to the perfect surface. The adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the double defect site is about 2.5 times as large as that on the perfect graphene surface. Moreover, the oxygen molecule interacts with S-W defect site gives rise to stable epoxy structure, which pulling the carbon atom outward from the original site in the direction perpendicular to the surface. If the oxygen molecule is adsorbed on the single vacancy site, two C-O bonds are formed on the graphene surface. However, when the oxygen molecule is chemisorbed on the double vacancy site, the oxygen atoms substitute the missing carbon atom's position in the carbon plane and form a hexagonal structure on the graphene network. The results indicate that single active oxygen atom approaches the defect site, it's completely adsorbed in the plane and high energy is released. In all cases, the interaction of an oxygen atom with defect surface involves an exothermic process. The defect site creates active sites on the surface of graphene and produces catalytic effects during the process of oxidation of carbonaceous materials.

  6. Defective aluminium nitride nanotubes: a new way for spintronics? A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeoni, M; Santucci, S; Picozzi, S; Delley, B

    2006-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties (in terms of Mulliken charges, density of states and band structures) of pristine and defective (10,0) AlN nanotubes have been calculated within density functional theory. The results show that, in several defective tubes, a spontaneous spin-polarization arises, due to the presence of spin-split flat bands close to the Fermi level, with a strong localization of the corresponding electronic states and of the magnetic moments. The highest positive spin-magnetization (3 μ B per cell) is found for the vacancy in the Al site, while the other magnetic tubes (the vacancy in N, C and O substitutional for N and Al, respectively) show a magnetization of only 1 μ B per cell. The spontaneous magnetization of some defective tubes might open the way to their use for spintronic applications

  7. VV and VO2 defects in silicon studied with hybrid density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Christopoulos, Stavros Richard G; Wang, Hao; Chroneos, Alexander I.; Londos, Charalampos A.; Sgourou, Efstratia N.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The formation of VO (A-center), VV and VO2 defects in irradiated Czochralski-grown silicon (Si) is of technological importance. Recent theoretical studies have examined the formation and charge states of the A-center in detail. Here we use density

  8. Theoretical studies of defects in insulators within the framework of the local density approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, M.R.; Klein, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The muffin-tin Green's function method and a linear combination of atomic orbitals cluster method for defect studies are discussed. These methods have been used to carry out calculations on F-like centers in MgO, CaO and LiF. Although the local density approximation leads to qualitatively correct information pertaining to the occupied states, in addition to the usual perfect-crystal band gap problem, the unoccupied defect levels are found to lie above the onset of the conducting band, in disagreement with the experimental measurements. Results using two methods for incorporating many-electron corrections into an LDA-like computational algorithm are discussed. These methods are the 'scissor-operator' approach to the band gap problem, and the self-interaction-correction (SIC) framework for improving the local spin density approximation. SIC results for the defect excitation spectra are in very good agreement with experiment. This method, when fully developed, should give an excellent ab initio description of defects in insulators. (author) 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  10. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Activation Energies for Carrier Capture by Defects in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.

    The rate of defect-induced carrier recombination is determined by both defect levels and carrier capture cross-sections. Density functional theory (DFT) has been widely and successfully used to predict defect levels, but only recently has work begun to focus on using DFT to determine carrier capture cross-sections. Lang and Henry developed the theory of carrier-capture by multiphonon emission in the 1970s and showed that carrier-capture cross-sections differ between defects primarily due to differences in their carrier capture activation energies. We present an approach to using DFT to calculate carrier capture activation energies that does not depend on an assumed configuration coordinate and that fully accounts for anharmonic effects, which can substantially modify carrier activation energies. We demonstrate our approach for intrinisic defects in GaAs and GaN and discuss how our results depend on the choice of exchange-correlation functional and the treatment of spin polarization. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Annihilation momentum density of positrons trapped at vacancy-type defects in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansil, A.; Prasad, R.; Benedek, R.

    1988-01-01

    Positron annihilation, especially the angular correlation of annihilation radiation, is a powerful tool for investigating the electronic spectra of ordered as well as defected materials. The tendency of positrons to trap at vacancy-type defects should enable this technique to study the local environment of such defects. However, we need to develop a theoretical basis for calculating the two-photon annihilation momentum density rho/sub 2gamma/(p-vector). We have recently formulated and implemented a theory of rho/sub 2gamma/(p-vector) from vacancy-type defects in metals and alloys. This article gives an outline of our approach together with a few of our results. Section 2 summarizes the basic equations for evaluating rho/sub 2gamma/(p-vector). Our Green's function-based approach is nonperturbative and employs a realistic (one-particle) muffin-tin Hamiltonian for treating electrons and positrons. Section 3 presents and discusses rho/sub 2gamma/(p-vector) results for a mono-vacancy in Cu. We have neglected the effects of electron-positron correlations and of lattice distortion around the vacancy. Section 4 comments briefly on the question of treating defects such as divacancies and metal-impurity complexes in metals and alloys. Finally, in Section 5, we remark on the form of rho/sub 2gamma/(p-vector) for a mono-vacancy in jellium. 2 figs

  12. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  13. Nonlinear electron-density distribution around point defects in simple metals. I. Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Jena, P.; Singwi, K.S.

    1978-01-01

    Modification, which is exact in the limit of long wavelength, of the nonlinear theory of Sjoelander and Stott of electron distribution around point defects is given. This modification consists in writing a nonlinear integral equations for the Fourier transform γ 12 (q) of the induced charge density surrounding the point defect, which includes a term involving the density derivative of γ 12 (q). A generalization of the Pauli-Feynman coupling-constant-integration method, together with the Kohn-Sham formalism, is used to exactly determine the coefficient of this derivative term in the long-wavelength limit. The theory is then used to calculate electron-density profiles around a vacancy, an eight-atom void, and a point ion. The results are compared with those of (i) a linear theory, (ii) Sjoelander-Stott theory, and (iii) a fully self-consistent calculation based on the density-functional formalism of Kohn and Sham. It is found that in the case of a vacancy, the results of the present theory are in very good agreement with those based on Kohn-Sham formalism, whereas in the case of a singular attractive potential of a proton, the results are quite poor in the vicinity of the proton, but much better for larger distances. A critical discussion of the theory vis a vis the Kohn-Sham formalism is also given. Some applications of the theory are pointed out

  14. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; McCollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-11-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  15. Threshold defect production in silicon determined by density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, E.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.

    2008-01-01

    We studied threshold displacement energies for creating stable Frenkel pairs in silicon using density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations. The average threshold energy over all lattice directions was found to be 36±2 STAT ±2 SYST eV, and thresholds in the directions and were found to be 20±2 SYST eV and 12.5±1.5 SYST eV, respectively. Moreover, we found that in most studied lattice directions, a bond defect complex is formed with a lower threshold than a Frenkel pair. The average threshold energy for producing either a bond defect or a Frenkel pair was found to be 24±1 STAT ±2 SYST eV

  16. Control of magnonic spectra in cobalt nanohole arrays: the effects of density, symmetry and defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barman, Anjan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanohole arrays are important systems for propagation of magnetic excitations and are among the potential candidates for magnonic crystals. A thorough investigation of magnonic band structures and the effect of the geometry of the array on them are important. Here, we present a systematic micromagnetic simulation study of magnonic modes in cobalt nanohole (antidot) arrays. In particular, we investigate the effects of the areal density and symmetry of the array and defects introduced in the array. The magnonic modes are strongly dependent on the density and the symmetry of the array but are weakly dependent on the defects. We have further investigated the modes in a tailored array consisting of equally wide hexagonal arrays with varying density. The magnonic spectrum of the tailored array contains additional modes above the modes of the constituent arrays due to the appearance of irregular domain structures at the regions joining arrays of two different types. This opens up the possibility of tuning the magnonic bands in magnetic nanohole arrays by careful design of the structure of the array.

  17. Dependence of the saturated light-induced defect density on macroscopic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Park, H. R.; Liu, J. Z.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Maruyama, A.; Isomura, M.; Wagner, S.; Abelson, J. R.; Finger, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report a study of the saturated light-induced defect density Ns,sat in 37 hydrogenated (and in part fluorinated) amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(F)] films grown in six different reactors under widely different conditions. Ns,sat was attained by exposing the films to light from a krypton ion laser (λ=647.1 nm). Ns,sat is determined by the constant photocurrent method and lies between 5×1016 and 2×1017 cm−3. Ns,sat drops with decreasing optical gap Eopt and hydrogen content cH, but is not correlat...

  18. Doping and defects in YBa2Cu3O7: Results from hybrid density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2012-06-21

    Modified orbital occupation and inhomogeneous charge distribution in high-Tc oxide compounds due to doping and/or defects play a huge role for the material properties. To establish insight into the charge redistribution, we address metallic YBa2Cu3O7 in two prototypical configurations: Ca doped (hole doping) and O deficient (electron doping). By means of first principles calculations for fully relaxed structures, we evaluate the orbital occupations. We find that the change of the charge density, in particular in the CuO2 planes, shows a complex spatial pattern instead of the expected uniform (de-)population of the valence states.

  19. Low defect densities in molecular beam epitaxial GaAs achieved by isoelectronic In doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, P. K.; Dhar, S.; Berger, P.; Juang, F.-Y.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of adding small amounts of In (0.2-1.2 pct) to GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The density of four electron traps decreases in concentration by an order of magnitude, and the peak intensities of prominent emissions in the excitonic spectra are reduced with increase in In content. Based on the higher surface migration rate of In, compared to Ga, at the growth temperatures it is apparent that the traps and the excitonic transitions are related to point defects. This agrees with earlier observations by Briones and Collins (1982) and Skromme et al. (1985).

  20. Dependence of the electrical properties of defective single-walled carbon nanotubes on the vacancy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yu-Pin; Tien Li-Gan; Tsai Chuen-Horng; Lee Ming-Hsien; Li Feng-Yin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the electric properties and the vacancy density in single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated from first principles as well as the dependence of the influencing range of a vacancy in the nanotube on the nanotube chirality. Compared with the long-range interaction of the vacancies in a single-walled carbon nanotube with non-zero chiral angle, a much shorter interaction was found between vacancies in a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube. In this study, we investigated the bandstructure fluctuations caused by the nanotube strain, which depends on both the vacancy density and the tube chirality. These theoretical results provide new insight to understand the relationship between the local deformation of a defective single-walled carbon nanotube and its measurable electronic properties. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Topological defect and quasi-particle dynamics in charge density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masahiko; Ebisawa, Hiromichi

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of topological defects (dislocations) in charge density waves (CDW's) is largely affected by the quasi-particle dynamics in the cores of the dislocations. The dislocations mediate the conversion of the electron number between condensate and quasi-particle sub-systems. This is especially important in the sliding conduction of CDW. In this work we propose a simple model, which is obtained by extending the Ginzburg-Landau theory partially taking into account the quasi-particle dynamics in the sense of two-fluid model. We perform the numerical simulation of sliding conduction of CDW based on our model. Using this model we may clarify the detailed process of dislocation nucleation and annihilation near the contacts.

  2. Effect of point defects on the electronic density states of SnC nanosheets: First-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleyman Majidi

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the electronic and structural properties of various defects including single Sn and C vacancies, double vacancy of the Sn and C atoms, anti-sites, position exchange and the Stone–Wales (SW defects in SnC nanosheets by using density-functional theory (DFT. We found that various vacancy defects in the SnC monolayer can change the electronic and structural properties. Our results show that the SnC is an indirect band gap compound, with the band gap of 2.10 eV. The system turns into metal for both structure of the single Sn and C vacancies. However, for the double vacancy contained Sn and C atoms, the structure remains semiconductor with the direct band gap of 0.37 eV at the G point. We also found that for anti-site defects, the structure remains semiconductor and for the exchange defect, the structure becomes indirect semiconductor with the K-G point and the band gap of 0.74 eV. Finally, the structure of SW defect remains semiconductor with the direct band gap at K point with band gap of 0.54 eV. Keywords: SnC nanosheets, Density-functional theory, First-principles calculations, Electronic density of states, Band gap

  3. Extraction of the defect density of states in microcrystalline silicon from experimental results and simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibermacine, T.; Ledra, M.; Ouhabab, N.; Merazga, A.

    2015-01-01

    The constant photocurrent method in the ac-mode (ac-CPM) is used to determine the defect density of states (DOS) in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) prepared by very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD). The absorption coefficient spectrum (ac-α(hv)), is measured under ac-CPM conditions at 60 Hz. The measured ac-α(hv) is converted by the CPM spectroscopy into a DOS distribution covering a portion in the lower energy range of occupied states. We have found that the density of valence band-tail states falls exponentially towards the gap with a typical band-tail width of 63 meV. Independently, computer simulations of the ac-CPM are developed using a DOS model that is consistent with the measured ac-α(hv) in the present work and a previously measured transient photocurrent (TPC) for the same material. The DOS distribution model suggested by the measurements in the lower and in the upper part of the energy-gap, as well as by the numerical modelling in the middle part of the energy-gap, coincide reasonably well with the real DOS distribution in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon because the computed ac-α(hv) is found to agree satisfactorily with the measured ac-α(hv). (paper)

  4. Adsorption of gas molecules on armchair AlN nanoribbons with a dangling bond defect by using density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Guodong; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Wenxue; Li, Hui; He, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the adsorption of gas molecules (CO, NO, O_2, CO_2, and NO_2) on armchair aluminum nitride nanoribbons (AAlNNRs) with a dangling bond defect has been investigated by density functional theory. For all the studied systems, the adsorption geometries, adsorption energies, charge transfer, and electronic structures are discussed. The adsorption energies of O_2, NO_2, and CO_2 are -1.53, -2.24, and -2.88 eV, respectively, corresponding to strong chemisorption. While for CO and NO, the adsorptions are between weak chemisorption and strong physisorption. Moreover, the magnetic property of defective AAlNNR are sensitive to the adsorption of NO_2. Therefore, based on the obtained results, AAlNNRs with a dangling bond defect is promising for using in gas sensor devices to detect NO_2. - Highlights: • The adsorption properties of gas molecules on defective AAlNNRs are performed by DFT. • The adsorption of O_2, NO_2, and CO_2 on defective AAlNNRs are strong chemisorption. • The magnetic property of defective AAlNNRs are sensitive to the adsorption of NO_2. • The defective AAlNNRs is promising in gas sensor devices to detect and capture NO_2.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen–hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO3 perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 eV comp...

  6. Defect properties of CuCrO2: A density functional theory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zhi-Jie; Zhu Ji-Zhen; Zhou Jiang; Mo Man

    2012-01-01

    Using the first-principles methods, we study the formation energetics properties of intrinsic defects, and the charge doping properties of extrinsic defects in transparent conducting oxides CuCrO 2 . Intrinsic defects, some typical acceptor-type, and donor-type extrinsic defects in their relevant charge state are considered. By systematically calculating the formation energies and transition energy, the results of calculation show that, V Cu , O i , and O Cu are the relevant intrinsic defects in CuCrO 2 ; among these intrinsic defects, V Cu is the most efficient acceptor in CuCrO 2 . It is found that all the donor-type extrinsic defects have difficulty in inducing n-conductivity in CuCrO 2 because of their deep transition energy level. For all the acceptor-type extrinsic defects, substituting Mg for Cr is the most prominent doping acceptor with relative shallow transition energy levels in CuCrO 2 . Our calculation results are expected to be a guide for preparing promising n-type and p-type materials in CuCrO 2 . (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  7. Density functional theory study of atomic and electronic properties of defects in reduced anatase TiO2 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kazuki; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanocrystals have received considerable attention owing to their promising applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and fuel cells. Although experimental evidence has shown that the performance of nanocrystals can be significantly improved through reduction, the mechanistic basis of this enhancement remains unclear. To shed a light on the chemistry of reduced anatase TiO2 nanocrystals, density functional theory were used to investigate the properties of defects and excess electrons. We demonstrated that oxygen vacancies are stable both on the surface and at the sub-surface of the nanocrystal, while titanium interstitials prefer sub-surface sites. Different defect locations possessed different excess electron structures, which contributed to deep and shallow states in the band gap of the nanocrystals. Furthermore, valence band tailing was observed, resulting in band gap narrowing. The theoretical results presented here deepen our understanding, and show the potential of defects to considerably change the macroscopic properties of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals.

  8. Influence of aspect ratio and surface defect density on hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods towards amperometric glucose biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mayoorika; Pramila; Dixit, Tejendra; Prakash, Rajiv; Palani, I. A.; Singh, Vipul

    2017-11-01

    In this work, hydrothermally grown ZnO Nanorods Array (ZNA) has been synthesized over Platinum (Pt) coated glass substrate, for biosensing applications. In-situ addition of strong oxidizing agent viz KMnO4 during hydrothermal growth was found to have profound effect on the physical properties of ZNA. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was later immobilized over ZNA by means of physical adsorption process. Further influence of varying aspect ratio, enzyme loading and surface defects on amperometric glucose biosensor has been analyzed. Significant variation in biosensor performance was observed by varying the amount of KMnO4 addition during the growth. Moreover, investigations revealed that the suppression of surface defects and aspect ratio variation of the ZNA played key role towards the observed improvement in the biosensor performance, thereby significantly affecting the sensitivity and response time of the fabricated biosensor. Among different biosensors fabricated having varied aspect ratio and surface defect density of ZNA, the best electrode resulted into sensitivity and response time to be 18.7 mA cm-2 M-1 and <5 s respectively. The observed results revealed that apart from high aspect ratio nanostructures and the extent of enzyme loading, surface defect density also hold a key towards ZnO nanostructures based bio-sensing applications.

  9. Influence of relaxation processes on the evaluation of the metastable defect density in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciaszek, M.; Zabierowski, P. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warszawa 00 662 (Poland)

    2016-06-07

    In this contribution, we investigated by means of numerical simulations the influence of relaxation processes related to metastable defects on electrical characteristics of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}. In particular, we analyzed the relaxation of a metastable state induced by illumination at a fixed temperature as well as the dependence of the hole concentration on the temperature during cooling. The knowledge of these two relaxation processes is crucial in the evaluation of the hole concentration in the relaxed state and after light soaking. We have shown that the distribution of the metastable defects can be considered frozen below 200 K. The hole capture cross section was estimated as ∼3 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}. It was shown that the usually used cooling rates may lead to relevant changes of the hole concentration. We calculated the lower limit of the hole concentration after cooling, and we presented how it depends on densities of shallow acceptors and metastable defects. Moreover, we proposed a method which allows for the evaluation of shallow acceptor and metastable defect densities from two capacitance-voltage profiles measured in the relaxed and light soaking states. Finally, we indicated experimental conditions in which the influence of relaxation processes on the accuracy of this method is the smallest.

  10. Evaluation of defect density by top-view large scale AFM on metamorphic structures grown by MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocalinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.gocalinska@tyndall.ie; Manganaro, Marina; Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Pelucchi, Emanuele

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Metamorphic buffer layers of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As were grown by MOVPE and characterised by AFM and TEM. • It was found that AFM provides sufficient information to estimate threading defect density in metamorphic structures, even when significant roughness is present. • When planar-view TEM is lacking, a combination of cross-sectional TEM and large scale AFM can provide good evaluation of the material quality. • It is fast, cheap and non-destructive – can be very useful in development process of complicated structures, requiring multiple test growths and characterisation. - Abstract: We demonstrate an atomic force microscopy based method for estimation of defect density by identification of threading dislocations on a non-flat surface resulting from metamorphic growth. The discussed technique can be applied as an everyday evaluation tool for the quality of epitaxial structures and allow for cost reduction, as it lessens the amount of the transmission electron microscopy analysis required at the early stages of projects. Metamorphic structures with low surface defectivities (below 10{sup 6}) were developed successfully with the application of the technique, proving its usefulness in process optimisation.

  11. Experimental evaluation of noise spectral density to investigate structure defects and electrical behavior of solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashur, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work current voltage characteristics and voltage spectral density, in both forward and reverse bias operations were evaluated for a group of mono- crystalline silicon solar cells. The cells were tested for the sake of device quality evaluation and identification of failure modes and mechanisms. Experimental results showed transport characteristics with varying slopes. In addition, electrical noise density versus frequency response, for the constant voltage mode, showed an extremum of noise voltage spectral density at zero D.C. frequency. It decreased with increasing frequency and revealed spikes of the noise voltage density at certain frequencies. (author)

  12. Investigation of room temperature UV emission of ZnO films with different defect densities induced by laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Yijian

    2010-08-01

    We studied the room temperature UV emission of ZnO films with different defect densities which is fabricated by KrF laser irradiation process. It is shown room temperature UV photoluminescence of ZnO film is composed of contribution from free-exciton (FX) recombination and its longitudinal-optical phonon replica (FX-LO) (1LO, 2LO). With increase of the defect density, the FX emission decreased and FX-LO emission increased dramatically; and the relative strengths of FX to FX-LO emission intensities determine the peak position and intensity of UV emission. What is more, laser irradiation with moderate energy density could induce the crystalline ZnO film with very flat and smooth surface. This investigation indicates that KrF laser irradiation could effectively modulate the exciton emission and surface morphology, which is important for the application of high performance of UV emitting optoelectronic devices. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Defect Size and Number Density on the Transmission and Reflection of Guided Elastic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    localized region, a photoacoustic source generates elastic waves on one side of the damaged region, and then two ultrasound transducers measure the...Panther OPO) operating at 1.55um and with a pulse width of 7ns, a repetition rate of 30Hz and an average power of 65mW. This configuration seems...where the defects are of the same order as the wavelength of the ultrasound , we find ourselves confronted with Mie scattering, which has weaker

  14. InP layers with low density of defects: effect of holmium and erbium admixture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Olga; Novotný, Jan; Zavadil, Jiří; Kohout, Jindřich; Žďánský, Karel

    Roč. 48, 9 Special Issue (1997), s. 66-69 ISSN 0013-578X. [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education - DMS-RE 1997 /7./. Kočovce, 09.06.1997-11.06.1997] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/96/1238 Keywords : semiconductors * epitaxial growth * rare earth compounds * crystal defects Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  15. Low Defect Density Substrates and High-Quality Epi-Substrate Interfaces for ABCS Devices and Progress Toward Phonon-Mediated THz Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodhue, William; Bliss, David; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Vangala, Shivashankar; Li, Jin; Zhu, Beihong

    2005-01-01

    ... has been developing technology for producing low defect density substrates and high-quality epi-substrate interfaces for ABCS device applications as well as developing fabrication and device concepts...

  16. Effects of Nb and Si on densities of valence electrons in bulk and defects of Fe3Al alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓文; 钟夏平; 黄宇阳; 熊良钺; 王淑荷; 郭建亭; 龙期威

    1999-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements have been performed in binary Fe3Al and Fe3Al doping with Nb or Si alloys. The densities of valence electrons of the bulk and microdefects in all tested samples have been calculated by using the positron lifetime parameters. Density of valence electron is low in the bulk of Fe3Al alloy. It indicates that, the 3d electrons in a Fe atom have strong-localized properties and tend to form covalent bonds with Al atoms, and the bonding nature in Fe3Al is a mixture of metallic and covalent bonds. The density of valence electron is very low in the defects of Fe3Al grain boundary, which makes the bonding cohesion in grain boundary quite weak. The addition of Si to Fe3Al gives rise to the decrease of the densities of valence electrons in the bulk and the grain boundary thus the metallic bonding cohesion. This makes the alloy more brittle. The addition of Nb to Fe3Al results in the decrease of the ordering energy of the alloy and increases the density of valence electron and th

  17. Doping and defects in YBa2Cu3O7: Results from hybrid density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Schuster, Cosima

    2012-01-01

    7 in two prototypical configurations: Ca doped (hole doping) and O deficient (electron doping). By means of first principles calculations for fully relaxed structures, we evaluate the orbital occupations. We find that the change of the charge density

  18. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondon, Akash; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan; Singh, Mohinder

    2015-01-01

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from 137 Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voids in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ∼ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method

  19. Density functional theory study of atomic and electronic properties of defects in reduced anatase TiO2 nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Morita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Anatase TiO2 nanocrystals have received considerable attention owing to their promising applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and fuel cells. Although experimental evidence has shown that the performance of nanocrystals can be significantly improved through reduction, the mechanistic basis of this enhancement remains unclear. To shed a light on the chemistry of reduced anatase TiO2 nanocrystals, density functional theory were used to investigate the properties of defects and excess electrons. We demonstrated that oxygen vacancies are stable both on the surface and at the sub-surface of the nanocrystal, while titanium interstitials prefer sub-surface sites. Different defect locations possessed different excess electron structures, which contributed to deep and shallow states in the band gap of the nanocrystals. Furthermore, valence band tailing was observed, resulting in band gap narrowing. The theoretical results presented here deepen our understanding, and show the potential of defects to considerably change the macroscopic properties of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals.

  20. Si clusters/defective graphene composites as Li-ion batteries anode materials: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Meng; Liu, Yue-Jie; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Wang, Xiao-guang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the interaction between Si clusters with pristine and defective graphene. • We find that the binding strength of Si clusters on graphene can be enhanced to different degrees after introducing various defects. • It is found that both graphene and Si cluster in the Si/graphene composites can preserve their Li uptake ability. - Abstract: Recently, the Si/graphene hybrid composites have attracted considerable attention due to their potential application for Li-ion batteries. How to effectively anchor Si clusters to graphene substrates to ensure their stability is an important factor to determine their performance for Li-ion batteries. In the present work, we have performed comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the geometric structures, stability, and electronic properties of the deposited Si clusters on defective graphenes as well as their potential applications for Li-ion batteries. The results indicate that the interfacial bonding between these Si clusters with the pristine graphene is quietly weak with a small adsorption energy (<−0.21 eV). Due to the presence of vacancy site, the binding strength of Si clusters on defective graphene is much stronger than that of pristine one, accompanying with a certain amount of charge transfer from Si clusters to graphene substrates. Moreover, the ability of Si/graphene hybrids for Li uptake is studied by calculating the adsorption of Li atoms. We find that both graphenes and Si clusters in the Si/graphene composites preserve their Li uptake ability, indicating that graphenes not only server as buffer materials for accommodating the expansion of Si cluster, but also provide additional intercalation sites for Li

  1. Intracellular transport of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol is defective in Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscum, L.; Ruggiero, R.M.; Faust, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is characterized by substantial intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol. The accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in NPC fibroblasts cultured with low density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to result from the inability of LDL to stimulate cholesterol esterification in addition to impaired LDL-mediated downregulation of LDL receptor activity and cellular cholesterol synthesis. Although a defect in cholesterol transport in NPC cells has been inferred from previous studies, no experiments have been reported that measure the intracellular movement of LDL-cholesterol specifically. We have used four approaches to assess intracellular cholesterol transport in normal and NPC cells and have determined the following: (a) mevinolin-inhibited NPC cells are defective in using LDL-cholesterol for growth. However, exogenously added mevalonate restores cell growth equally in normal and NPC cells; (b) the transport of LDL-derived [3H]cholesterol to the plasma membrane is slower in NPC cells, while the rate of appearance of [3H]acetate-derived, endogenously synthesized [3H]cholesterol at the plasma membrane is the same for normal and NPC cells; (c) in NPC cells, LDL-derived [3H]cholesterol accumulates in lysosomes to higher levels than normal, resulting in defective movement to other cell membranes; and (d) incubation of cells with LDL causes an increase in cholesterol content of NPC lysosomes that is threefold greater than that observed in normal lysosomes. Our results indicate that a cholesterol transport defect exists in NPC that is specific for LDL-derived cholesterol

  2. Implementation of density functional embedding theory within the projector-augmented-wave method and applications to semiconductor defect states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new implementation of the density functional embedding theory (DFET) in the VASP code, using the projector-augmented-wave (PAW) formalism. Newly developed algorithms allow us to efficiently perform optimized effective potential optimizations within PAW. The new algorithm generates robust and physically correct embedding potentials, as we verified using several test systems including a covalently bound molecule, a metal surface, and bulk semiconductors. We show that with the resulting embedding potential, embedded cluster models can reproduce the electronic structure of point defects in bulk semiconductors, thereby demonstrating the validity of DFET in semiconductors for the first time. Compared to our previous version, the new implementation of DFET within VASP affords use of all features of VASP (e.g., a systematic PAW library, a wide selection of functionals, a more flexible choice of U correction formalisms, and faster computational speed) with DFET. Furthermore, our results are fairly robust with respect to both plane-wave and Gaussian type orbital basis sets in the embedded cluster calculations. This suggests that the density functional embedding method is potentially an accurate and efficient way to study properties of isolated defects in semiconductors

  3. Bone density of defects treated with lyophilized amniotic membrane versus colagen membrane: a tomographic and histomorfogenic study in a rabbi´s femur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Ríos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the bone density of bone defects treated with lyophilizated amniotic membrane (LAM and collagen Membrane (CM, at 3 and 5 weeks. Two bone defects of 4mm in diameter and 6mm deep were created in left distal femoral diaphysis of New Zealand rabbits (n=12. The animals were randomly divided into 2 groups. One of the defects was covered with lyophilized amniotic membrane (Rosa Chambergo Tissue Bank/National Institute of Child Health-IPEN, Lima, Peru or collagen Membrane (Dentium Co, Seoul, Korea. The second was left uncovered (NC. The rabbits were killed after 3 and 5 weeks (3 rabbits/period. The results showed a high bone density and repair of the defect by new bone. The tomographic study revealed that the bone density of the defects treated with LAM at 3 weeks was equivalent to the density obtained with CM and higher density compared with NC (p0.05. The results show that lyophilizated amniotic membrane provides bone density equal or higher to the collagen membrane.

  4. Density of states of adsorbed sulphur atoms on pristine and defective graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2017-01-01

    The density of states for adsorbed sulphur atom on a graphene layer system is discussed for pristine graphene layer and for mono and divacancies on the graphene layer. To our knowledge this is the first time that an entire adsorption of the sulphur atom is reported at the plane of the carbon atoms, when there is a pair of closer vacancies at the graphene layer. (paper)

  5. Defects influence on short circuit current density in p-i-n silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagah F Mohamad; Alhan M Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    The admittance analysis method has been used to calculate the collection efficiency and the short circuit current density in a-Si:H p-i-n solar cell, as a function of the thickness of i-layer. Its is evident that the results of the short circuit current can be used to determine the optimal thickness of the i-layer of a cell, and it will be more accurate in comparison with the previous studies using a constant generation rate or an empirical exponential function for the generation of charge carriers throughout the i-layer

  6. Time-dependent broken-symmetry density functional theory simulation of the optical response of entangled paramagnetic defects: Color centers in lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.

    2018-02-01

    Parameter-free atomistic simulations of entangled solid-state paramagnetic defects may aid in the rational design of devices for quantum information science. This work applies time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) embedded-cluster simulations to a prototype entangled-defect system, namely two adjacent singlet-coupled F color centers in lithium fluoride. TDDFT calculations accurately reproduce the experimental visible absorption of both isolated and coupled F centers. The most accurate results are obtained by combining spin symmetry breaking to simulate strong correlation, a large fraction of exact (Hartree-Fock-like) exchange to minimize the defect electrons' self-interaction error, and a standard semilocal approximation for dynamical correlations between the defect electrons and the surrounding ionic lattice. These results motivate application of two-reference correlated ab initio approximations to the M-center, and application of TDDFT in parameter-free simulations of more complex entangled paramagnetic defect architectures.

  7. Non-negligible electroweak penguin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Libo; Li Xingyi

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the leading logarithmic low energy effective Hamiltonian and the Bauer-Stech-Wirbe (BSW) model, the authors calculate the electroweak penguin effects in the two-body hadronic pure penguin processes of B-meson. In the case of B→PP and PV decay, the authors find that the processes involving external penguin diagrams receive large contribution from electroweak penguin effects which can even play dominant role

  8. Lowering the density of electronic defects on organic-functionalized Si(100) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Weina; DeBenedetti, William J. I.; Kim, Seonjae; Chabal, Yves J.; Hines, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical quality of functionalized, oxide-free silicon surfaces is critical for chemical sensing, photovoltaics, and molecular electronics applications. In contrast to Si/SiO 2 interfaces, the density of interface states (D it ) cannot be reduced by high temperature annealing because organic layers decompose above 300 °C. While a reasonable D it is achieved on functionalized atomically flat Si(111) surfaces, it has been challenging to develop successful chemical treatments for the technologically relevant Si(100) surfaces. We demonstrate here that recent advances in the chemical preparation of quasi-atomically-flat, H-terminated Si(100) surfaces lead to a marked suppression of electronic states of functionalized surfaces. Using a non-invasive conductance-voltage method to study functionalized Si(100) surfaces with varying roughness, a D it as low as 2.5 × 10 11  cm −2 eV −1 is obtained for the quasi-atomically-flat surfaces, in contrast to >7 × 10 11  cm −2 eV −1 on atomically rough Si(100) surfaces. The interfacial quality of the organic/quasi-atomically-flat Si(100) interface is very close to that obtained on organic/atomically flat Si(111) surfaces, opening the door to applications previously thought to be restricted to Si(111)

  9. Bulk contribution to magnetotransport properties of low-defect-density Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngabonziza, P.; Wang, Y.; Brinkman, A.

    2018-04-01

    An important challenge in the field of topological materials is to carefully disentangle the electronic transport contribution of the topological surface states from that of the bulk. For Bi2Te3 topological insulator samples, bulk single crystals and thin films exposed to air during fabrication processes are known to be bulk conducting, with the chemical potential in the bulk conduction band. For Bi2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy, we combine structural characterization (transmission electron microscopy), chemical surface analysis as function of time (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and magnetotransport analysis to understand the low defect density and record high bulk electron mobility once charge is doped into the bulk by surface degradation. Carrier densities and electronic mobilities extracted from the Hall effect and the quantum oscillations are consistent and reveal a large bulk carrier mobility. Because of the cylindrical shape of the bulk Fermi surface, the angle dependence of the bulk magnetoresistance oscillations is two dimensional in nature.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of the adsorbed and defected Cu nanowires: A density-functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Ying-Ni [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Zhang, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.com [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Fan, Xiao-Xi [Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Xu, Ke-Wei [College of Physics and Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Xian University of Arts and Science, Xian 710065, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory, we systematically investigate the influence of adsorbates (CO molecule and O atom) and defects (adsorb one extra Cu atom and monovacancy) on the structural and electronic properties of Cu{sub 5-1}NW and Cu{sub 6-1}NW. For both nanowires, CO molecule prefers to adsorb on the top site, while O atom prefers to adsorb on the center site. The hybridization between the CO and Cu states is dominated by the donation–backdonation process, which leads to the formation of bonding/antibonding pairs, 5σ{sub b}/5σ{sub a} and 2π{sub b}{sup ⁎}/2π{sub a}{sup ⁎}. The larger adsorption energies, larger charge transfers to O adatom and larger decrease in quantum conductance 3G{sub 0} for an O atom adsorbed on the Cu{sub 5-1}NW and Cu{sub 6-1}NW show both Cu{sub 5-1}NW and Cu{sub 6-1}NW can be used as an O sensor. Furthermore, the decrease in quantum conductance 1G{sub 0} for a CO molecule adsorbed on the Cu{sub 6-1}NW also shows the Cu{sub 6-1}NW can be used to detect CO molecule. So we expect these results may have implications for CuNW based chemical sensing. High adsorption energy of one extra Cu atom and relatively low formation energy of a monovacancy suggest that these two types of defects are likely to occur in the fabrication of CuNWs. One extra Cu atom does not decrease the quantum conductance, while a Cu monovacancy leads to a drop of the quantum conductance.

  11. Histomorphometric Analysis of Periodontal Tissue Regeneration by the Use of High Density Polytetrafluoroethylen Membrane in Grade II Furcation Defects of Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoofi S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are limited histomorphometric studies on biologic efficacy of high density tetrafluoroethylen (d-PTFE membrane. Objectives: To investigate the healing of surgically induced grade II furcation defects in dogs following the use of dense polytetrafluoroethylene as the barrier membrane and to compare the results with the contra lateral control teeth without the application of any membrane. Materials andMethods: Mandibular and maxillary 3rd premolar teeth of 18 young adult male mongrel dogs were used for the experiment. The furcation defects were created during the surgery. 5 weeks later, regenerative surgery was performed. The third premolar teeth were assigned randomly to control and test groups. In the test group, after a full thickness flap reflection, the d-PTFE membrane was placed over furcation defects. In the control group, no membrane was placed over the defect. 37 tissue blocks containing the teeth and surrounding hard and soft tissues were obtained three months post-regenerative surgery. The specimens were demineralized, serially sectioned, mounted and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin staining technique. From each tissue block, 35-45 sections of 10 μm thickness within 60μm interval captured the entire surgically created defect. The histological images were transferred to computer and then the linear measurement ranges of the defects area, interadicular alveolar bone, epithelial attachment and coronal extension of the new cementum were done. Then, the volume and area of aforementioned parameters were calculated considering the thickness and interval of the sections. To compare the parameters between the control and test teeth, we calculated the amount of each one proportionally to the original amount of defects. Results: The mean interradicular root surface areas of original defects covered with new cementum was 74.46% and 29.59% for the membrane and control defects, respectively (p < 0.0001. Corresponding

  12. Critical current densities and flux creep rate in Co-doped BaFe2As2 with columnar defects introduced by heavy-Ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Taen, T.; Yagyuda, H.; Tamegai, T.; Okayasu, S.; Sasase, M.; Kitamura, H.; Murakami, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report the formation of columnar defects in Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 single crystals with different heavy-ion irradiations. The formation of columnar defects by 200 MeV Au ion irradiation is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and their density is about 40% of the irradiation dose. Magneto-optical imaging and bulk magnetization measurements reveal that the critical current density J c is enhanced in the 200 MeV Au and 800 MeV Xe ion irradiated samples while J c is unchanged in the 200 MeV Ni ion irradiated sample. We also find that vortex creep rates are strongly suppressed by the columnar defects. We compare the effect of heavy-ion irradiation into Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 and cuprate superconductors.

  13. Adsorption of SF6 decomposed gas on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces with oxygen defect: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Chen, Qinchuan; Tang, Ju; Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Jinbin

    2014-01-01

    The detection of partial discharge by analyzing the components of SF6 gas in gas-insulated switchgears is important to the diagnosis and assessment of the operational state of power equipment. A gas sensor based on anatase TiO2 is used to detect decomposed gases in SF6. In this paper, first-principle density functional theory calculations are adopted to analyze the adsorption of SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2, the primary decomposition by-products of SF6 under partial discharge, on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces. Simulation results show that the perfect anatase (001) surface has a stronger interaction with the three gases than that of anatase (101), and both surfaces are more sensitive and selective to SO2 than to SOF2 and SO2F2. The selection of a defect surface to SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2 differs from that of a perfect surface. This theoretical result is corroborated by the sensing experiment using a TiO2 nanotube array (TNTA) gas sensor. The calculated values are analyzed to explain the results of the Pt-doped TNTA gas sensor sensing experiment. The results imply that the deposited Pt nanoparticles on the surface increase the active sites of the surface and the gas molecules may decompose upon adsorption on the active sites. PMID:24755845

  14. Quantification of Valleys of Randomly Textured Substrates as a Function of Opening Angle: Correlation to the Defect Density in Intrinsic nc-Si:H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yun; Hänni, Simon; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Zeman, Miro

    2016-08-17

    Optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cells are strongly influenced by the morphology of underlying substrates. By texturing the substrates, the photogenerated current of nc-Si:H solar cells can increase due to enhanced light scattering. These textured substrates are, however, often incompatible with defect-less nc-Si:H growth resulting in lower Voc and FF. In this study we investigate the correlation between the substrate morphology, the nc-Si:H solar-cell performance, and the defect density in the intrinsic layer of the solar cells (i-nc-Si:H). Statistical surface parameters representing the substrate morphology do not show a strong correlation with the solar-cell parameters. Thus, we first quantify the line density of potentially defective valleys of randomly textured ZnO substrates where the opening angle is smaller than 130° (ρdrops. It is also observed that ρdefect increases following a power law dependence of ρ<130. This result is attributed to more frequently formed defective regions for substrates having higher ρ<130.

  15. Relationship between optical coherence tomography sector peripapillary angioflow-density and Octopus visual field cluster mean defect values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Holló

    Full Text Available To compare the relationship of Octopus perimeter cluster mean-defect (cluster MD values with the spatially corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT sector peripapillary angioflow vessel-density (PAFD and sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT values.High quality PAFD and RNFLT images acquired on the same day with the Angiovue/RTVue-XR Avanti OCT (Optovue Inc., Fremont, USA on 1 eye of 27 stable early-to-moderate glaucoma, 22 medically controlled ocular hypertensive and 13 healthy participants were analyzed. Octopus G2 normal visual field test was made within 3 months from the imaging.Total peripapillary PAFD and RNFLT showed similar strong positive correlation with global mean sensitivity (r-values: 0.6710 and 0.6088, P<0.0001, and similar (P = 0.9614 strong negative correlation (r-values: -0.4462 and -0.4412, P≤0.004 with global MD. Both inferotemporal and superotemporal sector PAFD were significantly (≤0.039 lower in glaucoma than in the other groups. No significant difference between the corresponding inferotemporal and superotemporal parameters was seen. The coefficient of determination (R2 calculated for the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD (0.5141, P<0.0001 was significantly greater than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD (0.2546, P = 0.0001. The R2 values calculated for the relationships between superotemporal sector PAFD and RNFLT, and inferotemporal cluster MD were similar (0.3747 and 0.4037, respectively, P<0.0001.In the current population the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD was strong. It was stronger than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD. Further investigations are necessary to clarify if our results are valid for other populations and can be usefully applied for glaucoma research.

  16. In-situ determination of electronic surface and volume defect density of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebke, F.

