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Sample records for non-erosive reflux diseases

  1. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive reflux disease. Haley Smith. Abstract. Reflux is a normal process that occurs in healthy infants, children and adults. Most episodes are short-lived and do not cause bothersome symptoms of complications. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops ...

  2. Role of non-acid reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karamanolis, Georgios P.; Tutuian, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although acid reflux is the most important cause of symptom generation in NERD patients, non-acid reflux is also associated with reflux symptoms. The temporal relation between symptoms and reflux episodes is of importance in evaluating the results of combined pH-impedance monitoring in NERD patients. Mucosal hypersensitivity and mechanical stimulation due to great volume of non-acid reflux ar...

  3. How to differentiate non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Mei Yun

    2012-12-01

    Heartburn is a common symptom in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Endoscopic examination can differentiate between reflux esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), but not between NERD and functional heartburn. With the development of new techniques, more NERD patients could be identified among those previously diagnosed with functional heartburn. Most patients with NERD, however, could be identified based on their clinical characteristics and response to proton pump inhibitors and/or integrated anti-gastroesophageal reflux therapy. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2012 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Regional oesophageal sensitivity to acid and weakly acidic reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Sifrim, D; Blondeau, K; Cicala, M

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) remain to be elucidated. Non-erosive reflux disease patients appear to be more sensitive to intraluminal stimula than erosive patients, the proximal oesophagus being the most sensitive. In order to assess regional oesophageal changes in reflux acidity and sensitivity to reflux, according either to the acidity or the composition of the refluxate, combined multiple pH and multiple pH-impedance (pH-MII) was performed in 16 NERD patients. According to multiple pH-metry, 29% and 12% of reflux events reached the middle and proximal oesophagus respectively, and 35% and 19% according to conventional pH-MII (P acid reflux became weakly acidic at the proximal oesophagus. In all patients, the frequency of symptomatic refluxes, both acid and weakly acidic, was significantly higher at the proximal, compared with distal oesophagus (25 +/- 8%vs 11 +/- 2% for acid reflux and 27 +/- 8%vs 8 +/- 2% for weakly acidic reflux; P reflux. As approximately 30% of acid reflux becomes weakly acidic along the oesophageal body, to better characterize proximal reflux, in clinical practice, combined proximal pH-impedance monitoring should be used. In NERD patients, the proximal oesophagus seems to be more sensitive to both acid and weakly acidic reflux.

  5. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-31

    Jan 31, 2010 ... hypersensitivity.7,8. Management of GORD. Depending on how ... reflux include lifestyle changes, dietary modification and using non-prescription ... acid clearance, minimising the incidence of reflux events, or both.8 Lifestyle ...

  6. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  7. Mechanisms of acid reflux and how refluxed Acid extends proximally in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hirohito; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kawami, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Yuriko; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that cause acid reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), including those that determine how acid extends proximally, are not yet clear. Concurrent esophageal manometry and pH monitoring were performed for 3 h after a meal in 13 patients with NERD, 12 with mild reflux esophagitis (RE), and 13 healthy subjects (HS). Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR) was the major mechanism of acid reflux in all three groups. LES pressure did not differ between the groups. At 2 cm above the LES, there were no differences between the three groups in the number of TLESR-related acid reflux episodes, rate of TLESRs and rate of acid reflux during TLESR. However, at 7 cm above the LES, the rate of acid reflux during TLESRs was significantly higher in patients with NERD (mean ± SEM 42.3 ± 4.8) than in those with mild RE (28.0 ± 3.8) and HS (10.8 ± 2.5). TLESRs are the sole motor events underlying acid reflux episodes in patients with NERD. Acid extends proximally more readily in patients with NERD than in HS and those with mild RE.

  8. Functional heartburn has more in common with functional dyspepsia than with non-erosive reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, E; Pohl, D; Zentilin, P; Dulbecco, P; Sammito, G; Sconfienza, L; Vigneri, S; Camerini, G; Tutuian, R; Savarino, V

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Functional dyspepsia and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are prevalent gastrointestinal conditions with accumulating evidence regarding an overlap between the two. Still, patients with NERD represent a very heterogeneous group and limited data on dyspeptic symptoms in various subgroups of NERD are available. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of dyspeptic symptoms in patients with NERD subclassified by using 24 h impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH). Methods: Patients with typical reflux symptoms and normal endoscopy underwent impedance-pH monitoring off proton pump inhibitor treatment. Oesophageal acid exposure time (AET), type of acid and non-acid reflux episodes, and symptom association probability (SAP) were calculated. A validated dyspepsia questionnaire was used to quantify dyspeptic symptoms prior to reflux monitoring. Results: Of 200 patients with NERD (105 female; median age, 48 years), 81 (41%) had an abnormal oesophageal AET (NERD pH-POS), 65 (32%) had normal oesophageal AET and positive SAP for acid and/or non-acid reflux (hypersensitive oesophagus), and 54 (27%) had normal oesophageal AET and negative SAP (functional heartburn). Patients with functional heartburn had more frequent (pheartburn reinforces the concept that functional gastrointestinal disorders extend beyond the boundaries suggested by the anatomical location of symptoms. This should be regarded as a further argument to test patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in order to separate patients with functional heartburn from patients with NERD in whom symptoms are associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:19460766

  9. Acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): a study using intraluminal impedance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, José M.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Selimah, Mohamed; Samsom, Melvin; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, André J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) are the most common phenotypic presentations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). AIM: To assess acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with EE and NERD using combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring. METHODS:

  10. Acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) : A study using intraluminal impedance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, Jose M.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Selimah, Mohamed; Samsom, Melvin; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J.

    Background Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) are the most common phenotypic presentations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Aim To assess acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with EE and NERD using combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring. Methods A

  11. PPI therapy is equally effective in well-defined non-erosive reflux disease and in reflux esophagitis: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, P. W.; Cremonini, F.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Symptomatic response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is often reported as lower than in patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD). However, the definition of NERD differs across clinical trials. This meta-analysis aims to estimate

  12. Functional dyspepsia (FD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): overlapping or discrete entities?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    As the incidence of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease have declined, that of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and non-ulcer, or functional dyspepsia (FD) have reached virtually epidemic proportions. As we come to appreciate the expression of these disorders in the community, the real spectrum of each disease has become evident. FD and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), the most prevalent manifestation of GORD, frequently overlap. Where then does GORD end and FD begin? Is it realistic, or even clinically relevant, to attempt a clear separation between these entities? These are more than issues of mere semantics; therapeutic options may be dictated by the classification of the patient as one or the other. Recent work indicates clearly that NERD is a heterogeneous disorder incorporating some patients who may well harbour subtle manifestations of oesophagitis and others who have entirely normal 24-hour pH studies. These differences may be crucial to the concept of NERD\\/FD overlap. While evidence in support of this concept is far from complete, it would appear that this overlap is most relevant to those NERD patients who do not exhibit abnormal esophageal acid exposure. These patients truly belong in the spectrum of functional gastrointestinal disorders rather than in GORD; attempts to shoe-horn these individuals into the spectrum of GORD will result in therapeutic disappointment and surgical disaster.

  13. Acid reflux episodes sensitize the esophagus to perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux in non-erosive reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Guarino, M P L; Balestrieri, P; Altomare, A; Rescio, M P; Cicala, M

    2014-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients are more sensitive than erosive esophagitis patients to weakly acidic reflux and to the presence of gas in the refluxate. Intra-esophageal acid perfusion sensitizes esophageal receptors to mechanical and chemical stimuli. To establish whether acid sensitization plays a role in the perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux episodes, 29 NERD patients, responders and 14 non-responders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), underwent pH-impedance monitoring. Non-responders repeated the study while on PPIs. To assess the effect of acid exposure on symptom perception, the time period with pH below 4 was measured in 15- and 30-minute time-windows preceding the onset of each reflux episode. Considering weakly acidic and mixed refluxes, both in responder and non-responder patients (off PPIs), the symptomatic refluxes were preceded by a significantly higher cumulative acid exposure than the asymptomatic refluxes. In all patients, following acid reflux, the percentage of symptomatic weakly acidic reflux episodes was significantly higher than that of asymptomatic refluxes. Non-responder patients, off-treatment, were characterized by a lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux and mixed reflux episodes. In the non-responder patients on PPI, only mixed and weakly symptomatic reflux episodes were preceded by a higher cumulative acid exposure. In NERD patients, spontaneous acid reflux enhances subsequent reflux perception, regardless of acidity or liquid/mixed composition of episodes; in non-responder patients on PPIs, only the perception of mixed and weakly acidic reflux episodes seems to be mediated by a preceding acid exposure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Autofluorescence imaging endoscopy can distinguish non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi; Guo, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Wei-Feng; Peng, Li-Hua; Yang, Yun-Sheng; Uedo, Noriya

    2016-04-14

    To investigate whether autofluorescence imaging (AFI) endoscopy can distinguish non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) from functional heartburn (FH). In this prospective observational trial, 127 patients presenting with typical reflux symptoms for > 6 mo were screened. All the participants underwent endoscopy, during which white light imaging (WLI) was followed by AFI. Finally 84 patients with normal esophageal appearance on WLI were enrolled. It was defined as being suggestive of NERD if one or more longitudinal purple lines longer than one centimeter were visualized in the distal part of the esophagus during AFI endoscopy. Ambulatory 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring was also performed. After standard proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) tests, subjects were divided into an NERD group and an FH group and the diagnostic performance of AFI endoscopy to differentiate NERD from FH was evaluated. Of 84 endoscopy-negative patients, 36 (42.9%) had a normal pH/impedance test. Of these, 26 patients with favorable responses to PPI tests were classified as having NERD. Finally 10 patients were diagnosed with FH and the others with NERD. Altogether, 68 (81.0%) of the 84 patients were positive on AFI endoscopy. In the NERD group, there were 67 (90.5%) patients with abnormal esophageal findings on AFI endoscopy while only 1 (10%) patient was positive on AFI endoscopy in the FH group. The sensitivity and specificity of AFI in differentiating NERD from FH were 90.5% (95%CI: 81.5%-96.1%) and 90.0% (95%CI: 55.5%-99.7%), respectively. Meanwhile, the accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of AFI in differentiating between NERD and FH were 90.5% (95%CI: 84.2%-96.8%), 98.5% (95%CI: 92.1%-99.9%) and 56.3% (95%CI: 30.0%-80.2%), respectively. Autofluorescence imaging may serve as a complementary method in evaluating patients with NERD and FH.

  15. Effect of amiloride on experimental acid-induced heartburn in non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulsiewicz, William J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Hansen, Mark B; Pruitt, Amy; Orlando, Roy C

    2013-07-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are esophageal nociceptors that are candidates to mediate heartburn in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Amiloride, a diuretic, is known to inhibit ASICs. For this reason, we sought a role for ASICs in mediating heartburn by determining whether amiloride could block heartburn in NERD induced by esophageal acid perfusion. In a randomized double-blind crossover study, we perfused the esophagus with amiloride or (saline) placebo prior to eliciting acid-induced heartburn in patients with a history of proton pump inhibitor-responsive NERD. Those with NERD and positive modified Bernstein test were randomized to perfusion with amiloride, 1 mmol/l, or placebo for 5 min, followed by repeat acid-perfusion. Heartburn severity and time to onset was measured and the process repeated following crossover to the alternative agent. 14 subjects completed the study. Amiloride did not reduce the frequency (100 vs. 100 %) or severity of acid-induced heartburn (Mean 2.50 ± SEM 0.33 vs. 2.64 ± 0.45), respectively. There was a trend towards longer time to onset of heartburn for amiloride versus placebo (Mean 2.93 ± SEM 0.3 vs. 2.36 ± 0.29 min, respectively), though these differences did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Amiloride had no significant effect on acid-induced heartburn frequency or severity in NERD, although there was a trend towards prolonged time to onset of symptoms.

  16. Responsiveness of measures of heartburn improvement in non-erosive reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghard, Ola; Halling, Katarina

    2007-01-01

    Background When measuring treatment effect on symptoms, the treatment success variable should be as responsive as possible. The aim of the study was to investigate the responsiveness of various treatment success variables in patients with symptoms of heartburn. Methods A total of 1640 patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) were treated with proton pump inhibitors for 4 weeks. Treatment success variables were based on a symptom questionnaire (Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale) and on investigator-assessed heartburn, measured at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. The rates of treatment success were compared with patients' perceived change in symptoms, assessed by the Overall Treatment Effect questionnaire. Results Generally, more stringent treatment success criteria (i.e., those demanding the better response) translated into more responsive treatment success variables. For example, the treatment success variable 'no heartburn' at 4 weeks was more responsive than the variable 'at most mild heartburn' at 4 weeks. Treatment success variables based on change from baseline to 4 weeks were, in general, less responsive than those based on the week 4 assessments only. Conclusion In patients with NERD, responsiveness varied among different treatment success definitions, with more demanding definitions (based on the 4-week assessment) giving better responsiveness. PMID:17562006

  17. Efficacy of esomeprazole and flupentixol and melitracen in treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease with depression and anxiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟英强

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of esomeprazole (Esomeprazole) and flupentixol and melitracen (Deanxit) in treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD) with depression and anxiety. Methods The diagnosis of NERD was based on the results of esomeprazole scale (reflux diagnostic questionnaires, RDQ) and endoscopy, the degree and frequency of symptoms were graded and scored. Hamilton depression scale was used to evaluate depression and anxiety status. Sixty-three patients were randomly divided into group A (esomeprazole 20 mg qd),B (Deanxit 1 tab

  18. Microscopic esophagitis distinguishes patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, Edoardo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Mastracci, Luca; Dulbecco, Pietro; Marabotto, Elisa; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Bruzzone, Luca; de Bortoli, Nicola; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Fiocca, Roberto; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Microscopic esophagitis (ME) is common in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and dilation of intercellular spaces (DIS) has been regarded as the potential main mechanism of symptom generation. We aimed to compare these histological abnormalities in healthy volunteers (HVs) and patients with erosive esophagitis (EE), NERD, and functional heartburn (FH). Consecutive patients with heartburn prospectively underwent upper endoscopy and impedance-pH off-therapy. Twenty EE patients and fifty-seven endoscopy-negative patients (NERD), subclassified as 22 with pH-POS (positive for abnormal acid exposure), 20 with hypersensitive esophagus (HE; normal acid/symptom association probability [SAP]+ or symptom index [SI]+), and 15 with FH (normal acid/SAP-/SI-/ proton pump inhibitor [PPI] test-), were enrolled. Twenty HVs were also included. In each patient/control, multiple specimens (n = 5) were taken from the distal esophagus and histological alterations were evaluated. ME was diagnosed when the global histological score was >0.35. The prevalence of ME was higher (p < 0.0001) in EE (95 %), pH-POS (77 %), and HE (65 %) NERD patients than in FH patients (13 %) and HVs (15 %). Also, basal cell hyperplasia (p < 0.0023), DIS (p < 0.0001), and papillae elongation (p < 0.0002) showed similar rates of prevalence in the above populations (p < 0.0001). ME, including each histological lesion, had similar low frequencies in FH and HVs (p = 0.9990). Considering the histological abnormalities together, they permitted us to clearly differentiate EE and NERD from FH and HVs (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The lack of ME in the esophageal distal biopsies of FH patients indicates a limited role of these histological abnormalities in symptom generation in them. ME can be considered as an accurate and reliable diagnostic marker for distinguishing FH patients from GERD patients and has the potential to be used to guide the correct therapy.

  19. Tailored therapy guided by multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring for refractory non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaldo, Nunzio; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Iannone, Andrea; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Barone, Michele; De Carne, Massimo; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo

    2017-09-07

    A relevant percentage of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) treatment. Multichannel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) monitoring should give useful pathophysiological information about refractoriness. Therefore, our aim was to assess whether this technique could be useful to guide a 'tailored' therapy in refractory NERD. We retrospectively recruited NERD patients undergoing MII-pH monitoring for unsuccessful treatment. All patients had undergone upper endoscopy, and those with erosive esophagitis were excluded. No patient received PPI during MII-pH monitoring. Subjects were subgrouped into three categories: acid reflux, non-acid reflux and functional heartburn. MII-pH-guided therapy was performed for 4 weeks as follows: patients with acid reflux received PPI at double dose, patients with non-acid reflux PPI at full dose plus alginate four times a day and patients with functional heartburn levosulpiride 75 mg per day. A visual analog scale (VAS) ranging from 0 to 100 mm was administered before and after such tailored therapy to evaluate overall symptoms. Responders were defined by VAS improvement of at least 40%. Sixty-nine patients with refractory NERD were selected (female-male ratio 43 : 26, mean age 47.6±15.2 years). Overall effectiveness of tailored therapy was 84% without statistical difference among subgroups (88.5% acid reflux, 92% non-acid reflux, 66.6% functional heartburn; P=0.06). Univariate analysis showed that therapy failure directly correlated with functional heartburn diagnosis (OR=4.60) and suggested a trend toward a negative correlation with smoking and a positive one with nausea. However, at multivariate analysis, these parameters were not significant. Functional heartburn experienced a lower median percent VAS reduction than acid reflux (52.5% versus 66.6%, Pacid reflux (66.6%). In conclusion, a tailored approach to refractory NERD, guided by MII-pH monitoring, demonstrated to be effective

  20. Fiber-enriched diet helps to control symptoms and improves esophageal motility in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Sergey; Isakov, Vasily; Konovalova, Mariya

    2018-06-07

    To investigate the effect of dietary fiber on symptoms and esophageal function testing parameters in non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NERD) patients. Thirty-six NERD patients with low (gastroesophageal refluxes (GER) decreased from 67.9 ± 17.7 to 42.4 ± 13.5 ( P reflux time decreased from 10.6 ± 12.0 min to 5.3 ± 3.7 min ( P gastroesophageal refluxes, and a decrease of heartburn frequency per week in NERD.

  1. In vivo evaluation of acid-induced changes in oesophageal mucosa integrity and sensitivity in non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Philip; Al-Zinaty, Mohannad; Yazaki, Etsuro; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) have impaired oesophageal mucosal integrity (dilated intercellular spaces). Oesophageal mucosal integrity reflects the balance between repeated reflux damage and mucosal recovery. The relationship between mucosal integrity and acid sensitivity is unclear. Oesophageal impedance may be used for in vivo mucosal integrity measurement. We studied acid-induced changes in oesophageal mucosal integrity and acid perception in patients with heartburn. 50 patients with heartburn whithout oesophagitis underwent impedance monitoring before, during and after 10 min oesophageal perfusion with neutral (pH 6.5) and acid solutions (pH 1). Symptoms and impedance were recorded during perfusion. Impedance recovery was assessed for 2 h post-perfusion in ambulatory conditions followed by 24-h impedance-pH study. Reflux monitoring discriminated 20 NERD and 30 functional heartburn (FH) patients. Neutral perfusion caused impedance fall that recovered within 10 min. Acid perfusion caused impedance fall with slow recovery: 6.5 Ω/min (IQR 3.3-12.0 Ω/min). Patients with slow recovery (acid sensitivity (10/12 vs. 4/12, p = 0.04) than those with fast (> 75th percentile) recovery. Patients with NERD had lower baseline impedance (1669 ± 182 Ω vs. 2384 ± 211 Ω, p = 0.02) and slower impedance recovery (6.0 ± 0.9 Ω/min vs. 10.7 ± 1.6 Ω/min, p = 0.03) than patients with FH. Impaired mucosal integrity might be the consequence of repeated reflux episodes with slow recovery. Mucosal integrity, recovery capacity and symptom perception are linked. Low basal impedance and slow recovery after acid challenge are associated with increased acid sensitivity.

  2. Efficacy of Vonoprazan for Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Patients with Proton Pump Inhibitor-resistant Non-erosive Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Yoku; Takahashi, Akihiro; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2018-03-30

    Objective Clinically, patients with proton pomp inhibitor (PPI)-resistant gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of symptom relief and adverse events among PPI-resistant GERD patients that changed their therapy from a PPI to vonoprazan. Methods Patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (total GERD-Q score ≥8) without endoscopic findings of mucosal breaks who changed their medication from a PPI to vonoprazan during a 12-week period from 2015 to 2016 at 2 hospitals were selected. The primary outcome was the self-reported relief of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The odds ratio (OR) for the improvement of symptoms was calculated based on an exact binomial distribution using a matched-pair analysis. The secondary outcome was the GERD-Q score and adverse events. Results Twenty-six patients (6 men) with a mean age of 67.5 years were analyzed. After the therapy was changed from a PPI to vonoprazan, 18 patients (69.2%) reported an improvement, 6 (23.1%) reported no change, and 2 (7.7%) reported an exacerbation of symptoms. A change in therapy was significantly associated with improved self-reported symptoms (OR 9.0, pgastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Vonoprazan is one of the most promising treatment options for patients with PPI-resistant GERD.

