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Sample records for non-magnetic cloaking device

  1. Rigorous analysis of non-magnetic cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    Nonmagnetic cloak offers a feasible way to achieve invisibility at optical frequencies using materials with only electric responses. In this letter, we suggest an approximation of the ideal nonmagnetic cloak and quantitatively study its electromagnetic characteristics using a full-wave scattering...

  2. Optimized cylindrical invisibility cloak with minimum layers of non-magnetic isotropic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhenzhong; Feng Yijun; Xu Xiaofei; Zhao Junming; Jiang Tian, E-mail: yjfeng@nju.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Engineering, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China)

    2011-05-11

    We present optimized design of cylindrical invisibility cloak with minimum layers of non-magnetic isotropic materials. Through an optimization procedure based on genetic algorithm, simpler cloak structure and more realizable material parameters can be achieved with better cloak performance than that of an ideal non-magnetic cloak with a reduced set of parameters. We demonstrate that a cloak shell with only five layers of two normal materials can result in an average 20 dB reduction in the scattering width for all directions when covering the inner conducting cylinder with the cloak. The optimized design can substantially simplify the realization of the invisibility cloak, especially in the optical range.

  3. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  4. Designing the coordinate transformation function for non-magnetic invisibility cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiaofei; Feng Yijun; Zhao Lin; Jiang Tian [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Lu Chunhua; Xu Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, 210009 (China)], E-mail: yjfeng@nju.edu.cn

    2008-11-07

    An optical invisibility cloak based on a transformation approach has recently been proposed by a reduced set of material properties due to their easier implementation in reality and little need for an inhomogeneous permeability distribution, but the drawback of undesired scattering caused by the impedance mismatching at the outer boundary is unavoidable in such a cloak. By properly designing the coordinate transformation function to ensure impedance matching at the outer surface, we show that the performance of a nonmagnetic cylindrical cloak could be improved with minimized scattering fields. Using either a single high order power function or an optimized piecewise continuous power function, a cylindrical non-magnetic cloak has been designed with nearly perfect cloaking performance, which is better than those generated with a linear or a quadratic function. Due to the monotonicity of the designed power functions, the resulting cloak has no restriction on the size of the cloaking shell, therefore is suitable for both thick and thin cloaking structures.

  5. Non-magnetic simplified cylindrical cloak with suppressed zero-th order scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wei; Qiu, Min

    2008-01-01

    A new type of simplified cloaks with matched exterior boundaries is proposed. The cloak uses non-magnetic material for the TM polarization and can function with a relatively thin thickness. It is shown that the $zero^{th}$ order scattering of such cloak is dominant among all cylindrical scattering terms. A gap is added at the cloak's inner surface to eliminate the zero-th order scattering, through the mechanism of scattering resonance. The reduction in scattering is relatively smooth, indicating that the proposed scattering reduction method has good tolerance to perturbations. Numerical simulations also confirm that the proposed structure has very low scattering.

  6. Invisibility with a tunable cloaking device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Rosa, F.S.S.; Pinheiro, F.A.; Farina, C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: In the last decades, electromagnetic cloaking devices have been extensively investigated by physicists and engineers for several reasons. A variety of approaches have been proposed for achieving invisibility based on the unusual properties of meta materials, such as the coordinate-transformation method or scattering cancellation techniques, and both of them have already been experimentally implemented successfully. However, despite all the recent improvements in cloaking techniques, it is still a challenge to make practical tunable cloaking devices. Nowadays, the designed cloaks used in the experiments are generally manufactured to work at or around a certain frequency that cannot be freely controlled after fabrication. >From the experimental point of view this is a considerable limitation to test the cloaking efficiency in different frequency ranges of operation. Hence, it would be very interesting to conceive a cloaking device whose electromagnetic properties could be controlled by an external tunable agent. Our purpose in this work is to show that a magneto-optical cloaking device under the influence of a tunable external magnetic field can be used to control the invisibility condition for a frequency range of operation. Besides, our results, which can be achieved for moderate magnetic fields and typical plasmonic materials, are shown to be robust to material losses, so that they may pave the way for developing actively tunable, versatile plasmonic cloaks. (author)

  7. Open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Yang, Fan; Jin, Tian Yu; Lei Mei, Zhong; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    We propose open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation. Compared with the closed configurations of active cloaking and illusion devices, we focus on improving the distribution schemes for the controlled sources, which do not have to surround the protected object strictly. Instead, the controlled sources can be placed in several small discrete clusters, and produce the desired voltages along the controlled boundary, to actively hide or disguise the protected object. Numerical simulations are performed with satisfactory results, which are further validated by experimental measurements. The open cloaking and illusion devices have many advantages over the closed configurations in various potential applications.

  8. A Cloaking Device for Transiting Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M

    2016-01-01

    The transit method is presently the most successful planet discovery and characterization tool at our disposal. Other advanced civilizations would surely be aware of this technique and appreciate that their home planet's existence and habitability is essentially broadcast to all stars lying along their ecliptic plane. We suggest that advanced civilizations could cloak their presence, or deliberately broadcast it, through controlled laser emission. Such emission could distort the apparent shape of their transit light curves with relatively little energy, due to the collimated beam and relatively infrequent nature of transits. We estimate that humanity could cloak the Earth from Kepler-like broadband surveys using an optical monochromatic laser array emitting a peak power of about 30 MW for roughly 10 hours per year. A chromatic cloak, effective at all wavelengths, is more challenging requiring a large array of tunable lasers with a total power of approximately 250 MW. Alternatively, a civilization could cloak ...

  9. A cloaking device for transiting planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.; Teachey, Alex

    2016-06-01

    The transit method is presently the most successful planet discovery and characterization tool at our disposal. Other advanced civilizations would surely be aware of this technique and appreciate that their home planet's existence and habitability is essentially broadcast to all stars lying along their ecliptic plane. We suggest that advanced civilizations could cloak their presence, or deliberately broadcast it, through controlled laser emission. Such emission could distort the apparent shape of their transit light curves with relatively little energy, due to the collimated beam and relatively infrequent nature of transits. We estimate that humanity could cloak the Earth from Kepler-like broad-band surveys using an optical monochromatic laser array emitting a peak power of ˜30 MW for ˜10 hours per year. A chromatic cloak, effective at all wavelengths, is more challenging requiring a large array of tunable lasers with a total power of ˜250 MW. Alternatively, a civilization could cloak only the atmospheric signatures associated with biological activity on their world, such as oxygen, which is achievable with a peak laser power of just ˜160 kW per transit. Finally, we suggest that the time of transit for optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is analogous to the water-hole in radio SETI, providing a clear window in which observers may expect to communicate. Accordingly, we propose that a civilization may deliberately broadcast their technological capabilities by distorting their transit to an artificial shape, which serves as both a SETI beacon and a medium for data transmission. Such signatures could be readily searched in the archival data of transit surveys.

  10. Ray-optics cloaking devices for large objects in incoherent natural light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Lian; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    A cloak that can hide living creatures from sight is a common feature of mythology but still remains unrealized as a practical device. To preserve the wave phase, the previous cloaking solution proposed by Pendry and colleagues required transformation of the electromagnetic space around the hidden object in such a way that the rays bending around the object inside the cloak region have to travel faster than those passing it by. This difficult phase preservation requirement is the main obstacle for building a broadband polarization-insensitive cloak for large objects. Here we propose a simplified version of Pendry’s cloak by abolishing the requirement for phase preservation, as it is irrelevant for observation using incoherent natural light with human eyes, which are phase and polarization insensitive. This allows for a cloak design on large scales using commonly available materials. We successfully demonstrate the cloaking of living creatures, a cat and a fish, from the eye. PMID:24153410

  11. Design of optical cloaks and illusion devices along a circumferential direction in curvilinear coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tungyang; Yu, Shang-Ru

    2010-11-01

    We propose a cloaking and illusion device of circumferential topology based on the concept of transformation optics. The device is capable to cloak an object and/or simultaneously generate illusion images along a circumferential direction in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. This feature allows us to construct multiple illusions in different ways, irrespective of the profile and direction of incident wave. Particularly when the device is served as a building brick of a larger device, one can generate a circumferential array of illusions in a periodic or any preferred pattern. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed illusion devices by carrying out full wave simulations based on finite element calculations.

  12. Practical Invisibility Cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joseph Sung-hwoon

    This thesis presents mainly two methodologies for achieving practical invisibility cloaking. Thus, using commercial technologies, devices that are good approximations to an 'ideal' cloak can be achieved - a cloak that is omnidirectional, broadband, operational for the visible spectrum, three-dimensional (3D), and phase-matching for the light field, among other attributes. We first describe 'paraxial cloaking,' where cloaking is considered as an imaging system. The small-angle ('paraxial') formalism provides a first-order design requirement for any 'perfect' cloaking device. A ray optics four-lens cloak (called the "Rochester Cloak'") is experimentally demonstrated, followed by theoretical work to match the phase for the entire visible spectrum. To extend our broadband, paraxial cloak to larger viewing angles, we then discretize space, angle, spectrum, and phase to approximate an ideal, omnidirectional cloak. Such 'discretized cloaking' is experimentally demonstrated as a 'digital cloak,' where commercially available digital image capture and display technologies are used. In particular, we demonstrate an active cloak that uses lenticular lenslet arrays, similar to 'integral imaging' for 3D displays. The 'digital integral cloak' we demonstrate is dynamic, but requires a time delay for image capture and processing, and is two-dimensional (2D) without phase-matching. Continuing improvements in commercial digital technology and computational power will minimize the resolution limitations of a digital cloak and enhance its processing speed. Thus, a wearable cloak can then be practically realized in the future.

  13. Paraxial Ray Optics Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    Despite much interest and progress in optical spatial cloaking, a three-dimensional (3D), transmitting, continuously multidirectional cloak in the visible regime has not yet been demonstrated. Here we experimentally demonstrate such a cloak using ray optics, albeit with some edge effects. Our device requires no new materials, uses isotropic off-the-shelf optics, scales easily to cloak arbitrarily large objects, and is as broadband as the choice of optical material, all of which have been challenges for current cloaking schemes. In addition, we provide a concise formalism that quantifies and produces perfect optical cloaks in the small-angle (`paraxial') limit, and must be satisfied by any good cloaks.

  14. Invisibility cloak inside a Luneburg lens: Experimental demonstration of birefrigent transformation optics devices

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninova, V N; Piazza, A; Schaefer, D; Smolyaninov, I I

    2012-01-01

    Transformation optics (TO) has recently become a useful methodology in the design of unusual optical devices, such as novel metamaterial lenses and invisibility cloaks. Very recently Danner et al. [1] have suggested theoretical extension of this approach to birefrigent TO devices, which perform useful and different functions for mutually orthogonal polarization states of light. Theoretical designs which operate as invisibility cloak for one polarization while behaving as a Luneburg lens for another orthogonal polarization have been suggested. Here we report the first experimental realization of this and other birefrigent TO designs based on lithographically defined metal/dielectric waveguides. Adiabatic variations of the waveguide shape enable control of the effective refractive indices experienced by the TE and TM modes propagating inside the waveguides. We have studied wavelength and polarization dependent performance of the resulting birefrigent TO devices. These novel optical devices considerably extend o...

  15. Harry Potter's Cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X F; Tu, J; Zhang, D; Cheng, J C

    2011-01-01

    The magic "Harry Potter's cloak" has been the dream of human beings for really long time. Recently, transformation optics inspired from the advent of metamaterials offers great versatility for manipulating wave propagation at will to create amazing illusion effects. In the present work, we proposed a novel transformation recipe, in which the cloaking shell somehow behaves like a "cloaking lens", to provide almost all desired features one can expect for a real magic cloak. The most exciting feature of the current recipe is that an object with arbitrary characteristics (e.g., size, shape or material properties) can be invisibilized perfectly with positive-index materials, which significantly benefits the practical realization of a broad-band cloaking device fabricated with existing materials. Moreover, the one concealed in the hidden region is able to undistortedly communicate with the surrounding world, while the lens-like cloaking shell will protect the cloaked source/sensor from being traced back by outside ...

  16. Broadband unidirectional cloak designed by eikonal theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Wu, Xiaojia; Zhang, Luoning; Zhou, Jing

    2015-11-02

    A method for designing optical device is derived based on the eikonal theory, which could obtain the eikonal distribution on a curved surface according to the propagation characteristics of the subsequent light wave. Then combining with the phase matching condition, we designed a broadband unidirectional cloak. Different from the reported unidirectional cloaks, the proposed one could be used for coherent wave and has continuous broadband performance. Moreover, it has three cloaked regions. Full-wave simulation results verify the properties of the cloak.

  17. Temperature-Controlled Chameleonlike Cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiguang Peng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Invisibility cloaking based on transformation optics has brought about unlimited space for reverie. However, the design and fabrication of transformation-optics-based cloaks still remain fairly challenging because of the complicated, even extreme, material prescriptions, including its meticulously engineered anisotropy, inhomogeneity and singularity. And almost all the state-of-the-art cloaking devices work within a narrow and invariable frequency band. Here, we propose a novel mechanism for all-dielectric temperature-controllable cloaks. A prototype device was designed and fabricated with SrTiO_{3} ferroelectric cuboids as building blocks, and its cloaking effects were successfully demonstrated, including its frequency-agile invisibility by varying temperature. It revealed that the predesignated cloaking device based on our proposed strategy could be directly scaled in dimensions to operate at different frequency regions, without the necessity for further efforts of redesign. Our work opens the door towards the realization of tunable cloaking devices for various practical applications and provides a simple strategy to readily extend the cloaking band from microwave to terahertz regimes without the need for reconfiguration.

  18. Temperature-Controlled Chameleonlike Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ruiguang; Xiao, Zongqi; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Fuli; Meng, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji; Fan, Yuancheng; Zhang, Peng; Shen, Nian-Hai; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-01-01

    Invisibility cloaking based on transformation optics has brought about unlimited space for reverie. However, the design and fabrication of transformation-optics-based cloaks still remain fairly challenging because of the complicated, even extreme, material prescriptions, including its meticulously engineered anisotropy, inhomogeneity and singularity. And almost all the state-of-the-art cloaking devices work within a narrow and invariable frequency band. Here, we propose a novel mechanism for all-dielectric temperature-controllable cloaks. A prototype device was designed and fabricated with SrTiO3 ferroelectric cuboids as building blocks, and its cloaking effects were successfully demonstrated, including its frequency-agile invisibility by varying temperature. It revealed that the predesignated cloaking device based on our proposed strategy could be directly scaled in dimensions to operate at different frequency regions, without the necessity for further efforts of redesign. Our work opens the door towards the realization of tunable cloaking devices for various practical applications and provides a simple strategy to readily extend the cloaking band from microwave to terahertz regimes without the need for reconfiguration.

  19. Cloaking a metal object from an electromagnetic pulse: A comparison between various cloaking techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, Pekka; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic cloaks are devices that can be used to reduce the total scattering cross section of various objects. An ideal cloak removes all scattering from an object and thus makes this object "invisible" to the electromagnetic fields that impinge on the object. However, ideal cloaking appears to be possible only at a single frequency. To study cloaking from an electromagnetic pulse we consider propagation of a pulse inside a waveguide with a cloaked metal object inside. There are several ways to achieve cloaking and in this paper we study three such methods, namely, the coordinate-transformation cloak, the transmission-line cloak, and the metal-plate cloak. In the case of the two last cloaks, pulse propagation is studied using experimental data whereas the coordinate-transformation cloak is studied with numerical simulations. The results show that, at least in the studied cases where the cloaked object's diameter is smaller than the wavelength, the cloaks based on transmission-line meshes and metal plate...

  20. Dielectric optical invisibility cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J.; Tamma, V. A.; Park, W.; Summers, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, metamaterial cloaks for the microwave frequency range have been designed using transformative optics design techniques and experimentally demonstrated. The design of these structures requires extreme values of permittivity and permeability within the device, which has been accomplished by the use of resonating metal elements. However, these elements severely limit the operating frequency range of the cloak due to their non-ideal dispersion properties at optical frequencies. In this paper we present designs to implement a simpler demonstration of cloaking, the carpet cloak, in which a curved reflective surface is compressed into a flat reflective surface, effectively shielding objects behind the curve from view with respect to the incoming radiation source. This approach eliminates the need for metallic resonant elements. These structures can now be fabricated using only high index dielectric materials by the use of electron beam lithography and standard cleanroom technologies. The design method, simulation analysis, device fabrication, and near field optical microscopy (NSOM) characterization results are presented for devices designed to operate in the 1400-1600nm wavelength range. Improvements to device performance by the deposition/infiltration of linear, and potentially non-linear optical materials, were investigated.

  1. Macroscopic Invisibility Cloaking of Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xianzhong; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Kyle; Pendry, John B; Zhang, Shuang

    2010-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks of light, which used to be confined to the imagination, have now been turned into a scientific reality, thanks to the enabling theoretical tools of transformation optics and conformal mapping. Inspired by those theoretical works, the experimental realisation of electromagnetic invisibility cloaks has been reported at various electromagnetic frequencies. All the invisibility cloaks demonstrated thus far, however, have relied on nano- or micro-fabricated artificial composite materials with spatially varying electromagnetic properties, which limit the size of the cloaked region to a few wavelengths. Here we report realisation of a macroscopic volumetric invisibility cloak constructed from natural birefringent crystals. The cloak operates at visible frequencies and is capable of hiding three-dimensional objects of the scale of centimetres and millimetres. Our work opens avenues for future applications with macroscopic cloaking devices.

  2. Regularized Transformation-Optics Cloaking for the Helmholtz Equation: From Partial Cloak to Full Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu; Rondi, Luca; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2015-04-01

    We develop a very general theory on the regularized approximate invisibility cloaking for the wave scattering governed by the Helmholtz equation in any space dimensions via the approach of transformation optics. There are four major ingredients in our proposed theory: (1) The non-singular cloaking medium is obtained by the push-forwarding construction through a transformation that blows up a subset in the virtual space, where is an asymptotic regularization parameter. will degenerate to K 0 as , and in our theory K 0 could be any convex compact set in , or any set whose boundary consists of Lipschitz hypersurfaces, or a finite combination of those sets. (2) A general lossy layer with the material parameters satisfying certain compatibility integral conditions is employed right between the cloaked and cloaking regions. (3) The contents being cloaked could also be extremely general, possibly including, at the same time, generic mediums and, sound-soft, sound-hard and impedance-type obstacles, as well as some sources or sinks. (4) In order to achieve a cloaking device of compact size, particularly for the case when is not "uniformly small", an assembly-by-components, the (ABC) geometry is developed for both the virtual and physical spaces and the blow-up construction is based on concatenating different components. Within the proposed framework, we show that the scattered wave field corresponding to a cloaking problem will converge to u 0 as , with u 0 being the scattered wave field corresponding to a sound-hard K 0. The convergence result is used to theoretically justify the approximate full and partial invisibility cloaks, depending on the geometry of K 0. On the other hand, the convergence results are conducted in a much more general setting than what is needed for the invisibility cloaking, so they are of significant mathematical interest for their own sake. As for applications, we construct three types of full and partial cloaks. Some numerical experiments are

  3. Full and Partial Cloaking in Electromagnetic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youjun; Liu, Hongyu; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two regularized transformation-optics cloaking schemes for electromagnetic (EM) waves. Both schemes are based on the blowup construction with the generating sets being, respectively, a generic curve and a planar subset. We derive sharp asymptotic estimates in assessing the cloaking performances of the two constructions in terms of the regularization parameters and the geometries of the cloaking devices. The first construction yields an approximate full-cloak, whereas the second construction yields an approximate partial-cloak. Moreover, by incorporating properly chosen conducting layers, both cloaking constructions are capable of nearly cloaking arbitrary EM contents. This work complements the existing results in Ammari et al. (SIAM J Appl Math 73:2055-2076, 2013), Bao and Liu (SIAM J Appl Math 74:724-742, 2014), Bao et al. (J Math Pure Appl (9) 101:716-733, 2014) on approximate EM cloaks with the generating set being a singular point, and it also extends Deng et al. (On regularized full- and partial-cloaks in acoustic scat- tering. Preprint, arXiv:1502.01174, 2015), Li et al. (Commun Math Phys, 335:671-712, 2015) on regularized full and partial cloaks for acoustic waves governed by the Helmholtz system to the more challenging EM case governed by the full Maxwell system.

  4. Robust large dimension terahertz cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Dachuan; Han, Jiaguang; Yang, Yuanmu; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Weili

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaking not only catches the human imagination, but also promises fascinating applications in optics and photonics. By manipulating electromagnetic waves with metamaterials, researchers have been able to realize electromagnetic cloaking in the microwave, terahertz and optical regimes. Nevertheless, the complex design and fabrication process, narrow bandwidth, and high intrinsic losses in the metamaterial-based cloaks have imposed intractable limitations on their realistic applications. Seeking new approaches to overcome these perceived disadvantages is in progress. Here by using uniform sapphire crystal, we demonstrate the first homogenous invisibility cloak functioning at terahertz frequencies. The terahertz invisibility device features a large concealed volume, low loss, and broad bandwidth. In particular, it is capable of hiding objects with a dimension nearly an order of magnitude larger than that of its lithographic counterpart, but without involving complex and time-consuming cleanroom pro...

  5. Invisibility cloak with image projection capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasish; Ji, Chengang; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of invisibility cloaks have been led by rigorous theories and such cloak structures, in general, require extreme material parameters. Consequently, it is challenging to realize them, particularly in the full visible region. Due to the insensitivity of human eyes to the polarization and phase of light, cloaking a large object in the full visible region has been recently realized by a simplified theory. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a device concept where a large object can be concealed in a cloak structure and at the same time any images can be projected through it by utilizing a distinctively different approach; the cloaking via one polarization and the image projection via the other orthogonal polarization. Our device structure consists of commercially available optical components such as polarizers and mirrors, and therefore, provides a significant further step towards practical application scenarios such as transparent devices and see-through displays.

  6. Non-Euclidean cloaking for light waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyc, Tomas; Chan, Che Ting; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Non-Euclidean geometry combined with transformation optics has recently led to the proposal of an invisibility cloak that avoids optical singularities and therefore can work, in principle, in a broad band of the spectrum [U. Leonhardt and T. Tyc, Science 323, 110 (2009)]. Such a cloak is perfect in the limit of geometrical optics, but not in wave optics. Here we analyze, both analytically and numerically, full wave propagation in non-Euclidean cloaking. We show that the cloaking device performs remarkably well even in a regime beyond geometrical optics where the device is comparable in size with the wavelength. In particular, the cloak is nearly perfect for a spectrum of frequencies that are related to spherical harmonics. We also show that for increasing wavenumber the device works increasingly better, approaching perfect behavior in the limit of geometrical optics.

  7. Design, implementation, and extension of thermal invisibility cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youming Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thermal invisibility cloak, as inspired by optical invisibility cloaks, is a device which can steer the conductive heat flux around an isolated object without changing the ambient temperature distribution so that the object can be “invisible” to external thermal environment. While designs of thermal invisibility cloaks inherit previous theories from optical cloaks, the uniqueness of heat diffusion leads to more achievable implementations. Thermal invisibility cloaks, as well as the variations including thermal concentrator, rotator, and illusion devices, have potentials to be applied in thermal management, sensing and imaging applications. Here, we review the current knowledge of thermal invisibility cloaks in terms of their design and implementation in cloaking studies, and their extension as other functional devices.

  8. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-04-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers.

  9. Experimental demonstration of an ultra-thin three-dimensional thermal cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Fei; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    We report the first experimental realization of a three-dimensional thermal cloak shielding an air bubble in a bulk metal without disturbing external thermal flux. The cloak is made of a thin layer of homogeneous and isotropic material with simple mechanical manufacturing. The thickness of cloak is 200 um while the cloaked air bubble has a diameter of 1 cm, achieving the ratio between dimensions of the cloak and the cloaked object 2 orders smaller than previous thermal cloaks which were mainly realized at a two-dimensional plane. This work can find applications in novel thermal devices in the three-dimensional physical space.

  10. Experimental and computational studies of electromagnetic cloaking at microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui

    An invisibility cloak is a device that can hide the target by enclosing it from the incident radiation. This intriguing device has attracted a lot of attention since it was first implemented at a microwave frequency in 2006. However, the problems of existing cloak designs prevent them from being widely applied in practice. In this dissertation, we try to remove or alleviate the three constraints for practical applications imposed by loosy cloaking media, high implementation complexity, and small size of hidden objects compared to the incident wavelength. To facilitate cloaking design and experimental characterization, several devices and relevant techniques for measuring the complex permittivity of dielectric materials at microwave frequencies are developed. In particular, a unique parallel plate waveguide chamber has been set up to automatically map the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution for wave propagation through the resonator arrays and cloaking structures. The total scattering cross section of the cloaking structures was derived based on the measured scattering field by using this apparatus. To overcome the adverse effects of lossy cloaking media, microwave cloaks composed of identical dielectric resonators made of low loss ceramic materials are designed and implemented. The effective permeability dispersion was provided by tailoring dielectric resonator filling fractions. The cloak performances had been verified by full-wave simulation of true multi-resonator structures and experimental measurements of the fabricated prototypes. With the aim to reduce the implementation complexity caused by metamaterials employment for cloaking, we proposed to design 2-D cylindrical cloaks and 3-D spherical cloaks by using multi-layer ordinary dielectric material (epsilon r>1) coating. Genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the dielectric profiles of the cloaking shells to provide the minimum scattering cross sections of the cloaked targets. The designed cloaks can

  11. Radiation and scattering from imperfect cylindrical electromagnetic cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isic, G; Gajic, R; Novakovic, B; Popovic, Z V; Hingerl, K

    2008-02-04

    The design of electromagnetic invisibility cloaks is based on singular mappings prescribing zero or infinite values for material parameters on the inner surface of the cloak. Since this is only approximately feasible, an asymptotic analysis is necessary for a sound description of cloaks. We adopt a simple and effective approach for analyzing electromagnetic cloaks - instead of the originally proposed singular mapping, nonsingular mappings asymptotically approaching the ideal one are considered. Scattering and radiation from this type of imperfect cylindrical cloaks is solved analytically and the results are confirmed by full-wave finite element simulations. Our analysis sheds more light on the influence of this kind of imperfection on the cloaking performance and further explores the physics of cloaking devices.

  12. Transformation thermodynamics and heat cloaking: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Muhammad; Liu, Yichao; Lee, El Hang; Ma, Yungui

    2016-04-01

    This article is a review of the advances and progresses in the field of heat cloaking which is being realized using metamaterials. Heat cloaking has been a particularly important subject of study due to its potential multidimensional applications. The process which manipulates the heat flux in such a way that it can neither enter into the cloaked region nor be distorted outside is called thermal cloaking. Transformation optics has made the hitherto inconceivable advancements in the field of thermodynamics possible with the remarkable assistance of metamaterials. In this article we present a review of the work done in the field of heat cloaking, its progress and outlook. We discuss the theoretical and experimental studies, models, design managements, implementations and behaviors of thermal invisibility cloaking and related devices. This review is intended to help further develop practical and applicable concepts, examine fabrication techniques for a variety of different invisibility cloaking devices and systems, and to pave a way for the new avenues leading to new future technologies.

  13. Harry Potter's Cloak

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, X. F.; Liang, B.; J; Tu; Zhang, D; Cheng, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The magic "Harry Potter's cloak" has been the dream of human beings for really long time. Recently, transformation optics inspired from the advent of metamaterials offers great versatility for manipulating wave propagation at will to create amazing illusion effects. In the present work, we proposed a novel transformation recipe, in which the cloaking shell somehow behaves like a "cloaking lens", to provide almost all desired features one can expect for a real magic cloak. The most exciting fe...

  14. Diffusive-light invisibility cloak for transient illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazbayev, B.; Beruete, M.; Martínez, A.; García-Meca, C.

    2016-12-01

    Invisibility in a diffusive-light-scattering medium has been recently demonstrated by employing a scattering-cancellation core-shell cloak. Unlike nondiffusive cloaks, such a device can be simultaneously macroscopic, broadband, passive, polarization independent, and omnidirectional. Unfortunately, it has been verified that this cloak, as well as more sophisticated ones based on transformation optics, fail under pulsed illumination, invalidating their use for a variety of applications. Here, we introduce a different approach based on unimodular transformations that enables the construction of unidirectional diffusive-light cloaks exhibiting a perfect invisibility effect, even under transient conditions. Moreover, we demonstrate that a polygonal cloak can extend this functionality to multiple directions with a nearly ideal behavior, while preserving all other features. We propose and numerically verify a simple cloak realization based on a layered stack of two isotropic materials. The studied devices have several applications not addressable by any of the other cloaks proposed to date, including shielding from pulse-based detection techniques, cloaking undesired scattering elements in time-of-flight imaging or high-speed communication systems for diffusive environments, and building extreme optical security features. The discussed cloaking strategy could also be applied to simplify the implementation of thermal cloaks.

  15. Complementary media invisibility cloak that cloaks objects at a distance outside the cloaking shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun; Chen, Huanyang; Zhang, Zhao-Qing; Chan, C T

    2009-03-06

    Based on the concept of complementary media, we propose an invisibility cloak operating at a finite frequency that can cloak an object with a prespecified shape and size within a certain distance outside the shell. The cloak is comprised of a dielectric core and an "antiobject" embedded inside a negative index shell. The cloaked object is not blinded by the cloaking shell since it lies outside the cloak. Full-wave simulations in two dimensions have been performed to verify the cloaking effect.

  16. Transformation Optics, Generalized Cloaking and Superlenses

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolet, Andre; Geuzaine, Christophe; 10.1109/TMAG.2010.2043073

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, transformation optics is presented together with a generalization of invisibility cloaking: instead of an empty region of space, an inhomogeneous structure is transformed via Pendry's map in order to give, to any object hidden in the central hole of the cloak, a completely arbitrary appearance. Other illusion devices based on superlenses considered from the point of view of transformation optics are also discussed.

  17. A rigorous analysis of high-order electromagnetic invisibility cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weder, Ricardo [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, PO Box 68 (Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2b) FI-00014 (Finland)], E-mail: weder@servidor.unam.mx

    2008-02-15

    There is currently a great deal of interest in the invisibility cloaks recently proposed by Pendry et al that are based on the transformation approach. They obtained their results using first-order transformations. In recent papers, Hendi et al and Cai et al considered invisibility cloaks with high-order transformations. In this paper, we study high-order electromagnetic invisibility cloaks in transformation media obtained by high-order transformations from general anisotropic media. We consider the case where there is a finite number of spherical cloaks located in different points in space. We prove that for any incident plane wave, at any frequency, the scattered wave is identically zero. We also consider the scattering of finite-energy wave packets. We prove that the scattering matrix is the identity, i.e., that for any incoming wave packet the outgoing wave packet is the same as the incoming one. This proves that the invisibility cloaks cannot be detected in any scattering experiment with electromagnetic waves in high-order transformation media, and in particular in the first-order transformation media of Pendry et al. We also prove that the high-order invisibility cloaks, as well as the first-order ones, cloak passive and active devices. The cloaked objects completely decouple from the exterior. Actually, the cloaking outside is independent of what is inside the cloaked objects. The electromagnetic waves inside the cloaked objects cannot leave the concealed regions and vice versa, the electromagnetic waves outside the cloaked objects cannot go inside the concealed regions. As we prove our results for media that are obtained by transformation from general anisotropic materials, we prove that it is possible to cloak objects inside general crystals.

  18. Natural Light Cloaking for Aquatic and Terrestrial Creatures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hongsheng; Shen, Lian; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Zheludev, Nikolay; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    A cloak that can hide living creatures from sight is a common feature of mythology but still remains unrealized as a practical device. To preserve the phase of wave, the previous cloaking solution proposed by Pendry \\emph{et al.} required transforming electromagnetic space around the hidden object in such a way that the rays bending around it have to travel much faster than those passing it by. The difficult phase preservation requirement is the main obstacle for building a broadband polarization insensitive cloak for large objects. Here, we suggest a simplifying version of Pendry's cloak by abolishing the requirement for phase preservation as irrelevant for observation in incoherent natural light with human eyes that are phase and polarization insensitive. This allows the cloak design to be made in large scale using commonly available materials and we successfully report cloaking living creatures, a cat and a fish, in front of human eyes.

  19. Two-Dimensional (2D) Polygonal Electromagnetic Cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao; YAO Kan; LI Fang

    2009-01-01

    Transformation optics offers remarkable control over electromagnetic fields and opens an exciting gateway to design 'invisible cloak devices' recently.We present an important class of two-dimensional (2D) cloaks with polygon geometries.Explicit expressions of transformed medium parameters are derived with their unique properties investigated.It is found that the elements of diagonalized permittivity tensors are always positive within an irregular polygon cloak besides one element diverges to plus infinity and the other two become zero at the inner boundary.At most positions,the principle axes of permittivity tensors do not align with position vectors.An irregular polygon cloak is designed and its invisibility to external electromagnetic waves is numerically verified.Since polygon cloaks can be tailored to resemble any objects,the transformation is finally generalized to the realization of 2D cloaks with arbitrary geometries.

  20. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Chen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xue-Feng [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zou, Xin-Ye, E-mail: xyzou@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices.

  1. Dispersive finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis of the elliptic cylindrical cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Ahn, D. [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A dispersive full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is used to calculate the performance of elliptic cylindrical cloaking devices. The permittivity and the permeability tensors for the cloaking structure are derived by using an effective medium approach in general relativity. The elliptic cylindrical invisibility devices are found to show imperfect cloaking, and the cloaking performance is found to depend on the polarization of the incident waves, the direction of the propagation of those waves, the semi-focal distances and the loss tangents of the meta-material. When the semifocal distance of the elliptic cylinder decreases, the performance of the cloaking becomes very good, with neither noticeable scatterings nor field penetrations. For a larger semi-focal distance, only the TM wave with a specific propagation direction shows good cloaking performance. Realistic cloaking materials with loss still show a cloak that is working, but attenuated back-scattering waves exist.

  2. Electromagnetic Reciprocal Cloak with Only Axial Material Parameter Spatially Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal cloak is an intriguing metamaterial device, in which a hidden antenna or a sensor can receive electromagnetic irradiation from the outside but its presence will not be detected. Based on transformation optics, a cylindrical electromagnetic reciprocal cloak with only axial parameter varying with radius is designed and validated by full wave simulation. When two dispersive reciprocal cloaks are put together, they do not interfere with each other. Our work demonstrates the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC ability of the reciprocal cloak which is very important in multi antenna and sensor design.

  3. Photorealistic ray tracing of free-space invisibility cloaks made of uniaxial dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Halimeh, Jad C

    2012-01-01

    The design rules of transformation optics generally lead to spatially inhomogeneous and anisotropic impedance-matched magneto-dielectric material distributions for, e.g., free-space invisibility cloaks. Recently, simplified anisotropic non-magnetic free-space cloaks made of a locally uniaxial dielectric material (calcite) have been realized experimentally. In a two-dimensional setting and for in-plane polarized light propagating in this plane, the cloaking performance can still be perfect for light rays. However, for general views in three dimensions, various imperfections are expected. In this paper, we study two different purely dielectric uniaxial cylindrical free-space cloaks. For one, the optic axis is along the radial direction, for the other one it is along the azimuthal direction. The azimuthal uniaxial cloak has not been suggested previously to the best of our knowledge. We visualize the cloaking performance of both by calculating photorealistic images rendered by ray tracing. Following and complemen...

  4. Three-dimensional invisibility cloaks functioning at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Zhou, Fan; Liang, Dachuan; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Weili

    2014-05-01

    Quasi-three-dimensional invisibility cloaks, comprised of either homogeneous or inhomogeneous media, are experimentally demonstrated in the terahertz regime. The inhomogeneous cloak was lithographically fabricated using a scalable Projection Microstereolithography process. The triangular cloaking structure has a total thickness of 4.4 mm, comprised of 220 layers of 20 μm thickness. The cloak operates at a broad frequency range between 0.3 and 0.6 THz, and is placed over an α-lactose monohydrate absorber with rectangular shape. Characterized using angular-resolved reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the results indicate that the terahertz invisibility cloak has successfully concealed both the geometrical and spectroscopic signatures of the absorber, making it undetectable to the observer. The homogeneous cloaking device made from birefringent crystalline sapphire features a large concealed volume, low loss, and broad bandwidth. It is capable of hiding objects with a dimension nearly an order of magnitude larger than that of its lithographic counterpart, but without involving complex and time-consuming cleanroom processing. The cloak device was made from two 20-mm-thick high-purity sapphire prisms. The cloaking region has a maximum height 1.75 mm with a volume of approximately 5% of the whole sample. The reflected TM beam from the cloak shows nearly the same profile as that reflected by a flat mirror.

  5. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone, E-mail: dhlin@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  6. Hiding a Realistic Object Using a Broadband Terahertz Invisibility Cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Fan; Cao, Wei; Stuart, Colin T; Gu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been a long-standing dream for many researchers over the decades. The introduction of transformational optics has revitalized this field by providing a general method to design material distributions to hide the subject from detection. By transforming space and light propagation, a three-dimensional (3D) object is perceived as having a reduced number of dimensions, in the form of points, lines, and thin sheets, making it "undetectable" judging from the scattered field. Although a variety of cloaking devices have been reported at microwave and optical frequencies, the spectroscopically important Terahertz (THz) domain remains unexplored. Moreover, due to the difficulties in fabricating cloaking devices that are optically large in all three dimensions, hiding realistic 3D objects has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of a 3D THz cloaking device fabricated using a scalable Projection Microstereolithography process. The cloak operates at a broa...

  7. Illusions and Cloaks for Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, T. M.; Valiente-Kroon, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hao, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Ever since the inception of Transformation Optics (TO), new and exciting ideas have been proposed in the field of electromagnetics and the theory has been modified to work in such fields as acoustics and thermodynamics. The most well-known application of this theory is to cloaking, but another equally intriguing application of TO is the idea of an illusion device. Here, we propose a general method to transform electromagnetic waves between two arbitrary surfaces. This allows a flat surface to reproduce the scattering behaviour of a curved surface and vice versa, thereby giving rise to perfect optical illusion and cloaking devices, respectively. The performance of the proposed devices is simulated using thin effective media with engineered material properties. The scattering of the curved surface is shown to be reproduced by its flat analogue (for illusions) and vice versa for cloaks.

  8. Cloaking and imaging at the same time

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Qiannan; Chen, Huanyang

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a conceptual device to perform subwavelength imaging with positive refraction. The key to this proposal is that a drain is no longer a must for some cases. What's more, this device is an isotropic omnidirectional cloak with a perfect electric conductor hiding region and shows versatile illusion optical effects. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the functionalities.

  9. Cloaking and imaging at the same time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiannan; Xu, Yadong; Li, Hui; Chen, Huanyang

    2013-02-01

    In this letter, we propose a conceptual device to perform good imaging with positive refraction. At the same time, this device is an isotropic omnidirectional cloak with a perfect electric conductor hiding region and shows versatile illusion optical effects. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the functionalities.

  10. Electret electrostatic cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhao, Zhigang; Li, Hua, E-mail: 12.66@163.com

    2015-04-01

    We report that a bi-layer electret cylinder can cloak electrostatic field. We fabricated two hollow electret cylinders, the two hollow electret cylinders nested a bi-layer hollow electret cylinder. The direction of the polarization intensity is parallel to one of the diameters. Experimental results show that the bi-layer hollow electret cylinder can cloak electrostatic field.

  11. The boundary conditions for point transformed electromagnetic invisibility cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weder, Ricardo [Departamento de Metodos Matematicos y Numericos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-726, Mexico DF 01000 (Mexico)], E-mail: weder@servidor.unam.mx

    2008-10-17

    In this paper we study point transformed electromagnetic invisibility cloaks in transformation media that are obtained by transformation from general anisotropic media. We assume that there are several point transformed electromagnetic cloaks located in different points in space. Our results apply in particular to the first-order invisibility cloaks introduced by Pendry et al and to the high-order invisibility cloaks introduced by Hendi et al and by Cai et al. We identify the appropriate cloaking boundary conditions that the solutions of Maxwell equations have to satisfy at the outside, {partial_derivative}K{sub +}, and at the inside, {partial_derivative}K{sub -}, of the boundary of the cloaked object K in the case where the permittivity and the permeability are bounded below and above in K. Namely, that the tangential components of the electric and the magnetic fields have to vanish at {partial_derivative}K{sub +}-which is always true-and that the normal components of the curl of the electric and the magnetic fields have to vanish at {partial_derivative}K{sub -}. These results are proven requiring that energy be conserved. In the case of one spherical cloak with a spherically stratified K and a radial current at {partial_derivative}K we verify by an explicit calculation that our cloaking boundary conditions are satisfied and that cloaking of active devices holds, even if the current is at the boundary of the cloaked object. As we prove our results for media that are obtained by transformation from general anisotropic media, our results apply to the cloaking of objects with passive and active devices contained in general anisotropic media, in particular to objects with passive and active devices contained inside general crystals. Our results suggest a method to enhance cloaking in the approximate transformation media that are used in practice. Namely, to coat the boundary of the cloaked object (the inner boundary of the cloak) with a material that imposes the

  12. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  13. Omnidirectional surface wave cloak using an isotropic homogeneous dielectric coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    The field of transformation optics owes a lot of its fame to the concept of cloaking. While some experimental progress has been made towards free-space cloaking in three dimensions, the material properties required are inherently extremely difficult to achieve. The approximations that then have to be made to allow fabrication produce unsatisfactory device performance. In contrast, when surface wave systems are the focus, it has been shown that a route distinct from those used to design free-space cloaks can be taken. This results in very simple solutions that take advantage of the ability to incorporate surface curvature. Here, we provide a demonstration in the microwave regime of cloaking a bump in a surface. The distortion of the shape of the surface wave fronts due to the curvature is corrected with a suitable refractive index profile. The surface wave cloak is fabricated from a metallic backed homogeneous dielectric waveguide of varying thickness, and exhibits omnidirectional operation.