    1992-07-01

    The density of localized gap states in the bulk and in the near-surface region of amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) was measured for non oxidized undoped, B-doped and P-doped samples as well as for films with low carbon (C) and germanium (Ge) content. Also the influence of light soaking on the bulk and surface density of states was investigated. The samples were prepared by rf glow discharge in an UHV-system at substrate temperatures between 100degC and 400degC and transferred to the analysis chamber by a vacuum lock. We combined the constant photocurrent method (CPM) and the total-yield photoelectron spectroscopy (TY) to obtain in-situ information about the defect densities. While the first method yields information about the density of states in the bulk, the other method obtains the density of occupied states in the near-surface region. The mean information depth of the TY-measurements is limited by the escape lenght of photoelectrons and can be estimated to 5 nm. In addition to the defect density the position of the Fermi energy was determined for the bulk by dark conductivity measurements and at the surface using a calibrated Kelvin probe. (orig.)

  17. Direct comparison of photoluminescence lifetime and defect densities in ZnO epilayers studied by time-resolved photoluminescence and slow positron annihilation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koida, T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); NICP, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda 102-0071 (Japan); Uedono, A. [Institute of Applied Physics and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8755 (Japan); Sota, T. [Department of Electrical, Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Shinjuku 169-8555 (Japan); Kawasaki, M. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8755 (Japan); Combinatorial Materials Exploration and Technology (COMET), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Chichibu, S.F. [NICP, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda 102-0071 (Japan); Photodynamics Research Center, RIKEN, Sendai 980-0868 (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    The roles of point defects and defect complexes governing nonradiative processes in ZnO epilayers were studied using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and slow positron annihilation measurements. The density or size of Zn vacancies (V{sub Zn}) decreased and the nonradiative PL lifetime ({tau}{sub nr}) increased with higher growth temperature for epilayers grown on a ScAlMgO{sub 4} substrate. Accordingly, the steady-state free excitonic PL intensity increased with increase in {tau}{sub nr} at room temperature. The use of a homoepitaxial substrate further decreased the V{sub Zn} concentration. However, no perfect relation between {tau}{sub nr} and the density or size of V{sub Zn} or other positron scattering centers was found. The results indicated that nonradiative recombination processes are governed not solely by single point defects, but by certain defect species introduced by the presence of V{sub Zn} such as vacancy complexes. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of intrinsic defects and Mg transmutants in 3C–SiC determined by density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jiang, Weilin; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of transmutant Mg in 3C–SiC due to high-energy neutron irradiation associated with the fusion nuclear environment. The formation and binding energies of intrinsic defects, Mg-related defects, and clusters in 3C–SiC are systematically calculated. The minimum energy paths and activation energies during point defect migration and small cluster evolution are studied using a generalized solid-state nudged elastic band (G-SSNEB) method with DFT energy calculations. Stable defect structures and possible defect migration mechanisms are identified. The evolution of binding energies during Mg 2 Si formation demonstrates that the formation of Mg 2 Si needs to overcome a critical nucleus size and nucleation barrier. It is found that C vacancies promote the formation of the Mg 2 Si nucleus, and formation of which results in a compressive stress field around the nucleus. These data are important inputs in meso- and macro-scale modeling and experiments to understand and predict the impact of Mg on phase stability, microstructure evolution, and performance of SiC and SiC-based materials during long-term neutron exposures

  19. Effect of high current density to defect generation of blue LED and its characterization with transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, R.; Sugiarti, E.; Isnaeni; Purawiardi, R. I.; Widodo, H.; Muslimin, A. N.; Yuliasari; Ronaldus, C. E.; Prastomo, N.; Hastuty, S.

    2018-03-01

    The optical, electrical and structural characteristics of InGaN-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were investigated to identify the degradation of LED before and after current injection. The sample was injected by high current of 200 A/cm2 for 5 and 20 minutes. It was observed that injection of current shifts light intensity and wavelength characteristics that indicated defect generation. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterization was carried out in order to clarify the structure degradation caused by defect in active layer which consisted of 14 quantum well with thickness of about 5 nm and confined with barrier layer with thickness of about 12 nm. TEM results showed pre-existing defect in LED before injection with high current. Furthermore, discontinue and edge defect was found in dark spot region of LED after injection with high current.

  20. Understanding and Calibrating Density-Functional-Theory Calculations Describing the Energy and Spectroscopy of Defect Sites in Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Sajid, A; Kobayashi, Rika; Ford, Michael J

    2018-03-13

    Defect states in 2-D materials present many possible uses but both experimental and computational characterization of their spectroscopic properties is difficult. We provide and compare results from 13 DFT and ab initio computational methods for up to 25 excited states of a paradigm system, the V N C B defect in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Studied include: (i) potentially catastrophic effects for computational methods arising from the multireference nature of the closed-shell and open-shell states of the defect, which intrinsically involves broken chemical bonds, (ii) differing results from DFT and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations, (iii) comparison of cluster models to periodic-slab models of the defect, (iv) the starkly differing effects of nuclear relaxation on the various electronic states that control the widths of photoabsorption and photoemission spectra as broken bonds try to heal, (v) the effect of zero-point energy and entropy on free-energy differences, (vi) defect-localized and conduction/valence-band transition natures, and (vii) strategies needed to ensure that the lowest-energy state of a defect can be computationally identified. Averaged state-energy differences of 0.3 eV are found between CCSD(T) and MRCI energies, with thermal effects on free energies sometimes also being of this order. However, DFT-based methods can perform very poorly. Simple generalized-gradient functionals like PBE fail at the most basic level and should never be applied to defect states. Hybrid functionals like HSE06 work very well for excitations within the triplet manifold of the defect, with an accuracy equivalent to or perhaps exceeding the accuracy of the ab initio methods used. However, HSE06 underestimates triplet-state energies by on average of 0.7 eV compared to closed-shell singlet states, while open-shell singlet states are predicted to be too low in energy by 1.0 eV. This leads to misassignment of the ground state of the V N C B defect. Long

  1. Low-dislocation-density epitatial layers grown by defect filtering by self-assembled layers of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming

    2013-04-23

    A method for growing low-dislocation-density material atop a layer of the material with an initially higher dislocation density using a monolayer of spheroidal particles to bend and redirect or directly block vertically propagating threading dislocations, thereby enabling growth and coalescence to form a very-low-dislocation-density surface of the material, and the structures made by this method.

  2. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Effect of grain boundary density on carrier mobility in UCP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J.; Stringfellow, G. B.; Natesh, R.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships between hole mobility and grain boundary density were studied. Mobility was measured using the van der Pauw technique, and grain boundary density was measured using a quantitative microscopy technique. Mobility was found to decrease with increasing grain boundary density.

  3. Quantitative assessment of slit Mura defect in a thin film transistor-liquid crystal display based on chromaticity and optical density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzu, Fu-Ming; Chou, Jung-Hua

    2010-01-01

    An innovative non-contact optical inspection method is developed to quantify slit Mura defects for thin film transistor–liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs). From the measurements of both chromaticity and optical densities across the slit Mura, the results indicate that the optical density profile is a concave shape and the chromaticity distribution is a convex shape. A linear relation with a negative slope exists between the chromaticity and optical density. A larger colour difference has a steeper slope, and vice versa. All of the measurements with uncertainties of a 99.7% confidence interval satisfy the requirements of the flat panel display industry. The proposed method can accurately quantify the pattern of blue slit Mura of TFT-LCDs; even the perceptibility is below the just noticeable difference

  4. Effect of thermal treatment on the density of radiation-induced defects in dielectrics and on the semiconductor surface of silicon MDS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daliev, Kh.S.; Lebedev, A.A.; Ehkke, V.; 3425000DD)

    1987-01-01

    Isochronous annealing of radiation defects formed under MIS structure irradiation by γ-quanta at the presence of shift stress on a metal electrode is studied. Complex measurements of non-stationary capacitance spectroscopy and volt-farad characteristics (VFC) have shown that a built-in charge and volumetric states (VS) of the dielectric are annealed at 250 deg C, fast surface states (SS) - at 350 deg C, and the characteristic radiation defect in the Si-SiO 2 transition layer is completely annealed only at 400 deg C. Additional VS and SS occurring in the structures at positive shift on the metal electrode under radiation are annealed at 120 deg C, the kinetics of defect annealing at higher temperatures is independent from shift polarity. SS density calculated by VFC is determined in reality by recharging not only SS but some VS of the dielectric in the range of width of the order of 3.5 nm from the surface of the semiconductor

  5. Reduction in interface defect density in p-BaSi2/n-Si heterojunction solar cells by a modified pretreatment of the Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yudai; Yachi, Suguru; Takabe, Ryota; Sato, Takuma; Emha Bayu, Miftahullatif; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    We have investigated defects that occurred at the interface of p-BaSi2/n-Si heterojunction solar cells that were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that BaSi2 (a-axis-oriented) was subjected to in-plane compressive strain, which relaxed when the thickness of the p-BaSi2 layer exceeded 50 nm. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed defects in the Si layer near steps that were present on the Si(111) substrate. Deep level transient spectroscopy revealed two different electron traps in the n-Si layer that were located at 0.33 eV (E1) and 0.19 eV (E2) below the conduction band edge. The densities of E1 and E2 levels in the region close to the heterointerface were approximately 1014 cm-3. The density of these electron traps decreased below the limits of detection following Si pretreatment to remove the oxide layers from the n-Si substrate, which involved heating the substrate to 800 °C for 30 min under ultrahigh vacuum while depositing a layer of Si (1 nm). The remaining traps in the n-Si layer were hole traps located at 0.65 eV (H1) and 0.38 eV (H2) above the valence band edge. Their densities were as low as 1010 cm-3. Following pretreatment, the current versus voltage characteristics of the p-BaSi2/n-Si solar cells under AM1.5 illumination were reproducible with conversion efficiencies beyond 5% when using a p-BaSi2 layer thickness of 100 nm. The origin of the H2 level is discussed.

  6. Density functional study of NO adsorption on undefected and oxygen defective Au–BaO(1 0 0) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Añez, Rafael, E-mail: ranez@ivic.gob.ve [Laboratorio de Química Física y Catálisis Computacional, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado, 21827 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Sierraalta, Aníbal; Bastardo, Anelisse [Laboratorio de Química Física y Catálisis Computacional, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado, 21827 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Coll, David [Laboratorio de Físico Química Teórica de Materiales, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado, 21827 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Garcia, Belkis [Instituto Universitario de Tecnología de Valencia IUTVAL, Valencia, Edo. Carabobo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    A periodic density functional approach has been used in order to explore the interaction of NO with undoped and Au doped BaO(1 0 0) surface. Due to oxygen vacancies increase the interaction between the doping metal and the surface, F{sub S} and F{sub S}{sup +} vacancies were studied and compared with the results obtained on the undefected doped BaO(1 0 0). Our results indicate that the high basicity of the BaO surface, besides the electron density changes produced by the oxygen vacancies, modify considerably how the Au atom interacts with the surface increasing the ionic character of the interaction. F{sub S} vacancy shows to be a promise center to activate de NO bond on the BaO(1 0 0) surface.

  7. Determination of the stacking fault density in highly defective single GaAs nanowires by means of coherent diffraction imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Arman; Biermanns, Andreas; Loffeld, Otmar; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2016-06-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is used to measure diffraction patterns from individual highly defective nanowires, showing a complex speckle pattern instead of well-defined Bragg peaks. The approach is tested for nanowires of 500 nm diameter and 500 nm height predominately composed by zinc-blende (ZB) and twinned zinc-blende (TZB) phase domains. Phase retrieval is used to reconstruct the measured 2-dimensional intensity patterns recorded from single nanowires with 3.48 nm and 0.98 nm spatial resolution. Whereas the speckle amplitudes and distribution are perfectly reconstructed, no unique solution could be obtained for the phase structure. The number of phase switches is found to be proportional to the number of measured speckles and follows a narrow number distribution. Using data with 0.98 nm spatial resolution the mean number of phase switches is in reasonable agreement with estimates taken from TEM. However, since the resolved phase domain still is 3-4 times larger than a single GaAs bilayer we explain the non-ambiguous phase reconstruction by the fact that depending on starting phase and sequence of subroutines used during the phase retrieval the retrieved phase domain host a different sequence of randomly stacked bilayers. Modelling possible arrangements of bilayer sequences within a phase domain demonstrate that the complex speckle patterns measured can indeed be explained by the random arrangement of the ZB and TZB phase domains.

  8. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation of local currents in pristine and single-defect zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Shenglai, E-mail: shenglai.he@vanderbilt.edu; Russakoff, Arthur; Li, Yonghui; Varga, Kálmán, E-mail: kalman.varga@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    The spatial current distribution in H-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) under electrical bias is investigated using time-dependent density-functional theory solved on a real-space grid. A projected complex absorbing potential is used to minimize the effect of reflection at simulation cell boundary. The calculations show that the current flows mainly along the edge atoms in the hydrogen terminated pristine ZGNRs. When a vacancy is introduced to the ZGNRs, loop currents emerge at the ribbon edge due to electrons hopping between carbon atoms of the same sublattice. The loop currents hinder the flow of the edge current, explaining the poor electric conductance observed in recent experiments.

  9. Point defect dynamics in sodium aluminum hydrides - a combined quasielastic neutron scattering and density functional theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qing; Voss, Johannes; Jacobsen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    we study hydrogen dynamics in undoped and TiCl3-doped samples of NaAlH4 and Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. Hydrogen dynamics is found to be limited and mediated by hydrogen vacancies in both alanate phases, requiring......Understanding the catalytic role of titanium-based additives on the reversible hydrogenation of complex metal hydrides is an essential step towards developing hydrogen storage materials for the transport sector. Improved bulk diffusion of hydrogen is one of the proposed catalytic effects, and here...

  10. Performance potential of low-defect density silicon thin-film solar cells obtained by electron beam evaporation and laser crystallisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K. H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A few microns thick silicon films on glass coated with a dielectric intermediate layer can be crystallised by a single pass of a line-focused diode laser beam. Under favorable process conditions relatively large linear grains with low defect density are formed. Most grain boundaries are defect-free low-energy twin-boundaries. Boron-doped laser crystallised films are processed into solar cells by diffusing an emitter from a phosphorous spin-on-dopant source, measuring up to 539 mV open-circuit voltage prior to metallisation. After applying a point-contact metallisation the best cell achieves 7.8% energy conversion efficiency, open-circuit voltage of 526 mV and short-circuit current of 26 mA/cm2. The efficiency is significantly limited by a low fill-factor of 56% due to the simplified metallisation approach. The internal quantum efficiency of laser crystallised cells is consistent with low front surface recombination. By improving cell metallisation and enhancing light-trapping the efficiencies of above 13% can be achieved.

  11. Linear-scaling density-functional simulations of charged point defects in Al2O3 using hierarchical sparse matrix algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, N D M; Haynes, P D; Mostofi, A A; Payne, M C

    2010-09-21

    We present calculations of formation energies of defects in an ionic solid (Al(2)O(3)) extrapolated to the dilute limit, corresponding to a simulation cell of infinite size. The large-scale calculations required for this extrapolation are enabled by developments in the approach to parallel sparse matrix algebra operations, which are central to linear-scaling density-functional theory calculations. The computational cost of manipulating sparse matrices, whose sizes are determined by the large number of basis functions present, is greatly improved with this new approach. We present details of the sparse algebra scheme implemented in the ONETEP code using hierarchical sparsity patterns, and demonstrate its use in calculations on a wide range of systems, involving thousands of atoms on hundreds to thousands of parallel processes.

  12. The role of interfacial defects in enhancing the critical current density of YBa2Cu3O7-delta coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foltyn, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Haiyan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Civale, Leonardo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maiorov, Boris A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jia, Quanxi [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The critical current density (J{sub c}) of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}0{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) films can approach 10 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K in self field , but only for very thin films. We have shown previously that strong thickness dependence results if J{sub c} is enhanced near the film-substrate interface. In the present work we investigate interfacial enhancement using laser-deposited YBCO films on NdGaO{sub 3} substrates, and find that we can adjust deposition conditions to switch the enhancement on and off. Interestingly, we find that the 'on' state is accompanied by interfacial misfit dislocations, establishing an unambiguous correlation between enhanced J{sub c} and dislocations at the film-substrate interface.

  13. A study on density functional theory of the effect of pressure on the formation and migration enthalpies of intrinsic point defects in growing single crystal Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueoka, Koji; Kamiyama, Eiji; Kariyazaki, Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    In 1982, Voronkov presented a model describing point defect behavior during the growth of single crystal Si from a melt and derived an expression to predict if the crystal was vacancy- or self-interstitial-rich. Recently, Vanhellemont claimed that one should take into account the impact of compressive stress introduced by the thermal gradient at the melt/solid interface by considering the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the formation enthalpy of the intrinsic point defects. To evaluate the impact of thermal stress more correctly, the pressure dependence of both the formation enthalpy (Hf) and the migration enthalpy (Hm) of the intrinsic point defects should be taken into account. Furthermore, growing single crystal Si is not under hydrostatic pressure but almost free of external pressure (generally in Ar gas under reduced pressure). In the present paper, the dependence of Hf and Hm on the pressure P, or in other words, the pressure dependence of the formation energy (Ef) and the relaxation volume (vf), is quantified by density functional theory calculations. Although a large number of ab initio calculations of the properties of intrinsic point defects have been published during the last years, calculations for Si crystals under pressure are rather scarce. For vacancies V, the reported pressure dependences of HfV are inconsistent. In the present study, by using 216-atom supercells with a sufficient cut-off energy and mesh of k-points, the neutral I and V are found to have nearly constant formation energies EfI and EfV for pressures up to 1 GPa. For the relaxation volume, vfI is almost constant while vfV decreases linearly with increasing pressure P. In case of the hydrostatic pressure Ph, the calculated formation enthalpy HfI and migration enthalpy HmI at the [110] dumbbell site are given by HfI = 3.425 - 0.057 × Ph (eV) and HmI = 0.981 - 0.039 × Ph (eV), respectively, with Ph given in GPa. The calculated HfV and HmV dependencies on Ph given by HfV = 3.543 - 0

  14. Effects of thermal cycle annealing on reduction of defect density in lattice-mismatched InGaAs solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, T.; Arafune, K.; Lee, H.S.; Ekins-Daukes, N.J.; Tanaka, S.; Ohshita, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Lattice-mismatched In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As solar cells were grown on GaAs substrates using graded In x Ga 1- x As buffer layers and homogenous In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As buffer layers. The indium composition x in the graded buffer changed from 0% to 16% continuously. Thermal cycle annealing (TCA) was performed after the growth of the graded buffer layers. The effects of TCA on the solar cell open-circuit voltage and quantum efficiency have been investigated. The minority carrier lifetime is observed to increase in the p-type In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As layer after applying the TCA process. Electron-beam-induced current microscopy also shows a related reduction in dislocation density in the p-type In 0.16 Ga 0.84 As layer after TCA processing. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy performed on the graded buffer layer suggests that the strain present in the cell layers is reduced after the TCA process, implying that the TCA treatment promotes strain relaxation in the graded buffer layers

  15. Creation of excitations and defects in insulating materials by high-current-density electron beams of nanosecond pulse duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisburd, D.I.; Evdokimov, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is concerned with fast and ultra-fast processes in insulating materials under the irradiation by a high-current-density electron beam of a nanosecond pulse duration. The inflation process induced by the interaction of a high-intensity electron beam with a dielectric is examined. The ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes is one of the most important stages of the process. Ionization-passive electrons and holes make the main contribution to many fast processes with a characteristic time in the range 10 -14 /10 -12 s: high-energy conductivity, intraband luminescence, etc. A technique was developed for calculation of the ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes in a dielectric prior to electron-phonon relaxation. The following experimental effects are considered: intraband luminescence, coexistence of intraband electron luminescence and band-to-band hole luminescence in CsI, high energy conductivity; generation of mechanical fields and their interaction with cracks and dislocations. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Observation of lower defect density in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}Pb(I,Cl){sub 3} solar cells by admittance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Minlin; Lan, Fei; Tao, Quan; Li, Guangyong, E-mail: gaod@pitt.edu, E-mail: gul6@pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Zhao, Bingxin [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wu, Jiamin; Gao, Di, E-mail: gaod@pitt.edu, E-mail: gul6@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    The introduction of Cl into CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} precursors is reported to enhance the performance of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cell, which is attributed to the significantly increased diffusion lengths of carriers in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}Pb(I,Cl){sub 3} solar cell. It has been assumed but never experimentally approved that the defect density in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}Pb(I,Cl){sub 3} solar cell should be reduced according to the higher carrier lifetime observed from photoluminescence (PL) measurement. We have fabricated CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}Pb(I,Cl){sub 3} solar cell by adding a small amount of Cl source into CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} precursor. The performance of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}Pb(I,Cl){sub 3} solar cell is significantly improved from 15.39% to 18.60%. Results from scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the morphologies and crystal structures of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}Pb(I,Cl){sub 3} thin films remain unchanged. Open circuit voltage decay and admittance spectroscopy characterization jointly approve that Cl plays an extremely important role in suppressing the formation of defects in perovskite solar cells.

  17. Evidence against or for topological defects in the BOOMERanG data?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, F.R.; Peter, P.; Riazuelo, A.; Sakellariadou, M.

    2002-01-01

    The recently released BOOMERanG data were taken as 'contradicting topological defect predictions'. We show that such a statement is partly misleading. Indeed, the presence of a series of acoustic peaks is perfectly compatible with a non-negligible topological defect contribution. In such a mixed perturbation model (inflation and topological defects) for the source of primordial fluctuations, the natural prediction is a slightly lower amplitude for the Doppler peaks, a feature shared by many other purely inflationary models. Thus, for the moment, it seems difficult to rule out these models with the current data

  18. High current density GaAs/Si rectifying heterojunction by defect free Epitaxial Lateral overgrowth on Tunnel Oxide from nano-seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Charles; Molière, Timothée; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Alvarez, José; Vincent, Laetitia; Jaffré, Alexandre; Hallais, Géraldine; Connolly, James Patrick; Mencaraglia, Denis; Bouchier, Daniel

    2016-05-04

    Interest in the heteroepitaxy of GaAs on Si has never failed in the last years due to the potential for monolithic integration of GaAs-based devices with Si integrated circuits. But in spite of this effort, devices fabricated from them still use homo-epitaxy only. Here we present an epitaxial technique based on the epitaxial lateral overgrowth of micrometer scale GaAs crystals on a thin SiO2 layer from nanoscale Si seeds. This method permits the integration of high quality and defect-free crystalline GaAs on Si substrate and provides active GaAs/Si heterojunctions with efficient carrier transport through the thin SiO2 layer. The nucleation from small width openings avoids the emission of misfit dislocations and the formation of antiphase domains. With this method, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a monolithically integrated GaAs/Si diode with high current densities of 10 kA.cm(-2) for a forward bias of 3.7 V. This epitaxial technique paves the way to hybrid III-V/Si devices that are free from lattice-matching restrictions, and where silicon not only behaves as a substrate but also as an active medium.

  19. Differentiation between grade 3 and grade 4 articular cartilage defects of the knee: Fat-suppressed proton density-weighted versus fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Yeon; Jee, Won-Hee; Kim, Sun Ki (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Koh, In-Jun (Dept. of Joint Reconstruction Center, Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea)); Kim, Jung-Man (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-05-15

    Background: Fat-suppressed (FS) proton density (PD)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FS three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo imaging such as spoiled gradient-recalled (SPGR) sequence have been established as accurate methods for detecting articular cartilage defects. Purpose: To retrospectively compare the diagnostic efficacy between FS PD-weighted and FS 3D gradient-echo MRI for differentiating between grade 3 and grade 4 cartilage defects of the knee with arthroscopy as the standard of reference. Material and Methods: Twenty-one patients who had grade 3 or 4 cartilage defects in medial femoral condyle at arthroscopy and knee MRI were included in this study: grade 3, >50% cartilage defects; grade 4, full thickness cartilage defects exposed to the bone. Sagittal FS PD-weighted MR images and FS 3D gradient-echo images with 1.5 T MR images were independently graded for the cartilage abnormalities of medial femoral condyle by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test. Inter-observer agreement in grading of cartilage was assessed using ? coefficients. Results: Arthroscopy revealed grade 3 defects in 17 patients and grade 4 defects in 4 patients in medial femoral condyles. For FS 3D gradient-echo images grade 3 defects were graded as grade 3 (n=15) and grade 4 (n=2), and all grade 4 defects (n=4) were correctly graded. However, for FS PD-weighted MR images all grade 3 defects were misinterpreted as grade 1 (n=1) and grade 4 (n=16), whereas all grade 4 defects (n=4) were correctly graded. FS 3D gradient-echo MRI could differentiate grade 3 from grade 4 defects (P=0.003), whereas FS PD-weighted imaging could not (P=1.0). Inter-observer agreement was substantial (?=0.70) for grading of cartilage using FS PD-weighted imaging, whereas it was moderate (?=0.46) using FS 3D gradient-echo imaging. Conclusion: FS 3D gradient-echo MRI is more helpful for differentiating between grade 3 and grade 4 cartilage

  20. Lean Thinking in Systems with Non-Negligible Process Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erland Hejn; Simons, David

    2000-01-01

    Lean Thinking (Womack and Jones) improves quality, cost and delivery through the relentless elimination of the wastes. For example, the exemplar of Lean, the Toyota Production system, focuses on improvement through the continual elimination of seven categorised wastes (Ohno). Time compression (St...

  1. Lean Thinking in systems with non-negligible process variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erland Hejn; Simons, David

    2000-01-01

    Lean Thinking (Womack and Jones) improves quality, cost and delivery through the relentless elimination of wastes. For example, the exemplar of Lean, the Toyota Production system, focuses on improvement through the continual elimination of seven categorised wastes (Ohno). Time compression (Stalk ...

  2. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  3. Influence of ZnO seed layer precursor molar ratio on the density of interface defects in low temperature aqueous chemically synthesized ZnO nanorods/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnoor, Hatim, E-mail: hatim.alnoor@liu.se; Iandolo, Donata; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping (Sweden); Pozina, Galia; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr; Liu, Xianjie [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-583 81 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-04-28

    Low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (LT-ACS) of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) has been attracting considerable research interest due to its great potential in the development of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The influence of the molar ratio of the zinc acetate (ZnAc): KOH as a ZnO seed layer precursor on the density of interface defects and hence the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in LT-ACS of ZnO NRs/GaN LEDs has been systematically investigated. The material quality of the as-prepared seed layer as quantitatively deduced by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is found to be influenced by the molar ratio. It is revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence that the seed layer molar ratio plays a significant role in the formation and the density of defects at the n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN heterostructure interface. Consequently, LED devices processed using ZnO NRs synthesized with molar ratio of 1:5 M exhibit stronger yellow emission (∼575 nm) compared to those based on 1:1 and 1:3 M ratios as measured by the electroluminescence. Furthermore, seed layer molar ratio shows a quantitative dependence of the non-radiative defect densities as deduced from light-output current characteristics analysis. These results have implications on the development of high-efficiency ZnO-based LEDs and may also be helpful in understanding the effects of the ZnO seed layer on defect-related non-radiative recombination.

  4. Formation of topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachaspati, T.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the formation of point and line topological defects (monopoles and strings) from a general point of view by allowing the probability of formation of a defect to vary. To investigate the statistical properties of the defects at formation we give qualitative arguments that are independent of any particular model in which such defects occur. These arguments are substantiated by numerical results in the case of strings and for monopoles in two dimensions. We find that the network of strings at formation undergoes a transition at a certain critical density below which there are no infinite strings and the closed-string (loop) distribution is exponentially suppressed at large lengths. The results are contrasted with the results of statistical arguments applied to a box of strings in dynamical equilibrium. We argue that if point defects were to form with smaller probability, the distance between monopoles and antimonopoles would decrease while the monopole-to-monopole distance would increase. We find that monopoles are always paired with antimonopoles but the pairing becomes clean only when the number density of defects is small. A similar reasoning would also apply to other defects

  5. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  6. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...... the trapped state iri the defect. The annihilation characteristics (e.g., the lifetime of the positron) can be measured and provide information about the nature of the defect (e.g., size, density, morphology). The technique is sensitive to both defect size (in the range from monovacancies up to cavities...

  7. Point defects as a test ground for the local density approximation +U theory: Mn, Fe, and V{sub Ga} in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volnianska, O.; Zakrzewski, T. [Institute of Physics PAS, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Boguslawski, P. [Institute of Physics PAS, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, Kazimierz Wielki University, 85-072 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2014-09-21

    Electronic structure of the Mn and Fe ions and of the gallium vacancy V{sub Ga} in GaN was analysed within the GGA + U approach. First, the +U term was treated as a free parameter, and applied to p(N), d(Mn), and d(Fe). The band gap of GaN is reproduced for U(N) ≈ 4 eV. The electronic structure of defect states was found to be more sensitive to the value of U than that of the bulk states. Both the magnitude and the sign of the U-induced energy shifts of levels depend on occupancies, and thus on the defect charge state. The energy shifts also depend on the hybridization between defect and host states, and thus are different for different level symmetries. In the case of V{sub Ga}, these effects lead to stabilization of spin polarization and the “negative-U{sub eff}” behavior. The values of Us were also calculated using the linear response approach, which gives U(Fe) ≈ U(Mn) ≈ 4 eV. This reproduces well the results of previous hybrid functionals calculations. However, the best agreement with the experimental data is obtained for vanishing or even negative U(Fe) and U(Mn)

  8. Point defects in platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercy, G.R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made of the mobility and types of point defect introduced in platinum by deformation in liquid nitrogen, quenching into water from 1600 o C, or reactor irradiation at 50 o C. In all cases the activation energy for motion of the defect was determined from measurements of electrical resistivity. Measurements of density, hardness, and x-ray line broadening were also made there applicable. These experiments indicated that the principal defects remaining in platinum after irradiation were single vacant lattice sites and after quenching were pairs of vacant lattice sites. Those present after deformation In liquid nitrogen were single vacant lattice sites and another type of defect, perhaps interstitial atoms. (author)

  9. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Chicago Univ., IL; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-04-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings. 18 refs

  10. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended-inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of the bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings

  11. Reduced defect densities in the ZnO epilayer grown on Si substrates by laser-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy using a ZnS epitaxial buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, T.; Chichibu, S.F.; Uedono, A.; Yoo, Y.-Z.; Chikyow, T.; Sota, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Koinuma, H.

    2004-01-01

    Nonradiative photoluminescence (PL) lifetime (τ nr ) and point defect density in the (0001) ZnO epilayer grown on (111) Si substrates by laser-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy (L-MBE) using a (0001) ZnS epitaxial buffer layer were compared with those in the ZnO films on (111) and (001) Si substrates prepared by direct transformation of ZnS epilayers on Si by thermal oxidation [Yoo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 616 (2001)]. Both the ZnO films exhibited excitonic reflectance anomalies and corresponding PL peaks at low temperature, and the density or size of vacancy-type point defects (Zn vacancies), which were measured by the monoenergetic positron annihilation measurement, in the L-MBE epilayer was lower than that in the films prepared by the oxidation transformation. The ZnO epilayer grown on a (0001) ZnS epitaxial buffer on (111) Si exhibited longer τ nr of 105 ps at room temperature

  12. Designing topological defects in 2D materials using scanning probe microscopy and a self-healing mechanism: a density functional-based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Igor; Đurišić, Ivana; Belić, Milivoj R.

    2017-12-01

    Engineering of materials at the atomic level is one of the most important aims of nanotechnology. The unprecedented ability of scanning probe microscopy to address individual atoms opened up the possibilities for nanomanipulation and nanolitography of surfaces and later on of two-dimensional materials. While the state-of-the-art scanning probe lithographic methods include, primarily, adsorption, desorption and repositioning of adatoms and molecules on substrates or tailoring nanoribbons by etching of trenches, the precise modification of the intrinsic atomic structure of materials is yet to be advanced. Here we introduce a new concept, scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip, for engineering of the atomic structure of membranes based on two-dimensional materials. In order to indicate the viability of the concept, we present our theoretical research, which includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, Fourier analysis and electronic transport calculations. While stretching can be employed for fabrication of atomic chains only, our comprehensive molecular dynamics simulations indicate that nanomanipulation by scanning probe microscopy with a rotating tip is capable of assembling a wide range of topological defects in two-dimensional materials in a rather controllable and reproducible manner. We analyze two possibilities. In the first case the probe tip is retracted from the membrane while in the second case the tip is released beneath the membrane allowing graphene to freely relax and self-heal the pore made by the tip. The former approach with the tip rotation can be achieved experimentally by rotation of the sample, which is equivalent to rotation of the tip, whereas irradiation of the membrane by nanoclusters can be utilized for the latter approach. The latter one has the potential to yield a yet richer diversity of topological defects on account of a lesser determinacy. If successfully realized experimentally the concept proposed here could

  13. A density functional study of NO{sub 2} adsorption on perfect and defective MgO (1 0 0) and Li/MgO (1 0 0) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eid, Kh.M., E-mail: Khaled_eid@edu.asu.edu.eg [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11757, Cairo (Egypt); Ammar, H.Y. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, P.O. Box 11757, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Najran University, Najran (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-07-15

    The density functional theory (DFT) in combination with embedded cluster model have been used to study the adsorption of nitrogen dioxide molecule (NO{sub 2}) on Li atom deposited on the surfaces of metal oxide MgO (1 0 0) on both anionic (O{sup 2-}) and defect (F{sub s} and F{sub s}{sup +}-centers) sites. The adsorption energy (E{sub ads}) of NO{sub 2} molecule (N-down as well as O-down) in different positions on O{sup -2}, F{sub s} and F{sub s}{sup +}-sites is considered. The geometrical optimizations have been done for the additive materials and MgO substrate surfaces. The formation energies have been evaluated for F{sub s} and F{sub s}{sup +} of MgO substrate surfaces. The ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (eA) for defect free and defect containing surfaces have been calculated. The adsorption properties of NO{sub 2} are analyzed in terms of the adsorption energy, the electron donation (basicity), the elongation of N-O bond length and the atomic charges on adsorbed materials. The densities of states (DOS) have been calculated and used for examining the adsorption properties. The NO{sub 2} molecule is dissociated due to the interaction with the defective substrate surface (F{sub s}-site) producing an oxygen atom strongly chemisorbed to the vacancy of the substrate and gaseous NO far away from the surface. The presence of the Li atom increases the surface chemistry of the anionic O{sup 2-}-site of MgO substrate surfaces (converted from physisorption to chemisorption). On the other hand, the presence of the Li atom decreases the surface chemistry of the F{sub s} and F{sub s}{sup +}-sites of MgO substrate surfaces. Generally, the NO{sub 2} molecule is strongly adsorbed (chemisorption) on the MgO substrate surfaces containing F{sub s} and F{sub s}{sup +}-centers.

  14. Ultra-thin silicon oxide layers on crystalline silicon wafers: Comparison of advanced oxidation techniques with respect to chemically abrupt SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces with low defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegemann, Bert, E-mail: bert.stegemann@htw-berlin.de [HTW Berlin - University of Applied Sciences, 12459 Berlin (Germany); Gad, Karim M. [University of Freiburg, Department of Microsystems Engineering - IMTEK, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Balamou, Patrice [HTW Berlin - University of Applied Sciences, 12459 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (HZB), 12489 Berlin (Germany); Sixtensson, Daniel [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (HZB), 12489 Berlin (Germany); Vössing, Daniel; Kasemann, Martin [University of Freiburg, Department of Microsystems Engineering - IMTEK, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Angermann, Heike [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (HZB), 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Fabrication of ultrathin SiO{sub 2} tunnel layers on c-Si. • Correlation of electronic and chemical SiO{sub 2}/Si interface properties revealed by XPS/SPV. • Chemically abrupt SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces generate less interface defect states considerable. - Abstract: Six advanced oxidation techniques were analyzed, evaluated and compared with respect to the preparation of high-quality ultra-thin oxide layers on crystalline silicon. The resulting electronic and chemical SiO{sub 2}/Si interface properties were determined by a combined x-ray photoemission (XPS) and surface photovoltage (SPV) investigation. Depending on the oxidation technique, chemically abrupt SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces with low densities of interface states were fabricated on c-Si either at low temperatures, at short times, or in wet-chemical environment, resulting in each case in excellent interface passivation. Moreover, the beneficial effect of a subsequent forming gas annealing (FGA) step for the passivation of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface of ultra-thin oxide layers has been proven. Chemically abrupt SiO{sub 2}/Si interfaces have been shown to generate less interface defect states.

  15. The relationship between the hardness and the point-defect-density in neutron-irradiated MgO·3.0Al2O3 and AlN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Yatsui, K.; Yano, T.

    2001-01-01

    MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 single crystals and sintered AlN polycrystals were irradiated with fast neutrons in various conditions and the hardness of the irradiated and unirradiated samples was measured with a Vickers hardness tester. The hardness of as-irradiated MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 and AlN samples increased by 23 and 51%, respectively. After isochronal annealing, the hardness gradually decreased and mostly recovered to that of the unirradiated one up to 1400degC. Volume of the sample also increased after the irradiation and changed in the same way as the hardness by annealing. A relationship between the hardness and the density of point defects is proposed and the experimental results agree with the relationship. It implies that the point defects generated by the irradiation pin down dislocations and increase the hardness of neutron irradiated MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 samples. (author)

  16. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  17. The role of the anionic and cationic pt sites in the adsorption site preference of water and ethanol on defected Pt4/Pt(111) substrates: A density functional theory investigation within the D3 van der waals corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminovski, Yohanna; Amaral, Rafael C.; Tereshchuk, Polina; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2018-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) atoms in the bulk face-centered cubic structure have neutral charge because they are equivalent by symmetry, however, in clean Pt surfaces, the effective charge on Pt atoms can turn slightly negative (anionic) or positive (cationic) while increasing substantially in magnitude for defected (low-coordinated) Pt sites. The effective charge affect the adsorption properties of molecular species on Pt surfaces and it can compete in importance with the coupling of the substrate-molecule electronic states. Although several studies have been reported due to the importance of Pt for catalysis, our understanding of the role played by low-coordinated sites is still limited. Here, we employ density functional theory within the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation functional and the D3 van der Waals (vdW) correction to investigate the role of the cationic and anionic Pt sites on the adsorption properties of ethanol and water on defected Pt4/Pt(111) substrates. Four substrates were carefully selected, namely, two two-dimensional (2D) Pt4 configurations (2D-strand and 2D-island) and two tri-dimensional (3D) Pt4 (3D-fcc and 3D-hcp), to understand the role of coordination, effective charge, and coupling of the electronic states in the adsorption properties. From the Bader charge analysis, we identified the cationic and anionic sites among the Pt atoms exposed to the vacuum region in the Pt4/Pt(111) substrates. We found that ethanol and water bind via the anionic O atoms to the low-coordinated defected Pt sites of the substrates, where the angle PtOH is nearly 100° for most configurations. In the 3D-fcc or 3D-hcp defected configurations, the lowest-coordinated Pt atoms are anionic, hence, those Pt sites are not preferable for the adsorption of O atoms. The charge transfer from water and ethanol to the Pt substrates has similar magnitude for all cases, which implies similar Coulomb contribution to the adsorption energy. Moreover, we found a correlation of the

  18. Defectos eritrocíticos y densidad de la parasitemia en pacientes con malaria por Plasmodium falciparum en Buenaventura, Colombia Erythrocyte defects and parasitemia density in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Buenaventura, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Moyano

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar la prevalencia de algunos defectos eritrocíticos y evaluar su relación con la densidad de la parasitemia en personas con diagnóstico de malaria (paludismo por Plasmodium falciparum en una población del Pacífico colombiano. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio de prevalencia en 242 personas con malaria por P. falciparum que consultaron al Programa de Enfermedades Tropicales en la ciudad de Buenaventura, Colombia. Se midieron los niveles de parasitemia y se determinó la presencia de defectos eritrocíticos congénitos (deficiencia de glucosa-6-fosfato deshidrogenasa [G6PD] y presencia de hemoglobinas anormales y de talasemias y de otros factores potencialmente relacionados con los niveles de parasitemia. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia obtenida de defectos eritrocíticos fue de 26,4% (IC95% 21,0 a 32,5, similar a la hallada en estudios realizados antes en la misma zona. En los modelos de regresión múltiple, las personas con drepanocitosis o deficiencia total de la G6PD presentaron una menor densidad de parasitemia que las personas sin defecto, y el riesgo de parasitemias altas fue menor en estas personas después de ajustes respecto a otras variables de interés (razón de posibilidades [odds ratio, RP]: 0,30 y 0,72, respectivamente. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados confirman una alta prevalencia de defectos eritrocíticos en el Pacífico colombiano, en una población con características étnicas similares a las de algunas poblaciones del África Occidental, y aportan información en favor de la existencia de resistencia innata a la malaria en personas portadoras de hemoglobina AS o con deficiencia de la G6PD.OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of some erythrocyte defects and to evaluate the relation that that has with parasitemia density in individuals diagnosed with Plasmodium falciparum malaria in a population in the Pacific coastal region of Colombia. METHODS: This prevalence study was carried out with 242 persons with P

  19. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  20. Characterization of point defects in monolayer arsenene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiongyi; Ng, Siu-Pang; Ding, Ning; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2018-06-01

    Topological defects that are inevitably found in 2D materials can dramatically affect their properties. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method, the structural, thermodynamic, electronic and magnetic properties of six types of typical point defects in arsenene, i.e. the Stone-Wales defect, single and double vacancies and adatoms, were systemically studied. It was found that these defects were all more easily generated in arsenene with lower formation energies than those with graphene and silicene. Stone-Wales defects can be transformed from pristine arsenene by overcoming a barrier of 2.19 eV and single vacancy defects tend to coalesce into double vacancy defects by diffusion. However, a type of adatom defect does not exhibit kinetic stability at room temperature. In addition, SV defects and another type of adatom defect can remarkably affect the electronic and magnetic properties of arsenene, e.g. they can introduce localized states near the Fermi level, as well as a strongly local magnetic moment due to dangling bond and unpaired electron. Furthermore, the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Raman spectroscopy were computed and the types of point defects can be fully characterized by correlating the STM images and Raman spectra to the defective atomistic structures. The results provide significant insights to the effect of defects in arsenene for potential applications, as well as identifications of two helpful tools (STM and Raman spectroscopy) to distinguish the type of defects in arsenene for future experiments.