  3. Histomorphological differentiation of non-erosive reflux disease and functional heartburn in patients with PPI-refractory heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandulski, A; Jechorek, D; Caro, C; Weigt, J; Wex, T; Mönkemüller, K; Malfertheiner, P

    2013-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory heartburn may be due to persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn (FH). The differentiation between non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and FH may be very difficult. However, this differentiation is important for appropriate therapeutic management. Dilated intercellular spaces (DIS), papillary elongation (PE) and basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) can be all assessed by light microscopy. Whether these mucosal abnormalities allow the differentiation of NERD from FH in PPI-refractory patients is uncertain. To assess histopathological findings by light microscopy in patients with refractory heartburn to differentiate NERD from FH. Sixty-two patients with PPI-refractory symptoms underwent EGD and MII-pH after pausing PPI medication for 2 weeks before investigation. Twenty-five subjects without upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included as controls. Symptom assessment was based on the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ). Biopsies were taken 3-5 cm above the gastro-oesophageal junction. DIS, PE, BCH and infiltration of immune cells were evaluated and a sum score was calculated. Based on endoscopy and MII-pH, GERD was diagnosed in 43 patients (NERD: 20; ERD: 23) and FH in 19 patients. There was no difference in symptoms between the groups. Each individual histopathological item was different between the groups (P < 0.0001). Between NERD and FH, the most significant difference was found for DIS and the histopathological sum score (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that oesophageal biopsies are useful to differentiate NERD from FH. Increased DIS and a histological sum score are the most significant histopathological abnormalities in NERD as compared with FH. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of nortriptyline on brain responses to painful esophageal acid infusion in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcelini, C M; Tomiozzo, J C; Farré, R; Van Oudenhove, L; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Ribeiro, M; Madalosso, B H; Fornari, F

    2014-02-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients generally present with heartburn as the main symptom. Antidepressants might help to relieve heartburn by acting on the esophagus-brain axis. We aimed to assess the effect of nortriptyline on behavioral and brain responses to painful esophageal acid infusion in NERD patients evaluated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 20 NERD patients off proton pump inhibitors (36.1 ± 9.3 years, 75% women) were assigned to 21 days of nortriptyline and placebo, in counterbalanced order, with a 21 days washout period in between both treatment periods. Changes in acid-induced brain response on fMRI and heartburn perception were assessed and at the end of each treatment. Nortriptyline significantly reduced the acid-induced brain response in prefrontal cortex (median [IQR]: -1.9 [-4.5 to -0.1] vs -0.3 [-2.5 to 2.3]; p = 0.050), caudate (-3.0 [-5.1 to -0.01] vs 0.48 [-1.9 to 3.1]; p = 0.029), insula (-2.4 [-4.8 to -0.6] vs -0.2 [-1.5 to 1.5]; p = 0.029), cingulate (-4.2 [-8.8 to -0.1] vs -0.6 [-1.8 to 3.0]; p = 0.017), and hippocampus (-2.7 [-6.0 to 0.5] vs -0.04 [-2.3 to 1.9]; p = 0.006) in comparison with placebo. However, there was no significant difference between nortriptyline and placebo in clinical outcomes and side effects. Nortriptyline decreased the brain response to esophageal acid infusion more markedly than placebo, but without clinical significance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Background factors of reflux esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease: a cross-sectional study of 10,837 subjects in Japan.

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    Chihiro Minatsuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the high prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, its risk factors are still a subject of controversy. This is probably due to inadequate distinction between reflux esophagitis (RE and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD, and is also due to inadequate evaluation of adjacent stomach. Our aim is therefore to define background factors of RE and NERD independently, based on the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric atrophy. METHODS: We analyzed 10,837 healthy Japanese subjects (6,332 men and 4,505 women, aged 20-87 years who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. RE was diagnosed as the presence of mucosal break, and NERD was diagnosed as the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation in RE-free subjects. Using GERD-free subjects as control, background factors for RE and NERD were separately analyzed using logistic regression to evaluate standardized coefficients (SC, odds ratio (OR, and p-value. RESULTS: Of the 10,837 study subjects, we diagnosed 733 (6.8% as RE and 1,722 (15.9% as NERD. For RE, male gender (SC = 0.557, OR = 1.75, HP non-infection (SC = 0.552, OR = 1.74, higher pepsinogen I/II ratio (SC = 0.496, OR = 1.64, higher BMI (SC = 0.464, OR = 1.60, alcohol drinking (SC = 0.161, OR = 1.17, older age (SC = 0.148, OR = 1.16, and smoking (SC = 0.129, OR = 1.14 are positively correlated factors. For NERD, HP infection (SC = 0.106, OR = 1.11, female gender (SC = 0.099, OR = 1.10, younger age (SC = 0.099, OR = 1.10, higher pepsinogen I/II ratio (SC = 0.099, OR = 1.10, smoking (SC = 0.080, OR = 1.08, higher BMI (SC = 0.078, OR = 1.08, and alcohol drinking (SC = 0.076, OR = 1.08 are positively correlated factors. Prevalence of RE in subjects with chronic HP infection and successful HP eradication denotes significant difference (2.3% and 8.8%; p<0.0001, whereas that of NERD shows no difference (18.2% and 20.8%; p = 0.064. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly associated factors of NERD are considerably

  6. Efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker for improving symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Hojo, Mariko; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Ueyama, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Kohei; Izumi, Kentaro; Takeda, Tsutomu; Komori, Hiroyuki; Akazawa, Yoichi; Shimada, Yuji; Osada, Taro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of a potassium-competitive acid blocker (PCAB) named vonoprazan (VPZ) for improving symptoms in patients with reflux esophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and functional dyspepsia (FD). A hospital-based, retrospective study of outpatients in our department (Department of Gastroenterology, University of Juntendo, Tokyo, Japan) between March 2015 and August 2016 was performed. The patients who were experiencing heartburn, acid regurgitation, gastric pain, and/or a heavy feeling in the stomach of at least moderate severity at baseline were treated with 20 mg VPZ once daily for 4 weeks. The patients completed the global overall symptom (GOS) scale to determine their symptom severity at baseline and after the 4 week treatment period. The proportions of patients with RE, NERD, and FD achieving improvement of their symptoms, defined as a GOS scale score of 1 ('no problem') or 2 ('minimal problem'), were evaluated. During 4 weeks of VPZ therapy, changes in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) score, which was defined as the total points for heartburn and acid regurgitation on the GOS scale in patients with RE and NERD, and in the FD score, which was defined as the total points for gastric pain and a heavy feeling in the stomach on the GOS scale in patients with FD, were also evaluated. A total of 88 eligible cases were included in the present study, comprising 20 patients with RE, 25 patients with NERD, and 43 patients with FD. The rates of symptomatic improvement in patients with RE, NERD, and FD were 75.0, 60.0, and 48.8%, respectively. For the patients who were first administered VPZ, the rates of symptomatic improvement were 90.9, 66.7, and 58.8% in patients with RE, NERD, and FD, respectively. For those patients who were resistant to 8 weeks of proton pump inhibitor therapy, the rates of symptomatic improvement were 55.6, 53.8, and 42.3% in patients with RE, NERD, and FD, respectively

  7. The added value of quantitative analysis of on-therapy impedance-pH parameters in distinguishing refractory non-erosive reflux disease from functional heartburn.

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    Frazzoni, M; Conigliaro, R; Mirante, V G; Melotti, G

    2012-02-01

    By analysis of symptom-reflux association, endoscopy-negative refractory heartburn can be related to acid/non-acid refluxes with impedance-pH monitoring. Unfortunately, patients frequently do not report symptoms during the test. We aimed to assess the contribution of quantitative analysis of impedance-pH parameters added to symptom-reflux association in evaluating patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn refractory to high-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The symptom association probability (SAP), the symptom index (SI), the esophageal acid exposure time and the number of distal and proximal refluxes were assessed at on-therapy impedance-pH monitoring. Relationships with hiatal hernia and manometric findings were also evaluated. Eighty patients were prospectively studied. Refractory heartburn was more frequently related to reflux by a positive SAP/SI and/or abnormal impedance-pH parameters (52/80 cases) (65%) than by a positive SAP/SI only (38/80 cases) (47%) (P = 0.038). In patients with refractory non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) defined by a positive SAP/SI and/or abnormal impedance-pH parameters, the prevalence of hiatal hernia was significantly higher (56%vs 21%, P = 0.007) and the mean lower esophageal sphincter tone was significantly lower (18.7 vs 25.8 mmHg, P = 0.005) than in those (35%) with reflux-unrelated, i.e., functional heartburn (FH). On the contrary, no significant difference was observed subdividing patients according to a positive SAP/SI only. Quantitative analysis of impedance-pH parameters added to symptom-reflux association allows a subdivision of refractory-heartburn patients into refractory NERD and FH which is substantiated by pathophysiological findings and which restricts the diagnosis of FH to one third of cases. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Randomized, multicenter study: on-demand versus continuous maintenance treatment with esomeprazole in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

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    Bayerdörffer, Ekkehard; Bigard, Marc-Andre; Weiss, Werner; Mearin, Fermín; Rodrigo, Luis; Dominguez Muñoz, Juan Enrique; Grundling, Hennie; Persson, Tore; Svedberg, Lars-Erik; Keeling, Nanna; Eklund, Stefan

    2016-04-14

    Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience symptomatic relapse after stopping acid-suppressive medication. The aim of this study was to compare willingness to continue treatment with esomeprazole on-demand versus continuous maintenance therapy for symptom control in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) after 6 months. This multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel-group study enrolled adults with NERD who were heartburn-free after 4 weeks' treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg daily. Patients received esomeprazole 20 mg daily continuously or on-demand for 6 months. The primary variable was discontinuation due to unsatisfactory treatment. On-demand treatment was considered non-inferior if the upper limit of the one-sided 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the difference between treatments was reflux esophagitis versus none in the continuous group (P Reflux dimension was also improved for continuous versus on-demand treatment. Esomeprazole was well tolerated. In terms of willingness to continue treatment, on-demand treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg was non-inferior to continuous maintenance treatment and reduced medication usage in patients with NERD who had achieved symptom control with initial esomeprazole treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02670642 ; Date of registration: December 2015.

  9. Partial symptom-response to proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive reflux disease or reflux oesophagitis - a post hoc analysis of 5796 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, P; van Zanten, S Veldhuyzen; Mattsson, H

    2012-01-01

    Although most patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) benefit from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, some experience only partial symptom relief.......Although most patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) benefit from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, some experience only partial symptom relief....

  10. The differences in esophageal motility and its clinical significance between the patients with typical and atypical symptoms of non-erosive reflux disease

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    Ling LIN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the characteristics of esophageal motility in the patients with different symptoms of nonerosive reflux disease (non-erosive reflux disease, NERD. Methods  Eighty-six patients with NERD who visited the Department of Gastroenterology in our hospital from August 2012 to December 2014 were selected. They were all evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and high resolution esophageal manometry. Those who had neither definite esophageal mucosal erosion nor Barrett's esophagus at endoscopy were diagnosed as NERD. According to the presence or absence of typical acid reflux and/or heartburn symptoms, patients with NERD were divided into two groups: the typical symptom group (47 cases, and the atypical symptom group (39 cases. High resolution measurement of esophageal pressure was used to evaluate the differences in esophageal dynamic characteristics between patients with different symptoms of NERD. The final results were analyzed with t test and chi-square test. Results  Compared with atypical symptom group, both the resting pressure (20.68±1.64mmHg vs 15.79±1.21mmHg respectively, P0.05. Conclusion  There is a difference in esophageal motility characteristics between the patients with typical and atypical symptoms of NERD, and the main differences are changes in the resting pressure and residual pressure of LES. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.12.12

  11. Ambulatory 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and high resolution endoscopy distinguish patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chuanlian; Du, Quanlin; Li, Changqing; Zhang, Linlu; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zuo, Fang; Zhang, Yanmin; Li, Fang; Xie, Guofeng; Li, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    To assess the contribution of 24-h esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) monitoring and high resolution endoscopy (HRE) with i-scan imaging in differentiating non erosive reflux disease (NERD) from functional heartburn (FH). This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with heartburn from the Endoscopy Unit. NERD patients and FH patients were defined by 24-h MII-pH monitoring and white light endoscopy. Minimal mucosal changes were assessed by HRE with i-scan imaging. Total of 156 consecutive patients with heartburn but without esophageal mucosal erosions were studied. Forty-eight of these subjects had NERD, with increased acid exposure time (AET) and positive SAP and/or SI. Eighteen had FH with normal AET and negative SAP and SI. When compared to FH patients and healthy controls, NERD patients had significantly increased number of total acid reflux episodes, as well as increased number of weakly acidic reflux episodes (p<0.01). The rate of proximal reflux episodes in NERD patients was higher than that of FH patients and healthy controls (p<0.01). Irregular or blurring of the Z-line (58.3%) and white mucosal turbidity (47.9%) were the most common endoscopic findings of minimal mucosal changes observed in this study. NERD patients had more prevalent minimal changes than FH patients and the controls (87.5%vs. 66.6%vs. 61.9%; p = 0.004) with sensitivity of 87.5%. Histopathological evaluation showed that NERD patients had significantly higher average scores of intercellular spaces dilation (2.82±0.9 vs. 1.2±0.6, p = 0.005) and papillae elongation (2.65±1.0 vs. 1.5±0.8, p = 0.014), but not for basal cell proliferation (1.6±1.3 vs. 1.0±0.9, p = 0.070). The histological scores of the NERD patients were 7.1±1.2, which were higher than those of FH patients (3.4±1.0, p = 0.004). Minimal mucosal changes could be useful markers to support clinical diagnosis of NERD. Combination of 24-h MII-pH monitoring and i-scan high resolution endoscopy

  12. Ambulatory 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and high resolution endoscopy distinguish patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlian Chu

    Full Text Available To assess the contribution of 24-h esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH monitoring and high resolution endoscopy (HRE with i-scan imaging in differentiating non erosive reflux disease (NERD from functional heartburn (FH.This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with heartburn from the Endoscopy Unit. NERD patients and FH patients were defined by 24-h MII-pH monitoring and white light endoscopy. Minimal mucosal changes were assessed by HRE with i-scan imaging.Total of 156 consecutive patients with heartburn but without esophageal mucosal erosions were studied. Forty-eight of these subjects had NERD, with increased acid exposure time (AET and positive SAP and/or SI. Eighteen had FH with normal AET and negative SAP and SI. When compared to FH patients and healthy controls, NERD patients had significantly increased number of total acid reflux episodes, as well as increased number of weakly acidic reflux episodes (p<0.01. The rate of proximal reflux episodes in NERD patients was higher than that of FH patients and healthy controls (p<0.01. Irregular or blurring of the Z-line (58.3% and white mucosal turbidity (47.9% were the most common endoscopic findings of minimal mucosal changes observed in this study. NERD patients had more prevalent minimal changes than FH patients and the controls (87.5%vs. 66.6%vs. 61.9%; p = 0.004 with sensitivity of 87.5%. Histopathological evaluation showed that NERD patients had significantly higher average scores of intercellular spaces dilation (2.82±0.9 vs. 1.2±0.6, p = 0.005 and papillae elongation (2.65±1.0 vs. 1.5±0.8, p = 0.014, but not for basal cell proliferation (1.6±1.3 vs. 1.0±0.9, p = 0.070. The histological scores of the NERD patients were 7.1±1.2, which were higher than those of FH patients (3.4±1.0, p = 0.004.Minimal mucosal changes could be useful markers to support clinical diagnosis of NERD. Combination of 24-h MII-pH monitoring and i-scan high resolution

  13. Pathophysiology and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a physiological phenomenon but becomes pathological if troublesome symptoms and/or complications occur. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has different phenotypes ranging from non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), through reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, and

  14. Pathogenesis of Double-Dose Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Non-Erosive Reflux Disease, and Mechanism of Reflux Symptoms and Gastric Acid Secretion-Suppressive Effect in the Presence or Absence of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawami, Noriyuki; Takenouchi, Nana; Umezawa, Mariko; Hoshino, Shintaro; Hanada, Yuriko; Hoshikawa, Yoshimasa; Sano, Hirohito; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been suggested to be responsible for contributing to the occurrence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-resistant non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The aims of this study were to clarify the pathogenesis of PPI-resistant NERD. Fifty-three patients with NERD, who had persistent reflux symptoms despite taking double-dose PPI, were included in this study. After excluding eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and primary esophageal motility disorder, esophageal impedance-pH monitoring was carried out. In symptom index (SI)-positive patients, the mechanism of SI positivity and the percent time with intragastric pH >4 were investigated according to the presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori infection. One of the 53 patients had EoE, and 4 had primary esophageal motility disorder. Twenty-three and 2 patients were SI-positive for liquid and gas-only reflux respectively. Of 17 SI-positive, H. pylori-negative patients, 5 were SI-positive for acid reflux, whereas all of the H. pylori-positive patients were SI-positive for non-acid reflux. The percent time with intragastric pH >4 was significantly lower in the H. pylori-negative patients than in the H. pylori-positive patients. The pathogenesis of double-dose PPI-resistant NERD was identified in 57%. In some of H. pylori-negative patients, acid-related symptoms were observed. However, in H. pylori-positive patients, these symptoms were excluded by taking double-dose PPI. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. No association of coffee consumption with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, reflux esophagitis, and non-erosive reflux disease: a cross-sectional study of 8,013 healthy subjects in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Takeshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Kodashima, Shinya; Takahashi, Yu; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Masashi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Probably due to caffeine-induced gastric acid secretion, negative effects of coffee upon various upper-gastrointestinal diseases have been precariously accepted, despite the inadequate epidemiological evidence. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of coffee consumption on four major acid-related diseases: gastric ulcer (GU), duodenal ulcer (DU), reflux esophagitis (RE), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) based on the large-scale multivariate analysis. Of the 9,517 healthy adults, GU, DU, and RE were diagnosed by endoscopy, and NERD was diagnosed by the symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation without esophageal erosion. Associations between coffee consumption and the four disorders were evaluated, together with age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection status, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol. We further performed meta-analysis using the random effects model to redefine the relationship between coffee intake and peptic ulcer disease. The eligible 8,013 study subjects comprised of 5,451 coffee drinkers and 2,562 non-coffee drinkers. By univariate analysis, age, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, and alcohol showed significant associations with coffee consumption. By multiple logistic regression analysis, positively correlated factors with significance were HP infection, current smoking, BMI, and pepsinogen I/II ratio for GU; HP infection, pepsinogen I/II ratio, and current smoking for DU; HP non-infection, male, BMI, pepsinogen I/II ratio, smoking, age, and alcohol for RE; younger age, smoking, and female for NERD. The meta-analyses could detect any association of coffee consumption with neither GU nor DU. In conclusion, there are no significant relationship between coffee consumption and the four major acid-related upper gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. The added value of impedance-pH monitoring to Rome III criteria in distinguishing functional heartburn from non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, Edoardo; Marabotto, Elisa; Zentilin, Patrizia; Frazzoni, Marzio; Sammito, Giorgio; Bonfanti, Daria; Sconfienza, Luca; Assandri, Lorenzo; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Malesci, Alberto; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2011-07-01

    Functional heartburn is defined by Rome III criteria as an endoscopy-negative condition with normal oesophageal acid exposure time, negative symptom association to acid reflux and unsatisfactory response to proton pump inhibitors. These criteria underestimated the role of non-acid reflux. To assess the contribution of impedance-pH with symptom association probability (SAP) analysis in identifying endoscopy-negative patients with reflux disease and separating them from functional heartburn. Consecutive endoscopy-negative patients treated with proton pump inhibitors (n=219) undergoing impedance-pH monitoring off-therapy were analysed. Distal acid exposure time, reflux episodes, SAP and symptomatic response to proton pump inhibitors were measured. Based on impedance-pH/SAP, 67 (31%) patients were pH+/SAP+, 6 (2%) pH+/SAP-, 83 (38%) hypersensitive oesophagus and 63 (29%) functional heartburn. According to pH-metry alone/response to proton pump inhibitors, 62 (28%) were pH+/SAP+, 11 (5%) pH+/SAP-, 61 (28%) hypersensitive oesophagus and 85 (39%) functional heartburn. In the normal-acid exposure population the contribution of impedance-pH/SAP compared to pH-metry alone/response to proton pump inhibitors in identifying patients with reflux disease and functional heartburn resulted to be 10%. In patients with abnormal-acid exposure, the contribution of impedance-pH/SAP increased by 3%. Comparing impedance-pH testing with pH-metry alone plus the response to proton pump inhibitor therapy demonstrated that the latter ones cause underestimation of reflux disease patients and overestimation of functional heartburn patients. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of coexisting irritable bowel syndrome and non-erosive reflux disease on postprandial abdominal fullness and sleep disorders in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagami, Seiji; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Izumi, Nikki; Wakabayashi, Taiga; Kodaka, Yasuhiro; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Shindo, Tomotaka; Kawagoe, Tetsuro; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-01-01

    The association between clinical symptoms and sleep disorders in functional dyspepsia (FD)-overlap syndrome has not been studied in detail. The subjects were 139 patients with FD, 14 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 12 with nonerosive reflux disease (NERD), and 41 healthy volunteers. Gastric motility was evaluated with the (13)C-acetate breath test. We used Rome III criteria to evaluate upper abdominal symptoms, and Self-Rating Questionnaire for Depression (SRQ-D) scores to determine depression status. Sleep disorders were evaluated with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores. There were no significant differences in age, body-mass index, alcohol intake, and smoking rate between patients with FD alone and those with FD-overlap syndrome. The postprandial abdominal fullness score in patients with FD-NERD-IBS was significantly greater than that in patients with FD-NERD overlap syndrome (pSleep Quality Index score in subjects with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome was significantly greater than that in subjects with FD alone. Symptom scores, such as those for postprandial abdominal fullness, heartburn, and the feeling of hunger, in patients with FD-overlap syndromes are significantly greater than those in patients with FD alone. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether various symptoms are related to sleep disorders in patients with FD-NERD-IBS overlap syndrome.

  18. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  19. Relação entre o tamanho de hérnia hiatal e tempo de exposição ácida esofágica nas doenças do refluxo erosiva e não-erosiva Relationship between the size of hiatal hernia and esophageal acid exposure time in erosive and non-erosive reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz João Abrahão Jr.

    2006-03-01

    erosiva e doença do refluxo não-erosiva.BACKGROUND: In the last few years studies have demonstrated that hiatal hernias have an important role in the pathogenesis of reflux disease, promoting reflux by many different mechanisms, emphasizing that the larger the hiatal hernia, the higher the reflux intensity and erosive esophagitis prevalence. AIM: To correlate the size of hiatal hernias (small or large with reflux intensity (measured by pH monitoring parameters in patients with non-erosive and erosive reflux disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed pH monitoring from patients with typical reflux symptoms (heartburn previously submitted to upper endoscopy. Reflux intensity was measured by the % of total time of pH 5 cm. RESULTS: A total of 192 patients were included, being 115 in erosive reflux disease group and 77 in non-erosive reflux disease group. In erosive reflux disease patients, there were 94 (81% with small hiatal hernias and 21 (19% with large ones and in non-erosive reflux disease patients there were 66 (85% with small and 11(15% with large hiatal hernias. In erosive reflux disease group, the %TT, %UT and %ST were of 13.1 + 7.1; 13.4 + 7.4 and 12.3 + 11.5 in small hiatal hernias and 20.2 + 12.3; 17.8 + 14.1 and 20.7 + 14.1 in large hiatal hernias, respectively (P <0,05 for %TT and %TS. In non-erosive reflux disease patients, %TT, %UT and %ST were 9.6 + 4.8; 10.8 + 6.8 and 8.6 + 7.3 in small hiatal hernias and of 14.6 + 13.3; 11.2 + 7.5 and 18.1 + 21.0 in large hiatal hernias respectively (P <0,05 for %TT and %TS. CONCLUSION: Large hiatal hernias increase acid exposure time only in supine position in erosive esophagitis patients and in non-erosive patients.