  14. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; Jiang, Yuyu; Yu, Faxin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder as if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light—a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0+ to 6 GHz. This work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits. PMID:26056299

  15. Analytical Solution for Elliptical Cloaks Based on The Frequency Selective Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ghasemi Mizuji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the elliptical dielectric cylinder which is covered with FSS cloak is considered. Frequency selective surface cloak which Alu named it mantle cloak is one of the recent techniques for cloaking. In this method an appropriate FSS can act as cloaking device for suppressing  the scattering of object  in the desired frequency. With using this method the dimension of the cloaks is extremely reduced. By this proposed structure, the RCS of elliptical cylinder  is reduced about 10-20 dB and designed cloak has an appropriate performance.  The analytical solution for the wave in each layer is presented and with using simulation, the electric field and the scattering pattern has been drawn.

  16. Invisibility cloaking in weak scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setälä, Tero; Hakkarainen, Timo; Friberg, Ari T.; Hoenders, Bernhard J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider invisibility cloaking of a slab object in scalar wave theory within the first-order Born approximation. We show that in the forward direction cloaking is achieved for any object slab and incident field, whereas in the backward direction cloaking is possible at least for self-imaging fiel

  17. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  18. Broadband cloaking using composite dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Bing Hwang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel cloaking structure that is able to make a metallic block invisible in a metallic waveguide. Such a cloak is made up of a stack of commonly used dielectric slabs. We carry out the numerical simulation and observe the detour of the vector Poynting power through the cloak. Moreover, the experiment is conducted for measuring the scattering characteristics including the reflection and transmission coefficients. The great improvement in the transmission coefficient in a broad bandwidth after cloaking is demonstrated. Significantly, the theory of mode conversion is developed for explaining the cloaking phenomenon.

  19. Thermal cloak-concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopically manipulating heat flow at will, thermal metamaterials have opened a practical way, which possesses a single function, such as either cloaking or concentrating the flow of heat even though environmental temperature varies. By developing a theory of transformation heat transfer for multiple functions, here we introduce the concept of intelligent thermal metamaterials with a dual function, which is in contrast to the existing thermal metamaterials with single functions. By assembling homogeneous isotropic materials and shape-memory alloys, we experimentally fabricate a kind of intelligent thermal metamaterials, which can automatically change from a cloak (or concentrator) to a concentrator (or cloak) when the environmental temperature changes. This work paves an efficient way for a controllable gradient of heat, and also provides guidance both for arbitrarily manipulating the flow of heat and for efficiently designing similar intelligent metamaterials in other fields.

  20. Experimental demonstration of illusion optics with ``external cloaking'' effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Guochang; Li, Fang; Fang, Guangyou

    2011-08-01

    A metamaterial "illusion optics" with "complementary medium" and "restoring medium" is designed by using inductor-capacitor (L-C) network medium. The unprecedented effects of "external cloaking" and "transforming one object to appear as another" are demonstrated experimentally. We also demonstrate that the non-resonant nature of the L-C network decreases the sensitivity of the "external cloaking" effect to the variation of the frequency and results in an acceptable bandwidth of the whole device.

  1. Transmutation of planar media singularities in a conformal cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichao; Mukhtar, Musawwadah; Ma, Yungui; Ong, C K

    2013-11-01

    Invisibility cloaking based on optical transformation involves materials singularity at the branch cut points. Many interesting optical devices, such as the Eaton lens, also require planar media index singularities in their implementation. We show a method to transmute two singularities simultaneously into harmless topological defects formed by anisotropic permittivity and permeability tensors. Numerical simulation is performed to verify the functionality of the transmuted conformal cloak consisting of two kissing Maxwell fish eyes.

  2. Broadband cloaking for flexural waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zareei, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The governing equation for elastic waves in flexural plates is not form invariant, and hence designing a cloak for such waves faces a major challenge. Here, we present the design of a perfect broadband cloak for flexural waves through the use of a nonlinear transformation, and by matching term-by-term the original and transformed equations. For a readily achievable flexural cloak in a physical setting, we further present an approximate adoption of our perfect cloak under more restrictive physical constraints. Through direct simulation of the governing equations, we show that this cloak, as well, maintains a consistently high cloaking efficiency over a broad range of frequencies. The methodology developed here may be used for steering waves and designing cloaks in other physical systems with non form-invariant governing equations.

  3. Two-dimensional cylindrical thermal cloak designed by implicit transformation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuebo; Lin, Guochang; Wang, Youshan

    2016-07-01

    As a new-type technology of heat management, thermal metamaterials have attracted more and more attentions recently and thermal cloak is a typical case. Thermal conductivity of thermal cloak designed by coordinate transformation method is usually featured by inhomogeneity, anisotropy and local singularity. Explicit transformation method, which is commonly used to design thermal cloak with the coordinate transformation known in advance, has insufficient flexibility, making it hard to proactively reduce the difficulty of device fabrication. In this work, we designed the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) cylindrical thermal cloak using the implicit transformation method without knowledge of the coordinate transformation in advance. With two classes of generation functions taken into consideration, this study adopted full-wave simulations to analyze the thermal cloaking performances of designed thermal cloaks. Material distributions and simulation results showed that the implicit transformation method has high flexibility. The form of coordinate transformation not only influences the homogeneity and anisotropy but also directly influences the thermal cloaking performance. An improved layered structure for 2D cylindrical thermal cloak was put forward based on the generation function g(r) = r15, which reduces the number of the kinds of constituent materials while guaranteeing good thermal cloaking performance. This work provides a beneficial guidance for reducing the fabrication difficulty of thermal cloak.

  4. Broad band invisibility cloak made of normal dielectric multilayer

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiaofei; Xiong, Shuai; Fan, Jinlong; Zhao, Jun-Ming; Jiang, Tian

    2011-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and performance test of a quasi three-dimensional carpet cloak made of normal dielectric in the microwave regime. Taking advantage of a simple linear coordinate transformation we design a carpet cloak with homogeneous anisotropic medium and then practically realize the device with multilayer of alternating normal dielectric slabs based on the effective medium theory. As a proof-of-concept example, we fabricate the carpet cloak with multilayer of FR4 dielectric slabs with air spacing. The performance of the fabricated design is verified through full-wave numerical simulation and measurement of the far-field scattering electromagnetic waves in a microwave anechoic chamber. Experimental results have demonstrated pronounced cloaking effect in a very broad band from 8 GHz to 18 GHz (whole X and Ku band) due to the low loss, non-dispersive feature of the multilayer dielectric structure.

  5. A hybrid Scatter/Transform cloaking model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad Licht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Scatter/Transform cloak is developed that combines the light bending of refraction characteristic of a Transform cloak with the scatter cancellation characteristic of a Scatter cloak. The hybrid cloak incorporates both Transform’s variable index of refraction with modified linear intrusions to maximize the Scatter cloak effect. Scatter/Transform improved the scattering cross-section of cloaking in a 2-dimensional space to 51.7% compared to only 39.6% or 45.1% respectively with either Scatter or Transform alone. Metamaterials developed with characteristics based on the new ST hybrid cloak will exhibit superior cloaking capabilities.

  6. Design and analysis of the trapeziform and flat acoustic cloaks with controllable invisibility performance in a quasi-space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the design, implementation and detailed performance analysis for a class of trapeziform and flat acoustic cloaks. An effective large invisible area is obtained compared with the traditional carpet cloak. The cloaks are realized with homogeneous metamaterials which are made of periodic arrangements of subwavelength unit cells composed of steel embedded in air. The microstructures and its effective parameters of the cloaks are determined quickly and precisely in a broadband frequency range by using the effective medium theory and the proposed parameters optimization method. The invisibility capability of the cloaks can be controlled by the variation of the key design parameters and scale factor which are proved to have more influence on the performance in the near field than that in the far field. Different designs are suitable for different application situations. Good cloaking performance demonstrates that such a device can be physically realized with natural materials which will greatly promote the real applications of invisibility cloak.

  7. Grating-Coupled Waveguide Cloaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Fu; QU Shao-Bo; XU Zhuo; MA Hua; WANG Cong-Min; XIA Song; WANG Xin-Hua; ZHOU Hang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concept of a grating-coupled waveguide (GCW),a new strategy for realizing EM cloaking is presented.Using metallic grating,incident waves are firstly coupled into the effective waveguide and then decoupled into free space behind,enabling EM waves to pass around the obstacle.Phase compensation in the waveguide keeps the wave-front shape behind the obstacle unchanged.Circular,rectangular and triangular cloaks are presented to verify the robustness of the GCW cloaking.Electric field animations and radar cross section (RCS)comparisons convincingly demonstrate the cloaking effect.

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from DC to 250 kHz

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Jianfei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (e.g., microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favorably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from zero to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  9. Transformation optics and invisibility cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Min; Yan, Min; Yan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly summarize the theory of transformation optics and introduce its application in achieving perfect invisibility cloaking. In particular, we theoretically show how the task of realizing cylindrical invisibility cloaks can be eased by using either structural approximation...

  10. Analysis of flexural wave cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Climente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a comprehensive study of the cloak for bending waves theoretically proposed by Farhat et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009] and later on experimentally realized by Stenger et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 014301 (2012]. This study uses a semi-analytical approach, the multilayer scattering method, which is based in the Kirchoff-Love wave equation for flexural waves in thin plates. Our approach was unable to reproduce the predicted behavior of the theoretically proposed cloak. This disagreement is here explained in terms of the simplified wave equation employed in the cloak design, which employed unusual boundary conditions for the cloaking shell. However, our approach reproduces fairly well the measured displacement maps for the fabricated cloak, indicating the validity of our approach. Also, the cloak quality has been here analyzed using the so called averaged visibility and the scattering cross section. The results obtained from both analysis let us to conclude that there is room for further improvements of this type of flexural wave cloak by using better design procedures.

  11. Analysis of flexural wave cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climente, Alfonso; Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the cloak for bending waves theoretically proposed by Farhat et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009)] and later on experimentally realized by Stenger et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 014301 (2012)]. This study uses a semi-analytical approach, the multilayer scattering method, which is based in the Kirchoff-Love wave equation for flexural waves in thin plates. Our approach was unable to reproduce the predicted behavior of the theoretically proposed cloak. This disagreement is here explained in terms of the simplified wave equation employed in the cloak design, which employed unusual boundary conditions for the cloaking shell. However, our approach reproduces fairly well the measured displacement maps for the fabricated cloak, indicating the validity of our approach. Also, the cloak quality has been here analyzed using the so called averaged visibility and the scattering cross section. The results obtained from both analysis let us to conclude that there is room for further improvements of this type of flexural wave cloak by using better design procedures.

  12. Three-dimensional broadband acoustic illusion cloak for sound-hard boundaries of curved geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Weiwei; Liang, Bin; Li, Ruiqi; Jiang, Xue; Zou, Xin-Ye; Yin, Lei-Lei; Cheng, Jianchun

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic illusion cloaks that create illusion effects by changing the scattered wave have many potential applications in a variety of scenarios. However, the experimental realization of generating three-dimensional (3D) acoustic illusions under detection of broadband signals still remains challenging despite the paramount importance for practical applications. Here we report the design and experimental demonstration of a 3D broadband cloak that can effectively manipulate the scattered field to generate the desired illusion effect near curved boundaries. The designed cloak simply comprises positive-index anisotropic materials, with parameters completely independent of either the cloaked object or the boundary. With the ability of manipulating the scattered field in 3D space and flexibility of applying to arbitrary geometries, our method may take a major step toward the real world application of acoustic cloaks and offer the possibilities of building advanced acoustic devices with versatile functionalities.

  13. Directional cloaking of flexural waves in a plate with a locally resonant metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Rupin, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical design of a directional invisibility cloak for backward scattered elastic waves propagating in a thin plate (A0 Lamb waves). The directional cloak is based on a set of resonating beams that are attached perpendicular to the plate and are arranged at a sub-wavelength scale in ten concentric rings. The exotic effective properties of this locally resonant metamaterial ensure coexistence of bandgaps and directional cloaking for certain beam configurations over a large frequency band. The best directional cloaking was obtained when the resonators' length decreases from the central to the outermost ring. In this case, flexural waves experience a vanishing index of refraction when they cross the outer layers, leading to a frequency bandgap that protects the central part of the cloak. Numerical simulation shows that there is no back-scattering in these configurations. These results might have applications in the design of seismic-wave protection devices.

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    'Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic', as the late Arthur C Clarke wrote. So what does it take to do magic by technology? Transformation optics has developed some tantalizing ideas and the first practical demonstrations of 'pure and applied magic'. Transformation optics gathers an unusual mix of scientists, ranging from practically-minded engineers to imaginative theoretical physicists and mathematicians or hybrids of all three. The engineers have been developing new materials with extraordinary electromagnetic properties, from materials for microwaves, to be used in radar or wireless technology, to materials for terahertz radiation and visible light. These materials typically are composites—they consist of artificial structures much smaller than the wavelength that act like man-made atoms, apart being much larger in size. The properties of these artificial atoms depend on their shapes and sizes and so they are tunable, in contrast to most real atoms or molecules. This degree of control is what makes these materials—called metamaterials—so interesting. Such new-won freedom invites the other side of the spectrum of scientists, the theorists, to dream. Just imagine there are no practical limits on electromagnetic materials—what could we do with them? One exciting application of metamaterials has been Veselago's idea of negative refraction, dating back to the 1960s. Metamaterials have breathed life into Veselago's idea, culminating in recent optical demonstrations (see for example [1,2]). Another application is cloaking, developing ideas and first experimental demonstrations for invisibility devices [3]. It turns out that both negative refraction and cloaking are examples where materials seem to transform the geometry of space. Any optical material appears to change light's perception of space, as countless optical illusions prove, but the materials of transformation optics act in more specific ways: they appear to perform

  15. Exterior optical cloaking and illusions by using active sources: A boundary element perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H. H.; Xiao, J. J.; Lai, Y.; Chan, C. T.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that active sources can be used to cloak any objects that lie outside the cloaking devices [F. Guevara Vasquez, G. W. Milton, and D. Onofrei, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 073901 (2009)]. Here, we propose that active sources can create illusion effects so that an object outside the cloaking device can be made to look like another object. Invisibility is a special case in which the concealed object is transformed to a volume of air. From a boundary element perspective, we show that active sources can create a nearly “silent” domain which can conceal any objects inside and at the same time make the whole system look like an illusion of our choice outside a virtual boundary. The boundary element method gives the fields and field gradients, which can be related to monopoles and dipoles, on continuous curves which define the boundary of the active devices. Both the cloaking and illusion effects are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  16. Metasurface Cloaks for Large Cylindrical Cluster Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Yakovlev, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    small cylinders, we demonstrate that even electrically large clusters of such particles can be cloaked by covering its constituent cylinders with the metasurface cloaks. This holds for densely packed cylinders due to significantly reduced coupling by the presence of the cloaks. The results may...

  17. An Electromagnetic GL Double Layered Cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ganquan; Xie, Feng; Xie, Lee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new electromagnetic (EM) GL double layered cloak. The GL double layered cloak is consist of two sphere annular layers, $R_1 \\le r \\le R_2$ and $R_2 \\le r \\le R_3$. Two type cloak materials are proposed and installed in the each layer, respectively. The outer layer cloak of the GL double layered cloak has the invisible function, the inner layer cloak has fully absorption function. The GL double layered metamaterials are weak degenerative and weak dispersive. When the source is located outside of the GL double layered cloak, the excited EM wave field propagation outside of the double layered cloak is as same as in free space and never be disturbed by the cloak; also, the exterior EM wave can not penetrate into the inner layer and concealment. When local sources are located inside of the GL double cloaked concealment with the normal EM materials, the excited EM wave is propagating under Maxwell equation governing, it is complete absorbed by the inner layer cloak of GL double cloak and...

  18. Transformation-optics macroscopic visible-light cloaking beyond two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Chia-Wei; Lee, Chih Jie; Duan, Yubo; Tsai, Din Ping; Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Transformation optics, a recent geometrical design strategy of controlling light by combining Maxwell's principles of electromagnetism with Einstein's general relativity, promises without precedent an invisibility cloaking device that can render a macroscopic object invisible in three dimensions. However, most previous proof-of-concept transformation-optics cloaking devices focused predominantly on two dimensions, whereas detection of a macroscopic object along its third dimension was always unfailing. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of transformation-optics macroscopic visible-light cloaking beyond two dimensions. This almost-three-dimensional cloak exhibits three-dimensional (3D) invisibility for illumination near its center (i.e. with a limited field of view), and its ideal wide-angle invisibility performance is preserved in multiple two-dimensional (2D) planes intersecting in the 3D space. Both light ray trajectories and optical path lengths have been verified experimentally at the ma...

  19. Electromagnetic Invisibility of Elliptic Cylinder Cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Kan; LI Chao; LI Fang

    2008-01-01

    Structures with unique electromagnetic properties are designed based on the approach of spatial coordinate transformations of Maxwell's equations.This approach is applied to scheme out invisible elliptic cylinder cloaks,which provide more feasibility for cloaking arbitrarily shaped objects.The transformation expressions for the anisotropic material parameters and the field distribution are derived.The cloaking performances of ideal and lossy elliptic cylinder cloaks are investigated by finite element simulations. It is found that the cloaking performance will degrade in the forward direction with increasing loss.

  20. Optical Neutrality: Invisibility without Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Reed; Durach, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys.Rev.E 74, 026607 (2006)] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alu and Engheta [Phys.Rev.E 72, 016623 (2005)], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  1. The Art of Cloaking Ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalders, Gerard; Wiebes, Cees

    1996-01-01

    After years of intensive research in archives throughout Europe and the U.S., the authors of The Art of Cloaking Ownership discovered that firms located in 'neutral' Sweden supported the Nazis' financial and industrial leadership. The case of Enskilda, a bank owned by the still powerful Wallenberg f

  2. Detecting Thermal Cloaks via Transient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Bai, Xue; Li, Baowen; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Recent research on the development of a thermal cloak has concentrated on engineering an inhomogeneous thermal conductivity and an approximate, homogeneous volumetric heat capacity. While the perfect cloak of inhomogeneous κ and inhomogeneous ρcp is known to be exact (no signals scattering and only mean values penetrating to the cloak’s interior), the sensitivity of diffusive cloaks to defects and approximations has not been analyzed. We analytically demonstrate that these approximate cloaks are detectable. Although they work as perfect cloaks in the steady-state, their transient (time-dependent) response is imperfect and a small amount of heat is scattered. This is sufficient to determine the presence of a cloak and any heat source it contains, but the material composition hidden within the cloak is not detectable in practice. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, we constructed a cloak with similar approximation and directly detected its presence using these transient temperature deviations outside the cloak. Due to limitations in the range of experimentally accessible volumetric specific heats, our detection scheme should allow us to find any realizable cloak, assuming a sufficiently large temperature difference. PMID:27605153

  3. Detecting Thermal Cloaks via Transient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Bai, Xue; Li, Baowen; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Recent research on the development of a thermal cloak has concentrated on engineering an inhomogeneous thermal conductivity and an approximate, homogeneous volumetric heat capacity. While the perfect cloak of inhomogeneous κ and inhomogeneous ρcp is known to be exact (no signals scattering and only mean values penetrating to the cloak’s interior), the sensitivity of diffusive cloaks to defects and approximations has not been analyzed. We analytically demonstrate that these approximate cloaks are detectable. Although they work as perfect cloaks in the steady-state, their transient (time-dependent) response is imperfect and a small amount of heat is scattered. This is sufficient to determine the presence of a cloak and any heat source it contains, but the material composition hidden within the cloak is not detectable in practice. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, we constructed a cloak with similar approximation and directly detected its presence using these transient temperature deviations outside the cloak. Due to limitations in the range of experimentally accessible volumetric specific heats, our detection scheme should allow us to find any realizable cloak, assuming a sufficiently large temperature difference.

  4. Detecting electromagnetic cloaks using backward-propagating waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    A novel approach for detecting transformation-optics invisibility cloaks is proposed. The detection method takes advantage of the unusual backward-propagation characteristics of recently reported beams and pulses to induce electromagnetic scattering from the cloak. Even though waves with backward-propagating energy flux cannot penetrate the cloaking shell and interact with the cloaked objects (i.e., they do not make the cloaked object visible), they provide a mechanism for detecting the presence of cloaks. © 2011 IEEE.

  5. Watching outside while under a carpet cloak of invisibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Zhu; Wang, De-Lin; Peng, Ru-Wen; Hu, Qing; Wang, Mu

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate in this work a unique approach for watching outside while hiding in a carpet cloaking based on transformation optics. Unlike conventional carpet cloaking, which screens all the incident electromagnetic waves, we break the cloak and allow incident light get into the carpet. Hence outside information is detected inside the cloak. To recover the invisible cloaking, complementary techniques are applied in the broken space. Consequently, a hiding-inside and watching-outside (HIWO) carpet cloak is sewed, which works as an invisible cloaking and allows surveillance of the outside at the same time. Our work provides a strategy for an ideal cloak with "hiding" and "watching" functions simultaneously.

  6. Electromagnetic Detection of a Perfect Carpet Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Lin, Xiao; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a spherical invisibility cloak originally proposed by Pendry et al. can be electromagnetically detected by shooting a charged particle through it, whose underlying mechanism stems from the asymmetry of transformation optics applied to motions of photons and charges [PRL 103, 243901 (2009)]. However, the conceptual three-dimensional invisibility cloak that exactly follows specifications of transformation optics is formidably difficult to implement, while the simplified cylindrical cloak that has been experimentally realized is inherently visible. On the other hand, the recent carpet cloak model has acquired remarkable experimental development, including a recently demonstrated full-parameter carpet cloak without any approximation in the required constitutive parameters. In this paper, we numerically investigate the electromagnetic radiation from a charged particle passing through a perfect carpet cloak and propose an experimentally verifiable model to demonstrate symmetry breaking of transformation optics. PMID:25997798

  7. Topology optimized cloak for airborne sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Jacob Anders; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Directional acoustic cloaks that conceal an aluminum cylinder for airborne sound waves are presented in this paper. Subwavelength cylindrical aluminum inclusions in air constitute the cloak design to aid practical realizations. The positions and radii of the subwavelength cylinders are determined...... by minimizing scattering from the cloak-structure and cylinder using the gradient-based topology optimization method. In the final optimization step, the radii of the subwavelength cylinders are constrained to three discrete values. A near-perfect narrow-banded and angular cloaking effect is obtained...

  8. Surface Wave Cloak from Graded Refractive Index Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spada, L.; McManus, T. M.; Dyke, A.; Haq, S.; Zhang, L.; Cheng, Q.; Hao, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been re-emerged on the possibility to manipulate surface waves, in particular, towards the THz and optical regime. Both concepts of Transformation Optics (TO) and metamaterials have been regarded as one of key enablers for such applications in applied electromagnetics. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a dielectric surface wave cloak from engineered gradient index materials to illustrate the possibility of using nanocomposites to control surface wave propagation through advanced additive manufacturing. The device is designed analytically and validated through numerical simulations and measurements, showing good agreement and performance as an effective surface wave cloak. The underlying design approach has much wider applications, which span from microwave to optics for the control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and radiation of nanoantennas.

  9. Designing near-perfect invisibility cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Min; Yan, Wei; Yan, Min

    2008-01-01

    Using the theory of transformation optics, practical cylindrical invisibility cloaks can be devised to conceal objects from detection at a targeted wavelength.......Using the theory of transformation optics, practical cylindrical invisibility cloaks can be devised to conceal objects from detection at a targeted wavelength....

  10. Minimizing the scattering of a nonmagnetic cloak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    Nonmagnetic cloak offers a feasible way to achieve invisibility at optical frequencies using materials with only electric responses. In this letter, we suggest an approximation of the ideal nonmagnetic cloak and quantitatively study its electromagnetic characteristics using a full-wave scattering...

  11. Macroscopic invisibility cloaking of visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xianzhong; Luo, Y.; Zhang, Jingjing

    2011-01-01

    to a few wavelengths. Here, we report the first realization of a macroscopic volumetric invisibility cloak constructed from natural birefringent crystals. The cloak operates at visible frequencies and is capable of hiding, for a specific light polarization, three-dimensional objects of the scale...

  12. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-...

  13. Do Cloaked Objects Really Scatter Less?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Monticone

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the global scattering response of invisibility cloaks over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from static to very high frequencies. Based on linearity, causality, and energy conservation, we show that the total extinction and scattering, integrated over all wavelengths, of any linear, passive, causal, and nondiamagnetic cloak, necessarily increase compared to the uncloaked case. In light of this general principle, we provide a quantitative measure to compare the global performance of different cloaking techniques and we discuss solutions to minimize the global scattering signature of an object using thin, superconducting shells. Our results provide important physical insights on how invisibility cloaks operate and affect the global scattering of an object, suggesting ways to defeat countermeasures aimed at detecting cloaked objects using short impinging pulses.

  14. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own. PMID:27329510

  15. Conformal cloak for waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huanyang; Tyc, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Conformal invisibility devices are only supposed to work within the validity range of geometrical optics. Here we show by numerical simulations and analytical arguments that for certain quantized frequencies they are nearly perfect even in a regime that clearly violates geometrical optics. The quantization condition follows from the analogy between the Helmholtz equation and the stationary Schrodinger equation.

  16. A temporal cloak at telecommunication data rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Joseph M; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-06-13

    Through advances in metamaterials--artificially engineered media with exotic properties, including negative refractive index--the once fanciful invisibility cloak has now assumed a prominent place in scientific research. By extending these concepts to the temporal domain, investigators have recently described a cloak which hides events in time by creating a temporal gap in a probe beam that is subsequently closed up; any interaction which takes place during this hole in time is not detected. However, these results are limited to isolated events that fill a tiny portion of the temporal period, giving a fractional cloaking window of only about 10(-4) per cent at a repetition rate of 41 kilohertz (ref. 15)--which is much too low for applications such as optical communications. Here we demonstrate another technique for temporal cloaking, which operates at telecommunication data rates and, by exploiting temporal self-imaging through the Talbot effect, hides optical data from a receiver. We succeed in cloaking 46 per cent of the entire time axis and conceal pseudorandom digital data at a rate of 12.7 gigabits per second. This potential to cloak real-world messages introduces temporal cloaking into the sphere of practical application, with immediate ramifications in secure communications.

  17. Theory of diffusive light scattering cancellation cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Mohamed; Guenneau, Sebastien; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled Nabil; Alu, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new concept of cloaking objects in diffusive light regime using the paradigm of the scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking techniques. We show numerically that an object can be made completely invisible to diffusive photon density waves, by tailoring the diffusivity constant of the spherical shell enclosing the object. This means that photons' flow outside the object and the cloak made of these spherical shells behaves as if the object were not present. Diffusive light invisibility may open new vistas in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography or tissue imaging.

  18. Enhancement of non-resonant dielectric cloaks using anisotropic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Takezawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of homogenized anisotropic materials in non-resonant dielectric multilayer cloaking is studied. Because existing multilayer cloaking by isotropic materials can be regarded as homogenous anisotropic cloaking from a macroscopic view, they can be efficiently designed by handling the physical properties of anisotropic materials directly. Anisotropic properties can be realized in two-phase composites if the physical properties of the material are within appropriate bounds. The optimized anisotropic physical properties are identified by a numerical optimization technique based on a full-wave simulation using the finite element method. The cloaking performance measured by the total scattering width is improved by about 10% compared with existing multilayer cloaking by isotropic materials in eight-layer cylindrical cloaking materials. The same performance with eight-layer cloaking by isotropic materials is achieved by three-layer cloaking using anisotropic materials. Cloaking with a about 50% reduct...

  19. Design of elliptic cylindrical thermal cloak with layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuebo; Lin, Guochang; Wang, Youshan

    2017-01-01

    Thermal cloak has potential applications in thermal protection and sensing. Based on the theories of spatial transformation and effective medium, layered structure of elliptic cylindrical thermal cloak was designed. According to theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, the layered structure has typical characteristics of perfect thermal cloak. The external temperature field remains unchanged, while the internal temperature gradient decreases obviously. Meanwhile, the cloaking effect is stable in any direction. The cloaking effect can be improved by increasing the number of discretization layers or reducing the cloak thickness. The elliptic cylindrical cloak can be considered as cylindrical cloak when the focal distance is close to zero. This study has provided an effective way for realizing thermal cloak with more complex shapes.

  20. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, G.R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 45371-38791 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, A.G. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadkhani, R., E-mail: rmkhani@znu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 45371-38791 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-06

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes. - Highlights: • Invisibility cloaks for matter waves with three different geometries. • Exact analytical form of the effective mass tensor and potential. • Analogy between cloaking for quantum mechanical waves with classical electromagnetic waves. • Possible experimental realization in engineered semiconducting structures.

  1. Permittivity and permeability tensors for cloaking applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Balamati; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on derivations of analytical expressions for stealth and cloaking applications. An optimal version of electromagnetic (EM) stealth is the design of invisibility cloak of arbitrary shapes in which the EM waves can be controlled within the cloaking shell by introducing a prescribed spatial variation in the constitutive parameters. The promising challenge in design of invisibility cloaks lies in the determination of permittivity and permeability tensors for all the layers. This book provides the detailed derivation of analytical expressions of the permittivity and permeability tensors for various quadric surfaces within the eleven Eisenhart co-ordinate systems. These include the cylinders and the surfaces of revolutions. The analytical modeling and spatial metric for each of these surfaces are provided along with their tensors. This mathematical formulation will help the EM designers to analyze and design of various quadratics and their hybrids, which can eventually lead to design of cloakin...

  2. Macroscopic Invisible Cloak for Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Baile; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufacturing techniques. A transparent cloak made of two pieces of calcite is created. This cloak is able to conceal a macroscopic object with a maximum height of 2 mm, larger than 3500 free-space-wavelength, inside a transparent liquid environment. Its working bandwidth encompassing red, green and blue light is also demonstrated.

  3. Cloaking through cancellation of diffusive wave scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2016-08-10

    A new cloaking mechanism, which makes enclosed objects invisible to diffusive photon density waves, is proposed. First, diffusive scattering from a basic core-shell geometry, which represents the cloaked structure, is studied. The conditions of scattering cancellation in a quasi-static scattering regime are derived. These allow for tailoring the diffusivity constant of the shell enclosing the object so that the fields scattered from the shell and the object cancel each other. This means that the photon flow outside the cloak behaves as if the cloaked object were not present. Diffusive light invisibility may have potential applications in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography or tissue imaging. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Ideal cylindrical cloak: perfect but sensitive to tiny perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhichao; Yan, Min; Neff, Curtis W; Qiu, Min

    2007-09-14

    A cylindrical wave expansion method is developed to obtain the scattering field for an ideal two-dimensional cylindrical invisibility cloak. A near-ideal model of the invisibility cloak is set up to solve the boundary problem at the inner boundary of the cloak shell. We confirm that a cloak with the ideal material parameters is a perfect invisibility cloak by systematically studying the change of the scattering coefficients from the near-ideal case to the ideal one. However, because of the slow convergence of the zeroth-order scattering coefficients, a tiny perturbation on the cloak would induce a noticeable field scattering and penetration.

  5. Design of invisibility cloaks with an open tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako, Thomas; Yan, Min; Qiu, Min

    2010-12-20

    In this paper we apply the methodology of transformation optics for design of a novel invisibility cloak which can possess an open tunnel. Such a cloak facilitates the insertion (retrieval) of matter into (from) the cloak's interior without significantly affecting the cloak's performance, overcoming the matter exchange bottleneck inherent to most previously proposed cloak designs.We achieve this by applying a transformation which expands a point at the origin in electromagnetic space to a finite area in physical space in a highly anisotropic manner. The invisibility performance of the proposed cloak is verified by using full-wave finite-element simulations.

  6. Active Invisibility Cloaks in One Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 063812 (2015) Active invisibility cloaks in one dimension Ali Mostafazadeh* Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Koc¸ University, Sarıyer 34450, Istanbul, Turkey (Received 19 March 2015; published 12 June 2015) We outline a general method of constructing finite-range cloaking potentials which render a given finite-range real or complex potential, v(x), unidirectionally reflectionless or invisible at a wave number, k0, of our choice.We give explici...

  7. Transformation thermodynamics: cloaking and concentrating heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenneau, Sebastien; Amra, Claude; Veynante, Denis

    2012-03-26

    We adapt tools of transformation optics, governed by a (elliptic) wave equation, to thermodynamics, governed by the (parabolic) heat equation. We apply this new concept to an invibility cloak in order to thermally protect a region (a dead core) and to a concentrator to focus heat flux in a small region. We finally propose a multilayered cloak consisting of 20 homogeneous concentric layers with a piecewise constant isotropic diffusivity working over a finite time interval (homogenization approach).

  8. On the sensitivity of the 2D electromagnetic invisibility cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaproulias, S. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Sigalas, M.M., E-mail: sigalas@upatras.gr [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2012-10-15

    A computational study of the sensitivity of the two dimensional (2D) electromagnetic invisibility cloaks is performed with the finite element method. A circular metallic object is covered with the cloak and the effects of absorption, gain and disorder are examined. Also the effect of covering the cloak with a thin dielectric layer is studied.

  9. Towards all-dielectric, polarization-independent optical cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Jacob Anders; Mortensen, N. Asger; Sigmund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Fully enclosing, all-dielectric cloaks working for both E-z and H-z polarizations simultaneously are presented in this letter. The cloaks are effective for two antiparallel angles of incidence, and the layout of standard dielectric material in the cloak is determined by topology optimization...

  10. Optical phase cloaking of 700 nm light waves in the far field by a three-dimensional carpet cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Tolga; Fischer, Joachim; Wegener, Martin

    2011-10-21

    Transformation optics is a design tool that connects the geometry of space and propagation of light. Invisibility cloaking is a corresponding benchmark example. Recent experiments at optical frequencies have demonstrated cloaking for the light amplitude only. In this Letter, we demonstrate far-field cloaking of the light phase by interferometric microscope-imaging experiments on the previously introduced three-dimensional carpet cloak at 700 nm wavelength and for arbitrary polarization of light.

  11. Omnidirectional transformation-optics cloak made from lenses and glenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Oxburgh, Stephen; Cowie, Euan N; Chaplain, Gregory J; Macauley, Gavin; White, Chris D; Courtial, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    We present a design for an omnidirectional transformation-optics (TO) cloak comprising thin lenses and glenses (generalized thin lenses) [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A33, 962 (2016)1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.33.000962]. It should be possible to realize such devices in pixelated form. Our design is a piecewise nonaffine generalization of piecewise affine pixelated-TO devices [Proc. SPIE9193, 91931E (2014)PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.2061404; J. Opt18, 044009 (2016)]. It is intended to be a step in the direction of TO devices made entirely from lenses, which should be readily realizable on large length scales and for a broad range of wavelengths.

  12. Mechanical cloak design by direct lattice transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bückmann, Tiemo; Kadic, Muamer; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2015-04-21

    Spatial coordinate transformations have helped simplifying mathematical issues and solving complex boundary-value problems in physics for decades already. More recently, material-parameter transformations have also become an intuitive and powerful engineering tool for designing inhomogeneous and anisotropic material distributions that perform wanted functions, e.g., invisibility cloaking. A necessary mathematical prerequisite for this approach to work is that the underlying equations are form invariant with respect to general coordinate transformations. Unfortunately, this condition is not fulfilled in elastic-solid mechanics for materials that can be described by ordinary elasticity tensors. Here, we introduce a different and simpler approach. We directly transform the lattice points of a 2D discrete lattice composed of a single constituent material, while keeping the properties of the elements connecting the lattice points the same. After showing that the approach works in various areas, we focus on elastic-solid mechanics. As a demanding example, we cloak a void in an effective elastic material with respect to static uniaxial compression. Corresponding numerical calculations and experiments on polymer structures made by 3D printing are presented. The cloaking quality is quantified by comparing the average relative SD of the strain vectors outside of the cloaked void with respect to the homogeneous reference lattice. Theory and experiment agree and exhibit very good cloaking performance.

  13. Transmission-line networks cloaking objects from electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, Pekka; Jylhä, Liisi; Venermo, Jukka; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    We consider a novel method of cloaking objects from the surrounding electromagnetic fields in the microwave region. The method is based on transmission-line networks that simulate the wave propagation in the medium surrounding the cloaked object. The electromagnetic fields from the surrounding medium are coupled into the transmission-line network that guides the waves through the cloak thus leaving the cloaked object undetected. The cloaked object can be an array or interconnected mesh of small inclusions that fit inside the transmission-line network.

  14. Optimized invisibility cloaks from the Logarithm conformal mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhui; Liu, Lijun; Song, Zhengyong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Invisibility cloaks designed from the coordinate transformation method have attracted increasing interest recently. Conformal transformation optics scheme leads to cloaks that possess isotopic media, thus provides a prospective way to facilitate easier realization. Reducing the maximum value of the refractive index required by the cloaks is very important in practical imple- mentation. This letter studies on how the parameters in the logarithm conformal mapping control the cloaking effect. The optimized invisibility cloaks are designed. The maximum values of the refractive index required from the first kind and the second kind of logarithm conformal mappings are reduced to 9.779 and 12.936, respectively.

  15. Cloaking and Magnifying Using Radial Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kettunen, Henrik; Sihvola, Ari

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the electrostatic responses of a polarly radially anisotropic cylinder and a spherically radially anisotropic sphere. For both geometries, the permittivity components differ from each other in the radial and tangential directions. We show that choosing the ratio between these components in a certain way, these rather simple structures can be used in cloaking dielectric inclusions with arbitrary permittivity and shape in the quasi-static limit. For an ideal cloak, the contrast between the permittivity components has to tend to infinity. However, only positive permittivity values are required and a notable cloaking effect can already be observed with relatively moderate permittivity contrasts. Furthermore, we show that the polarly anisotropic cylindrical shell has a complementary capability of magnifying the response of an inner cylinder.

  16. Flow stabilization with active hydrodynamic cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav A; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.056313

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that fluid flow cloaking solutions based on active hydrodynamic metamaterials exist for two-dimensional flows past a cylinder in a wide range of Reynolds numbers, up to approximately 200. Within the framework of the classical Brinkman equation for homogenized porous flow, we demonstrate using two different methods that such cloaked flows can be dynamically stable for $Re$ in the range 5-119. The first, highly efficient, method is based on a linearization of the Brinkman-Navier-Stokes equation and finding the eigenfrequencies of the least stable eigen-perturbations; the second method is a direct, numerical integration in the time domain. We show that, by suppressing the Karman vortex street in the weekly turbulent wake, porous flow cloaks can raise the critical Reynolds number up to about 120, or five times greater than for a bare, uncloaked cylinder.

  17. Experiments on elastic cloaking in thin plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Nicolas; Wilhelm, Manfred; Wegener, Martin

    2012-01-06

    Following a theoretical proposal [M. Farhat et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009)], we design, fabricate, and characterize a cloaking structure for elastic waves in 1 mm thin structured polymer plates. The cloak consists of 20 concentric rings of 16 different metamaterials, each being a tailored composite of polyvinyl chloride and polydimethylsiloxane. By using stroboscopic imaging with a camera from the direction normal to the plate, we record movies of the elastic waves for monochromatic plane-wave excitation. We observe good cloaking behavior for carrier frequencies in the range from 200 to 400 Hz (one octave), in good agreement with a complete continuum-mechanics numerical treatment. This system is thus ideally suited for demonstration experiments conveying the ideas of transformation optics.