  1. Packing defects into ordered structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechstein, R.; Kristoffersen, Henrik Høgh; Vilhelmsen, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    . With the help of density functional theory calculations we develop a complete structural model for the entire strand and demonstrate these adstructures to be more stable than an equivalent amount of bulk defects such as Ti interstitials. We argue that strands can form particularly easy on stepped surfaces......We have studied vicinal TiO2(110) surfaces by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. On TiO2 surfaces characterized by a high density of ⟨11̅ 1⟩ steps, scanning tunneling microscopy reveals a high density of oxygen-deficient strandlike adstructures...

  2. Defect-induced transitions in synchronous asymmetric exclusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Mingzhe; Wang Ruili; Jiang Rui; Hu Maobin; Gao Yang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a single local defect in synchronous asymmetric exclusion processes are investigated via theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations. Our theoretical analysis shows that there are four possible stationary phases, i.e., the (low density, low density), (low density, high density), (high density, low density) and (high density, high density) in the system. In the (high density, low density) phase, the system can reach a maximal current which is determined by the local defect, but independent of boundary conditions. A phenomenological domain wall approach is developed to predict dynamic behavior at phase boundaries. The effects of defective hopping probability p on density profiles and currents are investigated. Our investigation shows that the value of p determines phase transitions when entrance rate α and exit rate β are fixed. Density profiles and currents obtained from theoretical calculations are in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations

  3. Topological defects from the multiverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

  4. Topological defects from the multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Blanco-Pillado, Jose J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013, Bilbao (Spain); Garriga, Jaume [Departament de Fisica Fonamental i Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

  5. Topological defects from the multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jun; Vilenkin, Alexander; Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Garriga, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble

  6. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  7. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  8. Optimizing image-based patterned defect inspection through FDTD simulations at multiple ultraviolet wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Bryan M.; Zhou, Hui; Henn, Mark-Alexander; Sohn, Martin Y.; Silver, Richard M.

    2017-06-01

    The sizes of non-negligible defects in the patterning of a semiconductor device continue to decrease as the dimensions for these devices are reduced. These "killer defects" disrupt the performance of the device and must be adequately controlled during manufacturing, and new solutions are required to improve optics-based defect inspection. To this end, our group has reported [Barnes et al., Proc. SPIE 1014516 (2017)] our initial five-wavelength simulation study, evaluating the extensibility of defect inspection by reducing the inspection wavelength from a deep-ultraviolet wavelength to wavelengths in the vacuum ultraviolet and the extreme ultraviolet. In that study, a 47 nm wavelength yielded enhancements in the signal to noise (SNR) by a factor of five compared to longer wavelengths and in the differential intensities by as much as three orders-of-magnitude compared to 13 nm. This paper briefly reviews these recent findings and investigates the possible sources for these disparities between results at 13 nm and 47 nm wavelengths. Our in-house finite-difference time-domain code (FDTD) is tested in both two and three dimensions to determine how computational conditions contributed to the results. A modified geometry and materials stack is presented that offers a second viewpoint of defect detectability as functions of wavelength, polarization, and defect type. Reapplication of the initial SNR-based defect metric again yields no detection of a defect at λ = 13 nm, but additional image preprocessing now enables the computation of the SNR for λ = 13 nm simulated images and has led to a revised defect metric that allows comparisons at all five wavelengths.

  9. Study of EUV induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Rizo, P.J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, Christopher James; Banine, V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Defects in graphene greatly affect its properties1-3. Radiation induced-defects may reduce the long-term survivability of graphene-based nano-devices. Here, we expose few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5nm) radiation and show there is a power-dependent increase in defect density. We

  10. Experimental and numerical response of rigid slender blocks with geometrical defects under seismic excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathey Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates on the influence of small geometrical defects on the behavior of slender rigid blocks. A comprehensive experimental campaign was carried out on one of the shake tables of CEA/Saclay in France. The tested model was a massive steel block with standard manufacturing quality. Release, free oscillations tests as well as shake table tests revealed a non-negligible out-of-plane motion even in the case of apparently plane initial conditions or excitations. This motion exhibits a highly reproducible part for a short duration that was used to calibrate a numerical geometrically asymmetrical model. The stability of this model when subjected to 2 000 artificial seismic horizontal bidirectional signals was compared to the stability of a symmetrical one. This study showed that the geometrical imperfections slightly increase the rocking and overturning probabilities under bidirectional seismic excitations in a narrow range of peak ground acceleration.

  11. Achievement report for fiscal 1981 on Sunshine Program research and development of photovoltaic power systems. Research and development of amorphous solar cells (Research on amorphous silicon defect density); 1981 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Amorphous taiyo denchi no kenkyu kaihatsu (Amorphous silicon no kekkan mitsudo no kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-03-01

    So as to determine the energy distribution of defect level density in a-Si, which is indispensable for an optimum solar cell design, the hitherto unclear theoretical relationship between the field effect method and MOS (metal oxide semiconductor) capacity method is made clear, and a unified theory is newly established. A high-speed totally automatic evaluation system is developed, capable of high-accuracy determination of defect levels. For the realization of an a-Si MOS structure required for fulfilling the above purpose, a-Si is grown and then diborane and ammonia are subjected to a glow discharge decomposition process for the formation of a new insulation film. It is found that the material may be utilized for MOS structure construction for defect density evaluation. Studies are conducted on plasma emission spectroscopy and infrared absorption analysis for the elucidation of growth mechanism for the growth of high-quality a-Si. Key radicals in plasma that govern film growth are investigated. It is disclosed that excited hydrogen in plasma plays an important part in microcrystalline phase deposition. It is also disclosed that hydrogenation greatly improves on CVD (chemical vapor deposition) a-Si doping efficiency. (NEDO)

  12. Density of states controls Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Fernández, David; Smolka, Stephan; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We prove Anderson localization in a disordered photonic crystal waveguide by measuring the ensemble-averaged extinction mean-free path, ℓe, which is controlled by the dispersion in the photon density of states (DOS) of the photonic crystal waveguide. Except for the very low DOS case, where out......-of-plane losses are non-negligible, ℓe can be approximated to be the localization length ξ. The extinction mean-free path shows a fivefold variation between the low- and the high-DOS regime, and it becomes shorter than the sample length thus giving rise to strongly confined modes. The dispersive behavior of ℓe...

  13. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... Defect reconstruction and fixation of the graft: The defect of ... where all loose fragments of fractured frontal bone was removed via the ... Mandible. • Ilium. • Allograft ... pediatric patients owing to skull growth. Thus, autologous ...

  14. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  15. Defect of the Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanning Nina; Pelton, Ron W; Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, John David

    2017-08-01

    Eyelid defects disrupt the complex natural form and function of the eyelids and present a surgical challenge. Detailed knowledge of eyelid anatomy is essential in evaluating a defect and composing a reconstructive plan. Numerous reconstructive techniques have been described, including primary closure, grafting, and a variety of local flaps. This article describes an updated reconstructive ladder for eyelid defects that can be used in various permutations to solve most eyelid defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  17. Fibrous metaphyseal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, P.; Hajek, P.C.; Pechmann, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients with fibrous metaphyseal defects were examined with both plain radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Depending on the age of the fibrous metaphyseal defects, characteristic radiomorphologic changes were found which correlated well with MR images. Following intravenous Gadolinium-DTPA injection, fibrous metaphyseal defects invariably exhibited a hyperintense border and signal enhancement. (orig./GDG)

  18. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Defects KidsHealth / For Parents / Birth Defects What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Anomalías congénitas What Are Birth Defects? While still in the womb, some babies ...

  19. Stochastic transport models for mixing in variable-density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    In variable-density (VD) turbulent mixing, where very-different- density materials coexist, the density fluctuations can be an order of magnitude larger than their mean. Density fluctuations are non-negligible in the inertia terms of the Navier-Stokes equation which has both quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. Very different mixing rates of different materials give rise to large differential accelerations and some fundamentally new physics that is not seen in constant-density turbulence. In VD flows material mixing is active in a sense far stronger than that applied in the Boussinesq approximation of buoyantly-driven flows: the mass fraction fluctuations are coupled to each other and to the fluid momentum. Statistical modeling of VD mixing requires accounting for basic constraints that are not important in the small-density-fluctuation passive-scalar-mixing approximation: the unit-sum of mass fractions, bounded sample space, and the highly skewed nature of the probability densities become essential. We derive a transport equation for the joint probability of mass fractions, equivalent to a system of stochastic differential equations, that is consistent with VD mixing in multi-component turbulence and consistently reduces to passive scalar mixing in constant-density flows.

  20. Ab initio study of point defects in magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, C. A.; Kenny, S. D.; Smith, R.; Sanville, E.

    2007-01-01

    Energetics of a variety of point defects in MgO have been considered from an ab initio perspective using density functional theory. The considered defects are isolated Schottky and Frenkel defects and interstitial pairs, along with a number of Schottky defects and di-interstitials. Comparisons were made between the density functional theory results and results obtained from empirical potential simulations and these generally showed good agreement. Both methodologies predicted the first nearest neighbor Schottky defects to be the most energetically favorable of the considered Schottky defects and that the first, second, and fifth nearest neighbor di-interstitials were of similar energy and were favored over the other di-interstitial configurations. Relaxed structures of the defects were analyzed, which showed that empirical potential simulations were accurately predicting the displacements of atoms surrounding di-interstitials, but were overestimating O atom displacement for Schottky defects. Transition barriers were computed for the defects using the nudged elastic band method. Vacancies and Schottky defects were found to have relatively high energy barriers, the majority of which were over 2 eV, in agreement with conclusions reached using empirical potentials. The lowest barriers for di-interstitial transitions were found to be for migration into a first nearest neighbor configuration. Charges were calculated using a Bader analysis and this found negligible charge transfer during the defect transitions and only small changes in the charges on atoms surrounding defects, indicating why fixed charge models work as well as they do

  1. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is an important property for almost all applications involving heat transfer, ranging from energy and microelectronics to food processing and textiles. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate the thermal conductivity of any crystalline line compound from first principles [1,2] using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM)[3,4]. However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open quest...

  2. Revisiting the Logan plot to account for non-negligible blood volume in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schain, Martin; Fazio, Patrik; Mrzljak, Ladislav; Amini, Nahid; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl; Bronzova, Juliana; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Sampaio, Christina; Halldin, Christer; Varrone, Andrea

    2017-08-18

    Reference tissue-based quantification of brain PET data does not typically include correction for signal originating from blood vessels, which is known to result in biased outcome measures. The bias extent depends on the amount of radioactivity in the blood vessels. In this study, we seek to revisit the well-established Logan plot and derive alternative formulations that provide estimation of distribution volume ratios (DVRs) that are corrected for the signal originating from the vasculature. New expressions for the Logan plot based on arterial input function and reference tissue were derived, which included explicit terms for whole blood radioactivity. The new methods were evaluated using PET data acquired using [ 11 C]raclopride and [ 18 F]MNI-659. The two-tissue compartment model (2TCM), with which signal originating from blood can be explicitly modeled, was used as a gold standard. DVR values obtained for [ 11 C]raclopride using the either blood-based or reference tissue-based Logan plot were systematically underestimated compared to 2TCM, and for [ 18 F]MNI-659, a proportionality bias was observed, i.e., the bias varied across regions. The biases disappeared when optimal blood-signal correction was used for respective tracer, although for the case of [ 18 F]MNI-659 a small but systematic overestimation of DVR was still observed. The new method appears to remove the bias introduced due to absence of correction for blood volume in regular graphical analysis and can be considered in clinical studies. Further studies are however required to derive a generic mapping between plasma and whole-blood radioactivity levels.

  3. Electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Reseach Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology

    1996-04-01

    To add information of point defects in cubic crystal SiC, polycrystal {beta}-SiC on the market was used as sample and irradiated by neutron and electron. In situ observation of neutron and electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC were carried out by ultra high-voltage electronic microscope (UHVEM) and ordinary electronic microscope. The obtained results show that the electron irradiation-induced secondary defects are micro defects less than 20 nm at about 1273K, the density of defects is from 2x10{sup 17} to 1x10{sup 18}/cc, the secondary defects may be hole type at high temperature and the preexistant defects control nuclear formation of irradiation-induced defects, effective sink. (S.Y.)

  4. Defect spectroscopy of single ZnO microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, M.; Ferreyra, J. M.; Zapata, C.; Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Iikawa, F.; Esquinazi, P.; Heluani, S. P.; de Lima, M. M.; Cantarero, A.

    2014-04-01

    The point defects of single ZnO microwires grown by carbothermal reduction were studied by microphotoluminescence, photoresistance excitation spectra, and resistance as a function of the temperature. We found the deep level defect density profile along the microwire showing that the concentration of defects decreases from the base to the tip of the microwires and this effect correlates with a band gap narrowing. The results show a characteristic deep defect levels inside the gap at 0.88 eV from the top of the VB. The resistance as a function of the temperature shows defect levels next to the bottom of the CB at 110 meV and a mean defect concentration of 4 × 1018 cm-3. This combination of techniques allows us to study the band gap values and defects states inside the gap in single ZnO microwires and opens the possibility to be used as a defect spectroscopy method.

  5. Dirichlet topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.M.; Trodden, M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a class of field theories featuring solitonic solutions in which topological defects can end when they intersect other defects of equal or higher dimensionality. Such configurations may be termed open-quotes Dirichlet topological defects,close quotes in analogy with the D-branes of string theory. Our discussion focuses on defects in scalar field theories with either gauge or global symmetries, in 3+1 dimensions; the types of defects considered include walls ending on walls, strings on walls, and strings on strings. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  6. Synthetic Defects for Vibrothermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Jeremy; Holland, Stephen D.; Thompson, R. Bruce; Eisenmann, David J.

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic defects are an important tool used for characterizing the performance of nondestructive evaluation techniques. Viscous material-filled synthetic defects were developed for use in vibrothermography (also known as sonic IR) as a tool to improve inspection accuracy and reliability. This paper describes how the heat-generation response of these VMF synthetic defects is similar to the response of real defects. It also shows how VMF defects can be applied to improve inspection accuracy for complex industrial parts and presents a study of their application in an aircraft engine stator vane.

  7. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  8. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  9. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  10. On holographic defect entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, John; Jensen, Kristan; O’Bannon, Andy; Tsatis, Efstratios; Wrase, Timm

    2014-01-01

    We study a number of (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3+1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1+1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions

  11. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  12. Positron studies of defected metals, metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansil, A.

    1991-01-01

    Specific problems proposed under this project included the treatment of electronic structure and momentum density in various disordered and defected systems. Since 1987, when the new high-temperature superconductors were discovered, the project focused extensively on questions concerning the electronic structure and Fermiology of high-T c superconductors, in particular, (i) momentum density and positron experiments, (ii) angle-resolved photoemission intensities, (iii) effects of disorder and substitutions in the high-T c 's

  13. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm '2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  14. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua

    2015-02-19

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm \\'2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  15. Defect Proliferation in Active Nematic Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Prashant; Bowick, Mark J.; Giomi, Luca; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The rich structure of equilibrium nematic suspensions, with their characteristic disclination defects, is modified when active forces come into play. The uniform nematic state is known to be unstable to splay (extensile) or bend (contractile) deformations above a critical activity. At even higher activity the flow becomes oscillatory and eventually turbulent. Using hydrodynamics, we classify the active flow regimes as functions of activity and order parameter friction for both contractile and extensile systems. The turbulent regime is marked by a non-zero steady state density of mobile defect pairs. The defect density itself scales with an ``active Ericksen number,'' defined as the ratio of the rate at which activity is injected into the system to the relaxation rate of orientational deformations. The work at Syracuse University was supported by the NSF on grant DMR-1004789 and by the Syracuse Soft Matter Program.

  16. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  17. Nanocarbon: Defect Architectures and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Amanda

    The allotropes of carbon make its solid phases amongst the most diverse of any element. It can occur naturally as graphite and diamond, which have very different properties that make them suitable for a wide range of technological and commercial purposes. Recent developments in synthetic carbon include Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and nano-carbons, such as fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene. The main industrial application of bulk graphite is as an electrode material in steel production, but in purified nuclear graphite form, it is also used as a moderator in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors across the United Kingdom. Both graphene and graphite are damaged over time when subjected to bombardment by electrons, neutrons or ions, and these have a wide range of effects on their physical and electrical properties, depending on the radiation flux and temperature. This research focuses on intrinsic defects in graphene and dimensional change in nuclear graphite. The method used here is computational chemistry, which complements physical experiments. Techniques used comprise of density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD), which are discussed in chapter 2 and chapter 3, respectively. The succeeding chapters describe the results of simulations performed to model defects in graphene and graphite. Chapter 4 presents the results of ab initio DFT calculations performed to investigate vacancy complexes that are formed in AA stacked bilayer graphene. In AB stacking, carbon atoms surrounding the lattice vacancies can form interlayer structures with sp2 bonding that are lower in energy compared to in-plane reconstructions. From the investigation of AA stacking, sp2 interlayer bonding of adjacent multivacancy defects in registry creates a type of stable sp2 bonded wormhole between the layers. Also, a new class of mezzanine structure characterised by sp3 interlayer bonding, resembling a prismatic vacancy loop has also been identified. The mezzanine, which is a

  18. Possible mechanism for d0 ferromagnetism mediated by intrinsic defects

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Roqan, Iman S.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of several intrinsic defects on the magnetic behavior of ZnS nanostructures using hybrid density functional theory to gain insights into d0 ferromagnetism. Previous studies have predicted that the magnetism is due to a

  19. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  20. Metallography of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, E.A.; Bochvar, G.A.; Brun, M.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Different types of defects of metallurgical, technological and exploitation origin in intermediate and final products of titanium alloys, are considered. The examples of metallic and nonmetallic inclusions, chemical homogeneity, different grains, bands, cracks, places of searing, porosity are given; methods of detecting the above defects are described. The methods of metallography, X-ray spectral analysis, measuring microhardness are used

  1. Beating Birth Defects

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Each year in the U.S., one in 33 babies is affected by a major birth defect. Women can greatly improve their chances of giving birth to a healthy baby by avoiding some of the risk factors for birth defects before and during pregnancy. In this podcast, Dr. Stuart Shapira discusses ways to improve the chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.

  2. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  3. Defects in dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Buyanova, I.A.; Tu, C.W.; Yonezu, H.

    2005-01-01

    We provide a brief review our recent results from optically detected magnetic resonance studies of grown-in non-radiative defects in dilute nitrides, i.e. Ga(In)NAs and Ga(Al,In)NP. Defect complexes involving intrinsic defects such as As Ga antisites and Ga i self interstitials were positively identified.Effects of growth conditions, chemical compositions and post-growth treatments on formation of the defects are closely examined. These grown-in defects are shown to play an important role in non-radiative carrier recombination and thus in degrading optical quality of the alloys, harmful to performance of potential optoelectronic and photonic devices based on these dilute nitrides. (author)

  4. Non-perturbative embedding of local defects in crystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cances, Eric; Deleurence, Amelie; Lewin, Mathieu

    2008-01-01

    We present a new variational model for computing the electronic first-order density matrix of a crystalline material in the presence of a local defect. A natural way to obtain variational discretizations of this model is to expand the difference Q between the density matrix of the defective crystal and the density matrix of the perfect crystal, in a basis of precomputed maximally localized Wannier functions of the reference perfect crystal. This approach can be used within any semi-empirical or density functional theory framework

  5. Characterization of lacunar defects by positrons annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthe, M.F.; Corbel, C.; Blondiaux, G.

    2003-01-01

    Among the nondestructive methods for the study of matter, the positrons annihilation method allows to sound the electronic structure of materials by measuring the annihilation characteristics. These characteristics depend on the electronic density as seen by the positon, and on the electron momentums distribution which annihilate with the positon. The positon is sensible to the coulombian potential variations inside a material and sounds preferentially the regions away from nuclei which represent potential wells. The lacunar-type defects (lack of nuclei) represent deep potential wells which can trap the positon up to temperatures close to the melting. This article describes the principles of this method and its application to the characterization of lacunar defects: 1 - positrons: matter probes (annihilation of electron-positon pairs, annihilation characteristics, positrons sources); 2 - positrons interactions in solids (implantation profiles, annihilation states, diffusion and trapping, positon lifetime spectrum: evolution with the concentration of defects); 3 - measurement of annihilation characteristics with two gamma photons (lifetime spectroscopy with the β + 22 Na isotope, spectroscopy of Doppler enlargement of the annihilation line); 4 - determination of the free volume of defects inside or at the surface of materials (annihilation signature in lacunar defects, lacuna, lacunar clusters and cavities, acceptors nature in semiconductors: ionic or lacunar, interface defects, precipitates in alloys); 5 - conclusions. (J.S.)

  6. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritherdon, J

    2001-05-15

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  7. Transient fatty cortical defects following fractures in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malghem, J.; Maldague, B.

    1986-01-01

    Self-regressing subperiosteal defects appearing during consolidation of fractures were observed in two children aged 6 and 10 years, in the tibia and the radious respectively. These transient defects appeared several weeks after fracture, at a distance from the fracture site. They involved the newly formed subperiosteal bone, did not enlarge, and were replaced progressively by normal-appearing bone. A computed tomography (CT) study performed on one of these defects demonstrated a density consistent with a fatty content. It is suggested that these transient post-traumatic defect could result from the inclusion of medulary fat drops within the subperiosteal heamtoma near the fracture site. (orig.)

  8. Intrinsic Defects and H Doping in WO3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2017-01-18

    WO3 is widely used as industrial catalyst. Intrinsic and/or extrinsic defects can tune the electronic properties and extend applications to gas sensors and optoelectonics. However, H doping is a challenge to WO3, the relevant mechanisms being hardly understood. In this context, we investigate intrinsic defects and H doping by density functional theory and experiments. Formation energies are calculated to determine the lowest energy defect states. O vacancies turn out to be stable in O-poor environment, in agreement with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and O-H bond formation of H interstitial defects is predicted and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Electron transport in ethanol & methanol absorbed defected graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandeliya, Sushmita; Srivastava, Anurag

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, the sensitivity of ethanol and methanol molecules on surface of single vacancy defected graphene has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The changes in structural and electronic properties before and after adsorption of ethanol and methanol were analyzed and the obtained results show high adsorption energy and charge transfer. High adsorption happens at the active site with monovacancy defect on graphene surface. Present work confirms that the defected graphene increases the surface reactivity towards ethanol and methanol molecules. The presence of molecules near the active site affects the electronic and transport properties of defected graphene which makes it a promising choice for designing methanol and ethanol sensor.

  10. A computational framework for automation of point defect calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Anuj; Gorai, Prashun; Peng, Haowei

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a complete and rigorously validated open-source Python framework to automate point defect calculations using density functional theory. Furthermore, the framework provides an effective and efficient method for defect structure generation, and creation of simple yet customizable workflows to analyze defect calculations. This package provides the capability to compute widely-accepted correction schemes to overcome finite-size effects, including (1) potential alignment, (2) image-charge correction, and (3) band filling correction to shallow defects. Using Si, ZnO and In2O3 as test examples, we demonstrate the package capabilities and validate the methodology.

  11. Defects and diffusion in semiconductors XIV

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2012-01-01

    This 14th volume in the series covers the latest results in the field of Defects and Diffusion in Semiconductor. The issue also includes some original papers: An Experimental Study of the Thermal Properties of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel; Physico-Mechanical Properties of Sintered Iron-Silica Sand Nanoparticle Composites: A Preliminary Study; Defect and Dislocation Density Parameters of 5251 Al Alloy Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Technique; A Novel Computational Strategy to Enhance the Ability of Elaborate Search by Entire Swarm to Find the Best Solution in Optimization of AMCs; Synthesis and

  12. Computed tomography on a defective CANDU fuel pencil end cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    Five tomographic slices through a defective end cap from a CANDU fuel pencil have been generated using a Co-60 source and a first generation translate-rotate tomography scanner. An anomaly in the density distribution that is believed to have resulted from the defect has been observed. However, with the 0.30 mm spatial resolution used, it has not been possible to state unequivocally whether the change in density is caused by a defect in the weld or a statistical anomaly in the data. It is concluded that a microtomography system, with a spatial resolution in the range of 0.1 mm, could detect the flaw

  13. Defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geonyeop; Yang, Gwangseok; Cho, Ara; Han, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-25

    We report defect-engineered graphene chemical sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity (e.g., 33% improvement in NO2 sensing and 614% improvement in NH3 sensing). A conventional reactive ion etching system was used to introduce the defects in a controlled manner. The sensitivity of graphene-based chemical sensors increased with increasing defect density until the vacancy-dominant region was reached. In addition, the mechanism of gas sensing was systematically investigated via experiments and density functional theory calculations, which indicated that the vacancy defect is a major contributing factor to the enhanced sensitivity. This study revealed that defect engineering in graphene has significant potential for fabricating ultra-sensitive graphene chemical sensors.

  14. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Call your doctor if your baby or child: Tires easily when eating or playing Is not gaining ... heart procedures. Risk factors Ventricular septal defects may run in families and sometimes may occur with other ...

  15. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  16. Endocardial cushion defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 426. Kouchoukos NT, Blackstone EH, Hanley FL, Kirklin JK. Atrioventricular septal defect. In: Kouchoukos NT, Blackstone EH, Hanley FL, Kirklin JK, eds. Kirklin/Barratt- ...

  17. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E.; Crisp, R.W.; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E.; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We

  18. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  19. Defect cascades produced by neutron irradiation in YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A.; Farmer, J.

    1994-02-01

    The defect cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ single crystals were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The visible defects were found to have sizes between 1 and 5 rim. Defect densities were obtained as a function of neutron fluence between 2 and 8x 10 21 m -2 (E>0.1 MeV). The measured defect density scales linearly with fluence and amounts to 1x10 22 m -3 at a neutron fluence of 2x10 2l m -2 . The defect stability was studied at room temperature and through annealing to 400 degrees C

  20. Universe as a topological defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anabalon, Andres; Willison, Steven; Zanelli, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional Einstein's general relativity is shown to arise from a gauge theory for the conformal group, SO(4,2). The theory is constructed from a topological dimensional reduction of the six-dimensional Euler density integrated over a manifold with a four-dimensional topological defect. The resulting action is a four-dimensional theory defined by a gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. An ansatz is found which reduces the full set of field equations to those of Einstein's general relativity. When the same ansatz is replaced in the action, the gauged WZW term reduces to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Furthermore, the unique coupling constant in the action can be shown to take integer values if the fields are allowed to be analytically continued to complex values

  1. Electrochemical Implications of Defects in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jonathan Peter

    The electrochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) containing both intrinsic and extrinsically introduced defects has been investigated through the study of bamboo and hollow multi-walled CNT morphologies. The controlled addition of argon, hydrogen, and chlorine ions in addition to atomic hydrogen and magnesium vapor was used for varying the charge and type of extrinsic defects. To quantify changes in the CNTs upon treatment, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques were employed. It was indicated from Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and chronopotentiometric experiments that the electrochemical response of hollow type CNTs could be tailored more significantly compared to bamboo type CNTs, which have innately high reactive site densities and are less amenable to modification. Total defect density and edge-plane-like defect concentrations monitored through Raman spectroscopy were used to correlate changes in the electrochemical response of the CNT electrodes as a function of treatment. The implementation of CNT electrodes in a prototypical electrolytic capacitor device was then explored and characterized. Dependencies on source current and redox couple concentration were evaluated, as well as changes in the total capacitance as a function of treatment. Cyclability studies were also performed as a function of source current magnitude to evaluate the longevity of the faradaic currents which typically decrease over time in other similar capacitors. This thesis then concludes with an overall summary of the themes and findings of the research presented in this work.

  2. Norwegian Pitched Roof Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Gullbrekken

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The building constructions investigated in this work are pitched wooden roofs with exterior vertical drainpipes and wooden load-bearing system. The aim of this research is to further investigate the building defects of pitched wooden roofs and obtain an overview of typical roof defects. The work involves an analysis of the building defect archive from the research institute SINTEF Building and Infrastructure. The findings from the SINTEF archive show that moisture is a dominant exposure factor, especially in roof constructions. In pitched wooden roofs, more than half of the defects are caused by deficiencies in design, materials, or workmanship, where these deficiencies allow moisture from precipitation or indoor moisture into the structure. Hence, it is important to increase the focus on robust and durable solutions to avoid defects both from exterior and interior moisture sources in pitched wooden roofs. Proper design of interior ventilation and vapour retarders seem to be the main ways to control entry from interior moisture sources into attic and roof spaces.

  3. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E; Crisp, Ryan W; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-10-23

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We utilized atomically thin semiconductor nanoplatelets as a convenient platform for studying, both microscopically and spectroscopically, the development of defects during ligand exchange with the conductive ligands Na 4 SnS 4 and (NH 4 ) 4 Sn 2 S 6 . These defects can be repaired via mild chemical or thermal routes, through the addition of L-type ligands or wet annealing, respectively. This results in a higher-quality, conductive, colloidally stable nanomaterial that may be used as the active film in optoelectronic devices. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Defect identification using positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

    2001-01-01

    The current use of the lifetime and Doppler broadening techniques in defect identification is demonstrated with two studies, the first being the identification of carbon vacancy in n-6H SiC through lifetime spectroscopy, and the second the production of de-hydrogenated voids in α-Si:H through light soaking. Some less conventional ideas are presented for more specific defect identification, namely (i) the amalgamation of lifetime and Doppler techniques with conventional deep level transient spectroscopy in what may be called ''positron-deep level transient spectroscopy'', and (ii) the extraction of more spatial information on vacancy defects by means of what may be called ''Fourier transform Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectroscopy'' (orig.)

  5. Neutron scattering from a substitutional mass defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.D.; Lovesey, S.W.

    1985-06-01

    The dynamic structure factor is calculated for a low concentration of light mass scatterers substituted in a cubic crystal matrix. A new numerical method for the exact calculation is demonstrated. A local density of states for the low momentum transfer limit, and the shifts and widths of the oscillator peaks in the high momentum transfer limit are derived. The limitations of an approximation which decouples the defect from the lattice is discussed. (author)

  6. Metastable light induced defects in pentacene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering (DIIn), University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

  7. Statistical relation between particle contaminations in ultra pure water and defects generated by process tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wali, F.; Knotter, D. Martin; Wortelboer, Ronald; Mud, Auke

    2007-01-01

    Ultra pure water supplied inside the Fab is used in different tools at different stages of processing. Data of the particles measured in ultra pure water was compared with the defect density on wafers processed on these tools and a statistical relation is found Keywords— Yield, defect density,

  8. Quantum computing with defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Joel

    2011-03-01

    The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized ``deep-center'' point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NC VSi - 1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials. This work was performed in collaboration with J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, B. B. Buckley, A. Janotti, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom. This work was supported by ARO, AFOSR, and NSF.

  9. Polydispersity-driven topological defects as order-restoring excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2014-04-08

    The engineering of defects in crystalline matter has been extensively exploited to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of many materials. Recent experiments on manipulating extended defects in graphene, for example, show that defects direct the flow of electric charges. The fascinating possibilities offered by defects in two dimensions, known as topological defects, to control material properties provide great motivation to perform fundamental investigations to uncover their role in various systems. Previous studies mostly focus on topological defects in 2D crystals on curved surfaces. On flat geometries, topological defects can be introduced via density inhomogeneities. We investigate here topological defects due to size polydispersity on flat surfaces. Size polydispersity is usually an inevitable feature of a large variety of systems. In this work, simulations show well-organized induced topological defects around an impurity particle of a wrong size. These patterns are not found in systems of identical particles. Our work demonstrates that in polydispersed systems topological defects play the role of restoring order. The simulations show a perfect hexagonal lattice beyond a small defective region around the impurity particle. Elasticity theory has demonstrated an analogy between the elementary topological defects named disclinations to electric charges by associating a charge to a disclination, whose sign depends on the number of its nearest neighbors. Size polydispersity is shown numerically here to be an essential ingredient to understand short-range attractions between like-charge disclinations. Our study suggests that size polydispersity has a promising potential to engineer defects in various systems including nanoparticles and colloidal crystals.

  10. Defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, C.A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Some problems openned in the study of defects in semiconductors are presented. In particular, a review is made of the more important problems in Si monocrystals of basic and technological interest: microdefects and the presence of oxigen and carbon. The techniques usually utilized in the semiconductor material characterization are emphatized according its potentialities. Some applications of x-ray techniques in the epitaxial shell characterization in heterostructures, importants in electronic optics, are shown. The increase in the efficiency of these defect analysis methods in semiconductor materials with the use of synchrotron x-ray sources is shown. (L.C.) [pt

  11. Electronic structure of point defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    trace concentration (of the order of one part per million). However, owing to the heavy burden of the quantum-mechanical electronic structure calculations, which grow very rapidly with the number of electrons, the present day simulations do not easily exceed a few hundred atoms nowadays. This induces effective defect concentrations of the order of one percent which are very far from the diluted defects observed in the experiments. The extrapolation of high concentrations to low concentrations is difficult because defects in semiconductors often bear a net electric charge which induces long-range interactions between the spuriously interacting charged defects. The first part of my work presents the techniques available in this area, improvements in the techniques and some understanding of these spurious interactions. The second topic addressed in this memoir focuses on improving the electronic structure of defects in semiconductors and insulators. Defects in these materials introduce discrete electronic levels within the band gap of the pristine bulk material. These electronic levels correspond to the electrons involved in the defect states. Their wave function is more or less localized around the defect region and the filling of the state may also vary with the thermodynamic conditions (Fermi level). These levels inside the band gap govern the modification of the properties of electronic and optical transport. Unfortunately the standard ab initio approaches, in the context of Density Functional Theory (DFT), are unable to get the correct band gaps of semiconductors and insulators. This is why many defect properties cannot be predicted with certainty within these approaches. This second part demonstrates how the introduction of the many-body perturbation theory in the so-called GW approximation solves the problem of band gaps and thus allows one to obtain more reliable defect properties. Of course, the field of ab initio electronic structure for defects is far from being

  12. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  13. Electronic structure of defects in semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussy, Bernard; Ganghoffer, Jean Francois

    2002-01-01

    Full text.heterojunctions and semiconductors and superlattices are well known and well used by people interested in optoelectronics communications. Components based on the use of heterojunctions are interesting for confinement of light and increase of quantum efficiency. An heterojunction is the contact zone between two different semiconductors, for example GaAs and Ga 1-x Al x As. Superlattices are a succession of heterojunctions (up to 10 or 20). These systems have been the subjects of many experiments ao analyse the contact between semiconductors. They also have been theoretically studied by different types of approach. The main result of those studies is the prediciton of band discontinuities. Defects in heterojunctions are real traps for charge carriers; they can affect the efficiency of the component decreasing the currents and the fluxes in it. the knowledge of their electronic structure is important, a great density of defects deeply modifies the electronic structure of the whole material creating real new bands of energy in the band structure of the component. in the first part of this work, we will describe the heterostructure and the defect in terms of quantum wells and discrete levels. This approach allows us to show the role of the width of the quantum well describing the structure but induces specific behaviours due to the one dimensional modelling. Then a perturbative treatment is proposed using the Green's functions formalism. We build atomic chains with different types of atoms featuring the heterostructure and the defect. Densities of states of a structure with a defect and levels associated to the defect are obtained. Results are comparable with the free electrons work, but the modelling do not induce problems due to a one dimensional approach. To extend our modelling, a three dimensions approach, based on a cavity model, is investigated. The influence of the defect, - of hydrogenoid type - introduced in the structure, is described by a cavity

  14. Defect detection module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernwein, R.; Westermann, G.

    1986-01-01

    The ''defect detector'' module is aimed at exceptional event or state recording. Foreseen for voltage presence monitoring on high supply voltage module of drift chambers, its characteristics can also show up the vanishing of supply voltage and take in account transitory fast signals [fr

  15. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  16. Finite volume form factors in the presence of integrable defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajnok, Z.; Buccheri, F.; Hollo, L.; Konczer, J.; Takacs, G.

    2014-01-01

    We developed the theory of finite volume form factors in the presence of integrable defects. These finite volume form factors are expressed in terms of the infinite volume form factors and the finite volume density of states and incorporate all polynomial corrections in the inverse of the volume. We tested our results, in the defect Lee–Yang model, against numerical data obtained by truncated conformal space approach (TCSA), which we improved by renormalization group methods adopted to the defect case. To perform these checks we determined the infinite volume defect form factors in the Lee–Yang model exactly, including their vacuum expectation values. We used these data to calculate the two point functions, which we compared, at short distance, to defect CFT. We also derived explicit expressions for the exact finite volume one point functions, which we checked numerically. In all of these comparisons excellent agreement was found

  17. Amino acids interacting with defected carbon nanotubes: ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Darvish Ganji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of a number of amino acids on a defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by using the density-functional theory (DFT calculations. The adsorption energies and equilibrium distances are calculated for various configurations such as amino acid attaching to defect sites heptagon, pentagon and hexagon in defective tube and also for several molecular orientations with respect to the nanotube surface. The results showed that amino acids prefer to be physisorbed on the outer surface of the defected nanotube with different interaction strength following the hierarchy histidine > glycine > phenylalanine > cysteine. Comparing these findings with those obtained for perfect SWCNTs reveals that the adsorption energy of the amino acids increase for adsorption onto defected CNTs. The adsorption nature has also been evaluated by means of electronics structures analysis within the Mulliken population and DOS spectra for the interacting entities.

  18. Atomic defects and doping of monolayer NbSe2

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Lan; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Kashtiban, Reza J; Peters, Jonathan J.P.; Lawlor, Sean; Sanchez, Ana M.; Sloan, Jeremy; Gorbachev, Roman; Grigorieva, Irina; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Haigh, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the structure of atomic defects within monolayer NbSe2 encapsulated in graphene by combining atomic resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and strain mapping using geometric phase analysis. We demonstrate the presence of stable Nb and Se monovacancies in monolayer material and reveal that Se monovacancies are the most frequently observed defects, consistent with DFT calculations of their formation energy. We reve...

  19. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-01

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality

  20. Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segercrantz, N.; Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Song, Y.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

  1. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be associated with genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome . But the cause of most congenital heart defects isn't known. While they can't be prevented, many treatments are available for the defects and related health ...

  2. Antigravity from a spacetime defect

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Queiruga, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We argue that there may exist spacetime defects embedded in Minkowski spacetime, which have negative active gravitational mass. One such spacetime defect then repels a test particle, corresponding to what may be called "antigravity."

  3. Defects and Disorder in the Drosophila Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Carthew, Richard; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    Cell division and differentiation tightly control the regular pattern in the normal eye of the Drosophila fruit fly while certain genetic mutations introduce disorder in the form of topological defects. Analyzing data from pupal retinas, we develop a model based on Voronoi construction that explains the defect statistics as a consequence of area variation of individual facets (ommatidia). The analysis reveals a previously unknown systematic long-range area variation that spans the entire eye, with distinct effects on topological disorder compared to local fluctuations. The internal structure of the ommatidia and the stiffness of their interior cells also plays a crucial role in the defect generation. Accurate predictions of the correlation between the area variation and the defect density in both normal and mutant animals are obtained without free parameters. This approach can potentially be applied to cellular systems in many other contexts to identify size-topology correlations near the onset of symmetry breaking. This work has been supported by the NIH (GM098077) and the NSF (Grant No. 1504301).

  4. Graphene defects induced by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Grzegorz; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Baranowski, Jacek; Jagielski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    The CVD graphene deposited on the glass substrate was bombarded by molecular carbon ions C3+ C6+ hydrocarbon ions C3H4+ and atomic ions He+, C+, N+, Ar+, Kr+ Yb+. Size and density of ion induced defects were estimated from evolution of relative intensities of Raman lines D (∼1350 1/cm), G (∼1600 1/cm), and D‧ (∼1620 1/cm) with ion fluence. The efficiency of defect generation by atomic ions depend on ion mass and energy similarly as vacancy generation directly by ion predicted by SRIM simulations. However, efficiency of defect generation in graphene by molecular carbon ions is essentially higher than summarized efficiency of similar group of separate atomic carbon ions of the same energy that each carbon ion in a cluster. The evolution of the D/D‧ ratio of Raman lines intensities with ion fluence was observed. This effect may indicate evolution of defect nature from sp3-like at low fluence to a vacancy-like at high fluence. Observed ion graphene interactions suggest that the molecular ion interacts with graphene as single integrated object and should not be considered as a group of atomic ions with partial energy.

  5. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Congenital heart defects and ... in congenital heart defects. You have a family history of congenital heart ... syndrome or VCF. After birth Your baby may be tested for CCHD as ...