  20. Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective and safe drugs for the treatment of erosive and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of GERD patients (30 - 40%) continue to suffer from symptoms during PPI treatment, which has stimulated the

  1. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, Pim W.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and

  2. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  3. Role of Acid and weakly acidic reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease off proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-07-01

    Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus.

  4. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  5. Influence of exercise testing in gastroesophageal reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Filho, Antonio Moreira; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado Pinto; Nasi, Ary; Eisig, Jaime Natan; Rodrigues, Tomas Navarro; Barbutti, Ricardo Correa; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Chinzon, Decio

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a worldwide prevalent condition that exhibits a large variety of signs and symptoms of esophageal or extra-esophageal nature and can be related to the esophagic adenocarcinoma. In the last few years, greater importance has been given to the influence of physical exercises on it. Some recent investigations, though showing conflicting results, point to an exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux during physical exercises. To evaluate the influence of physical activities in patients presenting with erosive and non erosive disease by ergometric stress testing and influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and body mass index during this situation. Twenty-nine patients with erosive disease (group I) and 10 patients with non-erosive disease (group II) were prospectively evaluated. All the patients were submitted to clinical evaluation, followed by upper digestive endoscopy, manometry and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. An ergometric testing was performed 1 h before removing the esophageal pH probe. During the ergometric stress testing, the following variables were analyzed: test efficacy, maximum oxygen uptake, acid reflux duration, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and influence of body mass index in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux during these physical stress. Maximum oxigen consumption or VO 2 max, showed significant correlation when it was 70% or higher only in the erosive disease group, evaluating the patients with or without acid reflux during the ergometric testing (p=0,032). The other considered variables didn't show significant correlations between gastroesophageal reflux and physical activity (p>0,05). 1) Highly intensive physical activity can predispose the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux episodes in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with erosive disease; 2) light or short sessions of physical activity have no influence on reflux, regardless of body

  6. [Association between acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhi-hui; Feng, Li; Wen, Mao-yao; Liu, Jian-rong; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association between esophageal motility and acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 94 patients with typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain, whose score (Sc) of reflux diagnostic questionnaire (RDQ) was greater than or equal to 12 were enrolled in the study. Each participant was evaluated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution manometry (HRM) of esophagus and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. The participants were divided into groups of reflux esophagitis (RE) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) on the basis of endoscopy findings. The 24 h esophageal pH monitoring categorized participants into physiologic reflux (pH) and pathologic reflux (pH+). The characteristics of esophageal motility and acid reflux were compared between the two groups of participants. Lower but non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pressure of lower esophageal sphincter (LESP), length of lower esophageal sphincter (LESL), esophageal contraction amplitude (CA), distal contractile integral (DCI) and effective peristalsis proportion (EPP) in the participants in the RE group compared with those in the NERD group. Participants in the RE group had significantly higher prevalence of reduced LESP (63.0% vs. 31.7%, P 0.05). RE is closely associated with acid reflux and hiatus hernia. Esophageal dysmotility is more likely to appear in patients with pH+. The interaction of acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility may play a role in GERD.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis; Reflux esophagitis; GERD; Heartburn - chronic; Dyspepsia - GERD ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can ...

  8. Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Murphy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a disorder in which reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications and which affects health-related quality of life. It is one of the commonest disorders and appears to be increasing in incidence. The mechanisms leading to reflux are complex and multifactorial. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LES is an important part of the gastro-oesophageal barrier. Transient LES relaxations (TLESRs lead to reflux as these vagally mediated motor patterns cause relaxation of the LES and also result in oesophageal shortening and inhibition of the crural diaphragm. Heartburn and regurgitation are the characteristic symptoms of GERD. A clinical diagnosis of GERD can be made with typical symptoms. Oesophagitis is seen in a minority of patients with GERD. Lifestyle modification is widely advocated for patients with GERD. For short-term relief of symptoms of mild GERD, antacids/alginates are frequently used but they do not heal oesophagitis. Both histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA and proton pump inhibitors (PPI have been shown to heal and prevent relapse of oesophagitis, although PPIs have been shown to be superior. The PPIs are the recommended first-line therapy for erosive oesophagitis and initial management of non-erosive reflux disease. Maintenance PPI therapy should be given to patients with oesophagitis, those who have recurrence of symptoms after discontinuation of medication and for those with complications of GERD.

  9. Proton Pump Inhibitors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash

    2017-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been redefined, in light of recent advances highlighting GERD phenotypes that respond to PPIs, and fresh revelations of potential risks of long-term PPI therapy. Erosive esophagitis predicts excellent response to PPI therapy, but non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) with abnormal reflux parameters on ambulatory reflux monitoring also demonstrates a similar response. In contrast, response is suboptimal in the absence of abnormal reflux parameters. In this setting, if an alternate appropriate indication for PPI therapy does not coexist, risks may outweigh benefits of PPI therapy. Adverse events from long-term PPI therapy continue to be reported, most based on association rather than cause-and-effect. Appropriate indications need to be established before embarking on long-term PPI therapy. Future research will define true risks of long-term PPI therapy, and develop alternate management options for acid peptic diseases.

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and vocal disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease in which gastroduodenal contents reflux into the esophagus. The clinical picture of gastroesophageal reflux disease is usually composed by heartburn and regurgitation (typical manifestations. Atypical manifestations (vocal disturbances and asthma may also be complaint. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pHmetric aspects of patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with vocal disturbances. METHODS: Fifty patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied, including 25 with vocal disturbances (group 1 - G1 and 25 without these symptoms (group 2 - G2. All patients were submitted to endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pHmetry (2 probes. The group 1 patients were submitted to videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Endoscopic findings: non-erosive reflux disease was observed in 95% of G1 patients and 88% of G2. Videolaryngoscopy: vocal fold congestion, asymmetry, nodules and polyps were observed in G1 patients. Manometric findings: pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 11.6 ± 5.2 in G1 and 14.0 ± 6.2 in G2 (P = 0.14; pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 58.4 ± 15.9 in G1 and 69.5 ± 30.7 in the controls. pHmetric findings: De Meester index: 34.0 ± 20.9 in G1 and 15.4 ± 9.4 in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in distal probe: 43.0 ± 20.4 in G1 and 26.4 ± 17.2 in G2 (P = 0.003; percentage of time with esophageal pH value lower than 4 units (distal sensor: 9.0% ± 6.4% in G1 and 3.4% ± 2.1% in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in proximal probe: 7.5 ± 10.9 in G1 and 5.3 ± 5.7 in G2 (P = 0.38; percentage of time with esophageal pH values lower than 4 units (Proximal probe: 1.2 ± 2.7 in G1 and 0.5 ± 0.7 in G2 (P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The clinical, endoscopic, and manometric findings observed in patients with vocal disturbance do not differ from those without these symptoms; 2 gastroesophageal

  11. Efficacy of low-dose lansoprazole in the treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease: Influence of infection by Helicobacter pylori Eficacia de lansoprazol a dosis bajas en el tratamiento de la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico no erosiva: Influencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro Fernández

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are the most effective drugs to cure peptic esophagitis and control the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. In most patients with GERD esophagitis is not detected by endoscopy, which represents GERD with a negative endoscopy or non-erosive reflux disease (NERD. The influence of infection by H. pylori in the evolution of GERD is controversial since a protective action is identified by some studies, but not all. We conducted a clinical trial to assess the efficacy of lansoprazole 15 mg/day in the initial control of NERD symptoms, and as a secondary endpoint the impact of H. pylori infection on response to treatment. Patients and methods: a pilot, single-center clinical trial was conducted -single-blind regarding the experimental medication (unknown to patients, and double-blind regarding the information concerning H. pylori infection. Sixty (60 patients with NERD were initially included, who had suffered from daytime or nocturnal heartburn for 1-2 days in each of the last two weeks. Nine patients were excluded for failing to comply with the study protocol. The 51 remaining patients, 35 women and 16 men, with a mean age of 49 years, comprised the per protocol analysis population. Patients received treatment for two weeks with a capsule of the study medication (15 mg/day of lansoprazole, with daily controls on the presence and severity of daytime and nocturnal heartburn. Treatment was considered effective when, upon completion, patients referred a maximum of one episode of mild heartburn as defined in the protocol, or answered the following question in the affirmative: "Does the medication you are receiving satisfactorily control the symptoms of your disease?". During diagnostic endoscopy we obtained biopsies of the gastric body and antrum to investigate infection by H. pylori by means of a urease test. Treatment efficacy was assessed with no patients or doctors responsible for the study

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kault, B.; Halvorsen, T.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Radionucleotide scintigraphy and esophagoscopy with biopsy were carried out in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. GER was visualized by scintigraphy in 86.1% of the patients. Endoscopic and histologic esophagitis were found in 68.1% and 58.4% of the patients, respectively, whereas both examinations taken together showed evidence of esophagitis in 82%. Histologic evidence of esophagitis was found in nearly all patients with severe endoscopic changes, and in 43.7% of the patients with no endoscopic abnormality. Scintigraphic reflux was demonstrated more frequently (p<0.05) in the patients with severe endoscopic esophagitis (97.5%) than in those with no or only mild endoscopic changes (78.6%). Scintigraphic reflux was found in 91.5% and 78.5% of the patients with and without histologic evidence of esophagitis (p=0.07). 15 of the 18 patients (83.3%) without endoscopic and histologic abnormalities in the esophagus had scintigraphic evidence of reflux. The present study strongly supports the clinical significance of scintigraphy in GER disease and confirms that esophageal biopsy specimens increase the sensitivity of endoscopic evaluation

  13. Food and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdea-Blaga, Teodora; Negrutiu, Dana E; Palage, Mariana; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2017-05-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic condition with a high prevalence in western countries. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation episodes and a decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure are the main mechanisms involved. Currently used drugs are efficient on reflux symptoms, but only as long as they are administered, because they do not modify the reflux barrier. Certain nutrients or foods are generally considered to increase the frequency of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, therefore physicians recommend changes in diet and some patients avoid bothering foods. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding food and gastroesophageal reflux. For example, fat intake increases the perception of reflux symptoms. Regular coffee and chocolate induce gastroesophageal reflux and increase the lower esophageal exposure to acid. Spicy foods might induce heartburn, but the exact mechanism is not known. Beer and wine induce gastroesophageal reflux, mainly in the first hour after intake. For other foods, like fried food or carbonated beverages data on gastroesophageal reflux is scarce. Similarly, there is few data about the type of diet and gastroesophageal reflux. Mediterranean diet and a very low carbohydrate diet protect against reflux. Regarding diet-related practices, consistent data showed that a "short-meal-to-sleep interval" favors reflux episodes, therefore some authors recommend that dinner should be at least four hours before bedtime. All these recommendations should consider patient's weight, because several meta-analysis showed a positive association between increased body mass index and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update on inflammation and symptom perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Annamaria; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cocca, Silvia; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in Western countries, with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of symptoms remain to be fully elucidated. GERD symptoms and complications may result from a multifactorial mechanism, in which acid and acid-pepsin are the important noxious factors involved. Prolonged contact of the esophageal mucosa with the refluxed content, probably caused by a defective anti-reflux barrier and luminal clearance mechanisms, would appear to be responsible for macroscopically detectable injury to the esophageal squamous epithelium. Receptors on acid-sensitive nerve endings may play a role in nociception and esophageal sensitivity, as suggested in animal models of chronic acid exposure. Meanwhile, specific cytokine and chemokine profiles would appear to underlie the various esophageal phenotypes of GERD, explaining, in part, the genesis of esophagitis in a subset of patients. Despite these findings, which show a significant production of inflammatory mediators and neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of GERD, the relationship between the hypersensitivity and esophageal inflammation is not clear. Moreover, the large majority of GERD patients (up to 70%) do not develop esophageal erosions, a variant of the condition called non-erosive reflux disease. This summary aims to explore the inflammatory pathway involved in GERD pathogenesis, to better understand the possible distinction between erosive and non-erosive reflux disease patients and to provide new therapeutic approaches.

  15. [Underlying Mechanisms and Management of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South Korea has increased over the past 10 years. Patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) shows better response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). NERD is a heterogeneous condition, showing pathological gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal hypersensitivity to reflux contents. NERD patients with pathological gastroesophageal reflux or hypersensitivity to acid may respond to PPIs. However, many patients with esophageal hypersensitivity to nonacid or functional heartburn do not respond to PPIs. Therefore, careful history and investigations are required when managing patients with refractory GERD who show poor response to conventional dose PPIs. Combined pH-impedance studies and a PPI diagnostic trial are recommended to reveal underlying mechanisms of refractory symptoms. For those with ongoing reflux-related symptoms, split dose administration, change to long-acting PPIs or PPIs less influenced by CYP2C19 genotypes, increasing dose of PPIs, and the addition of alginate preparations, prokinetics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants can be considered. Pain modulators, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants are more likely to be effective for those with reflux-unrelated symptoms. Surgery or endoscopic per oral fundoplication may be effective in selected patients.

  16. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  17. Is the use of esomeprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease a cost-effective option in Poland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryszyn, Pawel; Staniak, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej

    2016-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esomeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in Poland. Studies comparing esomeprazole with other PPIs in the treatment of erosive esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease maintenance therapy were systematically reviewed. 9 randomized clinical trials were selected, meta-analyses were conducted. Cost data derived from Polish Ministry of Health and Pharmacies in Wroclaw. In the treatment of erosive esophagitis esomeprazole was significantly more effective than other PPIs. Both for 4- and 8-week therapy respective incremental cost-effectiveness ratio values were acceptably low. Differences in effectiveness of non-erosive reflux disease therapy were not significant. The replacement of pantoprazole 20 mg with more effective esomeprazole 20 mg in the 6-month maintenance therapy was associated with a substantially high incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

  18. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Over past decades, considerable shifts in thinking about the disease have taken place. At a time when radiology was the only diagnostic test available, reflux disease was regarded as synonymous with

  19. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  4. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Rohof, Wout O.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive diseases in the Western world, with typical symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, or retrosternal pain, reported by 15% to 20% of the general population. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Our understanding

  5. Asia-Pacific consensus on the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: an update focusing on refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Talley, Nicholas; Goh, Khean Lee; Sugano, Kentaro; Katelaris, Peter; Holtmann, Gerald; Pandolfino, John E; Sharma, Prateek; Ang, Tiing Leong; Hongo, Michio; Wu, Justin; Chen, Minhu; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Law, Ngai Moh; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Zhang, Jun; Ho, Khek Yu; Sollano, Jose; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Bhatia, Shobna

    2016-09-01

    Since the publication of the Asia-Pacific consensus on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 2008, there has been further scientific advancement in this field. This updated consensus focuses on proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus. A steering committee identified three areas to address: (1) burden of disease and diagnosis of reflux disease; (2) proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; (3) Barrett's oesophagus. Three working groups formulated draft statements with supporting evidence. Discussions were done via email before a final face-to-face discussion. We used a Delphi consensus process, with a 70% agreement threshold, using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria to categorise the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. A total of 32 statements were proposed and 31 were accepted by consensus. A rise in the prevalence rates of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in Asia was noted, with the majority being non-erosive reflux disease. Overweight and obesity contributed to the rise. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease was recognised to be common. A distinction was made between refractory symptoms and refractory reflux disease, with clarification of the roles of endoscopy and functional testing summarised in two algorithms. The definition of Barrett's oesophagus was revised such that a minimum length of 1 cm was required and the presence of intestinal metaplasia no longer necessary. We recommended the use of standardised endoscopic reporting and advocated endoscopic therapy for confirmed dysplasia and early cancer. These guidelines standardise the management of patients with refractory gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus in the Asia-Pacific region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as symptoms or mucosal damage caused by reflux of gastric contents into the esophageal body, is a multifactorial disorder. Malfunctioning of the anti-reflux barrier at the esophagogastric junction, consisting of the right diaphragmatic crus and the

  7. Fragments of e-Cadherin as Biomarkers of Non-erosive Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovov, Biljana; Reed, Craig C; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Pruitt, Amy; Ferrell, Kathleen; Orlando, Geraldine S; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C

    2018-03-01

    Approximately, 20% of patients with heartburn and normal endoscopic findings do not symptomatically improve on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy making diagnosis and treatment uncertain. A biomarker distinguishing PPI-responsive from PPI-refractory heartburn is desirable. We performed a pilot study assessing whether carboxy(C)-terminal fragments (CTFs) of e-cadherin in esophageal biopsies or amino(N)-terminal fragments (NTFs) of e-cadherin in serum could serve this purpose. Twenty-nine patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn had esophageal biopsies for CTFs on Western blot and blood for serum NTFs on ELISA. All patients received dexlansoprazole 30 mg daily for 4 weeks, and heartburn was assessed by daily diary entry. Post-treatment blood samples were obtained for serum NTFs. A control group without GERD symptoms (n = 6) had biopsies for CTFs and a second control group (n = 20) blood serum for serum NTFs. Twenty-seven of 29 patients (93.1%) with endoscopy-negative heartburn, but 0 of 6 controls, were positive for CTFs. All patients and controls had measureable serum NTFs, but mean NTFs were significantly higher in those with PPI-responsive heartburn compared to those with PPI-refractory heartburn and controls. Following treatment, 24 of 29 (82.8) patients had relief of heartburn, which associated with a decline in mean NTFs compared to controls. NTFs in PPI-refractory patients (n = 5) were similar to controls before and after PPI therapy. When heartburn responds to PPI, elevated serum NTFs decline to normal. These data suggest that cleaved products of e-cadherin may serve as biomarkers of NERD. Further data are needed to assess and confirm this concept.

  8. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Olinichenko, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the research is to study the features of gastroesophageal reflux disease, combined with the metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The study involved 490 patients (250 have got gastroesophageal reflux disease, combined with the metabolic syndrome and 240 have got gastroesophageal reflux disease without the metabolic syndrome). The patients besides general clinical examination were carried out video-fibro-gastro-duodeno-skopy, pH-monitoring in the esophagus, anthropometry, deter...

  9. [Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Jorge A; Piskorz, María Marta; Vela, Marcelo F

    2016-06-01

    GERD is a highly prevalent disease in our country. It has a deep impact in patient´s quality of life, representing extremely high costs regarding health. The correct understanding of its pathophysiology is crucial for the rational use of diagnoses methods and the implementation of appropriate treatment adjusted to each individual case. In this review we evaluate this disorder based on the best available evidence, focusing in pathophysiological mechanisms, its epidemiology, modern diagnosis methods and current management standards.

  10. Dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): is there any correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2009-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and signs of upper gastrointestinal tract and the adjacent organs. It is estimated that 25% of the community have symptoms of dyspepsia syndrome. One-third of patients who visit general physician practices are patients with dyspepsia syndrome; and half of patients who visit gastroenterologists are also patients with dyspepsia syndrome. Dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very prevalent in the community throughout the world.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more and more commonly found in daily medical practice. Until now,the natural history of disease on GERD and dyspepsia is hardly understood, even though many scientists studied both conditions and there are frequently overlapping. In an individual, GERD and dyspepsia may occur simultaneously and therefore they are hardly to be discriminated.The management of GERD is performed in keeping with Indonesia and Asia Pacific consensus, life-style modification and administering the acid suppression agents (Proton pump inhibitor (drug of choice), H2-receptor antagonist, etc),prokinetic agents (Cisapride, domperidone, etc). Life-style modification shall be performed as follows, i.e. sleep with 30-45 degree elevated head or upper chest, do not avoid sour beverages, chocolate, coffee or alcohol, avoid fat and various fried foods, sour food, less stress, stop smoking, small but frequent feeding, etc. There is a correlation between dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD), particularly between the functional dyspepsia and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux (NERD). More appropriate definition is necessary to differentiate the dyspepsia syndrome and GERD. Further studies are needed to establish distinct definition and criteria between dyspepsia syndrome and GERD.

  11. Symptom perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease is dependent on spatiotemporal reflux characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The mechanisms responsible for the development of symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are poorly understood. The aims of this study were to identify differences in spatiotemporal reflux characteristics (proximal extent and duration of reflux episodes, ascending

  12. Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; Fass, Ronnie

    2018-01-01

    Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) commonly starts with an empiric trial of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and complementary lifestyle measures, for patients without alarm symptoms. Optimization of therapy (improving compliance and timing of PPI doses), or increasing PPI dosage to twice daily in select circumstances, can reduce persistent symptoms. Patients with continued symptoms can be evaluated with endoscopy and tests of esophageal physiology, to better determine their disease phenotype and optimize treatment. Laparoscopic fundoplication, magnetic sphincter augmentation, and endoscopic therapies can benefit patients with well-characterized GERD. Patients with functional diseases that overlap with or mimic GERD can also be treated with neuromodulators (primarily antidepressants), or psychological interventions (psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive and behavioral therapy). Future approaches to treatment of GERD include potassium-competitive acid blockers, reflux-reducing agents, bile acid binders, injection of inert substances into the esophagogastric junction, and electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prospective study on effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Sabah Jalal Shareef

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The Helicobacter pylori infections role in etiology of peptic ulcer is well known, but its role in gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the important issues which has to be confirmed. We tried to find out the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods: The current study was done on 100 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease from January 1st to June 30th, 2014 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil city. The diagnosis was made by history, clinical examination, and endoscopy. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by gastric biopsy and histopathological examination. We tried to find out the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients and its eradication on their symptoms. The data was analyzed with the statistical package for the social sciences (version 18. Results: The mean age ± SD of participants was 37.13 ± 12.5 (17-75 years. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 75%. The endoscopy showed that 50 out of 75 patients had erosive esophagitis and 25 out of 75 patients had normal appearance known as non-erosive esophagitis. The study showed no significance of its eradication on symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Conclusion: The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients was significant regarding endoscopic finding while inversely related to symptoms severity. The eradication of infection did not cause improvement in symptom severity i.e. triple therapy not advised in the course of treatment.