  18. Cylindrical invisibility cloak with simplified material parameters is inherently visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Ruan, Zhichao; Qiu, Min

    2007-12-07

    It was proposed that perfect invisibility cloaks can be constructed for hiding objects from electromagnetic illumination [J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006)10.1126/science.1125907]. The cylindrical cloaks experimentally demonstrated [D. Schurig, Science 314, 977 (2006)10.1126/science.1133628] and theoretically proposed [W. Cai, Nat. Photon. 1, 224 (2007)10.1038/nphoton.2007.28] have however simplified material parameters in order to facilitate easier realization as well as to avoid infinities in optical constants. Here we show that the cylindrical cloaks with simplified material parameters inherently allow the zeroth-order cylindrical wave to pass through the cloak as if the cloak is made of a homogeneous isotropic medium, and thus visible. To all high-order cylindrical waves, our numerical simulation suggests that the simplified cloak inherits some properties of the ideal cloak, but finite scatterings exist.

  19. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, G. R.; Moghaddam, A. G.; Mohammadkhani, R.

    2016-03-01

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes.

  20. Elastodynamic cloaking and field enhancement for soft spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-11-01

    We propose a spherical cloak described by a non-singular asymmetric elasticity tensor {C} depending upon a small parameter η, that defines the softness of a region one would like to conceal from elastodynamic waves. By varying η, we generate a class of soft spheres dressed by elastodynamic cloaks, which are shown to considerably reduce the scattering of the soft spheres. Importantly, such cloaks also provide some wave protection except for a countable set of frequencies, for which some large elastic field enhancement can be observed within the soft spheres. Through an investigation of trapped modes in elasticity, we supply a good approximation of such Mie-type resonances by some transcendental equation. Our results, unlike previous studies that focused merely on the invisibility aspects, shed light on potential pitfalls of elastodynamic cloaks for earthquake protection designed via geometric transforms: a seismic cloak needs to be designed in such a way that its inner resonances differ from eigenfrequencies of the building one wishes to protect. In order to circumvent this downfall of field enhancement inside the cloaked area, we introduce a novel generation of cloaks, named here, mixed cloaks. Such mixed cloaks consist of a shell that detours incoming waves, hence creating an invisibility region, and of a perfectly matched layer (PML, located at the inner boundary of the cloaks) that absorbs residual wave energy in such a way that aforementioned resonances in the soft sphere are strongly attenuated. The designs of mixed cloaks with a non-singular elasticity tensor combined with an inner PML and non-vanishing density bring seismic cloaks one step closer to a practical implementation. Note in passing that the concept of mixed cloaks also applies in the case of singular cloaks and can be translated in other wave areas for a similar purpose (i.e. to smear down inner resonances within the invisibility region).

  1. Yttrium oxide based three dimensional metamaterials for visible light cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2014-04-01

    Metamaterial with negative refractive index is the key phenomenon behind the concept of a cloaking device to hide an object from light in visible spectrum. Metamaterials made of two and three dimensional lattices of periodically placed electromagnetic resonant cells can achieve absorption and propagation of incident electromagnetic radiation as confined electromagnetic fields confined to a waveguide as surface plasmon polaritons, which can be used for shielding an object from in-tune electromagnetic radiation. The periodicity and dimensions of resonant cavity determine the frequency, which are very small as compared to the wavelength of incident light. Till now the phenomena have been demonstrated only for lights in near infrared spectrum. Recent advancements in fabrication techniques have made it possible to fabricate array of three dimensional nanostructures with cross-sections as small as 25 nm that are required for negative refractive index for wavelengths in visible light spectrum of 400-700 nm and for wider view angle. Two types of metamaterial designs, three dimensional concentric split ring and fishnet, are considered. Three dimensional structures consisted of metal-dielectric-metal stacks. The metal is silver and dielectric is yttrium oxide, other than conventional materials such as FR4 and Duroid. High κ dielectric and high refractive index as well as large crystal symmetry of Yttrium oxide has been investigated as encapsulating medium. Dependence of refractive index on wavelength and bandwidth of negative refractive index region are analyzed for application towards cloaking from light in visible spectrum.

  2. Novel applications of photonic signal processing: Temporal cloaking and biphoton pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Joseph M.

    We experimentally demonstrate two innovative applications of photonic technologies previously solidified in the field of classical optical communications. In the first application, we exploit electro-optic modulator technology to develop a novel "time cloak,'' a device which hides events in time by manipulating the flow of a probing light beam. Our temporal cloak is capable of masking high-speed optical data from a receiver, greatly improving the feasibility of time cloaking and bringing such exotic concepts to the verge of practical application. In the second specialization, high-resolution Fourier-transform pulse shaping---perfected for multi-wavelength telecom networks---is applied to shape the correlations of entangled photon pairs, states which have received considerable attention in nonlocal tests of quantum theory and in quantum key distribution. Using nonlinear waveguides fabricated out of periodically poled lithium niobate, we are able to demonstrate ultrafast coincidence detection with record-high efficiency, which coupled with our pulse shaper allows us to realize for the first time several capabilities in biphoton control, including high-order dispersion cancellation, orthogonal spectral coding, correlation train generation, and tunable delay control. Each of these experiments represents an important advance in quantum state manipulation, with the potential to impact developments in quantum information. And more generally, our work introducing telecommunication technology into both temporal cloaking and biphoton control highlights the potential of such tools in more nascent outgrowths of classical and quantum optics.

  3. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ~λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (experiments show a transmission efficiency >-2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  4. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis.

  5. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jun

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

  6. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves.

  7. Coordinate transformations make perfect invisibility cloaks with arbitrary shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Wei; Yan Min; Ruan Zhichao; Qiu Min [Laboratory of Optics, Photonics and Quantum Electronics, Department of Microelectronics and Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)], E-mail: min@kth.se

    2008-04-15

    By investigating wave properties at cloak boundaries, invisibility cloaks with arbitrary shape constructed by general coordinate transformations are confirmed to be perfectly invisible to the external incident wave. The differences between line transformed cloaks and point transformed cloaks are discussed. The fields in the cloak medium are found analytically to be related to the fields in the original space via coordinate transformation functions. At the exterior boundary of the cloak, it is shown that no reflection is excited even though the permittivity and permeability do not always have a perfectly matched layer form, whereas at the inner boundary, no reflection is excited either, and in particular no field can penetrate into the cloaked region. However, for the inner boundary of any line transformed cloak, the permittivity and permeability in a specific tangential direction are always required to be infinitely large. Furthermore, the field discontinuity at the inner boundary always exists; the surface current is induced to make this discontinuity self-consistent. A point transformed cloak does not experience such problems. The tangential fields at the inner boundary are all zero, implying that no field discontinuity exists.

  8. Topology optimized low-contrast all-dielectric optical cloak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Jacob Anders; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    A systematic methodology for designing low-contrast all-dielectric cloaks operating in the optical range is presented. Topology optimization is used to find the layout of standard dielectric material that minimizes the norm of the scattered field in the surroundings of the cloak. Rotational...... symmetries are exploited to optimize for multiple angles based on the solution for a single angle of incidence. For a few discrete angles of incidences (1-4) the cloaking is shown to be nearly perfect in a limited frequency range, and even for a rotational symmetric design, cloak and object appear smaller...

  9. Optical Möbius strips and twisted ribbon cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Isaac

    2014-02-15

    Optical Möbius strips that surround points of circular polarization, C points, in a generic three-dimensional optical field are cloaked by lines of twisted ribbons attached to the C points. When cloaking occurs, the observable signed twist index that counts the number of half-twists (one or three), and also measures the handedness (right or left), of a generic Möbius strip is determined by the twisted ribbon cloaks. Although some cloaks can be detached, they can never all be removed.

  10. The design of metamaterial cloaks embedded in anisotropic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By using coordinate transformation method, this paper obtains an useful equation of designing meta-material cloaks embedded in anisotropic medium. This equation is the generalization of what was introduced early by Pendry et al (2006 Science 312 1780) and can be more widely used. As an example of its applications, this paper deduces the material parameter equation for cylinder cloaks embedded in anisotropic medium, and then offers the numerical simulation. The results show that such a cylinder cloak has perfect cloaking performance and therefore verifies the method proposed in this paper.

  11. Experimental demonstration of a bilayer thermal cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Gao, Dongliang; Thong, John T L; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-02-07

    Invisibility has attracted intensive research in various communities, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, thermodynamics, dc, etc. However, many experimental demonstrations have only been achieved by virtue of simplified approaches due to the inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by the transformation-optic method, and usually require a challenging realization with metamaterials. In this Letter, we demonstrate a bilayer thermal cloak made of bulk isotropic materials, and it has been validated as an exact cloak. We experimentally verified its ability to maintain the heat front and its heat protection capabilities in a 2D proof-of-concept experiment. The robustness of this scheme is validated in both 2D (including oblique heat front incidence) and 3D configurations. The proposed scheme may open a new avenue to control the diffusive heat flow in ways inconceivable with phonons, and also inspire new alternatives to the functionalities promised by transformation optics.

  12. On three-dimensional spherical acoustic cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munteanu, Ligia; Chiroiu, Veturia, E-mail: ligia_munteanu@hotmail.com, E-mail: veturiachiroiu@yahoo.com [Institute of Solid Mechanics, Romanian Academy, 15 Constantin Mille, PO Box 1-863, 010141 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-08-15

    Transformation acoustics opens a new avenue towards the design of acoustic metamaterials, which are materials engineered at the subwavelength scale in order to mimic the parameters in wave equations. The design of the acoustic cloaking is based on the property of equations being invariant under a coordinate transformation, i.e. a specific spatial compression is equivalent to a variation of the material parameters in the original space. In this paper, the sound invisibility performance is discussed for spherical cloaks. The original domain consists of alternating concentric layers made from piezoelectric ceramics and epoxy resin, following a triadic Cantor sequence. The spatial compression, obtained by applying the concave-down transformation, leads to an equivalent domain with an inhomogeneous and anisotropic distribution of the material parameters.

  13. Extremely Thin Dielectric Metasurface for Carpet Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, LiYi; Kanté, Boubacar

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel and simple approach to cloaking a scatterer on a ground plane. We use an extremely thin dielectric metasurface ({\\lambda}/12) to reshape the wavefronts distorted by a scatterer in order to mimic the reflection pattern of a flat ground plane. To achieve such carpet cloaking, the reflection angle has to be equal to the incident angle everywhere on the scatterer. We use a graded metasurface and calculate the required phase gradient to achieve cloaking. Our metasurface locally provides additional phase to the wavefronts to compensate for the phase difference amongst light paths induced by the geometrical distortion. We design our metasurface in the microwave range using highly sub-wavelength dielectric resonators. We verify our design by full-wave time-domain simulations using micro-structured resonators and show that results match theory very well. This approach can be applied to hide any scatterer on a ground plane not only at microwave frequencies, but also at higher frequencies up to th...

  14. 隐身材料%Cloaking materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖耘; 杭志宏; 黄学勤; 陈子亭

    2012-01-01

    由于超构材料(metamaterials)的发现,隐身(cloaking)科学近年来取得了长足的发展.与军事上的隐形(stealth)所不同的是,隐身指的是将电磁波的散射在各个方向上都完全消除,从而实现神话故事或科幻小说中那种真正的全方位、全角度的“消失”.隐身也因其重要的科学价值以及将对人类生活产生跨越式的改变而成为国际上的科研热点.除了隐身之外,科学家还证明了可以将物体变成任意的幻像,从而在光学上实现了孙悟空的“七十二变”,这被称为幻像光学(illusion optics).未来,隐身和幻像光学的发展有望将人类的极限想象变为现实.文章介绍了作者在隐身和幻像领域里的一些工作.%There has been extensive development in the study of cloaking technology since the discovery of metamaterials. Different from "stealth" technology used for military purposes, cloaking refers to a total annihilation of the scattering of electromagnetic waves in all directions, and thus achieving invisibility as depicted in mythology and sci-fiction. Because of its scientific importance and the possible dramatic impact on technology, cloaking has become a hot research topic. Moreover, illusion optics has also been demon- strated by means of which scientists can make an object "look like" anything else. The development of cloaking and illusion optics could turn human imagination to reality in the future. Some of our works in cloaking and illusion optics are reviewed here.

  15. Spontaneous emission and the operation of invisibility cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed Behbahani, Mina; Amooghorban, Ehsan; Mahdifar, Ali

    2016-07-01

    As a probe to explore the ability of invisibility cloaks to conceal objects in the quantum mechanics domain, we study the spontaneous emission rate of an excited two-level atom in the vicinity of an ideal invisibility cloaking. On this base, first, a canonical quantization scheme is presented for the electromagnetic field interacting with atomic systems in an anisotropic, inhomogeneous, and absorbing magnetodielectric medium which can suitably be used for studying the influence of arbitrary invisibility cloak on the atomic radiative properties. The time dependence of the atomic subsystem is obtained in the Schrodinger picture. By introducing a modified set of the spherical wave-vector functions, the Green tensor of the system is calculated via exact and discrete methods. In this formalism, the decay rate and as well the emission pattern of the aforementioned atom are computed analytically for both weak and strong coupling interaction, and then numerically calculations are done to demonstrate the performances of cloaking in the quantum mechanics domain. Special attention is paid to different possible orientations and locations of the atomic system near the spherical invisibility cloaking. Results in the presence and the absence of the invisibility cloak are compared. We find that the cloak works very well far from its resonance frequency to conceal a macroscopic object, whereas at near the resonance frequency the object is more visible than the situation where the object is not covered by the cloak.

  16. Impedance-Matched Reduced Acoustic Cloaking with Realizable Mass and Its Layered Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huan-Yang; YANG Tao; LUO Xu-Dong; MA Hong-Ru

    2008-01-01

    We present an impedance-matched reduced version of acoustic cloaking whose mass is in a reasonable range. A layered cloak design with isotropic material is also proposed for the reduced cloak. Numerical calculations from the transfer matrix methods show that the present layered cloak can reduce the scattering of an air cylinder substantially.

  17. A two-component NZRI metamaterial based rectangular cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammd Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2015-10-01

    A new two-component, near zero refractive index (NZRI) metamaterial is presented for electromagnetic rectangular cloaking operation in the microwave range. In the basic design a pi-shaped, metamaterial was developed and its characteristics were investigated for the two major axes (x and z-axis) wave propagation through the material. For the z-axis wave propagation, it shows more than 2 GHz bandwidth and for the x-axis wave propagation; it exhibits more than 1 GHz bandwidth of NZRI property. The metamaterial was then utilized in designing a rectangular cloak where a metal cylinder was cloaked perfectly in the C-band area of microwave regime. The experimental result was provided for the metamaterial and the cloak and these results were compared with the simulated results. This is a novel and promising design for its two-component NZRI characteristics and rectangular cloaking operation in the electromagnetic paradigm.

  18. Invisibility cloaking via non-smooth transformation optics and ray tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosskey, Miles M., E-mail: mmc31@duke.ed [Mathematics Department, Duke University, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708-0320 (United States); Nixon, Andrew T., E-mail: andrew_nixon@brown.ed [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, 182 George Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Schick, Leland M., E-mail: lschick@math.arizona.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 617 N. Santa Rita Ave., P.O. Box 210089, Tucson, AZ 85721-0089 (United States); Kovacic, Gregor, E-mail: kovacg@rpi.ed [Mathematical Sciences Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2011-05-02

    We present examples of theoretically-predicted invisibility cloaks with shapes other than spheres and cylinders, including cones and ellipsoids, as well as shapes spliced from parts of these simpler shapes. In addition, we present an example explicitly displaying the non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. We depict rays propagating through these example cloaks using ray tracing for geometric optics. - Highlights: Theoretically-predicted conical and ellipsoidal invisibility cloaks. Non-smooth cloaks spliced from parts of simpler shapes. Example displaying non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. Rays propagating through example cloaks depicted using geometric optics.

  19. Asymmetric Cloaking Theory Based on Finsler Geometry ~ How to design Harry Potter's invisibility cloak with a scientific method ~

    CERN Document Server

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Taki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to actually make Harry's invisibility cloaks? The most promising approach for realizing such magical cloaking in our real world would be to use transformation optics, where an empty space with a distorted geometry is imitated with a non-distorted space but filled with transformation medium having appropriate permittivity and permeability. An important requirement for practical invisibility cloaks is nonreciprocity; that is, a person in the cloak should not be seen from the outside but should be able to see the outside. This invisibility cloak, or a nonreciprocal shield, cannot be created as far as we stay in conventional transformation optics. Conventional transformation optics is based on Riemann geometry with a metric tensor independent of direction, and therefore cannot be used to design the nonreciprocal shield. To overcome this problem, we propose an improved theory of transformation optics that is based on Finsler geometry, an extended version of Riemann geometry. Our theory shows that no...

  20. An optimization method for the problems of thermal cloaking of material bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, G. V.; Levin, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Inverse heat-transfer problems related to constructing special thermal devices such as cloaking shells, thermal-illusion or thermal-camouflage devices, and heat-flux concentrators are studied. The heatdiffusion equation with a variable heat-conductivity coefficient is used as the initial heat-transfer model. An optimization method is used to reduce the above inverse problems to the respective control problem. The solvability of the above control problem is proved, an optimality system that describes necessary extremum conditions is derived, and a numerical algorithm for solving the control problem is proposed.

  1. Non-magnetic negative-refraction systems for terahertz and far-infrared frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseyev, Leonid V; Narimanov, Evgenii E

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that homogeneous naturally-occurring materials can form non-magnetic negative refractive index systems, and present specific realizations of the proposed approach for the THz and far-IR frequencies. The proposed structure operates away from resonance, thereby promising the capacity for low-loss devices.

  2. The effect of electrostatic shielding using invisibility cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruo-Yang Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrostatic shielding for a spherical invisibility cloak with arbitrary charges inside is investigated. Our result reveals that the charge inside the cloak is a crucial factor to determine the detection. When charged bodies are placed inside the cloak with an arbitrary distribution, the electric fields outside are purely determined by the total charges just as the fields of a point charge at the center of the cloak. As the total charges reduce to zero, the bodies can not be detected. On the other hand, if the total charges are nonzero, the electrostatic potential inside an ideal cloak tends to infinity. For unideal cloaks, this embarrassment is overcome, while they still have good behaviors of shielding. In addition, the potential across the inner surface of an ideal cloak is discontinuous due to the infinite polarization of the dielectric, however it can be alternatively interpreted as the dual Meissner effect of a dual superconductive layer with a surface magnetic current.

  3. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-02-10

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called "stress bandage", the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated.

  4. UXC55 Non-Magnetic Robot

    CERN Document Server

    Najjar, Tony

    2017-01-01

    As part of the collaboration between CMS and the Lebanese American University, we are looking into building a non-magnetic inspection rover capable of roaming around UXC55 and specifically under the detector. The robot should be specifically tailored and engineered to cope with the strong magnetic field in the cavern (300 G on average with peaks up to 1500 G) as well as other constraints such as flammability and geometry. Moreover, we are also taking part in the development of the instrumentation and wireless communication of the rover. The biggest challenge in setting up a non-magnetic rover lies in the actuation mechanism, in other words, getting it to move; motors are rotary actuators that rely on the concept of a rotor “trying to catch up” to a rotating magnetic field. We quickly realize the complication with using this popular technology; the strong field created by the CMS magnet greatly interferes with the motor, rendering it utterly stalled. Our approach, on the other hand, consists of using compl...

  5. Broadening the Cloaking Bandwidth with Non-Foster Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Argyropoulos, Christos; Alù, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We introduce the concept and practical design of broadband, ultrathin cloaks based on non-Foster, negatively capacitive metasurfaces. By using properly tailored, active frequency-selective screens conformal to an object, within the realm of a practical realization, we show that it is possible to drastically reduce the scattering over a wide frequency range in the microwave regime, orders of magnitude broader than any available passive cloaking technology. The proposed active cloak may impact not only invisibility and camouflaging, but also practical antenna and sensing applications.

  6. Plasma metamaterials as cloaking and nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, O.; Yamaguchi, S.; Bambina, A.; Iwai, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Tamayama, Y.; Miyagi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma metamaterials, composites of low-temperature plasmas and periodic functional microstructures, work as cloaking and nonlinear media. Due to functions of the microstructures like negative permeability, electromagnetic waves in and around plasma metamaterials propagate in a quite different manner from the case with the conventional space in which relative permeability is positive and unity. Using plasmas and plasma metamaterials, we achieve various controls of microwave propagating paths such as unidirectionality and cloaking in the two- or 3D spaces. For instance, a concentric plasma layer makes wave propagation unidirectional, and waves propagate in different routes when they start inside or outside the concentric layer. Furthermore, due to spatial permittivity gradient and anisotropic refractive index, electromagnetic waves detour in plasma metamaterial layers. Another significant point that plasma metamaterials can realize is nonlinearity. When we study high-power electromagnetic waves propagating in them, we observe several properties describable in terms of nonlinear dynamics and nonlinear photonics. Microwaves beyond threshold energy trigger bifurcations in plasma permittivity, and the second harmonic wave detected simultaneously is generated with strong emission levels. Such electromagnetic wave propagation is achieved with advantages over other materials, since plasmas and metallic microstructures work in harmony and in synergy.

  7. Acoustic cloaking and mirages with flying carpets

    CERN Document Server

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Carpets under consideration here, in the context of pressure acoustic waves propagating in a compressible fluid, do not touch the ground: they levitate in mid-air (or float in mid-water), which leads to approximate cloaking for an object hidden underneath, or touching either sides of a square cylinder on, or over, the ground. The tentlike carpets attached to the sides of a square cylinder illustrate how the notion of a carpet on a wall naturally generalizes to sides of other small compact objects. We then extend the concept of flying carpets to circular cylinders. However, instead of reducing its scattering cross-section like in acoustic cloaks, we rather mimic that of another obstacle, say a square rigid cylinder. For instance, show that one can hide any type of defects under such circular carpets, and yet they still scatter waves just like a smaller cylinder on its own. Interestingly, all these carpets are described by non-singular acoustic parameters. To exemplify this important aspect, we propose a multi-...

  8. Making Waves Round a Structured Cloak: Lattices, Negative Refraction and Fringes

    CERN Document Server

    Colquitt, DJ; Movchan, NV; Brun, AB Movchan M; McPhedran, RC

    2013-01-01

    Using the framework of transformation optics, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a non-singular square cloak for acoustic, out-of-plane shear elastic, and electromagnetic waves. The generating map is examined in detail and linked to the material properties of the cloak. Analysis of wave propagation through the cloak is presented and accompanied by numerical illustrations. The efficacy of the regularised cloak is demonstrated and an objective numerical measure of the quality of the cloaking effect is provided. It is demonstrated that the cloaking effect persists over a wide range of frequencies. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of the regularised cloak, a Young's double slit experiment is presented. The stability of the interference pattern is examined when a cloaked and uncloaked obstacle are successively placed in front of one of the apertures. This novel link with a well-known quantum mechanical experiment provides an additional method through which the quality of cloaks may be examined. In t...

  9. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and guides the sound waves bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section.

  10. Active cloaking for clusters of pins in thin plates

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, Jane; Haslinger, Stewart; Movchan, Natasha; Craster, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers active cloaking of a square array of evenly spaced pins in a Kirchhoff plate in the presence of flexural waves. Active sources are distributed exterior to the cluster and are represented by the non-singular Green's function for the biharmonic operator. The complex amplitudes of the active sources, which cancel out selected multipole orders of the scattered field, are found by solving an algebraic system of equations. For frequencies in the zero-frequency stop band, we find that a small number of active sources located on a grid is sufficient for cloaking. For higher frequencies, we achieve efficient cloaking with the active sources positioned on a circle surrounding the cluster. We demonstrate the cloaking efficiency with several numerical illustrations, considering key frequencies from band diagrams and dispersion surfaces for a Kirchhoff plate pinned in a doubly periodic fashion.

  11. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  12. Electrically-Generated Spin Polarization in Non-Magnetic Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0143 Electrically -generated spin polarization in non-magnetic semiconductors Vanessa Sih UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final Report 03...SUBTITLE (YIP) - Electrically -generated spin polarization in non-magnetic semiconductors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0258 5c...that produced electrically -generated electron spin polarization in non-magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. Electrically -generated electron spin

  13. Time-of-flight imaging of invisibility cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Halimeh, Jad C

    2011-01-01

    As invisibility cloaking has recently become experimental reality, it is interesting to explore ways to reveal remaining imperfections. In essence, the idea of most invisibility cloaks is to recover the optical path lengths without an object (to be made invisible) by a suitable arrangement around that object. Optical path length is proportional to the time of flight of a light ray or to the optical phase accumulated by a light wave. Thus, time-of-flight images provide a direct and intuitive tool for probing imperfections. Indeed, recent phase-sensitive experiments on the carpet cloak have already made early steps in this direction. In the macroscopic world, time-of-flight images could be measured directly by light detection and ranging (LIDAR). Here, we show calculated time-of-flight images of the conformal Gaussian carpet cloak, the conformal grating cloak, the cylindrical free-space cloak, and of the invisible sphere. All results are obtained by using a ray-velocity equation of motion derived from Fermat's ...

  14. Broadband solid cloak for underwater acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Bi, Yafeng; Sun, Zhaoyong; Xiang, Ping; Yang, Jun; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-01-01

    Shielding an object to be undetectable is an important issue for engineering applications. Cloaking is the ultimate shielding example, routing waves around an object without mutual interaction, demonstrated as possible in principle by transformation and metamaterial techniques. Example applications have been successfully designed and validated for electromagnetic wave, thin plate flexural wave, thermal flux, and airborne sound. However, for underwater acoustics, the commonly used scheme based on meta-fluids with anisotropic density for airborne sound is unworkable since an acoustic rigid material is required with mass density three orders of magnitude higher than water. Material with such high density is impossible using even the heaviest metal, and may suffer from a narrow working frequency band even if realized with locally resonant techniques. An alternative solution was recently suggested based on solid pentamode material, which can be impedance matched with water and has anisotropic modulus. Here, we rep...

  15. a Simplified Parameter Design Method for Transformation Optics-Based Metamaterial Innovative Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Hua; Huang, Ming; Yang, Jing-Jing; Lu, Jin; Cao, Hui-Lu

    2013-10-01

    Transformation optics-based innovative cloak which combines the virtues of both internal and external cloaks to enable arbitrary multi-objects hidden with visions and movements was first proposed by Huang et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett.101, 151901 (2012)]. But it is rather difficult to implement in practice, for the required material parameters vary with radius and even have singular values. To accelerate its practical realization but still keep good performance of invisibility, a simplified innovative cloak with only spatially varying axial parameter is developed via choosing appropriate transformation function. The advantage of such a cloak is that both radial and azimuthal parameters are constants, and all three components are nonsingular and finite. Full-wave simulation confirms the perfect cloaking effect of the cloak. Besides, the influences of metamaterials loss and parameter deviation on the performance of cloak are also investigated. This work provides a simple and feasible solution to push metamaterial-assisted innovative cloak more closely to the practice.

  16. Bistatic scattering characterization of a three-dimensional broadband cloaking structure

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, Pekka; Osipov, Andrey V; Thurner, Stefan; Kemptner, Erich; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the results of full experimental characterization of broadband cloaking of a finite-sized metallic cylinder at X-band. The cloaking effect is characterized by measuring the bistatic scattering patterns of uncloaked and cloaked objects in free space and then comparing these with each other. The results of the measurements demonstrate a broadband cloaking effect and are in good agreement with numerical predictions.

  17. Object-dependent cloaking in the first-order Born approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setälä, Tero; Hakkarainen, Timo; Friberg, Ari T.; Hoenders, Bernhard J.; Setälä, Tero

    2010-01-01

    We consider the cloaking of a slab object in scalar wave theory within the first-order Born approximation. We show that in the forward direction cloaking is achieved for any transversally invariant, positively refracting, and absorbing object by using a lossy, negative-index metamaterial cloak. Cloa

  18. Theoretical model of lossy acoustic bipolar cylindrical cloak with negative index metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Y.; Ahn, Doyeol

    2017-09-01

    While, it was shown that for the lossless acoustic cloak the illumination direction independent cloaking can be achieved by employing the structure with compressed geometry and complementary media, the effect of the material loss have not been fully explored yet. Here, we show that realistic cloaking materials with moderate loss still works when complementary media is introduced but with the attenuated back scattering waves.

  19. Design of cloaking metamaterials using spectral representation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Leung, Lai; Fung, Tai Hang; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-03-01

    Controlling the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves, for instance in cloaking problem, has become an important topic in nanophotonics. So far, following the cloaking model proposed by Pendry et al. [1], the experimental realization was only limited to the microwave region [2]. Since practical application lies in the visible range, we have extended the investigation to that region by utilizing nanocomposites with reference to the material parameters proposed by Pendry et al. and Shalaev et al. [3]. The calculations can be made much simpler by invoking the spectral representation theory [4]. The loss and dispersion effects, as well as the propagation of EM waves are assessed for the designed cloaking models in order to investigate the cloaking performance. Further analyses show that our models can accomplish the desired cloaking effect in the visible range. Moreover, the loss and dispersion effects are found to be small and acceptable.[1] J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006). [2] D. Schurig, J. J. Mock, B. J. Justice, S. A. Cummer, J. B. Pendry, A. F. Starr, D. R. Smith Science 314, 5801 (2006). [3] Wenshan Cai, Uday K. Chettiar, Alexander V. Kildishev and Vladimir M. Shalaev, Nature photonics 1 (2007). [4] L. Dong, Mikko Karttunen, K. W. Yu, Phys. Rev. E 72, 016613 (2005).

  20. Invisible anti-cloak with elliptic cross section using phase complement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Qi; Zhang Min; Yue Jian-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theory of phase complement, an anti-cloak with circular cross section can be made invisible to an object outside its domain. As the cloak with elliptic cross section is more effective to make objects invisible than that with circular cross section, a scaled coordinate system is proposed to design equivalent materials of invisible anti-cloak with elliptic cross section using phase complement. The cloaks with conventional dielectric and double negative parameters are both simulated with the geometrical transformations. The results show that the cloak with elliptic cross section through phase complement can effectively hide the outside objects.

  1. A metasurface carpet cloak for electromagnetic, acoustic and water waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-29

    We propose a single low-profile skin metasurface carpet cloak to hide objects with arbitrary shape and size under three different waves, i.e., electromagnetic (EM) waves, acoustic waves and water waves. We first present a metasurface which can control the local reflection phase of these three waves. By taking advantage of this metasurface, we then design a metasurface carpet cloak which provides an additional phase to compensate the phase distortion introduced by a bump, thus restoring the reflection waves as if the incident waves impinge onto a flat mirror. The finite element simulation results demonstrate that an object can be hidden under these three kinds of waves with a single metasurface cloak.

  2. Metamaterials. Invisibility cloaking in a diffusive light scattering medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Wegener, Martin

    2014-07-25

    In vacuum, air, and other surroundings that support ballistic light propagation according to Maxwell's equations, invisibility cloaks that are macroscopic, three-dimensional, broadband, passive, and that work for all directions and polarizations of light are not consistent with the laws of physics. We show that the situation is different for surroundings leading to multiple light scattering, according to Fick's diffusion equation. We have fabricated cylindrical and spherical invisibility cloaks made of thin shells of polydimethylsiloxane doped with melamine-resin microparticles. The shells surround a diffusively reflecting hollow core, in which arbitrary objects can be hidden. We find good cloaking performance in a water-based diffusive surrounding throughout the entire visible spectrum and for all illumination conditions and incident polarizations of light. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Decoupling antennas in printed technology using elliptical metasurface cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernety, Hossein M., E-mail: hmehrpou@go.olemiss.edu, E-mail: yakovlev@olemiss.edu; Yakovlev, Alexander B., E-mail: hmehrpou@go.olemiss.edu, E-mail: yakovlev@olemiss.edu [Center for Applied Electromagnetic Systems Research (CAESR), Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677-1848 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    In this paper, we extend the idea of reducing the electromagnetic interactions between transmitting radiators to the case of widely used planar antennas in printed technology based on the concept of mantle cloaking. Here, we show that how lightweight elliptical metasurface cloaks can be engineered to restore the intrinsic properties of printed antennas with strip inclusions. In order to present the novel approach, we consider two microstrip-fed monopole antennas resonating at slightly different frequencies cloaked by confocal elliptical metasurfaces formed by arrays of sub-wavelength periodic elements, partially embedded in the substrate. The presence of the metasurfaces leads to the drastic suppression of mutual near-field and far-field couplings between the antennas, and thus, their radiation patterns are restored as if they were isolated. Moreover, it is worth noting that this approach is not limited to printed radiators and can be applied to other planar structures as well.

  4. Mantle cloaking for co-site radio-frequency antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Alessio, E-mail: alessio.monti@uniroma3.it; Barbuto, Mirko [“Niccolò Cusano” University, Via Don Carlo Gnocchi 3, Rome 00166 (Italy); Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Ramaccia, Davide; Vellucci, Stefano; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto [Department of Engineering, “Roma Tre” University, Via Vito Volterra 62, Rome 00146 (Italy); Trotta, Fabrizio [Antenna Department, ELETTRONICA S.p.A., Via Tiburtina Valeria Km 13700, Rome 00131 (Italy)

    2016-03-14

    We show that properly designed mantle cloaks, consisting of patterned metallic sheets placed around cylindrical monopoles, allow tightly packing the same antennas together in a highly dense telecommunication platform. Our experimental demonstration is applied to the relevant example of two cylindrical monopole radiators operating for 3G and 4G mobile communications. The two antennas are placed in close proximity, separated by 1/10 of the shorter operational wavelength, and, after cloaking, are shown to remarkably operate as if isolated in free-space. This result paves the way to unprecedented co-siting strategies for multiple antennas handling different services and installed in overcrowded platforms, such as communication towers, satellite payloads, aircrafts, or ship trees. More broadly, this work presents a significant application of cloaking technology to improve the efficiency of modern communication systems.

  5. Tuning plasmonic cloaks with an external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Pinheiro, F A; Farina, C

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to actively tune the operation of plasmonic cloaks with an external magnetic field by investigating electromagnetic scattering by a dielectric cylinder coated with a magneto-optical shell. In the long wavelength limit we show that the presence of an external magnetic field may drastically reduce the scattering cross-section at all observation angles. We demonstrate that the application of external magnetic fields can modify the operation wavelength without the need of changing material and/or geometrical parameters. We also show that applied magnetic fields can reversibly switch on and off the cloak operation. These results, which could be achieved for existing magneto-optical materials, are shown to be robust to material losses, so that they may pave the way for developing actively tunable, versatile plasmonic cloaks.

  6. Doppler cloak restores invisibility to objects in relativistic motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaccia, Davide; Sounas, Dimitrios L.; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2017-02-01

    Although cloaks are effective at suppressing the observability of static objects, they can be defeated when in motion. Here we discuss a general technique to cloak the motion of objects from static observers, based on compensating the Doppler shift associated with their motion with frequency conversion sustained by a spatiotemporally modulated cover. The concept is theoretically and numerically demonstrated in a system composed of a planar reflector covered by a spatiotemporally modulated slab. It is shown that, for properly selected modulation frequency, the composite system can appear to an external observer as stationary, even though it is actually moving. This concept may pave the way to the minimization of clutter produced by moving objects as well as to new directions in the science of cloaking.

  7. Graphene based metamaterials for terahertz cloaking and subwavelength imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzmand, Seyedali

    Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon crystal that became one of the most controversial topics of research in the last few years. The intense interest in graphene stems from recent demonstrations of their potentially revolutionary electromagnetic applications -- including negative refraction, subdiffraction imaging, and even invisibility -- which have suggested a wide range of new devices for communications, sensing, and biomedicine. In addition, it has been shown that graphene is amenable to unique patterning schemes such as cutting, bending, folding, and fusion that are predicted to lead to interesting properties. A recent proposed application of graphene is in engineering the scattering properties of objects, which may be leveraged in applications such as radar-cross-section management and stealth, where it may be required to make one object look like another object or render an object completely invisible. We present the analytical formulation for the analysis of electromagnetic interaction with a finite conducting wedge covered with a cylindrically shaped nanostructured graphene metasurface, resulting in the scattering cancellation of the dominant scattering mode for all the incident and all the observation angles. Following this idea, the cylindrical graphene metasurface is utilized for cloaking of several concentric finite conducting wedges. In addition, a wedge shaped metasurface is proposed as an alternative approach for cloaking of finite wedges. The resolution of the conventional imaging lenses is restricted by the natural diffraction limit. Artificially engineered metamaterials now offer the possibility of creating a superlens that overcomes this restriction. We demonstrate that a wire medium (WM) slab loaded with graphene sheets enables the enhancement of the near field for subwavelength imaging at terahertz (THz) frequencies. The analysis is based on the nonlocal homogenization model for WM with the additional boundary condition in the connection of

  8. Making waves round a structured cloak: lattices, negative refraction and fringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, D J; Jones, I S; Movchan, N V; Movchan, A B; Brun, M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-09-01

    Using the framework of transformation optics, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a non-singular square cloak for acoustic, out-of-plane shear elastic and electromagnetic waves. Analysis of wave propagation through the cloak is presented and accompanied by numerical illustrations. The efficacy of the regularized cloak is demonstrated and an objective numerical measure of the quality of the cloaking effect is provided. It is demonstrated that the cloaking effect persists over a wide range of frequencies. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of the regularized cloak, a Young's double slit experiment is presented. The stability of the interference pattern is examined when a cloaked and uncloaked obstacle are successively placed in front of one of the apertures. This novel link with a well-known quantum mechanical experiment provides an additional method through which the quality of cloaks may be examined. In the second half of the paper, it is shown that an approximate cloak may be constructed using a discrete lattice structure. The efficiency of the approximate lattice cloak is analysed and a series of illustrative simulations presented. It is demonstrated that effective cloaking may be obtained by using a relatively simple lattice structure, particularly, in the low-frequency regime.

  9. Acoustic carpet invisibility cloak with two open windows using multilayered homogeneous isotropic material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Chun-Yu; Xiang Zhi-Hai; Cen Zhang-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for designing an open acoustic cloak that can conceal a perturbation on flat ground and simultaneously meet the requirement of communication and matter interchange between the inside and the outside of the cloak.This cloak can be constructed with a multilayered structure and each layer is an isotropic and homogeneous medium.The design scheme consists of two steps:firstly,we apply a conformal coordinate transformation to obtain a quasi-perfect cloak with heterogeneous isotropic material; then,according to the profile of the material distribution,we degenerate this cloak into a multilayered-homogeneous isotropic cloak,which has two open windows with negligible disturbance on its invisibility performance.This may greatly facilitate the fabrication and enhance the applicability of such a carpet-type cloak.

  10. Optical force on a discrete invisibility cloak in time-dependent fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Zolla, Frederic; Nicolet, Andre; Belkebir, Kamal [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, Campus de St-Jerome 13013 Marseille (France); Rahmani, Adel [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    We study, in time domain, the exchange of momentum between an electromagnetic pulse and a three-dimensional, discrete, spherical invisibility cloak. We find that a discrete cloak, initially at rest, would experience an electromagnetic force due to the pulse but would acquire zero net momentum and net displacement. On the other hand, we find that while the cloak may manage to conceal an object and shroud it from the electromagnetic forces associated with the pulse, the cloak itself can experience optomechanical stress on a scale much larger than the object would in the absence of the cloak. We also consider the effects of material dispersion and losses on the electromagnetic forces experienced by the cloak and show that they lead to a transfer of momentum from the pulse to the cloak.

  11. Experimental demonstration of an invisible cloak with irregular shape by using tensor transmission line metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Chang; Li, Chao; Fang, Guang-You

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and the experimental demonstration of an invisible cloak with irregular shape by using tensor transmission line (TL) metamaterials. The fabricated cloak consists of tensor TL unit cells exhibiting anisotropic effective material parameters, while the background medium consists of isotropic TL unit cells. The simulated and the measured field patterns around the cloak show a fairly good agreement, both demonstrate that the fabricated cloak can shield the cloaked interior area from electromagnetic fields without perturbing the external fields. The scattering of the cloaked perfect electric conductor (PEC) is minimized. Furthermore, the nonresonant property of the TL structure results in a relatively broad bandwidth of the realized cloak, which is clearly observed in our experiment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos.11174280, 60990323, and 60990320) and the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No.YYYJ-1123).

  12. Full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulation of electromagnetic cloaking structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hao, Yang

    2008-04-28

    This paper proposes a radial dependent dispersive finite-difference time-domain method for the modeling of electromagnetic cloaking structures. The permittivity and permeability of the cloak are mapped to the Drude dispersion model and taken into account in dispersive FDTD simulations. Numerical simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions, objects placed inside the cloak are 'invisible' to external electromagnetic fields. However for the simplified cloak based on linear transformations, the back scattering has a similar level to the case of a PEC cylinder without any cloak, rendering the object still being 'visible'. It is also demonstrated numerically that the simplified cloak based on high-order transformations can indeed improve the cloaking performance.

  13. Detection of a diffusive cloak via second-order statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Koirala, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to detect the diffusive cloak proposed by Schittny et al [Science 345, 427 (2014)]. We exploit the fact that diffusion of light is an approximation that disregards wave interference. The long-range contribution to intensity correlation is sensitive to locations of paths crossings and the interference inside the medium, allowing one to detect the size and position, including the depth, of the diffusive cloak. Our results also suggest that it is possible to separately manipulate the first- and the second-order statistics of wave propagation in turbid media.