  6. Dark matter from decaying topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Kirk, Russell; West, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We study dark matter production by decaying topological defects, in particular cosmic strings. In topological defect or ''top-down'' (TD) scenarios, the dark matter injection rate varies as a power law with time with exponent p−4. We find a formula in closed form for the yield for all p < 3/2, which accurately reproduces the solution of the Boltzmann equation. We investigate two scenarios (p = 1, p = 7/6) motivated by cosmic strings which decay into TeV-scale states with a high branching fraction into dark matter particles. For dark matter models annihilating either by s-wave or p-wave, we find the regions of parameter space where the TD model can account for the dark matter relic density as measured by Planck. We find that topological defects can be the principal source of dark matter, even when the standard freeze-out calculation under-predicts the relic density and hence can lead to potentially large ''boost factor'' enhancements in the dark matter annihilation rate. We examine dark matter model-independent limits on this scenario arising from unitarity and discuss example model-dependent limits coming from indirect dark matter search experiments. In the four cases studied, the upper bound on Gμ for strings with an appreciable channel into TeV-scale states is significantly more stringent than the current Cosmic Microwave Background limits

  7. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  8. Oxygen defects in Fe-substituted Tl-system superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳; 曹国辉; 王耘波; 马庆珠; 熊小涛; 陈宁; 马如璋; 郭应焕; 许祝安; 王劲松; 张小俊; 焦正宽; 彭获田; 周思海

    1996-01-01

    For Fe-doped T1-1223 phase,the excess oxygen defects induced by Fe dopants are studied by means of Hall coefficient,thermogravimetric measurements,Mossbauer spectroscopy,and the model calculation of the effective bond valence.The extra oxygen defects have effects on carrier density and microstructure of the superconductors.In the light doping level of Fe (x=0-0.05),the superconducting transition and carrier density have significant corresponding relation--the zero resistance temperature Tco and carrier densities decrease linearly with Fe dopants increasing.The thermogravimetric measurements show that the Fe3+ ions’ substituting for Cu2+ ions can bring the extra oxygen into the lattice to form extra oxygen defects.The calculation of the effective bond valence shows that the decrease of carrier density originates the strongly localized binding of the extra oxygen defects.The distortion of Cu-O layer induced by the extra oxygen defects decreases the superconductive transition temperature.The microstructure

  9. Immobile defects in ferroelastic walls: Wall nucleation at defect sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Salje, E. K. H.; Ding, X.; Sun, J.

    2018-02-01

    Randomly distributed, static defects are enriched in ferroelastic domain walls. The relative concentration of defects in walls, Nd, follows a power law distribution as a function of the total defect concentration C: N d ˜ C α with α = 0.4 . The enrichment Nd/C ranges from ˜50 times when C = 10 ppm to ˜3 times when C = 1000 ppm. The resulting enrichment is due to nucleation at defect sites as observed in large scale MD simulations. The dynamics of domain nucleation and switching is dependent on the defect concentration. Their energy distribution follows the power law with exponents during yield between ɛ ˜ 1.82 and 2.0 when the defect concentration increases. The power law exponent is ɛ ≈ 2.7 in the plastic regime, independent of the defect concentration.

  10. Benign gastric filling defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  11. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  12. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K K; Lee, Y H; Cho, O K; Park, C Y [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  13. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed

  14. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-08-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed.

  15. Nucleation of voids and other irradiation-produced defect aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Katz, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleation of defect clusters in crystalline solids from radiation-produced defects is different from the usual nucleation processes in one important aspect: the condensing defects, interstitial atoms and vacancies, can mutually annihilate and are thus similar to matter and antimatter. The nucleation process is described as the simultaneous reaction of vacancies and interstitials (and gas atoms if present) with embryos of all sizes. The reaction rates for acquisition of point defects (and gas atoms) are calculated from their respective jump frequencies and concentrations in the supersaturated system. The reaction rates for emission of point defects are derived from the free energies of the defect clusters in the thermodynamic equilibrium system, i.e., the system without excess point defects. This procedure differs from that used in conventional nucleation theory and permits the inclusion of the ''antimatter'' defect into the set of reaction-rate equations in a straightforward manner. The method is applied to steady-state nucleation, during irradiation, of both dislocation loops and voids in the absence and in the presence of immobile and mobile gas. The predictions of the nucleation theory are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations, e.g., void densities increase with increasing displacement rates; gases such as helium enhance void nucleation; at low displacement rates and at high temperatures the presence of gas is essential to void formation. For quantitative predictions, the theory must be extended to include the termination of nucleation

  16. Point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.; Chroneos, Alexander I.; Grimes, Robin W.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Bracht, Hartmut A.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion of phosphorous in germanium is very fast, requiring point defect engineering strategies to retard it in support of technological application. Density functional theory corroborated with hybrid density functional calculations are used to investigate the influence of the isovalent codopants tin and hafnium in the migration of phosphorous via the vacancy-mediated diffusion process. The migration energy barriers for phosphorous are increased significantly in the presence of oversized isovalent codopants. Therefore, it is proposed that tin and in particular hafnium codoping are efficient point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous migration. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  17. Resonance scattering of Rayleigh waves by a mass defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, M.; Grecu, D.

    1978-06-01

    The resonance scattering of an incident Rayleigh wave by a mass defect extending over a small cylindrical region situated in the surface of a semi-infinite isotropic, elastic medium is investigated by means of the Green's function method. The form of the differential cross-section for the scattering into different channels exhibits a strong resonance phenomenon at two frequencies. The expression of the resonance frequencies as well as of the corresponding widths depends on the relative change in mass density. The main assumption that the wavelengths of incoming and scattered wave are large compared to the defect dimension implies a large relative mass-density change. (author)

  18. Surface defects and chiral algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córdova, Clay [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Dr, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Gaiotto, Davide [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline St N, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Shao, Shu-Heng [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Dr, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-05-26

    We investigate superconformal surface defects in four-dimensional N=2 superconformal theories. Each such defect gives rise to a module of the associated chiral algebra and the surface defect Schur index is the character of this module. Various natural chiral algebra operations such as Drinfeld-Sokolov reduction and spectral flow can be interpreted as constructions involving four-dimensional surface defects. We compute the index of these defects in the free hypermultiplet theory and Argyres-Douglas theories, using both infrared techniques involving BPS states, as well as renormalization group flows onto Higgs branches. In each case we find perfect agreement with the predicted characters.

  19. Characterization of lacunar defects by positrons annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, M F; Blondiaux, G

    2003-01-01

    Among the nondestructive methods for the study of matter, the positrons annihilation method allows to sound the electronic structure of materials by measuring the annihilation characteristics. These characteristics depend on the electronic density as seen by the positon, and on the electron momentums distribution which annihilate with the positon. The positon is sensible to the coulombian potential variations inside a material and sounds preferentially the regions away from nuclei which represent potential wells. The lacunar-type defects (lack of nuclei) represent deep potential wells which can trap the positon up to temperatures close to the melting. This article describes the principles of this method and its application to the characterization of lacunar defects: 1 - positrons: matter probes (annihilation of electron-positon pairs, annihilation characteristics, positrons sources); 2 - positrons interactions in solids (implantation profiles, annihilation states, diffusion and trapping, positon lifetime spec...

  20. Research on Defects Inspection of Solder Balls Based on Eddy Current Pulsed Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyun Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve tiny defect detection for solder balls in high-density flip-chip, this paper proposed feasibility study on the effect of detectability as well as classification based on eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT. Specifically, numerical analysis of 3D finite element inductive heat model is generated to investigate disturbance on the temperature field for different kind of defects such as cracks, voids, etc. The temperature variation between defective and non-defective solder balls is monitored for defects identification and classification. Finally, experimental study is carried on the diameter 1mm tiny solder balls by using ECPT and verify the efficacy of the technique.

  1. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are more......). The stronger orbital hybridization between the Pt atom and the carbon atom shows larger charge transfers on the defective CNTs than on the defect free CNTs, which allows the strong interaction between Pt clusters and CNTs. On the basis of DFT calculations, CNTs with point defect can be used as the catalyst...

  2. Point defects in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretto, P.

    1969-01-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I B (31 deg. K), I C (42 deg. K), I D (from to 57 deg. K) and I E (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I B the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I D it is near the direction from the vacancy. In stage I E there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II B (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III A (370 deg. K) and III B (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [fr

  3. Scaling defect decay and the reionization history of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avelino, P.P.; Barbosa, D.

    2004-01-01

    We consider a model for the reionization history of the Universe in which a significant fraction of the observed optical depth is a result of direct reionization by the decay products of a scaling cosmic defect network. We show that such network can make a significant contribution to the reionization history of the Universe even if its energy density is very small (the defect energy density has to be greater than about 10 -11 of the background density). We compute the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature, polarization and temperature-polarization cross power spectrum and show that a contribution to the observed optical depth due to the decay products of a scaling defect network may help to reconcile a high optical depth with a low redshift of complete reionization suggested by quasar data. However, if the energy density of defects is approximately a constant fraction of the background density then these models do not explain the large scale bump in the temperature-polarization cross power spectrum observed by Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

  4. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, B.; Turkmen, N.; Fedakar, R.; Cetin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  5. Level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    For any applications of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions it is very important to obtain the parameters of the level density description from the reliable experimental data. The cumulative numbers of low-lying levels and the average spacings between neutron resonances are usually used as such data. The level density parameters fitted to such data are compiled in the RIPL Starter File for the tree models most frequently used in practical calculations: i) For the Gilber-Cameron model the parameters of the Beijing group, based on a rather recent compilations of the neutron resonance and low-lying level densities and included into the beijing-gc.dat file, are chosen as recommended. As alternative versions the parameters provided by other groups are given into the files: jaeri-gc.dat, bombay-gc.dat, obninsk-gc.dat. Additionally the iljinov-gc.dat, and mengoni-gc.dat files include sets of the level density parameters that take into account the damping of shell effects at high energies. ii) For the backed-shifted Fermi gas model the beijing-bs.dat file is selected as the recommended one. Alternative parameters of the Obninsk group are given in the obninsk-bs.dat file and those of Bombay in bombay-bs.dat. iii) For the generalized superfluid model the Obninsk group parameters included into the obninsk-bcs.dat file are chosen as recommended ones and the beijing-bcs.dat file is included as an alternative set of parameters. iv) For the microscopic approach to the level densities the files are: obninsk-micro.for -FORTRAN 77 source for the microscopical statistical level density code developed in Obninsk by Ignatyuk and coworkers, moller-levels.gz - Moeller single-particle level and ground state deformation data base, moller-levels.for -retrieval code for Moeller single-particle level scheme. (author)

  6. Defect detection using transient thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zaki Umar; Ibrahim Ahmad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah

    2008-08-01

    An experimental research had been carried out to study the potential of transient thermography in detecting sub-surface defect of non-metal material. In this research, eight pieces of bakelite material were used as samples. Each samples had a sub-surface defect in the circular shape with different diameters and depths. Experiment was conducted using one-sided Pulsed Thermal technique. Heating of samples were done using 30 kWatt adjustable quartz lamp while infra red (IR) images of samples were recorded using THV 550 IR camera. These IR images were then analysed with ThermofitTMPro software to obtain the Maximum Absolute Differential Temperature Signal value, ΔΤ m ax and the time of its appearance, τ m ax (ΔΤ). Result showed that all defects were able to be detected even for the smallest and deepest defect (diameter = 5 mm and depth = 4 mm). However the highest value of Differential Temperature Signal (ΔΤ m ax), were obtained at defect with the largest diameter, 20 mm and at the shallowest depth, 1 mm. As a conclusion, the sensitivity of the pulsed thermography technique to detect sub-surface defects of bakelite material is proportionately related with the size of defect diameter if the defects are at the same depth. On the contrary, the sensitivity of the pulsed thermography technique inversely related with the depth of defect if the defects have similar diameter size. (Author)

  7. Dipole defects in beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, B A; Cordeiro, R C; Blak, A R

    2010-01-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be 3 Al 2 Si 6 O 18 ) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  8. Hardening in AlN induced by point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Mitchell, T.E.; Iseki, T.; Yano, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressureless-sintered AIN was neutron irradiated and the hardness change was examined by Vickers indentation. The hardness was increased by irradiation. When the samples were annealed at high temperature, the hardness gradually decreased. Length was also found to increase and to change in the same way as the hardness. A considerable density of dislocation loops still remained, even after the hardness completely recovered to the value of the unirradiated sample. Thus, it is concluded that the hardening in AIN is caused by isolated point defects and small clusters of point defects, rather than by dislocation loops. Hardness was found to increase in proportion to the length change. If the length change is assumed to be proportional to the point defect density, then the curve could be fitted qualitatively to that predicted by models of solution hardening in metals. Furthermore, the curves for three samples irradiated at different temperatures and fluences are identical. There should be different kinds of defect clusters in samples irradiated at different conditions, e.g., the fraction of single point defects is the highest in the sample irradiated at the lowest temperature. Thus, hardening is insensitive to the kind of defects remaining in the sample and is influenced only by those which contribute to length change

  9. Paramagnetic defects in hydrogenated amorphous carbon powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeble, D J; Robb, K M; Smith, G M; Mkami, H El; Rodil, S E; Robertson, J

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon materials typically contain high concentrations of paramagnetic defects, the density of which can be quantified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In this work EPR measurements near 9.5, 94, and 189 GHz have been performed on polymeric and diamond-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) powder samples. A similar single resonance line was observed at all frequencies for the two forms of a-C:H studied. No contributions to the spectrum from centres with resolved anisotropic g-values as reported earlier were detected. An increase in linewidth with microwave frequency was observed. Possible contributions to this frequency dependence are discussed

  10. Computer simulation of defect cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-01

    In order to elucidate individual element process of various defects and defect clusters of used materials under irradiation environments, interatomic potential with reliability was investigated. And for comparison with experimental results, it is often required to adopt the temperature effect and to investigate in details mechanism of one dimensional motion of micro conversion loop and so forth using the molecular dynamic (MD) method. Furthermore, temperature effect is also supposed for stable structure of defects and defect clusters, and many problems relating to alloy element are also remained. And, simulation on photon life at the defects and defect clusters thought to be important under comparison with equipment can also be supposed an improvement of effectiveness due to relation to theses products. In this paper, some topics in such flow was extracted to explain them. In particular, future important problems will be potential preparation of alloy, structure, dynamic behavior and limited temperature of intralattice atomic cluster. (G.K.)

  11. Issues in first-principles calculations for defects in semiconductors and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieminen, Risto M

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in density-functional theory (DFT) calculations of defect electronic properties in semiconductors and insulators are discussed. In particular, two issues are addressed: the band-gap underestimation of standard density-functional methods with its harmful consequences for the positioning of defect-related levels in the band-gap region, and the slow convergence of calculated defect properties when the periodic supercell approach is used. Systematic remedies for both of these deficiencies are now available, and are being implemented in the context of popular DFT codes. This should help in improving the parameter-free accuracy and thus the predictive power of the methods to enable unambiguous explanation of defect-related experimental observations. These include not only the various fingerprint spectroscopies for defects but also their thermochemistry and dynamics, i.e. the temperature-dependent concentration and diffusivities of defects under various doping conditions and in different stoichiometries

  12. Point defect weakened thermal contraction in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xian-Hu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Lin, Zijing

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the thermal expansion behaviors of monolayer graphene and three configurations of graphene with point defects, namely the replacement of one carbon atom with a boron or nitrogen atom, or of two neighboring carbon atoms by boron-nitrogen atoms, based on calculations using first-principles density functional theory. It is found that the thermal contraction of monolayer graphene is significantly decreased by point defects. Moreover, the corresponding temperature for negative linear thermal expansion coefficient with the maximum absolute value is reduced. The cause is determined to be point defects that enhance the mechanical strength of graphene and then reduce the amplitude and phonon frequency of the out-of-plane acoustic vibration mode. Such defect weakening of graphene thermal contraction will be useful in nanotechnology to diminish the mismatching or strain between the graphene and its substrate.

  13. A study of point defects in quenched stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheloufi, Khelifa.

    1977-07-01

    Thin foils of stainless steels (18%Cr, 14%Ni) containing boron (50x10 -6 ) and stabilised with titanium have been quenched at different rates in order to observe secondary defects by transmission electron microscopy. A rapid quenching in gallium has not given any secondary defects either before or after annealing. But samples quenched from temperatures greater than 800 0 C-900 0 C exhibit a dislocation density approximately 10 9 cm/cm 3 . A vacancy concentration less than 10 -6 has been observed by positron annihilation technique. After a moderate quenching, any secondary defects has been observed. It is thus clear that boron does not favour the secondary defects formation as does phosphorus [fr

  14. Defects in new protective aprons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, S.; LeBlanc, A.D.; Bushong, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Upon careful examination, several defects have been detected in new protective aprons. The nature of the defects is identified and described. Although the occurrence of such defects has not exceeded 5%, they are significant enough to warrant return of the lead apron to the supplier. It is recommended that the integrity of all new protective aprons be verified upon receipt as well as at yearly intervals

  15. Characterization of defects in metals by positron-annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    The application of positron-annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the characterization and study of defects in metals has grown rapidly and increasingly useful in recent years. Owing to the ability of the positron to annihilate from a variety of defect-trapped states in metals, PAS can yield defect-specific information which, by itself or in conjunction with more traditional experimental techniques, has already made a significant impact upon our knowledge regarding lattice defect properties in metals. This has been especially true for vacancy defets, as a result of the positron's affinity for lower-than-average electron-density regions in the metal. The physical basis for the positron annihilation techniques is presented in this paper; and the experimental techniques, lifetime, Doppler broadening, and angular correlation, are briefly described and compared with respect to the information that can be obtained from each of them. A number of examples of the application of PAS to the characterization of atomic defects and their agglomerates are presented. The particular examples, chosen from the areas of equilibrium vacancy formation and atomic-defect recovery, were selected with a view toward elucidating the particular advantages of PAS over more traditional defect-characterization techniques. Limitations of PAS are also pointed out. 98 references

  16. Defect engineering of the electrochemical characteristics of carbon nanotube varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefer, Mark A.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) containing both intrinsic and extrinsically introduced defects has been investigated through the study of bamboo and hollow multiwalled CNT morphologies. The controlled addition of argon ions was used for varying the charge and type of extrinsic defects. It was indicated from Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry that the electrocatalytic response of hollow type CNTs could be tailored more significantly, compared to bamboo type CNTs which have innately high reactive site densities and are less amenable to modification. An in-plane correlation length parameter was used to understand the variation of the defect density as a function of argon ion irradiation. The work has implications in the design of nanotube based chemical sensors, facilitated through the introduction of suitable reactive sites.

  17. Defect engineering of the electrochemical characteristics of carbon nanotube varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Mark A.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2010-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) containing both intrinsic and extrinsically introduced defects has been investigated through the study of bamboo and hollow multiwalled CNT morphologies. The controlled addition of argon ions was used for varying the charge and type of extrinsic defects. It was indicated from Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry that the electrocatalytic response of hollow type CNTs could be tailored more significantly, compared to bamboo type CNTs which have innately high reactive site densities and are less amenable to modification. An in-plane correlation length parameter was used to understand the variation of the defect density as a function of argon ion irradiation. The work has implications in the design of nanotube based chemical sensors, facilitated through the introduction of suitable reactive sites.

  18. Metastable gravity on classical defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringeval, Christophe; Rombouts, Jan-Willem

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the realization of metastable gravity on classical defects in infinite-volume extra dimensions. In dilatonic Einstein gravity, it is found that the existence of metastable gravity on the defect core requires violation of the dominant energy condition for codimension N c =2 defects. This is illustrated with a detailed analysis of a six-dimensional hyperstring minimally coupled to dilaton gravity. We present the general conditions under which a codimension N c >2 defect admits metastable modes, and find that they differ from lower codimensional models in that, under certain conditions, they do not require violation of energy conditions to support quasilocalized gravity

  19. Defect Characterization of Pyroelectric Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keeble, David

    2002-01-01

    Two methods for identify point defects applicable to the study of technologically relevant pyroelectric oxide materials have been investigated, namely Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS...

  20. Who named the quantum defect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, A.R.P.; Inokuti, M.

    1997-01-01

    The notion of the quantum defect is important in atomic and molecular spectroscopy and also in unifying spectroscopy with collision theory. In the latter context, the quantum defect may be viewed as an ancestor of the phase shift. However, the origin of the term quantum defect does not seem to be explained in standard textbooks. It occurred in a 1921 paper by Schroedinger, preceding quantum mechanics, yet giving the correct meaning as an index of the short-range interactions with the core of an atom. The authors present the early history of the quantum-defect idea, and sketch its recent developments

  1. Fibrous metaphyseal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, P.C.; Ritschi, P.; Kramer, J.; Imhof, H.; Karnel, F.

    1988-01-01

    Eighty-two patients (107 fibrous metaphyseal defects [FMDs]) were investigated with standard radiography and MR imaging (N = 15). Twenty-two of these were followed up sequentially up to 10 years (mean, 7.3 years). Histologic studies proved that FMDs originate at the site of insertion of a tendon in the perichondrium of the epiphyseal cartilage. After normal bone growth is regained, all FMDs were found to move diaphysically, following a straight line parallel to the long axis of the FMDs. This line pointed to the insertion of the tendon originally involved, a fact that was proved with MR imaging. Four characteristic stages were found to define a typical radiomorphologic course of an FMD

  2. Ab initio theory of the N2V defect in diamond for quantum memory implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvarhelyi, Péter; Thiering, Gergő; Londero, Elisa; Gali, Adam

    2017-10-01

    The N2V defect in diamond is characterized by means of ab initio methods relying on density functional theory calculated parameters of a Hubbard model Hamiltonian. It is shown that this approach appropriately describes the energy levels of correlated excited states induced by this defect. By determining its critical magneto-optical parameters, we propose to realize a long-living quantum memory by N2V defect, i.e., H 3 color center in diamond.

  3. Measurement of the relative afferent pupillary defect in retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, J A; Burton, T C

    1980-07-01

    A swinging flashlight test and calibrated neutral density filters were used to quantitate the depth of relative afferent pupillary defects in ten patients with retinal detachment. Postoperatively, the pupillary responses returned to normal in seven of nine patients with anatomically successful surgery.

  4. Topological defects control collective dynamics in neural progenitor cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and of the macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions remains largely qualitative. Here we report on the collective dynamics of cultured murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which are multipotent stem cells that give rise to cells in the central nervous system. At low densities, NPCs moved randomly in an amoeba-like fashion. However, NPCs at high density elongated and aligned their shapes with one another, gliding at relatively high velocities. Although the direction of motion of individual cells reversed stochastically along the axes of alignment, the cells were capable of forming an aligned pattern up to length scales similar to that of the migratory stream observed in the adult brain. The two-dimensional order of alignment within the culture showed a liquid-crystalline pattern containing interspersed topological defects with winding numbers of +1/2 and -1/2 (half-integer due to the nematic feature that arises from the head-tail symmetry of cell-to-cell interaction). We identified rapid cell accumulation at +1/2 defects and the formation of three-dimensional mounds. Imaging at the single-cell level around the defects allowed us to quantify the velocity field and the evolving cell density; cells not only concentrate at +1/2 defects, but also escape from -1/2 defects. We propose a generic mechanism for the instability in cell density around the defects that arises from the interplay between the anisotropic friction and the active force field.

  5. Defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} chalcopyrite semiconductors: a comparative study of material properties, defect states, and photovoltaic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qing; Gunawan, Oki; Copel, Matthew; Reuter, Kathleen B; Chey, S Jay; Mitzi, David B [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Deline, Vaughn R [IBM Almaden Resesarch Center, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Understanding defects in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} (CIGS), especially correlating changes in the film formation process with differences in material properties, photovoltaic (PV) device performance, and defect levels extracted from admittance spectroscopy, is a critical but challenging undertaking due to the complex nature of this polycrystalline compound semiconductor. Here we present a systematic comparative study wherein varying defect density levels in CIGS films were intentionally induced by growing CIGS grains using different selenium activity levels. Material characterization results by techniques including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and medium energy ion scattering indicate that this process variation, although not significantly affecting CIGS grain structure, crystal orientation, or bulk composition, leads to enhanced formation of a defective chalcopyrite layer with high density of indium or gallium at copper antisite defects ((In, Ga){sub Cu}) near the CIGS surface, for CIGS films grown with insufficient selenium supply. This defective layer or the film growth conditions associated with it is further linked with observed current-voltage characteristics, including rollover and crossover behavior, and a defect state at around 110 meV (generally denoted as the N1 defect) commonly observed in admittance spectroscopy. The impact of the (In, Ga){sub Cu} defects on device PV performance is also established. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Freely-migrating defects: Their production and interaction with cascade remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Wiedersich, H.

    1991-05-01

    Many microstructural changes that occur during irradiation are driven primarily by freely-migrating defects, i.e. those defects which escape from nascent cascades to migrate over distances that are large relative to typical cascade dimensions. Several measurements during irradiation at elevated temperatures have shown that the survival rate of freely-migrating defects decreases much more strongly with increasing primary recoil energy than does the survival rate for defects generated at liquid helium temperatures. For typical fission or fusion recoil spectra, and for heavy-ion bombardment, the fraction of defects that migrate long-distances is apparently only ∼1% of the calculated dpa. This small surviving fraction of freely-migrating defects results at least partially from additional intracascade recombination at elevated temperatures. However, cascade remnants, e.g., vacancy and interstitial clusters, also contribute by enhancing intercascade defect annihilation. A recently developed rate-theory approach is used to discuss the relative importance of intra- and intercascade recombination to the survival rate of freely-migrating defects. Within the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, the additional sink density provided by defect clusters produced directly within individual cascades can explain the difference between a defect survival rate of about 30% for low dose, low temperature irradiations with heavy ions, and a survival rate of only ∼1% for freely-migrating defects at elevated temperatures. The status of our current understanding of freely-migrating defects, including remaining unanswered questions, is also discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs

  7. Transition mechanism of Stone-Wales defect in armchair edge (5,5) carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, Agung; Suprijadi

    2015-04-01

    We performed first principles calculations of Stone-Wales (SW) defects in armchair edge (5,5) carbon nanotube (CNT) by the density functional theory (DFT). Stone Wales (SW) defect is one kind of topological defect on the CNT. There are two kind of SW defect on the armchair edge (5,5) CNT, such as longitudinal and circumference SW defect. Barrier energy in the formation of SW defects is a good consideration to become one of parameter in controlling SW defects on the CNT. Our calculation results that a longitudinal SW defect is more stable than circumference SW defect. However, the barrier energy of circumference SW defect is lower than another one. We applied Climbing Image Nudge Elastic Band (CI-NEB) method to find minimum energy path (MEP) and barrier energy for SW defect transitions. We also found that in the case of circumference SW defect, armchair edge (5,5) CNT become semiconductor with the band gap of 0.0544 eV.

  8. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are mo...

  9. First-Principles Investigations of Defects in Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok K.

    2011-07-01

    The ideal crystal has an infinite 3-dimensional repetition of identical units which may be atoms or molecules. But real crystals are limited in size and they have disorder in stacking which as called defects. Basically three types of defects exist in solids: 1) point defects, 2) line defects, and 3) surface defects. Common point defects are vacant lattice sites, interstitial atoms and impurities and these are known to influence strongly many solid-state transport properties such as diffusion, electrical conduction, creep, etc. In thermal equilibrium point defects concentrations are determined by their formation enthalpies and their movement by their migration barriers. Line and surface defects are though absent from the ideal crystal in thermal equilibrium due to higher energy costs but they are invariably present in all real crystals. Line defects include edge-, screw- and mixed-dislocations and their presence is essential in explaining the mechanical strength and deformation of real crystals. Surface defects may arise at the boundary between two grains, or small crystals, within a larger crystal. A wide variety of grain boundaries can form in a polycrystal depending on factors such growth conditions and thermal treatment. In this talk we will present our first-principles density functional theory based defect studies of SiO2 polymorphs (stishovite, CaCl2-, α-PbO2-, and pyrite-type), Mg2SiO4 polymorphs (forsterite, wadsleyite and ringwoodite) and MgO [1-3]. Briefly, several native point defects including vacancies, interstitials, and their complexes were studied in silica polymorphs upto 200 GPa. Their values increase by a factor of 2 over the entire pressure range studied with large differences in some cases between different phases. The Schottky defects are energetically most favorable at zero pressure whereas O-Frenkel pairs become systematically more favorable at pressures higher than 20 GPa. The geometric and electronic structures of defects and migrating

  10. Stone-Wales defects can cause a metal-semiconductor transition in carbon nanotubes depending on their orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partovi-Azar, P; Namiranian, A

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the two different orientations of Stone-Wales (SW) defects, i.e. longitudinal and circumferential SW defects, on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) result in two different electronic structures. Based on density functional theory we have shown that the longitudinal SW defects do not open a bandgap near the Fermi energy, while a relatively small bandgap emerges in tubes with circumferential defects. We argue that the bandgap opening in the presence of circumferential SW defects is a consequence of long-range symmetry breaking which can spread all the way along the tube. Specifically, the distribution of contracted and stretched bond lengths due to the presence of defects, and hopping energies for low-energy electrons, i.e. the 2p z electrons, show two different patterns for the two types of defects. Interplay between the geometric features and the electronic properties of the tubes have also been studied for different defect concentrations. Considering π-orbital charge density, it has also been shown that the deviations of bond lengths from their relaxed length result in different doping for two defect orientations around the defects - electron-rich for a circumferential defect and hole-rich for a longitudinal one. We have also shown that, in the tubes having both types of defects, circumferential defects would dominate and impose their electronic properties. (paper)

  11. Mechanism of Si intercalation in defective graphene on SiC

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.

    2012-01-01

    Previously reported experimental findings on Si-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001) seem to indicate the possibility of an intercalation process based on the migration of the intercalant through atomic defects in the graphene sheet. We employ density

  12. Lumber defect detection by ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. A. McDonald

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonics, the technology of high-frequency sound, has been developed as a viable means for locating most defects In lumber for use in digital form in decision-making computers. Ultrasonics has the potential for locating surface and internal defects in lumber of all species, green or dry, and rough sawn or surfaced.

  13. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  14. Lectures on cosmic topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachaspati, T [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Colaba, Mumbai (India) and Physics Department, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2001-11-15

    These lectures review certain topological defects and aspects of their cosmology. Unconventional material includes brief descriptions of electroweak defects, the structure of domain walls in non-Abelian theories, and the spectrum of magnetic monopoles in SU(5) Grand Unified theory. (author)

  15. Disclinations, dislocations, and continuous defects: A reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleman, M.; Friedel, J.

    2008-01-01

    Disclinations were first observed in mesomorphic phases. They were later found relevant to a number of ill-ordered condensed-matter media involving continuous symmetries or frustrated order. Disclinations also appear in polycrystals at the edges of grain boundaries; but they are of limited interest in solid single crystals, where they can move only by diffusion climb and, owing to their large elastic stresses, mostly appear in close pairs of opposite signs. The relaxation mechanisms associated with a disclination in its creation, motion, and change of shape involve an interplay with continuous or quantized dislocations and/or continuous disclinations. These are attached to the disclinations or are akin to Nye’s dislocation densities, which are particularly well suited for consideration here. The notion of an extended Volterra process is introduced, which takes these relaxation processes into account and covers different situations where this interplay takes place. These concepts are illustrated by a variety of applications in amorphous solids, mesomorphic phases, and frustrated media in their curved habit space. These often involve disclination networks with specific node conditions. The powerful topological theory of line defects considers only defects stable against any change of boundary conditions or relaxation processes compatible with the structure considered. It can be seen as a simplified case of the approach considered here, particularly suited for media of high plasticity or/and complex structures. It cannot analyze the dynamical properties of defects nor the elastic constants involved in their static properties; topological stability cannot guarantee energetic stability, and sometimes cannot distinguish finer details of the structure of defects.

  16. Determination of the extinction factor in function of the density of dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.

    1991-12-01

    There are exist three basic types of crystalline lattice defects: point, line (or dislocations) and surface defects. Such defects may be incorporated intentionally to produce desired mechanical and physical properties. This report presents a FORTRAN language program to calculate the extinction factor in samples of polycrystalline copper as function of the dislocations density. (Author)

  17. Condensation energy density in Bi-2212 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Teruo; Kiuchi, Masaru; Haraguchi, Teruhisa; Imada, Takeki; Okamura, Kazunori; Okayasu, Satoru; Uchida, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Kishio, Kohji

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the condensation energy density and the anisotropy parameter, γ a , has been derived for Bi-2212 superconductors in various anisotropic states by analysing the critical current density due to columnar defects introduced by heavy ion irradiation. The critical current density depended on the size of the defects, determined by the kind and irradiation energy of the ions. A significantly large critical current density of 17.0 MA cm -2 was obtained at 5 K and 0.1 T even for the defect density of a matching field of 1 T in a specimen irradiated with iodine ions. The dependence of the critical current density on the size of the defects agreed well with the prediction from the summation theory of pinning forces, and the condensation energy density could be obtained consistently from specimens irradiated with different ions. The condensation energy density obtained increased with decreasing γ a over the entire range of measurement temperature, and reached about 60% of the value for the most three-dimensional Y-123 observed by Civale et al at 5 K. This gives the reason for the very strong pinning in Bi-2212 superconductors at low temperatures. The thermodynamic critical field obtained decreased linearly with increasing temperature and extrapolated to zero at a certain characteristic temperature, T * , lower than the critical temperature, T c . T * , which seems to be associated with the superconductivity in the block layers, was highest for the optimally doped specimen. This shows that the superconductivity becomes more inhomogeneous as the doped state of a superconductor deviates from the optimum condition

  18. The pinning property of Bi-2212 single crystals with columnar defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kazunori; Kiuchi, Masaru; Otabe, Edmund Soji; Yasuda, Takashi; Matsushita, Teruo; Okayasu, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    It is qualitatively understood that the condensation energy density in oxide superconductors, which is one of the essential parameters for determining their pinning strength, becomes large with increasing dimensionality of the superconductor. However, the condensation energy density has not yet been evaluated quantitatively. Its value can be estimated from the elementary pinning force of a known defect. Columnar defects created by heavy ion irradiation are candidates for being such defects. That is, the size and number density of columnar defects can be given. In addition, it is known that two-dimensional vortices like those in Bi-2212 are forced into three-dimensional states by these defects in a magnetic field parallel to the defects. Thus, the condensation energy density can be estimated from the pinning property of the columnar defects even for two-dimensional superconductors. A similar analysis was performed also for three-dimensional Y-123. A discussion is given of the relationship between the condensation energy density and the anisotropy parameter estimated from measurements of anisotropic resistivity and peak field

  19. Toward Intelligent Software Defect Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2011-01-01

    Source code level software defect detection has gone from state of the art to a software engineering best practice. Automated code analysis tools streamline many of the aspects of formal code inspections but have the drawback of being difficult to construct and either prone to false positives or severely limited in the set of defects that can be detected. Machine learning technology provides the promise of learning software defects by example, easing construction of detectors and broadening the range of defects that can be found. Pinpointing software defects with the same level of granularity as prominent source code analysis tools distinguishes this research from past efforts, which focused on analyzing software engineering metrics data with granularity limited to that of a particular function rather than a line of code.

  20. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.; Meyer, René; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    We study SU(N) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of the defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.

  1. Low threading dislocation density aluminum nitride on silicon carbide through the use of reduced temperature interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Wu, Feng; Zollner, Christian; Alif, Muhammad Esmed; Saifaddin, Burhan; Almogbel, Abdullah; Iza, Michael; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2017-01-01

    temperature on the AlN crystal quality, defect density, and surface morphology. The crystal quality was characterized using omega rocking curve scans and the threading dislocation density was determined by plan view transmission electron microscopy. The growth

  2. Defect forces, defect couples and path integrals in fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.

    1979-07-01

    In this work, it is shown that the path integrals can be introduced without any reference to the material behavior. The method is based on the definition in a continuous medium of a set of vectors and couples having the dimension of a force or a moment. More precisely, definitions are given of volume defect forces, surface defect forces, volume defect couples, and surface defect couples. This is done with the help of the stress working variation of a particule moving through the solid. The most important result is: the resultant of all the defect forces included in a volume V is the J integral on the surface surrounding V and the moment resultant is the L integral. So these integrals are defined without any assumption on the material constitutive equation. Another result is the material form of the virtual work principle - defect forces are acting like conventional forces in the conventional principles of virtual work. This lead to the introduction of the energy momentum tensor and of the associated couple stress. Application of this method is made to fracture mechanics in studying the defect forces distribution around a crack [fr

  3. Influence of growth temperature on bulk and surface defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weina; Anand, Benoy; Liu, Lihong; Sampat, Siddharth; Bearden, Brandon E.; Malko, Anton V.; Chabal, Yves J.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of perovskite solar cells has focused its attention on defects in perovskites, which are gradually realized to strongly control the device performance. A fundamental understanding is therefore needed for further improvement in this field. Recent efforts have mainly focused on minimizing the surface defects and grain boundaries in thin films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, we show that bulk defects in perovskite samples prepared using vapor assisted solution process (VASP) play a key role in addition to surface and grain boundary defects. The defect state density of samples prepared at 150 °C (~1017 cm-3) increases by 5 fold at 175 °C even though the average grains size increases slightly, ruling out grain boundary defects as the main mechanism for the observed differences in PL properties upon annealing. Upon surface passivation using water molecules, the PL intensity and lifetime of samples prepared at 200 °C are only partially improved, remaining significantly lower than those prepared at 150 °C. Thus, the present study indicates that the majority of these defect states observed at elevated growth temperatures originates from bulk defects and underscores the importance to control the formation of bulk defects together with grain boundary and surface defects to further improve the optoelectronic properties of perovskites.The rapid development of perovskite solar cells has focused its attention on defects in perovskites, which are gradually realized to strongly control the device performance. A fundamental understanding is therefore needed for further improvement in this field. Recent efforts have mainly focused on minimizing the surface defects and grain boundaries in thin films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, we show that bulk defects in perovskite samples prepared using vapor assisted solution process (VASP) play a key role in addition to surface and grain boundary defects. The defect state

  4. Defect assessment benchmark studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooton, D.G.; Sharples, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Assessments of the resistance to fast fracture of the beltline region of a PWR vessel subjected to a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient have been carried out using the procedures of French (RCC-M) and German (KTA) design codes, and comparisons made with results obtained using the R6 procedure as applied for Sizewell B. The example chosen for these comparisons is of a generic nature, and is taken as the PTS identified by the Hirsch addendum to the Second Marshall report (1987) as the most severe transient with regard to vessel integrity. All assessment methods show the beltline region of the vessel to be safe from the risk of fast fracture, but by varying factors of safety. These factors are discussed in terms of margins between limiting and reference defect sizes, fracture toughness and stress intensity factor, and material temperature and temperature at the onset of upper-shelf materials behaviour. Based on these studies, consideration is given to issues involved in the harmonization of those sections of the design codes which are concerned with methods for the demonstration of the avoidance of the risk of failure by fast fracture. (author)

  5. IMPACT OF A REALISTIC DENSITY STRATIFICATION ON A SIMPLE SOLAR DYNAMO CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Elisa; Lopes, Ilidio, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-09-20

    In our Sun, the magnetic cycle is driven by the dynamo action occurring inside the convection zone, beneath the surface. Rotation couples with plasma turbulent motions to produce organized magnetic fields that erupt at the surface and undergo relatively regular cycles of polarity reversal. Among others, the axisymmetric dynamo models have been proved to be a quite useful tool to understand the dynamical processes responsible for the evolution of the solar magnetic cycle and the formation of the sunspots. Here, we discuss the role played by the radial density stratification on the critical layers of the Sun on the solar dynamo. The current view is that a polytropic description of the density stratification from beneath the tachocline region up to the Sun's surface is sufficient for the current precision of axisymmetric dynamo models. In this work, by using an up-to-date density profile obtained from a standard solar model, which is itself consistent with helioseismic data, we show that the detailed peculiarities of the density in critical regions of the Sun's interior, such as the tachocline, the base of the convection zone, the layers of partial ionization of hydrogen and helium, and the super-adiabatic layer, play a non-negligible role on the evolution of the solar magnetic cycle. Furthermore, we found that the chemical composition of the solar model plays a minor role in the formation and evolution of the solar magnetic cycle.

  6. IMPACT OF A REALISTIC DENSITY STRATIFICATION ON A SIMPLE SOLAR DYNAMO CALCULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Elisa; Lopes, Ilídio

    2012-01-01

    In our Sun, the magnetic cycle is driven by the dynamo action occurring inside the convection zone, beneath the surface. Rotation couples with plasma turbulent motions to produce organized magnetic fields that erupt at the surface and undergo relatively regular cycles of polarity reversal. Among others, the axisymmetric dynamo models have been proved to be a quite useful tool to understand the dynamical processes responsible for the evolution of the solar magnetic cycle and the formation of the sunspots. Here, we discuss the role played by the radial density stratification on the critical layers of the Sun on the solar dynamo. The current view is that a polytropic description of the density stratification from beneath the tachocline region up to the Sun's surface is sufficient for the current precision of axisymmetric dynamo models. In this work, by using an up-to-date density profile obtained from a standard solar model, which is itself consistent with helioseismic data, we show that the detailed peculiarities of the density in critical regions of the Sun's interior, such as the tachocline, the base of the convection zone, the layers of partial ionization of hydrogen and helium, and the super-adiabatic layer, play a non-negligible role on the evolution of the solar magnetic cycle. Furthermore, we found that the chemical composition of the solar model plays a minor role in the formation and evolution of the solar magnetic cycle.

  7. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  8. Quasi-one-dimensional metals on semiconductor surfaces with defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    2010-01-01

    Several examples are known in which massive arrays of metal atomic chains are formed on semiconductor surfaces that show quasi-one-dimensional metallic electronic structures. In this review, Au chains on Si(557) and Si(553) surfaces, and In chains on Si(111) surfaces, are introduced and discussed with regard to the physical properties determined by experimental data from scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electrical conductivity measurements. They show quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surfaces and parabolic band dispersion along the chains. All of them are known from STM and ARPES to exhibit metal-insulator transitions by cooling and charge-density-wave formation due to Peierls instability of the metallic chains. The electrical conductivity, however, reveals the metal-insulator transition only on the less-defective surfaces (Si(553)-Au and Si(111)-In), but not on a more-defective surface (Si(557)-Au). The latter shows an insulating character over the whole temperature range. Compared with the electronic structure (Fermi surfaces and band dispersions), the transport property is more sensitive to the defects. With an increase in defect density, the conductivity only along the metal atomic chains was significantly reduced, showing that atomic-scale point defects decisively interrupt the electrical transport along the atomic chains and hide the intrinsic property of transport in quasi-one-dimensional systems.