  14. Abnormal Gastroesophageal Flap Valve Is Associated With High Gastresophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire Score and the Severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Vietnamese Patients With Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Duc T; Nguyen, Trang T; Hiyama, Toru

    2018-04-30

    There have been no studies investigating the distribution of abnormal gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) among patients with dyspepsia, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and reflux esophagitis (RE) in the same set of patients. The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the association between GEFV and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERDQ) score, and (2) the distribution of abnormal GEFV in Vietnamese patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Three hundred and thirty-one patients recruited in this prospective cross-sectional study were classified into 3 groups: reflux esophagitis (RE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (GERDQ score ≥ 8, no endoscopic mucosal injury), and dyspepsia (GERDQ score < 8, no endoscopic mucosal injury). The GEFV was graded endoscopically according to the Hill classification. GEFV grades I and II were regarded as normal, while grades III and IV were regarded as abnormal GEFV. There were 215 (65.0%) patients with dyspepsia, 55 (16.6%) patients with NERD, and 61 (18.4%) patients with RE. Abnormal GEFV was an independent risk factor for GERD (OR, 2.93; CI 95%, 1.76-4.88) and RE (OR, 3.41; CI 95%, 1.78-6.53). The mean GERDQ score of patients with abnormal GEFV was significantly higher than that of patients with normal GEFV (5.7 ± 2.4 vs 4.9 ± 2.7, P = 0.011). The prevalence of abnormal GEFV gradually increased in patients with dyspepsia (27.4%), NERD (43.6%), grade A RE (56.8%), and grades B/C RE (80.0%) ( P < 0.001). Abnormal GEFV was significantly associated with high GERDQ score. Its prevalence gradually increased in patients with dyspepsia, NERD, and RE, respectively.

  15. Esophageal abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-06-01

    Fluoroscopic esophagography is a widely available, safe, and inexpensive test for detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease. In this article, we review the technique for performing a high-quality esophagram, including upright, double-contrast views of the esophagus and cardia with high-density barium; prone, single-contrast views of the esophagus with low-density barium; and evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux. We then discuss the radiographic findings associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, including esophageal dysmotility, reflux esophagitis, peptic strictures, and Barrett's esophagus. Finally, we consider the differential diagnosis for the various radiographic findings associated with this condition. When carefully performed and interpreted, the esophagram is a useful test for evaluating gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications.

  16. Clinical characteristics and effectiveness of lansoprazole in Japanese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Hiroto; Sanada, Katsuyuki; Miyata, Koji; Haruma, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently have symptoms of dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms. Treatment options for dyspepsia are not standardized. The aim of this study was to clarify the therapeutic effect of lansoprazole on dyspepsia in Japanese patients with GERD. GERD patients with dyspepsia were enrolled and treated with lansoprazole 15 or 30 mg once daily for 4 weeks. Reflux and dyspeptic symptoms were assessed by questionnaires before treatment, and 2 and 4 weeks after the start of lansoprazole treatment. In the effectiveness analysis set (n = 12,653), heartburn was reported by 91.6 % of patients at study enrollment. Postprandial fullness was the most frequently reported dyspepsia symptom at the start of the study, reported by 79.0 % of enrolled patients. After 4 weeks of lansoprazole treatment, heartburn symptoms were improved in 75.7 % of patients and symptoms of postprandial fullness were improved in 68.7 % of patients. The therapeutic effect of low and high doses of lansoprazole on dyspepsia, as well as on reflux symptoms, was approximately 10 % higher in patients with endoscopy-confirmed erosive esophagitis (60.1-82.2 %), than in patients with non-erosive reflux diseases (53.0-73.3 %). Lansoprazole was well tolerated. In this large-scale clinical study, lansoprazole effectively relieved dyspepsia in addition to reflux symptoms in patients with GERD.

  17. Esophageal chemical clearance and baseline impedance values in patients with chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenca, Andrea; de Bortoli, Nicola; Mauro, Aurelio; Frazzoni, Marzio; Savarino, Edoardo; Massironi, Sara; Russo, Salvatore; Bertani, Lorenzo; Marchi, Santino; Penagini, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    The factors influencing new markers of gastro-esophageal reflux disease detected by impedance-pH monitoring - mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) and post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index - need to be evaluated. To compare endoscopy-negative heartburn with chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis (CAAG). 24 patients with CAAG, 25 with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and 25 with functional heartburn (FH) were included. In all patients the main impedance-pH monitoring parameters were calculated. CAAG and NERD patients had a number of reflux events (non-acid ones being more common among the former group) which was higher than that found in FH (p3000Ohm), CAAG (>2000Ohm) and NERD (reflux based on the high number of reflux events and confirmed by low values of MNBI and PSPW index. MNBI is a strong marker of acid/non-acid reflux-induced mucosal damage, whereas the PSPW index can reliably discriminate patients with reflux from those with FH, independently of the acidity of refluxate. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Population Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease varies in different parts of the world. There are no population based studies in Nigeria. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease in a population of Nigerian medical students. Methods The Carlsson-Dent questionnaire was administered to medical students in the clinical phase of their training at the University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus. Some putative risk ...

  20. Mechanisms of Reflux Perception in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with reflux symptoms often do not have excessive esophageal acid exposure, and patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux often do not have reflux symptoms. Understanding why different types of reflux induce symptoms in different patients is vital for addressing therapeutic gaps in the

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease burden in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Alireza; Moradi, Ghobad; Elahi, Elham; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The prevalence of this disease ranges from 5% to 20% in Asia, Europe, and North America. The aim of this study was to estimate the burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Iran. Burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Iran was estimated for one year from 21 March 2006 to 20 March 2007. The definition was adjusted with ICD-code of K21. Incident-based disability-adjusted life year (DALY) was used as the unit of analysis to quantify disease burden. A simplified disease model and DisMod II software were used for modeling. The annual incidence for total population of males and females in Iran was estimated 17.72 and 28.06 per 1000, respectively. The average duration of gastroesophageal reflux disease as a chronic condition was estimated around 10 years in both sexes. Total DALYs for an average of 59 symptomatic days per year was estimated 153,554.3 (60,330.8 for males and 93,223.5 for females).   The results of this study showed that reflux imposes high burden and high financial costs on the Iranian population. The burden of this disease in Iran is more similar to that of European countries rather than Asian countries. It is recommended to consider the disease as a public health problem and make decisions and public health plans to reduce the burden and financial costs of the disease in Iran.

  2. Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance is associated with severity of acid reflux and epithelial structural abnormalities in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chanjuan; Duan, Liping; Wang, Kun; Xu, Zhijie; Ge, Ying; Yang, Changqing; Han, Yajing

    2013-05-01

    The esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance may be used to evaluate the status of mucosa integrity. Esophageal acid exposure decreases the baseline impedance. We aimed to compare baseline impedance in patients with various reflux events and with different acid-related parameters, and investigate the relationships between epithelial histopathologic abnormalities and baseline impedance. A total of 229 GERD patients and 34 controls underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH monitoring), gastroendoscopy, and completed a GERD questionnaire (GerdQ). We quantified epithelial intercellular spaces (ICSs) and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins by histologic techniques. Mean baseline values in reflux esophagitis (RE) (1752 ± 1018 Ω) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (2640 ± 1143 Ω) were significantly lower than in controls (3360 ± 1258 Ω; p acid reflux group (2510 ± 1239 Ω) and mixed acid/weakly acidic reflux group (2393 ± 1009 Ω) were much lower than in controls (3360 ± 1258 Ω; p = 0.020 and p acid exposure time (AET) (r = -0.41, p acid reflux events and with longer AET have low baseline impedance. Baseline values are correlated with esophageal mucosal histopathologic changes such as dilated ICS and TJ alteration.

  3. Clinical characteristics and psychosocial impact of different reflux time in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Wen, Shu-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an emerging disease, and can impair quality of life and sleep. This study aimed to investigate whether GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics. This study prospectively enrolled individuals who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during a health checkup. Each participant completed all questionnaires including Reflux Disease Questionnaire, Nighttime GERD questionnaire, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Combined reflux was defined as the timing of reflux symptoms occurring at both daytime and nighttime. A total of 2604 participants were enrolled. Of them, 651 symptomatic GERD patients, according to the Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, were recruited for final analysis. Of them, 224 (34.4%) had erosive esophagitis on endoscopy. According to the timing of reflux symptoms, 184 (28.3%) were assigned to the daytime reflux group, 71 (10.9%) to the nighttime reflux group, and 396 (60.8%) to the combined reflux group. In post hoc analysis, the combined reflux group had a significantly higher Reflux Disease Questionnaire score than the daytime reflux group (p reflux groups had higher body mass index and longer duration (> 12 years) of education than the daytime reflux group (p reflux of have more troublesome symptoms than those with daytime reflux. GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics in terms of body mass index and duration of education, but not in terms of esophageal inflammation, quality of sleep, and psychosocial status. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Hiatial hernia in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.; Grette, K.; Roeysland, P.; Halvorsen, T.

    1986-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiologic examination were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Hiatus hernia (HH) was found in 50 patients diagnosed by radiography or endoscopy, or both, in 22, 19, and 9 patients respectively. Severe endoscopic esophagitis (grades III and IV) was found more often in the patients with HH than in those without. The same was true for the early positive timed acid perfusion tests. Furthermore, the patients with HH more often had reflux by the standard acid reflux test (42 og 50 versus 28 of 51, gastroesophageal scintigraphy (47 of 50 versus 40 of 51; and radiography (20 of 50 versus 2 of 51; than the patients without HH. The results show that severe GER disease can occur without an associated HH and indicate that patients with symptoms of GER disease and associated HH are likely to have a more severe GER disease than those without HH.

  5. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reflux perception and the esophageal mucosal barrier in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain are the key symptoms. Patients with reflux symptoms often have more than average reflux of acidic contents in the esophagus. However, frequently there is

  7. The influence of the speed of food intake on multichannel impedance in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Bayrakci, Berna; Erdogan, Askin; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2013-10-01

    There is a general belief that gastro-oesophageal reflux increases after meals and especially following a rapid intake. To evaluate the impact of rapid vs. slow food intake on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. Forty-six GORD patients with heartburn and / or acid regurgitation once a week or more often common were included in this study. Participants were asked to eat the same standard meal within either 5 or 30 minutes under observation in a random order on 2 consecutive days. A total of 28 hours of recording were obtained by intraoesophageal impedance pH and number of liquid and mixed reflux episodes within 3 hours of the slow- and fast-eating postprandial periods were calculated. While all patients defined GORD symptoms, 10 (21.7%) had pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance measurement, 15 (32.6%) had pathological DeMeester and 21.7% had erosive oesophagitis. No difference has been shown according to the eating speed when all reflux episodes were taken together (754 vs. 733). Speed of food intake also did not have an impact on patients with normal vs. pathological 24-h intraoesophageal impedance or erosive vs. non-erosive. During the first postprandial hour, approximately half of the reflux events were non-acid, compared to 34.2% during the second hour and 26.8% during the third hour (p reflux episodes was significantly higher than non-acid reflux especially during the second and third hours and in total for 3 hours. This first study addressing the effect of eating speed on reflux episodes in GORD patients did not support the general belief that reflux increases following fast eating. Acid and non-acid reflux were similar at the first postprandial hour, then acid reflux episodes were predominantly higher, which implicate the importance of acid pockets.

  8. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the

  9. Pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a role for mucosa integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, R

    2013-10-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is very prevalent and has a high burden on health security system costs. Nevertheless, pathophysiology is complex and not well-understood. Several mechanisms have been proposed: decreased salivation, impaired esophageal clearance, decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure resting tone, presence of hiatal hernia, increased number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), increased acid, and pepsin secretion, pyloric incompetence provoking duodeno-gastro-esophageal reflux of bile acids and trypsin. Independent of the relevance of each mechanism, the ultimate phenomenon is that mucosal epithelium is exposed for a longer time to agents as acid and pepsin or is in contact to luminal agents not commonly present in gastric refluxate as trypsin or bile acids. This leads to a visible damage of the epithelium (erosive esophagitis -EE) or impairing mucosal integrity without any sign of macroscopic alteration as occurs in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Luminal factors are not the only responsible for such impairment; more recent data indicate that endogenous factors may also play a role. This review will update the most recent findings on the putative pathophysiological mechanisms and specially will focus on the role of esophageal mucosal integrity in GERD. Methodologies used for the evaluation of mucosal integrity, its relevance in EE and NERD, its involvement in symptoms perception and the effect of luminal and endogenous factors will be discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Esophageal Sphincter Device for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganz, Robert A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A.; Dunst, Christy M.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Lipham, John C.; Luketich, James D.; Melvin, W. Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C.; Smith, C. Daniel; Smith, Christopher C.; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS We prospectively assessed 100 patients

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's Esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    Several articles have been published during the last year that may affect the management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or Barrett's esophagus in the near future. A new method of measuring esophageal pH has been introduced that does not require an indwelling transnasal

  12. The effect of dietary carbohydrate on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Yao, Chih-Chien; Tai, Wei-Chen; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lim, Chee-Sang; Chiu, Yi-Chun

    2018-01-12

    Acid changes in gastroesophageal reflux with vary component in the food have less been studied, especially carbohydrate. We plan to clarify the effect of different carbohydrate density on low esophageal acid and reflux symptoms of patients with gastroesophgeal reflux disease. Twelve patients (52 ± 12 years old; five female) with gastroesophageal reflux disease were recruited for the prospective crossover study. Each patient was invited for panendoscope, manometry and 24 h pH monitor. The two formulated liquid meal, test meal A: 500 ml liquid meal (containing 84.8 g carbohydrate) and B: same volume liquid meal (but 178.8 g carbohydrate) were randomized supplied as lunch or dinner. Reflux symptoms were recorded. There are significant statistic differences in more Johnson-DeMeester score (p = 0.019), total reflux time (%) (p = 0.028), number of reflux periods (p = 0.026) and longest reflux (p = 0.015) after high carbohydrate diet than low carbohydrate. Total reflux time and number of long reflux periods more than 5 min are significant more after high carbohydrate diet. More acid reflux symptoms are found after high carbohydrate diet. High carbohydrate diet could induce more acid reflux in low esophagus and more reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Reflux esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a cross-sectional study of gastroesophageal reflux disease patients by age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Filho Rowilson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of acid reflux and severity of esophageal tissue damage in a cross-sectional study of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Seventy-eight patients with were selected in accordance with the strict 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pHmetry (24h-pHM criteria and distributed into three age groups: Group A: 14 - 24 years of age. Group B: 25 - 54; and Group C: 55 - 64. The 24h-pHM was carried out in accordance with DeMeester standardization, and the Savary-Miller classification for the diagnosis of reflux esophagitis was used. The groups were similar in 24h-pHM parameters (p > 0.05, having above normal values. For the study group as a whole, there was no correlation between age group and intensity of acid reflux, and there was no correlation between intensity of acid reflux and severity of esophageal tissue damage. However, when the same patients were sub-grouped in accordance with the depth of their epithelial injury and then distributed into age groups, there was a significant difference in esophagitis without epithelial discontinuity. Younger patients had less epithelial damage than older patients. Additionally, although there was a significant progression from the least severe to the moderate stages of epithelial damage among the age groups, there was no apparent difference among the age groups in the distribution between the moderate stages and most severe stages. The findings support the conclusion that the protective response of individuals to acid reflux varies widely. Continued aggression by acid reflux appears to lead to the exhaustion of individual mechanisms of epithelial protection in some patients, but not others, regardless of age or duration of the disease. Therefore, the diagnosis and follow-up of GERD should include both measurements of the quantity of refluxed acid and an assessment of the damage to the esophageal epithelium.

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux and respiratory diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, S.; Saeed, M.A.; Jafri, S.R.A.; Raza, M.; Kundi, Z.U.; Hyder, S.W.

    2002-01-01

    The association of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its pulmonary manifestation is well known however the exact underlying mechanism is unclear. The medical literature is deluged with studies on relationship between Gear and its pulmonary manifestations. The aim of this study was to 1) determine prevalence of GER in children with rLRTI, wheezing and asthma. 2) determine prevalence of asymptomatic respiratory anomalies in children with clinical reflux 3) determine effectiveness of anti-reflux therapy in clinical control of asthma, wheezing and rLRTI. Children were included in the study if they presented either with rLRTI, wheezing, Bronchial asthma or Clinical suspicion of GER without any respiratory symptoms. The GER study comprised esophageal transit, gastroesophageal reflux and lung aspiration studies. Acquisition and processing were according to predetermined protocol. Segmental and global esophageal transit times, GER according to duration of episode and volume of refluxed liquid, Reflux severity, Gastric retention at 30 minutes, Gastric emptying time, Presence of lung aspiration were calculated for each study. All children underwent Barium studies on a separate day. Clinical follow-up was done every 3 months and GER study was repeated every 6 months up to one year. The patient's therapy was determined by local protocols at discretion of clinicians. GER scintigraphy was performed in 43 patients (age range 5 months -12 years). Gastroesophageal reflux of varying degrees was observed in 10 children (23.25%) in all groups. The severity of clinical symptoms was directly related to severity of GER. The direct correlation was found between GER and reflux index. The results of GER scintigraphy were compared with Barium studies and results were found to be superior in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in detecting disease. It was possible to objectively evaluate and monitor response to therapy after medical treatment in few cases with help of follow

  16. Comparison of Endoscopic Findings with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaires (GerdQ) and Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Gontar Alamsyah; Halim, Sahat; Sitepu, Ricky Rivalino

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There are many questionnaires that have been developed to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), i.e. reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), and the recently developed, gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaires (GerdQ). In this study, we tried to compare GerdQ and RDQ in terms of sensitivity and specificity to diagnose GERD and its relationship with endoscopic findings. Method: This study was a cross sectional analytical study. Subsequently, all the subj...

  17. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekiewicz, M A; Karolewska-Bochenek, K; Dembiński, Ł; Gawronska, A; Krenke, K; Lange, J; Banasiuk, M; Kuchar, E; Kulus, M; Albrecht, P; Banaszkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in adult patients with interstitial lung disease. However, no data currently exist regarding the prevalence and characteristics of the disease in pediatric patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and characterize its features in children with interstitial lung disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was established based on 24 h pH-impedance monitoring (MII-pH). Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (GERs) were classified according to widely recognized criteria as acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. Eighteen consecutive patients (15 boys, aged 0.2-11.6 years) were enrolled in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a half (9/18) of children. A thousand GERs were detected by MII-pH (median 53.5; IQR 39.0-75.5). Of these, 585 (58.5 %) episodes were acidic, 407 (40.7 %) were weakly acidic, and eight (0.8 %) were weakly alkaline. There were 637 (63.7 %) proximal GERs. The patients in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed had a significantly higher number of proximal and total GERs. We conclude that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with interstitial lung disease is high; thus, the disease should be considered regardless of presenting clinical symptoms. A high frequency of non-acid and proximal GERs makes the MII-pH method a preferable choice for the detection of reflux episodes in this patient population.

  18. Inconsistency in the Diagnosis of Functional Heartburn: Usefulness of Prolonged Wireless pH Monitoring in Patients With Proton Pump Inhibitor Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penagini, Roberto; Sweis, Rami; Mauro, Aurelio; Domingues, Gerson; Vales, Andres; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The diagnosis of functional heartburn is important for management, however it stands on fragile pH monitoring variables, ie, acid exposure time varies from day to day and symptoms are often few or absent. Aim of this study was to investigate consistency of the diagnosis of functional heartburn in subsequent days using prolonged wireless pH monitoring and its impact on patients’ outcome. Methods Fifty proton pump inhibitotor refractory patients (11 male, 48 years [range, 38–57 years]) with a diagnosis of functional heart-burn according to Rome III in the first 24 hours of wireless pH monitoring were reviewed. pH variables were analysed in the following 24-hour periods to determine if tracings were indicative of diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease (either acid exposure time > 5% or normal acid exposure time and symptom index ≥ 50%). Outcome was assessed by review of hospital files and/or telephone interview. Results Fifteen out of 50 patients had a pathological acid exposure time after the first day of monitoring (10 in the second day and 5 in subsequent days), which changed their diagnosis from functional heartburn to non-erosive reflux disease. Fifty-four percent of non-erosive reflux disease vs 11% of functional heartburn patients (P heartburn patients (P heartburn at 24-hour pH-monitoring can be re-classified as non-erosive reflux disease after a more prolonged pH recording period. This observation has a positive impact on patients’ management. PMID:25843078

  19. Proton pump inhibitor resistance, the real challenge in gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicala, Michele; Emerenziani, Sara; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Ribolsi, Mentore

    2013-10-21

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases. Although proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent the mainstay of treatment both for healing erosive esophagitis and for symptom relief, several studies have shown that up to 40% of GERD patients reported either partial or complete lack of response of their symptoms to a standard PPI dose once daily. Several mechanisms have been proposed as involved in PPIs resistance, including ineffective control of gastric acid secretion, esophageal hypersensitivity, ultrastructural and functional changes in the esophageal epithelium. The diagnostic evaluation of a refractory GERD patients should include an accurate clinical evaluation, upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring, which allows to discriminate non-erosive reflux disease patients from those presenting esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn. Treatment has been primarily based on doubling the PPI dose or switching to another PPI. Patients with proven disease, not responding to PPI twice daily, are eligible for anti-reflux surgery.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  1. Hiatus hernia in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.; Grette, K.; Roeysland, P.; Halvorsen, T.