  14. Metamaterial Structure Design Optimization: A Study of the Cylindrical Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    energy. iv First, I wish to thank God and my savior, Jesus Christ , for the opportunity to study His creation. Next, a big thank-you goes to my loving wife...requirements to create a more physically realizable set of material parameters. 6 2.1 TO Cylindrical Cloak Originally , TO was conceived in an effort to avoid...TO method to designing a cloak consists of deforming the coordinate system such that the origin point is expanded into a boundary around an area to be

  15. Optical delay of a signal through a dispersive invisibility cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baile; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng

    2009-04-13

    We present a full-wave analysis method on the transmission of a Gaussian light pulse through a spherical invisibility cloak with causal dispersions. The spatial energy distribution of the Gaussian light pulse is distorted after the transmission. A volcano-shaped spatial time-delay distribution of the transmitted light pulse is demonstrated as a concrete example in our physical model. Both the time-delay and the energy transport depend on the polarization of light waves. This study helps to provide a complete picture of energy propagation through an invisibility cloak.

  16. A dc carpet cloak based on resistor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Zhong Lei; Liu, Yu Sha; Yang, Fan; Cui, Tie Jun

    2012-11-05

    We propose, design, and implement a two-dimensional dc carpet cloak for steady electric field using the transformation optics (TO) method. Based on the circuit theory, we introduce a resistor network to mimic the resulting anisotropic conducting medium. The experimental prototype is fabricated using metal film resistors, and the measured results agree perfectly well with theoretical predictions. This study gives the first experimental verification of a dc carpet cloak, which expands the application of TO theory, and has potential applications in related areas.

  17. Thermal invisibility based on scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-04-30

    We theoretically and numerically analyze thermal invisibility based on the concept of scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking. We show that a small object can be made completely invisible to heat diffusion waves, by tailoring the heat conductivity of the spherical shell enclosing the object. This means that the thermal scattering from the object is suppressed, and the heat flow outside the object and the cloak made of these spherical shells behaves as if the object is not present. Thermal invisibility may open new vistas in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography, military furtivity, and electronics heating reduction.

  18. Spontaneous emission and the operation of invisibility cloaks: Can the invisibility cloaks render objects invisible in quantum mechanic domain?

    CERN Document Server

    Behbahani, Mina Morshed; Mahdifar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    As a probe to explore the ability of invisibility cloaks to conceal objects in the quantum mechanics domain, we study the spontaneous emission rate of an excited two-level atom in the vicinity of an ideal invisibility cloaking. On this base, first, a canonical quantization scheme is presented for the electromagnetic field interacting with atomic systems in an anisotropic, inhomogeneous and absorbing magnetodielectric medium which can suitably be used for studying the influence of arbitrary invisibility cloak on the atomic radiative properties. The time dependence of the atomic subsystem is obtained in the Schrodinger picture. By introducing a modified set of the spherical wave vector functions, the Green tensor of the system is calculated via the continuous and discrete methods. In this formalism, the decay rate and as well the emission pattern of the aforementioned atom are computed analytically for both weak and strong coupling interaction, and then numerically calculations are done to demonstrate the perfo...

  19. How non-magnetic are "non-magnetic" Herbig Ae/Be stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, G A; Catala, C; Bagnulo, S; Landstreet, J D; Flood, J; Böhm, T; Bouret, J -C; Donati, J -F; Folsom, C P; Grunhut, J; Silvester, J

    2007-01-01

    Our recent discovery of magnetic fields in a small number of Herbig Ae/Be stars has required that we survey a much larger sample of stars. From our FORS1 and ESPaDOnS surveys, we have acquired about 125 observations of some 70 stars in which no magnetic fields are detected. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we have performed statistical comparisons of the observed longitudinal fields and LSD Stokes V profiles of these apparently non-magnetic stars with a variety of field models. This has allowed us to derive general upper limits on the presence of dipolar fields in the sample, and to place realistic upper limits on undetected dipole fields which may be present in individual stars. This paper briefly reports the results of the statistical modeling, as well as field upper limits for individual stars of particular interest.

  20. Metamaterial-Based Cylinders Used for Invisible Cloak Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Branimir Ivsic Tin Komljenovic University of Zagreb Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing Unska 3 Zagreb, Croatia HR-10000...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Zvonimir Sipus Dario Bojanjac Branimir Ivsic Tim Komljenovic 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK...Used for Invisible Cloak Realization by Zvonimir Sipus Dario Bojanjac Branimir Ivsic Tin Komljenovic

  1. Invariance of the magnetic behavior and AMI in ferromagnetic biphase films with distinct non-magnetic metallic spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, E.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-900 Natal, RN (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Gamino, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande de Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Andrade, A.M.H. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande de Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vázquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Correa, M.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-900 Natal, RN (Brazil); Bohn, F., E-mail: felipebohn@fisica.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-900 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quasi-static magnetic, magnetotransport, and dynamic magnetic properties in ferromagnetic biphase films with distinct non-magnetic metallic spacer layers. We observe that the nature of the non-magnetic metallic spacer material does not have significant influence on the overall biphase magnetic behavior, and, consequently, on the magnetotransport and dynamic magnetic responses. We focus on the magnetoimpedance effect and verify that the films present asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect. Moreover, we explore the possibility of tuning the linear region of the magnetoimpedance curves around zero magnetic field by varying the probe current frequency in order to achieve higher sensitivity values. The invariance of the magnetic behavior and the asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect in ferromagnetic biphase films with distinct non-magnetic metallic spacers place them as promising candidates for probe element and open possibilities to the development of lower-cost high sensitivity linear magnetic field sensor devices.

  2. Invariance of the magnetic behavior and AMI in ferromagnetic biphase films with distinct non-magnetic metallic spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E. F.; Gamino, M.; Andrade, A. M. H. de; Vázquez, M.; Correa, M. A.; Bohn, F.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the quasi-static magnetic, magnetotransport, and dynamic magnetic properties in ferromagnetic biphase films with distinct non-magnetic metallic spacer layers. We observe that the nature of the non-magnetic metallic spacer material does not have significant influence on the overall biphase magnetic behavior, and, consequently, on the magnetotransport and dynamic magnetic responses. We focus on the magnetoimpedance effect and verify that the films present asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect. Moreover, we explore the possibility of tuning the linear region of the magnetoimpedance curves around zero magnetic field by varying the probe current frequency in order to achieve higher sensitivity values. The invariance of the magnetic behavior and the asymmetric magnetoimpedance effect in ferromagnetic biphase films with distinct non-magnetic metallic spacers place them as promising candidates for probe element and open possibilities to the development of lower-cost high sensitivity linear magnetic field sensor devices.

  3. A 3D tunable and multi-frequency graphene plasmonic cloak

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of cloaking three-dimensional objects at multi-frequencies in the far-infrared part of the spectrum. The proposed cloaking mechanism exploits graphene layers wrapped around the object to be concealed. Graphene layers are doped via a variable external voltage difference permitting continuous tuning of the cloaking frequencies. Particularly, two configurations are investigated: (i) Only one graphene layer is used to suppress the scattering from a dielectric sphere. (ii) Several of these layers biased at different gate voltages are used to achieve a multi-frequency cloak. These frequencies can be set independently. The proposed cloak\\'s functionality is verified by near- and far-field computations. By considering geometry and material parameters that are realizable by practical experiments, we contribute to the development of graphene based plasmonic applications that may find use in disruptive photonic technologies. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  4. A fundamental Lagrangian approach to transformation acoustics and spherical spacetime cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Michael M.

    2012-05-01

    Transformation acoustics centers on the construction of advanced acoustic devices by combining mathematical transformation techniques with the engineering of acoustic metamaterials. We show how differential-geometric methods together with a variational principle form the basis of a powerful framework to control acoustic waves as desired. This formalism is required to leave the acoustic wave equation invariant under coordinate transformations and is shown to consist of a proposed acoustic Lagrangian function on a smooth spacetime manifold. As an immediate consequence, we can derive the general constitutive relations between the acoustic parameters (bulk modulus and mass-density tensor) of the physical and virtual spaces under consideration. We conclude with a practical application of this theory by presenting acoustic spherical cloaking with time dilation.

  5. Cloaking of solar cell contacts at the onset of Rayleigh scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, Etor; Vitrey, Alan; Buencuerpo, Jerónimo; Prieto, Iván; Llorens, José M.; García-Martín, Antonio; Alén, Benito; Chaudhuri, Anabil; Neumann, Alexander; Brueck, S. R. J.; Ripalda, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical contacts on the top surface of solar cells and light emitting diodes cause shadow losses. The phenomenon of extraordinary optical transmission through arrays of subwavelength holes suggests the possibility of engineering such contacts to reduce the shadow using plasmonics, but resonance effects occur only at specific wavelengths. Here we describe instead a broadband effect of enhanced light transmission through arrays of subwavelength metallic wires, due to the fact that, in the absence of resonances, metal wires asymptotically tend to invisibility in the small size limit regardless of the fraction of the device area taken up by the contacts. The effect occurs for wires more than an order of magnitude thicker than the transparency limit for metal thin films. Finite difference in time domain calculations predict that it is possible to have high cloaking efficiencies in a broadband wavelength range, and we experimentally demonstrate contact shadow losses less than half of the geometric shadow. PMID:27339390

  6. Ancient DNA recovers the origins of Māori feather cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnup, K; Huynen, L; Te Kanawa, R; Shepherd, L D; Millar, C D; Lambert, D M

    2011-10-01

    Feather cloaks ("kakahu"), particularly those adorned with kiwi feathers, are treasured items or "taonga" to the Māori people of "Aotearoa"/New Zealand. They are considered iconic expression of Māori culture. Despite their status, much of our knowledge of the materials used to construct cloaks, the provenance of cloaks, and the origins of cloak making itself, has been lost. We used ancient DNA methods to recover mitochondrial DNA sequences from 849 feather samples taken from 109 cloaks. We show that almost all (>99%) of the cloaks were constructed using feathers from North Island brown kiwi. Molecular sexing of nuclear DNA recovered from 92 feather cloak samples also revealed that the sex ratio of birds deviated from a ratio of 1:1 observed in reference populations. Additionally, we constructed a database of 185 mitochondrial control region DNA sequences of kiwi feathers comprising samples collected from 26 North Island locations together with data available from the literature. Genetic subdivision (G(ST)), nucleotide subdivision (N(ST)) and Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variants (SAMOVA) analyses revealed high levels of genetic structuring in North Island brown kiwi. Together with sequence data from previously studied ancient and modern kiwi samples, we were able to determine the geographic provenance of 847 cloak feathers from 108 cloaks. A surprising proportion (15%) of cloaks were found to contain feathers from different geographic locations, providing evidence of kiwi trading among Māori tribes or organized hunting trips into other tribal areas. Our data also suggest that the east of the North Island of New Zealand was the most prolific of all kiwi cloak making areas, with over 50% of all cloaks analyzed originating from this region. Similar molecular approaches have the potential to discover a wealth of lost information from artifacts of endemic cultures worldwide.

  7. Exploring the proper experimental conditions in 2D thermal cloaking demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Run; Zhou, Shuling; Yu, Xingjian; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    Although thermal cloak has been studied extensively, the specific discussions on the proper experimental conditions to successfully observe the thermal cloaking effect are lacking. In this study, we focus on exploring the proper experimental conditions for 2D thermal cloaking demonstration. A mathematical model is established and detailed discussions are presented based on the model. The proper experimental conditions are suggested and verified with finite element simulations.

  8. Broadening the Bandwidth of Metamaterial Cloaks with Non-Foster Metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Alu, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the concept and practical design of broadband, ultrathin cloaks based on non-Foster, negatively capacitive metasurfaces. By using properly tailored, active frequency-selective screens conformal to an object, within the realm of practical realization, is shown to enable drastically reduced scattering over a wide frequency range in the microwave regime, orders of magnitude broader than any available passive cloaking technology. The proposed active cloak may impact not only invisibility and camouflaging, but also practical antenna and sensing applications.

  9. Invisibility cloaks with arbitrary geometries for layered and gradually changing backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C; Yao, K; Li, F, E-mail: cli@mail.ie.ac.c [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2009-09-21

    Cloaks with arbitrary geometries are proposed which can make objects invisible in inhomogeneous backgrounds. The general and explicit expressions of the complex permittivity and permeability tensors are derived for cloaks embedded in layered and gradually changing media. The inner and the outer boundaries of the cloaks can be non-conformal with arbitrary shapes, which considerably improve the flexibility of the cloak applications. The interactions of electromagnetic waves with irregular cloaks are studied based on numerical simulations. The influences of the cloaked and uncloaked perfect electric conductor (PEC) cylinders upon the scattering fields of the multilayered backgrounds are quantitatively evaluated. The effect of loss on the cloaking performance has also been investigated. It is verified that cloaks with ideal parameters can smoothly deflect and guide the incoming beams to propagate around the shielded regions without disturbing the beams when they return to the inhomogeneous backgrounds. Therefore, the objects in the shielded region can be effectively invisible to the corresponding backgrounds. The performance of lossy cloaks will degrade with comparatively large power reduction of the transmitted beams.

  10. The scattering of a cylindrical invisibility cloak: reduced parameters and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Ran, L.; Mortensen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the scattering of 2D cylindrical invisibility cloaks with simplified constitutive parameters with the assistance of scattering coefficients. We show that the scattering of the cloaks originates not only from the boundary conditions but also from the spatial variation of the component...... of permittivity/permeability. According to our formulation, we propose some restrictions to the invisibility cloak in order to minimize its scattering after the simplification has taken place. With our theoretical analysis, it is possible to design a simplified cloak using some peculiar composites...

  11. Temperature controlled infrared broadband cloaking with the bilayer coatings of semiconductor and superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaohua [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng 224051 (China); Liu, Youwen, E-mail: ywliu@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Feng, Yuncai [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We first propose that the cloak is composed of the bilayer of semiconductor and superconductor. • We realize the infrared broadband cloaking based on the scattering cancellation method. • The cloaking frequency can be tuned by external temperature. - Abstract: The infrared broadband tunable cloaking have been proposed and investigated with the bilayer coating materials of semiconductor (n-Ge) and high-temperature superconductor (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}), whose cloaking frequency can be controlled by external temperature. The analytical solution is derived based on the scattering cancellation cloaking technique from the Mie scattering theory, and the full-wave numerical simulation is performed by the finite element method. The calculated and simulated results have demonstrated that this invisibility cloak may reduce the total scattering cross section of the composite structure of 90% over a broad frequency band of nearly 20 THz, and the infrared cloaking frequency can be tuned by the external temperature. It can provide a feasible way to design a broadband tunable cloak.

  12. Acoustic carpet cloak based on an ultrathin metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustic metasurface carpet cloak based on membrane-capped cavities is proposed and investigated numerically. This design has been chosen for allowing ultrathin geometries, although adapted to airborne sound frequencies in the range of 1 kHz (λ ≈30 cm), surpassing the designs reported in the literature in terms of thinness. A formulation of generalized Snell's laws is first proposed, mapping the directions of the incident and reflected waves to the metasurface phase function. This relation is then applied to achieve a prescribed wavefront reflection direction, for a given incident direction, by controlling the acoustic impedance grading along the metasurface. The carpet cloak performance of the proposed acoustic metasurface is then assessed on a triangular bump obstacle, generally considered as a baseline configuration in the literature.

  13. A simple construction for a cylindrical cloak via inverse homogenization

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Tom H; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    An effective cylindrical cloak may be conceptualized as an assembly of adjacent local neighbourhoods, each of which is made from a homogenized composite material (HCM). The HCM is required to be a certain uniaxial dielectric-magnetic material, characterized by positive-definite constitutive dyadics. It can arise from the homogenization of remarkably simple component materials, such as two isotropic dielectric-magnetic materials, randomly distributed as oriented spheroidal particles. By carefully controlling the spheroidal shape of the component particles, a high degree of HCM anisotropy may be achieved, which is necessary for the cloaking effect to be realized. The inverse Bruggeman formalism can provide estimates of the shape and constitutive parameters for the component materials, as well as their volume fractions.

  14. Unraveling an Old Cloak: k-anonymity for Location Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Reza; Troncoso, Carmela; Diaz, Claudia; Freudiger, Julien; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    There is a rich collection of literature that aims at protecting the privacy of users querying location-based services. One of the most popular location privacy techniques consists in cloaking users' locations such that k users appear as potential senders of a query, thus achieving k-anonymity. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of k-anonymity approaches for protecting location privacy in the presence of various types of adversaries. The unraveling of the scheme unfolds the inconsistency b...

  15. Prospects for poor-man's cloaking with low-contrast all-dielectric optical elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Sigmund, Ole; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for low-contrast all-dielectric cloaking and offer a simple picture illustrating the basic obstacle for perfect cloaking without materials with an effective double-negative response. However, the same simple picture also gives directions for less perfect designs allowing...

  16. Metasurface Cloak Performance Near-by Multiple Line Sources and PEC Cylindrical Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Yatman, William H.; Pehrson, Signe

    2014-01-01

    The performance/robustness of metasurface cloaks to a complex field environment which may represent a realistic scenario of radiating sources is presently reported. Attention is devoted to the cloak operation near-by multiple line sources and multiple perfectly electrically conducting cylinders...

  17. Broadband invisibility by non-Euclidean cloaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomás

    2009-01-02

    Invisibility and negative refraction are both applications of transformation optics where the material of a device performs a coordinate transformation for electromagnetic fields. The device creates the illusion that light propagates through empty flat space, whereas in physical space, light is bent around a hidden interior or seems to run backward in space or time. All of the previous proposals for invisibility require materials with extreme properties. Here we show that transformation optics of a curved, non-Euclidean space (such as the surface of a virtual sphere) relax these requirements and can lead to invisibility in a broad band of the spectrum.

  18. Invisibility Cloaks Modeled by Anisotropic Metamaterials Based on Inductor-capacitor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiao; Yao, Kan; Meng, Xiankun; Li, Fang

    2009-01-01

    Base on the transformation optics, a novel transmission-line (TL) approach to realize invisibility cloaking using planar anisotropic metamaterials (MTMs) is proposed. The two-dimensional cylindrical cloaks are modeled based on inductor-capacitor (L-C) MTMs networks. The three elements of the constitutive parameters are all allowed to be spatially inhomogeneous which lead to the full parameter realization of a cylindrical cloak. As an example, a cloak working at VHF band is modeled and its invisibility behavior is demonstrated based on the solution of the node voltages distributions. Due to the non-resonant properties of the L-C elements, the broadband characteristic of the proposed cloaks is also evident.

  19. Towards omnidirectional, large scale, full polarization, and broadband practical invisibility cloaks: challenges and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yihao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invisibility cloaks have experienced a tremendous development in the past few years, but the current technologies to convert the cloaks into practical applications are still facing numerous bottlenecks. In this paper, we provide the review of the challenges and recent progress in the invisibility cloaks from a practical perspective. In particular, the following key challenges such as non-extreme parameters, homogeneity, omnidirectivity, full polarization, large scale and broad band are addressed. We analyze the physical mechanisms behind the challenges and consequently evaluate the merits and defects of the recent solutions. We anticipate some compromises on the ideal cloaks are required in order to achieve practical invisibility cloaks in the future.

  20. Scattering cross-section of a transformation optics-based metamaterial cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundtz, Nathan; Gaultney, Daniel; Smith, David R, E-mail: nbk@duke.ed [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2010-04-15

    We present experimental quantitative scattering cross-section (SCS) measurements for a metamaterial cloak. The cloak is nearly identical to that reported in 2006; however, quantitative experimental measurements have not yet been reported for such a structure. This cylindrically symmetric cloak is designed to operate at a frequency of 10 GHz and to reduce the SCS of a cylinder 50 mm in diameter. Despite being only a crude approximation of the ideal transformation optical design, the fabricated metamaterial cloak is shown to reduce the SCS of the cylinder over the frequency range from 9.91 to 10.14 GHz, a span of 230 MHz or a 2.3% bandwidth. The maximum reduction in the SCS is 24%. This result provides a useful experimental, quantitative benchmark that can form the basis for comparison of the performances of future improved cloaking structures.

  1. A self-assembled three-dimensional cloak in the visible

    KAUST Repository

    Mühlig, Stefan

    2013-08-07

    An invisibility cloak has been designed, realized and characterized. The cloak hides free-standing sub-wavelength three-dimensional objects at the short wavelength edge of the visible spectrum. By a bottom-up approach the cloak was self-assembled around the object. Such fabrication approach constitutes a further important step towards real world applications of cloaking; leaving the realm of curiosity. The cloak and the way it was fabricated opens an avenue for many spectacular nanooptical applications such as non-disturbing sensors and photo-detectors, highly efficient solar cells, or optical nanoantenna arrays with strongly suppressed cross-talk to mention only a few. Our results rely on the successful combination of concepts from various disciplines, i.e. chemistry, material science, and plasmonics. Consequently, this work will stimulate these fields by unraveling new paths for future research.

  2. Horizontal cloaking and vertical reflection by transformation acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyung Lee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation shows that if an acoustic metamaterial bounded by an external rectangle and an internal circular cavity is properly engineered by a set of transformation equations that satisfy certain requirements, it can virtually cloak an object against incoming acoustic waves in one direction and make an incoming wave along the orthogonal direction reflected by an object located inside its inner cavity. The specific transformation equations realizing the metamaterial are suggested and an analysis is carried out to investigate the wave phenomena taking place along the cavity boundary.

  3. Quantifying absolute spin polarization with non-magnetic contacts in FM/ n-GaAs heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, Chad; Wienkes, Lee; Christie, Kevin; Patel, Sahil; Palmstrøm, Chris; Crowell, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We report on a novel method of quantifying spin accumulation in Co2MnSi/ n-GaAs and Fe/ n-GaAs heterostructures using a non-magnetic probe. The presence of a non-equilibrium spin polarization generates a large electrostatic potential shift relative to the equilibrium state. This is due to the combination of (1) the parabolic (non-constant) density of states and (2) the population imbalance between the two spin sub-bands. We observe this shift as a Hanle effect in a non-local, non-magnetic semiconducting contact. Since this signal depends only on experimentally accessible parameters of the bulk semiconductor, its magnitude may be used to quantify the injected spin polarization in absolute terms. By comparison with the (smaller) spin-valve signal observed with a second ferromagnetic contact, we demonstrate that this electrostatic shift scales quadratically with spin polarization, dephases in the presence of both applied and hyperfine fields, and is observable to higher temperatures than traditional non-local measurements. Quantitative modeling allows extraction of absolute polarizations in excess of 50 % at low temperatures, and further indicates that this contribution constitutes a large fraction of the three-terminal signal observed in these devices. Supported by NSF DMR-1104951; by STARnet, a SRC program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA; and by the NSF MRSEC program.

  4. A Near Zero Refractive Index Metamaterial for Electromagnetic Invisibility Cloaking Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Sunbeam Islam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the design of a unit cell of a metamaterial that shows more than 2 GHz wideband near zero refractive index (NZRI property in the C-band region of microwave spectra. The two arms of the unit cell were splitted in such a way that forms a near-pi-shape structure on epoxy resin fiber (FR-4 substrate material. The reflection and transmission characteristics of the unit cell were achieved by utilizing finite integration technique based simulation software. Measured results were presented, which complied well with simulated results. The unit cell was then applied to build a single layer rectangular-shaped cloak that operates in the C-band region where a metal cylinder was perfectly hidden electromagnetically by reducing the scattering width below zero. Moreover, the unit cell shows NZRI property there. The experimental result for the cloak operation was presented in terms of S-parameters as well. In addition, the same metamaterial shell was also adopted for designing an eye-shaped and triangular-shaped cloak structure to cloak the same object, and cloaking operation is achieved in the C-band, as well with slightly better cloaking performance. The novel design, NZRI property, and single layer C-band cloaking operation has made the design a promising one in the electromagnetic paradigm.

  5. Temporal cloak with large fractional hiding window at telecommunication data rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Dong, Jianji; Yan, Siqi; Yang, Ting

    2017-04-01

    We design and experimentally investigate a temporal cloak scheme using ultrashort pulse compression and time-domain Fraunhofer diffraction. An input continuous-wave probe beam is compressed to ultrashort pulse train based on self-phase modulation effect and chirp compensation using single mode fiber. Accordingly, wide temporal gaps appear to act as the cloaking windows. The train of ultrashort pulses can be converted to continuous wave after experiencing enough dispersion, indicating that the temporal gaps are closed. Thus, any time events will be hidden in the temporal gaps from observers. In our study, we demonstrated a temporal cloak system, which is able to hide 88% of the whole time period and cloak pseudorandom digital data at a bitrate of 10 Gbit/s. The relationships of cloaking window fraction versus pump power and the condition of cloaking off are also investigated. These results present a new feasible way towards obtaining a high-fractional cloaking window at telecommunication data rate and hiding real-world messages.

  6. An Object-Independent ENZ Metamaterial-Based Wideband Electromagnetic Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-01-01

    A new, metamaterial-based electromagnetic cloaking operation is proposed in this study. The metamaterial exhibits a sharp transmittance in the C-band of the microwave spectrum with negative effective property of permittivity at that frequency. Two metal arms were placed on an FR-4 substrate to construct a double-split-square shape structure. The size of the resonator was maintained to achieve the effective medium property of the metamaterial. Full wave numerical simulation was performed to extract the reflection and transmission coefficients for the unit cell. Later on, a single layer square-shaped cloak was designed using the proposed metamaterial unit cell. The cloak hides a metal cylinder electromagnetically, where the material exhibits epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) property. Cloaking operation was demonstrated adopting the scattering-reduction technique. The measured result was provided to validate the characteristics of the metamaterial and the cloak. Some object size- and shape-based analyses were performed with the cloak, and a common cloaking region was revealed over more than 900 MHz in the C-band for the different objects. PMID:27634456

  7. An Object-Independent ENZ Metamaterial-Based Wideband Electromagnetic Cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-09-16

    A new, metamaterial-based electromagnetic cloaking operation is proposed in this study. The metamaterial exhibits a sharp transmittance in the C-band of the microwave spectrum with negative effective property of permittivity at that frequency. Two metal arms were placed on an FR-4 substrate to construct a double-split-square shape structure. The size of the resonator was maintained to achieve the effective medium property of the metamaterial. Full wave numerical simulation was performed to extract the reflection and transmission coefficients for the unit cell. Later on, a single layer square-shaped cloak was designed using the proposed metamaterial unit cell. The cloak hides a metal cylinder electromagnetically, where the material exhibits epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) property. Cloaking operation was demonstrated adopting the scattering-reduction technique. The measured result was provided to validate the characteristics of the metamaterial and the cloak. Some object size- and shape-based analyses were performed with the cloak, and a common cloaking region was revealed over more than 900 MHz in the C-band for the different objects.

  8. Transformation-based spherical cloaks designed by an implicit transformation-independent method: theory and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitsky, Andrey [Department of Theoretical Physics, Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosti Avenue 4, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Qiu, C-W [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zouhdi, Said [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, SUPELEC, Plateau de Moulon 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: eleqc@nus.edu.sg

    2009-11-15

    Based on the concept of the cloak generating function, we propose an implicit transformation-independent method for the required parameters of spherical cloaks without knowing the needed coordinate transformation beforehand. A non-ideal discrete model is used to calculate and optimize the total scattering cross-sections of different profiles of the generating function. A bell-shaped quadratic spherical cloak is found to be the best candidate, which is further optimized by controlling the design parameters involved. Such improved invisibility is steady even when the model is highly discretized.

  9. General scaling limitations of ground-plane and isolated-object cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Hila; Johnson, Steven G. [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Oskooi, A. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University (Japan); Joannopoulos, J. D. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    We prove that, for arbitrary three-dimensional transformation-based invisibility cloaking of an object above a ground plane or of isolated objects, there are practical constraints that increase with the object size. In particular, we show that the cloak thickness must scale proportionally to the thickness of the object being cloaked, assuming bounded refractive indices, and that absorption discrepancies and other imperfections must scale inversely with the object thickness. For isolated objects, we also show that bounded refractive indices imply a lower bound on the effective cross section.

  10. Biomimetic antimicrobial cloak by graphene-oxide agar hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Bugli, Francesca; De Spirito, Marco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ciancico, Carlotta; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Angelani, Luca; Conti, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Antibacterial surfaces have an enormous economic and social impact on the worldwide technological fight against diseases. However, bacteria develop resistance and coatings are often not uniform and not stable in time. The challenge is finding an antibacterial coating that is biocompatible, cost-effective, not toxic, and spreadable over large and irregular surfaces. Here we demonstrate an antibacterial cloak by laser printing of graphene oxide hydrogels mimicking the Cancer Pagurus carapace. We observe up to 90% reduction of bacteria cells. This cloak exploits natural surface patterns evolved to resist to microorganisms infection, and the antimicrobial efficacy of graphene oxide. Cell integrity analysis by scanning electron microscopy and nucleic acids release show bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect. Nucleic acids release demonstrates microorganism cutting, and microscopy reveals cells wrapped by the laser treated gel. A theoretical active matter model confirms our findings. The employment of biomimetic graphene oxide gels opens unique possibilities to decrease infections in biomedical applications and chirurgical equipment; our antibiotic-free approach, based on the geometric reduction of microbial adhesion and the mechanical action of Graphene Oxide sheets, is potentially not affected by bacterial resistance.

  11. Nuclear conversion theory: molecular hydrogen in non-magnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilisca, Ernest; Ghiglieno, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogen conversion patterns on non-magnetic solids sensitively depend upon the degree of singlet/triplet mixing in the intermediates of the catalytic reaction. Three main `symmetry-breaking' interactions are brought together. In a typical channel, the electron spin-orbit (SO) couplings introduce some magnetic excitations in the non-magnetic solid ground state. The electron spin is exchanged with a molecular one by the electric molecule-solid electron repulsion, mixing the bonding and antibonding states and affecting the molecule rotation. Finally, the magnetic hyperfine contact transfers the electron spin angular momentum to the nuclei. Two families of channels are considered and a simple criterion based on the SO coupling strength is proposed to select the most efficient one. The denoted `electronic' conversion path involves an emission of excitons that propagate and disintegrate in the bulk. In the other denoted `nuclear', the excited electron states are transients of a loop, and the electron system returns to its fundamental ground state. The described model enlarges previous studies by extending the electron basis to charge-transfer states and `continui' of band states, and focuses on the broadening of the antibonding molecular excited state by the solid conduction band that provides efficient tunnelling paths for the hydrogen conversion. After working out the general conversion algebra, the conversion rates of hydrogen on insulating and semiconductor solids are related to a few molecule-solid parameters (gap width, ionization and affinity potentials) and compared with experimental measures.

  12. The scattering of a cylindrical invisibility cloak: reduced parameters and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, L; Mortensen, N A [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DTU-building 345 west, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Ran, L, E-mail: plia@fotonik.dtu.dk [Department of Information and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-04-06

    We investigate the scattering of 2D cylindrical invisibility cloaks with simplified constitutive parameters with the assistance of scattering coefficients. We show that the scattering of the cloaks originates not only from the boundary conditions but also from the spatial variation of the component of permittivity/permeability. According to our formulation, we propose some restrictions to the invisibility cloak in order to minimize its scattering after the simplification has taken place. With our theoretical analysis, it is possible to design a simplified cloak using some peculiar composites such as photonic crystals which mimic an effective refractive index landscape rather than offering effective constitutives, meanwhile cancelling the scattering from the inner and outer boundaries.

  13. Transformation cloaking and radial approximations for flexural waves in elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, M; Jones, I S; Movchan, A B; Movchan, N V

    2014-01-01

    It is known that design of elastic cloaks is much more challenging than the design idea for acoustic cloaks, cloaks of electromagnetic waves or scalar problems of anti-plane shear. In this paper, we address fully the fourth-order problem and develop a model of a broadband invisibility cloak for channelling flexural waves in thin plates around finite inclusions. We also discuss an option to employ efficiently an elastic pre-stress and body forces to achieve such a result. An asymptotic derivation provides a rigorous link between the model in question and elastic wave propagation in thin solids. This is discussed in detail to show connection with non-symmetric formulations in vector elasticity studied in earlier work.

  14. Isotropic-medium three-dimensional cloaks for acoustic and electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Smith, David R; 10.1063/1.3691242

    2012-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the two-dimensional eikonal-limit cloak derived from a conformal transformation to three dimensions. The proposed cloak is a spherical shell composed of only isotropic media; it operates in the transmission mode and requires no mirror or ground plane. Unlike the well-known omnidirectional spherical cloaks, it may reduce visibility of an arbitrary object only for a very limited range of observation angles. In the short-wavelength limit, this cloaking structure restores not only the trajectories of incident rays, but also their phase, which is a necessary ingredient to complete invisibility. Both scalar-wave (acoustic) and transverse vector-wave (electromagnetic) versions are presented.

  15. Molding the flow of light with a magnetic field: plasmonic cloaking and directional scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Pinheiro, F A; Farina, C

    2014-01-01

    We investigate electromagnetic scattering and plasmonic cloaking in a system composed by a dielectric cylinder coated with a magneto-optical shell. In the long-wavelength limit we demonstrate that the application of an external magnetic field can not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism but also mitigate losses, as the absorption cross-section is shown to be minimal precisely at the cloaking operation frequency band. We also show that the angular distribution of the scattered radiation can be effectively controlled by applying an external magnetic field, allowing for a swift change in the scattering pattern. By demonstrating that these results are feasible with realistic, existing magneto-optical materials, such as graphene epitaxially grown on SiC, we suggest that magnetic fields could be used as an effective, versatile external agent to tune plasmonic cloaks and to dynamically control electromagnetic scattering in an unprecedented way, we hope that these results may find use in disruptive photonic ...

  16. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    The advent of nanoparticle-based delivery systems has made a significant impact on clinical patient outcomes. In recent decades, myriad nanoparticle-based therapeutic agents have been developed for the treatment and management of ailments such as cancer, diabetes, pain, bacterial infections, and asthma, among many others. Nanotherapeutics offer many distinct advantages over conventional free drug formulations. For example, nanoparticles are able to accumulate at tumor sites by extravasation through leaky vasculature at tumor sites via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; nanoparticles can also be tailored to have desirable characteristics, such as prolonged circulation in the blood stream, improved drug encapsulation, and sustained or triggered drug release. Currently, a growing number of nanoformulations with favorable pharmacological profiles and promising efficacy are being used in clinical trials for the treatment of various cancers. Building on the success of these encouraging clinical results, new engineering strategies have emerged that combine synthetic nanoparticles with natural biomaterials to create nature-inspired biomimetic delivery systems. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on the biointerfacing between synthetic and natural materials, namely in the manifestation of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles. By exploiting the natural functionalities of source cell membranes, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have huge potential in the delivery of therapeutic agents for a variety of applications. The first portion of this thesis will focus on understanding the fundamentals underlying cell membrane coating on synthetic nanoparticles. First introduced in 2011, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles showed immediate promise in drug delivery applications, but further understanding was necessary to be able to harness the full potential of the membrane coating platform. The first section provides further insight into the interfacial

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  18. Dispersion characteristics of silicon nanorod based carpet cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata A; Blair, John; Summers, Christopher J; Park, Wounjhang

    2010-12-06

    A wide range of transformation media designed with conformal mapping are currently being studied extensively due to their favorable properties: isotropy, moderate index requirements, low loss and broad bandwidth. For optical frequency operation, the transformation media are commonly fabricated on high index semiconductor thin films. These 2D implementations, however, inevitably introduces waveguide dispersion, which affects the bandwidth and loss behavior. In this paper, for carpet cloaks implemented by a silicon nanorod array, we have confirmed that waveguide dispersion limits the bandwidth of the transformation medium by direct visualizing the cut-off conditions with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). Furthermore, we have experimentally demonstrated the extension of cut-off wavelength by depositing a conformal dielectric layer. This study illustrates the constraints on the 2D transformation media imposed by the waveguide dispersion and suggests a general technique to tune and modify their optical properties.

  19. Magnetic light cloaking control in the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Ohtsuka, S.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the light cloaking behavior of the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina under a magnetic field. Optical interferences in the multi-laminated guanine crystal layer beneath the dorsal body surface create a brilliant structural color, which can be almost entirely removed by changing the light reflection. In the investigation, we immersed segments of Sapphirina in seawater contained in an optical chamber. When the derived Sapphirina segments were attached to the container surface, they were inert to magnetic fields up to 300 mT. However, when the back plate segments were attached to the substrate at a point, with most of the plate floating in the seawater, the plate rotated oppositely to the applied magnetic field. In addition, the brilliant parts of the Sapphirina back plate rotated backward and forward by changing the magnetic field directions. Our experiment suggests a new model of an optical micro-electro-mechanical system that is controllable by magnetic fields.

  20. Submentalizing or Mentalizing in a Level 1 Perspective-Taking Task: A Cloak and Goggles Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that humans possess an automatic system to represent mental states (‘implicit mentalizing’). The existence of an implicit mentalizing system has generated considerable debate however, centered on the ability of various experimental paradigms to demonstrate unambiguously such mentalizing. Evidence for implicit mentalizing has previously been provided by the ‘dot perspective task,’ where participants are slower to verify the number of dots they can see when an avatar can see a different number of dots. However, recent evidence challenged a mentalizing interpretation of this effect by showing it was unaltered when the avatar was replaced with an inanimate arrow stimulus. Here we present an extension of the dot perspective task using an invisibility cloaking device to render the dots invisible on certain trials. This paradigm is capable of providing unambiguous evidence of automatic mentalizing, but no such evidence was found. Two further well-powered experiments used opaque and transparent goggles to manipulate visibility but found no evidence of automatic mentalizing, nor of individual differences in empathy or perspective-taking predicting performance, contradicting previous studies using the same design. The results cast doubt on the existence of an implicit mentalizing system, suggesting that previous effects were due to domain-general processes. PMID:27893269

  1. Giant spin Seebeck effect in a non-magnetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, C M; Myers, R C; Johnston-Halperin, E; Heremans, J P

    2012-07-11

    The spin Seebeck effect is observed when a thermal gradient applied to a spin-polarized material leads to a spatially varying transverse spin current in an adjacent non-spin-polarized material, where it gets converted into a measurable voltage. It has been previously observed with a magnitude of microvolts per kelvin in magnetically ordered materials, ferromagnetic metals, semiconductors and insulators. Here we describe a signal in a non-magnetic semiconductor (InSb) that has the hallmarks of being produced by the spin Seebeck effect, but is three orders of magnitude larger (millivolts per kelvin). We refer to the phenomenon that produces it as the giant spin Seebeck effect. Quantizing magnetic fields spin-polarize conduction electrons in semiconductors by means of Zeeman splitting, which spin-orbit coupling amplifies by a factor of ∼25 in InSb. We propose that the giant spin Seebeck effect is mediated by phonon-electron drag, which changes the electrons' momentum and directly modifies the spin-splitting energy through spin-orbit interactions. Owing to the simultaneously strong phonon-electron drag and spin-orbit coupling in InSb, the magnitude of the giant spin Seebeck voltage is comparable to the largest known classical thermopower values.

  2. Elliptical metasurfaces for cloaking and antenna applications at microwave and terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpourbernety, Hossein

    One of the interesting applications of metamaterials is the phenomenon of electromagnetic invisibility and cloaking, which implies the suppression of bistatic scattering width of a given object, independent of incident and observation angles. In this regard, diverse techniques have been proposed to analyze and design electromagnetic cloak structures, including transformation optics, anomalous resonance methods, transmission-line networks, and plasmonic cloaking, among others. A common drawback of all these methods is that they rely on bulk materials, which are difficult to realize in practice. To overcome this issue, the mantle cloaking method has been proposed, which utilizes an ultrathin metasurface that provides anti-phase surface currents to reduce the scattering dominant mode of a given object. Recently, an analytical model has been proposed to cloak dielectric and conducting cylindrical objects realized with printed and slotted arrays at microwave frequencies. At low-terahertz (THz) frequencies, one of the promising materials to realize the required metasurface is graphene. In this regard, a graphene monolayer, characterized by inductive reactance, has been proposed to cloak dielectric planar and cylindrical objects. Then, it has been shown that a metasurface made of graphene nanopatches owns dual capacitive/inductive inductance and can be used to cloak both dielectric and conducting cylindrical objects at low-THz frequencies. So far, planar and cylindrical dielectric and conducting structures have been studied. In our study, we have extended the concept and presented an accurate analytical approach to investigate the cloaking of two-dimensional (2-D) elliptical objects including infinite dielectric elliptical cylinders using graphene monolayer; metallic elliptical cylinders, and also, as a special case, 2-D metallic strips using a nanostructured graphene patch array at low-THz frequencies. We have also obtained the results for cloaking of ellipses at

  3. Anisotropic metamaterial devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiang Jiang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, a rapid development has been achieved in a subject area, so called optical transformation, which is based on the property of metric invariance in Maxwell's equations. Optical transformation, also known as transformation optics, allows metamaterials to be tailor-made according to practical needs. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent progress on the parametric design of transformation devices, such as invisibility cloaks, electromagnetic (EM concentrator, EM-wave converter, etc. The technique of optical transformation can also be applied when the sources are included in the transformed space.