  9. Electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy and Stone-Wales defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil; Razavi, Mohsen Emami; Nayebi, Payman

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The electronic properties of graphene device with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect have been studied. • The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding. • The density of state, current voltage curves of pure graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects have been investigated. • Transmission spectrum of pristine graphene device and graphene with SV and SW defects has been examined. - Abstract: The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding in order to examine the electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defects. We have optimized structures of pristine graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects. The bond lengths, current-voltage curve and transmission probability have been calculated. We found that the bond length for relaxed graphene is 1.43 Å while for graphene with SV and SW defects the bond lengths are 1.41 Å and 1.33 Å, respectively. For the SV defect, the arrangement of atoms with three nearest neighbors indicates sp_2 bonding. While for SW defect, the arrangement of atoms suggests nearly sp bonding. From the current-voltage curve for graphene with defects we have determined that the behavior of the I–V curves is nonlinear. It is also found that the SV and SW defects cause to decrease the current compared to the pristine graphene case. Furthermore, the single vacancy defect reduces the current more than the Stone-Wales defect. Moreover, we observed that by increasing the voltage from zero to 1 V new peaks near Fermi level in the transmission probability curves have been created.

  10. Electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy and Stone-Wales defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaminpayma, Esmaeil [Physics Group, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Mohsen Emami, E-mail: razavi246@gmail.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nayebi, Payman [Department of Physics, College of Technical and Engineering, Saveh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Saveh (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The electronic properties of graphene device with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect have been studied. • The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding. • The density of state, current voltage curves of pure graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects have been investigated. • Transmission spectrum of pristine graphene device and graphene with SV and SW defects has been examined. - Abstract: The first principles calculations have been performed based on self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding in order to examine the electronic properties of graphene with single vacancy (SV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defects. We have optimized structures of pristine graphene and graphene with SV and SW defects. The bond lengths, current-voltage curve and transmission probability have been calculated. We found that the bond length for relaxed graphene is 1.43 Å while for graphene with SV and SW defects the bond lengths are 1.41 Å and 1.33 Å, respectively. For the SV defect, the arrangement of atoms with three nearest neighbors indicates sp{sub 2} bonding. While for SW defect, the arrangement of atoms suggests nearly sp bonding. From the current-voltage curve for graphene with defects we have determined that the behavior of the I–V curves is nonlinear. It is also found that the SV and SW defects cause to decrease the current compared to the pristine graphene case. Furthermore, the single vacancy defect reduces the current more than the Stone-Wales defect. Moreover, we observed that by increasing the voltage from zero to 1 V new peaks near Fermi level in the transmission probability curves have been created.

  11. Visualization and automatic detection of defect distribution in GaN atomic structure from sampling Moiré phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kodera, Masako; Suguro, Kyoichi; Miyashita, Naoto

    2017-09-19

    Quantitative detection of defects in atomic structures is of great significance to evaluating product quality and exploring quality improvement process. In this study, a Fourier transform filtered sampling Moire technique was proposed to visualize and detect defects in atomic arrays in a large field of view. Defect distributions, defect numbers and defect densities could be visually and quantitatively determined from a single atomic structure image at low cost. The effectiveness of the proposed technique was verified from numerical simulations. As an application, the dislocation distributions in a GaN/AlGaN atomic structure in two directions were magnified and displayed in Moire phase maps, and defect locations and densities were detected automatically. The proposed technique is able to provide valuable references to material scientists and engineers by checking the effect of various treatments for defect reduction. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Serine biosynthesis and transport defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-07-01

    l-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is biosynthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, l-serine is a potent neurotrophic factor and a precursor of a number of essential compounds including phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, glycine, and d-serine. Serine biosynthesis defects result from impairments of PGDH, PSAT, or PSP leading to systemic serine deficiency. Serine biosynthesis defects present in a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes, at the severe end, Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease, intermediately, infantile serine biosynthesis defects with severe neurological manifestations and growth deficiency, and at the mild end, the childhood disease with intellectual disability. A serine transport defect resulting from deficiency of the ASCT1, the main transporter for serine in the central nervous system, has been recently described in children with neurological manifestations that overlap with those observed in serine biosynthesis defects. l-serine therapy may be beneficial in preventing or ameliorating symptoms in serine biosynthesis and transport defects, if started before neurological damage occurs. Herein, we review serine metabolism and transport, the clinical, biochemical, and molecular aspects of serine biosynthesis and transport defects, the mechanisms of these diseases, and the potential role of serine therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced defects recombination in ion irradiated SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, G.; Litrico, G.; Grassia, F.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.

    2010-01-01

    Point defects induced in SiC by ion irradiation show a recombination at temperatures as low as 320 K and this process is enhanced after running current density ranging from 80 to 120 A/cm 2 . Ion irradiation induces in SiC the formation of different defect levels and low-temperature annealing changes their concentration. Some levels (S 0 , S x and S 2 ) show a recombination and simultaneously a new level (S 1 ) is formed. An enhanced recombination of defects is besides observed after running current in the diode at room temperature. The carriers introduction reduces the S 2 trap concentration, while the remaining levels are not modified. The recombination is negligible up to a current density of 50 A/cm 2 and increases at higher current density. The enhanced recombination of the S 2 trap occurs at 300 K, which otherwise requires a 400 K annealing temperature. The process can be related to the electron-hole recombination at the associated defect.

  14. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above

  15. Defective pyrite (100) surface: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andras; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of sulfur monomeric defects at the FeS 2 (100) surface have been studied by periodic density-functional calculations. We have shown that for a monomeric sulfur bound to an originally fivefold coordinated surface Fe site, the defect core features a triplet electronic ground state with unpaired spins localized on the exposed Fe-S unit. At this site, the iron and sulfur ions have oxidation states +4 and -2, respectively. This defect can be seen as produced via heterolytic bond breaking of the S-S sulfur dimer followed by a Fe-S redox reaction. The calculated sulfur 2p core-level shifts of the monomeric defects are in good agreement with experimental photoemission spectra, which allow a compelling assignment of the different spectroscopic features. The effect of water on the stability of the defective surface has also been studied, and it has been shown that the triplet state is stable against the wetting of the surface. The most important implications of the presence of the monomeric sulfur defect on the reactivity are also discussed

  16. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  17. Electronic structure properties of deep defects in hBN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Pratibha; Prdm Collaboration

    In recent years, the search for room-temperature solid-state qubit (quantum bit) candidates has revived interest in the study of deep-defect centers in semiconductors. The charged NV-center in diamond is the best known amongst these defects. However, as a host material, diamond poses several challenges and so, increasingly, there is an interest in exploring deep defects in alternative semiconductors such as hBN. The layered structure of hBN makes it a scalable platform for quantum applications, as there is a greater potential for controlling the location of the deep defect in the 2D-matrix through careful experiments. Using density functional theory-based methods, we have studied the electronic and structural properties of several deep defects in hBN. Native defects within hBN layers are shown to have high spin ground states that should survive even at room temperature, making them interesting solid-state qubit candidates in a 2D matrix. Partnership for Reduced Dimensional Material (PRDM) is part of the NSF sponsored Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (PREM).

  18. Influence of oxygen impurity atoms on defect clusters and radiation hardening in neutron-irradiated vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystal TEM samples and polycrystalline tensile samples of vanadium containing 60-640 wt ppm oxygen were irradiated at about 100 0 C to about 1.3 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (E greater than 1 MeV) and post-irradiation annealed up to 800 0 C. The defect cluster density increased and the average size decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. Higher oxygen concentrations caused the radiation hardening and radiation-anneal hardening to increase. The observations are consistent with the nucleation of defect clusters by small oxygen or oxygen-point defect complexes and the trapping of oxygen at defect clusters upon post-irradiation annealing

  19. Characterization of point defects in CdTe by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsharkawy, M. R. M. [Carnegie Laboratory of Physics, SUPA, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, P.O. Box 61519, Minia (Egypt); Kanda, G. S.; Keeble, D. J., E-mail: d.j.keeble@dundee.ac.uk [Carnegie Laboratory of Physics, SUPA, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Abdel-Hady, E. E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, P.O. Box 61519, Minia (Egypt)

    2016-06-13

    Positron lifetime measurements on CdTe 0.15% Zn-doped by weight are presented, trapping to monovacancy defects is observed. At low temperatures, localization at shallow binding energy positron traps dominates. To aid defect identification density functional theory, calculated positron lifetimes and momentum distributions are obtained using relaxed geometry configurations of the monovacancy defects and the Te antisite. These calculations provide evidence that combined positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler spectroscopy measurements have the capability to identify neutral or negative charge states of the monovacancies, the Te antisite, A-centers, and divacancy defects in CdTe.

  20. Prediction of power-ramp defects in CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, P.; Wadsworth, S.; Daniels, T.

    2010-01-01

    Power ramps result in fuel pellet expansion and can lead to fuel sheath failures by fission product induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Historically, empirical models fit to experimental test data were used to predict the onset of power-ramp failures in CANDU fuel. In 1988, a power-ramped fuel defect event at PNGS-1 led to the refinement of these empirical models. This defect event has recently been re-analyzed and the empirical model updated. The empirical model is supported by a physically based model which can be used to extrapolate to fuel conditions (density, burnup) outside of the 1988 data set. (author)

  1. Defects investigation in neutron irradiated reactor steels by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) based on positron lifetime measurements using the Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) was applied to the investigation of defects of irradiated and thermally treated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. PLEPS results showed that the changes in microstructure of the RPV-steel properties caused by neutron irradiation and post-irradiation heat treatment can be well detected. From the lifetime measurements in the near-surface region (20-550 nm) the defect density in Russian types of RPV-steels was calculated using the diffusion trapping model. The post-irradiation heat treatment studies performed on non-irradiated specimens are also presented. (author)

  2. Defect detection based on extreme edge of defective region histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhir Wakaf

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic thresholding has been used by many applications in image processing and pattern recognition systems. Specific attention was given during inspection for quality control purposes in various industries like steel processing and textile manufacturing. Automatic thresholding problem has been addressed well by the commonly used Otsu method, which provides suitable results for thresholding images based on a histogram of bimodal distribution. However, the Otsu method fails when the histogram is unimodal or close to unimodal. Defects have different shapes and sizes, ranging from very small to large. The gray-level distributions of the image histogram can vary between unimodal and multimodal. Furthermore, Otsu-revised methods, like the valley-emphasis method and the background histogram mode extents, which overcome the drawbacks of the Otsu method, require preprocessing steps and fail to use the general threshold for multimodal defects. This study proposes a new automatic thresholding algorithm based on the acquisition of the defective region histogram and the selection of its extreme edge as the threshold value to segment all defective objects in the foreground from the image background. To evaluate the proposed defect-detection method, common standard images for experimentation were used. Experimental results of the proposed method show that the proposed method outperforms the current methods in terms of defect detection.

  3. Revealing origin of quasi-one dimensional current transport in defect rich two dimensional materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Mikkel Rønne; Boll, Mads; Hansen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    to a non-uniform current flow characteristic of lower dimensionality. In this work, simulations based on a finite element method together with a Monte Carlo approach are used to establish the transition from 2D to quasi-1D current transport, when applying a micro four-point probe to measure on 2D...... conductors with an increasing amount of line-shaped defects. Clear 2D and 1D signatures are observed at low and high defect densities, respectively, and current density plots reveal the presence of current channels or branches in defect configurations yielding 1D current transport. A strong correlation...

  4. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  5. Defect microstructure in copper alloys irradiated with 750 MeV protons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Horsewell, A.; Singh, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks of pure copper and solid solution copper alloys containing 5 at% of Al, Mn, or Ni were irradiated with 750 MeV protons to damage levels between 0.4 and 2 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperatures between 60 and 200 degrees C. The defect...... significant effect on the total density of small defect clusters, but they did cause a significant decrease in the fraction of defect clusters resolvable as SFT to similar to 20 to 25%. In addition, the dislocation loop density (> 5 nm diameter) was more than an order of magnitude higher in the alloys...

  6. A first principles study of native defects in alpha-quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Roma, G

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of several neutral and charged oxygen and silicon defects in alpha-quartz. We performed plane waves pseudopotential calculations in the framework of density functional theory in the local density approximation. We will show the structures that we obtained for vacancies and interstitials in several charge states and the corresponding formation energies. We discuss the reciprocal dependence of formation energies of charged defects (and thus concentrations) and the electron chemical potential on each other and we determine the latter by iterative self-consistent solution of the equation imposing charge neutrality. Results on defect concentrations, their dependence on oxygen partial pressure, and self-doping effects are presented.

  7. Defect cascades produced by neutron irradiation in YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A.; Farmer, J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Weber, H.W.

    1992-12-01

    The defect cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ single crystals were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The visible defects were found to have sizes between 1 and 5 nm. Defect densities were obtained as a function of neutron fluence between 2 and 8 x 10 21 m -2 (E>0.1 MeV) and compared to damage calculations. The measured defect density was found to scale linearly with fluence and to be 1 x 10 22 m -3 at 2 x 10 21 m -2 . The defect stability was studied at room temperature and through annealing to 400 degrees C. The high fluence regime (∼10 22 m -2 ) was investigated as well

  8. In situ probing of the evolution of irradiation-induced defects in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Hattar, K.; Misra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Through in situ Cu 3+ ion irradiation at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), we have investigated the evolution of defect clusters as a function of the radiation dose at different distances from the 3 {1 1 2} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu. Post in situ ion irradiation, high resolution TEM was used to explore the types of defects, which are composed of a high-density of vacancy stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and sparsely distributed interstitial Frank loops. During irradiation, defect clusters evolve through four stages: (i) incubation, (ii) non-interaction, (iii) interaction and (iv) saturation; and the corresponding density was observed to initially increase with irradiation dose and then approach saturation. No obvious denuded zone is observed along the 3 {1 1 2} ITB and the configuration of defects at the boundary displays as truncated SFTs. Several defect evolution models have been proposed to explain the observed phenomena

  9. Optimizing the hydrogen storage in boron nitride nanotubes by defect engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdogan, Kemal; Berber, Savas [Physics Department, Gebze Institute of Technology, Cayirova Kampusu, Gebze, 41400 Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    We use ab initio density functional theory calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with vacancies in boron nitride nanotubes to optimize the hydrogen storage capacity through defect engineering. The vacancies reconstruct by forming B-B and N-N bonds across the defect site, which are not as favorable as heteronuclear B-N bonds. Our total energy and structure optimization results indicate that the hydrogen cleaves these reconstructing bonds to form more stable atomic structures. The hydrogenated defects offer smaller charge densities that allow hydrogen molecule to pass through the nanotube wall for storing hydrogen inside the nanotubes. Our optimum reaction pathway search revealed that hydrogen molecules could indeed go through a hydrogenated defect site with relatively small energy barriers compared to the pristine nanotube wall. The calculated activation energies for different diameters suggest a preferential diameter range for optimum hydrogen storage in defective boron nitride nanotubes. (author)

  10. Influence of defects in SiC (0001) on epitaxial graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yu; Guo Li-Wei; Lu Wei; Huang Jiao; Jia Yu-Ping; Sun Wei; Li Zhi-Lin; Wang Yi-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Defects in silicon carbide (SiC) substrate are crucial to the properties of the epitaxial graphene (EG) grown on it. Here we report the effect of defects in SiC on the crystalline quality of EGs through comparative studies of the characteristics of the EGs grown on SiC (0001) substrates with different defect densities. It is found that EGs on high quality SiC possess regular steps on the surface of the SiC and there is no discernible D peak in its Raman spectrum. Conversely, the EG on the SiC with a high density of defects has a strong D peak, irregular stepped morphology and poor uniformity in graphene layer numbers. It is the defects in the SiC that are responsible for the irregular stepped morphology and lead to the small domain size in the EG. (rapid communication)

  11. Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of CHDs. The types marked with a star (*) are considered critical CHDs. Atrial Septal Defect Atrioventricular ... for Disease Control and Prevention Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  12. Birth Defects Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit" /> Information For… Media Policy Makers Data & Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... and critical. Read below for the latest national statistics on the occurrence of birth defects in the ...

  13. Defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly, L.

    1993-04-01

    In this thesis, experimental results of the transition metals Ti, V, Nb, Mo, and W as impurity centres in silicon are presented. Transition metal doping was accomplished by ion implantation. Emphasis is put on energy level position, electrical and optical properties of the encountered defect levels. Junction space charge methods (JSCM) such as DLTS, photocapacitance and photocurrent techniques are employed. Three energy levels are found for the 3d-transition metals Ti(E c -0.06eV, E c -0.30eV, E v +0.26) and V(E c -0.21eV, E c -0,48e, E v +0.36eV), and for the 4d-element Nb(E c -0.29eV, E c -0.58eV, E v +0.163eV) in Silicon, whereas only one transition metal induced level is found for Mo(E v +0.30eV) and W(E v +0.38eV) respectively. Electrical and optical characteristics of Si 1-x Ge x ,0.7 7 cm -2 . The solvent Bi, used in the LPE-process, is found to be the dominant impurity element. Furthermore, liquid phase epitaxy of high purity In 0.53 Ga 0.57 As on InP, together with the properties of the Cu-induced acceptor in this material are examined. Free electron concentrations of n=5x10 14 cm -3 and electron Hall-mobilities of μ 77K = 44000 cm 2 /Vs are achieved. The energy level position of the Cu-acceptor is found to be E v +0.025eV. Photoluminescence and Hall-effect measurements, together with JSCM are the main characterization methods used. The band linups of In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As with GaAs and with InP are determined according to the Cu-acceptor energy level position in these materials. Additionally, the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the Cu-acceptor energy level position in In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As is examined. (103 refs.)

  14. Electrical fingerprint of pipeline defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mica, Isabella; Polignano, Maria Luisa; Marco, Cinzia De

    2004-01-01

    Pipeline defects are dislocations that connect the source region of the transistor with the drain region. They were widely reported to occur in CMOS, BiCMOS devices and recently in SOI technologies. They can reduce device yield either by affecting the devices functionality or by increasing the current consumption under stand-by conditions. In this work the electrical fingerprint of these dislocations is studied, its purpose is to enable us to identify these defects as the ones responsible for device failure. It is shown that the pipeline defects are responsible for a leakage current from source to drain in the transistors. This leakage has a resistive characteristic and it is lightly modulated by the body bias. It is not sensitive to temperature; vice versa the off-current of a good transistor exhibits the well-known exponential dependence on 1/T. The emission spectrum of these defects was studied and compared with the spectrum of a good transistor. The paper aims to show that the spectrum of a defective transistor is quite peculiar; it shows well defined peaks, whereas the spectrum of a good transistor under saturation conditions is characterized by a broad spectral light emission distribution. Finally the deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) is tried on defective diodes

  15. Precipitation of ferromagnetic phase induced by defect energies during creep deformation in Type 304 austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Yuhki; Shiraki, Atsuhiro; Murata, Yoshinori; Takaya, Shigeru; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Morinaga, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    The correlation of defect energies with precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase near M 23 C 6 carbide during creep tests at high temperature in Type 304 austenitic steel was examined by estimating the defect energies near the carbide, based on micromechanics. As one of the defect energies, the precipitation energy was calculated by assuming M 23 C 6 carbide to be a spherical inclusion. The other defect energy, creep dislocation energy, was calculated based on dislocation density data obtained from transmission electron microscopy observations of the creep samples. The dislocation energy density was much higher than the precipitation energy density in the initial stage of the creep process, when the ferromagnetic phase started to increase. Creep dislocation energy could be the main driving force for precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase.

  16. Precipitation of ferromagnetic phase induced by defect energies during creep deformation in Type 304 austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Yuhki, E-mail: tsukada@silky.numse.nagoya-u.ac.j [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Atsuhiro; Murata, Yoshinori [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takaya, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Morinaga, Masahiko [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    The correlation of defect energies with precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase near M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide during creep tests at high temperature in Type 304 austenitic steel was examined by estimating the defect energies near the carbide, based on micromechanics. As one of the defect energies, the precipitation energy was calculated by assuming M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide to be a spherical inclusion. The other defect energy, creep dislocation energy, was calculated based on dislocation density data obtained from transmission electron microscopy observations of the creep samples. The dislocation energy density was much higher than the precipitation energy density in the initial stage of the creep process, when the ferromagnetic phase started to increase. Creep dislocation energy could be the main driving force for precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase.

  17. Structure, stability and mobility of point defects in hexagonal close packed zirconium: an ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verite, G.

    2007-09-01

    This research aims at determining, by means of DFT (density functional theory) electronic structure computations, the structure, the stability, and the mobility of isolated point defects, lack defects, auto-interstitial defects, or small aggregate defects in the compact hexagonal zirconium (hc Zr). After a literature survey on the studied materials and a review of computer simulation methods in material science, the author presents and comments the available results from experiments or simulations on point defects in hc Zr. He presents the growth phenomenon under radiation. Then, he briefly described the computing techniques used in this study, reports the determination of the network parameters and elastic constants of each material. He reports and comments the results obtained with the SIESTA code and with a Monte Carlo kinetic simulation. The different types of defects are investigated

  18. Point defects in ZnO crystals grown by various techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čížek, J; Vlček, M; Hruška, P; Lukáč, F; Melikhova, O; Anwand, W; Selim, F; Hugenschmidt, Ch; Egger, W

    2017-01-01

    In the present work point defects in ZnO crystals were characterized by positron lifetime spectroscopy combined with back-diffusion measurement of slow positrons. Defects in ZnO crystals grown by various techniques were compared. Hydrothermally grown ZnO crystals contain defects characterized by lifetime of ≈181 ps. These defects were attributed to Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen. ZnO crystals prepared by other techniques (Bridgman, pressurized melt growth, and seeded chemical vapour transport) exhibit shorter lifetime of ≈165 ps. Positron back-diffusion studies revealed that hydrothermally grown ZnO crystals contain higher density of defects than the crystals grown by other techniques. The lowest concentration of defects was detected in the crystal grown by seeded chemical vapor transport. (paper)

  19. Impurity-defect complexes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.H.; Fong, C.Y.; Nichols, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The two most outstanding features observed for dopants in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-a shift in the Fermi level accompanied by an increase in the defect density and an absence of degenerate doping have previously been postulated to stem from the formation of substitutional dopant-dangling bond complexes. Using first-principles self-consistent pseudopotential calculations in conjunction with a supercell model for the amorphous network and the ability of network relaxation from the first-principles results. The authors have studied the electronic and structural properties of substitutional fourfold-coordinated phosphorus and boron at the second neighbor position to a dangling bond defect. This paper demonstrates that such impurity-defect complexes can account for the general features observed experimentally in doped a-Si:H

  20. Insulating Behavior in Graphene with Irradiation-induced Lattice Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Hao; Williams, Ellen; Fuhrer, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We irradiated cleaned graphene on silicon dioxide in ultra-high vacuum with low energy inert gas ions to produce lattice defects [1], and investigated in detail the transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence of the conductivity as a function of defect density. We measured the low field magnetoresistance and temperature-dependent resistivity in situ and find that weak localization can only account for a small correction of the resistivity increase with decreasing temperature. We will discuss possible origins of the insulating temperature dependent resistivity in defected graphene in light of our recent experiments. [4pt] [1] Jian-Hao Chen, W. G. Cullen, C. Jang, M. S. Fuhrer, E. D. Williams, PRL 102, 236805 (2009)

  1. Point defects in thorium nitride: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    Thorium and its compounds (carbides and nitrides) are being investigated as possible materials to be used as nuclear fuels for Generation-IV reactors. As a first step in the research of these materials under irradiation, we study the formation energies and stability of point defects in thorium nitride by means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory. We focus on vacancies, interstitials, Frenkel pairs and Schottky defects. We found that N and Th vacancies have almost the same formation energy and that the most energetically favorable defects of all studied in this work are N interstitials. These kind of results for ThN, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically.

  2. Point defects in thorium nitride: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Llois, A.M.; Mosca, H.O.

    2016-01-01

    Thorium and its compounds (carbides and nitrides) are being investigated as possible materials to be used as nuclear fuels for Generation-IV reactors. As a first step in the research of these materials under irradiation, we study the formation energies and stability of point defects in thorium nitride by means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory. We focus on vacancies, interstitials, Frenkel pairs and Schottky defects. We found that N and Th vacancies have almost the same formation energy and that the most energetically favorable defects of all studied in this work are N interstitials. These kind of results for ThN, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically.

  3. Possible mechanism for d0 ferromagnetism mediated by intrinsic defects

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhenkui

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of several intrinsic defects on the magnetic behavior of ZnS nanostructures using hybrid density functional theory to gain insights into d0 ferromagnetism. Previous studies have predicted that the magnetism is due to a coupling between partially filled defect states. By taking into account the electronic correlations, we find an additional splitting of the defect states in Zn vacancies and thus the possibility of gaining energy by preferential filling of hole states, establishing ferromagnetism between spin polarized S 3p holes. We demonstrate a crucial role of neutral S vacancies in promoting ferromagnetism between positively charged S vacancies. S dangling bonds on the nanoparticle surface also induce ferromagnetism. This journal is

  4. Ginzburg regime and its effects on topological defect formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Luis M. A.; Antunes, Nuno D.; Zurek, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Ginzburg temperature has historically been proposed as the energy scale of formation of topological defects at a second order symmetry breaking phase transition. More recently alternative proposals which compute the time of formation of defects from the critical dynamics of the system have been gaining both theoretical and experimental support. We investigate, using a canonical model for string formation, how these two pictures compare. In particular we show that prolonged exposure of a critical field configuration to the Ginzburg regime results in no substantial suppression of the final density of defects formed. These results eliminate the Ginzburg regime as a possible cause of erasure of vortex lines in the recent 4 He pressure quench experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Atomic Defects and Doping of Monolayer NbSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lan; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Khestanova, Ekaterina; Kashtiban, Reza J; Peters, Jonathan J P; Lawlor, Sean; Sanchez, Ana M; Sloan, Jeremy; Gorbachev, Roman V; Grigorieva, Irina V; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V; Haigh, Sarah J

    2017-03-28

    We have investigated the structure of atomic defects within monolayer NbSe 2 encapsulated in graphene by combining atomic resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and strain mapping using geometric phase analysis. We demonstrate the presence of stable Nb and Se monovacancies in monolayer material and reveal that Se monovacancies are the most frequently observed defects, consistent with DFT calculations of their formation energy. We reveal that adventitious impurities of C, N, and O can substitute into the NbSe 2 lattice stabilizing Se divacancies. We further observe evidence of Pt substitution into both Se and Nb vacancy sites. This knowledge of the character and relative frequency of different atomic defects provides the potential to better understand and control the unusual electronic and magnetic properties of this exciting two-dimensional material.

  6. Microstructural defects in EUROFER 97 after different neutron irradiation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dethloff

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural evolution is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is used to determine the defect microstructure after different neutron irradiation conditions. In particular dislocation loops, voids and precipitates are analyzed concerning defect nature, density and size distribution after irradiation to 15 dpa at 300 °C in the mixed spectrum High Flux Reactor (HFR. New results are combined with previously obtained data from irradiation in the fast spectrum BOR-60 reactor (15 and 32 dpa, 330 °C, which allows for assessment of dose and dose rate effects on the aforementioned irradiation induced defects and microstructural characteristics.

  7. Trivial constraints on orbital-free kinetic energy density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kai; Trickey, S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Approximate kinetic energy density functionals (KEDFs) are central to orbital-free density functional theory. Limitations on the spatial derivative dependencies of KEDFs have been claimed from differential virial theorems. We identify a central defect in the argument: the relationships are not true for an arbitrary density but hold only for the minimizing density and corresponding chemical potential. Contrary to the claims therefore, the relationships are not constraints and provide no independent information about the spatial derivative dependencies of approximate KEDFs. A simple argument also shows that validity for arbitrary v-representable densities is not restored by appeal to the density-potential bijection.

  8. Dual approaches for defects condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Grigorio, Leonardo de Souza; Wotzasek, Clovis [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Guimaraes, Marcelo Santos [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text. Due to the fact that the QCD running coupling constant becomes larger as we go into the low energy (or large distance) limit of the theory, a perturbative treatment of its infrared (IR) region is impossible. In particular, a formal mathematical demonstration of color confinement and a complete physical understanding of the exact mechanism that confines quarks and gluons are two missing points in our current knowledge of the IR-QCD. It was known that due to the Meissner effect of expulsion of magnetic fields in a electric condensate that usual superconductors should confine magnetic monopoles. That point led to the conjecture that the QCD vacuum could be a condensate of chromomagnetic monopoles, a dual superconductor (DSC). Such a chromomagnetic condensate should be responsible for the dual Meissner effect which is expected to lead to the confinement of color charges immersed in this medium. In dual superconductor models of color confinement, magnetic monopoles appear as topological defects in points of the space where the abelian projection becomes singular. Also, condensation of other kinds of defects such as vortices in superfluids and line-like defects in solids are responsible for a great variety of phase transitions, which once more proves the relevance of the subject. In the present work we review two methods that allow us to approach the condensation of defects: the Kleinert Mechanism (KM) and the Julia-Toulouse Mechanism (JTM). We show that in the limit where the vortex gauge field goes to zero, which we identify as the signature of the condensation of defects in the dual picture, these are two equivalent dual prescriptions for obtaining an effective theory for a phase where defects are condensed, starting from the fundamental theory defined in the normal phase where defects are diluted. (author)

  9. Determination of defect content and defect profile in semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubiaga, A; Garcia, J A; Plazaola, F; Zuniga-Perez, J; Munoz-Sanjose, V

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present an overview of the technique to obtain the defects depth profile and width of a deposited layer and multilayer based on positron annihilation spectroscopy. In particular we apply the method to ZnO and ZnO/ZnCdO layers deposited on sapphire substrates. After introducing some terminology we first calculate the trend that the W/S parameters of the Doppler broadening measurements must follow, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. From this point we extend the results to calculate the width and defect profiles in deposited layer samples.

  10. Determination of defect content and defect profile in semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A [Laboratory of Physics, HUT, PO Box 1100, 02015 TKK, Espoo (Finland); Garcia, J A; Plazaola, F [Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unbertsitatea, P. K. 644, 48080, Bilbao (Spain); Zuniga-Perez, J; Munoz-Sanjose, V, E-mail: fernando.plazaola@ehu.es [Universitat de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-10

    In this article we present an overview of the technique to obtain the defects depth profile and width of a deposited layer and multilayer based on positron annihilation spectroscopy. In particular we apply the method to ZnO and ZnO/ZnCdO layers deposited on sapphire substrates. After introducing some terminology we first calculate the trend that the W/S parameters of the Doppler broadening measurements must follow, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. From this point we extend the results to calculate the width and defect profiles in deposited layer samples.

  11. Defects in conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billò, Marco; Gonçalves, Vasco; Lauria, Edoardo; Meineri, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We discuss consequences of the breaking of conformal symmetry by a flat or spherical extended operator. We adapt the embedding formalism to the study of correlation functions of symmetric traceless tensors in the presence of the defect. Two-point functions of a bulk and a defect primary are fixed by conformal invariance up to a set of OPE coefficients, and we identify the allowed tensor structures. A correlator of two bulk primaries depends on two cross-ratios, and we study its conformal block decomposition in the case of external scalars. The Casimir equation in the defect channel reduces to a hypergeometric equation, while the bulk channel blocks are recursively determined in the light-cone limit. In the special case of a defect of codimension two, we map the Casimir equation in the bulk channel to the one of a four-point function without defect. Finally, we analyze the contact terms of the stress-tensor with the extended operator, and we deduce constraints on the CFT data. In two dimensions, we relate the displacement operator, which appears among the contact terms, to the reflection coefficient of a conformal interface, and we find unitarity bounds for the latter.

  12. Defects in conformal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billò, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1 I-10125 Torino (Italy); Gonçalves, Vasco [Centro de Física do Porto,Departamento de Física e Astronomia Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research Instituto de Física Teórica,UNESP - University Estadual Paulista,Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lauria, Edoardo [Institute for Theoretical Physics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Meineri, Marco [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Scuola Normale Superiore, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - sezione di Pisa,Piazza dei Cavalieri 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    We discuss consequences of the breaking of conformal symmetry by a flat or spherical extended operator. We adapt the embedding formalism to the study of correlation functions of symmetric traceless tensors in the presence of the defect. Two-point functions of a bulk and a defect primary are fixed by conformal invariance up to a set of OPE coefficients, and we identify the allowed tensor structures. A correlator of two bulk primaries depends on two cross-ratios, and we study its conformal block decomposition in the case of external scalars. The Casimir equation in the defect channel reduces to a hypergeometric equation, while the bulk channel blocks are recursively determined in the light-cone limit. In the special case of a defect of codimension two, we map the Casimir equation in the bulk channel to the one of a four-point function without defect. Finally, we analyze the contact terms of the stress-tensor with the extended operator, and we deduce constraints on the CFT data. In two dimensions, we relate the displacement operator, which appears among the contact terms, to the reflection coefficient of a conformal interface, and we find unitarity bounds for the latter.

  13. A DFT study of Cu nanoparticles adsorbed on defective graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Rodríguez, D.E.; Mendoza-Huizar, L.H.; Díaz, C.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu_n supported on graphene may be a promising electrode material for DBFC's cells. • Cu_n/graphene interaction is rather local and size independent. • Cu_1_3 anchors strongly to defects in graphene, while keeping its gas-phase properties. - Abstract: Metal nanoparticles adsorbed on graphene are systems of interest for processes relative to catalytic reactions and alternative energy production. Graphene decorated with Cu-nanoparticles, in particular, could be a good alternative material for electrodes in direct borohydride fuel cells. However our knowledge of this system is still very limited. Based on density functional theory, we have analyzed the interaction of Cu_n nanoparticles (n = 4, 5, 6, 7, 13) with pristine and defective-graphene. We have considered two types of defects, a single vacancy (SV), and an extended lineal structural defect (ELSD), formed by heptagon-pentagon pairs. Our analysis has revealed the covalent character of the Cu_n-graphene interaction for pristine- and ELSD-graphene, and a more ionic-like interaction for SV-graphene. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the interaction between the nanoparticles and the graphene is rather local, i.e., only the nanoparticle atoms close to the contact region are involved in the interaction, being the electronic contact region much higher for defective-graphene than for pristine-graphene. Thus, the higher the particle the lower its average electronic and structural distortion.

  14. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, SenPo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y B; Ho, Johnny C

    2016-09-12

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of "bottom-up" InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications.

  15. Defect dynamics and coarsening dynamics in smectic-C films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pargellis, A. N.; Finn, P.; Goodby, J. W.; Panizza, P.; Yurke, B.; Cladis, P. E.

    1992-12-01

    We study the dynamics of defects generated in free-standing films of liquid crystals following a thermal quench from the smectic-A phase to the smectic-C phase. The defects are type-1 disclinations, and the strain field between defect pairs is confined to 2π walls. We compare our observations with a phenomenological model that includes dipole coupling of the director field to an external ordering field. This model is able to account for both the observed coalescence dynamics and the observed ordering dynamics. In the absence of an ordering field, our model predicts the defect density ρ to scale with time t as ρ lnρ~t-1. When the dipole coupling of the director field to an external ordering field is included, both the model and experiments show the defect coarsening proceeds as ρ~e-αt with the strain field confined to 2π walls. The external ordering field most likely arises from the director's tendency to align with edge dislocations within the liquid-crystal film.

  16. Revisiting the reasons for contact fatigue defects in rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darenskiy Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As it is known rail is one of the most significant elements of the whole railway construction. Operation under alternating loads from wheels of the rolling stock and different ambient temperatures lead to appearance and development of rail defects and damages. A great variety of operational factors (freight traffic density, axial loads, traffic speeds, track layout and profile as well as special features of manufacturing and thermal treatment of rails create certain difficulties while identifying reasons for defects and damages. The article deals with an attempt to estimate influence of track layout and lateral forces on appearance of defects and damages in rails on the base of long-term observations of rail operation in Kharkiv Metro. On the basis of the vehicle/track mathematical model which considers structural features of both rolling stock and permanent way in underground systems, the level of lateral forces in curves was calculated. The coefficients of correlation between the track curvature, the level of forces and the amount of defected rails removed were later obtained, that made it possible to determine the dominant factor which may lead to appearance and development of contact fatigue defects in rails laid in curves.

  17. Impaired Mitochondrial Dynamics Underlie Axonal Defects in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Kyle; Mou, Yongchao; Xu, Chong-Chong; Shah, Dhruvi; Chang, Jaerak; Blackstone, Craig; Li, Xue-Jun

    2018-05-02

    Mechanisms by which long corticospinal axons degenerate in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are largely unknown. Here, we have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with two autosomal recessive forms of HSP, SPG15 and SPG48, which are caused by mutations in the ZFYVE26 and AP5Z1 genes encoding proteins in the same complex, the spastizin and AP5Z1 proteins, respectively. In patient iPSC-derived telencephalic glutamatergic and midbrain dopaminergic neurons, neurite number, length and branching are significantly reduced, recapitulating disease-specific phenotypes. We analyzed mitochondrial morphology and noted a significant reduction in both mitochondrial length and their densities within axons of these HSP neurons. Mitochondrial membrane potential was also decreased, confirming functional mitochondrial defects. Notably, mdivi-1, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial fission GTPase DRP1, rescues mitochondrial morphology defects and suppresses the impairment in neurite outgrowth and late-onset apoptosis in HSP neurons. Furthermore, knockdown of these HSP genes causes similar axonal defects, also mitigated by treatment with mdivi-1. Finally, neurite outgrowth defects in SPG15 and SPG48 cortical neurons can be rescued by knocking down DRP1 directly. Thus, abnormal mitochondrial morphology caused by an imbalance of mitochondrial fission and fusion underlies specific axonal defects and serves as a potential therapeutic target for SPG15 and SPG48.

  18. A DFT study of Cu nanoparticles adsorbed on defective graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rodríguez, D.E. [Universidad Politécnica de Aguascalientes, Calle Paseo San Gerardo No. 297 Fracc. San Gerardo, 20342 Aguascalientes, Ags. (Mexico); Mendoza-Huizar, L.H. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Área Académica de Química, Ciudad del Conocimiento. Carretera Pachuca-Tulancigo Km. 4.5 Mineral de la Reforma, 42186 Hidalgo (Mexico); Díaz, C., E-mail: cristina.diaz@uam.es [Departamento de Química, Módulo 13, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Institute for Advanced Research in Chemical Science (IAdChem), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Cu{sub n} supported on graphene may be a promising electrode material for DBFC's cells. • Cu{sub n}/graphene interaction is rather local and size independent. • Cu{sub 13} anchors strongly to defects in graphene, while keeping its gas-phase properties. - Abstract: Metal nanoparticles adsorbed on graphene are systems of interest for processes relative to catalytic reactions and alternative energy production. Graphene decorated with Cu-nanoparticles, in particular, could be a good alternative material for electrodes in direct borohydride fuel cells. However our knowledge of this system is still very limited. Based on density functional theory, we have analyzed the interaction of Cu{sub n} nanoparticles (n = 4, 5, 6, 7, 13) with pristine and defective-graphene. We have considered two types of defects, a single vacancy (SV), and an extended lineal structural defect (ELSD), formed by heptagon-pentagon pairs. Our analysis has revealed the covalent character of the Cu{sub n}-graphene interaction for pristine- and ELSD-graphene, and a more ionic-like interaction for SV-graphene. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the interaction between the nanoparticles and the graphene is rather local, i.e., only the nanoparticle atoms close to the contact region are involved in the interaction, being the electronic contact region much higher for defective-graphene than for pristine-graphene. Thus, the higher the particle the lower its average electronic and structural distortion.

  19. Detection of paint polishing defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeggiani, S.; Wagner, M.; Mazal, J.; Rosén, B.-G.; Dahlén, M.

    2018-06-01

    Surface finish plays a major role on perceived product quality, and is the first thing a potential buyer sees. Today end-of-line repairs of the body of cars and trucks are inevitably to secure required surface quality. Defects that occur in the paint shop, like dust particles, are eliminated by manual sanding/polishing which lead to other types of defects when the last polishing step is not performed correctly or not fully completed. One of those defects is known as ‘polishing roses’ or holograms, which are incredibly hard to detect in artificial light but are clearly visible in sunlight. This paper will present the first tests with a measurement set-up newly developed to measure and analyse polishing roses. The results showed good correlations to human visual evaluations where repaired panels were estimated based on the defects’ intensity, severity and viewing angle.

  20. Theory of Defects in Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Drabold, David A

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor science and technology is the art of defect engineering. The theoretical modeling of defects has improved dramatically over the past decade. These tools are now applied to a wide range of materials issues: quantum dots, buckyballs, spintronics, interfaces, amorphous systems, and many others. This volume presents a coherent and detailed description of the field, and brings together leaders in theoretical research. Today's state-of-the-art, as well as tomorrow’s tools, are discussed: the supercell-pseudopotential method, the GW formalism,Quantum Monte Carlo, learn-on-the-fly molecular dynamics, finite-temperature treatments, etc. A wealth of applications are included, from point defects to wafer bonding or the propagation of dislocation.

  1. Defect CFTs and holographic multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiol, Bartomeu, E-mail: bfiol@ub.edu [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    We investigate some aspects of a recent proposal for a holographic description of the multiverse. Specifically, we focus on the implications on the suggested duality of the fluctuations of a bubble separating two universes with different cosmological constants. We do so by considering a similar problem in a 2+1 CFT with a codimension one defect, obtained by an M5-brane probe embedding in AdS{sub 4} × S{sup 7}, and studying its spectrum of fluctuations. Our results suggest that the kind of behavior required by the spectrum of bubble fluctuations is not likely to take place in defect CFTs with an AdS dual, although it might be possible if the defect supports a non-unitary theory.