    1986-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiologic examination were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Hiatus hernia (HH) was found in 50 patients diagnosed by radiography or endoscopy, or both, in 22, 19, and 9 patients respectively. Severe endoscopic esophagitis (grades III and IV) was found more often (p<0.05) in the patients with HH than in those without. The same was true for the early positive timed acid perfusion tests (p<0.02). Furthermore, the patients with HH more often had reflux by the standard acid reflux test (42 og 50 versus 28 of 51; p<0.01), gastroesophageal scintigraphy (47 of 50 versus 40 of 51; p<0.05), and radiography (20 of 50 versus 2 of 51; p<0.001) than the patients without HH. The results show that severe GER disease can occur without an associated HH and indicate that patients with symptoms of GER disease and associated HH are likely to have a more severe GER disease than those without HH

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissas, John; Braghetto, Italo; Molina, Juan Carlos; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo; Iannelli, Antonio; Foletto, Mirto

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or hiatus hernia (HH) are one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Despite the positive effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) regarding weight loss and improvement in obesity co-morbidities, there are concerns about the development of de novo gastroesophageal reflux disease or worsening the existing GERD after this bariatric operation. Furthermore, controversy exists on the consequences of SG in lower esophageal sphincter function and about the ideal procedure when a hiatus hernia is preoperatively diagnosed or discovered during the laparoscopic SG. This review systematically investigates the incidence, the pathophysiology of GERD and/or HH in morbidly obese individuals before and after SG, and the treatment options for concomitant HH repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

  3. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. T...

  4. Associations among gastroesophageal reflux disease, psychological stress, and sleep disturbances in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Masatsugu; Takaishi, Osamu; Nakahara, Kenichi; Iwakura, Narika; Hasegawa, Tomoki; Oyama, Maizumi; Inoue, Ayumi; Ishizu, Hirotaka; Satoh, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and psychological stress are associated with sleep disturbances. The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of sleep disturbances, anxiety, and depression by GERD subtypes and to identify factors associated with sleep disturbances in general population. A total of 2002 Japanese subjects, who underwent annual health checkups, were enrolled and asked to fill out a questionnaire, including the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG), Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS), Rome III questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). GERD was divided into asymptomatic erosive reflux disease (a-ERD), symptomatic ERD (s-ERD), and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), according to the presence or absence of esophageal mucosal injury on endoscopy, and the FSSG scores. Sleep disturbances were diagnosed in subjects with AIS score ≥6. Prevalence of sleep disturbances was significantly higher in GERD subjects than in controls (35.9 and 14.7%, respectively), especially, in the NERD group (45.1%). Sleep duration was significantly shorter in the s-ERD group compared with other groups. Subjects in the NERD and s-ERD groups showed higher HADS scores, resulting in higher incidences of anxiety and depression than those in the control and a-ERD groups. Reflux symptoms, anxiety, depression, and coexisting functional dyspepsia, but not the presence of esophageal mucosal injury, were associated with an increased odds ratio for sleep disturbances. There were significant positive associations among reflux symptoms, psychological stress, and sleep disturbance in Japanese adults. Further studies investigating the efficacy of therapy are needed.

  5. Is the Routine Use of Impedance Analysis for the Diagnosis of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease More Expensive than Conventional pH Monitoring? Cost Analysis of Two Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törer, Nurkan; Aytaç, Özgür

    2017-06-01

    Conventional 24-h pH monitoring is the gold standard for the diagnosis of non-erosive, non-acidic gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance (MII) analysis markedly improves diagnostic accuracy of non-erosive, non-acidic gastro-esophageal reflux disease. However, MII catheters are more expensive than standard catheters. This study aimed to determine the rates of acid or non-acid reflux and by making a retrospective projection, to predict the costs of two algorithms. We retrospectively reviewed the medical data of 102 patients who presented to our hospital with suspected non-erosive GERD and underwent 24 h impedance/pH-monitoring. Demographic characteristics, Demeester scores, number of reflux episodes, and results of impedance analysis were recorded. According to these data, cost was calculated either for the scenario in which impedance measurement was performed solely or following a negative conventional pH monitoring. Thirty-seven of all 102 patients (36.3 %) had a Demeester score greater than 14.7. These patients were assigned as group 1 (acid reflux). The impedance analysis of the remaining 65 patients detected 34 patients (33.3 %) to have more than 50 reflux episodes over a period of 24 h and assigned as Group 2, and 31 patients (30.4 %) had no reflux (group 3). The cost of the single- step algorithm using MII catheter was calculated as $15,300, while the total cost of two-step scenario would have been predicted as $16,890. Our study showed that an initial conventional pH monitoring can make the diagnosis of GERD in only one third of the patients with suspected non-erosive GERD. In nearly two-thirds of patients, however, repeated procedures and use of impedance catheters are needed. It is clear that this algorithm has certain drawbacks with regard to cost, patient comfort, and workforce loss.

  6. Effect of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, P. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) report that coffee aggravates their symptoms and doctors tend to discourage its use in GORD. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of coffee ingestion on gastro-oesophageal acid reflux. DESIGN: A randomized, controlled, crossover

  7. Comorbidities are frequent in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease in a tertiary health care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P Moraes-Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several aspects of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD have been studied, but the frequency of comorbidities is not yet fully understood. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of GERD comorbidities in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: We prospectively studied 670 consecutive adult patients from the outpatient department of our facility. A diagnosis was established using clinical, endoscopic and/or pHmetry-related findings. Each patient's medical file was reviewed with respect to the presence of other medical conditions and diagnoses. RESULTS: Of the 670 patients, 459 (68.6% were female, and the mean age was 55.94 (17-80 years. We registered 316 patients (47.1% with the erosive form of GERD and 354 patients (52.9% with the non-erosive form. A total of 1,664 instances of comorbidities were recorded in 586 patients (87.5%, with the most common being arterial hypertension (21%, hypercholesterolemia (9%, obesity (9%, type II diabetes mellitus (5% and depression (4%. Two or more comorbidities were present in 437 individuals (64.8%. The occurrence of comorbidities increased with age and was higher in patients with the non-erosive form of GERD. CONCLUSIONS: In a tertiary referral population, comorbidities were very common, and these may have worsened the already impaired health-related quality of life of these patients. Clinicians caring for GERD patients in this setting must be aware of the likelihood and nature of comorbid disorders and their impact on disease presentation and patient management.

  8. Cytoprotective effects of hydrogen sulfide in novel rat models of non-erosive esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zayachkivska

    Full Text Available Non-erosive esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the esophagus and is a form of gastroesophageal reflux disease. There are limited treatment options for non-erosive esophagitis, and it often progresses to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma. Hydrogen sulfide has been demonstrated to be a critical mediator of gastric and intestinal mucosal protection and repair. However, roles for H2S in esophageal mucosal defence, inflammation and responses to injury have not been reported. We therefore examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous H2S in rat models of non-erosive esophagitis. Mild- and moderate-severity non-erosive esophagitis was induced in rats through supplementation of drinking water with fructose, plus or minus exposure to water-immersion stress. The effects of inhibitors of H2S synthesis or of an H2S donor on severity of esophagitis was then examined, along with changes in serum levels of a pro- and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-17 and IL-10, respectively. Exposure to water-immersion stress after consumption of the fructose-supplemented water for 28 days resulted in submucosal esophageal edema and neutrophil infiltration and the development of lesions in the muscular lamina and basal cell hyperplasia. Inhibition of H2S synthesis resulted in significant exacerbation of inflammation and injury. Serum levels of IL-17 were significantly elevated, while serum IL-10 levels were reduced. Treatment with an H2S donor significantly reduced the severity of esophageal injury and inflammation and normalized the serum cytokine levels. The rat models used in this study provide novel tools for studying non-erosive esophagitis with a range of severity. H2S contributes significantly to mucosal defence in the esophagus, and H2S donors may have therapeutic value in treating esophageal inflammation and injury.

  9. Diagnostic tests in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hani de Ardila, Albis

    2009-01-01

    The true prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is difficult to establish despite that an estimated 11% of the U.S. population experiencing heartburn daily or 30% every three days (1), perhaps due to that the disease can cause many symptoms, both typical and atypical as heartburn or chest pain, among others. Multiple techniques for measuring reflux have been used, and many authors (1-3) have asked why this situation, possibly because the techniques measure and quantify the basic pathophysiologic problem disease, the time of exposure of the esophagus distal to the gastric juice, because the measures are quantitatively related to the degree of esophageal mucosal injury, or because the episodes of exposure to gastric juice correlated with the patient's symptoms. As said Richter (4) m any times these studies are unnecessary because the history is sufficiently revealing to identify the presence of GERD. But the clinician must decide which test you choose to carry a diagnosis of a reliable, timely and cost-effective . But we cannot rely on the presence of symptoms to diagnosis, because we incur the overdiagnosis in a considerable number of individuals, the sensitivity set for the typical symptoms as heartburn is 68% and specificity was 63% (2), which leads us to conclude that atypical symptoms should be investigated as they may relate to functional dyspepsia rather than GERD. It is also clear that the severity and frequency of symptoms in any way correlates with the presence or absence of esophagitis, patients with erosive esophagitis are more severe disease and increased risk of developing complications. The persistent exposure of the esophagus to gastric juice does not cause mucosal injury in all individuals, therefore, it is possible to define the disease by the presence of mucosal injury, while endoscopy is able to define the mucosal injury caused by the reflux can also lead to false conclusions, such as those patients with symptoms of GERD who have no

  10. Patterns of reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric population of New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sarath Kumar; Cohen, Ralph Clinton; Karpelowsky, Jonathan Saul

    2017-02-01

    This study is to determine the association of ambulatory pH monitoring (24hr pH) with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and its other investigations. The clinical and epidemiological profiles of subjects referred for reflux disorders are also studied. Symptoms or group of symptoms, profiles and prior investigations of 1259 consecutive pediatric subjects (with 1332 24hr pH studies performed) referred for evaluation of reflux disorders between 1988 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Chi-square or fisher exact test was used for hypothesis testing, student t-test for the comparison of means and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for comparing medians of continuous variables. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as reflux causing major symptoms and complications, was diagnosed in 57.5% subjects of the total sample. Forty-three percent were girls and 56.7% were boys. The most common age group was between 4 months and 2 years (51.2%). Vomiting (64.4%) and irritability (74%) were the most common symptoms with the neurological conditions (23.2%) being the most frequent underlying condition. The parameters used in 24hr pH were significantly higher in those diagnosed with GERD (P reflux disorders. 24hr pH is reliable and should be considered routine in reflux disorders, as it identifies patients with pathologic reflux and avoids a needless surgery. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  11. Role of endoscopy in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a condition due to reflux of stomach content in the esophagus causing trouble symptoms or complications or both. GERD is a clinical diagnosis and typically presents with a heartburn and/or regurgitation and a positive response to antacid secretory medications. GERD is the leading outpatient diagnosis among all gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Approximately 40% of population report occasional symptoms of GERD whereas 10-20% of patients will have symptoms at least once in a week. Recent guidelines from gastrointestinal societies such as American College of Gastroenterology, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and American College of Physicians have laid out specific indications regarding role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in GERD. Despite these recommendations, studies have revealed that one-fifth to two-fifth EGDs may not be clinically indicated, especially where open access endoscopy referral system is used. Traditionally, GERD has been thought to be a disease of the western world. Prevalence rates had been estimated to be lower in Asia when compared to that of the Western Countries. Few recent epidemiological studies in India showed the prevalence of reflux disease in India to be between 8-24%, which is comparable to the western world. The use of EGDs becomes more critical for developing countries such as India where prevalence of GERD and BE is comparable to the western countries but have limited resources. In addition to direct cost for an EGD, it burdens economy with indirect costs such as time off from the work, transportation and any procedural complications. Risk stratifying patients with GERD may therefore prevent unnecessary procedures, harms and costs. The aim of this paper is to review the existing evidence on the role of endoscopy in GERD.

  12. Investigation of extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukali, Emmanouela; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The most common extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include chronic cough, asthma and laryngitis. There are two mechanisms proposed to explain extraesophageal syndromes caused by GERD. The first one is a direct way via irritation and/or microaspiration and the second one is an indirect, vagally mediated way. The investigation of extraesophageal manifestations of GERD is difficult and the empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitors usually double dose for at least three months is still the most common approach. PMID:24714277

  13. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Aerodigestive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Asim; Ryan, Matthew J

    2018-03-01

    This relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and airway disorders is complex, possibly bidirectional, and not clearly defined. The tools used to investigate gastroesophageal reflux are mostly informative about involvement of gastroesophageal reflux within the gastrointestinal tract, although they are often utilized to study the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and airway issues with are suspected to occur in relation to reflux. These modalities often lack specificity for reflux-related airway disorders. Co-incidence of gastroesophageal reflux and airway disorders does not necessarily infer causality. While much of our focus has been on managing acidity, controlling refluxate is an area that has not been traditionally aggressively pursued. Our management approach is based on some of the evidence presented, but also often from a lack of adequate study to provide further guidance. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  15. Complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasa, S; Sharma, P

    2013-06-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is on the rise with more than 20% of the western population reporting symptoms and is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States. This increase in GORD is not exactly clear but has been attributed to the increasing prevalence of obesity, changing diet, and perhaps the decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection. Complications of GORD could be either benign or malignant. Benign complications include erosive oesophagitis, bleeding and peptic strictures. Premalignant and malignant lesions include Barrett's metaplasia, and oesophageal cancer. Management of both the benign and malignant complications can be challenging. With the use of proton-pump inhibitors, peptic strictures (i.e., strictures related to reflux) have significantly declined. Several aspects of Barrett's management remain controversial including the stage in the disease process which needs to be intervened, type of the intervention and surveillance of these lesions to prevent development of high grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  17. Association Between Nocturnal Acid Reflux and Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Sheng; Lei, Wei-Yi; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether there is a direct association between subjective sleep quality and esophageal acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We enrolled patients with classic reflux symptoms for endoscopy and ambulatory pH monitoring. The severity of esophageal mucosal injury was assessed by upper endoscopy. Distal esophageal acid exposure was determined by ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring. Sleep disturbance was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. In total, 103 patients (53 patients without sleep dysfunction and 50 patients with sleep dysfunction) were studied. Erosive esophagitis was found more in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (45% versus 31%, P = 0.04). Abnormal esophageal pH was found more in patients with dysfunction (22%) than in patients without sleep dysfunction (5.7%, P = 0.03). Recumbent acid contact time (%) was greater in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (3.7 ± 2.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.9, P = 0.04). Sleep quality score positively correlated with acid contact time (r = 0.32, P = 0.02), prolonged reflux events (r = 0.45, P = 0.008) and longer reflux event (r = 0.28, P = 0.03) during recumbent period. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease along with sleep dysfunction are characterized with greater nocturnal acid reflux and more erosive esophagitis. Our study suggests that increased nocturnal acid reflux may play a role in inducing sleep disturbance in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  19. [Esophageal motor function of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Tian, Yuan; Ding, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the relationship between esophageal motor functional disorder [decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP)and ineffective motility (IEM)] and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Totally 89 patients with GERD were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent 24-hour pH monitoring with dual-channel probe and stationary esophageal manometry. In addition, 77 of these patients underwent upper endoscopy. IEM and LES, 10 mmHg were common disturbances in patients with GERD (54% and 48%, respectively). The number of the acid reflux events of distal esophagus and prevalence of moderate or severe erosive esophagitis (EE) were significantly higher in patients with low LESP and IEM than patients without low LESP ( Pesophagus was significantly correlated with the severity of esophagitis, distal esophagus amplitude, and LESP, while no such correlation was found between IEM and degree of esophageal acid exposure or esophagitis. The pathophysiology of GERD is probably multifactorial. Lower LESP or IEM is not a independent pathophysiological factor for GERD. However,one single factor is insufficient to explain all the pathogenic mechanism of GERD.

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Tooth Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbin Ranjitkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children and adults, and of “silent refluxers” in particular, increases the responsibility of dentists to be alert to this potentially severe condition when observing unexplained instances of tooth erosion. Although gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic occurrence, excessive gastric and duodenal regurgitation combined with a decrease in normal protective mechanisms, including an adequate production of saliva, may result in many esophageal and extraesophageal adverse conditions. Sleep-related GERD is particularly insidious as the supine position enhances the proximal migration of gastric contents, and normal saliva production is much reduced. Gastric acid will displace saliva easily from tooth surfaces, and proteolytic pepsin will remove protective dental pellicle. Though increasing evidence of associations between GERD and tooth erosion has been shown in both animal and human studies, relatively few clinical studies have been carried out under controlled trial conditions. Suspicion of an endogenous source of acid being associated with observed tooth erosion requires medical referral and management of the patient as the primary method for its prevention and control.

  1. Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Morbidly Obese Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Meredith C; Farrell, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has mirrored the increase in obesity, and GERD is now recognized as an obesity-related comorbidity. There is growing evidence that obesity, specifically central obesity, is associated with the complications of chronic reflux, including erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. While fundoplication is effective in creating a competent gastroesophageal junction and controlling reflux in most patients, it is less effective in morbidly obese patients. In these patients a bariatric operation has the ability to correct both the obesity and the abnormal reflux. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred procedure.

  2. The natural history of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, E; de Bortoli, N; De Cassan, C; Della Coletta, M; Bartolo, O; Furnari, M; Ottonello, A; Marabotto, E; Bodini, G; Savarino, V

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the upper gastrointestinal tract which is typically characterized by heartburn and acid regurgitation. These symptoms are widespread in the community and range from 2.5% to more than 25%. Economic analyses showed an increase in direct and indirect costs related to the diagnosis, treatment and surveillance of GERD and its complications. The aim of this review is to provide current information regarding the natural history of GERD, taking into account the evolution of its definition and the worldwide gradual change of its epidemiology. Present knowledge shows that there are two main forms of GERD, that is erosive reflux disease (ERD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and the latter comprises the majority of patients (up to 70%). The major complication of GERD is the development of Barrett esophagus, which is considered as a pre-cancerous lesion. Although data from medical literature on the natural history of this disease are limited and mainly retrospective, they seem to indicate that both NERD and mild esophagitis tend to remain as such with time and the progression from NERD to ERD, from mild to severe ERD and from ERD to Barrett's esophagus may occur in a small proportion of patients, ranging from 0 to 30%, 10 to 22% and 1 to 13% of cases, respectively. It is necessary to stress that these data are strongly influenced by the use of powerful antisecretory drugs (PPIs). Further studies are needed to better elucidate this matter and overcome the present limitations represented by the lack of large prospective longitudinal investigations, absence of homogeneous definitions of the various forms of GERD, influence of different treatments, clear exclusion of patients with functional disorders of the esophagus. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  4. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter; Yadlapati, Rena; Roman, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent) esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer) associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment. PMID:29034088

  5. Emerging dilemmas in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kahrilas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is common, but less so than widely reported because of inconsistencies in definition. In clinical practice, the diagnosis is usually based on a symptom assessment without testing, and the extent of diagnostic testing pursued should be limited to that which guides management or which protects the patient from the risks of a potentially morbid treatment or an undetected early (or imminent esophageal adenocarcinoma or which does both. When testing is pursued, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most useful initial diagnostic test because it evaluates for the major potential morbidities (Barrett’s, stricture, and cancer associated with GERD and facilitates the identification of some alternative diagnostic possibilities such as eosinophilic esophagitis. However, endoscopy is insensitive for diagnosing GERD because most patients with GERD have non-erosive reflux disease, a persistent diagnostic dilemma. Although many studies have tried to objectify the diagnosis of GERD with improved technology, this is ultimately a pragmatic diagnosis based on response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy, and, in the end, response to PPI therapy becomes the major indication for continued PPI therapy. Conversely, in the absence of objective criteria for GERD and the absence of apparent clinical benefit, PPI therapy is not indicated and should be discontinued. PPIs are well tolerated and safe, but nothing is perfectly safe, and in the absence of measurable benefit, even a miniscule risk dominates the risk-benefit assessment.

  6. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Current diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder difficult to diagnose and to treat. Due to the current definition of GERD, i.e. gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causing bothersome symptoms and/or complications, diagnosis is subject to broad interpretation. This thesis consists of studies

  7. Detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.; Ravnsbaek, J.; Toettrup, A.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.; Aarhus Kommunehospital

    1986-01-01

    In a prospective study a barium examination combined with food stimulation was compared with the acid reflux test in 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Both methods were further compared with endoscopy and histology. Gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated by the radiologic examination in 22 patients and by the acid reflux test in 23 patients. By combining the two methods gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated in 27 patients. Comparing the two methods with symptoms, endoscopy, and histology they seemed to be of equal value. Accordingly, a food-stimulated barium examination is recommended as the first method for demonstrating gastro-oesophageal reflux because it is simple and well-tolerated by the patient. (orig.)