  4. Numerical design of FSHL-based approximate cloaks with arbitrary shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Hou, Yanren; Li, Jingzhi

    2017-03-01

    This paper considers numerical design of finite sound-hard lining (FSHL)-based approximate cloaks with arbitrary shapes. Regarding the complexity of the shape, two new approaches are proposed to design the transformation map from the virtual space to the physical space via transformation optics. For star-shaped geometry, we propose an explicit global transformation map which can be easily differentiated and inverted. For more general shapes, an Initialize-Untangle-Extend (IUE) approach is initiated to build locally piecewise differentiable deformations, which can be locally inverted with the help of an approximate triangulation. With the locally piecewise-constructed transformation, the parameters of acoustic scattering models in physical space can be determined in both approaches based on the transformation invariance of the Helmholtz system. Then the cloaking effects for an arbitrary shape FSHL-based cloak can be realized following Li et al. (2012) [5]. Extensive numerical experiments are presented to illustrate both the effectiveness of cloak design and the efficiency of the proposed FSHL-based cloaks with arbitrary shapes.

  5. Infrared Cloaking, Stealth, and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Sheehan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Infrared signature management (IRSM has been a primary aeronautical concern for over 50 years. Most strategies and technologies are limited by the second law of thermodynamics. In this article, IRSM is considered in light of theoretical developments over the last 15 years that have put the absolute status of the second law into doubt and that might open the door to a new class of broadband IR stealth and cloaking techniques. Following a brief overview of IRSM and its current thermodynamic limitations, theoretical and experimental challenges to the second law are reviewed. One proposal is treated in detail: a high power density, solid-state power source to convert thermal energy into electrical or chemical energy. Next, second-law based infrared signature management (SL-IRSM strategies are considered for two representative military scenarios: an underground installation and a SL-based jet engine. It is found that SL-IRSM could be technologically disruptive across the full spectrum of IRSM modalities, including camouflage, surveillance, night vision, target acquisition, tracking, and homing.

  6. Cloaks and antiobject-independent illusion optics based on illusion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Zang, XiaoFei; Cai, Bin; Shi, Cheng; Zhu, YiMing

    2013-11-01

    Based on the transformation optics, we propose a new strategy of illusion media consisting of homogeneous and anisotropic materials. By utilizing the illusion media, invisible cloak is theoretically realized, in which objects covered with the illusion media could not be detected. The cloak here allows neither the propagation of light around the concealed region nor compensates the scattering field of object outside the media. What the cloak does is to shift the region into another place where outside the trace of light, so that objects in that region can disappear. Another application of the illusion media is to create the antiobject-independent illusion optics which means that two objects appear to be like some other objects of our choice. Finite element simulations for two-dimensional cases have been performed to prove these ideas.

  7. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our cloak. The proposed method will be a great addition to existing invisibility technology.

  8. Detailed optical characterization of three-dimensional visible-frequency polarization-independent carpet invisibility cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergin, Tolga, E-mail: tolga.ergin@kit.edu [Institute of Applied Physics, Institute of Nanotechnology, and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, Joachim; Wegener, Martin [Institute of Applied Physics, Institute of Nanotechnology, and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The invention of the three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal by Costas M. Soukoulis and coworkers in 1994 has stimulated much further research - excellent research stimulates further research. Here, we report on using spatially inhomogeneous polymer woodpile structures in the long-wavelength limit as artificial graded-index structures. After briefly reviewing previous work on carpet invisibility cloaks designed by transformation optics, we present new experiments for various focus planes of the inspecting microscope as well as for different inspection angles in three-dimensional space. Numerical ray-tracing modeling is also provided. These data confirm our previous assessment that three-dimensional cloaking is quite robust for these structures.

  9. Time gap for temporal cloak based on spectral hole burning in atomic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabar, M. S. Abdul; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating a time gap in the slow light based on spectral hole burning in a four-level Doppler broadened sodium atomic system. A time gap is also observed between the slow and the fast light in the hole burning region and near the burnt hole region, respectively. A cloaking time gap is attained in microseconds and no distortion is observed in the transmitted pulse. The width of the time gap is observed to vary with the inverse Doppler effect in this system. Our results may provide a way to create multiple time gaps for a temporal cloak. Project supported by the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.

  10. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-07-07

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our cloak. The proposed method will be a great addition to existing invisibility technology.

  11. Rainbow and blueshift effect of a dispersive spherical invisibility cloak impinged on by a nonmonochromatic plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baile; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2008-08-08

    We demonstrate some interesting phenomena associated with a nonmonochromatic plane wave passing through a spherical invisibility cloak whose radial permittivity and permeability are of Drude and Lorentz types. We observe that the frequency center of a quasimonochromatic incident wave will suffer a blueshift in the forward scattering direction. Different frequency components have different depths of penetration, causing a rainbowlike effect within the cloak. The concept of group velocity at the inner boundary of the cloak needs to be revisited. Extremely low scattering can still be achieved within a narrow band.

  12. Scattering suppression and wideband tunability of a flexible mantle cloak for finite-length conducting rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, R. S.; Soric, J. C.; Rainwater, D.; Kerkhoff, A.; Alù, A.

    2014-06-01

    A simple, thin, flexible mantle cloak for conducting rods based on scattering cancellation is analyzed, designed and experimentally realized. We show strong scattering suppression at all angles of incidence, for both far-field plane-wave and near-field Gaussian excitations. The required effective shunt surface impedance is realized by a subwavelength patch array, targeting the suppression of the dominant omnidirectional scattering contribution of a conductive rod. Full-wave simulations predict a total radar cross-section reduction better than 14 dB in the lossless case and nearly 8 dB when considering a lossy substrate in the cover. Measurements of the realized cloak are consistent and validate these numerical predictions. The proposed geometry is also shown to be an ideal platform for monolithic integration of varactor diodes, allowing real-time tuning of the effective surface capacitance of the cloak. We show with numerical simulations the possibility of tunable scattering suppression over 1 GHz of bandwidth by seamlessly integrating varactor diodes in our mantle cloak design.

  13. Electromagnetic cloak to restore the antenna radiation patterns affected by nearby scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperik, Tatiana V.; de Lustrac, André

    2015-12-01

    We have theoretically verified the feasibility of the concept of mantle cloak for very high frequency (VHF) antenna communications. While the applicability of the concept has been demonstrated for an infinitely long cylindrical obstacle and infinitely long electric source [Y.R. Padooru, A.B. Yakovlev, and P.-Y. Chen and Andrea Alù, J. Appl. Phys., 112, 104902, (2012)], the use of this cloak in realistic conditions is not straightforward. In this paper as an electric source we consider a typical VHF monopole antenna mounted on ground plane together with a metallic cylindrical obstacle. The both ground plane and obstacle affect the antenna radiation scattering. Nevertheless, we could show that the mantle cloak can bee successfully applied to restore the radiation patterns of antenna even when the source, the cylindrical metallic obstacle, and the ground plane have finite length. We have studied the antenna adaptation in the presence of the cloaked obstacle and found that the complete radiation system is still functional in the bandwidth that is reduced only by 11%.

  14. Beam Steering at Higher Photonic Bands and Design of a Directional Cloak Formed by Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Subramanian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam steering due to anomalous dispersion at higher photonic bands in dielectric photonic crystal is reported in this work. Based on this concept, directional cloak is designed that conceals a larger dimensional scattering object against the normal incident, linearly polarizedelectromagnetic waves.

  15. Electromagnetic cloak to restore the antenna radiation patterns affected by nearby scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teperik, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.teperik@u-psud.fr [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622, Orsay F-91405 (France); Donostia International Physics Center, Aptdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Lustrac, André de [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622, Orsay F-91405 (France); Univ. Paris-Ouest, 92410 Ville d’Avray (France)

    2015-12-15

    We have theoretically verified the feasibility of the concept of mantle cloak for very high frequency (VHF) antenna communications. While the applicability of the concept has been demonstrated for an infinitely long cylindrical obstacle and infinitely long electric source [Y.R. Padooru, A.B. Yakovlev, and P.-Y. Chen and Andrea Alù, J. Appl. Phys., 112, 104902, (2012)], the use of this cloak in realistic conditions is not straightforward. In this paper as an electric source we consider a typical VHF monopole antenna mounted on ground plane together with a metallic cylindrical obstacle. The both ground plane and obstacle affect the antenna radiation scattering. Nevertheless, we could show that the mantle cloak can bee successfully applied to restore the radiation patterns of antenna even when the source, the cylindrical metallic obstacle, and the ground plane have finite length. We have studied the antenna adaptation in the presence of the cloaked obstacle and found that the complete radiation system is still functional in the bandwidth that is reduced only by 11%.

  16. Spin caloritronics in magnetic/non-magnetic nanostructures and graphene field effect devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejene, Fasil

    2015-01-01

    In de afgelopen eeuw is er veel vooruitgang geboekt in het begrip van de koppeling tussen ladingsstromen en warmtestromen (thermo-elektriciteit) als ook voor ladingsstromen en spinstromen (spintronica). De combinatie van spintronica en thermo-elektriciteit heeft zeer recent geleid tot het ontstaan v

  17. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  18. Impact of Radii Ratios on a Two-Dimensional Cloaking Structure and Corresponding Analysis for Practical Design at Optical Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Anam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is an extension to the evaluation and analysis of a two-dimensional cylindrical cloak in the Terahertz or visible range spectrum using Finite Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method. It was concluded that it is possible to expand the frequency range of a cylindrical cloaking model by careful scaling of the inner and outer radius of the simulation geometry with respect to cell size and/or number of time steps in the simulation grid while maintaining appropriate stability conditions. Analysis in this study is based on a change in the radii ratio, that is, outer radius to inner radius, of the cloaking structure for an array of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. Corresponding outputs show inconsistency in the cloaking pattern with respect to frequency. The inconsistency is further increased as the radii ratio is decreased. The results also help to establish a linear relationship between the transmission coefficient and the real component of refractive index with respect to different radii ratios which may simplify the selection of the material for practical design purposes. Additional performance analysis is carried out such that the dimensions of the cloak are held constant at an average value and the frequency varied to determine how a cloaked object may be perceived by the human eye which considers different wavelengths to be superimposed on each other simultaneously.

  19. Local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic impurities in mesoscopic iron-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ji, Min; Schwarz, Tobias; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Yuan, Jie; Pereira, Paulo J; Huang, Ya; Zhang, Gufei; Feng, Hai-Luke; Yuan, Ya-Hua; Hatano, Takeshi; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Yamaura, Kazunari; Wang, Hua-Bing; Wu, Pei-Heng; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji; Vanacken, Johan; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2015-07-03

    The determination of the pairing symmetry is one of the most crucial issues for the iron-based superconductors, for which various scenarios are discussed controversially. Non-magnetic impurity substitution is one of the most promising approaches to address the issue, because the pair-breaking mechanism from the non-magnetic impurities should be different for various models. Previous substitution experiments demonstrated that the non-magnetic zinc can suppress the superconductivity of various iron-based superconductors. Here we demonstrate the local destruction of superconductivity by non-magnetic zinc impurities in Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 by exploring phase-slip phenomena in a mesoscopic structure with 119 × 102 nm(2) cross-section. The impurities suppress superconductivity in a three-dimensional 'Swiss cheese'-like pattern with in-plane and out-of-plane characteristic lengths slightly below ∼1.34 nm. This causes the superconducting order parameter to vary along abundant narrow channels with effective cross-section of a few square nanometres. The local destruction of superconductivity can be related to Cooper pair breaking by non-magnetic impurities.

  20. Level Set-Based Topology Optimization for the Design of an Electromagnetic Cloak With Ferrite Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otomori, Masaki; Yamada, Takayuki; Andkjær, Jacob Anders;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a structural optimization method for the design of an electromagnetic cloak made of ferrite material. Ferrite materials exhibit a frequency-dependent degree of permeability, due to a magnetic resonance phenomenon that can be altered by changing the magnitude of an externally...... applied dc magnetic field. Thus, such ferrite cloaks have the potential to provide novel functions, such as on-off operation in response to on-off application of an external magnetic field. The optimization problems are formulated to minimize the norm of the scattering field from a cylindrical obstacle....... A level set-based topology optimization method incorporating a fictitious interface energy is used to find optimized configurations of the ferrite material. The numerical results demonstrate that the optimization successfully found an appropriate ferrite configuration that functions as an electromagnetic...

  1. Fick's Second Law Transformed: One Path to Cloaking in Mass Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Here, we adapt the concept of transformational thermodynamics, whereby the flux of temperature is controlled via anisotropic heterogeneous diffusivity, for the diffusion and transport of mass concentration. The n-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous Fick's equation is considered, which is a parabolic partial differential equation also applicable to heat diffusion, when convection occurs, for example in fluids. This theory is illustrated with finite element computations for a liposome particle surrounded by a cylindrical multilayered cloak in a water-based environment, and for a spherical multilayered cloak consisting of layers of fluid with an isotropic homogeneous diffusivity, deduced from an effective medium approach. Initial potential applications could be sought in bio-engineering.

  2. Design of diamond-shaped transient thermal cloaks with homogeneous isotropic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Hua; Zhu, Dong-Lai; Mao, Fu-Chun; Huang, Ming; Yang, Jing-Jing; Li, Shou-Bo

    2016-10-01

    Transformation thermodynamics as a major extension of transformation optics has recently received considerable attention. In this paper, we present two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) diamond-shaped transient thermal cloaks with non-singular homogeneous material parameters. The absence of singularity in the parameters results from the fact that the linear coordinate transformation is performed by expanding a line segment rather than a point into a region, while the mechanism behind the homogeneity is the homogeneous stretching and compression along orthogonal directions during the transformation. Although the derived parameters remain anisotropic, we further show that this can be circumvented by considering a layered structure composed of only four types of isotropic materials based on the effective medium theory. Numerical simulation results confirm the good performance of the proposed cloaks.

  3. Fick's second law transformed: one path to cloaking in mass diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenneau, S; Puvirajesinghe, T M

    2013-06-06

    Here, we adapt the concept of transformational thermodynamics, whereby the flux of temperature is controlled via anisotropic heterogeneous diffusivity, for the diffusion and transport of mass concentration. The n-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous Fick's equation is considered, which is a parabolic partial differential equation also applicable to heat diffusion, when convection occurs, for example, in fluids. This theory is illustrated with finite-element computations for a liposome particle surrounded by a cylindrical multi-layered cloak in a water-based environment, and for a spherical multi-layered cloak consisting of layers of fluid with an isotropic homogeneous diffusivity, deduced from an effective medium approach. Initial potential applications could be sought in bioengineering.

  4. Lipid-insertion enables targeting functionalization of erythrocyte membrane-cloaked nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Chen, Kevin N. H.; Luk, Brian T.; Carpenter, Cody W.; Gao, Weiwei; Li, Shulin; Zhang, Dong-Er; Lu, Weiyue; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-09-01

    RBC membrane-cloaked polymeric nanoparticles represent an emerging nanocarrier platform with extended circulation in vivo. A lipid-insertion method is employed to functionalize these nanoparticles without the need for direct chemical conjugation. Insertion of both folate and the nucleolin-targeting aptamer AS1411 shows receptor-specific targeting against model cancer cell lines.RBC membrane-cloaked polymeric nanoparticles represent an emerging nanocarrier platform with extended circulation in vivo. A lipid-insertion method is employed to functionalize these nanoparticles without the need for direct chemical conjugation. Insertion of both folate and the nucleolin-targeting aptamer AS1411 shows receptor-specific targeting against model cancer cell lines. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03064d

  5. Total reflection and cloaking by zero index metamaterials loaded with rectangular dielectric defects

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2013-05-06

    In this work, we investigate wave transmission property through a zero index metamaterial (ZIM) waveguide embedded with rectangular dielectric defects. We show that total reflection and total transmission (cloaking) can be achieved by adjusting the geometric sizes and/or permittivities of the defects. Our work provides another possibility of manipulating wave propagation through ZIM in addition to the widely studied dielectric defects with cylindrical geometries.

  6. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Sun; Sailing He

    2016-01-01

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our...

  7. Dispersion engineering of metasurfaces for dual-frequency quasi-three-dimensional cloaking of microwave radiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the design methodology and experimental investigation of compact and lightweight dispersive coatings, comprised by multiple layers of anisotropic metasurfaces, which are capable of cloaking radiators at multiple frequencies are presented. To determine the required surface electromagnetic properties for each layer, an analytical model is developed for predicting the scattering from a cylinder surrounded by multiple layers of anisotropic metasurfaces subject to plane-wave illumination at a general oblique incidence angle. Particularly, two different metasurface coating solutions with different dispersive properties are designed to provide more than 10 dB scattering width suppression at two pre-selected frequencies within a field-of-view (FOV) of ± 20° off normal incidence. Both coating designs implemented using metasurfaces are fabricated and measured, experimentally demonstrating the simultaneous suppression of mutual coupling and quasi-three-dimensional radiation blockage at the two pre-selected frequency ranges. At the same time, the functionality of the coated monopole is still well-maintained. The performance comparison further sheds light on how the optimal performance can be obtained by properly exploiting the dispersion of each metasurface layer of the coating. In addition, the cloaking effect is retained even when the distance between the radiators is significantly reduced. The concept and general design methodology presented here can be extended for applications that would benefit from cloaking multi-spectral terahertz as well as optical antennas.

  8. Nurse Outcomes in Magnet® and Non-Magnet Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Lesly A.; McHugh, Matthew D.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2017-01-01

    The important goals of Magnet® hospitals are to create supportive professional nursing care environments. A recently published paper found little difference in work environments between Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine whether work environments, staffing, and nurse outcomes differ between Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. A secondary analysis of data from a 4-state survey of 26,276 nurses in 567 acute care hospitals to evaluate differences in work environments and nurse outcomes in Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals was conducted. Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments (t = −5.29, P < .001) and more highly educated nurses (t = −2.27, P < .001). Magnet hospital nurses were 18% less likely to be dissatisfied with their job (P < .05) and 13% less likely to report high burnout (P < .05). Magnet hospitals have significantly better work environments than non-Magnet hospitals. The better work environments of Magnet hospitals are associated with lower levels of nurse job dissatisfaction and burnout. PMID:22976894

  9. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  10. Temperature profile along an induction heated, moving non-magnetic charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januszkiewicz, K.

    1984-01-01

    Induction heating system, comprising three sections of a heating coil connected in series and supplied from one source, will be discussed. The charge to be heated is a non-magnetic pipe moving with steady speed. The heating coil is water cooled. Digital methods are used to compute temperature variations along the charge from start up to steady state temperature and also to determine power development in the heating circuit. Cooling zones between the heating coil sections are taken into account.

  11. The Effectof Insert of WC Powder on the Surface Hardening of Non Magnetic Foundry Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ike, Hiroyuki; Shobuzawa, Yoshiyuki; Goto, Shoji; Aso, Setsuo; Konishi, Nobuo

    2002-01-01

    Non magnetic foundry materials such as the austenitic stainless cast steel had not been used for abrasion resistant materials, because their hardnesses were very low. Usually, ceramics, cermets and cemented carbides are used for the abrasion resistant materials even though they are expensive compared with foundry materials. In this study, WC powder were inserted by using the austenitic stainless cast steel (JIS SCS13A) and the austenitic cast iron (JIS FCA-NiCr202) for producing surface ha...

  12. Molecular cloaking of H2A.Z on mortal DNA chromosomes during nonrandom segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yang Hoon; Sherley, James L

    2011-10-01

    Although nonrandom sister chromatid segregation is a singular property of distributed stem cells (DSCs) that are responsible for renewing and repairing mature vertebrate tissues, both its cellular function and its molecular mechanism remain unknown. This situation persists in part because of the lack of facile methods for detecting and quantifying nonrandom segregating cells and for identifying chromosomes with immortal DNA strands, the cellular molecules that signify nonrandom segregation. During nonrandom segregation, at each mitosis, asymmetrically self-renewing DSCs continuously cosegregate to themselves the set of chromosomes that contain immortal DNA strands, which are the oldest DNA strands. Here, we report the discovery of a molecular asymmetry between segregating sets of immortal chromosomes and opposed mortal chromosomes (i.e., containing the younger set of DNA template strands) that constitutes a new convenient biomarker for detection of cells undergoing nonrandom segregation and direct delineation of chromosomes that bear immortal DNA strands. In both cells engineered with DSC-specific properties and ex vivo-expanded mouse hair follicle stem cells, the histone H2A variant H2A.Z shows specific immunodetection on immortal DNA chromosomes. Cell fixation analyses indicate that H2A.Z is present on mortal chromosomes as well but is cloaked from immunodetection, and the cloaking entity is acid labile. The H2A.Z chromosomal asymmetry produced by molecular cloaking provides a first direct assay for nonrandom segregation and for chromosomes with immortal DNA strands. It also seems likely to manifest an important aspect of the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nonrandom sister chromatid segregation in DSCs.

  13. The space density and X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Pretorius, Magaretha L

    2011-01-01

    We combine two complete, X-ray flux-limited surveys, the ROSAT Bright Survey (RBS) and the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey, to measure the space density (\\rho) and X-ray luminosity function (\\Phi) of non-magnetic CVs. The combined survey has a flux limit of F_X \\ga 1.1 \\times 10^{-12} erg cm^{-2}s^{-1} over most of its solid angle of just over 2\\pi, but is as deep as \\simeq 10^{-14} erg cm^{-2}s^{-1} over a small area. The CV sample that we construct from these two surveys contains 20 non-magnetic systems. We carefully include all sources of statistical error in calculating \\rho and \\Phi by using Monte Carlo simulations; the most important uncertainty proves to be the often large errors in distances estimates. If we assume that the 20 CVs in the combined RBS and NEP survey sample are representative of the intrinsic population, the space density of non-magnetic CVs is 4^{+6}_{-2} \\times 10^{-6} pc^{-3}. We discuss the difficulty in measuring \\Phi in some detail---in order to account for biases in the me...

  14. Pre-Cloak Comic Superheroes: Tools for the Empowerment of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Fradkin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This note explores the notion of comic superheroes as tools for the empowerment of children. The author details interventions in Rwanda and Brazil, and their different usages of superheroes. With a focus on the superhero’s pre-cloak stage—the stage prior to their employing superpowers—the author offers glimpses of current work in progress to help therapists empower orphaned children. While this area of research is at an early stage, its potential among health professionals is growing. Thus the comic superhero may be more than celluloid, as health professionals learn to use his superpowers.

  15. Hide the interior region of core-shell nanoparticles with quantum invisible cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeng Yi

    2013-01-01

    By applying the interplay among the nodal points of partial waves, along with the concept of streamline in fluid dynamics for the probability flux, a quantum invisible cloak to the electron transport in a host semiconductor is demonstrated by simultaneously guiding the probability flux outside the core region and keeping the total scattering cross section negligible. As the probability flux vanishes in the interior region, one can embed any material inside a multiple core-shell sphere without affecting physical observables from the outside. Our results reveal the possibility to design a protection shield layer for fragile interior parts from the impact of transports of electrons.

  16. Coherent interaction of a metallic structure with a single quantum emitter: from super absorption to cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Agio, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general theoretical platform based on quantized radiation in absorptive and inhomogeneous media for investigating the coherent interaction of light with metallic structures in the immediate vicinity of quantum emitters. In the case of a very small metallic cluster, we demonstrate extreme regimes where a single emitter can either counteract or enhance particle absorption by three orders of magnitude. For larger structures, we show that an emitter can eliminate both scattering and absorption and cloak a plasmonic antenna. We provide physical interpretations of our results and discuss their applications in active metamaterials and quantum plasmonics.

  17. Development of a Non-Magnetic Inertial Sensor for Vibration Stabilization in a Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, Josef; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Chang, Allison; Partridge, Richard; /Brown U.

    2006-09-01

    One of the options for controlling vibration of the final focus magnets in a linear collider is to use active feedback based on accelerometers. While commercial geophysics sensors have noise performance that substantially exceeds the requirements for a linear collider, they are physically large, and cannot operate in the strong magnetic field of the detector. Conventional nonmagnetic sensors have excessive noise for this application. We report on the development of a non-magnetic inertial sensor, and on a novel commercial sensor both of which have demonstrated the required noise levels for this application.

  18. Magnetism of Rare-Earth Compounds with Non-Magnetic Crystal-Field Ground Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhao-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Among rare-earth compounds, there are many materials having non-magnetic crystal-field (CF) ground levels.To understand their magnetic behaviour at low temperatures, we study the effects of the CF levels and the Heisenberg-like coupling on the magnetic process of such a crystalline with mean-field and CF theory. It is found that the material can be magnetically ordered if the Heisenberg exchange is sufficiently strong. Additionally we obtain a condition for initial magnetic ordering, and derive a formula for estimating the Curie temperature if the ordering occurs.

  19. The space density and X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Magaretha L.; Knigge, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We combine two complete, X-ray flux-limited surveys, the ROSAT Bright Survey (RBS) and the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey, to measure the space density (ρ) and X-ray luminosity function (Φ) of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs). The combined survey has a flux limit of FX≳ 1.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 over most of its solid angle of just over ?, but is as deep as ≃10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 over a small area. The CV sample that we construct from these two surveys contains 20 non-magnetic systems. We carefully include all sources of statistical error in calculating ρ and Φ by using Monte Carlo simulations; the most important uncertainty proves to be the often large errors in distances estimates. If we assume that the 20 CVs in the combined RBS and NEP survey sample are representative of the intrinsic population, the space density of non-magnetic CVs is ?. We discuss the difficulty in measuring Φ in some detail - in order to account for biases in the measurement, we have to adopt a functional form for Φ. Assuming that the X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic CVs is a truncated power law, we constrain the power-law index to -0.80 ± 0.05. It seems likely that the two surveys have failed to detect a large, faint population of short-period CVs, and that the true space density may well be a factor of 2 or 3 larger than what we have measured; this is possible, even if we only allow for undetected CVs to have X-ray luminosities in the narrow range 28.7 log(LX/erg s-1) < 29.7. However, ρ as high as 2 × 10-4 pc-3 would require that the majority of CVs has X-ray luminosities below LX= 4 × 1028 erg s-1 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band.

  20. Implementation of Cavity Perturbation Method for Determining Relative Permittivity of Non Magnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAHIM GOHARAWAN

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Techniques for the cavity measurement of the electrical characteristics of the materials are well established using the approximate method due to its simplicity in material insertion and fabrication. However, the exact method which requires more comprehensive mathematical analysis as well, owing to the practical difficulties for the material insertion, is not mostly used while performing the measurements as compared to approximate method in most of the works. In this work the comparative analysis of both the approximate as well as Exact method is performed and accuracy of the Exact method is established by performing the measurements of non-magnetic material Teflon within the cavity.

  1. Experimental validation of an ultra-thin metasurface cloak for hiding a metallic obstacle from an antenna radiation at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperik, Tatiana V.; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; de Lustrac, André; Sabanowski, Guy; Piau, Gérard-Pascal

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate numerically and experimentally an ultra-thin (≈ λ/240) metasurface-based invisibility cloak for low frequency antenna applications. We consider a monopole antenna mounted on a ground plane and a cylindrical metallic obstacle of diameter smaller than the wavelength located in its near-field. To restore the intrinsic radiation patterns of the antenna perturbed by this obstacle, a metasurface cloak consisting simply of a metallic patch printed on a dielectric substrate is wrapped around the obstacle. Using a finite element method based commercial electromagnetic solver, we show that the radiation patterns of the monopole antenna can be restored completely owing to electromagnetic modes of the resonant cavity formed between the patch and obstacle. The metasurface cloak is fabricated, and the concept is experimentally demonstrated at 125 MHz. Performed measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations, verifying the efficiency of the proposed cloak.

  2. Kramers non-magnetic superconductivity in LnNiAsO superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuke; Luo, Yongkang; Li, Lin; Chen, Bin; Xu, Xiaofeng; Dai, Jianhui; Yang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Li; Cao, Guanghan; Xu, Zhu-an

    2014-10-22

    We investigated a series of nickel-based oxyarsenides LnNiAsO (Ln=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) compounds. CeNiAsO undergoes two successive anti-ferromagnetic transitions at TN1=9.3 K and TN2=7.3 K; SmNiAsO becomes an anti-ferromagnet below TN≃3.5 K; NdNiAsO keeps paramagnetic down to 2 K but orders anti-ferromagnetically below TN≃1.3 K. Superconductivity was observed only in Kramers non-magnetic LaNiAsO and PrNiAsO with Tc=2.7 K and 0.93 K, respectively. The superconductivity of PrNiAsO is further studied by upper critical field and specific heat measurements, which reveal that PrNiAsO is a weakly coupled Kramers non-magnetic superconductor. Our work confirms that the nickel-based oxyarsenide superconductors are substantially different in mechanism to iron-based ones, and are likely to be described by the conventional superconductivity theory.

  3. Component masses of young, wide, non-magnetic white dwarf binaries in the SDSS DR7

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, R B; Parker, Q A; Casewell, S L; Lodieu, N; Burleigh, M R; Lawrie, K A; Kulebi, B; Koester, D; Holland, B R

    2014-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic component analysis of 18 candidate young, wide, non-magnetic, double-degenerate binaries identified from a search of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7). All but two pairings are likely to be physical systems. We show SDSS J084952.47+471247.7 + SDSS J084952.87+471249.4 to be a wide DA+DB binary, only the second identified to date. Combining our measurements for the components of 16 new binaries with results for three similar, previously known systems within the DR7, we have constructed a mass distribution for the largest sample to date (38) of white dwarfs in young, wide, non-magnetic, double-degenerate pairings. This is broadly similar in form to that of the isolated field population with a substantial peak around M~0.6 Msun. We identify an excess of ultra-massive white dwarfs and attribute this to the primordial separation distribution of their progenitor systems peaking at relatively larger values and the greater expansion of their binary orbits during the final sta...

  4. Non-magnetic impurity effects in LiFeAs studied by STM/STS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaguri, T.; Khim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Bumsung; Kim, Kee Hoon; Kitagawa, K.; Matsubayashi, K.; Mazaki, Y.; Uwatoko, Y.; Takigawa, M.; Takagi, H.

    2012-02-01

    Detecting the possible sign reversal of the superconducting gap in iron-based superconductors is highly non-trivial. Here we use non-magnetic impurity as a sign indicator. If the sign of the superconducting gap is positive everywhere in momentum space, in-gap bound state should not be observed near the impurity site unless it is magnetic. On the other hand, if there is a sign-reversal in the gap, even non-magnetic impurity may create in-gap bound state [1]. We performed STM/STS experiments on self-flux and Sn-flux grown LiFeAs crystals and examined the effects of Sn impurity. In STM images of Sn-flux grown samples, we found a ring-like object which may represent Sn. Tunneling spectrum taken at this defect site exhibits in-gap bound state. Together with flat-bottom superconducting gap observed far from the defects, sign-reversing s-wave gap is the most plausible gap structure in LiFeAs. [1] T. Kariyado and M. Ogata, JPSJ 79, 083704 (2010).

  5. Objects cloaking in LWIR region by using a high efficiency infrared pixel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article, introduces a new pixel which can emit infrared wavelengths from its surface and can be used for the purpose of cloaking objects from thermal cameras. This pixel can simulate the temperatures between 0 and 100ºC emited from an infrared radiation in LWIR (8-12 micrometres region. Nanocomposite material is used in the pixel structure and this has increased its capacities like ZT factor %40-50 better than the commercial material like Bi2Te3. Technical aspects of the pixel such as the emission wavelengths, rate of temperature changing, thermal contrast, ZT factor and so on are discussed in this paper and were determined by using thermography, non-contact thermometry, radiometry, four probe ac method and temperature differential

  6. The man in the scarlet cloak. The mysterious death of Peter Anthony Motteux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, W B

    1991-09-01

    Peter Anthony Motteux (1663-1718), a Huguenot refugee in London, established a literary reputation by completing Sir Thomas Urquhart's translation of Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel, then Cervantes' Don Quixote. He later became an import-export merchant. On his 55th birthday he donned his scarlet cloak and went out on the town. He picked up a prostitute and after some dalliance returned to her bordello. Shortly thereafter he was found dead, although the evidence is that he was in good health when he arrived. Literary evidence is that he died from assisted erotic asphyxia, a variant of autoerotic asphyxia, cf. the case of Frantisek Koczwara (Am J Forensic Med Pathol 5:145-149, 1984.)

  7. A Phase-Conjugate-Mirror Inspired Approach for Building Cloaking Structures with Left-handed Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoan; Heng, Xin; Yang, Changhuei

    2009-01-01

    A phase conjugate mirror (PCM) has a remarkable property of cancellation the back-scattering wave of the lossless scatterers. The similarity of a phase conjugate mirror to the interface of a matched RHM (right-handed material) and a LHM (left-handed material) prompts us to explore the potentials of using the RHM-LHM structure to achieve the anti-scattering property of the PCM. In this paper, we present two such structures. The first one is a RHM-LHM cloaking structure with a lossless arbitrary-shape scatterer imbedded in the RHM and its left-handed duplicate imbedded in the matched LHM. It is shown that such a structure is transparent to the incident electromagnetic (EM) field. As a special case of this structure, we proposed an EM tunnel that allows EM waves to spatially transport to another location in space without significant distortion and reflection. The second one is an RHM-PEC (perfect electric conductor)-LHM cloaking structure, which is composed of a symmetric conducting shell embedded in the interface junction of an RHM and the matched LHM layer. Such a structure presents an anomalously small scattering cross-section to an incident propagating EM field, and the interior of the shell can be used to shield small objects (size comparable to the wavelength) from interrogation. We report the results of 2D finite-element-method (FEM) simulations that were performed to verify our idea, and discuss the unique properties of the proposed structures as well as their limitations.

  8. Non-magnetic photospheric bright points in 3D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F.; Steiner, O.; Freytag, B.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Small-scale bright features in the photosphere of the Sun, such as faculae or G-band bright points, appear in connection with small-scale magnetic flux concentrations. Aims: Here we report on a new class of photospheric bright points that are free of magnetic fields. So far, these are visible in numerical simulations only. We explore conditions required for their observational detection. Methods: Numerical radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of the Sun were carried out. The magnetic field-free simulations show tiny bright points, reminiscent of magnetic bright points, only smaller. A simple toy model for these non-magnetic bright points (nMBPs) was established that serves as a base for the development of an algorithm for their automatic detection. Basic physical properties of 357 detected nMBPs were extracted and statistically evaluated. We produced synthetic intensity maps that mimic observations with various solar telescopes to obtain hints on their detectability. Results: The nMBPs of the simulations show a mean bolometric intensity contrast with respect to their intergranular surroundings of approximately 20%, a size of 60-80 km, and the isosurface of optical depth unity is at their location depressed by 80-100 km. They are caused by swirling downdrafts that provide, by means of the centripetal force, the necessary pressure gradient for the formation of a funnel of reduced mass density that reaches from the subsurface layers into the photosphere. Similar, frequently occurring funnels that do not reach into the photosphere, do not produce bright points. Conclusions: Non-magnetic bright points are the observable manifestation of vertically extending vortices (vortex tubes) in the photosphere. The resolving power of 4-m-class telescopes, such as the DKIST, is needed for an unambiguous detection of them. The movie associated to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. 应用超常介质设计柱形隐形容器%Design Column Cloak Using Metamaterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马越界; 黄建平; 孙文波; 刘德全

    2012-01-01

    Melamaterial, a kind of artificial material composed by nanometer units, can be controlled permittivity and permeability at the same time. Taking advantage of this finding, we can adjust the transmission of light We used the approach of transformation optics and calculated out the permittivity and permeability of Metamaterial cloak in the condition of cylindrical and elliptical cylinder, to make sure the light along the specific trajectory and spread around the cloak, then outgoing along the direction of the incident radiatioa In this way, the information inside the cloak can not be divulged.%超常介质是一种纳米尺度的人工复合材料,可以同时设定材料的介电常数和磁导率.利用超常介质的这一特性,能够自由地调整光的传播路径.在此基础上,应用坐标转换的方法,计算出圆柱形和椭圆柱形的介电常数和磁导率分布.让光在介质内沿着特定的轨迹传播,绕过包围的空腔,沿入射的方向出射,从而实现圆柱和椭圆柱形状的隐形.

  10. Giant magneto-optical response in non-magnetic semiconductor BiTeI driven by bulk Rashba spin splitting

    OpenAIRE

    Demkó, L.; Schober, G. A. H.; Kocsis, V.; Bahramy, M.S.; Murakawa, H.; Lee, J. S.; Kézsmárki, I.; Arita, R.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We study the magneto-optical (MO) response of polar semiconductor BiTeI with giant bulk Rashba spin splitting at various carrier densities. Despite being non-magnetic, the material is found to yield a huge MO activity in the infrared region under moderate magnetic fields (

  11. Fabrication of a Textured Non-Magnetic Ni-12at.%V Alloy Substrate for Coated Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, M. M.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Suo, H. L.;

    2011-01-01

    Ni-12at.%V alloy is a promising candidate for non-magnetic cube textured metallic substrates used for high temperature coated conductors. In this work, a textured Ni-12at.%V substrate has been fabricated by powder metallurgy route. After cold rolling and recrystallization annealing, a cube texture...

  12. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-02-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed.

  13. Are non-magnetic mechanisms such as temporal solar diameter variations conceivable for an irradiance variability?

    CERN Document Server

    Rozelot, J P; Pireaux, S; Ajabshirizadeh, A

    2004-01-01

    Irradiance variability has been monitored from space for more than two decades. Even if data are coming from different sources, it is well established that a temporal variability exists which can be set to as approximately 0.1%, in phase with the solar cycle. Today, one of the best explanation for such an irradiance variability is provided by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic fields. But if some 90 to 95% can be reproduced, what would be the origin of the 10 to 5% left? Non magnetic effects are conceivable. In this paper we will consider temporal variations of the diameter of the Sun as a possible contributor for the remaining part. Such an approach imposes strong constraints on the solar radius variability. We will show that over a solar cycle, variations of no more than 20 mas of amplitude can be considered. Such a variability (far from what is reported by observers conducting measurements by means of ground-based solar astrolabes) may explain a little part of the irradiance changes not explained ...

  14. Controlling magnetism on metal surfaces with non-magnetic means: electric fields and surface charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Oleg O; Ruiz-Díaz, Pedro; Dasa, Tamene R; Stepanyuk, Valeri S

    2014-03-01

    We review the state of the art of surface magnetic property control with non-magnetic means, concentrating on metallic surfaces and techniques such as charge-doping or external electric field (EEF) application. Magneto-electric coupling via EEF-based charge manipulation is discussed as a way to tailor single adatom spins, exchange interaction between adsorbates or anisotropies of layered systems. The mechanisms of paramagnetic and spin-dependent electric field screening and the effect thereof on surface magnetism are discussed in the framework of theoretical and experimental studies. The possibility to enhance the effect of EEF by immersing the target system into an electrolyte or ionic liquid is discussed by the example of substitutional impurities and metallic alloy multilayers. A similar physics is pointed out for the case of charge traps, metallic systems decoupled from a bulk electron bath. In that case the charging provides the charge carrier density changes necessary to affect the magnetic moments and anisotropies in the system. Finally, the option of using quasi-free electrons rather than localized atomic spins for surface magnetism control is discussed with the example of Shockley-type metallic surface states confined to magnetic nanoislands.

  15. Role of on-board discharge in shock wave drag reduction and plasma cloaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Xiao-Ming; Tang De-Li; Sun Ai-Ping; Liu Wan-Dong; Zeng Xue-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, a physical model is proposed for reducing the problem of the drag reduction of an attached bow shock around the nose of a high-speed vehicle with on-board discharge, to the problem of a balance between the magnetic pressure and gas pressure of plane shock of a partially ionized gas consisting of the environmental gas around the nose of the vehicle and the on-board discharge-produced plasma. The relation between the shock strength and the discharge-induced magnetic pressure is studied by means of a set of one-fluid, hydromagnetic equations reformed for the present purpose, where the discharge-induced magnetic field consists of the electron current (produced by the discharge)-induced magnetic field and the partially ionized gas flow-induced one. A formula for the relation between the above parameters is derived. It shows that the discharge-induced magnetic pressure can minimize the shock strength,successfully explaining the two recent experimental observations on attached bow shock mitigation and elimination in a supersonic flow during on-board discharge [Phys. Plasmas 9 (2002) 721 and Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000) 1345]. In addition,the formula implies that the shock elimination leaves room for a layer of higher-density plasma rampart moving around the nose of the vehicle, being favourable to the plasma radar cloaking of the vehicle. The reason for it is expounded.