  2. Defect CFTs and holographic multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiol, Bartomeu

    2010-01-01

    We investigate some aspects of a recent proposal for a holographic description of the multiverse. Specifically, we focus on the implications on the suggested duality of the fluctuations of a bubble separating two universes with different cosmological constants. We do so by considering a similar problem in a 2+1 CFT with a codimension one defect, obtained by an M5-brane probe embedding in AdS 4 × S 7 , and studying its spectrum of fluctuations. Our results suggest that the kind of behavior required by the spectrum of bubble fluctuations is not likely to take place in defect CFTs with an AdS dual, although it might be possible if the defect supports a non-unitary theory

  3. Defect reduction in seeded aluminum nitride crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Morgan, Kenneth; Slack, Glen A; Rao, Shailaja P.; Gibb, Shawn Robert

    2017-09-26

    Bulk single crystal of aluminum nitride (AlN) having an areal planar defect density.ltoreq.100 cm.sup.-2. Methods for growing single crystal aluminum nitride include melting an aluminum foil to uniformly wet a foundation with a layer of aluminum, the foundation forming a portion of an AlN seed holder, for an AlN seed to be used for the AlN growth. The holder may consist essentially of a substantially impervious backing plate.

  4. Behavior of deep level defects on voltage-induced stress of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Cho, S.E. [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Solar Cell Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of deep level defects by a voltage-induced stress for CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been investigated. CIGS solar cells were used with standard structures which are Al-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGSe{sub 2}/Mo on soda lime glass, and that resulted in conversion efficiencies as high as 16%. The samples with the same structure were isothermally stressed at 100 °C under the reverse voltages. The voltage-induced stressing in CIGS samples causes a decrease in the carrier density and conversion efficiency. To investigate the behavior of deep level defects in the stressed CIGS cells, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy was utilized, and normally 3 deep level defects (including 2 hole traps and 1 electron trap) were found to be located at 0.18 eV and 0.29 eV above the valence band maximum (and 0.36 eV below the conduction band). In voltage-induced cells, especially, it was found that the decrease of the hole carrier density could be responsible for the increase of the 0.29 eV defect, which is known to be observed in less efficient CIGS solar cells. And the carrier density and the defects are reversible at least to a large extent by resting at room-temperature without the bias voltage. From optical capture kinetics in photo-induced current transient spectroscopy measurement, the types of defects could be distinguished into the isolated point defect and the extended defect. In this work, it is suggested that the increase of the 0.29 eV defect by voltage-induced stress could be due to electrical activation accompanied by a loss of positive ion species and the activated defect gives rise to reduction of the carrier density. - Highlights: • We investigated behavior of deep level defects by voltage-induced stress. • Defect generation could affect the decrease of the conversion efficiency of cells. • Defect generation could be electrically activated by a loss of positive ion species. • Type of defects could be studied with models of point defects

  5. Air density dependence of the response of the PTW SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber for 125I brachytherapy seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Del Río, J; Tornero-López, A M; Guirado, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the air density dependence of the response of the new SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber, manufactured by PTW. The air density dependence of three different SourceCheck 4pi chambers was studied by measuring 125 I sources. Measurements were taken by varying the pressure from 746.6 to 986.6hPa in a pressure chamber. Three different HDR 1000 Plus ionization chambers were also analyzed under similar conditions. A linear and a potential-like function of the air density were fitted to experimental data and their achievement in describing them was analyzed. SourceCheck 4pi chamber response showed a residual dependence on the air density once the standard pressure and temperature factor was applied. The chamber response was overestimated when the air density was below that under normal atmospheric conditions. A similar dependence was found for the HDR 1000 Plus chambers analyzed. A linear function of the air density permitted a very good description of this residual dependence, better than with a potential function. No significant variability between the different specimens of the same chamber model studied was found. The effect of overestimation observed in the chamber responses once they are corrected for the standard pressure and temperature may represent a non-negligible ∼4% overestimation in high altitude cities as ours (700m AMSL). This overestimation behaves linearly with the air density in all cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rail inspection of RCF defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Popović

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rail defects due to rolling contact fatigue (RCF threaten the traffic safety around the world. That hazard is more distinct on railways without adequate maintenance strategy. Realization of interoperability of European railway network demands from every infrastructure manager to have a maintenance plan for the infrastructure subsystem. Besides that, this plan includes rail inspection and strategy against RCF defects. This paper emphasizes the importance of rail inspection and early detection of RCF because the most of RCF crack should be removed in rail grinding campaigns (preventive, cyclical and corrective activities during the whole rail service life.

  7. Defect characterization with positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granatelli, L.; Lynn, K.G.

    1980-01-01

    Positron annihilation in metal crystals is reviewed. A brief introduction to the positron annihilation technique is presented first. Then the ability of the positron technique to perform microstructural characterization of four types of lattice defects (vacancies, voids, dislocations, grain boundaries) is discussed. It is frequently not possible to obtain samples that contain only one type of defect in nonnegligible concentrations. Such situations exist for some alloys and for fatigued metal samples. Finally, the current limitations and some future prospects of the technique are presented. 79 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  8. G-centers in irradiated silicon revisited: A screened hybrid density functional theory approach

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.

    2014-05-13

    Electronic structure calculations employing screened hybrid density functional theory are used to gain fundamental insight into the interaction of carbon interstitial (Ci) and substitutional (Cs) atoms forming the CiCs defect known as G-center in silicon (Si). The G-center is one of the most important radiation related defects in Czochralski grown Si. We systematically investigate the density of states and formation energy for different types of CiCs defects with respect to the Fermi energy for all possible charge states. Prevalence of the neutral state for the C-type defect is established.

  9. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a baby with a congenital heart defect. Family history and genetics Congenital heart disease is not usually passed along ... you or your child to a specialist in genetic testing. Cardiac MRI to diagnose a ... Factors to review family history, smoking, and medicines that increase your risk of ...

  10. Nuclear Pasta: Topology and Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Horowitz, Charles; Berry, Don; Caplan, Matt; Briggs, Christian

    2015-04-01

    A layer of complex non-uniform phases of matter known as nuclear pasta is expected to exist at the base of the crust of neutron stars. Using large scale molecular dynamics we study the topology of some pasta shapes, the formation of defects and how these may affect properties of neutron star crusts.

  11. Defect branes as Alice strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Takashi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2015-01-01

    There exist various defect-brane backgrounds in supergravity theories which arise as the low energy limit of string theories. These backgrounds typically have non-trivial monodromies, and if we move a charged probe around the center of a defect, its charge will be changed by the action of the monodromy. During the process, the charge conservation law seems to be violated. In this paper, to resolve this puzzle, we examine a dynamics of the charge changing process and show that the missing charge of the probe is transferred to the background. We then explicitly construct the resultant background after the charge transfer process by utilizing dualities. This background has the same monodromy as the original defect brane, but has an additional charge which does not have any localized source. In the literature, such a charge without localized source is known to appear in the presence of Alice strings. We argue that defect branes can in fact be regarded as a realization of Alice strings in string theory and examine the charge transfer process from that perspective.

  12. Defect branes as Alice strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Takashi [Theoretical Biology Laboratory, RIKEN,Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Sakatani, Yuho [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-25

    There exist various defect-brane backgrounds in supergravity theories which arise as the low energy limit of string theories. These backgrounds typically have non-trivial monodromies, and if we move a charged probe around the center of a defect, its charge will be changed by the action of the monodromy. During the process, the charge conservation law seems to be violated. In this paper, to resolve this puzzle, we examine a dynamics of the charge changing process and show that the missing charge of the probe is transferred to the background. We then explicitly construct the resultant background after the charge transfer process by utilizing dualities. This background has the same monodromy as the original defect brane, but has an additional charge which does not have any localized source. In the literature, such a charge without localized source is known to appear in the presence of Alice strings. We argue that defect branes can in fact be regarded as a realization of Alice strings in string theory and examine the charge transfer process from that perspective.

  13. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  14. Modelling water vapour permeability through atomic layer deposition coated photovoltaic barrier defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrawemi, Mohamed, E-mail: Mohamed.elrawemi@hud.ac.uk [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Bird, David, E-mail: David.Bird@uk-cpi.com [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Robbins, David [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Sweeney, Francis [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-03

    Transparent barrier films such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} used for prevention of oxygen and/or water vapour permeation are the subject of increasing research interest when used for the encapsulation of flexible photovoltaic modules. However, the existence of micro-scale defects in the barrier surface topography has been shown to have the potential to facilitate water vapour ingress, thereby reducing cell efficiency and causing internal electrical shorts. Previous work has shown that small defects (≤ 3 μm lateral dimension) were less significant in determining water vapour ingress. In contrast, larger defects (≥ 3 μm lateral dimension) seem to be more detrimental to the barrier functionality. Experimental results based on surface topography segmentation analysis and a model presented in this paper will be used to test the hypothesis that the major contributing defects to water vapour transmission rate are small numbers of large defects. The model highlighted in this study has the potential to be used for gaining a better understanding of photovoltaic module efficiency and performance. - Highlights: • A model of water vapour permeation through barrier defects is presented. • The effect of the defects on the water vapour permeability is investigated. • Defect density correlates with water vapour permeability. • Large defects may dominate the permeation properties of the barrier film.

  15. Effect of tin doping on oxygen- and carbon-related defects in Czochralski silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chroneos, A.; Londos, C. A.; Sgourou, E. N.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques are used to investigate the impact of tin doping on the formation and the thermal stability of oxygen- and carbon-related defects in electron-irradiated Czochralski silicon. The results verify previous reports that Sn doping reduces the formation of the VO defect and suppresses its conversion to the VO 2 defect. Within experimental accuracy, a small delay in the growth of the VO 2 defect is observed. Regarding carbon-related defects, it is determined that Sn doping leads to a reduction in the formation of the C i O i , C i C s , and C i O i (Si I ) defects although an increase in their thermal stability is observed. The impact of strain induced in the lattice by the larger tin substitutional atoms, as well as their association with intrinsic defects and carbon impurities, can be considered as an explanation to account for the above observations. The density functional theory calculations are used to study the interaction of tin with lattice vacancies and oxygen- and carbon-related clusters. Both experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that tin co-doping is an efficient defect engineering strategy to suppress detrimental effects because of the presence of oxygen- and carbon-related defect clusters in devices.

  16. COMPARISON BETWEEN WOOD DRYING DEFECT SCORES: SPECIMEN TESTING X ANALYSIS OF KILN-DRIED BOARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeison Cesar Batista

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is important to develop drying technologies for Eucalyptus grandis lumber, which is one of the most planted species of this genus in Brazil and plays an important role as raw material for the wood industry. The general aim of this work was to assess the conventional kiln drying of juvenile wood of three clones of Eucalyptus grandis. The specific aims were to compare the behavior between: i drying defects indicated by tests with wood specimens and conventional kiln-dried boards; and ii physical properties and the drying quality. Five 11-year-old trees of each clone were felled, and only flatsawn boards of the first log were used. Basic density and total shrinkage were determined, and the drying test with wood specimens at 100 °C was carried out. Kiln drying of boards was performed, and initial and final moisture content, moisture gradient in thickness, drying stresses and drying defects were assessed. The defect scoring method was used to verify the behavior between the defects detected by specimen testing and the defects detected in kiln-dried boards. As main results, the drying schedule was too severe for the wood, resulting in a high level of boards with defects. The behavior between the defects in the drying test with specimens and the defects of kiln-dried boards was different, there was no correspondence, according to the defect scoring method.

  17. One-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with sinusoidal densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, L.; Shang, L.; Zhang, S.

    2014-01-01

    Properties of electromagnetic waves with normal and oblique incidence have been studied for one-dimensional plasma layers with sinusoidal densities. Wave transmittance as a function of wave frequency exhibits photonic band gaps characteristic of photonic crystals. For periodic structures, increasing collision frequency is demonstrated to lead to greater absorption, increasing the modulation factor enlarges the gap width, and increasing incidence angle can change the gap locations of the two polarizations. If a defect layer is introduced by inserting a new plasma layer in the center, a defect mode may appear within the gap. Periodic number, collision frequency, and modulation factor can affect magnitude of the defect mode. The incidence angle enables the frequency to be tuned. Defect layer thickness affects both frequency and number of defect modes. These results may provide theoretical guidance in designing tunable narrow-band filters

  18. Fen (n=1–6) clusters chemisorbed on vacancy defects in graphene: Stability, spin-dipole moment, and magnetic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Pujari, Bhalchandra S.; Bhandary, Sumanta; Cossu, Fabrizio; Eriksson, Olle; Kanhere, Dilip G.; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the chemical and magnetic interactions of Fen (n=1–6) clusters with vacancy defects (monovacancy to correlated vacancies with six missing C atoms) in a graphene sheet by ab initio density functional calculations

  19. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Hieslmair, H.

    1997-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is one of the most promising materials for terrestrial solar cells. It is critical to getter impurities from the material as well as inhibit contamination during growth and processing. Standard processing steps such as, phosphorus in-diffusion for p-n junction formation and aluminum sintering for backside ohmic contact fabrication, intrinsically possess gettering capabilities. These processes have been shown to improve L n values in regions of multicrystalline silicon with low structural defect densities but not in highly dislocated regions. Recent Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) results indirectly reveal higher concentrations of iron in highly dislocated regions while further work suggests that the release of impurities from structural defects, such as dislocations, is the rate limiting step for gettering in multicrystalline silicon. The work presented here directly demonstrates the relationship between metal impurities, structural defects and solar cell performance in multicrystalline silicon. Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) multicrystalline silicon in the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing was used in this study. Standard solar cell processing steps were carried out at ASE Americas Inc. Metal impurity concentrations and distributions were determined by use of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe (beamline 10.3.1) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The sample was at atmosphere so only elements with Z greater than silicon could be detected, which includes all metal impurities of interest. Structural defect densities were determined by preferential etching and surface analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in secondary electron mode. Mapped areas were exactly relocated between the XRF and SEM to allow for direct comparison of impurity and structural defect distributions

  20. Fibrous metaphyseal defect (fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyschmidt, J.; Saure, D.; Dammenhain, S.

    1981-01-01

    Fibrous cortical defect and nonossifying fibromas can be classified together as fibrous metaphyseal defects (FMD) since they have the same pahtological substrate, with a tendency to the same localisation around the knee, and occuring at the same age. They have a tendency to spontaneous healing, are clinically silent and are usually discovered accidentally during radiological examination. A radiological survey fo 5.674 metaphyseal regions in the upper and lower extremities of 2.065 unselected patients aged one to 20 years revealed an incidence of 1.8%; exlcusive examination of the distal femur showed an incidence of 2.7%. 96% of all lesions were in the lower extremities and only 4% in the upper. The marked discrepancy in the incidence rate between American and German publications is discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H.; Fontaine, J.C.; Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.)

  2. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  3. Ab initio study of metastability of Eu{sup 3+} defect complexes in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouma, Cecil N.M., E-mail: Cecil.Ouma@up.ac.za; Meyer, Walter E.

    2014-04-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used to study the structural and electronic properties of Eu{sup 3+} defect complexes in GaN under Ga-rich conditions. Two distinct configurations of the Eu{sub Ga}V{sub N} defect complex, the axial and basal configuration, have been investigated. We report two forms of metastable defects namely; the Negative U defect in the lower half of the GaN band-gap and a metastable defect with two distinct configurations each with levels at E{sub C} −0.46 eV and −0.56 eV in the upper half of the GaN band-gap.

  4. Optical spectroscopy of vacancy related defects in silicon carbide generated by proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, C.; Sperlich, A.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G.V. [Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Kraus, H. [Japan Atomic EnergyAgency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Makino, T.; Sato, S.I.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic EnergyAgency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Dyakonov, V. [Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); ZAE Bayern, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Defects in silicon carbide (SiC) received growing attention in recent years, because they are promising candidates for spin based quantum information processing. In this study we examine silicon vacancies in 4H-SiC crystals generated by proton irradiation. By the use of confocal microscopy the implantation depth of Si vacancies for varying proton energies can be verified. An important issue is to ascertain the nature and distribution of the defects. For this purpose, we use the characteristic photoluminescence spectrum of Si vacancies, whose intensity is proportional to the defect density. Using xyz-scans, where the photoluminescence at each mapping point is recorded, one can thus determine the vacancies nature and their distribution in the SiC crystal. Additionally we verify the nature of the examined defects by measuring their uniquely defined zero-field-splitting by using ODMR associated with defect spins.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of zigzag InP nanoribbons with Stone–Wales type defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, R C; Carrete, J; Varela, L M; Gallego, L J

    2016-01-01

    By means of density-functional-theoretic calculations, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of a hexagonal InP sheet and of hydrogen-passivated zigzag InP nanoribbons (ZInPNRs) with Stone–Wales (SW)-type defects. Our results show that the influence of this kind of defect is not limited to the defected region but it leads to the formation of ripples that extend across the systems, in keeping with the results obtained recently for graphene and silicene sheets. The presence of SW defects in ZInPNRs causes an appreciable broadening of the band gap and transforms the indirect-bandgap perfect ZInPNR into a direct-bandgap semiconductor. An external transverse electric field, regardless of its direction, reduces the gap in both the perfect and defective ZInPNRs. (paper)

  6. Impact of Interfacial Defects on the Properties of Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Lateral Heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Zhen

    2017-03-25

    We explored the impact of interfacial defects on the stability and optoelectronic properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide lateral heterojunctions using a density functional theory approach. As a prototype, we focused on the MoS2-WSe2 system and found that even a random alloy-like interface with a width of less than 1 nm has only a minimal impact on the band gap and alignment compared to the defect-less interface. The largest impact is on the evolution of the electrostatic potential across the monolayer. Similar to defect-less interfaces, a small number of defects results in an electrostatic potential profile with a sharp change at the interface, which facilitates exciton dissociation. Differently, a large number of defects results in an electrostatic potential profile switching smoothly across the interface, which is expected to reduce the capability of the heterojunction to promote exciton dissociation. These results are generalizable to other transition metal dichalcogenide lateral heterojunctions.

  7. Stability and kinetics of point defects in SiO2 and in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roma, G.

    2012-01-01

    This document is conceived as an overview of Guido Roma's research achievements on defects stability and kinetics in two materials of interest in nuclear science and for many other application domains: silicon dioxide and silicon carbide. An extended summary in french is followed by the main document, in english. Chapter 1 describes the context, introduces the approach and explains the choice of silicon dioxide and silicon carbide. Chapter 2 discusses several approximations and specific issues of the application of Density Functional Theory to point defects in non-metallic materials for the study of defects energetics and diffusion. Chapter 3 is devoted to native defects in silicon dioxide and the understanding of self-diffusion in crystalline and amorphous SiO 2 . Chapter 4 summarises the results on native defects and palladium impurities in silicon carbide. A conclusion, including suggestions for future developments, closes the main part of the document. (author) [fr

  8. Predicting internal red oak (Quercus rubra) log defect features using surface defect defect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Determining the defects located within a log is crucial to understanding the tree/log resource for efficient processing. However, existing means of doing this non-destructively requires the use of expensive x-ray/CT (computerized tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), or microwave technology. These methods do not lend themselves to fast, efficient, and cost-...

  9. Topological defects after a quench in a Bénard-Marangoni convection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, S; González-Viñas, W; Mancini, H; Boccaletti, S

    2001-05-01

    We report experimental evidence of the fact that, in a Bénard-Marangoni conduction-convection transition, the density of defects in the emerging structure scales as a power law in the quench time needed for the control parameter to ramp through the threshold. The obtained scaling exponents differ from the ones predicted and observed in the case in which the defects correspond to zeros in the amplitude of the global two-dimensional field.

  10. Anisotropic mechanical properties and Stone-Wales defects in graphene monolayer: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, B.B.; Yang, X.B.; Zhang, R.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical properties of graphene monolayer via the density functional theoretical (DFT) method. We find that the strain energies are anisotropic for the graphene under large strain. We attribute the anisotropic feature to the anisotropic sp 2 hybridization in the hexagonal lattice. We further identify that the formation energies of Stone-Wales (SW) defects in the graphene monolayer are determined by the defect concentration and also the direction of applied tensile strain, correlating with the anisotropic feature.

  11. Vacancy defects in electron-irradiated ZnO studied by Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Betsuyaku, K.; Kawasuso, A.

    2008-03-01

    Vacancy defects in ZnO induced by electron irradiation were characterized by the Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements together with the local density approximation calculations. Zinc vacancies (VZn) are responsible for positron trapping in the as-irradiated state. These are annealed out below 200°C . The further annealing at 400°C results in the formation of secondary defects attributed to the complexes composed of zinc vacancies and zinc antisites (VZn-ZnO) .

  12. Positron lifetime calculation for defects and defect clusters in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onitsuka, T.; Ohkubo, H.; Takenaka, M.; Tsukuda, N.; Kuramoto, E.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations of positron lifetime have been made for vacancy type defects in graphite and compared with experimental results. Defect structures were obtained in a model graphite lattice after including relaxation of whole lattice as determined by the molecular dynamics method, where the interatomic potential given by Pablo Andribet, Dominguez-Vazguez, Mari Carmen Perez-Martin, Alonso, Jimenez-Rodriguez [Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. 115 (1996) 501] was used. For the defect structures obtained via lattice relaxation positron lifetime was calculated under the so-called atomic superposition method. Positron lifetimes 204 and 222 ps were obtained for the graphite matrix and a single vacancy, respectively, which can be compared with the experimental results 208 and 233 ps. For planar vacancy clusters, e.g., vacancy loops, lifetime calculation was also made and indicated that lifetime increases with the number of vacancies in a cluster. This is consistent with the experimental result in the region of higher annealing temperature (above 1200 deg. C), where the increase of positron lifetime is seen, probably corresponding to the clustering of mobile vacancies

  13. FOREWORD: Special issue on density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kenichi

    2004-04-01

    silicon spheres. These technologies are currently being used not only for establishing a solid density standard, but also for determining the Avogadro constant by the x-ray crystal density method, where the density, molar mass and lattice constant of a silicon crystal are measured based on the definition of the SI units. Considering that much of the present research on the Avogadro constant has been undertaken to replace the present definition of the kilogram with a new definition based on a number of atoms, it is satisfying to note that the most accurate density standard may contribute to a new definition of the kilogram. Differential density measurements by hydrostatic weighing and by the pressure of flotation method developed for measuring the density differences between silicon crystals and solids are given in a review article and three original articles, where combined standard uncertainties of a few parts in 108 have been achieved in measuring relative density differences. These technologies are being used not only for the determination of the Avogadro constant, but also for evaluating defects in silicon crystals used in the semiconductor industry. Another important liquid used in the density standard is mercury because the pressured standard determined from mercury column barometers, the molar gas constant determined from an acoustic resonator, and the Josephson constant determined from a mercury voltmeter are all dependent on the density of mercury. A review article is therefore dedicated to an overview of the history, recommended value and recent progress in the measurement of the density of mercury. This special issue also features the technologies developed for measuring the thermodynamic properties of fluids. New instruments with a magnetic suspension balance have substantially improved the uncertainty in measuring the density of fluids at elevated pressures and temperatures. Two review articles and an original article are therefore dedicated to describing the

  14. Reduction of Defects in Germanium-Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Crystals grown without contact with a container have far superior quality to otherwise similar crystals grown in direct contact with a container. In addition to float-zone processing, detached- Bridgman growth is a promising tool to improve crystal quality, without the limitations of float zoning or the defects introduced by normal Bridgman growth. Goals of this project include the development of the detached Bridgman process to be reproducible and well understood and to quantitatively compare the defect and impurity levels in crystals grown by these three methods. Germanium (Ge) and germanium-silicon (Ge-Si) alloys are being used. At MSFC, we are responsible for the detached Bridgman experiments intended to differentiate among proposed mechanisms of detachment, and to confirm or refine our understanding of detachment. Because the contact angle is critical to determining the conditions for detachment, the sessile drop method was used to measure the contact angles as a function of temperature and composition for a large number of substrates made of potential ampoule materials. Growth experiments have used pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) and fused silica ampoules with the majority of the detached results occurring predictably in the pBN. Etch pit density (EPD) measurements of normal and detached Bridgman-grown Ge samples show a two order of magnitude improvement in the detached-grown samples. The nature and extent of detachment is determined by using profilometry in conjunction with optical and electron microscopy. The stability of detachment has been analyzed, and an empirical model for the conditions necessary to achieve sufficient stability to maintain detached growth for extended periods has been developed. We have investigated the effects on detachment of ampoule material, pressure difference above and below the melt, and Si concentration; samples that are nearly completely detached can be grown repeatedly in pBN. Current work is concentrated on developing a

  15. Determining the internal quantum efficiency of shallow-implanted nitrogen-vacancy defects in bulk diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Boll, Mads; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2016-01-01

    -implanted NV defects in a single-crystal bulk diamond. Using a spherical metallic mirror with a large radius of curvature compared to the optical spot size, we perform calibrated modifications of the local density of states around NV defects and observe the change of their total decay rate, which is further...... used for IQE quantification. We also show that at the excitation wavelength of 532 nm, photo-induced relaxation cannot be neglected even at moderate excitation powers well below the saturation level. For NV defects shallow implanted 4.5 ± 1 and 8 ± 2 nm below the diamond surface, we determine...

  16. Defect pair formation in fluorine and nitrogen codoped TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordatos, A.; Kelaidis, N.; Chroneos, A.

    2018-04-01

    Titanium oxide is extensively investigated because of its high chemical stability and its photocatalytic properties; nevertheless, the large band gap limits its activity to a small portion of the solar spectrum. Nitrogen and fluorine codoping is an efficient defect engineering strategy to increase the photocatalytic activity of titanium oxide. In the present study, we apply density functional theory to investigate the interaction of nitrogen with fluorine and the formation of defect pairs. We show that in fluorine and nitrogen codoped titanium oxide, the FiNi, FONi, and FiNTi defects can form. Their impact on the electronic structure of titanium oxide is discussed.

  17. Chemical stability and defect formation in CaHfO3

    KAUST Repository

    Alay-E-Abbas, Syed Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    Defects in CaHfO3 are investigated by ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. Pristine and anion-deficient CaHfO 3 are found to be insulating, whereas cation-deficient CaHfO 3 is hole-doped. The formation energies of neutral and charged cation and anion vacancies are evaluated to determine the stability in different chemical environments. Moreover, the energies of the partial and full Schottky defect reactions are computed. We show that clustering of anion vacancies in the HfO layers is energetically favorable for sufficiently high defect concentrations and results in metallicity. © 2014 EPLA.

  18. Chemical stability and defect formation in CaHfO3

    KAUST Repository

    Alay-E-Abbas, Syed Muhammad; Nazir, Safdar; Mun Wong, Kin; Shaukat, Ali; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Defects in CaHfO3 are investigated by ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. Pristine and anion-deficient CaHfO 3 are found to be insulating, whereas cation-deficient CaHfO 3 is hole-doped. The formation energies of neutral and charged cation and anion vacancies are evaluated to determine the stability in different chemical environments. Moreover, the energies of the partial and full Schottky defect reactions are computed. We show that clustering of anion vacancies in the HfO layers is energetically favorable for sufficiently high defect concentrations and results in metallicity. © 2014 EPLA.

  19. Charged Semiconductor Defects Structure, Thermodynamics and Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Seebauer, Edmund G

    2009-01-01

    The technologically useful properties of a solid often depend upon the types and concentrations of the defects it contains. Not surprisingly, defects in semiconductors have been studied for many years, in many cases with a view towards controlling their behavior through various forms of "defect engineering." For example, in the bulk, charging significantly affects the total concentration of defects that are available to mediate phenomena such as solid-state diffusion. Surface defects play an important role in mediating surface mass transport during high temperature processing steps such as epitaxial film deposition, diffusional smoothing in reflow, and nanostructure formation in memory device fabrication. Charged Semiconductor Defects details the current state of knowledge regarding the properties of the ionized defects that can affect the behavior of advanced transistors, photo-active devices, catalysts, and sensors. Features: Group IV, III-V, and oxide semiconductors; Intrinsic and extrinsic defects; and, P...

  20. Influence of surface defects on the tensile strength of carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautard, F.; Dentzer, J.; Nardin, M.; Schultz, J.; Defoort, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon fibers, especially their tensile properties, are affected by internal and surface defects. In order to asses in what extent the generation of surface defects can result in a loss of the mechanical properties, non-surface treated carbon fibers were oxidized with three different surface treatment processes: electro-chemical oxidation, oxidation in nitric acid, and oxidation in oxygen plasma. Different surface topographies and surface chemistries were obtained, as well as different types and densities of surface defects. The density of surface defects was measured with both a physical approach (Raman spectroscopy) and a chemical approach (Active Surface Area). The tensile properties were evaluated by determining the Weibull modulus and the scale parameter of each reference, after measuring the tensile strength for four different gauge lengths. A relationship between the tensile properties and the nature and density of surface defects was noticed, as large defects largely control the value of the tensile strength. When optimized, some oxidation surface treatment processes can generate surface functional groups as well as an increase of the mechanical properties of the fibers, because of the removal of the contamination layer of pyrolytic carbon generated during the carbonization of the polyacrylonitrile precursor. Oxidation in oxygen plasma revealed to be a promising technology for alternative surface treatment processes, as high levels of functionalization were achieved and a slight improvement of the mechanical properties was obtained too.

  1. Revealing origin of quasi-one dimensional current transport in defect rich two dimensional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, Mikkel R.; Boll, Mads; Bøggild, Peter; Petersen, Dirch H.; Hansen, Ole; Kjær, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The presence of defects in graphene have for a long time been recognized as a bottleneck for its utilization in electronic and mechanical devices. We recently showed that micro four-point probes may be used to evaluate if a graphene film is truly 2D or if defects in proximity of the probe will lead to a non-uniform current flow characteristic of lower dimensionality. In this work, simulations based on a finite element method together with a Monte Carlo approach are used to establish the transition from 2D to quasi-1D current transport, when applying a micro four-point probe to measure on 2D conductors with an increasing amount of line-shaped defects. Clear 2D and 1D signatures are observed at low and high defect densities, respectively, and current density plots reveal the presence of current channels or branches in defect configurations yielding 1D current transport. A strong correlation is found between the density filling factor and the simulation yield, the fraction of cases with 1D transport and the mean sheet conductance. The upper transition limit is shown to agree with the percolation threshold for sticks. Finally, the conductance of a square sample evaluated with macroscopic edge contacts is compared to the micro four-point probe conductance measurements and we find that the micro four-point probe tends to measure a slightly higher conductance in samples containing defects

  2. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  3. Cooperation and Defection in Ghetto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    We consider ghetto as a community of people ruled against their will by an external power. Members of the community feel that their laws are broken. However, attempts to leave ghetto makes their situation worse. We discuss the relation of the ghetto inhabitants to the ruling power in context of their needs, organized according to the Maslow hierarchy. Decisions how to satisfy successive needs are undertaken in cooperation with or defection the ruling power. This issue allows to construct the tree of decisions and to adopt the pruning technique from the game theory. Dynamics of decisions can be described within the formalism of fundamental equations. The result is that the strategy of defection is stabilized by the estimated payoff.

  4. Topological defects in open string field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojita, Toshiko; Maccaferri, Carlo; Masuda, Toru; Schnabl, Martin

    2018-04-01

    We show how conformal field theory topological defects can relate solutions of open string field theory for different boundary conditions. To this end we generalize the results of Graham and Watts to include the action of defects on boundary condition changing fields. Special care is devoted to the general case when nontrivial multiplicities arise upon defect action. Surprisingly the fusion algebra of defects is realized on open string fields only up to a (star algebra) isomorphism.

  5. Various Stone-Wales defects in phagraphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openov, L. A.; Podlivaev, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    Various Stone-Wales defects in phagraphene, which is a graphene allotrope, predicted recently are studied in terms of the nonorthogonal tight-binding model. The energies of the defect formation and the heights of energy barriers preventing the formation and annealing of the defects are found. Corresponding frequency factors in the Arrhenius formula are calculated. The evolution of the defect structure is studied in the real-time mode using the molecular dynamics method.

  6. Iatrogenic Urethral Defect Repairment: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulas Fidan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Iatrogenic urethral defect is a complication that occurs after vaginal surgical procedures. Many surgical methods according to place of defect are described in case of injury of urethra. In this article, we reported the repairment of distal urethral defect with the help of greft taken from labia minor. This defect is made by the excision of the granulation tissue that occurred after chronic paraurethral  gland infection.

  7. Defect relaxation in disordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandell, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Using an exponential distribution of activation barriers, annealing data for metastable effects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, are quantitatively explained. This includes the stretched exponential time dependence of annealing and a Meyer-Neldel rule for the annealing time constant. An exponential distribution of annealing energies arises because defects are frozen in during growth at high temperature. Mechanisms that lead to an exponential distribution of annealing energies are weak bond-breaking and charge trapping

  8. Optimal lot sizing in screening processes with returnable defective items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishkaei, Behzad Maleki; Niaki, S. T. A.; Farhangi, Milad; Rashti, Mehdi Ebrahimnezhad Moghadam

    2014-07-01

    This paper is an extension of Hsu and Hsu (Int J Ind Eng Comput 3(5):939-948, 2012) aiming to determine the optimal order quantity of product batches that contain defective items with percentage nonconforming following a known probability density function. The orders are subject to 100 % screening process at a rate higher than the demand rate. Shortage is backordered, and defective items in each ordering cycle are stored in a warehouse to be returned to the supplier when a new order is received. Although the retailer does not sell defective items at a lower price and only trades perfect items (to avoid loss), a higher holding cost incurs to store defective items. Using the renewal-reward theorem, the optimal order and shortage quantities are determined. Some numerical examples are solved at the end to clarify the applicability of the proposed model and to compare the new policy to an existing one. The results show that the new policy provides better expected profit per time.

  9. Simulations of defect spin qubits in piezoelectric semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hosung

    In recent years, remarkable advances have been reported in the development of defect spin qubits in semiconductors for solid-state quantum information science and quantum metrology. Promising spin qubits include the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, dopants in silicon, and the silicon vacancy and divacancy spins in silicon carbide. In this talk, I will highlight some of our recent efforts devoted to defect spin qubits in piezoelectric wide-gap semiconductors for potential applications in mechanical hybrid quantum systems. In particular, I will describe our recent combined theoretical and experimental study on remarkably robust quantum coherence found in the divancancy qubits in silicon carbide. We used a quantum bath model combined with a cluster expansion method to identify the microscopic mechanisms behind the unusually long coherence times of the divacancy spins in SiC. Our study indicates that developing spin qubits in complex crystals with multiple types of atom is a promising route to realize strongly coherent hybrid quantum systems. I will also discuss progress and challenges in computational design of new spin defects for use as qubits in piezoelectric crystals such as AlN and SiC, including a new defect design concept using large metal ion - vacancy complexes. Our first principles calculations include DFT computations using recently developed self-consistent hybrid density functional theory and large-scale many-body GW theory. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through the University of Chicago MRSEC under Award Number DMR-1420709.

  10. Curvature-Controlled Topological Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Mesarec

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effectively, two-dimensional (2D closed films exhibiting in-plane orientational ordering (ordered shells might be instrumental for the realization of scaled crystals. In them, ordered shells are expected to play the role of atoms. Furthermore, topological defects (TDs within them would determine their valence. Namely, bonding among shells within an isotropic liquid matrix could be established via appropriate nano-binders (i.e., linkers which tend to be attached to the cores of TDs exploiting the defect core replacement mechanism. Consequently, by varying configurations of TDs one could nucleate growth of scaled crystals displaying different symmetries. For this purpose, it is of interest to develop a simple and robust mechanism via which one could control the position and number of TDs in such atoms. In this paper, we use a minimal mesoscopic model, where variational parameters are the 2D curvature tensor and the 2D orientational tensor order parameter. We demonstrate numerically the efficiency of the effective topological defect cancellation mechanism to predict positional assembling of TDs in ordered films characterized by spatially nonhomogeneous Gaussian curvature. Furthermore, we show how one could efficiently switch among qualitatively different structures by using a relative volume v of ordered shells, which represents a relatively simple naturally accessible control parameter.

  11. The relationship between collisional phase defect distribution and cascade collapse efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, K.; Heinisch, H.L.; Ishino, S.; Sekimura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Defect distributions after the collisional phase of cascade damage processes were calculated using the computer simulation code MARLOWE, which is based on the binary collision approximation. The densities of vacant sites were evaluated in defect-dense regions at the end of the collisional phase in simulated ion irradiations of several pure metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Ni, Fe, Mo and W). The vacancy density distributions were compared to the measured cascade collapse efficiencies obtained from low-dose ion irradiations of thin foils reported in the literature to identify the minimum or ''critical'' values of the vacancy densities during the collisional phase corresponding to cascade collapse. The critical densities are generally independent of the cascade energy in the same metal. The relationships between physical properties of the target elements and the critical densities are discussed within the framework of the cascade thermal spike model. ((orig.))

  12. Defects spectroscopy by means of the simple trapping model of the Fe78Si9B13 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, A.; Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, S.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is analyzed quantitatively the results of the positron annihilation in the Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 alloy by means of the simple trapping model. From this analysis its are derived: a reason of positron trapping in the defects (K), the defects concentration (C d ) and the electronic density associated to the defect (n d ); both first parameters, (K, C d ) its increase and n d diminishes when increasing the alloy temperature. From this analysis it is also inferred that the defect consists of a multi vacancy of between 15 and 20 mono vacancies. (Author)

  13. Defect grating modes as superimposed grating states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Sopaheluwakan, A.; Andonowati, A.; de Ridder, R.M; de Ridder, R.M.; Altena, G; Altena, G.; Geuzebroek, D.H.; Geuzenboek, D.; Dekker, R.; Dekker, R

    2003-01-01

    For a symmetric grating structure with a defect, we show that a fully transmitted defect mode in the band gap can be obtained as a superposition of two steady states: an amplified and an attenuated defect state. Without scanning the whole band gap by transmission calculations, this simplifies the

  14. Disc defect classification for optical disc drives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoirt, van J.; Leenknegt, G.A.L.; Steinbuch, M.; Goossens, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical disc drives are subject to various disturbances and faults. A special type of fault is the so-called disc defect. In this paper we present an approach for disc defect classification. It is based on hierarchical clustering of measured signals that are affected by disc defects. The

  15. Metastable and bistable defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukashev, Bulat N; Abdullin, Kh A; Gorelkinskii, Yurii V

    2000-01-01

    Existing data on the properties and structure of metastable and bistable defects in silicon are analyzed. Primary radiation-induced defects (vacancies, self-interstitial atoms, and Frenkel pairs), complexes of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and other impurity atoms and defects with negative correlation energy are considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  16. Defect production due to quenching through a multicritical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakaran, Uma; Mukherjee, Victor; Dutta, Amit; Sen, Diptiman

    2009-01-01

    We study the generation of defects when a quantum spin system is quenched through a multicritical point by changing a parameter of the Hamiltonian as t/τ, where τ is the characteristic timescale of quenching. We argue that when a quantum system is quenched across a multicritical point, the density of defects (n) in the final state is not necessarily given by the Kibble–Zurek scaling form n∼1/τ dν/(zν+1) , where d is the spatial dimension, and ν and z are respectively the correlation length and dynamical exponent associated with the quantum critical point. We propose a generalized scaling form of the defect density given by n∼1/τ d/(2z 2 ) , where the exponent z 2 determines the behavior of the off-diagonal term of the 2 × 2 Landau–Zener matrix at the multicritical point. This scaling is valid not only at a multicritical point but also at an ordinary critical point

  17. Flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budhani, R.C.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report some transport measurements carried out to study flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 films. Our results show that in these in situ deposited films containing a large concentration of defects frozen-in at the time of film growth, a marginal enhancement in critical current density occurs when the density of linear defects 10 /cm 2 , and their diameter of the order of coherence length. This criterion is satisfied by Ag +21 ions. The damage due to Au +24 ions is much too severe to improve the J c

  18. Electron scattering in graphene by defects in underlying h-BN layer: First-principles transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Ohno, Takahisa

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and the transport properties of graphene adsorbed onto h-BN with carbon impurities or atomic vacancies using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that the transport properties are degraded due to carrier doping and scattering off of localized defect states in h-BN. When graphene is doped by introducing defects in h-BN, the transmission spectra become asymmetric owing to the reduction of the electronic density of states, which contributes significantly to the degradation of graphene transport properties as compared with the effect of defect levels.

  19. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in sugar maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman

    1991-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for sugar maple. Eleven types of external...

  20. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in yellow-poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman

    1991-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for yellow-poplar. Twelve types of external...

  1. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in yellow birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman

    1991-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for yellow birch. Eleven types of external...

  2. Investigation of Near-Surface Defects Induced by Spike Rapid Thermal Annealing in c-SILICON Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guodong; Ren, Pan; Zhang, Dayong; Wang, Weiping; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The defects induced by a spike rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells were investigated by the photoluminescence (PL) technique and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Dislocation defects were found to form in the near-surface junction region of the monocrystalline Si solar cell after a spike RTA process was performed at 1100∘C. Photo J-V characteristics were measured on the Si solar cell before and after the spike RTA treatments to reveal the effects of defects on the Si cell performances. In addition, the Silvaco device simulation program was used to study the effects of defects density on the cell performances by fitting the experimental data of RTA-treated cells. The results demonstrate that there was an obvious degradation in the Si solar cell performances when the defect density after the spike RTA treatment was above 1×1013cm-3.