  8. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  9. General gastroscopy of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Analysis of 4086 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-wei HU

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD under general gastroscope. Methods The detection rates of GERD related abnormalities such as esophagitis, Barrett esophagus and hiatal hernia under the first gastroscopy of the adult GERD patients from January 2013 to January 2017 in our center and the statistical relationship between the abnormal findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results A total of 4086 GERD patients, 2004 males and 2082 females, were included in this study, and the age was 18-89(50.4±13.3 years old. The detection rate of non erosive GERD was 78.7%, esophagitis 21.3%; non Barrett esophagus 87.7%, suspected Barrett esophagus 8.3%, Barrett esophagus 3.9%; generally normal cardia 61.4%, short segment hiatus hernia 20.4%, and long segment hiatal hernia 18.2%. The detection rates of esophagitis showed statistically significant differences (P0.013. Comparing the three age groups of 18-39, 40-59 and ≥60 years old, the detection rate of hiatal hernia was significantly higher in the group of ≥60 years old than in the 18-39 and 40-59 years old groups (P=0.007, while there was no significant difference (P>0.013 between the 18-39 and 40-59 years old groups. The detection rate of esophagitis was significantly higher in ≥60 years old group than in 18-39 and 40-59 years old groups (P=0.004, P=0.008, while no significant statistically difference (P>0.013 was found between the later two groups. Conclusions Gastroscopy can be used as a basic examination means for GERD; short segment hiatal hernia can be regarded as an early form of hiatal hernia, and is of importantreference value for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD; more serious hiatal hernia and esophagitis could be found in elderly GERD patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2018.01.08

  10. Sexual activity does not predispose to reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Valytova, Elen; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of sexual activity on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an under-recognized concern of patients, and one rarely assessed by physicians. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the influence of sexual activity on the intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events in GERD patients. Methods Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of GERD were prospectively enrolled. Intraesophageal pH monitoring was recorded for 48 hours with a Bravo capsule. All patients were instructed to have sexual intercourse or abstain in a random order two hours after the same refluxogenic dinner within two consecutive nights. Patients were requested to have sex in the standard “missionary position” and women were warned to avoid abdominal compression. The patients completed a diary reporting the time of the sexual intercourse and GERD symptoms. The percentage of reflux time and acid reflux events were compared in two ways: within 30 and 60 minutes prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and in the same time frame of the day without sexual intercourse. Results Fifteen of 21 GERD patients were analyzed. The percentage of reflux time and number of acid reflux events did not show a significant difference within the 30- and 60-minute periods prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and on the day without sexual intercourse, as well. Conclusion Sexual activity does not predispose to increased intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings in patients who define reflux symptoms during sexual intercourse. PMID:25452843

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  12. Acid perfusion test in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    An acid perfusion test, isotope scanning, endoscopy, and esophageal biopsy were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. A positive acid perfusion test within 30 min (APT) and within 5 min (TAPT) was found in 70.2% and 37.6% of the patients, respectively. A positive APT was found significantly more often in patients with than without endoscopic esophagitis, whereas a positive TAPT was found significantly more often in patients with severe symptoms than in patients with moderate symptoms, and in a significantly higher proportion of patients with than without GER by scintigraphy. Neither the APT nor the TAPT showed any dependency on the presence of histologic esophagitis. Most (97%) patients with a negative acid perfusion test, in addition to typical symptoms, also presented with scintigraphic, endoscopic, or histologic evidence of GER disease. Although it shows that the acid perfusion test, particularly when early positive, may serve as a weak predictor of the severity of GER disease, the present study gives little support to the test's clinical usefulness.

  13. Relationship Between Salivary Pepsin Concentration and Esophageal Mucosal Integrity in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Wen; Sifrim, Daniel; Xie, Chenxi; Chen, Minhu; Xiao, Ying-Lian

    2017-10-30

    Increased salivary pepsin could indicate an increase in gastro-esophageal reflux, however, previous studies failed to demonstrate a correlation between salivary pepsin concentrations and 24-hour esophageal acid exposure. This study aims to detect the salivary pepsin and to evaluate the relationship between salivary pepsin concentrations and intercellular spaces (IS) in different gastroesophageal reflux disease phenotypes in patients. A total of 45 patients and 11 healthy volunteers were included in this study. All subjects underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 24-hour ambulatory multichannel impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring, and salivary sampling at 3-time points during the 24-hour MII-pH monitoring. IS were measured by transmission electron microscopy, and salivary pepsin concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The IS measurements were greater in the esophagitis (EE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and hypersensitive esophagus (HO) groups than in the functional heartburn (FH) and healthy volunteer groups, and significant differences were indicated. Patients with NERD and HO had higher average pepsin concentrations compared with FH patients. A weak correlation was determined between IS and salivary pepsin among patients with NERD ( r = 0.669, P = 0.035). We confirmed the presence of a higher level of salivary pepsin in patients with NERD than in patients with FH. Salivary pepsin concentrations correlated with severity of mucosal integrity impairment in the NERD group. We suggest that in patients with NERD, low levels of salivary pepsin can help identify patients with FH, in addition the higher the pepsin concentration, the more likely the severity of dilated IS.

  14. Anxiety and depression in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and their effect on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Jiang, Hong-Mei; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Song, Jun

    2015-04-14

    To explore the role of psychological factors in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and their effect on quality of life (QoL) of GERD patients. A total of 279 consecutive patients with typical symptoms and 100 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. All of the participants were evaluated with the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (ZSAS), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS) and the SF-36 questionnaire. The scores for anxiety, depression and QoL of the two groups were analyzed. The correlation between psychological factors and QoL was also analyzed. Compared with healthy controls (34.70 ± 8.00), the scores of ZSAS in the non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) group (48.27 ± 10.34) and the reflux esophagitis (RE) group (45.38 ± 10.27) were significantly higher (P < 0.001). The mean ZSAS score of the NERD group was significantly higher than that of the RE group (P = 0.01). Compared with healthy controls (37.61 ± 8.44), the mean ZSDS scores were significantly higher in the NERD group (49.65 ± 11.09, P < 0.001) and the RE group (46.76 ± 11.83, P < 0.001). All dimensions of the SF-36 form were negatively correlated with the SAS and SDS scores in patients with NERD and RE (P < 0.05). According to the SF-36 form, vitality, mental health and social functioning were significantly correlated with symptoms of depression in patients with NERD and RE. General health was obviously affected by symptoms of depression in patients with NERD (P < 0.05). Anxiety and depression may play an important role in the occurrence of GERD and especially that of NERD. The QoL of patients with GERD is reduced by anxiety and depression.

  15. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  17. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD. This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2nd step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3% and 166 (16.6%, respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.13–2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.02. By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42–3.52, positive Campylo-like organism (CLO test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37–0.84, and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05–67.6 were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  18. Mosapride for gastroesophageal reflux disease in neurologically impaired patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Kanamori, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Terawaki, Kan; Suzuki, Kan; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    The prokinetic agent cisapride is effective for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children, but is no longer used for this purpose because of safety concerns. Therefore, other pharmacological agents need to be investigated for efficacy in GERD treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness and safety of mosapride for the treatment of neurologically impaired children and adolescents with GERD. Mosapride (0.3 mg/kg/day) was administered to 11 neurologically impaired patients with GERD (five male; median age, 12.3 years). Esophageal acid exposure was measured using esophageal pH monitoring before and at >5 days after the start of mosapride treatment. The pressure and length of the lower esophageal sphincter were compared before and after mosapride treatment. In the 11 patients, median reflux index (percentage of the total monitoring period during which recorded pH was reflux (range, 0.5-2.1 min/reflux) before and 0.7 min/reflux (range, 0.4-1.2 min/reflux) after treatment with mosapride (P = 0.02). The median number of reflux episodes before (219) and after (122) drug treatment did not differ significantly. The decreased reflux index in neurologically impaired patients with GERD is due to mosapride, therefore mosapride may be a candidate for GERD treatment. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz, Seda; Cengiz, M ?nan?; Sara?, Y ?inasi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Chronic regurgitation of gastric acids in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may cause dental erosion, which can lead in combination with attrition or bruxism to extensive loss of coronal tooth tissue. Case presentation This clinical report describes treatment of severe tooth wear of a gastroesophageal reflux disease patient who is 54-year-old Turkish male patient. After his medical treatment, severe tooth wear, bruxism and decreased vertical dimensions were determined...

  20. Idiopathic gastroesophageal reflux disease in an adult horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Shannon J; Johnson, Philip J; David, Andrew; Cook, Cristi Reeves

    2004-06-15

    Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a 22-year-old female Tennessee Walking Horse that had signs of bruxism and ptyalism. Esophageal ulceration was detected via endoscopy. Compared with the damage to the proximal portions of the esophagus, the severity of the ulceration increased toward the gastroesophageal junction. Esophageal ulceration attributable to chronic gastric acid reflux is usually secondary to pyloric outflow obstruction in horses. In the horse of this report, there was no evidence of either a chronic pyloric or duodenal obstruction that could have resulted in esophageal ulceration. Esophageal ulceration in this horse was attributed to gastroesophageal reflux disease, a common condition in humans in which the underlying abnormality is functional incompetence of the gastroesophageal junction. Treatment is directed at decreasing gastric acidity and protecting the ulcerated mucosa. In the horse of this report, treatment was unsuccessful and the horse was euthanatized; a physical cause of gastroesophageal reflux disease was not identified during an extensive postmortem examination.

  1. Upper aerodigestive tract disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Zuolo, Michele; Feo, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-02-16

    A wide variety of symptoms and diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract are associated to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). These disorders comprise a large variety of conditions such as asthma, chronic otitis media and sinusitis, chronic cough, and laryngeal disorders including paroxysmal laryngospasm. Laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease is an extraoesophageal variant of GORD that can affect the larynx and pharynx. Despite numerous research efforts, the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux often remains elusive, unproven and controversial, and its treatment is then still empiric. Aim of this paper is to review the current literature on upper aerodigestive tract disorders in relation to pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux, focusing in particular on the pathophysiology base and results of the surgical treatment of GORD.

  2. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.; Schober, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [de

  3. Gastric emptying in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Yang Xiaochuan; Kuang Anren; Li Lixia; Ouyang Qin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and gastric emptying rate was investigated. Results of endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring were also evaluated. Methods: 15 patients were evaluated with endoscopy, pH monitoring and radionuclide gastric emptying. The results were compared with that of 17 control subjects. Correlations of gastric emptying rate and esophagitis, 24-hour pH monitoring between GERD patients and control subjects were also analyzed. Results: Liquid gastric emptying rate of GERD patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects at 15 and 30 min (P 0.05), but there exhibited a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score (r=0.643, P<0.05). Conclusions: The results indicate a delayed liquid and solid gastric emptying in GERD patients. There is a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of GERD

  4. Causes of, and Therapeutic Approaches for, Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishihara, Shunji

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most widely used drugs for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, approximately 20% of patients with reflux esophagitis and 40% of those with nonerosive reflux diseases complain of troublesome symptoms, even during treatment with PPIs. In patients with reflux esophagitis, dose escalation and co-administration with a histamine ...

  5. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children

    OpenAIRE

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom ...

  6. Airway Reflux, Cough and Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Ian D.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract. The adjacent respiratory structures are also at risk from material ejected from the proximal oesophagus as a result of the failure of anatomical and physiological barriers. There is evidence of the influence of reflux on several respiratory and otorhinological conditions and although in many cases the precise mechanism has yet to be elucidated, the association alone opens potential novel avenues of therapy to clinicians struggling to treat patients with apparently intractable respiratory complaints. This review provides a description of the airway reflux syndrome, its effects on the lung and current and future therapeutic options. PMID:23251752

  7. Treatment of clinically diagnosed laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Tarek Fouad; Ahmed, Mohamed Rifaat

    2010-11-01

    To determine the incidence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) stool antigen (HPSA) in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD), and to make a comparison of 2 treatment regimens that have been used based on the presence or absence of HPSA positivity in patients with LPRD. Randomized controlled study. Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismalia, Egypt. A total of 212 patients with symptoms of LPRD. Patients were evaluated by laryngoscopy, ambulatory pH monitoring for 24 hours, and HPSA testing. Esomeprazole magnesium as a monotherapy was evaluated vs triple therapy in patients with HP infection. To determine the incidence of HPSA in patients with LPRD, and to make a comparison of 2 treatment regimens that have been used based on the presence or absence of HPSA positivity in patients with LPRD. Persistent dry cough and a feeling of a lump in the throat (globus sensation) were the most frequent symptoms of LPRD, while posterior laryngeal inflammation was the main laryngoscopic finding. Results from the HPSA test were positive in 57% of the studied group. Patients with negative HPSA were treated with esomeprazole as single modality with a reported improvement score of 96.6%. Patients with positive HPSA test results were divided into 2 groups: 1 received only esomeprazole, with reported improvement in 40%, whereas the second group was treated with esomeprazole, plus amoxicillin sodium and clarithromycin (triple therapy) and reported a 90% incidence of symptom improvement. The incidence of HP infection in patients with LPRD in our study was 57%. Triple therapy showed a higher cure rate in patients with HPSA-positive test results.

  8. The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mouzan, Mohammad I.; Abdullah, Asaad M.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common disorder affecting children worldwide. The objective of this study is to report our experience on the accuracy of tests used for the diagnosis ofgastroesophageal reflux disease with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. This study took place in the Pediatric Gastroenterology Division, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, during the period of 1994 through to 1999. Results of barium meal, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy are analyzed and compared in children with and without gastroesophageal reflux disease. One hundred and forty-four children were investigated. The diagnosis was confirmed in 85 and excluded in 59 children, who will be considered as patients without gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of barium meal, 24 hour pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy were positive in 80%, 78%, 92%, and 70% of the patients with gastroesophageal disease. The same studies were falsely positive in 29%, 9%, 19%, and 0% of those without gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal pH was the most specific diagnostic study (91%), whereas endoscopy was the most sensitive (92%) and had the best positive predictive value (95%). The results of this study are similar to reports from other parts of the world. It is stressed that all procedures have important advantages and disadvantages indicating that the selection of procedures should be individualized and based on the clinical situation. (author)

  9. The Role of Esophageal PH-metri Test on Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Setyawati, Katharina; Abdullah, Murdani; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Fauzi, Achmad; Makmun, Dadang; Simadibrata, Marcellus; Manan, Chudahman; Rani, Abdul Aziz

    2008-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a pathological condition of esophagus which is caused by gastric content reflux into esophagus. There is an increased prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The roles of esophageal pH-metry in clinical application include looking for abnormal acid exposure on esophagus with no abnormality found in endoscopy; evaluating patients following the anti-reflux surgery who are being suspected for abnormal esophageal reflux; evaluating patients with normal ...

  10. Correlation of endoscopic severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease (gerd) with body mass index (bmi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.; Haq, I.U.; Butt, A.R.; Shafiq, F.; Huda, G.; Mirza, G.; Rehman, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the correlation of endoscopic severity of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) with Body Mass Index (BMI). This study was conducted on 203 patients, who presented with upper GI symptoms. Patients who fulfilled the symptom criteria were referred for endoscopy. Classification of GERD was done according to LA Grading classification system. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as Body Weight (BW) in kilograms (kg) divided by the square of the body height (BH) in meter (m2). Patient data was analyzed using SPSS 12 software. Statistical evaluation was done using non-parametric Wilcoxon's-sign Rank test. P-value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Distribution of GERD was as follows: GERD-A subjects 65 (32%), GERD B subjects 72 (35.4%), GERD-C subjects 23 (11.3%), GERD-D subjects 10 (4.92%), while Non-Erosive Reflux Disease (NERD) was present in 33 subjects (16.2%). Mean BMI was 27+5.02SD (range of 18.2-38.3). BMI of patients having NERD was in normal range but patients who were having advanced disease i.e. Grade C-D were in obese range of BMI, while those who were having LA grade A-B were in overweight BMI range. When regrouped as mild GERD (grade A-B) and NERD versus severe GERD (grade C-D), there was a strong significant correlation between severity of GERD and BMI, as detected by Wilcoxon's signed Rank test (p=0.001). Higher BMI seems to be associated with higher degree of endoscopic GERD severity. (author)

  11. Heartburn and regurgitation have different impacts on life quality of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lien, Han-Chung; Lee, Teng-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Yeh, Hong-Jeh; Chang, Chi-Sen

    2014-09-14

    To investigate the impact of heartburn and regurgitation on the quality of life among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Data from patients with GERD, who were diagnosed according to the Montreal definition, were collected between January 2009 and July 2010. The enrolled patients were assigned to a heartburn or a regurgitation group, and further assigned to an erosive esophagitis (EE) or a non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) subgroup, depending on the predominant symptoms and endoscopic findings, respectively. The general demographic data, the scores of the modified Chinese version of the GERDQ and the Short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire scores of these groups of patients were compared. About 108 patients were classified in the heartburn group and 124 in the regurgitation group. The basic characteristics of the two groups were similar, except for male predominance in the regurgitation group. Patients in the heartburn group had more sleep interruptions (22.3% daily vs 4.8% daily, P = 0.021), more eating or drinking problems (27.8% daily vs 9.7% daily, P = 0.008), more work interferences (11.2% daily vs none, P = 0.011), and lower SF-36 scores (57.68 vs 64.69, P = 0.042), than patients in the regurgitation group did. Individuals with NERD in the regurgitation group had more impaired daily activities than those with EE did. GERD patients with heartburn or regurgitation predominant had similar demographics, but those with heartburn predominant had more severely impaired daily activities and lower general health scores. The NERD cases had more severely impaired daily activity and lower scores than the EE ones did.

  12. A PROPOSITION FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM A WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NUSSLE, D; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; PEETERS, S; RAVELLI, A; POLANCO, [No Value; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-digestive tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) showed an increasing trend resulting from factors, including lifestyle and dietary habits; however, both etiology and pathological mechanisms remain controversial. GERD occurs as a result of a variety of mechanisms and there is no single factor. Symptoms of GERD are often non-typical, with a likelihood of being overlooked by non-gastroenterology professionals. Therefore, improving GERD awareness in non-gastroenterology practitioners, along with early diagnosis and treatment, provide potential benefit to clinicians and patients alike. Increasing evidence suggests GERD has specific connections with a variety of non-digestive tract conditions, may contribute an aggravating compounding effect on other diseases, prolong hospitalization, and increase subsequent medical costs. This review considers and emphasizes the association between GERD and non-digestive tract conditions, including atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primary pulmonary fibrosis and energy metabolism related to diet.

  14. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the therapeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, maintenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett’s esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any future development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the aforementioned areas of unmet need. PMID:26130628

  15. Dynamic characteristic of gastro-oesophageal reflux in ambulatory patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and normal control subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate the dynamic characteristics of pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux. METHODS: Five-channel ambulatory 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 19 gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients (age, 21-74 years) and in 19 healthy volunteers

  16. Surgical techniques for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Édder de Mello Cardoso Lima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most frequently gastrointestinal tract diseases currently found, having a great impact on the patient's quality of life. Purpose: to analyze the main surgical techniques used in the treatment of this pathology, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Methods: this is a literature review. Thirteen articles published between 1998 and 2013 in the Lilacs, Bireme e Scielo databases, addressing different surgical techniques for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux were selected. Results: Five hundred and thirty-eight total fundoplications and 466 partial fundoplications were performed. Conclusion: The findings of this review show that total fundoplication is the most commonly used technique in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  17. The Role of the Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the commonest chronic conditions in the western world and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The discovery of the acid pocket explained the paradox of acid reflux occurring more frequently in the postprandial period despite intragastric acidity being low due to the buffering effect of the meal. The acid pocket was first described in 2001 when it was detected as an area of low pH immediately distal to the cardia using dual pH electrode pull-through studies 15 minutes after a meal. It was hypothesized that there was a local pocket of acid close to the gastroesophageal junction that escapes the buffering effect of the meal, and that this is the source of postprandial acidic reflux. The presence of the acid pocket has been confirmed in other studies using different techniques including high-resolution pHmetry, Bravo capsule, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphy. This review aims to describe what we know about the acid pocket including its length, volume, fluid constituents, and its relationship to the lower esophageal sphincter and squamocolumnar junction. We will discuss the possible mechanisms that lead to the formation of the acid pocket and examine what differences exist in patients who suffer from acid reflux. Treatments for reflux disease that affect the acid pocket will also be discussed.

  18. The effects of proton pump inhibitors on autonomic tone in patients with erosive and non-erosive esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E L; Perring, S; Khattab, A; Allenby-Smith, O

    2016-05-01

    Reduction in autonomic tone as measured by heart rate variability (HRV) has been associated with various inflammatory conditions including reflux disease. The nature of and permanence of this damage have not been fully assessed. Fourteen individuals with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and 10 individuals with erosive reflux disease (ERD) as identified on endoscopy were assessed for HRV prior to starting a course of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and 8 weeks from the start of PPI therapy. Reflux symptoms were significantly improved by PPI therapy (p = 0.001), with no significant difference in reflux symptoms between the NERD and ERD groups either before (p = 0.45) or following therapy (p = 0.17). The ERD group displayed reduced HRV prior to PPI therapy as compared with a non-symptomatic group. There was significant improvement of HRV resulting from PPI therapy in the ERD group as measured by inspiration/expiration ratio on forced breathing (p = 0.02), Valsalva ratio (p = 0.03), and extended metronome-guided breathing at 6 breaths per minute (p = 0.03). While a similar pattern was seen in the NERD group, the effects were not as strong and did not reach statistical significance. The results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that cardiac autonomic neuropathy as measured by HRV is associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and also suggest that successful treatment of the inflammation can lead to reversal of the deterioration of autonomic tone associated with that inflammation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ANTISECRETORY TREATMENT FOR PEDIATRIC GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE - A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Ângelo Zambam de; Marchese, Gabriela Meirelles; Fonseca, Bárbara Brum; Kupski, Carlos; Machado, Marta Brenner

    2017-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists are two of the most commonly prescribed drug classes for pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease, but their efficacy is controversial. Many patients are treated with these drugs for atypical manifestations attributed to gastroesophageal reflux, even that causal relation is not proven. To evaluate the use of proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists in pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease through a systematic review. A systematic review was performed, using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. The search was limited to studies published in English, Portuguese or Spanish. There was no limitation regarding date of publication. Studies were considered eligible if they were randomized-controlled trials, evaluating proton pump inhibitors and/or histamine H2 receptor antagonists for the treatment of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. Studies published only as abstracts, studies evaluating only non-clinical outcomes and studies exclusively comparing different doses of the same drug were excluded. Data extraction was performed by independent investigators. The study protocol was registered at PROSPERO platform (CRD42016040156). After analyzing 735 retrieved references, 23 studies (1598 randomized patients) were included in the systematic review. Eight studies demonstrated that both proton pump inhibitors and histamine H2 receptor antagonists were effective against typical manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and that there was no evidence of benefit in combining the latter to the former or in routinely prescribing long-term maintenance treatments. Three studies evaluated the effect of treatments on children with asthma, and neither proton pump inhibitors nor histamine H2 receptor antagonists proved to be significantly better than placebo. One study compared different combinations of omeprazole, bethanechol and placebo for the

  20. Belching during gastroscopy and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B S; Lee, S H; Jang, D K; Chung, K H; Hwang, J H; Jang, S E; Cha, B H; Ryu, J K; Kim, Y-T

    2016-05-01

    Belching may result from transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; therefore, it has been proposed that belching may be a manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of belching during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and its association with GERD. A retrospective review was performed on prospectively collected clinical and endoscopic data from 404 subjects who underwent EGD without sedation from December 2012 to May 2013 in a training hospital in Korea. All detectable belching events during endoscopy were counted. Frequency and severity of belching events were compared between the group with and without GERD using an ordinal logistic regression model. There were 145 GERD patients (26 erosive reflux disease and 119 nonerosive reflux disease [NERD]). In the multivariable analysis, GERD was significantly associated with a higher frequency of belching events (odds ratio = 6.59, P reflux disease (n = 378) and NERD (n = 293). NERD was also a predictive factor for frequent belching during EGD (odds ratio = 6.61, P Diseases of the Esophagus.