  16. All-dielectric ultrathin conformal metasurfaces: lensing and cloaking applications at 532 nm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jierong; Jafar-Zanjani, Samad; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Metasurfaces are ideal candidates for conformal wave manipulation on curved objects due to their low profiles and rich functionalities. Here we design and analyze conformal metasurfaces for practical optical applications at 532 nm visible band for the first time. The inclusions are silicon disk nanoantennas embedded in a flexible supporting layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). They behave as local phase controllers in subwavelength dimensions for successful modification of electromagnetic responses point by point, with merits of high efficiency, at visible regime, ultrathin films, good tolerance to the incidence angle and the grid stretching due to the curvy substrate. An efficient modeling technique based on field equivalence principle is systematically proposed for characterizing metasurfaces with huge arrays of nanoantennas oriented in a conformal manner. Utilizing the robust nanoantenna inclusions and benefiting from the powerful analyzing tool, we successfully demonstrate the superior performances of the conformal metasurfaces in two specific areas, with one for lensing and compensation of spherical aberration, and the other carpet cloak, both at 532 nm visible spectrum.

  17. Design and testing of piezo motors for non-magnetic and/or fine positioning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, M. F.; Le Letty, R.; Seiler, R.; Coste, P.

    2005-07-01

    Piezoelectric motors offer several outstanding characteristics that may be very interesting for new scientific instruments in space applications. Piezo motors use a combination of electro-mechanical and frictional forces for generating a progressive motion; they are well suited for positioning applications because they exhibit a large force at rest without any power supply, and they often do not require any reduction gear. They are increasingly used in optical applications. Using piezo motors in space applications may become more and more relevant because of the continuous trend towards adaptive optics in future scientific payloads. In general, piezoelectric actuators are more and more used in space. Piezoelectric motors exhibit a number of advantages compared to conventional electromagnetic (stepping) motors, e.g. superior force/mass ratio, improved direct drive capability, no power supply to maintain a position, feasibility of a fully non-magnetic motor design. In this context, two complementary concepts have been designed and evaluated in the frame of ESA funded research and development activities: a resonant concept, called Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA), a quasi-static concept, called Rotary Piezo Motor for High Precision Pointing (RPMHPP). The developed Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA) is based on a Ultrasonic Piezo Drive (UPD) unit that drives a friction ring on the rotor part supported by a ball bearing assembly. This new motorization principle offers excellent motion dynamics and positioning accuracy combined with a high un-powered torque at standstill, and it does not rely on any magnetic features. A rotary piezo motor compliant with the requirements of a reference space application has been designed and tested. The technology remains challenging to be mastered, since the interdisciplinary aspects of the concept include, among others, drive electronics and controller design, piezo-electricity, contact mechanics and tribology. The conceptual design has lead to a

  18. Effect of stellar wind induced magnetic fields on planetary obstacles of non-magnetized hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkaev, N. V.; Odert, P.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Mezentsev, A. V.; Johnstone, C. P.; Kubyshkina, D. I.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the interaction between the magnetized stellar wind plasma and the partially ionized hydrodynamic hydrogen outflow from the escaping upper atmosphere of non-magnetized or weakly magnetized hot Jupiters. We use the well-studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b as an example for similar exoplanets, assuming a negligible intrinsic magnetic moment. For this planet, the stellar wind plasma interaction forms an obstacle in the planet's upper atmosphere, in which the position of the magnetopause is determined by the condition of pressure balance between the stellar wind and the expanded atmosphere, heated by the stellar extreme ultraviolet radiation. We show that the neutral atmospheric atoms penetrate into the region dominated by the stellar wind, where they are ionized by photoionization and charge exchange, and then mixed with the stellar wind flow. Using a 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, we show that an induced magnetic field forms in front of the planetary obstacle, which appears to be much stronger compared to those produced by the solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars. Depending on the stellar wind parameters, because of the induced magnetic field, the planetary obstacle can move up to ≈0.5-1 planetary radii closer to the planet. Finally, we discuss how estimations of the intrinsic magnetic moment of hot Jupiters can be inferred by coupling hydrodynamic upper planetary atmosphere and MHD stellar wind interaction models together with UV observations. In particular, we find that HD 209458b should likely have an intrinsic magnetic moment of 10-20 per cent that of Jupiter.

  19. Experimental model of topological defects in Minkowski spacetime based on disordered ferrofluid: magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the spacetime cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I; Smolyaninov, Alexei I

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid in the presence of external magnetic field forms a self-assembled hyperbolic metamaterial. Wave equation describing propagation of extraordinary light inside the ferrofluid exhibits 2+1 dimensional Lorentz symmetry. The role of time in the corresponding effective 3D Minkowski spacetime is played by the spatial coordinate directed along the periodic nanoparticle chains aligned by the magnetic field. Here we present a microscopic study of point, linear and volume defects of the nanoparticle chain structure and demonstrate that they may exhibit strong similarities with such Minkowski spacetime defects as magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the recently proposed spacetime cloaks. Experimental observations of such defects are described.

  20. A versatile smart transformation optics device with auxetic elasto-electromagnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongheok; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Lim, Donghwan; Kim, Kyoungsik; Smith, David R

    2014-02-13

    Synergistic integration of electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical properties of metamaterials, a concept known as smart metamaterials, promises new applications across the spectrum, from flexible waveguides to shape-conforming cloaks. These applications became possible thanks to smart transformation optics (STO), a design methodology that utilizes coordinate transformations to control both EM wave propagation and mechanical deformation of the device. Here, we demonstrate several STO devices based on extremely auxetic (Poisson ratio -1) elasto-electromagnetic metamaterials, both of which exhibit enormous flexibility and sustain efficient operation upon a wide range of deformations. Spatial maps of microwave electric fields across these devices confirm our ability to deform carpet cloaks, bent waveguides, and potentially other quasi-conformal TO-based devices operating at 7 ~ 8 GHz. These devices are each fabricated from a single sheet of initially uniform (double-periodic) square-lattice metamaterial, which acquires the necessary distribution of effective permittivity entirely from the mechanical deformation of its boundary. By integrating transformation optics and continuum mechanics theory, we provide analytical derivations for the design of STO devices. Additionally, we clarify an important point relating to two-dimensional STO devices: the difference between plane stress and plane strain assumptions, which lead to elastic metamaterials with Poisson ratio -1 and -∞, respectively.

  1. Dependence of the magnetization on the interface morphology in ultra-thin magnetic/non-magnetic films: Monte Carlo approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razouk, A. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Sultan Moulay Slimane, BP 523, 23000 Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Sahlaoui, M., E-mail: msahlaoui@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Sultan Moulay Slimane, BP 523, 23000 Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Sajieddine, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Sultan Moulay Slimane, BP 523, 23000 Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2009-07-30

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have studied the dependence of magnetic properties on interface morphology in magnetic/non-magnetic (M/NM) multilayers. Our aim is to relate macroscopic magnetic properties of the multilayers to their concentration profile at the interface. Our model consists of an alternate staking of magnetic and non-magnetic layers with disordered interfaces. We have considered different concentration and the existence of local magnetic domains at the interface. The results indicate the crucial dependence of magnetization amplitude with interface multilayers atomic composition and the spatial arrangement of magnetic atoms. In particular, we show that isolated islands at the interface leads to the apparition of super-paramagnetic behavior.

  2. Design of Matched Zero-Index Metamaterials Using Non-Magnetic Inclusions in Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) Media

    OpenAIRE

    Silveirinha, Mario; Engheta, Nader

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we study the electrodynamics of metamaterials that consist of resonant non-magnetic inclusions embedded in an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) host medium. It is shown that the inclusions can be designed in such a way that both the effective permittivity and permeability of the composite structure are simultaneously zero. Two different metamaterial configurations are studied and analyzed in detail. For a particular class of problems, it is analytically proven that such matched zero-index...

  3. AN INVESTIGATION ON SOFT MAGNETIC AND NON-MAGNETIC MATERIALS UNDER LOW FREQUENCY FOR BIOMEDICAL SENSOR APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheroz Khan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In consequence of the recent development of magnetic sensors in biomedical sector, the investigation of magneticmaterials has been a contributing factor in application stage. This paper proposes a novel technique to investigate materials by obtaining unique distinctive impedance peaks with unique impedance values. A magneto-inductive sensoris used to measure the induction of magnetic and non-magnetic impedance peaks related to the change in permeability, thus characterizing the materials under low frequency.

  4. INDUCTION HEATING OF NON-MAGNETIC SHEET METALS IN THE FIELD OF A FLAT CIRCULAR MULTITURN SOLENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of electromagnetic processes in the system for induction heating presented by a flat circular multiturn solenoid positioned above a plane of thin sheet non-magnetic metal has been conducted. The calculated dependences for the current induced in a metal sheet blank and ratio of transformation determined have been obtained. The maximal value of the transformation ratio with regard to spreading the eddy-currents over the whole area of the sheet metal has been determined.

  5. The invisibility cloak illusion: People (incorrectly) believe they observe others more than others observe them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Erica J; Clark, Margaret S; Bargh, John A

    2017-04-01

    Whether at a coffee shop, in a waiting room, or riding the bus, people frequently observe the other people around them. Yet they often fail to realize how much other people engage in the same behavior, and that they, therefore, also are being observed. Because it is logically impossible that people, on average, are the subjects of observation more than they are objects of it, the belief that one watches others more than one is watched is an illusion. Several studies show that people incorrectly believe that they observe others more than other people observe them. We call this mistaken belief the "invisibility cloak illusion." People believe that they observe others more than do other people and that they are generally observed less than are others (Studies 1-3, 5, 6). The illusion persists both among strangers in the same vicinity (Study 2) and among friends interacting with one another (Study 3), and it cannot be explained away as yet another general better-than-average bias nor is it the result of believing one has more thoughts, in general, than do other people (Studies 2-3). The illusion is supported by a failure to catch others watching oneself (Studies 1b, 4) and it is manifest in the specific contents of people's thoughts about one another (Studies 5 and 6). Finally, rendering a feature of one's appearance salient to oneself fails to interrupt the illusion despite increasing one's belief that others are paying more attention specifically to that salient feature (Study 6). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Non-destructive method of magnetic permeability control of non-magnetic machine elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bajorek, J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the principle of operation and conversion errors of magnetic permeability measuring circuit by means of reluctance sensors. The metrological properties of devices, which were designed, built and applied by authors in electromechanical industry, have been also presented.

  7. Non-Magnetic, Tough, Corrosion- and Wear-Resistant Knives From Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Douglas C.; Potter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Quality knives are typically fabricated from high-strength steel alloys. Depending on the application, there are different requirements for mechanical and physical properties that cause problems for steel alloys. For example, diver's knives are generally used in salt water, which causes rust in steel knives. Titanium diver's knives are a popular alternative due to their salt water corrosion resistance, but are too soft to maintain a sharp cutting edge. Steel knives are also magnetic, which is undesirable for military applications where the knives are used as a tactical tool for diffusing magnetic mines. Steel is also significantly denser than titanium (8 g/cu cm vs. 4.5 g/cu cm), which results in heavier knives for the same size. Steel is hard and wear-resistant, compared with titanium, and can keep a sharp edge during service. A major drawback of both steel and titanium knives is that they must be ground or machined into the final knife shape from a billet. Since most knives have a mirrored surface and a complex shape, manufacturing them is complex. It would be more desirable if the knife could be cast into a net or near-net shape in a single step. The solution to the deficiencies of titanium, steel, and ceramic knives is to fabricate them using bulk metallic glasses (or composites). These alloys can be cast into net or near-net shaped knives with a combination of properties that exceed both titanium and steel. A commercially viable BMG (bulk metallic glass) or composite knife is one that exhibits one or all of the following properties: It is based on titanium, has a self-sharpening edge, can retain an edge during service, is hard, is non-magnetic, is corrosion-resistant against a variety of corrosive environments, is tough (to allow for prying), can be cast into a net-shape with a mirror finish and a complex shape, has excellent wear resistance, and is low-density. These properties can be achieved in BMG and composites through alloy chemistry and processing. For

  8. Directionally hiding objects and creating illusions above a carpet-like device by reflection holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiluan; Wu, Kedi; Shi, Yile; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-02-01

    Realization of a perfect invisibility cloak still challenges the current fabricating technologies. Most experiments, if not all, are hence focused on carpet cloaks because of their relatively low requirements to material properties. Nevertheless, present invisibility carpets are used to hide beneath objects. Here, we report a carpet-like device to directionally conceal objects and further to create illusions above it. The device is fabricated through recording a reflection hologram of objects and is used to produce a time-reversed signal to compensate for the information of the objects and further to create light field of another object so as to realize both functions of hiding the objects and creating illusions, respectively. The carpet-like device can work for macroscopic objects at visible wavelength as the distance between objects and device is at decimeter scale. Our carpet-like device to realizing invisibility and creating illusions may provide a robust way for crucial applications of magic camouflaging and anti-detection etc.

  9. Tricritical wetting in the two-dimensional Ising magnet due to the presence of localized non-magnetic impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobo, Marta L; Albano, Ezequiel V

    2016-03-31

    Fixed vacancies (non-magnetic impurities) are placed along the centre of Ising strips in order to study the wetting behaviour in this confined system, by means of numerical simulations analysed with the aid of finite size scaling and thermodynamic integration methods. By considering strips of size L × M (L interface between magnetic domains of different orientation (driven by the corresponding surface fields), which are the precursors of the wetting transitions that occur in the thermodynamic limit. By placing vacancies or equivalently non-magnetic impurities along the centre of the sample, we found that for low vacancy densities the wetting transitions are of second order, while by increasing the concentration of vacancies the transitions become of first order. Second- and first-order lines meet in tricritical wetting points (H(tric)(SW), T(tric)(W)), where H(tric)(SW) and T(Tric)(W) are the magnitude of the surface field and the temperature, respectively. In the phase diagram, tricritical points shift from the high temperature and weak surface field regime at large vacancy densities to the T --> 0, H(tric)(SW) --> 1 limit for low vacancy densities. By comparing the locations of the tricritical points with those corresponding to the case of mobile impurities, we conclude that in order to observe similar effects, in the latter the required density of impurities is much smaller (e.g. by a factor 3-5). Furthermore, a proper density of non magnetic impurities placed along the centre of a strip can effectively pin rather flat magnetic interfaces for suitable values of the competing surface fields and temperature.

  10. Dilution Effects on Two-Dimensional Heisenberg Antiferromagnets with Non-Magnetic Spin-Gapped Ground State

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuda, Chitoshi; Todo, Synge; Matsumoto, Munehisa; Takayama, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    Dilution effects on spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnets with a non-magnetic spin-gapped ground state are studied by means of the qunatum Monte Carlo simulation. In the site-diluted system, an antiferromagnetic long-range order (AF-LRO) is induced at an infinitesimal concentration of dilution due to an effective coupling $\\tilde{J}_{mn}$ between induced magnetic moments. In the bond-diluted case, on the other hand, the AF-LRO is not induced up to a certain concentration of dilution du...

  11. Influence of Non-Magnetic Substitutional Atoms on Spontaneous Moment and Curie Temperature of Ce2Co17 Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of Ce2Co17-xMx(M=Ga,Al and Si) compounds for M concentrations up to x=5 were studied by means of X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. The experimental results show that the Curie temperatures and Co spontaneous magnetization decrease significantly with increasing the addition of non-magnetic substitutional atoms, and that Si which has a minimum solid solubility in Ce2Co17 causes a largest reduction of Curie temperature, spontaneous magnetization and moment per Co atom compared with Ga and Al.

  12. Dust formation and dynamic in magnetized and non-magnetized microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, Karim; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled

    2016-09-01

    Dusty plasmas studies are conducted for several decades to answer to various issues from microelectronic, nanotechnology, astrophysics and thermonuclear fusion devices. These studies are usually conducted in RF discharges at low pressure in which the major physics concerning dust formation mechanisms and dynamic is now well known. In our case, we focus on dust formation and dynamic in (i) microwave plasma under typical pressure conditions of RF discharges (50 Pa) and (ii) in magnetized (ECR: Electron Cyclotron Resonance) microwave plasma under very low pressure condition (0.1 to 1 Pa). The aim of this study is not only for fundamental purpose but also for respond to some issues concerning dust in fusion devices. Thus, we investigate the dust formation mechanisms and dynamic using laser extinction method and laser light scattering imaging coupling with SEM imaging in hydrocarbon plasma and with PVD system with using tungsten target (according to fusion device). We observed that dust formation occurs even if the very low pressure conditions are generally not suitable for nucleation growth in gas phase (the influence of the magnetic field will be discussed). We will also discuss about the particular dust dynamic behavior in microwave discharge in comparison with RF discharge.

  13. Component masses of young, wide, non-magnetic white dwarf binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, R. B.; Dobbie, P. D.; Parker, Q. A.; Casewell, S. L.; Lodieu, N.; Burleigh, M. R.; Lawrie, K. A.; Külebi, B.; Koester, D.; Holland, B. R.

    2014-06-01

    We present a spectroscopic component analysis of 18 candidate young, wide, non-magnetic, double-degenerate binaries identified from a search of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7). All but two pairings are likely to be physical systems. We show SDSS J084952.47+471247.7 + SDSS J084952.87+471249.4 to be a wide DA + DB binary, only the second identified to date. Combining our measurements for the components of 16 new binaries with results for three similar, previously known systems within the DR7, we have constructed a mass distribution for the largest sample to date (38) of white dwarfs in young, wide, non-magnetic, double-degenerate pairings. This is broadly similar in form to that of the isolated field population with a substantial peak around M ˜ 0.6 M⊙. We identify an excess of ultramassive white dwarfs and attribute this to the primordial separation distribution of their progenitor systems peaking at relatively larger values and the greater expansion of their binary orbits during the final stages of stellar evolution. We exploit this mass distribution to probe the origins of unusual types of degenerates, confirming a mild preference for the progenitor systems of high-field-magnetic white dwarfs, at least within these binaries, to be associated with early-type stars. Additionally, we consider the 19 systems in the context of the stellar initial mass-final mass relation. None appear to be strongly discordant with current understanding of this relationship.

  14. Theoretical and numerical analysis of layered cylindrical p entamo de acoustic cloak%圆柱形分层五模材料声学隐身衣的理论与数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张向东; 陈虹; 王磊; 赵志高; 赵爱国

    2015-01-01

    As a newly-developed method, acoustic cloak made of pentamode materials is on its speedway to the promising potential application. However, physical fabrication of pentamode cloak with continuously varying material parameters can be a tough work, if not totally impossible. Layering is a natural compromise to bypass this quandary. Researches on layering effects of inertial cloak are ample. However, researches on layering pentamode acoustic cloak are relatively limited. Among these researches Scandrett extends the effective bandwidth through optimization of material parame-ters[2010 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127 2856, 2011 Wave Motion. 48 505]. The present work concerns the layering effects of pentamode acoustic cloak. By comparing with precedent results, the present paper has two major innovations: Firstly, cylinder is chosen to be the basic geometry. This is of obvious advantage since cylinder is the basic geometry of acoustic cloak’s important potential host. Secondly, effects of layers’ number and thickness distribution on the stealth effect are analyzed. The two are key parameters to be determined in the layering process. This paper is organized as follows: Firstly, analytical expression of the scattering pressure field of layered cloak is deduced by means of variables separation. In this process Fourier expansion plays a key role. And the harmonic assumption of the incident acoustic wave is made. Secondly, typical cases are calculated to verify the validation of the theoretical analysis. First let material parameters tend towards that of water, and compare the scattering field with that of the bare rigid object when the cloak is replaced by water. Second let the layering number goes to infinity, and compare the scattering field with that of the continuous cloak. Phenomena conforming with basic physical laws are observed. And validity of the theory and codes is confirmed. Thirdly, effects of layers’ number and thickness distribution on the stealth character are

  15. General insight into the complementary medium-based camouflage devices from Fourier optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2010-07-01

    We present a general insight into complementary medium-based camouflage devices from Fourier optics. The cloaks are simply spatial filters with different transfer functions and play the role of passively remedying or actively modulating the propagation optical field to make an object invisible or changeable. We further analytically show and numerically demonstrate two filters for realizing another invisibility method: optically camouflaging an object at one place to appear at another place with parallel displacement or orientation changeable displacement, respectively. Our analysis is from a completely different point of view and should clarify understanding of the mechanism of invisibility phenomena.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Chemistry of Dynamically Evolving Prestellar Cores: I. Basic Magnetic and Non-Magnetic Models and Parameter Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W; Turner, Neal

    2011-01-01

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores, and explore the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compou...

  17. The non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 and superconductivity in the iron pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, J. H.; Tucker, G. S.; Pratt, D. K.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Ran, S.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and superconductivity has become a central topic of research in studies of superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We present unambiguous evidence of the absence of magnetic fluctuations in the non-superconducting collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 via inelastic neutron scattering time-of-flight data, which is consistent with the view that spin fluctuations are a necessary ingredient for unconventional superconductivity in the iron pnictides. We demonstrate that the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 is non-magnetic, and discuss this result in light of recent reports of high-temperature superconductivity in the collapsed tetragonal phase of closely related compounds. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Work at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Magnetic properties and the effect of non-magnetic impurities in the quasi-2D quantum magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuntia, P.; Dey, T.; Mahajan, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We present synthesis, x-ray diffraction, magnetisation and specific heat studies on the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) S = 1/2 antiferromagnet (CuCl)LaNb2O7 and its doping analogues (Cu1-x Zn x Cl)LaNb2O7 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.05), (Cu0.95Mg0.05Cl)LaNb2O7, and (CuCl)La1-y Ba y Nb2O7 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.10). The magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of the parent compound and its isovalent or hetereovalent counterparts do not display any signature of magnetic ordering down to 1.8 K. The parent compound and its doping variants exhibit spin-singlet behaviour with a finite gap in the spin excitation spectrum due to dimerisation of the dominant intradimer interactions as evidenced from our magnetic susceptibility and specific heat data. The systematic increase of magnetic susceptibility at low temperature with non-magnetic Zn2+ and Mg2+ (S = 0) substitution at the Cu2+ site reflect that impurities induce local moments around the non-magnetic sites. While heterovalent Ba2+ substitution at the La3+ site do not result in mobile holes but rather give rise to a Curie term in the susceptibility due to localisation. The low value of spin S = 1/2, and absence of long range ordering or spin freezing, and the presence of competing exchange interactions hold special significance in hosting novel magnetic properties in this class of quasi-2D quantum material.

  19. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  20. Future perspectives for spintronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Takanashi, Koki

    2014-05-01

    Spintronics is one of the emerging research fields in nanotechnology and has been growing very rapidly. Studies of spintronics were started after the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in 1988, which utilized spin-polarized electron transport across a non-magnetic metallic layer. Within 10 years, this discovery had been implemented into hard disk drives, the most common storage media, followed by recognition through the award of the Nobel Prize for Physics 19 years later. We have never experienced such fast development in any scientific field. Spintronics research is now moving into second-generation spin dynamics and beyond. In this review, we first examine the historical advances in spintronics together with the background physics, and then describe major device applications.

  1. Source illusion devices for flexural Lamb waves using elastic metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yongquan; Liu, Fu; Diba, Owen; Lamb, Alistair; Li, Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials with the transformation method has greatly promoted the development in achieving invisibility and illusion for various classical waves. However, the requirement of tailor-made bulk materials and extreme constitutive parameters associated to illusion designs hampers its further progress. Inspired by recent demonstrations of metasurfaces in achieving reduced versions of electromagnetic cloaks, we propose and experimentally demonstrate source illusion devices to manipulate flexural waves using metasurfaces. The approach is particularly useful for elastic waves due to the lack of form-invariance in usual transformation methods. We demonstrate metasurfaces for shifting, transforming and splitting a point source with "space-coiling" structures. The effects are found to be broadband and robust against a change of source position, with agreement from numerical simulations and Huygens-Fresnel theory. The proposed approach provides an avenue to generically manipulate guided elastic waves in solids, and is...

  2. Negative refractive index metamaterials from inherently non-magnetic materials for deep infrared to terahertz frequency ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannopapas, Vassilios; Moroz, Alexander

    2005-06-29

    We present a new set of artificial structures which can exhibit a negative refractive index band in excess of 6% in a broad frequency range from the deep infrared to the terahertz region. The structures are composites of two different kinds of non-overlapping spheres, one made from inherently non-magnetic polaritonic and the other from a Drude-like material. The polaritonic spheres are responsible for the existence of negative effective magnetic permeability whilst the Drude-like spheres are responsible for negative effective electric permittivity. The resulting negative refractive index structures are truly subwavelength structures with wavelength-to-structure ratio 14:1, which is almost 50% higher than has been previously achieved. Our results are explained in the context of the extended Maxwell-Garnett theory and are reproduced by calculations based on the layer Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method, an ab initio multiple scattering theory. The role of absorption in the constituent materials is discussed. Effective medium computer F77 code is freely available at http://www.wave-scattering.com.

  3. Comparison of the enrollment percentages of magnet and non-magnet schools in a large urban school district.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Arcia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Are magnet schools in a position to meet diversity ideals? As districts are declared unitary and released from court ordered desegregation, many are framing their commitments to fairness and equity in terms of diversity˜i.e., comparable rates of participation and comparable educational outcomes in all segments the student population. In this study, the enrollment statistics for magnet and contiguous non-magnet public schools in Miami-Dade County Public Schools, a large, urban district that had been released from court ordered desegregation, were compared to each other and to district enrollment averages at two time points: the year the district was declared unitary and four years hence. Findings indicated that within four years of being declared unitary, the gains that the magnet schools had made with regards to Black/non-Black desegregation had eroded substantially. Also, in the four year span, magnet schools had not made significant strides in meeting the diversity ideals adopted by the district at being released from supervision by the court. These findings highlight the difficulty of attaining diversity in student enrollment characteristics when quotas are not used and suggest that recruitment and enrollment policies must be crafted with care if districts are to achieve diversity goals.

  4. A photometric study of chemically peculiar stars with the STEREO satellites. II. Non-magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    CERN Document Server

    Paunzen, E; Fossati, L; Netopil, M; White, G J; Bewsher, D

    2012-01-01

    We have analysed the photometric data obtained with the STEREO spacecraft for 558 non-magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars to search for rotational and pulsational variability. Applying the Lomb-Scargle and the phase dispersion minimisation methods, we have detected photometric variability for 44 objects from which 35 were previously unknown. The new objects are all bright stars on the Ecliptic Plane (magnitude range 4.7 < V < 11.7) and will therefore be of great interest to studies of stellar structure and evolution. In particular, several show multiple signals consistent with hybrid delta Scuti and gamma Doradus pulsation, with different periodicities allowing very different regions of the stellar interior to be studied. There are two subgroups of stars in our sample: the cool metallic line Am (CP1) and the hot HgMn (CP3) stars. These objects fall well inside the classical instability strip where delta Scuti, gamma Doradus and slowly pulsating B-type stars are located. We also expect to find period...

  5. Insertion devices

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrdt, J

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an insertion device with the electron beam in a storage ring is discussed. The radiation property including brightness, ux and polarization of an ideal and real planar and helical / elliptical device is described. The magnet design of planar, helical, quasiperiodic devices and of devices with a reduced on axis power density are resumed.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic YAuX (X = Ge and Si) in hexagonal and cubic phases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Lekhal; F Z Benkhelifa; S Méçabih; B Abbar; B Bouhafs

    2016-02-01

    The structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic intermetallic YAuX (X = Ge and Si) crystallized in hexagonal phase have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented-plane wave (FPLAPW) method based on the density functional theory (DFT), within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated lattice parameters were in good agreement with experiment. Also, the structural and electronic properties of the non-magnetic half-Heusler YAuPb compound including the artificial YAuX (X = Ge and Si) calculated in cubic phase were determined. It was found that the half-Heusler YAuPb compound presented metallic character. The results showed that YAuGe in cubic phase is a semiconductor whereas the cubic YAuSi is an isolator.

  7. 基于速度动态差异的位置服务匿名算法%A LBSs Cloaking Algorithm Based on Velocity Dynamic Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇; 高诗梦; 聂肖; 张俊浩

    2015-01-01

    随着基于位置服务应用的日益流行,其潜在的用户隐私泄露问题也成为制约其发展的一大挑战.用户位置数据的泄露,可能导致与用户生活相关的活动、住址等隐私信息泄露,隐私问题成为位置服务中人们普遍关注的热门话题.尤其是在连续查询场景下,查询间存在着密切的联系,这就使得用户的隐私面临更大的威胁.针对这一问题,文章提出了一种连续查询下的隐私保护算法,称为基于速度的动态匿名算法(V-DCA).在匿名处理时,考虑了用户的运动特征和趋势,也就是速度和加速度,并且利用历史匿名集合来产生新的匿名集合,在抵御查询跟踪攻击、保护隐私的同时提供了良好的服务质量.文章设计了一种连续查询隐私保护算法——基于速度的动态匿名算法(V-DCA),将用户的速度、加速度作为匿名条件之一,有效地平衡了隐私和服务质量;为了评价匿名算法,分别从隐私保障、服务质量和匿名时间3个方面提出了多个度量指标;通过在真实地图及相同环境下与其他匿名算法进行比较实验,验证了V-DCA在隐私保障、服务质量和响应时间方面的良好表现.%With the extensive development of location-based services (LBSs), the potential threats to users'' privacy information have become one of the biggest challenges. With the disclosing of users'' location data, the related privacy such as users'' activities, living address may be leaked to others. Privacy issue becomes the most concerns in LBS application scenarios. Especially for continuous LBS queries, the correlations of users'' location data make it much easier to expose their privacy information. Hence, in this paper, we propose a novel privacy preserving algorithm, namely, velocity-based dynamic cloaking algorithm (V-DCA), for continuous LBS queries. V-DCA considers users'' moving properties and trends, including velocity and acceleration similarity while

  8. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  9. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  10. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  11. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  12. 从负折射超材料到光学隐身衣%From the Research of Negative Refraction Metamaterials to the Study of Optical Invisibility Cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志洵

    2014-01-01

    In 1964,Russian physicist V .Vesalago adapts Maxwell ’ s equations to show that it is possible for left-handed materials ( LHM) with a negative refraction index to exist .In 1996 and 1999,J.Pendry begins to design the LHM.In 2000,D.Smith creates the first LHM,it bend microwaves in opposite direc-tion to normal .Negative refraction in LHM has recently attracted much interest .It is also called meta-ma-terial,and that do not exist in nature .It can alter the propagation of electro -magnetic waves,resulting in negative refraction of electro -magnetic waves ,resulting in negative refraction and invisible cloaking .So far,invisibility cloaking experiments at microwaves and optical frequencies have been performed in 2D and 3 D situation .They are a notable breakthrough over the concept of the conventional stealth technology . The other applications of LHM are the left -handed transmission line ,imaging,etc. In this paper ,a brief review on the history and the research advances of the negative refraction study and the invisibility cloak design was given firstly .And then ,we discuss the meaning of theoretical and ex-perimental works in these areaes .We say that the situation with negative refraction in practice is extraordi-narily complicated .And we discuss the relations between the negative refraction index and the negative wave velocity ,the negative refraction index and the negative Goos -Hänchen shift .%1964年俄罗斯科学家V.Vesalago 从Maxwell方程组出发断言具有负折射率的左手材料( LHM)可以存在,1996年和1999年J.Pendry提出了LHM的初始设计。2000年D.Smith制成首个LHM,它可把微波波束弯折到与常规的不同方向。近年来LHM吸引了人们的兴趣,它也称为超材料,但在自然界并不存在。它可变更电磁波传播,从而造成负折射甚至隐形。一个时期以来,在微波和光频进行的隐身斗篷实验是2D或3D的,它们与通常的隐形方法显著不同。 LHM的

  13. Antiferromagnetic vs. non-magnetic ε phase of solid oxygen. Periodic density functional theory studies using a localized atomic basis set and the role of exact exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Solís, A; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Hernández-Lamoneda, R; Ochoa-Calle, A J

    2017-01-25

    The question of the non-magnetic (NM) vs. antiferromagnetic (AF) nature of the ε phase of solid oxygen is a matter of great interest and continuing debate. In particular, it has been proposed that the ε phase is actually composed of two phases, a low-pressure AF ε1 phase and a higher pressure NM ε0 phase [Crespo et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2014, 111, 10427]. We address this problem through periodic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations at pressures from 10 to 50 GPa using calibrated GGA and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals with Gaussian atomic basis sets. The two possible configurations for the antiferromagnetic (AF1 and AF2) coupling of the 0 ≤ S ≤ 1 O2 molecules in the (O2)4 unit cell were studied. Full enthalpy-driven geometry optimizations of the (O2)4 unit cells were done to study the pressure evolution of the enthalpy difference between the non-magnetic and both antiferromagnetic structures. We also address the evolution of structural parameters and the spin-per-molecule vs. pressure. We find that the spin-less solution becomes more stable than both AF structures above 50 GPa and, crucially, the spin-less solution yields lattice parameters in much better agreement with experimental data at all pressures than the AF structures. The optimized AF2 broken-symmetry structures lead to large errors of the a and b lattice parameters when compared with experiments. The results for the NM model are in much better agreement with the experimental data than those found for both AF models and are consistent with a completely non-magnetic (O2)4 unit cell for the low-pressure regime of the ε phase.

  14. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  15. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of austenitic steel strips for non-magnetic laminations of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 2 400 tonnes of cold-rolled austenitic steel strips for non-magnetic laminations of the cold mass of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 32 firms in fourteen Member States and two firms in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2617/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to three firms in two Member States and two firms in Japan. The Council agreed to the Management?s proposal to invite Japanese industry to participate, where appropriate, in calls for tenders for supplies for the LHC Project (CERN/CC/2110). By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to approve the negotiation of a contract with the firm KAWASAKI STEEL (JP), the lowest bidder complying with the technical specification, for the supply of 2 400 tonnes of cold-rolled austenitic steel for non-magnetic laminations of the cold mass of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets for a total amount of 1 277 856 000 Ja...

  16. Magnetism without magnetic ions in non-magnetic perovskites SrTiO 3, SrZrO 3 and SrSnO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, V. V.; Shein, I. R.; Kozhevnikov, V. L.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    Using the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation potential, we studied spin polarization induced by replacement of oxygen atoms by non-magnetic 2p impurities (B, C and N) in non-magnetic cubic SrMO 3 perovskites, where M=Ti, Zr and Sn. The results show that the magnetization may appear because of the spin-split impurity bands inside the energy gap of the insulating SrMO 3 matrix. Large magnetic moments are found for the impurity centers. Smaller magnetic moments are induced on the oxygen atoms around impurities. It is shown that SrTiO 3:C and SrSnO 3:C should be magnetic semiconductors while other compounds in this series (SrTiO 3:B, SrTiO 3:N and SrZrO 3:C) are expected to exhibit magnetic half-metallic or pseudo-half-metallic properties.

  17. Magnetism without magnetic ions in non-magnetic perovskites SrTiO{sub 3}, SrZrO{sub 3} and SrSnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, V.V.; Shein, I.R.; Kozhevnikov, V.L. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ivanovskii, A.L. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivanovskii@ihim.uran.ru

    2008-03-15

    Using the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation potential, we studied spin polarization induced by replacement of oxygen atoms by non-magnetic 2p impurities (B, C and N) in non-magnetic cubic SrMO{sub 3} perovskites, where M=Ti, Zr and Sn. The results show that the magnetization may appear because of the spin-split impurity bands inside the energy gap of the insulating SrMO{sub 3} matrix. Large magnetic moments are found for the impurity centers. Smaller magnetic moments are induced on the oxygen atoms around impurities. It is shown that SrTiO{sub 3}:C and SrSnO{sub 3}:C should be magnetic semiconductors while other compounds in this series (SrTiO{sub 3}:B, SrTiO{sub 3}:N and SrZrO{sub 3}:C) are expected to exhibit magnetic half-metallic or pseudo-half-metallic properties.

  18. 基于主动声学超材料的圆柱声隐身斗篷设计研究%Research on a cylindrical cloak with active acoustic metamaterial layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈惠杰; 温激鸿; 郁殿龙; 蔡力; 温熙森

    2012-01-01

    Enlightened by the tunable properties of effective density of the active acoustic metamaterial, we design an active infinite cylinder acoustic cloak according to the idea of the multilayer structured acoustic cloak with homogeneous isotropic materials. Utilizing the electrical analog, the dynamical equation of the acoustic cavity with Piezo-Diaphragm is presented. By analyzing the circuit diagram, the control strategy of achieving various effective densities which are used for constructing the acoustic cloak is given. Based on the necessary parameters such as the wide range values of the relative densities gained by active control, and the acoustic speed of each composite layer, the acoustic pressure field of the plane wave incident on the cloak is calculated, via the FEM model. Also the pressure map of a rigid cylinder scatterer with surrounded fluid is performed for comparison. Results show that outside the cloaking shell, the plane wave field is almost undisturbed. However inside the shell, the plane wavefronts are gradually deflected, and guided around the cloaked domain, returning to the original plane shape with small perturbation. This phenomenon making the cloak acoustically invisible in some frequency ranges has useful values in engineering applications. Finally, the total scattering cross section of the cloak is calculated to investigate the invisible effect according to the frequency domain. The total number of the composite active metamaterial layers is 15, which is much easier to realize in experiment.%基于多层复合材料结构的二维卢隐身斗篷设计思想,利用主动隔膜声学空腔有效密度可以任意控制这一特性,设计了主动声学超材料下的无限长圆柱声隐身斗篷.给出了主动隔膜声学空腔单元的声电元件类比模拟电路图和具体的有效密度控制方法.进行了主动声学超材料声隐身斗篷的结构建模,并对平面入射波入射下此圆柱隐身斗篷周围声压分布场进

  19. Analytical calculation of permittivity tensors for invisibility devices using general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Doyeol

    2010-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the permittivity tensors of invisibility devices for the cases of elliptic cylinder, prolate spheroid, and the confocal paraboloid are obtained using general relativistic relations between the electromagnetic tensor and its dual tensor and their application to the transformation between the electromagnetic spacetime and the physical spacetime. This approach has a merit of being intuitive. In the case of elliptic cylinder, we found that the point of infinite light speed in the electromagnetic space becomes two points in the physical space for the zz component of the permittivity tensor. This result is different from the case of perfect cylinder in which there is a line of cloak at which the speed of light becomes infinite. In the cases of prolate spheroid and confocal paraboloid, the point of infinite light speed in the electromagnetic space becomes line in the physical space in all tensor components.

  20. Ferroelectric devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  1. Effect of metal-to-metal interface states on the electric-field modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/non-magnetic metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X. W.; Cheng, X. M.; Huang, T.; Wang, S.; Xue, K. H.; Miao, X. S.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of metal-to-metal interface on electric-field modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/non-magnetic metal (Ta, Pt, Au) is revealed by density functional calculations. We demonstrate that the contribution from the metal-to-metal interface can be strong enough to dominate the electric field effect on magnetic anisotropy of Fe/MgO-based films, and the strain could also effectively tune the electric field effect. By analyzing the interface states by density of states and band structures, the dependence of the magnetoelectric effect on metal-to-metal interface is elucidated. These results are of considerable interest in the area of electric field controlled magnetic anisotropy and switching.

  2. Optimization of a partially non-magnetic primary radiation shielding for the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pyka, N M; Rogov, A

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to optimize the monochromator shielding of the polarized cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4B, the density of the total spectrum of incoming neutrons and gamma radiation from the beam tube SR-2 has been determined during the three-dimensional diffusion process in different types of heavy concrete and other absorbing material. Special attention has been paid to build a compact and highly efficient shielding, partially non-magnetic, with a total biological radiation dose of less than 10 mu Sv/h at its outsides. Especially considered was the construction of an albedo reducer, which serves to reduce the background in the experiment outside the shielding. (orig.)

  3. Properties of the antiferromagnetic selenite MnSeO3 and its non-magnetic analogue ZnSnO3 from first principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honer, C. J.; Prosniewski, M. J.; Putatunda, A.; Singh, David J.

    2017-10-01

    We report the properties of the antiferromagnetic selenite MnSeO3 and the non-magnetic analogue ZnSeO3, based on first principles calculations. These compounds are rare examples of ABO3 perovskites with a tetravalent A-site and a divalent B-site. The electronic structure is discussed in the context of the bonding and crystal structure. There is cross-gap hybridization between the O p states that form the valence bands of these compounds and the unoccupied p states of Se, reflecting the lone pair physics that leads to the strong off-centering of Se from the perovskite A-site. The G-type antiferromagnetism of MnSeO3 is a local moment in nature arising from high spin Mn2+ with short range interactions. Additionally, there is an interesting spin-dependent hybridization of Mn d and O p states analogous to that in colossal magnetoresistance manganites.