  3. Model for transport and reaction of defects and carriers within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at evolving displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with the details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers, and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster of defects. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were determined through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to displacement damage from energetic particle irradiation

  4. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH FIVE- AND SEVEN-MEMBERED FUSED RING DEFECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth and destruction are thought to proceed via the occasional incorporation of five- and seven-membered fused ring defects in the hexagonal carbon skeleton. Using density functional theory, this paper investigates the effect such five- and seven-membered fused ring defects have on the infrared spectra of ovalene, circumovalene, and circumcircumovalene. The defects make only small changes to the overall infrared (IR) spectra, both in the mid-IR and in the far-IR, of these species. In addition to small shifts in the positions of the bands between the PAHs with and without defects, the most common effect of the defects is to increase the number of bands. Except for an anion with the Stone-Wales defect, all of the species studied have the C-C stretching band at 6.3 μm or at longer wavelengths, the position in Classes B and C astronomical PAH spectra. In the case of the Stone-Wales anion, the band falls at 6.20 μm, suggesting that further study of defects is probably worthwhile, as some PAHs with defects might be important in those sources (Class A) that show a C-C stretching band that falls near 6.2 μm.

  5. Electronic and magnetic properties of MoS2 nanoribbons with sulfur line vacancy defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yang; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We performed DFT calculations on Sulfur line defects embedded MoS 2 . • The defects induced bond strains are larger in the zigzag (ZZ) edge ones. • The ZZ ones are metals, having two degenerate ground states FM and AFM. • The armchair ones are nonmagnetic semiconductors. • The defects can induce some defect states in the electronic structures. - Abstract: Motivated by the recent experimental result that single sulfur vacancies in monolayer MoS 2 are mobile under the electron beam and easily agglomerate into the sulfur line vacancy defects [Physical Review B 88, 035301(2013)] , the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of one dimensional zigzag (ZZ) and armchair (AC) edge MoS 2 nanoribbons with single or double staggered sulfur line vacancy defects (hereafter, abbreviated as SV or DV, respectively), parallel to their edges, have been investigated systematically by density functional theory calculations. It is very interesting to find that the bond strains induced by the sulfur line vacancy defect can cause a much larger out-of plane distortions in the ZZ edge MoS 2 nanoribbon than in the AC edge counterpart. Besides, the defective ZZ edge MoS 2 nanoribbons with SV or DV are both metals, having their two respective degenerate ground states with the same energy, among which one is ferromagnetic (FM “ + +”) and the other is antiferromagnetic (AFM “ + −”). But the AC edge MoS 2 nanoribbons with SV or DV are both nonmagnetic semiconductors, having very different gap values. Finally, the sulfur line vacancy defects would induce some defect states in the electronic structures of the defective MoS 2 nanoribbons. All these important results could provide a new route of tuning the electronic properties of MoS 2 nanoribbons and its derivatives for their promising applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics

  6. Electronic and magnetic properties of MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons with sulfur line vacancy defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yang [Group of Computational Condensed Matter Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhou, Jian [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Dong, Jinming, E-mail: jdong@nju.edu.cn [Group of Computational Condensed Matter Physics, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We performed DFT calculations on Sulfur line defects embedded MoS{sub 2}. • The defects induced bond strains are larger in the zigzag (ZZ) edge ones. • The ZZ ones are metals, having two degenerate ground states FM and AFM. • The armchair ones are nonmagnetic semiconductors. • The defects can induce some defect states in the electronic structures. - Abstract: Motivated by the recent experimental result that single sulfur vacancies in monolayer MoS{sub 2} are mobile under the electron beam and easily agglomerate into the sulfur line vacancy defects [Physical Review B 88, 035301(2013)] , the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of one dimensional zigzag (ZZ) and armchair (AC) edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons with single or double staggered sulfur line vacancy defects (hereafter, abbreviated as SV or DV, respectively), parallel to their edges, have been investigated systematically by density functional theory calculations. It is very interesting to find that the bond strains induced by the sulfur line vacancy defect can cause a much larger out-of plane distortions in the ZZ edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbon than in the AC edge counterpart. Besides, the defective ZZ edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons with SV or DV are both metals, having their two respective degenerate ground states with the same energy, among which one is ferromagnetic (FM “ + +”) and the other is antiferromagnetic (AFM “ + −”). But the AC edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons with SV or DV are both nonmagnetic semiconductors, having very different gap values. Finally, the sulfur line vacancy defects would induce some defect states in the electronic structures of the defective MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons. All these important results could provide a new route of tuning the electronic properties of MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons and its derivatives for their promising applications in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics.

  7. Quantifying defects in N-layer graphene via a phenomenological model of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Archanjo, Braulio S.; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a model to obtain the density of point defects in N-layer graphene by combining Raman spectroscopy and the TRIM (Transport Range of Ions in Matter) simulation package. The model relates the intensity (or area) ratio of graphene’s D and G bands to the defect density on each layer due to Ar + bombardment. Our method is effective for ion fluences ranging from 10 11 to ∼10 14 Ar + /cm −2 and it should be in principle extendable to any kind of ion and energy

  8. Quantifying defects in N-layer graphene via a phenomenological model of Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giro, Ronaldo, E-mail: rgiro@br.ibm.com [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Archanjo, Braulio S.; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Capaz, Rodrigo B. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Jorio, Ado [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Achete, Carlos A. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    We construct a model to obtain the density of point defects in N-layer graphene by combining Raman spectroscopy and the TRIM (Transport Range of Ions in Matter) simulation package. The model relates the intensity (or area) ratio of graphene’s D and G bands to the defect density on each layer due to Ar{sup +} bombardment. Our method is effective for ion fluences ranging from 10{sup 11} to ∼10{sup 14} Ar{sup +}/cm{sup −2} and it should be in principle extendable to any kind of ion and energy.

  9. Sensitive technique for detecting outer defect on tube with remote field eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Noriyasu; Nagai, Satoshi; Ochiai, Makoto; Jimbo, Noboru; Komai, Masafumi

    2008-01-01

    In the remote field eddy current testing, we proposed the method of enhancing the magnetic flux density in the vicinity of an exciter coil by controlling the magnetic flux direction for increasing the sensitivity of detecting outer defects on a tube and used the flux guide made of a magnetic material for the method. The optimum structural shape of the flux guide was designed by the magnetic field analysis. On the experiment with the application of the flux guide, the magnetic flux density increased by 59% and the artificial defect detection signal became clear. We confirmed the proposed method was effective in a high sensitivity. (author)

  10. Defect structures in MgB2 wires introduced by hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, X Z; Serquis, A; Zhu, Y T; Civale, L; Hammon, D L; Peterson, D E; Mueller, F M; Nesterenko, V F; Gu, Y

    2003-01-01

    The microstructures of MgB 2 wires prepared by the powder-in-tube technique and subsequent hot isostatic pressing were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. A large amount of crystalline defects including small-angle twisting, tilting and bending boundaries, in which high densities of dislocations reside, was found forming sub-grains within MgB 2 grains. It is believed that these defects resulted from particle deformation during the hot isostatic pressing process and are effective flux pinning centres that contribute to the high critical current densities of the wires at high temperatures and at high fields

  11. Concurrence of metaphyseal fibrous defect and osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakos, M.; Murphy, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The case of a 15-year-old girl with juxtaposition of a femoral metaphyseal fibrous defect (fibrous cortical defect) and an osteosarcoma is reported. Despite the relatively common occurrence of metaphyseal fibrous defects, their reported association with other bone tumors is exceedingly rare. Only two previous acceptable examples of this association were found. Reports of malignant transformation of metaphyseal fibrous defect were reviewed and rejected because they lacked convincing radiologic or histopathologic evidence of a pre-existent benign fibrous lesion. The finding of a malignant bone tumor in association with a metaphyseal fibrous defect appears to be a chance occurrence. (orig.)

  12. Software Defects, Scientific Computation and the Scientific Method

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Computation has rapidly grown in the last 50 years so that in many scientific areas it is the dominant partner in the practice of science. Unfortunately, unlike the experimental sciences, it does not adhere well to the principles of the scientific method as espoused by, for example, the philosopher Karl Popper. Such principles are built around the notions of deniability and reproducibility. Although much research effort has been spent on measuring the density of software defects, much less has been spent on the more difficult problem of measuring their effect on the output of a program. This talk explores these issues with numerous examples suggesting how this situation might be improved to match the demands of modern science. Finally it develops a theoretical model based on an amalgam of statistical mechanics and Hartley/Shannon information theory which suggests that software systems have strong implementation independent behaviour and supports the widely observed phenomenon that defects clust...

  13. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A.M.; Mosca, H.O.

    2014-01-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure

  14. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  15. Defect production in nonlinear quench across a quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Diptiman; Sengupta, K; Mondal, Shreyoshi

    2008-07-04

    We show that the defect density n, for a slow nonlinear power-law quench with a rate tau(-1) and an exponent alpha>0, which takes the system through a critical point characterized by correlation length and dynamical critical exponents nu and z, scales as n approximately tau(-alphanud/(alphaznu+1)) [n approximately (alphag((alpha-1)/alpha)/tau)(nud/(znu+1))] if the quench takes the system across the critical point at time t=0 [t=t(0) not = 0], where g is a nonuniversal constant and d is the system dimension. These scaling laws constitute the first theoretical results for defect production in nonlinear quenches across quantum critical points and reproduce their well-known counterpart for a linear quench (alpha=1) as a special case. We supplement our results with numerical studies of well-known models and suggest experiments to test our theory.

  16. Point defect stability in a semicoherent metallic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C.; Iglesias, R.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    We present a comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) -based study of different aspects of one vacancy and He impurity atom behavior at semicoherent interfaces between the low-solubility transition metals Cu and Nb. Such interfaces have not been previously modeled using DFT. A thorough analysis of the stability and mobility of the two types of defects at the interfaces and neighboring internal layers has been performed and the results have been compared to the equivalent cases in the pure metallic matrices. The different behavior of fcc and bcc metals on both sides of the interface has been specifically assessed. The modeling effort undertaken is the first attempt to study the stability and defect energetics of noncoherent Cu/Nb interfaces from first principles, in order to assess their potential use in radiation-resistant materials.

  17. Defect kinetics and resistance to amorphization in zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the radiation response of zirconium carbide (ZrC), and in particular its excellent resistance to amorphization, we have used density functional theory methods to study the kinetics of point defects in ZrC. The migration barriers and recombination barriers of the simple point defects are calculated using the ab initio molecular dynamics simulation and the nudged elastic band method. These barriers are used to estimate C and Zr interstitial and vacancy diffusion and Frenkel pair recombination rates. A significant barrier for C Frenkel pair recombination is found but it is shown that a large concentration of C vacancies reduces this barrier dramatically, allowing facile healing of radiation damage. The mechanisms underlying high resistance to amorphization of ZrC were analyzed from the perspectives of structural, thermodynamic, chemical and kinetic properties. This study provides insights into the amorphization resistance of ZrC as well as a foundation for understanding general radiation damage in this material

  18. Areva solutions for management of defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlaes, I.; Vo Van, V.

    2014-01-01

    Defective fuel management is a major challenge for nuclear operators when all fuel must be long-term managed. This paper describes AREVA solutions for managing defective fuel. Transport AREVA performs shipments of defective fuel in Europe and proposes casks that are licensed for that purpose in Europe and in the USA. The paper presents the transport experience and the new European licensing approach of defective fuel transport. Dry Interim Storage AREVA is implementing the defective fuel storage in the USA, compliant with the Safety Authority's requirements. In Europe, AREVA is developing a new, more long-term oriented storage solution for defective fuel, the best available technology regarding safety requirements. The paper describes these storage solutions. Treatment Various types of defective fuel coming from around the world have been treated in the AREVA La Hague plant. Specific treatment procedures were developed when needed. The paper presents operational elements related to this experience. (authors)

  19. Point defects and atomic transport in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidiard, A.B.

    1981-02-01

    There are two principle aspects to the theory of atomic transport in crystals as caused by the action of point defects, namely (1) the calculation of relevant properties of the point defects (energies and other thermodynamic characteristics of the different possible defects, activation energies and other mobility parameters) and (2) the statistical mechanics of assemblies of defects, both equilibrium and non-equilibrium assemblies. In the five lectures given here both these aspects are touched on. The first two lectures are concerned with the calculation of relevant point defect properties, particularly in ionic crystals. The first lecture is more general, the second is concerned particularly with some recent calculations of the free volumes of formation of defects in various ionic solids; these solve a rather long-standing problem in this area. The remaining three lectures are concerned with the kinetic theory of defects mainly in relaxation, drift and diffusion situations

  20. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  1. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  2. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  3. Magnetic field vector and electron density diagnostics from linear polarization measurements in 14 solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommier, V.

    1986-01-01

    The Hanle effect is the modification of the linear polarization parameters of a spectral line due to the effect of the magnetic field. It has been successfully applied to the magnetic field vector diagnostic in solar prominences. The magnetic field vector is determined by comparing the measured polarization to the polarization computed, taking into account all the polarizing and depolarizing processes in line formation and the depolarizing effect of the magnetic field. The method was applied to simultaneous polarization measurements in the Helium D3 line and in the hydrogen beta line in 14 prominences. Four polarization parameters are measured, which lead to the determination of the three coordinates of the magnetic field vector and the electron density, owing to the sensitivity of the hydrogen beta line to the non-negligible effect of depolarizing collisions with electrons and protons of the medium. A mean value of 1.3 x 10 to the 10th power cu. cm. is derived in 14 prominences.

  4. G-centers in irradiated silicon revisited: A screened hybrid density functional theory approach

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.; Chroneos, A.; Londos, C. A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations employing screened hybrid density functional theory are used to gain fundamental insight into the interaction of carbon interstitial (Ci) and substitutional (Cs) atoms forming the CiCs defect known as G

  5. Direct Observation of Radiation Defects: Experiment and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Electron microscopy is arguably the only available experimental method suitable for the direct visualization of nano-scale defect structures formed under irradiation. Images of dislocation loops and point-defect clusters in crystals are usually produced using diffraction contrast methods. For relatively large defects, a combination of dynamical imaging and image contrast simulations is required for determining the nature of visible radiation defects. At the same time, density functional theory (DFT) models developed over the last decade have provided unique information about the structure of nano-scale defects produced by irradiation, including the defects that are so small that they cannot be observed in an electron microscope, and about the pathways of migration and interaction between radiation defects. DFT models, involving no experimental input parameters and being as quantitatively accurate and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques for the direct observation of defects, have created a new paradigm for the scientific investigation of radiation damage phenomena. In particular, DFT models offer new insight into the origin of temperature-dependent response of materials to irradiation, a problem of pivotal significance for applications. By combining information derived from the first-principles models for radiation defects with information derived from small-scale experimental observations it may be possible to acquire quantitative knowledge about how materials respond to irradiation and, using this knowledge, develop materials suitable for advanced applications in fission and fusion. It now appears possible to pose the question about the development of integrated fusion power plant models, combining neutron transport calculations and microscopic models for microstructural evolution of materials, for example models for ab initio prediction of helium embrittlement. Such models, based on scientific principles and quantitative data, and developed

  6. Correlation between impurities, defects and cell performance in semicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, W.A.; Rohatgi, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that an in-depth analysis of Solarex CDS semicrystalline silicon has been performed and correlations between the efficiency and impurities, and defects present in the material have been made. Comparisons were made between cell performance and variations in interstitial oxygen, substitutional carbon, grain size, etch pit density, and trap location as a function of position in the ingot. The oxygen concentration was found to decrease with increasing distance from the bottom of the ingot while the carbon concentration as well as average grain size was found to increase. The best cell performance was obtained on wafers with minimum oxygen and maximum carbon (top). No correlation was found between etch pit density and cell performance. DLTS and JVT measurements revealed that samples with higher oxygen content (bottom) gave lower cell performance due to a large number of distributed states, possibly due to extended defects like oxygen precipitates. Low oxygen samples (top) showed predominately discrete states, improved cell performance and a doping dependent average trap density

  7. Microstructural factors influencing critical-current densities of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural defects are the primary determining factors for the values of critical current densities in superconductors. A review is made to assess, (1) what would be the maximum achievable critical-current density in the oxide superconductors if nearly ideal pinning sites were introduced? and (2) what types of pinning defects are currently introduced in these superconductors and how effective are these in pinning the vortices? Only the case where the applied field is parallel to the c-axis is considered here

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1984 on Sunshine Program-entrusted research and development. Research and development of photovoltaic power system (Research and development of amorphous solar cells - Research on defect density in amorphous silicon); 1984 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Amorphous taiyo denchi no kenkyu kaihatsu (amorphous silicon no kekkan mitsudo no kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-03-01

    For the development of high-efficiency, large-area, long-life, and low-cost solar cells, research is conducted on new methods of film formation and defect evaluation. Concerning the kinetics of Si thin film, a radical beam deposition method is proposed as a new low-temperature thin film growth method. Using the new method, a {mu}c-Si film is manufactured, through only a purely radical substrate surface reaction of chemically active, electrically neutral excited species. In research on the amorphous semiconductor superlattice, a new study is conducted on a multilayer, cyclic-structure superlattice consisting of thin films of a-Si:H and a-Si{sub 1-x}N{sub x}:H. In the research on an a-Si:H film formed by the direct photo-CVD (chemical vapor deposition) of disilane, the unit is improved and B and P are successfully doped by means of decompressed photo-CVD. In the evaluation of new materials for solar cells, research is conducted on the after-annealing characteristics of a-Si:H grown at a high speed, electrical characteristics of post-hydrogenated low boron-doped CVD a-Si, and microcrystalline SiGe alloys made by the spattering plasma CVD method. (NEDO)

  9. Magnetoencephalography signals are influenced by skull defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S; Flemming, L; Haueisen, J

    2014-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals had previously been hypothesized to have negligible sensitivity to skull defects. The objective is to experimentally investigate the influence of conducting skull defects on MEG and EEG signals. A miniaturized electric dipole was implanted in vivo into rabbit brains. Simultaneous recording using 64-channel EEG and 16-channel MEG was conducted, first above the intact skull and then above a skull defect. Skull defects were filled with agar gels, which had been formulated to have tissue-like homogeneous conductivities. The dipole was moved beneath the skull defects, and measurements were taken at regularly spaced points. The EEG signal amplitude increased 2-10 times, whereas the MEG signal amplitude reduced by as much as 20%. The EEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was under the edge of the defect, whereas the MEG signal amplitude deviated more when the source was central under the defect. The change in MEG field-map topography (relative difference measure, RDM(∗)=0.15) was geometrically related to the skull defect edge. MEG and EEG signals can be substantially affected by skull defects. MEG source modeling requires realistic volume conductor head models that incorporate skull defects. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dopants and defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    McCluskey, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    "The book goes beyond the usual textbook in that it provides more specific examples of real-world defect physics … The book will be most useful for beginning graduate students in materials science. … an easy reading, broad introductory overview of the field …"-Materials Today, July-August 2012"… well written, with clear, lucid explanations …"-Chemistry World"The scientific development towards the method of controllable doping transformed the erratic and not reproducible family of semiconductor materials into the truly wonderful basis of modern microelectronics. This book tells the remarkable success story and I recommend it!"-Hans J. Queisser, Max-Planck-Institute, Stuttgart, Germany"McCluskey and Haller have written an outstanding modern guide to this field that will be useful to newcomers, and also to active researchers who want to broaden their horizons, as a means to learn the capabilities and limitations of the many techniques that are used in semiconductor-defect science."-Professor Michael J....

  11. Determination of the extinction factor in function of the density of dislocations; Determinacion del factor de extincion en funcion de la densidad de dislocaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R

    1991-12-15

    There are exist three basic types of crystalline lattice defects: point, line (or dislocations) and surface defects. Such defects may be incorporated intentionally to produce desired mechanical and physical properties. This report presents a FORTRAN language program to calculate the extinction factor in samples of polycrystalline copper as function of the dislocations density. (Author)

  12. Densities of carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, J.O. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The densities of arc-evaporated carbon target foils have been measured by several methods. The density depends upon the method used to measure it; for the same surface density, values obtained by different measurement techniques may differ by fifty percent or more. The most reliable density measurements are by flotation, yielding a density of 2.01±0.03 g cm -3 , and interferometric step height with the surface density known from auxiliary measurements, yielding a density of 2.61±0.4 g cm -3 . The difference between these density values mayy be due in part to the compressive stresses that carbon films have while still on their substrates, uncertainties in the optical calibration of surface densities of carbon foils, and systematic errors in step-height measurements. Mechanical thickness measurements by micrometer caliper are unreliable due to nonplanarity of these foils. (orig.)

  13. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of the kinetics of lamellar block copolymer defect annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew J.; Lawson, Richard A.; Nation, Benjamin D.; Ludovice, Peter J.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art block copolymer (BCP)-directed self-assembly (DSA) methods still yield defect densities orders of magnitude higher than is necessary in semiconductor fabrication despite free-energy calculations that suggest equilibrium defect densities are much lower than is necessary for economic fabrication. This disparity suggests that the main problem may lie in the kinetics of defect removal. This work uses a coarse-grained model to study the rates, pathways, and dependencies of healing a common defect to give insight into the fundamental processes that control defect healing and give guidance on optimal process conditions for BCP-DSA. It is found that bulk simulations yield an exponential drop in defect heal rate above χN˜30. Thin films show no change in rate associated with the energy barrier below χN˜50, significantly higher than the χN values found previously for self-consistent field theory studies that neglect fluctuations. Above χN˜50, the simulations show an increase in energy barrier scaling with 1/2 to 1/3 of the bulk systems. This is because thin films always begin healing at the free interface or the BCP-underlayer interface, where the increased A-B contact area associated with the transition state is minimized, while the infinitely thick films cannot begin healing at an interface.

  14. Optical transmission properties of an anisotropic defect cavity in one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchani, Noama; El Moussaouy, Abdelaziz; Aynaou, Hassan; El Hassouani, Youssef; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2018-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the possibility to control the optical transmission in the visible and infrared regions by a defective one dimensional photonic crystal formed by a combination of a finite isotropic superlattice and an anisotropic defect layer. The Green's function approach has been used to derive the reflection and the transmission coefficients, as well as the densities of states of the optical modes. We evaluate the delay times of the localized modes and we compare their behavior with the total densities of states. We show that the birefringence of an anisotropic defect layer has a significant impact on the behavior of the optical modes in the electromagnetic forbidden bands of the structure. The amplitudes of the defect modes in the transmission and the delay time spectrum, depend strongly on the position of the cavity layer within the photonic crystal. The anisotropic defect layer induces transmission zeros in one of the two components of the transmission as a consequence of a destructive interference of the two polarized waves within this layer, giving rise to negative delay times for some wavelengths in the visible and infrared light ranges. This property is a typical characteristic of the anisotropic photonic layer and is without analogue in their counterpart isotropic defect layers. This structure offers several possibilities for controlling the frequencies, transmitted intensities and the delay times of the optical modes in the visible and infrared regions. It can be a good candidate for realizing high-precision optical filters.

  15. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  16. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  17. Positron annihilation spectroscopy in defects of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, Masanori

    2002-01-01

    Interaction of positron and defects, application to research of defects of semiconductor and defects on the surface of semiconductor are explained. Cz (Czochralski)-Si single crystal with 10 18 cm -3 impurity oxygen was introduced defects by electron irradiation and the positron lifetime was measured at 90K after annealing. The defect size and recovery temperature were determined by the lifetime measurement. The distribution of defects in the depth direction is shown by S-E curve. The chemical state analysis is possible by CBS (Coincidence Doppler Broadening) spectra. The application to silicon-implanted (100 keV, 2x10 15 cm -2 ) silicon and oxygen-implanted (180 keV, 2x10 15 cm -2 ) silicon are stated. On the oxygen-implanted silicon, the main product was V2 after implantation, V 6 O 2 at 600degC and V 10 O 6 at 800degC. (S.Y.)

  18. Perception of risk from automobile safety defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovic, P; MacGregor, D; Kraus, N N

    1987-10-01

    Descriptions of safety engineering defects of the kind that compel automobile manufacturers to initiate a recall campaign were evaluated by individuals on a set of risk characteristic scales that included overall vehicle riskiness, manufacturer's ability to anticipate the defect, importance for vehicle operation, severity of consequences and likelihood of compliance with a recall notice. A factor analysis of the risk characteristics indicated that judgments could be summarized in terms of two composite scales, one representing the uncontrollability of the damage the safety defect might cause and the other representing the foreseeability of the defect by the manufacturer. Motor vehicle defects were found to be highly diverse in terms of the perceived qualities of their risks. Location of individual defects within the factor space was closely associated with perceived riskiness, perceived likelihood of purchasing another car from the same manufacturer, perceived likelihood of compliance with a recall notice, and actual compliance rates.

  19. Automatic classification of defects in weld pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar Mikdad Muad; Mohd Ashhar Hj Khalid; Abdul Aziz Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2000-01-01

    With the advancement of computer imaging technology, the image on hard radiographic film can be digitized and stored in a computer and the manual process of defect recognition and classification may be replace by the computer. In this paper a computerized method for automatic detection and classification of common defects in film radiography of weld pipe is described. The detection and classification processes consist of automatic selection of interest area on the image and then classify common defects using image processing and special algorithms. Analysis of the attributes of each defect such as area, size, shape and orientation are carried out by the feature analysis process. These attributes reveal the type of each defect. These methods of defect classification result in high success rate. Our experience showed that sharp film images produced better results

  20. Strained interface defects in silicon nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hiller, Daniel; Zacharias, Margit [IMTEK - Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg (Germany); Luo, Jun-Wei; Beard, Matthew C. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Semonin, Octavi E. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-07

    The surface of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an oxide matrix can contain numerous interface defects. These defects strongly affect the nanocrystals' photoluminescence efficiency and optical absorption. Dangling-bond defects are nearly eliminated by H{sub 2} passivation, thus decreasing absorption below the quantum-confined bandgap and enhancing PL efficiency by an order of magnitude. However, there remain numerous other defects seen in absorption by photothermal deflection spectroscopy; these defects cause non-radiative recombination that limits the PL efficiency to <15%. Using atomistic pseudopotential simulations, we attribute these defects to two specific types of distorted bonds: Si-Si and bridging Si-O-Si bonds between two Si atoms at the nanocrystal surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Altering graphene line defect properties using chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Smitha; White, Carter; Gunlycke, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    First-principles calculations are presented of a fundamental topological line defect in graphene that was observed and reported in Nature Nanotech. 5, 326 (2010). These calculations show that atoms and smaller molecules can bind covalently to the surface in the vicinity of the graphene line defect. It is also shown that the chemistry at the line defect has a strong effect on its electronic and magnetic properties, e.g. the ferromagnetically aligned moments along the line defect can be quenched by some adsorbates. The strong effect of the adsorbates on the line defect properties can be understood by examining how these adsorbates affect the boundary-localized states in the vicinity of the Fermi level. We also expect that the line defect chemistry will significantly affect the scattering properties of incident low-energy particles approaching it from graphene.

  2. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Karami, Asieh; Rostami, Tahereh, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: karami@ipm.ir, E-mail: t.rostami@ipm.ir [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  3. Automatic classification of defects in weld pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar Mikdad Muad; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Abdul Aziz Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2001-01-01

    With the advancement of computer imaging technology, the image on hard radiographic film can be digitized and stored in a computer and the manual process of defect recognition and classification may be replaced by the computer. In this paper, a computerized method for automatic detection and classification of common defects in film radiography of weld pipe is described. The detection and classification processes consist of automatic selection of interest area on the image and then classify common defects using image processing and special algorithms. Analysis of the attributes of each defect such area, size, shape and orientation are carried out by the feature analysis process. These attributes reveal the type of each defect. These methods of defect classification result in high success rate. Our experience showed that sharp film images produced better results. (Author)

  4. Little string origin of surface defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haouzi, Nathan; Schmid, Christian [Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Berkeley,LeConte Hall, Berkeley (United States)

    2017-05-16

    We derive a large class of codimension-two defects of 4d N=4 Super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory from the (2,0) little string. The origin of the little string is type IIB theory compactified on an ADE singularity. The defects are D-branes wrapping the 2-cycles of the singularity. We use this construction to make contact with the description of SYM defects due to Gukov and Witten https://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0612073. Furthermore, we provide a geometric perspective on the nilpotent orbit classification of codimension-two defects, and the connection to ADE-type Toda CFT. The only data needed to specify the defects is a set of weights of the algebra obeying certain constraints, which we give explicitly. We highlight the differences between the defect classification in the little string theory and its (2,0) CFT limit.

  5. Agricultural Compounds in Water and Birth Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, Jean D; Weyer, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Agricultural compounds have been detected in drinking water, some of which are teratogens in animal models. The most commonly detected agricultural compounds in drinking water include nitrate, atrazine, and desethylatrazine. Arsenic can also be an agricultural contaminant, although arsenic often originates from geologic sources. Nitrate has been the most studied agricultural compound in relation to prenatal exposure and birth defects. In several case-control studies published since 2000, women giving birth to babies with neural tube defects, oral clefts, and limb deficiencies were more likely than control mothers to be exposed to higher concentrations of drinking water nitrate during pregnancy. Higher concentrations of atrazine in drinking water have been associated with abdominal defects, gastroschisis, and other defects. Elevated arsenic in drinking water has also been associated with birth defects. Since these compounds often occur as mixtures, it is suggested that future research focus on the impact of mixtures, such as nitrate and atrazine, on birth defects.

  6. Positron studies of defected metals, metallic surfaces. Final report, July 1, 1985--December 1, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, A.

    1991-12-31

    Specific problems proposed under this project included the treatment of electronic structure and momentum density in various disordered and defected systems. Since 1987, when the new high-temperature superconductors were discovered, the project focused extensively on questions concerning the electronic structure and Fermiology of high-{Tc} superconductors, in particular, (i) momentum density and positron experiments, (ii) angle-resolved photoemission intensities, (iii) effects of disorder and substitutions in the high-{Tc}`s.

  7. Coherent defects in superconducting circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of superconducting circuits with additional quantum systems is a topic that has found extensive study in the recent past. In the limit where the added system are incoherent, this is the standard field of decoherence and the system dynamics can be described by a simple master equation. In the other limit however, when the additional parts are coherent, the resulting time-evolution can become more complicated. In this thesis we have investigated the interaction of superconducting circuits with coherent and incoherent two-level defects. We have shown theoretical calculations characterizing this interaction for all relevant parameter regimes. In the weak coupling limit, the interaction can be described in an effective bath picture, where the TLS act as parts of a large, decohering environment. For strong coupling, however, the coherent dynamics of the full coupled system has to be considered. We show the calculations of the coupled time-evolution and again characterize the interaction by an effective decoherence rate. We also used experimental data to characterize the microscopic origin of the defects and the details of their interaction with the circuits. The results obtained by analyzing spectroscopic data allow us to place strong constraint on several microscopic models for the observed TLS. However, these calculations are not yet fully conclusive as to the physical nature of the TLS. We propose additional experiments to fully characterize the interaction part of the Hamiltonian, thus providing the answer to the question of the physical origin of the coupling. Additionally we have developed a method to directly drive individual defect states via virtual excitation of the qubit. This method allows one to directly probe the properties of single TLS and possibly make use of their superior coherence times for quantum information purposes. The last part of this thesis provided a way for a possible implementation of geometric quantum computation in

  8. An atomistic vision of the Mass Action Law: Prediction of carbon/oxygen defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenet, G.; Timerkaeva, D.; Caliste, D.; Pochet, P. [CEA, INAC-SP2M, Atomistic Simulation Laboratory, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, L-Sim, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece)

    2015-09-28

    We introduce an atomistic description of the kinetic Mass Action Law to predict concentrations of defects and complexes. We demonstrate in this paper that this approach accurately predicts carbon/oxygen related defect concentrations in silicon upon annealing. The model requires binding and migration energies of the impurities and complexes, here obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vacancy-oxygen complex kinetics are studied as a model system during both isochronal and isothermal annealing. Results are in good agreement with experimental data, confirming the success of the methodology. More importantly, it gives access to the sequence of chain reactions by which oxygen and carbon related complexes are created in silicon. Beside the case of silicon, the understanding of such intricate reactions is a key to develop point defect engineering strategies to control defects and thus semiconductors properties.

  9. CoFFEE: Corrections For Formation Energy and Eigenvalues for charged defect simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Mit H.; Jain, Manish

    2018-05-01

    Charged point defects in materials are widely studied using Density Functional Theory (DFT) packages with periodic boundary conditions. The formation energy and defect level computed from these simulations need to be corrected to remove the contributions from the spurious long-range interaction between the defect and its periodic images. To this effect, the CoFFEE code implements the Freysoldt-Neugebauer-Van de Walle (FNV) correction scheme. The corrections can be applied to charged defects in a complete range of material shapes and size: bulk, slab (or two-dimensional), wires and nanoribbons. The code is written in Python and features MPI parallelization and optimizations using the Cython package for slow steps.

  10. Theory of defects in Si and Ge: Past, present and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estreicher, S.K.; Backlund, D.; Gibbons, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, considerable progress has been achieved in the theoretical predictions of a wide range of properties of defects in semiconductors. In addition to structures, energetics, spin and charge densities, theory now routinely predicts accurate vibrational properties of defects, and thus connects to the optical characterization of light impurities. However, the positions of gap levels have yet to be predicted with systemically reliable accuracy. Today, supercells much larger than in the past are being used to describe defect centers from first principles. Systems large enough to study the dynamics of extended defects can be handled near the first-principles level. This paper contains a brief review of the key developments that have rendered theory quantitatively useful to experimentalists and an overview of the current 'state-of-the-art' and ongoing developments. Some of the remaining challenges are discussed, with examples in Si and Ge.

  11. A semi-mechanistic approach to calculate the probability of fuel defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayal, M.; Millen, E.; Sejnoha, R.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper the authors describe the status of a semi-mechanistic approach to the calculation of the probability of fuel defects. This approach expresses the defect probability in terms of fundamental parameters such as local stresses, local strains, and fission product concentration. The calculations of defect probability continue to reflect the influences of the conventional parameters like power ramp, burnup and CANLUB. In addition, the new approach provides a mechanism to account for the impacts of additional factors involving detailed fuel design and reactor operation, for example pellet density, pellet shape and size, sheath diameter and thickness, pellet/sheath clearance, and coolant temperature and pressure. The approach has been validated against a previous empirical correlation. AN illustrative example shows how the defect thresholds are influenced by changes in the internal design of the element and in the coolant pressure. (Author) (7 figs., tab., 12 refs.)

  12. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerikar, Pankaj; Watanabe, Taku; Tulenko, James S.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    The stability range of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide is determined as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and non-stoichiometry. The computational approach integrates high accuracy ab initio electronic-structure calculations and thermodynamic analysis supported by experimental data. In particular, the density functional theory calculations are performed at the level of the spin polarized, generalized gradient approximation and includes the Hubbard U term; as a result they predict the correct anti-ferromagnetic insulating ground state of uranium oxide. The thermodynamic calculations enable the effects of system temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on defect formation energy to be determined. The predicted equilibrium properties and defect formation energies for neutral defect complexes match trends in the experimental literature quite well. In contrast, the predicted values for charged complexes are lower than the measured values. The calculations predict that the formation of oxygen interstitials becomes increasingly difficult as higher temperatures and reducing conditions are approached

  13. Hybridization analysis of P2 phage and of a defective prophage of Escherichia Coli B by the density gradient centrifugation method; Analyse de l'hybridation du phage P2 et d'un prophage defectifs d'Escherichia Coli B, par la methode de centrifugation en gradient de densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Denise [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, C. E. N. de Saclay, Service de Biologie (France)

    1960-07-01

    The P2 Hydis phage produced by P2 phage multiplication in E. coli B shows a higher density than its P2 parent. This density increase is the same for all P2 Hydis coming from a huge number of distinct hybridizations. It is closed to 0.002 g.cm{sup -3}. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 946-948, sitting of 1 February 1960 [French] Le phage P2 Hydis, produit lors de la multiplication du phage P2 dans E. Coli B, presente une densite superieure a celle de son parent P2. Cette augmentation de densite est la meme pour tous les P2 Hydis issus d'un grand nombre d'hybridations distinctes. Elle est voisine de 0,002 g.cm{sup -3}. Reproduction d'un article publie dans les Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 946-948, seance du 1er fevrier 1960.

  14. Effects of mass defect in atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    We consider some implications of the mass defect on the frequency of atomic transitions. We have found that some well-known frequency shifts (such as gravitational and quadratic Doppler shifts) can be interpreted as consequences of the mass defect, i.e., without the need for the concept of time dilation used in special and general relativity theories. Moreover, we show that the inclusion of the mass defect leads to previously unknown shifts for clocks based on trapped ions..

  15. Phosphorous–vacancy–oxygen defects in silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2013-07-30

    Electronic structure calculations employing the hybrid functional approach are used to gain fundamental insight in the interaction of phosphorous with oxygen interstitials and vacancies in silicon. It recently has been proposed, based on a binding energy analysis, that phosphorous–vacancy–oxygen defects may form. In the present study we investigate the stability of this defect as a function of the Fermi energy for the possible charge states. Spin polarization is found to be essential for the charge neutral defect.

  16. Research In Diagnosing Bearing Defects From Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes research in bearing-defect signature analysis - use of vibration-signal analysis to diagnose defects in roller and ball bearings. Experiments performed on bearings in good condition and other bearings in which various parts scratched to provide known defects correlated with vibration signals. Experiments performed on highly instrumented motor-driven rotor assembly at speeds up to 10,050 r/min, using accelerometers, velocity probes, and proximity sensors mounted at various locations on assembly to measure vibrations.

  17. Thermophysical spectroscopy of defect states in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igamberdyev, Kh.T.; Mamadalimov, A.T.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The present work deals with analyzing the possibilities of using the non-traditional thermophysical methods to study a defect structure in silicon. For this purpose, the temperature dependences of thermophysical properties of defect silicon are investigated. A number of new, earlier unknown physical phenomena in silicon are obtained, and their interpretation has enabled one to establish the main physical mechanisms of formation of deep defect states in silicon

  18. Many-Body Theory of Proton-Generated Point Defects for Losses of Electron Energy and Photons in Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gao, Fei; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, D. A.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of point defects on the loss of either energies of ballistic electron beams or incident photons are studied by using a many-body theory in a multi-quantum-well system. This theory includes the defect-induced vertex correction to a bare polarization function of electrons within the ladder approximation, and the intralayer and interlayer screening of defect-electron interactions is also taken into account in the random-phase approximation. The numerical results of defect effects on both energy-loss and optical-absorption spectra are presented and analyzed for various defect densities, numbers of quantum wells, and wave vectors. The diffusion-reaction equation is employed for calculating distributions of point defects in a layered structure. For completeness, the production rate for Frenkel-pair defects and their initial concentration are obtained based on atomic-level molecular-dynamics simulations. By combining the defect-effect, diffusion-reaction, and molecular-dynamics models with an available space-weather-forecast model, it will be possible in the future to enable specific designing for electronic and optoelectronic quantum devices that will be operated in space with radiation-hardening protection and, therefore, effectively extend the lifetime of these satellite onboard electronic and optoelectronic devices. Specifically, this theory can lead to a better characterization of quantum-well photodetectors not only for high quantum efficiency and low dark current density but also for radiation tolerance or mitigating the effects of the radiation.

  19. The Correlation Between Dislocations and Vacancy Defects Using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jinbiao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Zhu

    2012-07-01

    An analysis program for positron annihilation lifetime spectra is only applicable to isolated defects, but is of no use in the presence of defective correlations. Such limitations have long caused problems for positron researchers in their studies of complicated defective systems. In order to solve this problem, we aim to take a semiconductor material, for example, to achieve a credible average lifetime of single crystal silicon under plastic deformation at different temperatures using positron life time spectroscopy. By establishing reasonable positron trapping models with defective correlations and sorting out four lifetime components with multiple parameters, as well as their respective intensities, information is obtained on the positron trapping centers, such as the positron trapping rates of defects, the density of the dislocation lines and correlation between the dislocation lines, and the vacancy defects, by fitting with the average lifetime with the aid of Matlab software. These results give strong grounds for the existence of dislocation-vacancy correlation in plastically deformed silicon, and lay a theoretical foundation for the analysis of positron lifetime spectra when the positron trapping model involves dislocation-related defects.

  20. Defect-Mediated Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y Q

    2015-12-22

    Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high capacities. In this work, first principle calculations based on spin density functional theory were performed to investigate adsorption and diffusion of lithium on monolayer MoS2 with defects, such as single- and few-atom vacancies, antisite, and grain boundary. The values of adsorption energies on the monolayer MoS2 with the defects were increased compared to those on the pristine MoS2. The presence of defects causes that the Li is strongly bound to the monolayer MoS2 with adsorption energies in the range between 2.81 and 3.80 eV. The donation of Li 2s electron to the defects causes an enhancement of adsorption of Li on the monolayer MoS2. At the same time, the presence of defects does not apparently affect the diffusion of Li, and the energy barriers are in the range of 0.25-0.42 eV. The presence of the defects can enhance the energy storage capacity, suggesting that the monolayer MoS2 with defects is a suitable anode material for the Li-ion batteries.

  1. Elastic fields, dipole tensors, and interaction between self-interstitial atom defects in bcc transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, S. L.; Ma, Pui-Wai

    2018-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that self-interstitial atom (SIA) defects in nonmagnetic body-centered-cubic (bcc) metals adopt strongly anisotropic configurations, elongated in the direction [S. Han et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 220101 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.66.220101; D. Nguyen-Manh et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 020101 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevB.73.020101; P. M. Derlet et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 054107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.054107; S. L. Dudarev, Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 43, 35 (2013), 10.1146/annurev-matsci-071312-121626]. Elastic distortions, associated with such anisotropic atomic structures, appear similar to distortions around small prismatic dislocation loops, although the extent of this similarity has never been quantified. We derive analytical formulas for the dipole tensors of SIA defects, which show that, in addition to the prismatic dislocation looplike character, the elastic field of a SIA defect also has a significant isotropic dilatation component. Using empirical potentials and DFT calculations, we parametrize dipole tensors of defects for all the nonmagnetic bcc transition metals. This enables a quantitative evaluation of the energy of elastic interaction between the defects, which also shows that in a periodic three-dimensional simple cubic arrangement of crowdions, long-range elastic interactions between a defect and all its images favor a orientation of the defect.