  1. Extraoesophageal symptoms and signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tepeš

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is very common in developed world, with the prevalence of disease is between 6 and 20%. Pathologic reflux can provoke not only typical symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation but also atypical symptoms and diseases of extraoesophageal organs (pulmonary, ENT, mouth. High prevalence of GERD in patients with unexplained chest pain, asthma, chronic cough, chronic laryngitis, hoarsness and dental erosions is not a proof of causality. GERD can cause these diseases with reflux of acid and pepsin into pharynx, larynx, lungs and mouth (reflux theory or through vasovagal mechanisms (reflex theory. Conclusions Good therapeutic success with medical or operative treatment in early methodologically not well conducted studies has not been completely proven in double-blind placebo controlled studies. GERD is an ethyological reason for these extraoesophageal symptoms and diseases in an approximately one third of patients. With diagnostic modalities that we have now, we cannot clearly define in which patient is GERD is an ethyologic factor or a contributer, before we start the treatment. In patients suspected of having GERD, there is therapeutic option of a trial with high dose of proton pump inhibitor for 3 to 6 months. In other patients with low clinical suspicion of GERD, 24-hour pH testing should be done first.

  2. Role of gastroesophageal reflux disease in lung transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorn, Kelly E; Chan, Walter W; Lo, Wai-Kit

    2017-01-01

    Lung transplantation is one of the highest risk solid organ transplant modalities. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and lung transplant outcomes, including acute and chronic rejection. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of GERD in lung transplantation, as informed by the most recent publications in the field. The pathophysiology of reflux-induced lung injury includes the effects of aspiration and local immunomodulation in the development of pulmonary decline and histologic rejection, as reflective of allograft injury. Modalities of reflux and esophageal assessment, including ambulatory pH testing, impedance, and esophageal manometry, are discussed, as well as timing of these evaluations relative to transplantation. Finally, antireflux treatments are reviewed, including medical acid suppression and surgical fundoplication, as well as the safety, efficacy, and timing of such treatments relative to transplantation. Our review of the data supports an association between GERD and allograft injury, encouraging a strategy of early diagnosis and aggressive reflux management in lung transplant recipients to improve transplant outcomes. Further studies are needed to explore additional objective measures of reflux and aspiration, better compare medical and surgical antireflux treatment options, extend follow-up times to capture longer-term clinical outcomes, and investigate newer interventions including minimally invasive surgery and advanced endoscopic techniques. PMID:28507913

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2006. The imperfect diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, John T.

    2006-01-01

    There continues to be significant controversy related to diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Clearly, barium contrast fluoroscopy is superior to any other test in defining the anatomy of the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract. Although fluoroscopy can demonstrate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), this observation does not equate to GERD. Fluoroscopy time should not be prolonged to attempt to demonstrate GER during barium contrast radiography. There are no data to justify prolonging fluoroscopy time to perform provocative maneuvers to demonstrate reflux during barium contrast UGI series. Symptoms of GERD may be associated with physiologic esophageal acid exposure measured by intraesophageal pH monitoring, and a significant percentage of patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure have no or minimal clinical symptoms of reflux. Abnormal acid exposure defined by pH monitoring over a 24-h period does not equate to GERD. In clinical practice presumptive diagnosis of GERD is reasonably assumed by substantial reduction or elimination of suspected reflux symptoms during therapeutic trial of acid reduction therapy. (orig.)

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2006. The imperfect diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, John T. [Children' s Hospital of Alabama, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama-Birmingham School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-09-15

    There continues to be significant controversy related to diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Clearly, barium contrast fluoroscopy is superior to any other test in defining the anatomy of the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract. Although fluoroscopy can demonstrate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), this observation does not equate to GERD. Fluoroscopy time should not be prolonged to attempt to demonstrate GER during barium contrast radiography. There are no data to justify prolonging fluoroscopy time to perform provocative maneuvers to demonstrate reflux during barium contrast UGI series. Symptoms of GERD may be associated with physiologic esophageal acid exposure measured by intraesophageal pH monitoring, and a significant percentage of patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure have no or minimal clinical symptoms of reflux. Abnormal acid exposure defined by pH monitoring over a 24-h period does not equate to GERD. In clinical practice presumptive diagnosis of GERD is reasonably assumed by substantial reduction or elimination of suspected reflux symptoms during therapeutic trial of acid reduction therapy. (orig.)

  5. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Batool M Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    Background : Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Patients and Methods: The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 ...

  6. Assessing Old and New Diagnostic Tests for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Michael F; Sifrim, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    A detailed critique of objective measurements of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) would improve management of patients suspecting of having reflux, leading to rational selection of treatment and better outcomes. Many diagnostic tests for GERD have been developed over the past decades. We analyze their development, positive- and negative-predictive values, and ability to predict response to treatment. These features are important for development of medical, surgical, and endoscopic therapies for GERD. We discuss the value of available diagnostic tests and review their role in management of patients with persistent reflux symptoms despite adequate medical or surgical treatment. This is becoming a significant health economic problem, due to the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors. GERD is believed to cause nonesophageal symptoms, such as those provoked by ear, nose, throat, or respiratory disorders. We analyze the value of GERD diagnostic tests in evaluation of these troublesome, nonesophageal symptoms. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: recent advances and its association with sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent in Asia as well as in Western countries. Sleep disturbance and breathing disorders during sleep are becoming increasingly prevalent, and they are commonly associated with GERD. The relationship between GERD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is still questionable, and it has expanded to include Barrett's esophagus. Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) symptoms might be clinically important in the explanation of this association. The therapy for reflux symptoms has resulted in improved subjective sleep parameters and enhanced sleep quality, thus supporting a direct relationship between GERD and sleep disturbance. This review discusses the epidemiology of sleep disturbances in GERD patients; the causative relationship between GERD and OSA, even though it remains an area of controversy; and the possible role of nGER in sleep problems. It also provides an update on the current state of knowledge linking GERD and sleep. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolier, E. A.; Kessing, B. F.; Smout, A. J.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality

  9. Possibilities and shortcomings of maintenance therapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1999-01-01

    An overview is given of the current possibilities and shortcomings of medical therapy in reflux disease. With H2-receptor antagonists and prokinetics, roughly 60% of the patients can be maintained in remission; with proton pump inhibitors, remission can be maintained in approximately 90%. Whether

  10. Erroneous diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessing, Boudewijn F.; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Most experienced gastroenterologists have seen one or several cases of achalasia patients who have been erroneously diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or even underwent antireflux surgery. We aim to describe the current knowledge about the diagnostic features of achalasia and

  11. [The novel approaches to the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and co-morbid pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komleva, N E; Marjanovsky, A A; Danilov, A N; Agasarov, L G

    This paper was designed to discuss the problems of co-morbidity and approaches to the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease and a concomitant pathology and to analyze the issues concerning the possible vertebro-visceral correlations inherent in the diseases of the internal organs. To evaluate the vertebro-neurological status of the thoracic segment of the vertebral column in the patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease and to further improve the methods for their treatment taking into consideration the concomitant pathology, if any. A total of 290 patients at the age varying from 25 to 60 (mean 44,3±11,3) years with the non-erosive form of gastroesophageal reflux disease were examined in the phase of its exacerbation. They included 132 (45.5%) men and 158 (54.5%) women. The duration of the disease averaged 13.1±3.3 years and that of the exacerbation period 1.2±0.5 months. All the patients underwent the vertebro-neurological examination. The visual analog scale was used to obtain the subjective characteristics of the pain syndrome associated with thoracalgia The quality of life of the patients was estimated based on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (scores of MOS SF-36). To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach to the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease, the 260 participants of the study were randomly allocated to two groups, the main and control ones. The latter group was comprised of 130 patients given the standard treatment including the use of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, stimulators of the motility of the gastrointestinal tract, alginates, and other drugs, as indicated. The former group consisted of the remaining 130 patients undergoing the standard course of pharmacopuncture to correct the functional disorders in the thoracic segment of the vertebral column. The medications of choice for the purpose were the anti-homotoxic agents, such as

  12. Esophageal chemical clearance is impaired in gastro-esophageal reflux disease--a 24-h impedance-pH monitoring assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoni, M; Manta, R; Mirante, V G; Conigliaro, R; Frazzoni, L; Melotti, G

    2013-05-01

    Impedance-pH monitoring allows assessment of retrograde and antegrade intra-esophageal movement of fluids and gas. Reflux is followed by volume clearance and chemical clearance, elicited by secondary and swallow-induced peristalsis, respectively. We aimed to assess whether chemical clearance is impaired in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Blinded retrospective review of impedance-pH tracings from patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and from proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory patients before and after laparoscopic fundoplication. The number of refluxes followed within 30 s by swallow-induced peristaltic waves was divided by the number of total refluxes to obtain a parameter representing chemical clearance namely the postreflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index. The PSPW index was significantly lower in 31 ERD (15%) and in 44 NERD (33%) off-PPI patients than in 30 controls (75%), as well as in 18 ERD (16%) and in 48 NERD (31%) on-PPI patients than in 26 on-PPI functional heartburn (FH) cases (67%) (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In 29 PPI-refractory patients, the median PSPW index was unaltered by otherwise effective antireflux surgery (20% postoperatively, 21% preoperatively). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of the PSPW index in identifying GERD patients were 97%, 89%, 96%, and 93%. Impairment of chemical clearance is a primary pathophysiological mechanism specific to GERD: it is unaffected by medical/surgical therapy, is not found in FH, and is more pronounced in ERD than in NERD. Using the PSPW index could improve the diagnostic efficacy of impedance-pH monitoring. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Does gastroesophageal reflux increase chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliaz, Sinem; Iliaz, Raim; Onur, Seda Tural; Arici, Serpil; Akyuz, Umit; Karaca, Cetin; Demir, Kadir; Besisik, Fatih; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin; Akyuz, Filiz

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) has been investigated less than asthma-GER. We aimed to evaluate the presence of GER in patients with COPD and its impact on exacerbations. We included 24 patients with stable mild-moderate stage COPD and 19 volunteers as the control group. We conducted a gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptom questionnaire, gastroscopy, manometry, and an ambulatory 24-h pH-impedance study. According to the GERD questionnaire, only 5 (20.8%) patients with COPD had typical GER symptoms. According to the 24-h pH-impedance study, the mean DeMeester score (DMS) was 38.1 ± 34.6 in the COPD group and 13.3 ± 16.8 in the control group (p = 0.01). The acid reflux (DMS > 14.7) rate was higher in patients with COPD than in controls (73.9% vs 26.3%, p = 0.01). The symptom association probability positivity rate was 17.4% (n = 4) in the COPD group, which was similar to the controls (p = 0.11). The mean proximal extension rate of reflux (Z 17 cm) was 26.4 ± 12.9% in the COPD group. The proximal extent of reflux was positively correlated with the number of COPD exacerbations per year (p = 0.03, r = 0.448). In the motility results, only 2 (20%) patients in the control group had a minor motility disorder. Seventeen (70.8%) patients in the COPD group had a minor motility disorder, and 4 (16.7%) had major motility disorders (p gastroesophageal reflux was frequent in patients with COPD, but only a quarter had typical reflux symptoms. The proximal extent of reflux may trigger frequent exacerbations of COPD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acid suppressants for managing gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jane C; Schneuer, Francisco J; Harrison, Christopher; Trevena, Lyndal; Hiscock, Harriet; Elshaug, Adam G; Nassar, Natasha

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate the diagnosis and management of reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in infants aged reflux and GORD and their management including prescribing of acid-suppressant medicines (proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine receptor antagonists (H2RAs)) and counselling, advice or education. Of all infants' visits, 512 (2.7%) included a diagnosis of reflux (n=413, 2.2%) or GORD (n=99, 0.5%). From 2006 to 2016, diagnostic rates decreased for reflux and increased for GORD. Prescribing of acid suppressants occurred in 43.6% visits for reflux and 48.5% visits for GORD, similar to rates of counselling, advice or education (reflux: 38.5%, GORD: 43.4% of visits). Prescribing of PPIs increased (statistically significant only for visits for reflux), while prescribing of H2RAs decreased. Overprescribing of acid suppressants to infants may be occurring. In infants, acid-suppressant medicines are no better than placebo and may have significant negative side effects; however, guidelines are inconsistent. Clear, concise and consistent guidance is needed. GPs and parents need to understand what is normal and limitations of medical therapy. We need a greater understanding of the influences on GP prescribing practices, of parents' knowledge and attitudes and of the pressures on parents of infants with these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric practice: current topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Bielousova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, much attention has been paid to the upper digestive tract diseases in children, particularly gastroesophageal reflux disease, as a cause that has an impact on the quality of life, even in children of school age, and thereafter in young adults. Consequently, there are searches for optimization of early detection, new me-thods of non-invasive diagnosis, screening of this pathology in children’s population in order to determine persons with risk factors and to control disease development and complicated course, as well as searches for the formation of preventive activities algorithm. Scientists came to a consensus that all examinations, which are used in pediatric practice, must be maximally available, simple and non-invasive to the extent of child’s condition. The question about advisability of performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for all patients with complaints of heartburn and with other symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, the question relative to performing ultrasonography of the esophagus in children as an additional method of examination, usage of questionnaire in pediatric practice, formation of disease course prediction algorithm, and identification of preventive measures specific to every patient remain open. In order to explain their application, the developmental mechanisms of this pathology must be well-understood, and individual risk factors that may influence disease severity and disease course prediction, which occur in children in different periods of life, must be taken into account. Therefore, the goal of this research is to provide an overview of modern literature with reference to topical issues of clinical evidence, risk factors, diagnosis, prediction of gastroesophageal reflux disease course in children of different ages (regarding main causative and pathogenic factors, clinical evidence (esophageal and extra-esophageal, diagnostic methods and modern approaches to gastroesophageal reflux disease

  16. The management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Charlotte; Hebbard, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    If there are no features of serious disease, suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease can be initially managed with a trial of a proton pump inhibitor for 4-8 weeks. This should be taken 30-60 minutes before food for optimal effect. Once symptoms are controlled, attempt to withdraw acid suppression therapy. If symptoms recur, use the minimum dose that controls symptoms. Patients who have severe erosive oesophagitis, scleroderma oesophagus or Barrett's oesophagus require long-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. Lifestyle modification strategies can help gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Weight loss has the strongest evidence for efficacy. Further investigation and a specialist referral are required if there is no response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Atypical symptoms or signs of serious disease also need investigation.

  17. [Esophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease: consequences or defensive reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Örs Péter; Bognár, Laura; Papp, András; Vereczkei, András

    2017-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects more than 10% of the adult population. Most patients can be effectively treated with lifestyle changes and adequate acid-reducing therapy. However, about 10% of the patients remain symptomatic despite treatment and severe complications may develop. Interestingly, some of these complications seem to be a sort of defensive mechanism that may either alleviate the patient's symptoms or prevent developing further complications. In Barrett's esophagus, which can be unambigously considered as a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease, reflux symptoms ruining the quality of life may significantly improve, since the metaplastic Barrett epithelium is much more resistent to gastric acid, than the normal epithelial lining of the esophagus. Furthermore, the motility disorders (hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, achalasia, cricopharyngeal achalasia) and structural changes (Schatzki's ring, esophageal stricture, subglottic trachea stenosis), which develop as a complication of reflux may help to prevent aspiration that can cause new complaints and may lead to further complications. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(20): 763-769.

  18. Epidemiology of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asia: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Ethnic and geographical differences are important factors in studying disease frequencies, because they may highlight the environmental or genetic influences in the etiology. We retrieved the studies which have been published regarding the epidemiologic features of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Asia, based on the definitions of GERD, study settings, publication years and geographical regions. From the population-based studies, the prevalence of symptom-based GERD in Eastern Asia was found to be 2.5%-4.8% before 2005 and 5.2%-8.5% from 2005 to 2010. In Southeast and Western Asia, it was 6.3%-18.3% after 2005, which was much higher than those in Eastern Asia. There were robust epidemiologic data of endoscopic reflux esophagitis in medical check-up participants. The prevalence of endoscopic reflux esophagitis in Eastern Asia increased from 3.4%-5.0% before 2000, to 4.3%-15.7% after 2005. Although there were only limited studies, the prevalence of extra-esophageal syndromes in Asia was higher in GERD group than in controls. The prevalence of Barrett's esophagus was 0.06%-0.84% in the health check-up participants, whereas it was 0.31%-2.00% in the referral hospital settings. In summary, the prevalence of symptom-based GERD and endoscopic reflux esophagitis has increased in Asian countries. However, the prevalence of Barrett's esophagus in Asia has not changed and also still rare. PMID:21369488

  19. Associations between peripheral vertigo and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viliušytė, Edita; Macaitytė, Raminta; Vaitkus, Antanas; Rastenytė, Daiva

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that peripheral vertigo is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Two mechanisms could be considered – gastric acids may directly irritate the respiratory mucosa and cause inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) could be present and cause local infection. Reflux material (Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and pepsin) could get into the middle ear via Eustachian tube and affect osseous structures directly. Disturbance of ossicles could cause tinnitus, which is more common for peripheral vertigo. H. pylori could also get in the esophagus and in the upper respiratory tract via gastroesophageal reflux, and could cause tympanosclerosis and fixation of ossicles. In our study group, 120 of 153 (78.4%) patients had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diagnostic tests of H. pylori (rapid urease test or blood antibody test) were performed for 96 of 120 (80%) patients with GERD and were found positive for 32 of 96 (33.3%) patients. Peripheral vertigo was present in 93 of 120 (77.6%) patients with GERD compared to 33 of 126 (26%) patients without GERD (χ(2)=9.016, p=0.003). H. pylori and peripheral vertigo coexisted in 26 of 126 patients (20.6%) (OR 1.36; 95% CI 0.49-3.74, p=0.55). Our study demonstrated statistically significant association between peripheral vertigo and GERD but not between peripheral vertigo and H. pylori. Further more extensive investigations are needed in order to explore our hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - unit description, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Raban

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many GPs are increasingly dealing with patients complaining of ailments likely to suggest gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. These symptoms include heartburn, abdominal pain, and a feeling of esophageal reflux (regurgitation. GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases that gastroenterologists meet in their practice (1, 2. In North America the problem is affected from 18.1% to even 27.8% of the population. The situation is similar in Europe, where the proportion of people with reflux symptoms is in the range of 8.8% - 25.9%. Among European countries, the prevalence of GERD symptoms is higher in the north of the continent than in the south. The growing problem of overweight and obesity that makes GERD more and more recognized in the population of children and adolescents (3 is a worrying fact. Interestingly, reflux-related complaints are much less frequent in eastern Asia, affecting only 2.5% -7.8% of the population (4.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. Scintigraphic, endoscopic and histologic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kault, B.; Halvorsen, T.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Radionucleotide scintigraphy and esophagoscopy with biopsy were carried out in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. GER was visualized by scintigraphy in 86.1% of the patients. Endoscopic and histologic esophagitis were found in 68.1% and 58.4% of the patients, respectively, whereas both examinations taken together showed evidence of esophagitis in 82%. Histologic evidence of esophagitis was found in nearly all patients with severe endoscopic changes, and in 43.7% of the patients with no endoscopic abnormality. Scintigraphic reflux was demonstrated more frequently in the patients with severe endoscopic esophagitis (97.5%) than in those with no or only mild endoscopic changes (78.6%). Scintigraphic reflux was found in 91.5% and 78.5% of the patients with and without histologic evidence of esophagitis. 15 of the 18 patients (83.3%) without endoscopic and histologic abnormalities in the esophagus had scintigraphic evidence of reflux. The present study strongly supports the clinical significance of scintigraphy in GER disease and confirms that esophageal biopsy specimens increase the sensitivity of endoscopic evaluation. 31 refs.

  2. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN THE TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Trofimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common disease of the esophagus, through the development of which is impaired motor function of the upper gastrointestinal system, allowing the disease to be quite be classified as psychosomatic, especially in the early stages of development, when no apparent organic complications that affect the structure of tissues. A significant percentage of mental disorders is observed in patients even before the development of somatic complaints. Patients in number of 105 people are examined. The first group — experienced (71 patient received complex treatment, which includes the basic pathogenetic, symptomatic, and psychotropic treatment in the form of anxiolytics and antidepressants. The choice of drug was based on the results of psychological testing. The second group — the comparison group (34 patients received only conventional treatment, without psychiatric support. Analysis was conducted of the astheno-vegetative syndrome, psychological characteristics of patients in relation to their disease, indicators of anxiety level and severity of depression. Patients with not erosive reflux disease have a frequency of detection of a depression and uneasiness was more than twice higher, than at patients with erosive reflux disease. After carrying out psychotropic treatment these indicators were practically made even. Prescription of psychotropic therapy in the form of antidepressants and anxiolytics has allowed to minimize the timing regression of clinical and psychosomatic manifestations of disease.