  4. Ventricular assist device

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAD; RVAD; LVAD; BVAD; Right ventricular assist device; Left ventricular assist device; Biventricular assist device; Heart pump; Left ventricular assist system; LVAS; Implantable ventricular assist device

  5. Separating device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, T.P.R.

    2001-01-01

    A sorting device (1) suitable for sorting wire from a waste stream, comprising a body (2) that moves when in use, and provided with spikes or similar projections. The body is embodied as a rotatable roll (2), which oscillates axially during its rotation. The roll is coupled to an oscillation engine

  6. Detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  7. Assistive Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a number of assistive devices. These are tools, products or types of equipment that help you perform tasks and activities. They may help you move around, see, communicate, eat, or get dressed. Some are high-tech tools, such as computers. Others are much simpler, ...

  8. Printing Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.J.; Markies, P.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2014-01-01

    An ink jetprinting device includes a pressure chamber formed by a plurality of wall segments, a first aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink jet orifice and a second aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink supply duct. The pressure

  9. Electrochemical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  10. Printing Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.J.; Markies, P.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2014-01-01

    An ink jetprinting device includes a pressure chamber formed by a plurality of wall segments, a first aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink jet orifice and a second aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink supply duct. The pressure cha

  11. Balancing device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorsser, W.D.; Herder, J.L.; Wisse B.M.; Barents, R.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a balancing device for a mass, comprising an arm that is adjustable about a pivoting point and with which the mass is coupled, and an adjustable spring system that is coupled with the arm, which spring system comprises at least one spring, wherein the spring system comprises

  12. Do Magnet®-accredited hospitals show improvements in nurse and patient outcomes compared to non-Magnet hospitals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit Dit Dariel, Odessa; Regnaux, Jean-Phillipe

    2015-07-17

    The Magnet model proposes an accreditation for hospitals having demonstrated a healthy work environment and, as a result, positive staff and patient outcomes. Yet there are conflicting findings surrounding the actual impact of Magnet's organizational model on these outcomes, as well as a wide range of designs influencing the quality of these results. To conduct a systematic review that explores the effect of Magnet accreditation on objective nurse and patient outcomes. Magnet and non-Magnet accredited hospitals matched according to their similarity (e.g. size, type [urban or rural], level of acuity, location, etc.). Hospitals could be either university based or non-teaching hospitals and in any geographical location. As the focus of the study was outcomes specific to Magnet accreditation, studies reporting on "reputational Magnets" (the original hospitals), Magnet-aspiring and non-Magnet hospitals alone were excluded from the review. TYPES OF INTERVENTION(S)/PHENOMENA OF INTEREST: Exposure to Magnet accreditation. A Magnet hospital is defined as a hospital with American Nursing Credentialing Center -designated Magnet status at the time of study and having received this accreditation in the last four years, as this is the length of time for which the accreditation is valid, after which the hospital must reapply for another four-year accreditation. TYPES OF STUDIES: This review considered any quantitative study comparing nurse and patient outcomes in Magnet accredited hospitals with those in non-Magnet hospitals. Controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after and interrupted time series were considered first. When these were not available, case-controlled, descriptive comparative and descriptive correlational designs were considered. All studies presenting a "case study" with no comparison and other studies reporting on interviews and other qualitative data were excluded. TYPES OF OUTCOMES: The outcomes of interest were nurse outcomes related to turnover and

  13. "Distinvar" device

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The alignment of one of the accelerator magnets being checked by the AR Division survey group. A "distinvar" device, invented by the group, using calibrated invar wires stretched between the fixed survey pillar (on the left) and a fixed point on the magnet. In two days it is thus possible to measure the alignment of the 100 magnets with an accuracy better than 1/10.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorlin, S.M.; Ljubimov, G.A.; Bitjurin, V.A.; Kovbasjuk, V.I.; Maximenko, V.I.; Medin, S.A.; Barshak, A.E.

    1979-12-25

    A magnetohydrodynamic device having a duct for a conducting gas to flow at an angle with the direction of the magnetic field induction vector is described. The duct is situated in the magnetic system and is provided with a plurality of electrodes adapted to interact electrically with the gas, whereas the cross-sectional shape of the duct working space is bounded by a closed contour formed by a curve inscribed into a rectangle. 1 claim.

  15. Lessons from our Own Solar System: Generation Mechanisms of Radio Emissions from Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and Atmospheric Loss from Magnetized versus non-magnetized planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2017-05-01

    The understanding of the engines and mechanisms behind kilometric and decametric radio emissions from the planets in our own solar system have taken great leaps with missions such as the NASA/Cassini, IMAGE and Galileo missions. The periodic Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) at Earth and the periodic decametric radio emissions from Jupiter all point to the same generation mechanisms: very large-scale explosive plasma heating events in the magnetotail of each of the planets. The character and periodicity of the associated radio emissions not only tells us about the presence of a magnetic field but also about the plasma content and size of the planetary magnetosphere, and the nature of the interaction with the solar wind.The presence of a planetary magnetic field, as could be established for exoplanets by the positive detection of low-frequency exoplanetary radio emissions, has been thought to shield a planet from atmospheric loss to space. However, recent data from Mars Express, MAVEN, and Venus Express, together with the wealth of terrestrial measurements of atmospheric escape to space has brought a surprising question in to light: Does a planetary magnetic field suppress or enhance atmospheric loss? While at the non-magnetized planets such as Mars and Venus, the solar wind has a more direct access to the ionized upper atmosphere, these planets do set up self shielding currents that do limit escape. Furthermore, it is not clear if Mars have lost the majority of its atmosphere by condensation in to surface and sub-surface frost, or through atmospheric escape. At Earth, the geomagnetic field sets up a relatively large cross section to the solar wind, that allows the induced solar-wind electric field to transfer substantial energy to the upper ionosphere and atmosphere resulting in substantial loss. It is therefore not clear how a planetary magnetic field correlates to the atmospheric loss, or if it does at all.In this

  16. Electrooptical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, C. E.

    1980-03-01

    This report covers work carried out with support of the Department of the Air Force during the period 1 October 1979 through 31 March 1980. A part of this support was provided by the Rome Air Development Center. CW operation at temperatures up to 55 C has been achieved for GaInAsP/InP double-heterostructure (DH) lasers emitting at 1.5 micrometers, which were grown without a GaInAsP buffer layer. These devices are of interest for use as sources in fiber-optics communications systems, since the lowest transmission loss reported for fused-silica optical fibers occurs at 1.55 micrometers. Surface passivation techniques developed for InP and GaInAsP avalanche photodiodes have resulted in reductions of dark current as large as four orders of magnitude, to values as low as .0000016 A/sq cm at 0.9 V(b) where V(b) is the breakdown voltage. Devices consisting entirely of InP have been passivated with plasma-deposited Si3N4, and those with a GaInAsP layer but with the p-n junction in InP have been passivated with polyimide. Neither of these techniques successfully reduces dark currents in devices with the p-n junction in the GaInAsP, but a film of photoresist sprayed with SF6 as the propellant has given excellent results. The electrical characteristics in InP ion implanted with Sn, Ge, Si, and C have been investigated. All of these column IV elements yielded n-type conductivity and Sn, Ge, and Si showed high electrical activation; however, implanted C was found to have a net electrical activation of only about 5 percent.

  17. Azimuthal ExB drift of electrons induced by the radial electric field flowing through a longitudinal magnetic channel with non-magnetized ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Takeda, Jun; Nezu, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    To examine of the effect of the radial electric field on the azimuthal electron motion under E × B field for plasmas with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions, an experimental study is conducted by a stationary plasma flow. The argon plasma flow is generated by a DC arc generator under atmospheric pressure, followed by a cw expansion into a rarefied gas-wind tunnel with a uniform magnetic field 0 . 16 T. Inside one of the magnets, we set a ring electrode to apply the radial electric field. We applied an up-down probe for the analysis of the electron motion, where one of the tips is also used as a Langmuir probe to measure electron temperature, density and the space potential. We found that the order of the radial electric field is about several hundred V/m, which should be caused by the difference in the magnetization between electrons and ions. Electron saturation current indicates the existence of the E × B rotation of electrons, whose order is about 2000 - 4000 m/s. The order of the observed electron drift velocity is consistent with the theoretical value calculated from the applied magnetic field and the measured electric field deduced from the space potential.

  18. Magnetization enhancement due to incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content in (Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16})N{sub x} nano-composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jitendra, E-mail: jitendra@ceeri.ernet.in; Akhtar, Jamil [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, New Delhi 110001 (India); Shukla, Rishabh; Bagri, Anita; Dhaka, Rajendra S. [Novel Materials and Interface Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2016-01-15

    We report the magnetic, electronic, and structural properties of nano-composite (Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16})N{sub x} or CZN films prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition method. As-deposited CZN films have shown enhancement in magnetization (M{sub s}) with incorporation of nitrogen content, which is related to the evolution of nano-composite phase. X-ray diffraction study has confirmed poly-crystalline growth of CZN films with fcc(331) and fcc(422) phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Co nano-clusters, which are embedded in the nano-composite matrix. Photoemission measurements show the change in the intensity near the Fermi level most likely due to defects and shift in the core-levels binding energy with nitrogen concentration. Raman spectroscopy data show an increase in the intensity of the Raman lines with nitrogen concentration upto 20%. However, the intensity is significantly lower for 30% sample. This indicates that less nitrogen or defect states are being substituted into the lattice above 20% and is consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. Our studies indicate that defects induced due to the incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content play a key role to enhance the magnetization.

  19. Magnetization enhancement due to incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content in (Co84Zr16Nx nano-composite films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the magnetic, electronic, and structural properties of nano-composite (Co84Zr16Nx or CZN films prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition method. As-deposited CZN films have shown enhancement in magnetization (Ms with incorporation of nitrogen content, which is related to the evolution of nano-composite phase. X-ray diffraction study has confirmed poly-crystalline growth of CZN films with fcc(331 and fcc(422 phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Co nano-clusters, which are embedded in the nano-composite matrix. Photoemission measurements show the change in the intensity near the Fermi level most likely due to defects and shift in the core-levels binding energy with nitrogen concentration. Raman spectroscopy data show an increase in the intensity of the Raman lines with nitrogen concentration upto 20%. However, the intensity is significantly lower for 30% sample. This indicates that less nitrogen or defect states are being substituted into the lattice above 20% and is consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. Our studies indicate that defects induced due to the incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content play a key role to enhance the magnetization.

  20. Scalable devices

    KAUST Repository

    Krüger, Jens J.

    2014-01-01

    In computer science in general and in particular the field of high performance computing and supercomputing the term scalable plays an important role. It indicates that a piece of hardware, a concept, an algorithm, or an entire system scales with the size of the problem, i.e., it can not only be used in a very specific setting but it\\'s applicable for a wide range of problems. From small scenarios to possibly very large settings. In this spirit, there exist a number of fixed areas of research on scalability. There are works on scalable algorithms, scalable architectures but what are scalable devices? In the context of this chapter, we are interested in a whole range of display devices, ranging from small scale hardware such as tablet computers, pads, smart-phones etc. up to large tiled display walls. What interests us mostly is not so much the hardware setup but mostly the visualization algorithms behind these display systems that scale from your average smart phone up to the largest gigapixel display walls.

  1. Practical microwave electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  2. Electrophoresis device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  3. Stratification devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    heating system. High temperatures in the top of the storage tank established by the energy from the solar collector reduce the use of auxiliary energy. Low temperatures in the bottom of the storage tank improve the operation conditions for the solar collector. Using thermal stratified heat storages...... results in longer operation periods and improved utilization of the solar collector. Thermal stratification can be achieved, for example by using inlet stratification devices at all inlets to the storage tank. This paper presents how thermal stratification is established and utilized by means of inlet......Thermal stratification in the storage tank is extremely important in order to achieve high thermal performance of a solar heating system. High temperatures in the top of the storage tank and low temperatures in the bottom of the storage tank lead to the best operation conditions for any solar...

  4. Integrated device architectures for electrochromic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Jonathan Mack; Berland, Brian Spencer

    2015-04-21

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for creating monolithically integrated electrochromic devices which may be a flexible electrochromic device. Monolithic integration of thin film electrochromic devices may involve the electrical interconnection of multiple individual electrochromic devices through the creation of specific structures such as conductive pathway or insulating isolation trenches.

  5. Laser device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  6. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  7. Measurement of Visual Reaction Times Using Hand-held Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Arsintescu, Lucia; Flynn-Evans, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Modern mobile devices provide a convenient platform for collecting research data in the field. But,because the working of these devices is often cloaked behind multiple layers of proprietary system software, it can bedifficult to assess the accuracy of the data they produce, particularly in the case of timing. We have been collecting datain a simple visual reaction time experiment, as part of a fatigue testing protocol known as the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT). In this protocol, subjects run a 5-minute block consisting of a sequence of trials in which a visual stimulus appears after an unpredictable variable delay. The subject is required to tap the screen as soon as possible after the appearance of the stimulus. In order to validate the reaction times reported by our program, we had subjects perform the task while a high-speed video camera recorded both the display screen, and a side view of the finger (observed in a mirror). Simple image-processing methods were applied to determine the frames in which the stimulus appeared and disappeared, and in which the finger made and broke contact with the screen. The results demonstrate a systematic delay between the initial contact by the finger and the detection of the touch by the software, having a value of 80 +- 20 milliseconds.

  8. Medical Device Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  9. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  10. Ultraefficient Themoelectric Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermoelectric (TE) devices already found a wide range of commercial, military and aerospace applications. However, at present commercially available TE devices...

  11. Phase separation in NiCrN coatings induced by N2 addition in the gas phase: A way to generate magnetic thin films by reactive sputtering of a non-magnetic NiCr target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciu, I.; Duday, D.; Choquet, P.; Perigo, E. A.; Michels, A.; Wirtz, T.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic coatings are used for a lot of applications from data storage in hard discs, spintronics and sensors. Meanwhile, magnetron sputtering is a process largely used in industry for the deposition of thin films. Unfortunately, deposition of magnetic coatings by magnetron sputtering is a difficult task due to the screening effect of the magnetic target lowering the magnetic field strength of the magnet positioned below the target, which is used to generate and trap ions in the vicinity of the target surface to be sputtered. In this work we present an efficient method to obtain soft magnetic thin films by reactive sputtering of a non-magnetic target. The aim is to recover the magnetic properties of Ni after dealloying of Ni and Cr due to the selective reactivity of Cr with the reactive nitrogen species generated during the deposition process. The effects of nitrogen content on the dealloying and DC magnetron sputtering (DCMS) deposition processes are studied here. The different chemical compositions, microstructures and magnetic properties of DCMS thin films obtained by sputtering in reactive gas mixtures with different ratios of Ar/N2 from a non-magnetic Ni-20Cr target have been determined. XPS data indicate that the increase of nitrogen content in the films has a strong influence on the NiCr phase decomposition into Ni and CrN, leading to ferromagnetic coatings due to the Ni phase. XRD results show that the obtained Ni-CrN films consist of a metallic fcc cubic Ni phase mixed with fcc cubic CrN. The lattice parameter decreases with the N2 content and reaches the theoretical value of the pure fcc-Ni, when Cr is mostly removed from the Ni-Cr phase. Dealloying of Cr from a Ni80-Cr20 solid solution is achieved in our experimental conditions and the deposition of Ni ferromagnetic coatings embedding CrN from a non-magnetic target is possible with reactive DC magnetron sputtering.

  12. Development of Plasmonically Cloaked Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, Eric [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Summers, Christopher [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-05-18

    An advanced in-pile multi-parameter reactor monitoring system is being proposed in this funding opportunity. The proposed effort brings cutting edge, high-fidelity optical measurement systems into the reactor environment in an unprecedented fashion, including in-core, in-cladding and in-fuel pellet itself. Unlike instrumented leads, the proposed system provides a unique solution to a multi-parameter monitoring need in core while being minimally intrusive in the reactor core. Detector designs proposed herein can monitor fuel compression and expansion in both the radial and axial dimensions as well as monitor linear power profiles and fission rates during the operation of the reactor. In addition to pressure, stress, strain, compression, neutron flux, neutron spectra, and temperature can be observed inside the fuel bundle and fuel rod using the proposed system. The proposed research aims at developing radiation-hard, harsh-environment multi-parameter systems for insertion into the reactor environment. The proposed research holds the potential to drastically increase the fidelity and precision of in-core instrumentation with little or no impact in the neutron economy in the reactor environment while providing a measurement system capable of operation for entire operating cycles. Significant work has been done over the last few years on the use of nanoparticle-based scintillators. Through the use of metamaterials, the PIs aim to develop planar neutron detectors and large-volume neutron detectors. These detectors will have high efficiencies for neutron detection and will have a high gamma discrimination capability.

  13. Rhetorical Devices in English Advertisements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芃

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve persuasive and convincing effects,rhetorical devices are frequently applied in English advertisements.The paper classifies rhetorical devices into four basic categories: phonetic devices,lexical devices,syntactic devices and figures of

  14. Implantable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  15. Thermography of electronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Panfilova S. P.; Vlasov A. I.; Gridnev V. N.; Chervinsky A. S.

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of application of thermography to diagnose the electronic devices is analyzed in the article. Typical faults of electronic devices which can be found by means of thermography are given. Advantages of noncontact thermal inspection in comparison with the contact one are described. Some features of thermography of electronic devices are considered. Thermography apparatus is viewed and some pieces of advice about choosing it for electronic devices diagnosis are given. An example o...

  16. Heterostructures and quantum devices

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1994-01-01

    Heterostructure and quantum-mechanical devices promise significant improvement in the performance of electronic and optoelectronic integrated circuits (ICs). Though these devices are the subject of a vigorous research effort, the current literature is often either highly technical or narrowly focused. This book presents heterostructure and quantum devices to the nonspecialist, especially electrical engineers working with high-performance semiconductor devices. It focuses on a broad base of technical applications using semiconductor physics theory to develop the next generation of electrical en

  17. Organic photosensitive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  18. Device-less interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaci, G.; Triki, M.; Sarroukh, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the results of a technology survey for device-less interaction. The Device-less Interaction project (2007-307) aims at providing interaction options for future home appliances without resorting to a remote control or any other dedicated control device. The target home applia

  19. Organic photosensitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  20. Photovoltaic device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  1. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  2. Optical plasma microelectronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Thyler; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices was successfully replaced with an optically triggered gas plasma channel. The combination of DC and laser-induced gas ionizations controls the conductivity of the channel, enabling us to realize different electronic devices such as transistors, switches, modulators, etc. A special micro-scale metasurface was used to enhance the laser-gas interaction, as well as combining it with DC ionization properly. Optical plasma devices benefit form the advantages of plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving most of the integrablity of semiconductor based devices.

  3. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  4. Solid state devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Solid State Device research program is directed toward developing innovative devices for space remote and in-situ sensing, and for data processing. Innovative devices can result from the standard structures in innovative materials such as low and high temperature superconductors, strained layer superlattices, or diamond films. Innovative devices can also result from innovative structures achieved using electron tunneling or nanolithography in standard materials. A final step is to use both innovative structures and innovative materials. A new area of emphasis is the miniaturization of sensors and instruments molded by using the techniques of electronic device fabrication to micromachine silicon into micromechanical and electromechanical sensors and actuators.

  5. 小儿脐疝贴治疗脐疝的临床研究%Clinical study of a non-magnetic umbilical hernia curing tape in the treatment of umbilical hernia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞钢; 刘千里; 洪淳; 刘翠芬

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析一种无磁小儿脐疝贴对小儿脐疝愈合的促进作用.方法 选择200例接受封脐治疗的脐疝患儿随机分为四组,分别使用不同的封脐方法.组1宽胶布机械压迫,每4天一换;组2使用永磁敷料贴,每4天一换;组3使用无磁小儿脐疝贴,每4天一换;组4使用无磁小儿脐疝贴,每2天一换.另取同期就诊但未接受封脐治疗的50例作空白对照(组5).观察并记录五组患儿脐疝的不同时间闭合情况,使用SPSS20.0软件统计分析相关数据.结果 封脐8天后脐孔闭合进度在四个治疗组之间无统计学差异,且四个治疗组的数值均显著大于组5;16天闭合进度、32天闭合进度、32天愈合率、6个月内随访愈合率在组2与组3之间无统计学差异,组2与组3的数值均显著大于组5而小于组4.结论 小儿脐疝贴能明显缩短脐疝的愈合时间,并且,调整位置进行减张的频率越高,愈合时间越短.%Objective To analyze the promoting effect of a non-magnetic tape in healing infantile umbilical hernia.Methods 200 patients with umbilical hernia who underwent the treatment of umbilical sealing were randomly divided into four groups,using different methods Group I used a wide surgical tape to seal umbilicus and renewed it every 4 days.Group 2 used a permanent magnetic tape and renewed it every 4 days.Group 3 used a non-magnetic tape and renewed it every 4 days.Group 4 used the same non-magnetic tape as group 3 but renewed it every 2 days.Another 50 patients who did not receive umbilical sealing or other treatments were set as blank control (group 5).We observed and recorded healing progress of five groups and processed data with SPSS20.0 statistical analysis software.Results There was no statistically significant difference in healing progress among four treatment groups after 8 days,and the value of four treatment groups were significantly higher than that of group 5.There were no statistically significant differences in

  6. Abstract Storage Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Koenig, Robert; Tessaro, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    A quantum storage device differs radically from a conventional physical storage device. Its state can be set to any value in a certain (infinite) state space, but in general every possible read operation yields only partial information about the stored state. The purpose of this paper is to initiate the study of a combinatorial abstraction, called abstract storage device (ASD), which models deterministic storage devices with the property that only partial information about the state can be read, but that there is a degree of freedom as to which partial information should be retrieved. This concept leads to a number of interesting problems which we address, like the reduction of one device to another device, the equivalence of devices, direct products of devices, as well as the factorization of a device into primitive devices. We prove that every ASD has an equivalent ASD with minimal number of states and of possible read operations. Also, we prove that the reducibility problem for ASD's is NP-complete, that t...

  7. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leahey Matt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s. Methods In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Results Laboratory tests of the devices

  8. Smart portable rehabilitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Danaher, Gil; Jensen, Katherine; Pelletier, Philip; Prugnarola, Jennifer; Stuart, Ryan; Arango, Roberto; Leahey, Matt; Pavone, Robert; Provo, Andrew; Yasevac, Dan

    2005-07-12

    The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s). In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Laboratory tests of the devices demonstrated that they were able to meet their design

  9. Stretchable Organic Semiconductor Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yan; Zhang, Xinwen; Xie, Linghai; Qi, Dianpeng; Chandran, Bevita K; Chen, Xiaodong; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Stretchable electronics are essential for the development of intensely packed collapsible and portable electronics, wearable electronics, epidermal and bioimplanted electronics, 3D surface compliable devices, bionics, prosthesis, and robotics. However, most stretchable devices are currently based on inorganic electronics, whose high cost of fabrication and limited processing area make it difficult to produce inexpensive, large-area devices. Therefore, organic stretchable electronics are highly attractive due to many advantages over their inorganic counterparts, such as their light weight, flexibility, low cost and large-area solution-processing, the reproducible semiconductor resources, and the easy tuning of their properties via molecular tailoring. Among them, stretchable organic semiconductor devices have become a hot and fast-growing research field, in which great advances have been made in recent years. These fantastic advances are summarized here, focusing on stretchable organic field-effect transistors, light-emitting devices, solar cells, and memory devices.

  10. Controlling Smart Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Milanič, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    Smart devices make our lives easier. However, by delegating more and more tasks to smart devices our wellbeing becomes dependent on their correct functioning. This creates a need for monitoring home devices in a similar way as businesses already do. The thesis describes the steps required for building a monitoring system suited for smart home monitoring, from the initial design to the final implementation of the solution. The goal was to create a user friendly monitoring system, designed as m...

  11. Sensor sentinel computing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  12. Establishment Registration & Device Listing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This searchable database contains establishments (engaged in the manufacture, preparation, propagation, compounding, assembly, or processing of medical devices...

  13. Establishment Registration & Device Listing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This searchable database contains establishments (engaged in the manufacture, preparation, propagation, compounding, assembly, or processing of medical devices...

  14. Simple piezoelectric translation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Ph.; Emch, R.; Descouts, P.

    1988-02-01

    We describe a piezoelectric device which allows continuous movement and high-resolution micropositioning, without distance limitation. Both mechanical construction and the electronics for the device are very simple. The movement is obtained via a stick-slip mechanism, and steps as small as 10 nm are obtained. A displacement speed of 0.4 mm/s has been attained, and the device was capable of carrying several times its own weight, exerting a horizontal force, or climbing a plane inclined by 7°. Due to its compact construction, the device shows prospects for miniaturization.

  15. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  16. Smart devices are different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Allan; Blunck, Henrik; Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    The widespread presence of motion sensors on users' personal mobile devices has spawned a growing research interest in human activity recognition (HAR). However, when deployed at a large-scale, e.g., on multiple devices, the performance of a HAR system is often significantly lower than in reporte...

  17. Inverted organic photosensitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Bailey-Salzman, Rhonda F.

    2016-12-06

    The present disclosure relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices grown in an inverted manner. An inverted organic photosensitive optoelectronic device of the present disclosure comprises a reflective electrode, an organic donor-acceptor heterojunction over the reflective electrode, and a transparent electrode on top of the donor-acceptor heterojunction.

  18. Active devices for electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Sowa, Walter A

    1971-01-01

    An introduction to semiconductors ; the p-n junction ; the junction transistor ; electrical characteristics and ratings ; basic transistor amplifiers ; the field-effect transistor ; the unijunction transistor (UJT) ; the silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) ; the DIAC and TRIAC ; light operated devices ; integrated circuits (ICs) ; other solid-state devices of interest ; electron tubes.

  19. Metallic spintronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    Metallic Spintronic Devices provides a balanced view of the present state of the art of metallic spintronic devices, addressing both mainstream and emerging applications from magnetic tunneling junction sensors and spin torque oscillators to spin torque memory and logic. Featuring contributions from well-known and respected industrial and academic experts, this cutting-edge work not only presents the latest research and developments but also: Describes spintronic applications in current and future magnetic recording devicesDiscusses spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device architectures and modelingExplores prospects of STT-MRAM scaling, such as detailed multilevel cell structure analysisInvestigates spintronic device write and read optimization in light of spintronic memristive effectsConsiders spintronic research directions based on yttrium iron garnet thin films, including spin pumping, magnetic proximity, spin hall, and spin Seebeck effectsProposes unique solutions for ...

  20. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  1. Device for cutting protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  2. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-06-19

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  3. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  4. Towards building a prototype spin-logic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumatcha, Ashish Verma

    Since the late 1980s, several key discoveries, such as Giant and Tunneling Magne- toresistance, and advances in magnetic materials have paved the way for exponentially higher bit-densities in magnetic storage. In particular, the discovery of Spin-Transfer Torque (STT) has allowed information to be written to individual magnets using spin-currents. This has replaced the more traditional Oersted-field control used in field-MRAMs and allowed further scaling of magnetic-memories. A less obvious con- sequence of STT is that it has made possible a logic-technology based on magnets controlled by spin-polarized currents. Charge-coupled Spin Logic (CSL) is one such device proposal that couples a giant spin Hall effect(GSHE) write-unit with a Mag- netic Tunnel Junction read-unit. Several theoretical reports have demonstrated that a CSL-style device can function as a fundamental building block for neuromorphic computing by harnessing the intrinsic properties of magnets. This thesis describes the working of a CSL device. Experimental progress towards building the individual components of CSL and also our efforts to integrate these components into a CSL prototype will be presented. In addition to the integration effort, this work also explores spin-injection from a GSHE metal to a nanoscale magnet through an intermediate non-magnetic metal. Our results indicate that with the right choice of intermediate layers, the spin-angular mo- mentum absorbed by the magnet can be increased without engineering the intrinsic spin Hall angle of the GSHE metal. Finally, this work also proposes a Schottky-barrier model to describe the current flow through low-dimensional semiconductors and uses it to extract the band gap of black-phosphorus thin-films in an attempt to characterize novel 2D-materials.

  5. Transparent EuTiO3 films: a possible two-dimensional magneto-optical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Roleder, Krystian; Stuhlhofer, Benjamin; Logvenov, Gennady; Lazar, Iwona; Soszyński, Andrzej; Koperski, Janusz; Simon, Arndt; Köhler, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity of high quality transparent thin films of insulating EuTiO3 (ETO) deposited on a thin SrTiO3 (STO) substrate, both being non-magnetic materials, are demonstrated to be a versatile tool for light modulation. The operating temperature is close to room temperature and allows for multiple device engineering. By using small magnetic fields birefringence of the samples can be switched off and on. Similarly, rotation of the sample in the field can modify its birefringence Δn. In addition, Δn can be increased by a factor of 4 in very modest fields with simultaneously enhancing the operating temperature by almost 100 K.

  6. Investigation of giant magnetoconductance in organic devices based on hopping mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F. J.; Qin, W.; Xie, S. J.

    2014-04-01

    We suggest a spin-dependent hopping mechanism which includes the effect of the external magnetic field as well as hyperfine interaction (HFI) to explain the observed giant magnetoconductance (MC) in non-magnetic organic devices. Based on the extended Marcus theory, we calculate the MC by using the master equation. It is found that a MC value as large as 91% is obtained under a low driving voltage. For suitable parameters, the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Influences of the carrier density, HFI, and the carrier localization on the MC value are investigated. Especially, it is found that a low-dimensional structure of the organic materials is favorable to get a large MC value.

  7. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Masahiro, E-mail: hino@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki [Center for Experimental Studies, KMI, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 203-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Tasaki, Seiji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS.

  8. Digital communication device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The invention concerns a digital communication device like a hearing aid or a headset. The hearing aid or headset has a power supply, a signal processing device, means for receiving a wireless signal and a receiver or loudspeaker, which produces an audio signal based on a modulated pulsed signal...... point is provided which is in electrical contact with the metal of the metal box and whereby this third connection point is connected to the electric circuitry of the communication device at a point having a stable and well defined electrical potential. In this way the electro-and magnetic radiation...

  9. Output hardcopy devices

    CERN Document Server

    Durbeck, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Output Hardcopy Devices provides a technical summary of computer output hardcopy devices such as plotters, computer output printers, and CRT generated hardcopy. Important related technical areas such as papers, ribbons and inks, color techniques, controllers, and character fonts are also covered. Emphasis is on techniques primarily associated with printing, as well as the plotting capabilities of printing devices that can be effectively used for computer graphics in addition to their various printing functions. Comprised of 19 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to vector and ras

  10. Emission rate measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckat, S.

    1980-09-01

    The development and application of an emission rate measuring device for gaseous components is explored. The device contains absorption fluid from a supply container that moistens a cylindrical paper sleeve. A newer model is provided with a direct current motor requiring less electricity than an older model. The hose pump is modified to avoid changing it and the filter sleeve is fastened more securely to the distributor head. Application of the measuring devices is discussed, particularly at the Cologne Cathedral, where damage to the stone is observed.

  11. Nanoelectronic device applications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, James E

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Device Applications Handbook gives a comprehensive snapshot of the state of the art in nanodevices for nanoelectronics applications. Combining breadth and depth, the book includes 68 chapters on topics that range from nano-scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices through recent developments in nano capacitors and AlGaAs/GaAs devices. The contributors are world-renowned experts from academia and industry from around the globe. The handbook explores current research into potentially disruptive technologies for a post-CMOS world.These include: Nanoscale advance

  12. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  13. Powering biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  14. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  15. Physics of photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  16. Marine Sanitation Devices (MSDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine sanitation devices treat or retain sewage from vessels, and have performance standards set by the EPA. This page provides information on MSDs, including who must use an MSD, states' roles, types of MSDs and standards.

  17. MDR (Medical Device Reporting)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database allows you to search the CDRH's database information on medical devices which may have malfunctioned or caused a death or serious injury during the...

  18. Devices for hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000359.htm Devices for hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you are living with hearing loss , you know that it takes extra effort to ...

  19. Water-walking devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, David L.; Prakash, Manu; Chan, Brian; Bush, John W. M.

    We report recent efforts in the design and construction of water-walking machines inspired by insects and spiders. The fundamental physical constraints on the size, proportion and dynamics of natural water-walkers are enumerated and used as design criteria for analogous mechanical devices. We report devices capable of rowing along the surface, leaping off the surface and climbing menisci by deforming the free surface. The most critical design constraint is that the devices be lightweight and non-wetting. Microscale manufacturing techniques and new man-made materials such as hydrophobic coatings and thermally actuated wires are implemented. Using highspeed cinematography and flow visualization, we compare the functionality and dynamics of our devices with those of their natural counterparts.

  20. Development of electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlicka, A

    2009-01-01

    Electrochromic devices (ECD) are systems of considerable commercial interest due to their controllable transmission, absorption and/or reflectance. For instance, these devices are mainly applied to glare attenuation in automobile rearview mirrors and also in some smart windows that can regulate the solar gains of buildings. Other possible applications of ECDs include solar cells, small- and large-area flat panel displays, and frozen food monitoring and document authentication also are of great interest. Over the past 20 years almost 1000 patents and 1500 papers in journals and proceedings have been published with the key words "electrochromic windows". Most of these documents report on materials for electrochromic devices and only some of them about complete electrochromic devices. This paper describes the first patents and some of the recent ones on ECDs, whose development is possible due to the advances in nanotechnology.

  1. "Centripede"-measuring device

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    "Centripede"-measuring device for the geometrical pole shape of the quadrupoles, developed by the electronics and mechanics section of the Survey Group. The black box contains a precision clinometer, which gives the transversal tilt of the reference plane.

  2. Thermoelectric materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Talcott, Noel A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    New thermoelectric materials comprise highly [111]-oriented twinned group IV alloys on the basal plane of trigonal substrates, which exhibit a high thermoelectric figure of merit and good material performance, and devices made with these materials.

  3. Authenticated sensor interface device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Poland, Richard W.

    2016-10-18

    A system and method for the secure storage and transmission of data is provided. A data aggregate device can be configured to receive secure data from a data source, such as a sensor, and encrypt the secure data using a suitable encryption technique, such as a shared private key technique, a public key encryption technique, a Diffie-Hellman key exchange technique, or other suitable encryption technique. The encrypted secure data can be provided from the data aggregate device to different remote devices over a plurality of segregated or isolated data paths. Each of the isolated data paths can include an optoisolator that is configured to provide one-way transmission of the encrypted secure data from the data aggregate device over the isolated data path. External data can be received through a secure data filter which, by validating the external data, allows for key exchange and other various adjustments from an external source.

  4. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Technology of Quantum Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-01-01

    Technology of Quantum Devices offers a multi-disciplinary overview of solid state physics, photonics and semiconductor growth and fabrication. Readers will find up-to-date coverage of compound semiconductors, crystal growth techniques, silicon and compound semiconductor device technology, in addition to intersubband and semiconductor lasers. Recent findings in quantum tunneling transport, quantum well intersubband photodetectors (QWIP) and quantum dot photodetectors (QWDIP) are described, along with a thorough set of sample problems.

  6. Bipolar intimal tacking device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, C E; Williams, G

    1984-09-01

    A bipolar electrocoagulating device has been designed to thermally tack arterial intimal flaps to the artery wall. The device was tested on intimal flaps created in the rabbit descending aorta. The vascular segments were tested for patency and the thermal tack points were examined on a scanning electron microscope. The tack points were shown to be of sufficient tensile strength and to have minimal thrombogenicity.

  7. Nanoplasmonics advanced device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, James W M

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on control and manipulation of plasmons at nanometer dimensions, nanoplasmonics combines the strength of electronics and photonics, and is predicted to replace existing integrated circuits and photonic devices. It is one of the fastest growing fields of science, with applications in telecommunication, consumer electronics, data storage, medical diagnostics, and energy.Nanoplasmonics: Advanced Device Applications provides a scientific and technological background of a particular nanoplasmonic application and outlines the progress and challenges of the application. It reviews the latest

  8. Communications for Wearable Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Tabibu, Shivram

    2017-01-01

    Wearable devices are transforming computing and the human-computer interaction and they are a primary means for motion recognition of reflexive systems. We review basic wearable deployments and their open wireless communications. An algorithm that uses accelerometer data to provide a control and communication signal is described. Challenges in the further deployment of wearable device in the field of body area network and biometric verification are discussed.

  9. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    OpenAIRE

    Leahey Matt; Arango Roberto; Stuart Ryan; Prugnarola Jennifer; Pelletier Philip; Jensen Katherine; Danaher Gil; Weinberg Brian; Nikitczuk Jason; Mavroidis Constantinos; Pavone Robert; Provo Andrew; Yasevac Dan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. Thes...

  10. Nitinol Temperature Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-09

    AD-A021 578 NITINOL TEMPERATURE MONITORING DEVICES William J. Buehler, et al Naval Surface Weapons Center Silver Spring, Maryland 9 January 1976...LABORATORY S NITINOL TEMPERATURE MONITORING DEVICES 9 JANUARY 1976 NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS CENTER WHITE OAK LABORATORY SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20910 * Approved...GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER NSWC/WOL/TR 75-140 ____ ______ 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPCRT & PERIOD COVERED Nitinol

  11. Intrauterine devices containing progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, F

    1977-05-01

    Characteristics of progesterone-releasing IUDs are reported. At present, the only progesterone-containing IUD on the market is Progestasert, a T-shaped ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer device containing 38 mg progesterone in silicone. The device releases approximately 65 mcg/day into the uterine cavity over the course of 1-year. The device does not alter pituitary function or ovulation, nor does it depend on a local mechanical effect. Rather, it may exert its effect by inhibiting sperm capacitation or survival, or it may prevent nidation by alterning the endometrium. The reported pregnancy rate for Progestasert is 1.9% in parous women and 2.5% in nulliparous women. This efficacy rate is similar to that for other IUDs and low-dose progestin-only oral contraceptives. Breakthrough bleeding is the most common side effect, and perhaps 10-15% of the acceptors will have the device removed for either bleeding, pain, or infection. The rate of spontaneous expulsion of the device is about 3-8%. It is recommended that the device be inserted during or shortly after the menstrual period.

  12. CoPrivacy: A Collaborative Location Privacy-Preserving Method without Cloaking Region%CoPrivacy:一种用户协作无匿名区域的位置隐私保护方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄毅; 霍峥; 孟小峰

    2011-01-01

    Serious location privacy problems arise with extensive application of location-based services. Nowadays, location k-anonymity is the one of the most popular location privacy-preserving methods, it requires a trusted third party as an anonymity server which is proved to be the performance bottleneck and aim point of attacks. In addition, it complicates the query processing by requiring an anonymity region instead of a point. This paper proposes a collaborative location privacy-preserving method without anonymity server and cloaking region. Anonymity groups are formed through user's collaboration, members in the group regard density center as their locations when requiring for LBS, and acquire kNN results incrementally from the service provider. At last, group members get the precise results through computing distances between their locations and the £NN results. The proposed method achieves k-anonymity without cloaking region, the efficiency of anonymity is improved, and query processing is simplified. Extensive experimental results show advantages of the proposed method.%基于位置的服务的广泛应用给人们的生活带来了极大的便利.但是用户在享受这些便利服务的同时,个人的位置隐私也面临着严重的威胁.目前,典型的位置隐私保护技术是基于中心服务器的位置k-匿名方法.该方法容易使中心服务器成为性能瓶颈和集中攻击点,也容易造成查询处理过程的复杂化,且牺牲了用户的服务质量.文中提出了一种用户协作无匿名区域的隐私保护方法CoPrivacy,该方法通过用户之间协作形成匿名组,匿名组内的用户用该组的密度中心代替真实位置发出查询,并增量地从服务器获得近邻查询结果.组内成员通过近邻查询结果与自身位置之间的距离计算得出精确的查询结果.CoPrivacy在不使用匿名区域的情况下达到了k-匿名的效果,不牺牲用户的服务质量,并且提高了匿名系统的整体

  13. Ventricular Assist Device Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Panayotis; Kutalek, Steven P.; Samuels, Fania L.; Holmes, Elena C.; Samuels, Louis E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe herein the cases of 2 patients who had ventricular arrhythmias. In one, a short-term biventricular assist device, the ABIOMED BVS 5000, was placed because the patient had sustained ventricular tachycardia and could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Excellent hemodynamic support was maintained for several days while the antiarrhythmic therapy was maximized. Sinus rhythm was restored, and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventricular assist device. However, the substrate for the arrhythmia persisted, and a recurrence, 1 week later, resulted in the patient's death. In the 2nd patient, the use of an implantable left ventricular assist device was successful in temporarily alleviating the ventricular tachycardia associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, after 2 days of device assistance, the patient experienced a recurrence of the tachycardia, which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation with a marked deterioration in the patient's hemodynamics. The arrhythmia persisted despite multiple attempts at external cardioversion, and internal cardioversion and placement of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were necessary. This treatment, along with repeated boluses of amiodarone, led to successful suppression of the arrhythmias, and the patient eventually underwent transplantation. The mechanical hemodynamic support of the circulation by ventricular assist devices was effective in supporting these 2 patients who had sustained ventricular arrhythmias. (Tex Heart Inst J 2002;29:33–6) PMID:11995847

  14. Physics of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rudan, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the basic physics of semiconductors, including the hierarchy of transport models, and connects the theory with the functioning of actual semiconductor devices.  Details are worked out carefully and derived from the basic physics, while keeping the internal coherence of the concepts and explaining various levels of approximation. Examples are based on silicon due to its industrial importance. Several chapters are included that provide the reader with the quantum-mechanical concepts necessary for understanding the transport properties of crystals. The behavior of crystals incorporating a position-dependent impurity distribution is described, and the different hierarchical transport models for semiconductor devices are derived (from the Boltzmann transport equation to the hydrodynamic and drift-diffusion models). The transport models are then applied to a detailed description of the main semiconductor-device architectures (bipolar, MOS). The final chapters are devoted to the description of s...