  2. Quantitative description of microstructure defects in hexagonal boron nitrides using X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimpf, C.; Motylenko, M.; Rafaja, D.

    2013-01-01

    A routine for simultaneous quantification of turbostratic disorder, amount of puckering and the dislocation and stacking fault density in hexagonal materials was proposed and tested on boron nitride powder samples that were synthesised using different methods. The routine allows the individual microstructure defects to be recognised according to their effect on the anisotropy of the X-ray diffraction line broadening. For quantification of the microstructure defects, the total line broadening is regarded as a linear combination of the contributions from the particular defects. The total line broadening is obtained from the line profile fitting. As testing material, graphitic boron nitride (h-BN) was employed in the form of hot-isostatically pressed h-BN, pyrolytic h-BN or a h-BN, which was chemically vapour deposited at a low temperature. The kind of the dominant microstructure defects determined from the broadening of the X-ray diffraction lines was verified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their amount was attempted to be verified by alternative methods. - Highlights: • Reliable method for quantification of microstructure defects in BN was suggested. • The method is based on the analysis of anisotropic XRD line broadening. • This XRD line broadening is unique and characteristic of the respective defect. • Thus, the quantification of coexistent microstructure defects is possible. • The method was tested on hexagonal BN, which was produced by different techniques

  3. Extrinsic- and intrinsic-defect creation in amorphous SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Francou, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the creation efficiency of various intrinsic and extrinsic defects in high-[OH] amorphous silica subjected to the ultraviolet emission from an O 2 plasma or 60 Co γ-ray radiation. Both oxygen-vacancy- and nitrogen-related defects are observed following γ-ray irradiation or ultraviolet exposure. The wavelength range responsible for defect creation is estimated to be 200 approx-lt λ approx-lt 300 nm (4 approx-lt E photon approx-lt 5.9 eV). The ultraviolet power output of the plasma estimated by comparing defect yields with those from a Hg lamp (λ=185 and 254 nm) suggests 200 approx-lt P approx-lt 900 mW cm -2 for a plasma power density ∼300 mW cm -3 . Nonbridging oxygen-hole centers and hydrogen-related defect centers as well as methyl radical (CH 3 . ) defects are observed after γ-ray irradiation but not after ultraviolet exposure. The efficiency of creation of the various defects is material dependent

  4. The electronic and optical properties of amorphous silica with hydrogen defects by ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dahua; Xiang, Baoyan; Hu, Cheng; Qian, Kai; Cheng, Xinlu

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen can be trapped in the bulk materials in four forms: interstitial molecular H2, interstitial atom H, O‑H+(2Si=O–H)+, Si‑H‑( {{4O}}\\bar \\equiv {{Si&x2212H}})‑ to affect the electronic and optical properties of amorphous silica. Therefore, the electronic and optical properties of defect-free and hydrogen defects in amorphous silica were performed within the scheme of density functional theory. Initially, the negative charged states hydrogen defects introduced new defect level between the valence band top and conduction band bottom. However, the neutral and positive charged state hydrogen defects made both the valence band and conduction band transfer to the lower energy. Subsequently, the optical properties such as absorption spectra, conductivity and loss functions were analyzed. It is indicated that the negative hydrogen defects caused the absorption peak ranging from 0 to 2.0 eV while the positive states produced absorption peaks at lower energy and two strong absorption peaks arose at 6.9 and 9.0 eV. However, the neutral hydrogen defects just improved the intensity of absorption spectrum. This may give insights into understanding the mechanism of laser-induced damage for optical materials. Project supported by the Science and Technology of Hubei Provincial Department of Education (No. B2017098).

  5. PyCDT: A Python toolkit for modeling point defects in semiconductors and insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Danny; Medasani, Bharat; Zimmermann, Nils E. R.; Yu, Guodong; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark; Hautier, Geoffroy

    2018-05-01

    Point defects have a strong impact on the performance of semiconductor and insulator materials used in technological applications, spanning microelectronics to energy conversion and storage. The nature of the dominant defect types, how they vary with processing conditions, and their impact on materials properties are central aspects that determine the performance of a material in a certain application. This information is, however, difficult to access directly from experimental measurements. Consequently, computational methods, based on electronic density functional theory (DFT), have found widespread use in the calculation of point-defect properties. Here we have developed the Python Charged Defect Toolkit (PyCDT) to expedite the setup and post-processing of defect calculations with widely used DFT software. PyCDT has a user-friendly command-line interface and provides a direct interface with the Materials Project database. This allows for setting up many charged defect calculations for any material of interest, as well as post-processing and applying state-of-the-art electrostatic correction terms. Our paper serves as a documentation for PyCDT, and demonstrates its use in an application to the well-studied GaAs compound semiconductor. We anticipate that the PyCDT code will be useful as a framework for undertaking readily reproducible calculations of charged point-defect properties, and that it will provide a foundation for automated, high-throughput calculations.

  6. Blockage of ultrafast and directional diffusion of Li atoms on phosphorene with intrinsic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqi; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-02-21

    The diffusion of Li in electrode materials is a key factor for the charging/discharging rate capacity of a Li-ion battery (LIB). Recently, two-dimensional phosphorene has been proposed as a very promising electrode material due to its ultrafast and directional lithium diffusion, as well as large energy capacity. Herein, on the basis of density functional theory, we report that intrinsic point defects, including vacancy and stone-wales defects, will block the directional ultrafast diffusion of lithium in phosphorene. On the defect-free phosphorene, diffusion of Li along the zig-zag lattice direction is 1.6 billion times faster than along the armchair lattice direction, and 260 times faster than that in graphite. After introducing intrinsic vacancy and stone-wales defect, the diffusion energy barrier of Li along the zig-zag lattice direction increases sharply to the range of 0.17-0.49 eV, which blocks the ultrafast migration of lithium along the zig-zag lattice direction. Moreover, the open circuit voltage increases with the emergence of defects, which is not suitable for anode materials. In addition, the formation energies of the defects in phosphorene are considerably lower than those in graphene and silicene sheet; therefore, it is highly important to generate defect-free phosphorene for LIB applications.

  7. Structure and flux pinning properties of irradiation defects in YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.

    1992-06-01

    We review our investigations of defects produced in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x by various forms of irradiation. The defect microstructure has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Irradiation enhancements of flux pinning have been studied by SQUID magnetometry on single crystals. In many cases the same single crystals were used in both TEM and SQUID investigations. The primary atom recoil spectra for all the irradiations studied have been carefully calculated and used to correlate the TEM and magnetization results for the different types of irradiation. Correlation of annealing experiments, employing both TEM and SQUID measurements, among several types of irradiation has also yielded information on the different defect structures present. Defect densities, sizes and strain field anisotropies have been determined by TEM. Defect flux pinning anisotropies have been determined for two field orientations in twinned single crystals. The temperature dependences of the flux pinning have been measured. The maximum field of irreversibility at 70 K is shown to change markedly upon both neutron and proton irradiations in some crystals and not others. The defect structure, chemistry and location in the unit cell has been determined in some cases. Some interaction with existing defect structure has been observed in proton and electron irradiations. The damage character and directionality has been determined in GeV ion irradiated crystals

  8. Future Road Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  9. Effects of graphene defect on electronic structures of its interface with organic semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing-Dan; Wang, Chundong; Mo, Hin-Wai; Lo, Ming-Fai; Yuen, Muk Fung; Ng, Tsz-Wai, E-mail: tszwaing@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: apcslee@cityu.edu.hk; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Lee, Chun-Sing, E-mail: tszwaing@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: apcslee@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Dou, Wei-Dong [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Physics Department, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Tsang, Sai-Wing [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-03-30

    Electronic structures of copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F{sub 16}CuPc)/graphene with different defect density were studied with ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. We showed that the charge transfer interaction and charge flow direction can be interestingly tuned by controlling the defect density of graphene through time-controlled H{sub 2} plasma treatment. By increasing the treatment time of H{sub 2} plasma from 30 s to 5 min, both the interface surface dipole and the electron transporting barrier at F{sub 16}CuPc/graphene interface are significantly reduced from 0.86 to 0.56 eV and 0.71 to 0.29 eV, respectively. These results suggested that graphene's defect control is a simple approach for tuning electronic properties of organic/graphene interfaces.

  10. Purity and Defect Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumitsu Miyata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purity and defects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced by various synthetic methods including chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge, and laser ablation. The SWCNT samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of SEM images suggested that the G-band Raman intensity serves as an index for the purity. By contrast, the intensity ratio of G-band to D-band (G/D ratio reflects both the purity and the defect density of SWCNTs. The combination of G-band intensity and G/D ratio is useful for a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the purity and defect density of a SWCNT sample.

  11. Disorder and defect formation mechanisms in molecular-beam-epitaxy grown silicon epilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari-Sharbaf, Arash; Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Wu, Xiaohua; Lockwood, David J.; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role of disorder, stress and crystallite size in determining the density of defects in disordered and partially ordered silicon thin films deposited at low or moderate temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the paramagnetic defect density measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) is strongly dependent on the growth temperature of the films, decreasing from ∼ 2 · 10 19 cm −3 at 98 °C to ∼ 1 · 10 18 cm −3 at 572 °C. The physical nature of the defects is strongly dependent on the range of order in the films: ESR spectra consistent with dangling bonds in an amorphous phase are observed at the lowest temperatures, while the ESR signal gradually becomes more anisotropic as medium-range order improves and the stress level (measured both by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy) is released in more crystalline films. Anisotropic ESR spectra consistent with paramagnetic defects embedded in an epitaxial phase are observed at the highest growth temperature (572 °C). - Highlights: ► Disordered Si epilayers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. ► Growth has been carried out at temperatures T = 98 °C–514 °C. ► A correlation between defect density and disorder in the films has been found. ► Lack of medium range order and stress cause the formation of defects at low T. ► At high T, defects are associated to grain boundaries and oriented stacking faults

  12. Renyi entropy and conformal defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Lorenzo [Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Meineri, Marco [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Myers, Robert C. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Smolkin, Michael [California Univ., Berkely, CA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics

    2016-04-18

    We propose a field theoretic framework for calculating the dependence of Renyi entropies on the shape of the entangling surface in a conformal field theory. Our approach rests on regarding the corresponding twist operator as a conformal defect and in particular, we define the displacement operator which implements small local deformations of the entangling surface. We identify a simple constraint between the coefficient defining the two-point function of the displacement operator and the conformal weight of the twist operator, which consolidates a number of distinct conjectures on the shape dependence of the Renyi entropy. As an example, using this approach, we examine a conjecture regarding the universal coefficient associated with a conical singularity in the entangling surface for CFTs in any number of spacetime dimensions. We also provide a general formula for the second order variation of the Renyi entropy arising from small deformations of a spherical entangling surface, extending Mezei's results for the entanglement entropy.

  13. Neural Tube Defects and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Çoşar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neural tube defects are congenital malformations those mostly causing life-long morbidities. They are prevented by the periconseptional folic acid usage and prenatal diagnostic methods. MATERIALS-METHODS: Pregnants from Afyonkarahisar and neighbourhood cities applied to our hospital and determined NTD, were investigated. RESULTS: In our obstetrics clinic 1403 delivery were made and 43 of them had fetus with NTD. Among these fetuses 41.3% had meningomyelocel, 17.4% had meningocel, 21.7% had encephalocel, 8.7% had unencephali and 4.3% had iniencephali. CONCLUSION: Incidence of NTD is high in our region and geographic region, nutrition and other socioeconomic factors may be related to the high incidence. Education of the mother and periconceptional folic acid usage may reduce teh incidence of NTD.

  14. Renyi entropy and conformal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Lorenzo; Myers, Robert C.; Smolkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We propose a field theoretic framework for calculating the dependence of Renyi entropies on the shape of the entangling surface in a conformal field theory. Our approach rests on regarding the corresponding twist operator as a conformal defect and in particular, we define the displacement operator which implements small local deformations of the entangling surface. We identify a simple constraint between the coefficient defining the two-point function of the displacement operator and the conformal weight of the twist operator, which consolidates a number of distinct conjectures on the shape dependence of the Renyi entropy. As an example, using this approach, we examine a conjecture regarding the universal coefficient associated with a conical singularity in the entangling surface for CFTs in any number of spacetime dimensions. We also provide a general formula for the second order variation of the Renyi entropy arising from small deformations of a spherical entangling surface, extending Mezei's results for the entanglement entropy.

  15. Achieving maximum baryon densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1984-01-01

    In continuing work on nuclear stopping power in the energy range E/sub lab/ approx. 10 GeV/nucleon, calculations were made of the energy and baryon densities that could be achieved in uranium-uranium collisions. Results are shown. The energy density reached could exceed 2 GeV/fm 3 and baryon densities could reach as high as ten times normal nuclear densities

  16. Crowding and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Design and Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Three-part report pinpointing problems and uncovering solutions for the dual concepts of density (ratio of people to space) and crowding (psychological response to density). Section one, A Primer on Crowding,'' reviews new psychological and social findings; section two, Density in the Suburbs,'' shows conflict between status quo and increased…

  17. Observations of defect structure evolution in proton and Ni ion irradiated Ni-Cr binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Samuel A., E-mail: sabriggs2@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Barr, Christopher M. [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); SKC-CEN Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mamivand, Mahmood [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Morgan, Dane D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Taheri, Mitra [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Two binary Ni-Cr model alloys with 5 wt% Cr and 18 wt% Cr were irradiated using 2 MeV protons at 400 and 500 °C and 20 MeV Ni{sup 4+} ions at 500 °C to investigate microstructural evolution as a function of composition, irradiation temperature, and irradiating ion species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to study irradiation-induced void and faulted Frank loops microstructures. Irradiations at 500 °C were shown to generate decreased densities of larger defects, likely due to increased barriers to defect nucleation as compared to 400 °C irradiations. Heavy ion irradiation resulted in a larger density of smaller voids when compared to proton irradiations, indicating in-cascade clustering of point defects. Cluster dynamics simulations were in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting that increases in Cr content lead to an increase in interstitial binding energy, leading to higher densities of smaller dislocation loops in the Ni-18Cr alloy as compared to the Ni-5Cr alloy. - Highlights: • Binary Ni-Cr alloys were irradiated with protons or Ni ions at 400 and 500 °C. • Higher irradiation temperatures yield increased size, decreased density of defects. • Hypothesize that varying Cr content affects interstitial binding energy. • Fitting CD models for loop nucleation to data supports this hypothesis.

  18. Ab initio study of native defects in SnO under strain

    KAUST Repository

    Bianchi Granato, Danilo; Albar, Arwa; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Tin monoxide (SnO) has promising properties to be applied as a p-type semiconductor in transparent electronics. To this end, it is necessary to understand the behaviour of defects in order to control them. We use density functional theory to study

  19. Method for quantifying defects in materials by microdensitometry of radiography films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, M.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the principle of a method for quantifying defects on metal parts obtained by casting. It is based on the relation expressing the optical density of the image according to the thickness of the material. The three techniques used, to wit: gammagraphy, microdensitometry and data processing, are presented, as is the equipment used and the methodology adopted [fr

  20. Highly effective SNP-based association mapping and management of recessive defects in livestock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlier, Carole; Coppieters, Wouter; Rollin, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The widespread use of elite sires by means of artificial insemination in livestock breeding leads to the frequent emergence of recessive genetic defects, which cause significant economic and animal welfare concerns. Here we show that the availability of genome-wide, high-density SNP panels, combi...

  1. Point Defects in Binary Laves-Phase Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, P.K.; Liu, C.T.; Pike, L.M.; Zhu, J.H.

    1999-01-11

    Point defects in the binary C15 NbCrQ and NbCoz, and C 14 NbFe2 systems on both sides of stoichiometry were studied by both bulk density and X-ray Iattiee parameter measurements. It was found that the vacancy concentrations in these systems after quenching from 1000"C are essentially zero. The constitutional defects on both sides of stoichiometry for these systems were found to be of the anti-site type in comparison with the model predictions. Thermal vacancies exhibiting a maximum at the stoichiometric composition were obtained in NbCr2 Laves phase alloys after quenching from 1400"C. However, there are essentially no thermal vacancies in NbFe2 alloys after quenching from 1300oC. Anti-site hardening was found on both sides of stoichiometry for all the tie Laves phase systems studied, while the thermal vacancies in NbCr2 alloys quenched from 1400'C were found to soften the Laves phase. The anti-site hardening of the Laves phases is similar to that of the B2 compounds and the thermal vacancy softening is unique to the Laves phase. Neither the anti-site defects nor the thermal vacancies affect the fracture toughness of the Laves phases significantly.

  2. Freely-migrating-defect production during irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, T.; Rehn, L. E.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1988-12-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in a Cu-1 at. % Au alloy was investigated using in situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The amount of Au atom depletion in the near surface region was measured as a function of dose during irradiation at 350 °C with four ions of substantially different masses. Relative efficiencies for producing freely migrating defects were evaluated for 1.8-MeV 1H, 4He, 20Ne, and 84Kr ions by determining beam current densities that gave similar radiation-induced segregation rates. Irradiations with primary knock-on atom median energies of 1.7, 13, and 79 keV yielded relative efficiencies of 53, 7, and 6 %, respectively, compared to the irradiation with a 0.83-keV median energy. Despite quite different defect and host alloy properties, the relative efficiencies for producing freely migrating defects determined in Cu-Au are remarkably similar to those found previously in Ni-Si alloys. Hence, the reported efficiencies appear to offer a reliable basis for making quantitative correlations of microstructural changes induced in different alloy systems by a wide variety of irradiation particles.

  3. Paternal occupation and birth defects: findings from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desrosiers, T.A.; Herring, A.H.; Shapira, S.K.; Hooiveld, M.; Luben, T.J.; Herdt-Losavio, M.L.; Lin, S.; Olshan, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several epidemiological studies have suggested that certain paternal occupations may be associated with an increased prevalence of birth defects in offspring. Using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, the authors investigated the association between paternal occupation

  4. Defining defect specifications to optimize photomask production and requalification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiekowsky, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Reducing defect repairs and accelerating defect analysis is becoming more important as the total cost of defect repairs on advanced masks increases. Photomask defect specs based on printability, as measured on AIMS microscopes has been used for years, but the fundamental defect spec is still the defect size, as measured on the photomask, requiring the repair of many unprintable defects. ADAS, the Automated Defect Analysis System from AVI is now available in most advanced mask shops. It makes the use of pure printability specs, or "Optimal Defect Specs" practical. This software uses advanced algorithms to eliminate false defects caused by approximations in the inspection algorithm, classify each defect, simulate each defect and disposition each defect based on its printability and location. This paper defines "optimal defect specs", explains why they are now practical and economic, gives a method of determining them and provides accuracy data.

  5. TEM assessment of defects in (CdHg)Te heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson-Jack, S.G.; Jones, I.P.; Williams, D.J.; Astles, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on transmission electron microscopy used to assess the defect contents of the various layers and interfaces in (CdHg)Te heterostructures. Examination of cross sectional specimens of these materials suggests that the density of misfit dislocations at the interfaces is related to the layer thicknesses, and that the high density of dislocations which are generated at the GaAs/CdTe interface are effectively prevented from penetrating into the CdHgTe epilayer by a 3 μm thick buffer layer. The majority of the dislocations in the layers were found to have a Burgers vector b = a/2 left-angle 110 right-angle and either lie approximately parallel or inclined at an angle of ∼ 60 degrees to the interfactial plane

  6. Modeling the relationships among internal defect features and external Appalachian hardwood log defect indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a hardwood tree grows and develops, surface defects such as branch stubs and wounds are overgrown. Evidence of these defects remain on the log surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. As the tree grows the defect is encapsulated or grown over by new wood. During this process the appearance of the defect in the tree's bark changes. The...

  7. Regional absolute conductivity reconstruction using projected current density in MREIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Oh In

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a non-invasive technique for imaging the internal conductivity distribution in tissue within an MRI scanner, utilizing the magnetic flux density, which is introduced when a current is injected into the tissue from external electrodes. This magnetic flux alters the MRI signal, so that appropriate reconstruction can provide a map of the additional z-component of the magnetic field (B z ) as well as the internal current density distribution that created it. To extract the internal electrical properties of the subject, including the conductivity and/or the current density distribution, MREIT techniques use the relationship between the external injection current and the z-component of the magnetic flux density B = (B x , B y , B z ). The tissue studied typically contains defective regions, regions with a low MRI signal and/or low MRI signal-to-noise-ratio, due to the low density of nuclear magnetic resonance spins, short T 2 or T* 2 relaxation times, as well as regions with very low electrical conductivity, through which very little current traverses. These defective regions provide noisy B z data, which can severely degrade the overall reconstructed conductivity distribution. Injecting two independent currents through surface electrodes, this paper proposes a new direct method to reconstruct a regional absolute isotropic conductivity distribution in a region of interest (ROI) while avoiding the defective regions. First, the proposed method reconstructs the contrast of conductivity using the transversal J-substitution algorithm, which blocks the propagation of severe accumulated noise from the defective region to the ROI. Second, the proposed method reconstructs the regional projected current density using the relationships between the internal current density, which stems from a current injection on the surface, and the measured B z data. Combining the contrast conductivity distribution in the entire imaging

  8. Defect Engineering and Interface Phenomena in Tin Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2017-04-05

    The advance in transparent electronics requires high-performance transparent conducting oxide materials. The microscopic properties of these materials are sensitive to the presence of defects and interfaces and thus fundamental understanding is required for materials engineering. In this thesis, first principles density functional theory is used to investigate the possibility of tuning the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of tin oxide by means of defects and interfaces. Our aim is to reveal unique properties and the parameters to control them as well as to explain the origin of unique phenomena in oxide materials. The stability of native defect in tin monoxide (SnO) under strain is investigated using formation energy calculations. We find that the conductivity (which is controlled by native defects) can be switched from p-type to either n-type or undoped semiconducting by means of applied pressure. We then target inducing magnetism in SnO by 3d transition metal doping. We propose that V doping is efficient to realize spin polarization at high temperature. We discuss different tin oxide interfaces. Metallic states are found to form at the SnO/SnO2 interface with electronic properties that depend on the interface terminations. The origin of these states is explained in terms of charge transfer caused by chemical bonding and band alignment. For the SnO/SnO2 heterostructure, we observe the formation of a two dimensional hole gas at the interface, which is surprising as it cannot be explained by the standard polar catastrophe model. Thus, we propose a charge density discontinuity model to explain our results. The model can be generalized to other polar-polar interfaces. Motivated by technological applications, the electronic and structural properties of the MgO (100)/SnO2 (110) interface are investigated. Depending on the interface termination, we observe the formation of a two dimensional electron gas or spin polarized hole gas. Aiming to identify further

  9. Xenon Defects in Uranium Dioxide From First Principles and Interatomic Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander

    In this thesis, we examine the defect energetics and migration energies of xenon atoms in uranium dioxide (UO2) from first principles and interatomic potentials. We also parameterize new, accurate interatomic potentials for xenon and uranium dioxide. To achieve accurate energetics and provide a foundation for subsequent calculations, we address difficulties in finding consistent energetics within Hubbard U corrected density functional theory (DFT+U). We propose a method of slowly ramping the U parameter in order to guide the calculation into low energy orbital occupations. We find that this method is successful for a variety of materials. We then examine the defect energetics of several noble gas atoms in UO2 for several different defect sites. We show that the energy to incorporate large noble gas atoms into interstitial sites is so large that it is energetically favorable for a Schottky defect cluster to be created to relieve the strain. We find that, thermodynamically, xenon will rarely ever be in the interstitial site of UO2. To study larger defects associated with the migration of xenon in UO 2, we turn to interatomic potentials. We benchmark several previously published potentials against DFT+U defect energetics and migration barriers. Using a combination of molecular dynamics and nudged elastic band calculations, we find a new, low energy migration pathway for xenon in UO2. We create a new potential for xenon that yields accurate defect energetics. We fit this new potential with a method we call Iterative Potential Refinement that parameterizes potentials to first principles data via a genetic algorithm. The potential finds accurate energetics for defects with relatively low amounts of strain (xenon in defect clusters). It is important to find accurate energetics for these sorts of low-strain defects because they essentially represent small xenon bubbles. Finally, we parameterize a new UO2 potential that simultaneously yields accurate vibrational properties

  10. Highly Efficient Defect Emission from ZnO:Zn and ZnO:S Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Henry

    2013-03-01

    Bulk Zinc Oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconductor with an ultraviolet direct band gap energy of 3.4 eV and a broad, defect-related visible wavelength emission band centered near 2 eV. We have shown that the external quantum efficiency can exceed 50% for this nearly white emission band that closely matches the human dark-adapted visual response. To explore the potential of ZnO as a rare earth-free white light phosphor, we investigated the mechanism of efficient defect emission in three types of ZnO powders: unannealed, annealed, and sulfur-doped. Annealing and sulfur-doping of ZnO greatly increase the strength of defect emission while suppressing the UV band edge emission. Continuous wave and ultrafast one- and two-photon excitation spectroscopy are used to examine the defect emission mechanism. Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectra were measured for all three compounds, and it was found that bound excitons mediate the defect emission. Temperature-dependent PLE spectra for the defect and band edge emission were measured to estimate trapping and activation energies of the bound excitons and clarify the role they play in the defect emission. Time-resolved techniques were used to ascertain the role of exciton diffusion, the effects of reabsorption, and the spatial distributions of radiative and non-radiative traps. In unannealed ZnO we find that defect emission is suppressed and UV band edge emission is inefficient (reduced, and a high density of defects responsible for the broad visible emission are created near the surface. Interestingly, nearly identical PLE spectra are found for both the band edge and the defect emission, one of many indications that the defect emission is deeply connected to bound excitons. Quantum efficiency, also measured as a function of excitation wavelength, closely mirrors the PLE spectra for both emission bands. Sulfur-doped ZnO exhibits additional PLE and X-ray features indicative of a ZnS-rich surface

  11. Failures and Defects in the Building Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Function failures, defects, mistakes and poor communication are major problems for the construction sector. As the empirical element in the research, a large construction site was observed from the very start to the very end and all failures and defects of a certain size were recorded and analysed...

  12. Treatment of osteochondral defects of the talus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, C. J. A.; de Leeuw, P. A. J.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2008-01-01

    This review article provides a current concepts overview of osteochondral defects of the talus, with special emphasis on treatment options, their indications and future developments. Osteochondral defects of the talar dome are mostly caused by a traumatic event. They may lead to deep ankle pain on

  13. Indicators for Building Process without Final Defects -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the preliminary data analysis, as well as the underlying theories and methods for identifying the indicators for building process without final defects. Since 2004, the Benchmark Centre for the Danish Construction Sector (BEC) has collected information about legal defects...

  14. Positron analysis of defects in metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, A.; Kruseman, A.C.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P.E.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Jean, YC; Eldrup, M; Schrader, DM; West, RN

    1997-01-01

    New methods are discussed to improve defect analysis. The first method employs mapping of two shape parameters, S and W, of the positron annihilation photopeak. It is demonstrated that the combined use of S and W allows to a better discrimination of defects. The other method is based on background

  15. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, T.; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U.

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  16. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, T. E-mail: marek@para.chem.elte.hu; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U

    2000-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  17. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  18. Iodide-trapping defect of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannall, P.R.; Steyn, A.F.; Van Reenen, O.

    1978-01-01

    We describe a grossly hypothyroid 50-year-old woman, mentally retarded since birth. On the basis of her history of recurrent goitre, absence of 131 I neck uptake and a low saliva/plasma 131 I ratio, congenital hypothyroidism due to a defect of the iodide-trapping mechanism was diagnosed. Other family members studied did not have the defect

  19. Impurity Role In Mechanically Induced Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Hartley, J.; Sterne, P.

    2000-01-01

    An improved understanding of dislocation dynamics and interactions is an outstanding problem in the multi scale modeling of materials properties, and is the current focus of major theoretical efforts world wide. We have developed experimental and theoretical tools that will enable us to measure and calculate quantities defined by the defect structure. Unique to the measurements is a new spectroscopy that determines the detailed elemental composition at the defect site. The measurements are based on positron annihilation spectroscopy performed with a 3 MeV positron beam [1]. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is highly sensitive to dislocations and associated defects and can provide unique elements of the defect size and structure. Performing this spectroscopy with a highly penetrating positron beam enables flexibility in sample handling. Experiments on fatigued and stressed samples have been done and in situ measurement capabilities have been developed. We have recently performed significant upgrades to the accelerator operation and novel new experiments have been performed [2-4] To relate the spectrographic results and the detailed structure of a defect requires detailed calculations. Measurements are coupled with calculated results based on a description of positions of atoms at the defect. This gives an atomistic view of dislocations and associated defects including impurity interactions. Our ability to probe impurity interactions is a unique contribution to defect understanding not easily addressed by other atomistic spectroscopies

  20. Probability densities and Lévy densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler

    For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated.......For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated....

  1. Optoelectronics and defect levels in hydroxyapatite by first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Leon A.; Paramonova, Ekaterina V.; Coutinho, José; Öberg, Sven; Bystrov, Vladimir S.; Bugaev, Lusegen A.

    2018-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an important component of mammal bones and teeth, being widely used in prosthetic implants. Despite the importance of HAp in medicine, several promising applications involving this material (e.g., in photo-catalysis) depend on how well we understand its fundamental properties. Among the ones that are either unknown or not known accurately, we have the electronic band structure and all that relates to it, including the bandgap width. We employ state-of-the-art methodologies, including density hybrid-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory within the dynamically screened single-particle Green's function approximation, to look at the optoelectronic properties of HAp. These methods are also applied to the calculation of defect levels. We find that the use of a mix of (semi-)local and exact exchange in the exchange-correlation functional brings a drastic improvement to the band structure. Important side effects include improvements in the description of dielectric and optical properties not only involving conduction band (excited) states but also the valence. We find that the highly dispersive conduction band bottom of HAp originates from anti-bonding σ* states along the ⋯OH-OH-⋯ infinite chain, suggesting the formation of a conductive 1D-ice phase. The choice of the exchange-correlation treatment to the calculation of defect levels was also investigated by using the OH-vacancy as a testing model. We find that donor and acceptor transitions obtained within semi-local density functional theory (DFT) differ from those of hybrid-DFT by almost 2 eV. Such a large discrepancy emphasizes the importance of using a high-quality description of the electron-electron interactions in the calculation of electronic and optical transitions of defects in HAp.

  2. Defect-Tolerant Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Rasmussen, Filip Anselm; Kuhar, Korina

    2016-01-01

    Localized electronic states formed inside the band gap of a semiconductor due to crystal defects can be detrimental to the material's optoelectronic properties. Semiconductors with a lower tendency to form defect induced deep gap states are termed defect-tolerant. Here we provide a systematic first...... the gap. These ideas are made quantitative by introducing a descriptor that measures the degree of similarity of the conduction and valence band manifolds. Finally, the study is generalized to nonpolar nanoribbons of the TMDs where we find that only the defect sensitive materials form edge states within......-principles investigation of defect tolerance in 29 monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) of interest for nanoscale optoelectronics. We find that the TMDs based on group VI and X metals form deep gap states upon creation of a chalcogen (S, Se, Te) vacancy, while the TMDs based on group IV metals form only...

  3. Teratology: from science to birth defects prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sonja A; Erickson, J David; Reef, Susan E; Ross, Danielle S

    2009-01-01

    One of the goals of birth defects research is to better understand risk or preventive factors for birth defects so that strategies for prevention can be developed. In this article, we have selected four areas of birth defects research that have led to the development of prevention strategies. These areas include rubella virus as a cause of congenital rubella syndrome, folic acid as a preventive factor for neural tube defects, cytomegalovirus infection as a cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities, and alcohol as a cause of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. For each of these areas, we review key clinical and research findings that led to the identification of the risk or preventive factor, milestones in the development of prevention strategies, and the progress made thus far toward prevention.

  4. Defective Reduction in Frozen Pie Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooted, Oranuch; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-06-01

    The frozen pie production has a lot of defects resulting in high production cost. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) technique has been applied to improve the frozen pie process. Pareto chart is also used to determine the major defects of frozen pie. There are 3 main processes that cause the defects which are the 1st freezing to glazing process, the forming process, and the folding process. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) obtained from FMEA is analyzed to reduce the defects. If RPN of each cause exceeds 45, the process will be considered to be improved and selected for the corrective and preventive actions. The results showed that RPN values decreased after the correction. Therefore, the implementation of FMEA technique can help to improve the performance of frozen pie process and reduce the defects approximately 51.9%.

  5. Defect accumulation under cascade damage conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Singh, B.N.; Woo, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    in terms of this reaction kinetics taking into account cluster production, dissociation, migration and annihilation at extended sinks. Microstructural features which are characteristic of cascade damage and cannot be explained in terms of the conventional single defect reaction kinetics are emphasized......There is now ample evidence from both experimental and computer simulation studies that in displacement cascades not only intense recombination takes place but also efficient clustering of both self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies. The size distributions of the two types of defects produced...... reactions kinetics associated with the specific features of cascade damage is described, with emphasis on asymmetries between SIA and vacancy type defects concerning their production, stability, mobility and interactions with other defects. Defect accumulation under cascade damage conditions is discussed...

  6. Defect pin behaviour in the DFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloss, W.M.; Bagley, K.Q.; Edmonds, E.; Potter, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    A program of defective fuel pin irradiations has been carried out in the DFR. This program employed fuel pins which had failed during previous irradiations (natural defects) and pins in which simulated failures (artificial defects) had been induced prior to irradiation or during an intermediate examination stage at moderate or substantial burnups. The artificial defects simulated longitudinal ruptures and were normally located at positions near the top, middle and bottom of the pin where clad temperatures were 450, 540 and 630 0 C respectively. The fuel was mixed U-Pu oxide, and fuel form, stoichiometry, clad type, pin diameter, linear rating, and burnup were among the variables examined. The defect pin tests were normally carried out in single pin or trefoil type vehicles. After irradiation all the pins were subjected to the normal nondestructive examination procedures and the visual, radiographic, gamma-scanning, and dimensional change results are presented. Several pins were destructively examined and the metallographic data are discussed

  7. Tritium releases, birth defects and infant deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The AECB has published a report 'Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and Birth Defects and Infant Mortality in Nearby Communities 1971-1988' (report number INFO-0401). This presents the results of a detailed analysis of deaths and birth defects occurring in infants born to mothers living in the area (25 Km radius) of the Pickering nuclear power plant, over an 18-year period. The analysis looked at the frequency of these defects and deaths in comparison to the general rate for Ontario, and also in relation to airborne and waterborne releases of tritium from the power plant. The overall conclusion was that the rates of infant death and birth defects were generally not higher in the study population than in all of Ontario. There was no prevalent relationship between these deaths and defects and tritium releases measured either at the power plant or by ground monitoring stations t some distance from the facility

  8. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  9. Characterization of deep level defects in Tl6I4S single crystals by photo-induced current transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J A; Liu, Z; Sebastian, M; Wessels, B W; Im, J; Freeman, A J; Nguyen, S; Kanatzidis, M G

    2015-01-01

    Defect levels in semi-insulating Tl 6 I 4 S single crystals grown by the horizontal Bridgman technique have been characterized using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). These measurements revealed six electron traps located at (0.059  ±  0.007), (0.13  ±  0.012), (0.31  ±  0.074), (0.39  ±  0.019), (0.62  ±  0.110), and (0.597  ±  0.105). These defect levels are attributed to vacancies (V I , V S ) and antisite defects (I S , Tl S , Tl I ) upon comparison to calculations of native defect energy levels using density functional theory and defects recently reported from photoluminescence and photoconductivity measurements. (paper)

  10. A proposed defect tracking model for classifying the inserted defect reports to enhance software quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Torky; Khedr, Ayman E; Sayed, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED Defect tracking systems play an important role in the software development organizations as they can store historical information about defects. There are many research in defect tracking models and systems to enhance their capabilities to be more specifically tracking, and were adopted with new technology. Furthermore, there are different studies in classifying bugs in a step by step method to have clear perception and applicable method in detecting such bugs. This paper shows a new proposed defect tracking model for the purpose of classifying the inserted defects reports in a step by step method for more enhancement of the software quality.

  11. How to 'visualize' lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kenji

    1974-01-01

    Methods to recognize objects are discussed. In case of optics, lenses are used, and light from objects passing through the lenses focuses on focal planes. The amplitude of light on the focal planes in given as a function of the structure factor of scattering light from objects, images of objects are made on image planes. In case of X-ray or neutron diffraction, lenses which make images by X-ray or neutrons can not be made, accordingly images cannot be obtained. Images can be seen with electron microscopes. By X-ray or thermal neutron diffraction, intensity on focal planes in observed, and the defects to be studied are recognized as diffuse scattering. Since it is necessary to minimize aberration in case of image observation with electron microscopes, slits are used to utilize electron beam near optical axis exclusively. Therefore large resolving power cannot be expected. The information concerning structure obtained from focal planes is of statistical nature, and that from image planes is local information. The principle of neutron topography, by which the informations concerning local points are obtained, is explained. A photograph of LiF irradiated by 0.5 MeV proton beam was taken by the topographic method, and shown in this paper. (Kato, T.)

  12. Characterization of the structure and chemistry of defects in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Ruehle, M.; Seidman, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Research programs, presented at the materials research symposium, on defects in materials are presented. Major areas include: point defects, defect aggregates, and ordering; defects in non-metals and semiconductors; atomic resolution imaging of defects; and gain boundaries, interfaces, and layered materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  13. Visual Field Defects and Retinal Ganglion Cell Losses in Human Glaucoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwerth, Ronald S.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The depth of visual field defects are correlated with retinal ganglion cell densities in experimental glaucoma. This study was to determine whether a similar structure-function relationship holds for human glaucoma. Methods The study was based on retinal ganglion cell densities and visual thresholds of patients with documented glaucoma (Kerrigan-Baumrind, et al.) The data were analyzed by a model that predicted ganglion cell densities from standard clinical perimetry, which were then compared to histologic cell counts. Results The model, without free parameters, produced accurate and relatively precise quantification of ganglion cell densities associated with visual field defects. For 437 sets of data, the unity correlation for predicted vs. measured cell densities had a coefficient of determination of 0.39. The mean absolute deviation of the predicted vs. measured values was 2.59 dB, the mean and SD of the distribution of residual errors of prediction was -0.26 ± 3.22 dB. Conclusions Visual field defects by standard clinical perimetry are proportional to neural losses caused by glaucoma. Clinical Relevance The evidence for quantitative structure-function relationships provides a scientific basis of interpreting glaucomatous neuropathy from visual thresholds and supports the application of standard perimetry to establish the stage of the disease. PMID:16769839

  14. Ab initio simulation study of defect assisted Zener tunneling in GaAs diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan; Fan, Zhi-Qiang; Gong, Jian; Jiang, Xiang-Wei

    2017-06-01

    The band to band tunneling of defective GaAs nano-junction is studied by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism with density functional theory. Aiming at performance improvement, two types of defect-induced transport behaviors are reported in this work. By examining the partial density of states of the system, we find the substitutional defect OAs that locates in the middle of tunneling region will introduce band-gap states, which can be used as stepping stones to increase the tunneling current nearly 3 times higher at large bias voltage (Vb≥0.3V). Another type of defects SeAs and VGa (Ga vacancy) create donor and acceptor states at the edge of conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB)respectively, which can change the band bending of the junction as well as increase the tunneling field obtaining a 1.5 times higher ON current. This provides an effective defect engineering approach for next generation TFET device design.

  15. Distribution of defects in wind turbine blades and reliability assessment of blades containing defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2009-01-01

    on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models additional information about number, type and size of the defects is included as stochastic variables. The probability of failure for a wind turbine blade will not only depend on variations in the material......In the present paper two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size based...... properties and the load but also on potential defects in the blades. As a numerical example the probability of failure is calculated for the main spar both with and without defects in terms of delaminations. The delaminations increase the probability of failure compared to a perfect blade, but by applying...

  16. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  17. Density limits in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.

    1984-06-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to neutral hydrogen radiation and recycling is of great importance for the energy balance at the periphery. It is shown that the requirement for thermal equilibrium implies a constraint on the maximum attainable edge density. The relation to other density limits is discussed. The average plasma density is shown to be a strong function of the refuelling deposition profile. (author)

  18. Nuclear Level Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research in the area of nuclear level densities is reviewed. The current interest in nuclear astrophysics and in structure of nuclei off of the line of stability has led to the development of radioactive beam facilities with larger machines currently being planned. Nuclear level densities for the systems used to produce the radioactive beams influence substantially the production rates of these beams. The modification of level-density parameters near the drip lines would also affect nucleosynthesis rates and abundances

  19. Measurement of true density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr-Brion, K.G.; Keen, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    System for determining the true density of a fluent mixture such as a liquid slurry, containing entrained gas, such as air comprises a restriction in pipe through which at least a part of the mixture is passed. Density measuring means such as gamma-ray detectors and source measure the apparent density of the mixture before and after its passage through the restriction. Solid-state pressure measuring devices are arranged to measure the pressure in the mixture before and after its passage through the restriction. Calculating means, such as a programmed microprocessor, determine the true density from these measurements using relationships given in the description. (author)

  20. Studies of defects in the near-surface region and at interfaces using low energy positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1995-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) is a powerful probe to study open-volume defects in solids. Its success is due to the propensity of positrons to seek out low-density regions of a solid, such as vacancies and voids, and the emissions of gamma rays from their annihilations that carry information about the local electronic environment. The development of low-energy positron beams allows probing of defects to depths of few microns, and can successfully characterize defects in the near-surface and interface regions of several technologically important systems. This review focuses on recent studies conducted on semiconductor-based systems