  15. Foreign Body Extraction Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lavy

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract are common. Mostly they are swallowed accidentally by children but also by adults. When round and slippery, foreign bodies cause a technical problem for removal. After several days in the stomach they are covered with mucus and extraction becomes even harder. There are various devices designed for use through the flexible endoscope for grasping foreign bodies but due to the great variety of objects, one may face a real problem while trying to remove them. We faced a challenge in a woman who underwent vertical band gastroplasty and was obstructed by a round and slippery hazelnut. We managed to remove the nut using a simple homemade device. This device is easy to make, cheap, and simple to use and maybe useful for various foreign bodies.

  16. Biochip scanner device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Belgovskiy, Alexander I. (Mayfield Heights, OH); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  17. Electronic devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1968-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 1 deals with the design and applications of electronic devices and circuits such as passive components, diodes, triodes and transistors, rectification and power supplies, amplifying circuits, electronic instruments, and oscillators. These topics are supported with introductory network theory and physics. This volume is comprised of nine chapters and begins by explaining the operation of resistive, inductive, and capacitive elements in direct and alternating current circuits. The theory for some of the expressions quoted in later chapters is presented. Th

  18. Phononic crystal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kady, Ihab F.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2012-01-10

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  19. Preventing medical device recalls

    CERN Document Server

    Raheja, Dev

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Medical Device RequirementsIntroductionThe ChallengesSources of ErrorsUnderstanding the Science of Safety     Overview of FDA Quality System Regulation     Overview of Risk Management Standard ISO 14971     Overview of FDA Device Approval Process     Overview of Regulatory Requirements for Clinical TrialsSummaryReferencesPreventing Recalls during Specification WritingIntroductionConduct Requirements Analysis to Identify Missing RequirementsSpecifications for Safety, Durability, and

  20. INLET STRATIFICATION DEVICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    An inlet stratification device (5) for a circuit circulating a fluid through a tank (1 ) and for providing and maintaining stratification of the fluid in the tank (1 ). The stratification de- vice (5) is arranged vertically in the tank (1) and comprises an inlet pipe (6) being at least partially...... formed of a flexible porous material and having an inlet (19) and outlets formed of the pores of the porous material. The stratification device (5) further comprises at least one outer pipe (7) surrounding the inlet pipe (6) in spaced relationship thereto and being at least partially formed of a porous...

  1. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  2. Asphaltene based photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianelli, Russell R.; Castillo, Karina; Gupta, Vipin; Qudah, Ali M.; Torres, Brenda; Abujnah, Rajib E.

    2016-03-22

    Photovoltaic devices and methods of making the same, are disclosed herein. The cell comprises a photovoltaic device that comprises a first electrically conductive layer comprising a photo-sensitized electrode; at least one photoelectrochemical layer comprising metal-oxide particles, an electrolyte solution comprising at least one asphaltene fraction, wherein the metal-oxide particles are optionally dispersed in a surfactant; and a second electrically conductive layer comprising a counter-electrode, wherein the second electrically conductive layer comprises one or more conductive elements comprising carbon, graphite, soot, carbon allotropes or any combinations thereof.

  3. A new 3D levitation force measuring device for REBCO bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.L. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Yang, W.M., E-mail: yangwm@snnu.edu.cn [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Li, J.W.; Yuan, X.C. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Ma, J. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810008 (China); Wang, M. [School of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •A new 3D levitation force measuring device has been designed and constructed. •It can measure the 3D real-time interaction force simultaneously and directly. •Performance, accuracy and effectiveness has been demonstrate by tests. -- Abstract: A new 3D levitation force measuring device for ReBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−x} (REBCO) bulk superconductors has been designed and constructed. Three pull pressure load cells are orthogonally set on a fixing bracket to test the interaction force between a bulk superconductor and a magnet in three dimensions. To realize the simple, rapid and accurate measurement of the levitation force, a non-magnetic hollow cylinder flange, three pull pressure load cells, a piece of iron plate, a NbFeB permanent magnet (PM) and some steel balls are elaborately constructed with the fixing bracket, thus the magnet or REBCO bulk superconductor can be well and rigidly connected with the load cells, and the mutual interference from the three pull pressure load cells can be effectively avoided during the levitation force measuring processes. This device can be used to measure the interaction (or levitation) force between a superconductor and a magnet, that between a magnet and a magnet, or the magnetic force among magnetic materials in three dimensions.

  4. Thin film based semi-active resonant marker design for low profile interventional cardiovascular MRI devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysoy, Engin; Yildirim, Dursun Korel; Ozsoy, Cagla; Mutlu, Senol; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2017-02-01

    A new microfabrication method to produce low profile radio frequency (RF) resonant markers on catheter shafts was developed. A semi-active RF resonant marker incorporating a solenoid and a plate capacitor was constructed on the distal shaft of a 5 Fr guiding catheter. The resulting device can be used for interventional cardiovascular MRI procedures. Unlike current semi-active device visualization techniques that require rigid and bulky analog circuit components (capacitor and solenoid), we fabricated a low profile RF resonant marker directly on guiding the catheter surface by thin film metal deposition and electroplating processes using a modified physical vapor deposition system. The increase of the overall device profile thickness caused by the semi-active RF resonant marker (130 µm thick) was lowered by a factor of 4.6 compared with using the thinnest commercial non-magnetic and rigid circuit components (600 µm thick). Moreover, adequate visibility performance of the RF resonant marker in different orientations and overall RF safety were confirmed through in vitro experiments under MRI successfully. The developed RF resonant marker on a clinical grade 5 Fr guiding catheter will enable several interventional congenital heart disease treatment procedures under MRI.

  5. Nano devices and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Chung, Yung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    This volume on semiconductor devices focuses on such topics as nano-imprinting, lithography, nanowire charge-trapping, thermo-stability in nanowires, nano-electrodes, and voltage and materials used for fabricating and improving electrical characteristics of nano-materials.

  6. Optical switching device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, F.J.A. den; Hanzen, R.M.N.; Duine, P.A.; Jungblut, R.M.; Draijer, C.; Roozeboom, F.; Sluis, P. van der

    2000-01-01

    A description is given of an optical switching device (1) comprising a transparent substrate (3), a switching film (5) of a hydride compound of a trivalent transition or rare earth metal having a thickness of 300 nm, and a palladium capping layer (7) having a thickness of 30 nm. The capping layer is

  7. Color identification testing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  8. Air Stable Photovoltaic Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A method of forming a conducting polymer based photovoltaic device comprising the steps of : (a) providing a transparent first electrode; (b) providing the transparent first electrode with a layer of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein the metal oxide is selected from the group consisting of : TiO...

  9. Device Oriented Project Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  10. Container Monitoring Device (case)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.; Ruijsbroek, W.G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Stage Gate 11 is een bedrijf dat technologische innovaties naar de markt brengt. De drie ondernemers hebben een nieuw product ontwikkeld, de Container Monitoring Device, een product dat stalen containers ‘smart’ maakt door er allerlei sensoren aan te koppelen. Maar waar ligt precies de toegevoegde w

  11. The missing intrauterine device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Devassy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (IUD is an acceptable and common form of contraception worldwide. The objective of this study was to report the case of an asymptomatic missing intrauterine contraceptive (IUD inserted to prevent intrauterine adhesions after synechiolysis. A patient presented with missing IUD threads. Ultrasound of the pelvis showed an empty uterine cavity with the missing IUD probably anterior to the uterus. We present a stepwise approach in the management of the and ldquo;lost IUD and rdquo;, where the strings of the device are not visible at the time of speculum examination. We suggest first determining sonographically whether the IUD is within the cavity. If it is in situ, options for retrieval are including hysteroscopic retrieval. If the IUD is not within the cavity, X-rays are recommended. The device will not be present on X-ray if expulsion has occurred. If the device is present on the X-ray, cystoscopic or laparoscopic retrieval is required. IUD-providers should not only screen potential users and insert IUD correctly, but also ensure adequate follow-up with localization. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(10.000: 3587-3589

  12. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  13. Alerts and Notices (Devices)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Communication 01/13/17 Safety Concerns with Implantable Infusion Pumps in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) Environment: FDA Safety Communication 01/11/17 Cybersecurity Vulnerabilities Identified in St. Jude Medical's Implantable Cardiac Devices and Merlin@home Transmitter: FDA Safety ...

  14. XY displacement device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerens, W.C.; Laham, C.D.; Holman, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    An XY-displacement device (1) with a four-fold symmetry comprises a reference frame (10); an object mount (20) for holding an object (22) to be displaced; an X-manipulator (100) coupled between the reference frame (10) and the object mount (20), which provides a rigid coupling between the object mou

  15. Complex Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Disruptive Basic Research Areas” – Metamaterials and Plasmonics – Quantum Information Science – Cognitive Neuroscience – Nanoscience and...Sayir, Fuller) Bio-Sensing of Magnetic Fields (Larkin, Bradshaw, Curcic, DeLong 2D Materials & Devices Beyond Graphene (Hwang, Pomrenke, Harrison

  16. A Medical Delivery Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a medical delivery device comprising at least two membrane electrode assembly units each of which comprises three layers: an upper and a lower electrode and a selective ionic conductive membrane provided there-between. At least one of the three layers are shared...

  17. Discourse Devices in Telugu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, A. Usha

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss some of the productive discourse devices and markers noted in 50 spoken narratives elicited from Telugu native speakers. Since most of them are college students and residents of Hyderabad, they are also exposed to English as well as Hindi-Urdu (Dakkhini). After presenting certain salient features of Telugu…

  18. Projection and registration device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinden, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    A projection and recording device, provided with a processing and control unit, a memory for recording images and other data, an input/output interface, a controllable camera, a touch screen for the input and display of data and images, a position determining system for determining the position of a

  19. Solid-State Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  20. Electronics Devices and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-17

    should be immae that nobw0sthtandirV any other projieion of law, no person shell be su*ect tD any penalty for faling to cornply with a oolk rd -in 0...a Lehighton instrument. I The 8 wafers with GaN devices were sawn and are ready for annealing. Additional training at NSI was performed on thermal

  1. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  2. Investigation of nanoscale magnetic materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rench, David William

    A host of fundamentally and technologically intriguing phenomena can be observed in ferromagnetic systems, ranging from Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) to spin structures that approximate the non-zero entropy state of water ice. In this dissertation, we consider systems of self-assembled MnAs nanoclusters in a doped GaAs matrix, a magnetically-doped topological insulator material, and magnetotransport devices constructed as artificial spin ices. We performed magnetic, structural, and electronic measurements in each of the projects herein to discover unique materials properties that range from new phase diagrams to electronic structure breaking and intriguing electrical characteristics that seem to defy the symmetry of the system that manifests them. We first explore the impact of co-doping a GaAs semiconductor matrix with magnetic and non-magnetic dopant ions (Mn and Be, respectively) and forcing phase separation to occur during the sample growth stage. The result of this phase-separated co-doped growth was the identification of two distinct materials classes: Type I materials, in which the phase separation produces ferromagnetic zinc blende (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters with a narrow distribution of small diameters within a weakly Be-doped GaAs matrix, and Type II materials, in which an abrupt mixing of large NiAs-type MnAs nanoclusters and the small (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters occurs. These two states are shown to also have accessible intermediate states in the case of a doped substrate and buffer layer. Magnetic measurements are performed to determine the dynamics of the unmixed Type I and the mixed Type II materials. Structural characteristization is done at the nanoscale in a variety of instruments to precisely determine the likely growth dynamics during sample synthesis and the resultant structures. The materials are found to be superparamagnetic with 10 K (Type I) and approximately 313 K (Type II) blocking temperatures with a strong dependence on Mn content during growth

  3. Microelectromechanical reprogrammable logic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, M. A. A.; Kosuru, L.; Younis, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    In modern computing, the Boolean logic operations are set by interconnect schemes between the transistors. As the miniaturization in the component level to enhance the computational power is rapidly approaching physical limits, alternative computing methods are vigorously pursued. One of the desired aspects in the future computing approaches is the provision for hardware reconfigurability at run time to allow enhanced functionality. Here we demonstrate a reprogrammable logic device based on the electrothermal frequency modulation scheme of a single microelectromechanical resonator, capable of performing all the fundamental 2-bit logic functions as well as n-bit logic operations. Logic functions are performed by actively tuning the linear resonance frequency of the resonator operated at room temperature and under modest vacuum conditions, reprogrammable by the a.c.-driving frequency. The device is fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible mass fabrication process, suitable for on-chip integration, and promises an alternative electromechanical computing scheme.

  4. Thin film device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Inderjeet

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional materials created ab initio by the process of condensation of atoms, molecules, or ions, called thin films, have unique properties significantly different from the corresponding bulk materials as a result of their physical dimensions, geometry, nonequilibrium microstructure, and metallurgy. Further, these characteristic features of thin films can be drasti­ cally modified and tailored to obtain the desired and required physical characteristics. These features form the basis of development of a host of extraordinary active and passive thin film device applications in the last two decades. On the one extreme, these applications are in the submicron dimensions in such areas as very large scale integration (VLSI), Josephson junction quantum interference devices, magnetic bubbles, and integrated optics. On the other extreme, large-area thin films are being used as selective coatings for solar thermal conversion, solar cells for photovoltaic conver­ sion, and protection and passivating layers. Ind...

  5. Inlet stratification device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    ) with an inlet passage way (16). The upper end of the inlet pipe (6) is connected with a top cap (9). The top cap (9) and the bottom cap (10) are mutually connected by means of a wire (8) and the top cap (9) is configured as a floating device providing a buoyancy force larger than the downwardly directed force......An inlet stratification (5) is adapted to be arranged vertically in a tank (1) during operation. The stratification device (5) comprises an inlet pipe (6) formed of a flexible porous material and having a lower and upper end. The lower end of the inlet pipe (6) is connected to a bottom cap (10...

  6. Microwave Magnetoelectric Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tatarenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tunable microwave magnetoelectric devices based on layered ferrite-ferroelectric structures are described. The theory and experiment for attenuator, band-pass filter and phase shifter are presented. Tunability of the ME devices characteristics can be executed by application of an electric field. This electric tuning is relatively fast and is not power-consuming. The attenuator insertion losses vary from 26 dB to 2 dB at frequency 7251 MHz. The tuning range of 25 MHz of band-pass filter at frequency 7360 MHz was obtained. A maximum phase shift of 30–40 degree at the frequency region 6–9 GHz was obtained.

  7. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). This is an optical device consisting if one waveguide that is split into two waveguide arms which are assembled again later on. By applying the mechanical field from a SAW the light in the two arms can be modulated and interfere constructively and destructively......The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model...

  8. Plastic photovoltaic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of organic, polymer-based photovoltaic elements has introduced the possibility of obtaining cheap and easy-to-produce energy from light. Photoinduced electron transfer from donor-type semiconducting polymers onto acceptor-type polymers or molecules, such as C60, is the basic phenomenon utilized in these photovoltaic devices. This process mimics the early photo-effects in natural photosynthesis. The polymeric semiconductors combine the photoelectrical properties of inorganic semiconductors with the large-scale, low-cost technology of polymeric ‘plastic’ materials. To date, devices with power conversion efficiencies of ∼5% have been reported. Several companies and research institutions are focusing on this field now, making power conversion efficiencies up to 8-10% highly likely in the near future.

  9. Localized environment characterization device

    KAUST Repository

    Alzain, Hashim

    2016-07-21

    Various apparatuses and methods are provided for measuring the likely environmental impact of a particular geographic location on power generation properties of potential solar installations at the particular location. In an example embodiment of one such apparatus, a measurement device is provided. The measurement device includes a base portion comprising a base frame element disposed on a plurality of supporting legs, and a top panel comprising a series of connected members and one or more measurement modules whose planar dimensions are defined by the series of connected members. The top panel is connected to the base portion by a joint such that the top panel can rotate about the joint, and a panel support element is configured to fasten the top panel immovably at a desired degree of rotation in relation to the base portion.

  10. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  11. Portable biochip scanner device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perov, Alexander (Troitsk, RU); Sharonov, Alexei (Moscow, RU); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Darien, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  12. Device for crushing rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanygin, A.S.; Bulavtsev, V.A.; Zhidkov, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to simplify the design. The device includes a hydrocylinder with main piston and rod, additional piston with rod placed in the cavity of the main piston rod, wedge attached to the additional piston rod, extension jaws attached to the hydrocylinder housing, and attachment for supply of the working fluid into the above-piston cavity of the rod in the main piston. The latter is made in the form of a channel with reverse valve which connects the rod cavity of the hydrocylinder to the above-piston cavity of the main piston rod. The reverse valve is in the main piston and is made with push rod which goes beyond the limits of the piston on the side of the hydrocylinder rod cavity. The device is designed to separate blocks from the massif on the borehole line.

  13. Organic photosensitive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Peter; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-01-22

    A photoactive device is provided. The device includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a photoactive region disposed between and electrically connected to the first and second electrodes. The photoactive region further includes an organic donor layer and an organic acceptor layer that form a donor-acceptor heterojunction. The mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region are different by a factor of at least 100, and more preferably a factor of at least 1000. At least one of the mobility of holes in the organic donor region and the mobility of electrons in the organic acceptor region is greater than 0.001 cm.sup.2/V-sec, and more preferably greater than 1 cm.sup.2/V-sec. The heterojunction may be of various types, including a planar heterojunction, a bulk heterojunction, a mixed heterojunction, and a hybrid planar-mixed heterojunction.

  14. Integrated elastic microscope device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. M.; Wright, D.; Watkins, R.; Cen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    The growing power of imaging and computing power of smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscopy system. High quality miniature microscopy lenses attached to smartphone are typically made with glass or plastics that can only be produce at low cost with high volume. To revise the paradigm of microscope lenses, we devised a simple droplet lens fabrication technique that which produces low cost and high performance lens. Each lens is integrated into thin 3-D printed holder with complimentary light emitted diode (LEDs) that clips onto majority of smartphones. The integrated device converts a smartphone into a high power optical microscope/dermatoscope at around $2. This low cost device has wide application in a multitude of practical uses such as material inspection, dermascope and educational microscope.

  15. Fractional-order devices

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  16. Microelectromechanical reprogrammable logic device

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, M. A. A.

    2016-03-29

    In modern computing, the Boolean logic operations are set by interconnect schemes between the transistors. As the miniaturization in the component level to enhance the computational power is rapidly approaching physical limits, alternative computing methods are vigorously pursued. One of the desired aspects in the future computing approaches is the provision for hardware reconfigurability at run time to allow enhanced functionality. Here we demonstrate a reprogrammable logic device based on the electrothermal frequency modulation scheme of a single microelectromechanical resonator, capable of performing all the fundamental 2-bit logic functions as well as n-bit logic operations. Logic functions are performed by actively tuning the linear resonance frequency of the resonator operated at room temperature and under modest vacuum conditions, reprogrammable by the a.c.-driving frequency. The device is fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible mass fabrication process, suitable for on-chip integration, and promises an alternative electromechanical computing scheme.

  17. Plastic photovoltaic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

    2004-01-01

    The development of organic, polymer-based photovoltaic elements has introduced the possibility of obtaining cheap and easy-to-produce energy from light. Photoinduced electron transfer from donor-type semiconducting polymers onto acceptor-type polymers or molecules, such as C60, is the basic phenomenon utilized in these photovoltaic devices. This process mimics the early photo-effects in natural photosynthesis. The polymeric semiconductors combine the photoelectrical properties of inorganic se...

  18. Memristor: the illusive device

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-05-03

    The memristor (M) is considered to be the fourth two-terminal passive element in electronics, alongside the resistor (R), the capacitor (C), and the inductor (L). Its existence was postulated in 1971 but its first implementation was reported in 2008. Where was it hiding all that time and what can we do with it? Come and learn how the memristor completes the roster of electronic devices much like a missing particle that physicists seek to complete their tableaus.

  19. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  20. Rooting an Android Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    tools that grant root privileges for both Windows and Linux . For the Linux system, open a shell window and use “cd” command to change the directory...defined as a process of gaining administrative commands and functions of an operating system (OS). In order to monitor live network traffic on any... Linux -based or, in this case, Android system, it is necessary to have administrative rights to gain access to any of the hardware devices, such as the

  1. High speed heterostructure devices

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Albert C; Willardson, R K; Kiehl, Richard A; Sollner, T C L Gerhard

    1994-01-01

    Volume 41 includes an in-depth review of the most important, high-speed switches made with heterojunction technology. This volume is aimed at the graduate student or working researcher who needs a broad overview andan introduction to current literature. Key Features * The first complete review of InP-based HFETs and complementary HFETs, which promise very low power and high speed * Offers a complete, three-chapter review of resonant tunneling * Provides an emphasis on circuits as well as devices.

  2. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  3. Hybrid electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiang, Joseph John; Duggal, Anil Raj; Michael, Joseph Darryl

    2010-08-03

    A hybrid electroluminescent (EL) device comprises at least one inorganic diode element and at least one organic EL element that are electrically connected in series. The absolute value of the breakdown voltage of the inorganic diode element is greater than the absolute value of the maximum reverse bias voltage across the series. The inorganic diode element can be a power diode, a Schottky barrier diode, or a light-emitting diode.

  4. [International progress of unique device identification for medical devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanjuan; Li, Jun; Li, Jingli

    2014-09-01

    Unique Device Identification (UDI) is a hot spot research area in the medical device administration. It comes a breakthrough from International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF) and government implementation recently. The article reviewed the advancement of IMDRF UDI program, discussed the framework for UDI system, analyzed the implementation of UDI in other countries, put forward some suggestions on the development of medical device coding system in our country.

  5. DeviceNet-based device-level control in SSRF

    CERN Document Server

    Leng Yong Bin; Lu Cheng Meng; Miao Hai Feng; Liu Song Qiang; Shen Guo Bao

    2002-01-01

    The control system of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility is an EPICS-based distributed system. One of the key techniques to construct the system is the device-level control. The author describes the design and implementation of the DeviceNet-based device controller. A prototype of the device controller was tested in the experiments of magnet power supply and the result showed a precision of 3 x 10 sup - sup 5

  6. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  7. Nanocomposites for ultra high density information storage, devices including the same, and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Shin, Junsoo

    2014-04-01

    A nanocomposite article that includes a single-crystal or single-crystal-like substrate and heteroepitaxial, phase-separated layer supported by a surface of the substrate and a method of making the same are described. The heteroepitaxial layer can include a continuous, non-magnetic, crystalline, matrix phase, and an ordered, magnetic magnetic phase disposed within the matrix phase. The ordered magnetic phase can include a plurality of self-assembled crystalline nanostructures of a magnetic material. The phase-separated layer and the single crystal substrate can be separated by a buffer layer. An electronic storage device that includes a read-write head and a nanocomposite article with a data storage density of 0.75 Tb/in.sup.2 is also described.

  8. Fresnel-Fizeau drag: Invisibility conditions for all inertial observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimeh, Jad C.; Thompson, Robert T.

    2016-03-01

    It was recently shown [J. C. Halimeh et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 013850 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.013850] that as a result of the Doppler effect, inherently dispersive single-frequency ideal free-space invisibility cloaks in relative motion to an observer can only cloak light whose frequency in the cloak frame coincides with the operational frequency of the cloak, although an infinite number of such rays exist for any cloak motion. In this article, we show analytically and through ray-tracing simulations that even though this relationship can be relaxed by simplifying the ideal invisibility cloak into a broadband amplitude cloak, Fresnel-Fizeau drag uncloaks the phase of light in the inertial frame of the cloak thereby compromising its amplitude cloaking in all other inertial frames. In other words, only an invisibility device that perfectly cloaks both the amplitude and the phase of light in its own inertial frame will also (perfectly) cloak this light in any other inertial frame. The same conclusion lends itself to invisible objects that are not cloaks, such as the invisible sphere.

  9. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  10. 77 FR 69488 - Medical Devices; Custom Devices; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Devices; Custom Devices; Request for Comments AGENCY... of developing an implementation strategy and policy for the custom device exemption criteria in the FD&C Act amended by FDASIA. FDA is seeking information on appropriate uses of the custom...

  11. Intrauterine device developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Results of recent IUD research are presented. The largest study of postpartum IUD insertion to date, a multicenter comparative trail involving 3791 women at 15 sites in 13 countries, has shown that the practice is safe and effective if the IUD is correctly placed. Modifications in design of the device are unnecessary to reduce expulsions. In 1977, Family Health International (FHI) began developing IUDs that would have clinically acceptable expulsion rates following postpartum insertion. By adding chromic catgut suture material to the upper arms of the TCu andLippes Loop, FHI developed the Delta T and Delta Loop. Many of the centers involved in studies of postpartum IUD insertion were large urban maternity hospitals in developing countries with heavy caseloads of 10,000-30,000 deliveries/year. Results of the trials and of a 19-center evaluation of the timing of postpartum insertion support several conclusions: 1) insertion should take place within 10 minutes of placental expulsion; 2) if insertion is done within 10 minutes of delivery, there is no increased risk of infection or uterine perforation; 3) the type of device inserted is less important than the method of insertion; expulsion rates at different clinics ranged from 6-37/1000 women at 6 monts, and the fundal placement of the device is crucial; and 4) expulsions are higher for postpartum than interval insertions but not so high as to make the offer of an IUD immediately postpartum unacceptable. Since the incidence of pain or bleeding associated with IUD use is related to their size, attempts to decrease the side effects have centered on development of smaller copper devices. 1 such device, the copper i, consists of a straight stem with small crossarms in an 'x' configuration disigned to anchor the IUD in place. A copper wire around the stem of the device exposes 200 sq millimeters of cooper. A study of 98 women who used the Copper i showed an accidental pregnancy rate of 3.2 at 6 months and 9.0 at 12 months

  12. Photoemission-based microelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Tyler J.; Tao, Andrea R.; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2016-11-01

    The vast majority of modern microelectronic devices rely on carriers within semiconductors due to their integrability. Therefore, the performance of these devices is limited due to natural semiconductor properties such as band gap and electron velocity. Replacing the semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices with a gas or vacuum channel may scale their speed, wavelength and power beyond what is available today. However, liberating electrons into gas/vacuum in a practical microelectronic device is quite challenging. It often requires heating, applying high voltages, or using lasers with short wavelengths or high powers. Here, we show that the interaction between an engineered resonant surface and a low-power infrared laser can cause enough photoemission via electron tunnelling to implement feasible microelectronic devices such as transistors, switches and modulators. The proposed photoemission-based devices benefit from the advantages of gas-plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving the integrability of semiconductor-based devices.

  13. Pointing Devices for Wearable Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés A. Calvo; Saverio Perugini

    2014-01-01

    We present a survey of pointing devices for wearable computers, which are body-mounted devices that users can access at any time. Since traditional pointing devices (i.e., mouse, touchpad, and trackpoint) were designed to be used on a steady and flat surface they are inappropriate for wearable computers. Just as the advent of laptops resulted in the development of the touchpad and trackpoint, the emergence of wearable computers is leading to the development of pointing devices designed for th...

  14. An introduction to electrooptic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminow, Ivan P

    1974-01-01

    An Introduction to Electrooptic Devices aims to present an introduction to the electrooptic effect and to summarize work on devices employing the electrooptic effect. The book provides the necessary background in classical crystal optics. The text then discusses topics including crystal symmetry, the tensor description of linear dielectric properties, propagation in anisotropic media, and passive crystal optic devices. The book also describes the phenomenological description of tensor nonlinear dielectric properties of crystals, with emphasis on the electrooptic effect; device design and appli

  15. Webshop Optimization for Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Long

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the programming technology which can be used to optimize the webshop design for mobile devices. The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate several possible solutions when doing implementation of webshop applications for mobile devices. web application developers and companies who wants to optimize their products for mobile devices could also benefit from this study.

  16. [Design of SCM inoculation device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Mingli; Xie, Haiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The first step of bacilli culture is inoculation bacteria on culture medium. Designing a device to increase efficiency of inoculation is significative. The new device is controlled by SCM. The stepper motor can drive the culture medium rotating, accelerating, decelerating, overturn and suspending. The device is high practicability and efficient, let inoculation easy for operator.

  17. Medical devices and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Errors related to health care devices are not well understood. Nurses in intensive care and progressive care environments can benefit from understanding manufacturer-related error and device-use error, the principles of human factors engineering, and the steps that can be taken to reduce risk of errors related to health care devices.

  18. Mechanical device for tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Maij, E.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a mechanical device for tissue- regeneration inside a patient, comprising means (2, 3) to place a scaffold for the tissue under mechanical stress. Said means comprise a first device-part (2) and a second device-part (3) which parts are arranged to be movable with respect to

  19. Silicon active photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  20. Nanoimprinted photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jayan; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Munoz, Ramon; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a simple yet efficient approach for nanoimprinting sub-50 nm dimensions starting from a low molecular weight plasticized polymer melt. This technique enabled us to successfully imprint versatile large area nanopatterns with high degrees of fidelity and rational control over the residual layers. The key advantage is its reliability in printing versatile nanostructures and nanophotonic devices doped with organic dyes owing to its low processing temperature. Since nanopatterns can be fabricated easily at low costs, this approach offers an easy pathway for achieving excellent nanoimprinted structures for a variety of photonic, electronic and biological research and applications.

  1. Data mining mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Mena, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    With today's consumers spending more time on their mobiles than on their PCs, new methods of empirical stochastic modeling have emerged that can provide marketers with detailed information about the products, content, and services their customers desire.Data Mining Mobile Devices defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. It explains how the integration of data mining and machine learning can enable the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and geospatial location throughout large communities of mobile users

  2. Microneedle Device Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Device Prototype Final Report iv | List of Figures List of Figures Figure 3-1. Print screen of the STL file of a hollow microneedle design in Alibre...created in the e-Shell 300 substrates to create a fluidic path between the hollow microneedles and the microfluidic chip. The bores were prepared by...100 mW. The laser’s beam was focused onto the sample with a 4× objective to increase the photon density and obtain two-photon polymerization of the

  3. Forensics mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad S. Markagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of possibilities of digitized mobile(portable devices, and methods of research data with them.Emphasis is placed on the forensic investigation of mobilephones, but are covered by other media and research for digitalprocessing, transmission and storage of information.A special emphasis was made on the software tools in carrying out the acquisition of digital data, with the aim of sending the reader on ways and methods to protect data but also knowledgewhich is the same all be found and how they can be misused for criminal purposes

  4. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  5. Pneumatically actuated micropipetting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szita, Nicolas; Buser, Rudolf A.

    1998-03-01

    We have realized a valveless micropipetting device with an integrated sensor which can aspirate and dispense liquid volumes without any valves, hence without any reflow or dead volume. With an external pneumatic actuation, we have demonstrated aspirating and dispensing from 190nl of 6 (mu) l of water. Measurements showed a standard deviation of down to 1 percent. An integrated capacitive sensor will allow monitoring of the pressure throughout the pipetting process and detect malfunctions, e.g. clotting of the pipetting tip. It is our intention to use this demonstrated precise aspiration mechanism in combination with a micromachined reaction chamber and a miniaturized optical analysis system.

  6. Stiffness of compression devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mosti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Veins and Lymphatics collects papers coming from the International Compression Club (ICC Meeting on Stiffness of Compression Devices, which took place in Vienna on May 2012. Several studies have demonstrated that the stiffness of compression products plays a major role for their hemodynamic efficacy. According to the European Committee for Standardization (CEN, stiffness is defined as the pressure increase produced by medical compression hosiery (MCH per 1 cm of increase in leg circumference.1 In other words stiffness could be defined as the ability of the bandage/stockings to oppose the muscle expansion during contraction.

  7. Hybrid silicon evanescent devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W. Fang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Si photonics as an integration platform has recently been a focus of optoelectronics research because of the promise of low-cost manufacturing based on the ubiquitous electronics fabrication infrastructure. The key challenge for Si photonic systems is the realization of compact, electrically driven optical gain elements. We review our recent developments in hybrid Si evanescent devices. We have demonstrated electrically pumped lasers, amplifiers, and photodetectors that can provide a low-cost, scalable solution for hybrid integration on a Si platform by using a novel hybrid waveguide architecture, consisting of III-V quantum wells bonded to Si waveguides.

  8. COMMUNICATION - ORGANIZATIONS’ WORK DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAVINIA HULEA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication represents a complex process of transmitting messages, owing to which the emitter encodes the information transmitted through a specific channel towards a receiver that will decode it. Owing to communication, organizations transmit to their customers the fact that they are capable of meeting one of their needs, of settling a problem or of offering a profit. Non-verbal and para-verbal communications usually accompany verbal communication. The importance of assimilating the forms of communication is, at an organizational level, a complex device that determines the mastering of certain techniques, procedures, and algorithms of encoding and decoding intricate messages transmitted through various channels.

  9. Electromechanical motion devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Paul C; Pekarek, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    This text provides a basic treatment of modern electric machine analysis that gives readers the necessary background for comprehending the traditional applications and operating characteristics of electric machines-as well as their emerging applications in modern power systems and electric drives, such as those used in hybrid and electric vehicles. Through the appropriate use of reference frame theory, Electromagnetic Motion Devices, Second Edition introduces readers to field-oriented control of induction machines, constant-torque, and constant-power control of dc, permanent-magnet ac

  10. Graphene device and method of using graphene device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Girit, Caglar; Kessler, Brian; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2015-08-11

    An embodiment of a graphene device includes a layered structure, first and second electrodes, and a dopant island. The layered structure includes a conductive layer, an insulating layer, and a graphene layer. The electrodes are coupled to the graphene layer. The dopant island is coupled to an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. An embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. Another embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device without the dopant island. A dopant island is placed on an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. A response of the dopant island to the voltage is observed.

  11. Emissivity modulating electrochromic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C., III; Sheets, Judd

    2009-05-01

    The IR-ECDTM (Infra-Red ElectroChromic Device) variable emitance device (VED) is an all-solid-state monolithic vacuum deposited thin film system with a unique metamaterial IR transparent-electrode system which functions as an electrically controlled dimmable mirror in the IR region. The maximum reflectance corresponding to the bleached condition of the system is around 90% (low-e condition, e=0.1). The minimum reflectance reaches nearly zero in the colored condition of the system (high emittance, e=1). The average emissivity modulation of the IRECDTM is 0.7 in the 8-12 micron region, and at 9.7 micron (room temperature) it reaches a value of 0.9. Half and full emissivity modulations occur within 2 and10 minutes respectively. Because of its light weight (5g/m2), low voltage requirement (+/- 1 Volts), extremely good emissivity control properties (from 0 to 0.9 at 300K) and highly repeatable deposition process, the IR-ECDTM technology is very attractive for satellite thermal control applications. The IR-ECDTM has been under evaluation in a real space environment since March 8, 2007. This paper presents recent achievements of the IR-ECDTM including space test results.

  12. Micro-Organ Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  13. Next generation toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one`s view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  14. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  15. Carbon for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals why carbon is playing such an increasingly prominent role as a sensing material. The various steps that transform a raw material in a sensing device are thoroughly presented and critically discussed.  The authors deal with all aspects of carbon-based sensors, starting from the various hybridization and allotropes of carbon, with specific focus on micro and nanosized carbons (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene) and their growth processes. The discussion then moves to the role of functionalization and the different routes to achieve it. Finally, a number of sensing applications in various fields are presented, highlighting the connection with the basic properties of the various carbon allotropes.  Readers will benefit from this book’s bottom-up approach, which starts from the local bonding in carbon solids and ends with sensing applications, linking the local hybridization of carbon atoms and its modification by functionalization to specific device performance. This book is a must-have in th...

  16. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  17. Heterostructure terahertz devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhii, Victor

    2008-08-19

    The terahertz (THz) range of frequencies is borderline between microwave electronics and photonics. It corresponds to the frequency bands of molecular and lattice vibrations in gases, fluids, and solids. The importance of the THz range is in part due to numerous potential and emerging applications which include imaging and characterization, detection of hazardous substances, environmental monitoring, radio astronomy, covert inter-satellite communications, as well as biological and medical applications. During the last decades marked progress has been achieved in the development, fabrication, and practical implementation of THz devices and systems. This is primarily owing to the utilization of gaseous and free electron lasers and frequency converters using nonlinear optical phenomena as sources of THz radiation. However, such devices and hence the systems based on them are fairly cumbersome. This continuously stimulates an extensive search for new compact and efficient THz sources based on semiconductor heterostructures. Despite tremendous efforts lasting several decades, the so-called THz gap unbridged by semiconductor heterostructure electron and optoelectron devices still exists providing appropriate levels of power of the generated THz radiation. The invention and realization of quantum cascade lasers made of multiple quantum-well heterostructures already resulted in the partial solution of the problem in question, namely, in the successful coverage of the high-frequency portion of the THz gap (2-3 THz and higher). Further advancement to lower frequencies meets, perhaps, fundamental difficulties. All this necessitates further extensive theoretical and experimental studies of more or less traditional and novel semiconductor heterostructures as a basis for sources of THz radiation. This special issue includes 11 excellent original papers submitted by several research teams representing 14 institutions in Europe, America, and Asia. Several device concepts which

  18. Preface: Heterostructure terahertz devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhii, Victor

    2008-08-01

    The terahertz (THz) range of frequencies is borderline between microwave electronics and photonics. It corresponds to the frequency bands of molecular and lattice vibrations in gases, fluids, and solids. The importance of the THz range is in part due to numerous potential and emerging applications which include imaging and characterization, detection of hazardous substances, environmental monitoring, radio astronomy, covert inter-satellite communications, as well as biological and medical applications. During the last decades marked progress has been achieved in the development, fabrication, and practical implementation of THz devices and systems. This is primarily owing to the utilization of gaseous and free electron lasers and frequency converters using nonlinear optical phenomena as sources of THz radiation. However, such devices and hence the systems based on them are fairly cumbersome. This continuously stimulates an extensive search for new compact and efficient THz sources based on semiconductor heterostructures. Despite tremendous efforts lasting several decades, the so-called THz gap unbridged by semiconductor heterostructure electron and optoelectron devices still exists providing appropriate levels of power of the generated THz radiation. The invention and realization of quantum cascade lasers made of multiple quantum-well heterostructures already resulted in the partial solution of the problem in question, namely, in the successful coverage of the high-frequency portion of the THz gap (2-3 THz and higher). Further advancement to lower frequencies meets, perhaps, fundamental difficulties. All this necessitates further extensive theoretical and experimental studies of more or less traditional and novel semiconductor heterostructures as a basis for sources of THz radiation. This special issue includes 11 excellent original papers submitted by several research teams representing 14 institutions in Europe, America, and Asia. Several device concepts which

  19. Stretchable and wearable electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chaoyi; Kang, Wenbin; Wang, Jiangxin; Cui, Mengqi; Wang, Xu; Foo, Ce Yao; Chee, Kenji Jianzhi; Lee, Pooi See

    2014-01-28

    Stretchable and wearable WO3 electrochromic devices on silver nanowire (AgNW) elastic conductors are reported. The stretchable devices are mechanically robust and can be stretched, twisted, folded, and crumpled without performance failure. Fast coloration (1 s) and bleaching (4 s) time and good cyclic stability (81% retention after 100 cycles) were achieved at relaxed state. Proper functioning at stretched state (50% strain) was also demonstrated. The electrochromic devices were successfully implanted onto textile substrates for potential wearable applications. As most existing electrochromic devices are based on rigid technologies, the innovative devices in their soft form hold the promise for next-generation electronics such as stretchable, wearable, and implantable display applications.

  20. Deformable paper origami optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-19

    Deformable optoelectronic devices are provided, including photodetectors, photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells. The devices can be made on a variety of paper substrates, and can include a plurality of fold segments in the paper substrate creating a deformable pattern. Thin electrode layers and semiconductor nanowire layers can be attached to the substrate, creating the optoelectronic device. The devices can be highly deformable, e.g. capable of undergoing strains of 500% or more, bending angles of 25° or more, and/or twist angles of 270° or more. Methods of making the deformable optoelectronic devices and methods of using, e.g. as a photodetector, are also provided.