  3. Endoscopic augmentation of the lower esophageal sphincter for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Multicenter study of the gatekeeper reflux repair system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fockens, P.; Bruno, M. J.; Gabbrielli, A.; Odegaard, S.; Hatlebakk, J.; Allescher, H. D.; Rösch, T.; Rhodes, M.; Bastid, C.; Rey, J.; Boyer, J.; Muehldorffer, S.; van den Hombergh, U.; Costamagna, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: The safety and effectiveness of the Gatekeeper Reflux Repair System (Medtronic Europe, Tolochenaz, Switzerland) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was evaluated. This new, reversible treatment modality involves the endoscopic introduction of

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Fatih; Doğan, Mansur; Karataş, Duran; Yüce, Salim; Şentürk, Mehmet; Külahli, Ismail

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate a possible relation between gastroesophageal reflux disease and middle ear effusion in children. Children who came to ear, nose, and throat (ENT) department with the symptoms of hearing loss or aural fullness and diagnosed as OME by examination and tympanometry were included into the study. Children were reviewed gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms including the following: (a) airway symptoms: stridor, frequent cough, recurrent croup, wheezing, nasal congestion, obstructive apnea, hoarseness, and throat clearing; (b) feeding symptoms: frequent emesis, dysphagia, choking: gagging, sore throat, halitosis, food refusal, regurgitation, pyrosis, irritability, failure to thrive, and anemia. Diagnosis is made with at least one positive test of radionuclide gastroesophageal scintigraphy or 24 h pH probe in the patients with reflux. ENT findings were also examined between gastroesophageal reflux disease positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease negative groups. Approximately 39 (54.9%) of 71 children had at least 1 positive test for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Between the gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups, symptoms of reflux were not significantly different. Two pooled variables were created: airway complex (stridor, frequent cough, throat clearing), and feeding complex (irritability, pyrosis, failure to thrive). Percentage of positive symptom complexes were no statistically different between gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups (>0.05). Ear, nose, and throat disorders (including rhinitis/sinusitis, adenoid hypertrophy, tonsillitis/pharyngitis, and laryngitis) were more frequent in gastroesophageal reflux disease-positive group. Tonsillitis/pharyngitis was significantly different between the gastroesophageal reflux disease positive and gastroesophageal reflux disease-negative groups. Upper respiratory tract infections were seen

  5. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijven, Marlies P; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I

    2014-02-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid reflux and physician preferences. Success of treatment depends on tailoring treatment modalities to the individual patient and adequate selection of treatment choice. PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) were searched for systematic reviews with an abstract, publication date within the last five years, in humans only, on key terms (laparosc* OR laparoscopy*) AND (fundoplication OR reflux* OR GORD OR GERD OR nissen OR toupet) NOT (achal* OR pediat*). Last search was performed on July 23nd and in total 54 articles were evaluated as relevant from this search. The laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication is the therapy of choice for normal-weight GERD patients qualifying for laparoscopic surgery. No better pharmaceutical, endoluminal or surgical alternatives are present to date. No firm conclusion can be stated on its cost-effectiveness. Results have to be awaited comparing the laparoscopic 180-degree anterior fundoplication with the Toupet fundoplication to be a possible better surgical alternative. Division of the short gastric vessels is not to be recommended, nor is the use of a bougie or a mesh in the vast majority of GERD patients undergoing surgery. The use of a robot is not recommended. Anti-reflux surgery is to be considered expert surgery, but there is no clear consensus what is to be called an 'expert surgeon'. As for setting, ambulatory settings seem promising although high-level evidence is lacking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The value of early wireless esophageal pH monitoring in diagnosing functional heartburn in refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Meonggi; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jinsu; Cho, Yukyung; Park, Jaemyung; Lee, Inseok; Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Kyuyong

    2013-10-01

    It is difficult to differentiate functional heartburn from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) failure. The aims of this study were to assess the role of early wireless esophageal pH monitoring in patients referred with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to identify differences in the clinical spectrum among GERD subtypes. We enrolled consecutive referred patients with suspected GERD. After endoscopy on the first visit, all underwent wireless esophageal pH monitoring when off the PPI. Two hundred thirty patients were enrolled. These patients were classified into a reflux esophagitis group (20, 8.7 %) and a normal endoscopic findings group (210, 91.3 %). Among the 210 patients in the normal endoscopic findings group, 63 (27.4 %) were diagnosed with pathological reflux, 35 (15.2 %) with hypersensitive esophagus, 87 (37.8 %) with normal acid exposure with negative symptom association, and 25 (10.9 %) with test failure. These groups did not differ in age, body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, symptom severity, quality of life, presence of atypical symptoms, overlap with irritable bowel syndrome, and the frequency of somatization, depression, and anxiety. PPI responses were evaluated in 135 patients. Fifty patients (37.0 %) were not responsive to the 4-week treatment; 26 (19.3 %) were diagnosed with refractory non-erosive gastroesophageal disease, and 24 (17.8 %) with functional heartburn. The demographics and clinical and psychological characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Demographic characteristics and symptom patterns alone cannot differentiate functional heartburn from various subtypes of GERD. Wireless esophageal pH monitoring should be considered for the initial evaluation of GERD in the tertiary referral setting.

  7. Asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a multidisciplinary point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solidoro, Paolo; Patrucco, Filippo; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Pellicano, Rinaldo

    2017-08-01

    Asthma and gastroesophageal reflux (GORD) are widespread and potentially coexisting diseases. Incidence and prevalence of concomitant asthma and GORD are highly variable among studies. This is mainly due to the heterogeneity of study designs. To explain a potential link, some pathophysiological anomaly has been proposed such as the altered pressure gradient between thorax and abdomen, the parasympathetic reflex, the heightened bronchial reactivity and chemical effects of microaspired gastric juice. An accurate diagnosis of asthma and GORD is pivotal in order to lead effective treatment and to reach a significant positive outcome, in terms of quality of life and respiratory function amelioration. Gastroenterological evaluation of GORD includes the empiric proton pump-inhibitors (PPIs) trial, the esophageal pH monitoring and endoscopic evaluation. Besides spirometric investigations, pulmonologist have more specific examens such as bronchoalveolar lavage and exhaled breath condensate. Actually, international recommendations regarding the management of asthma suggest the assessment of potential comorbidities, including the presence of GORD, mostly in children, only in patients with normal pulmonary functional tests with frequent respiratory symptoms, and in case of uncontrolled asthma. Symptomatic gastro-esophageal reflux patients should be treated, but those with uncontrolled asthma should not be treated with anti-reflux drugs unless they are symptomatic for reflux. This review explores the state of the art about the pathogenesis and the management of the relationship between asthma and GORD.

  8. The acid pocket: a target for treatment in reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; McColl, Kenneth; Fox, Mark; O'Rourke, Lisa; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J P M; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2013-07-01

    The nadir esophageal pH of reflux observed during pH monitoring in the postprandial period is often more acidic than the concomitant intragastric pH. This paradox prompted the discovery of the "acid pocket", an area of unbuffered gastric acid that accumulates in the proximal stomach after meals and serves as the reservoir for acid reflux in healthy individuals and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. However, there are differentiating features between these populations in the size and position of the acid pocket, with GERD patients predisposed to upward migration of the proximal margin onto the esophageal mucosa, particularly when supine. This upward migration of acid, sometimes referred to as an "acid film", likely contributes to mucosal pathology in the region of the squamocolumnar junction. Furthermore, movement of the acid pocket itself to a supradiaphragmatic location with hiatus hernia increases the propensity for acid reflux by all conventional mechanisms. Consequently, the acid pocket is an attractive target for GERD therapy. It may be targeted in a global way with proton pump inhibitors that attenuate acid pocket development, or with alginate/antacid combinations that colocalize with the acid pocket and displace it distally, thereby demonstrating the potential for selective targeting of the acid pocket in GERD.

  9. [Gastro-esophageal reflux and chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirou, S; Germaud, P; Bruley des Varannes, S; Magnan, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently occurs in association with chronic respiratory diseases although the casual link is not always clear. Several pathophysiological and experimental factors are considered to support a role for GERD in respiratory disease. Conversely, respiratory diseases and bronchodilator treatment can themselves exacerbate GERD. When cough or severe asthma is being investigated, GERD does not need to be systematically looked for and a therapeutic test with proton pump inhibitors is not always recommended. pH impedance monitoring is now the reference diagnostic tool to detect non acid reflux, a form of reflux for which proton pump inhibitor treatment is ineffective. Recent data have shown a potential role of GERD in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolitis obliterans following lung transplantation, leading to discussions about the place of surgery in this context. However, studies using pH impedance monitoring are still needed to better understand and manage the association between GERD and chronic respiratory diseases. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality of life, patient satisfaction, and disease burden in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with or without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Choi, Kee Don; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Youn, Young Hoon; Min, Byung-Hoon; Song, Kyung Ho; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2017-07-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL). The quality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) symptoms is also significantly impaired. However, the impact of LPR symptoms on HRQL in GERD patients has not been studied. A nationwide, random-sample, and face-to-face survey of 300 Korean patients with GERD was conducted from January to March 2013. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were assessed using the Rome III questionnaire, LPR symptoms using the reflux symptom index, and HRQL using the EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A structured questionnaire on patient satisfaction, sickness-related absences, and health-related work productivity was also used. Among the 300 patients with GERD, 150 had LPR symptoms. The mean EQ-5D index was lower in patients with GERD and LPR symptoms than in those without LPR (0.88 vs 0.91, P = 0.002). A linear regression model showed that the severity of LPR symptoms was related to decreased HRQL and was independent of age, marital status, body mass index, or household income. The overall satisfaction rate regarding treatment was lower in patients with GERD and LPR (40.0% vs 69.1%, P = 0.040). GERD patients with LPR symptoms reported greater sickness-related absent hours per week (0.36 vs 0.02 h, P = 0.016) and greater percentages of overall work impairment than those without LPR (31.1% vs 20.8%, P Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with LPR symptoms have a poorer HRQL, a lower satisfaction rate, and a greater disease burden than those without LPR. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations--a pharmacological target for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    The oesophago-gastric junction functions as an anti-reflux barrier preventing increased exposure of the oesophageal mucosa to gastric contents. Failure of this anti-reflux barrier results in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, and may lead to complications such as oesophagitis, Barrett's oesophagus

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Association with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-09-15

    Multiple factors including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were evaluated for a case-control study in Chonnam area to investigate the causative entity of COPD. Data on the multiple causative factors from hospital records and interview survey were analyzed in three groups of COPD (64 cases as case group), normal lung (83 cases as control group 1) and non-COPD lung disease (45 case as control group 2). Smoking status, history of adulthood pulmonary infection and frequent history of URI, socioeconomic status, and GERD were significant different between COPD group and control group 1. Drinking status, physical height of the subjects and GERD were significant different between COPD group and control group 2. If control group 1 was used, odds ratio of GERD and COPD was 5.68 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 2.59-12.45) and 4.81 (95% CI: 1.89-10.53) when adjusted by age and smoking status. If control group 2 was used, odds ratio of GERD and COPD was 4.22 (95% CI: 1.69-10.56) and 4.59 (95% CI: 1.64-12.86) when adjusted by alcohol and adulthood respiratory infection status. In summary, there result suggested that GERD might play a causative role in the development of COPD.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Association with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee; Byun, Joo Nam

    1992-01-01

    Multiple factors including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were evaluated for a case-control study in Chonnam area to investigate the causative entity of COPD. Data on the multiple causative factors from hospital records and interview survey were analyzed in three groups of COPD (64 cases as case group), normal lung (83 cases as control group 1) and non-COPD lung disease (45 case as control group 2). Smoking status, history of adulthood pulmonary infection and frequent history of URI, socioeconomic status, and GERD were significant different between COPD group and control group 1. Drinking status, physical height of the subjects and GERD were significant different between COPD group and control group 2. If control group 1 was used, odds ratio of GERD and COPD was 5.68 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 2.59-12.45) and 4.81 (95% CI: 1.89-10.53) when adjusted by age and smoking status. If control group 2 was used, odds ratio of GERD and COPD was 4.22 (95% CI: 1.69-10.56) and 4.59 (95% CI: 1.64-12.86) when adjusted by alcohol and adulthood respiratory infection status. In summary, there result suggested that GERD might play a causative role in the development of COPD

  14. Current status of gastroesophageal reflux disease : diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tang-Wei; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous studies were searched using the terms "gastroesophageal reflux disease" and "diagnosis" or "treatment" in Medline and Pubmed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, reviews, meta-analysis, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After a preliminary screening, all of the articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of the contemporary approaches to GERD. GERD has a variety of symptomatic manifestations, which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of other alarming symptoms, these symptoms allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis of GERD and initiate empiric therapy. GERD-associated complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modifications, medical and surgical therapy. Medical therapy involves acid suppression, which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The management of this disease requires a complex approach. Maintenance therapy of GERD after using anti-secretory drugs should be continuously monitored. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  15. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms and reflux-associated respiratory symptoms in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Silva H Janaka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD symptoms are common in asthma and have been extensively studied, but less so in the Asian continent. Reflux-associated respiratory symptoms (RARS have, in contrast, been little-studied globally. We report the prevalence of GORD symptoms and RARS in adult asthmatics, and their association with asthma severity and medication use. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study. A validated interviewer-administered GORD scale was used to assess frequency and severity of seven GORD symptoms. Subjects were consecutive asthmatics attending medical clinics. Controls were matched subjects without respiratory symptoms. Results The mean (SD composite GORD symptom score of asthmatics was significantly higher than controls (21.8 (17.2 versus 12.0 (7.6; P P Conclusions GORD symptoms and RARS were more prevalent in a cohort of Sri Lankan adult asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics. Increased prevalence of RARS is associated with both typical and atypical symptoms of GORD. Asthma disease and its severity, but not asthma medication, appear to influence presence of GORD symptoms.

  16. Foods Inducing Typical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Jung Wan; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Several specific foods are known to precipitate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and GERD patients are usually advised to avoid such foods. However, foods consumed daily are quite variable according to regions, cultures, etc. This study was done to elucidate the food items which induce typical GERD symptoms in Korean patients. Methods One hundred and twenty-six Korean patients with weekly typical GERD symptoms were asked to mark all food items that induced typic...

  17. Impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease before and after short-term potent acid suppression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Jonsson, Andreas; Denison, Hans; Wernersson, Börje; Hughes, Nesta; Howden, Colin W

    2014-05-01

    Limited data exist on the impact of regurgitation on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). We assessed the relationship between regurgitation frequency and HRQOL before and after acid suppression therapy in GORD. We used data from two randomised trials of AZD0865 25-75 mg/day versus esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg/day in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) (n=1415) or reflux oesophagitis (RO) (n=1460). The Reflux Disease Questionnaire was used to select patients with frequent and intense heartburn for inclusion and to assess treatment response. The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire was used to assess HRQOL. At baseline, 93% of patients in both the NERD and RO groups experienced regurgitation. Mean QOLRAD scores were similar for NERD and RO at baseline and at week 4 and disclosed decremental HRQOL with increasing frequency of regurgitation; a clinically relevant difference of >0.5 in mean QOLRAD scores was seen with regurgitation ≥4 days/week versus <4 days/week. The prevalence of frequent, persistent regurgitation (≥4 days/week) at week 4 among heartburn responders (≤1 day/week of mild heartburn) was 28% in NERD and 23% in RO. QOLRAD scores were higher among heartburn responders. There was a similar pattern of impact related to regurgitation frequency in heartburn responders compared with the group as a whole. Frequent regurgitation was associated with a clinically relevant, incremental decline in HRQOL beyond that associated with heartburn before and after potent acid suppression in both NERD and RO. NCT00206284 and NCT00206245.

  18. An alginate-antacid formulation localizes to the acid pocket to reduce acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roel J; Smout, Andre J P M; Thomas, Edward; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2013-12-01

    Alginate rafts (polysaccharide polymers that precipitate into a low-density viscous gel when they contact gastric acid) have been reported to form at the acid pocket, an unbuffered pool of acid that floats on top of ingested food and causes postprandial acid reflux. We studied the location of an alginate formulation in relation to the acid pocket and the corresponding effects on reflux parameters and acid pocket positioning in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic GERD and large hiatal hernias to groups who were given either (111)In-labeled alginate-antacid (n = 8, Gaviscon Double Action Liquid) or antacid (n = 8, Antagel) after a standard meal. The relative positions of labeled alginate and acid pocket were analyzed for 2 hours by using scintigraphy; reflux episodes were detected by using high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring. The alginate-antacid label localized to the acid pocket. The number of acid reflux episodes was significantly reduced in patients receiving alginate-antacid (3.5; range, 0-6.5; P = .03) compared with those receiving antacid (15; range, 5-20), whereas time to acid reflux was significantly increased in patients receiving alginate-antacid (63 minutes; range, 23-92) vs those receiving antacid (14 minutes; range, 9-23; P = .01). The acid pocket was located below the diaphragm in 71% of patients given alginate-antacid vs 21% of those given antacid (P = .08). There was an inverse correlation between a subdiaphragm position of the acid pocket and acid reflux (r = -0.76, P acid pocket and displaces it below the diaphragm to reduce postprandial acid reflux. These findings indicate the importance of the acid pocket in GERD pathogenesis and establish alginate-antacid as an appropriate therapy for postprandial acid reflux. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for gastroesophageal reflux disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Habu, Yasuki; Oshima, Tadayuki; Manabe, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagahara, Akihito; Kawamura, Osamu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ozawa, Soji; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Ohara, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Adachi, Kyoichi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miwa, Hiroto; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Haruma, Ken; Hongo, Michio; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-08-01

    As an increase in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported in Japan, and public interest in GERD has been increasing, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology published the Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for GERD (1st edition) in 2009. Six years have passed since its publication, and there have been a large number of reports in Japan concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and Barrett's esophagus during this period. By incorporating the contents of these reports, the guidelines were completely revised, and a new edition was published in October 2015. The revised edition consists of eight items: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, internal treatment, surgical treatment, esophagitis after surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract, extraesophageal symptoms, and Barrett's esophagus. This paper summarizes these guidelines, particularly the parts related to the treatment for GERD. In the present revision, aggressive proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy is recommended for severe erosive GERD, and on-demand therapy or continuous maintenance therapy is recommended for mild erosive GERD or PPI-responsive non-erosive GERD. Moreover, PPI-resistant GERD (insufficient symptomatic improvement and/or esophageal mucosal break persisting despite the administration of PPI at a standard dose for 8 weeks) is defined, and a standard-dose PPI twice a day, change in PPI, change in the PPI timing of dosing, addition of a prokinetic drug, addition of rikkunshito (traditional Japanese herbal medicine), and addition of histamine H2-receptor antagonist are recommended for its treatment. If no improvement is observed even after these treatments, pathophysiological evaluation with esophageal impedance-pH monitoring or esophageal manometry at an expert facility for diseases of the esophagus is recommended.

  20. Dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Seda; Cengiz, M Inanç; Saraç, Y Sinasi

    2009-07-22

    Chronic regurgitation of gastric acids in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may cause dental erosion, which can lead in combination with attrition or bruxism to extensive loss of coronal tooth tissue. This clinical report describes treatment of severe tooth wear of a gastroesophageal reflux disease patient who is 54-year-old Turkish male patient. After his medical treatment, severe tooth wear, bruxism and decreased vertical dimensions were determined. The vertical dimension was re-established and maxillary and mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were prepared for metal-ceramic restorations. Metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures were fabricated as full mouth restorations for both maxillary and mandibular arches because of splinting all teeth. And then maxillary stabilization splint was fabricated for his bruxism history. Significant loss of coronal tooth structure must taken into consideration. Gastroesophageal reflux disease by itself or in combination with attrition, abrasion or bruxism may be responsible for the loss. An extensive diagnostic evaluation is essential for the medical and dental effects of the problem.

  1. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD...... applied a multivariable Cox regression analysis with adjustment for well-established risk factors associated with COPD exacerbations or gastro-esophageal reflux disease, including COPD severity, and symptoms. RESULTS: Individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease had more chronic bronchitis...... and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We...

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: exaggerations, evidence and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cristina Targa; Carvalho, Elisa de; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Morais, Mauro Batista de; Vieira, Mário César; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    there are many questions and little evidence regarding the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. The association between GERD and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA), overuse of abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of GERD, and excessive pharmacological treatment, especially proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are some aspects that need clarification. This review aimed to establish the current scientific evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children. a search was conducted in the MEDLINE, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library electronic databases, using the following keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; gastroesophageal reflux disease; proton-pump inhibitors; and prokinetics; in different age groups of the pediatric age range; up to May of 2013. abdominal ultrasonography should not be recommended to investigate gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Simultaneous treatment of GERD and CMPA often results in unnecessary use of medication or elimination diet. There is insufficient evidence for the prescription of prokinetics to all patients with GER/GERD. There is little evidence to support acid suppression in the first year of life, to treat nonspecific symptoms suggestive of GERD. Conservative treatment has many benefits and with low cost and no side-effects. there have been few randomized controlled trials that assessed the management of GERD in children and no examination can be considered the gold standard for GERD diagnosis. For these reasons, there are exaggerations in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, which need to be corrected. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. [Differentiation therapy for non-acidic gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishchuk, N B; Simanenkov, V I; Tikhonov, S V

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and pathogenetic features of the non-acidic types of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to evaluate the impact of combined therapy versus monotherapy on the course of this disease. The investigation enrolled 62 patients with non-acidic GERD. The follow-up period was 6 weeks. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) weakly acidic gastroesophageal refluxes (GER); 2) weakly alkaline GER. Then each group was distributed, thus making up 4 groups: 1) 19 patients with weakly acidic GER who received monotherapy with rabeprazole 20 mg/day; 2) 21 patients with weakly acidic GER had combined therapy with rabeprazole 20 mg and itopride; 3) 8 patients with weakly alkaline GER who received ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) monotherapy; and 4) 14 patients with weakly alkaline GER who had combined therapy with UDCA and itopride, The clinical symptoms of the disease, the endoscopic pattern of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosa, histological changes in the esophageal and gastric mucosa, and the results of 24-hour impedance pH monitoring were assessed over time. During differentiation therapy, the majority of patients reported positive clinical changes and an improved or unchanged endoscopic pattern. Assessment of impedance pH monitoring results revealed decreases in the overall number of GERs, the presence of a bolus in the esophagus, and the number of proximal refluxes. These changes were noted not only in patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but also in those treated with UDCA monotherapy or combined PPI and prokinetic therapy. A differentiated approach to non-acidic GER treatment contributes to its efficiency. Adding the prokinetic itomed (itopride hydrochloride) to PPI therapy in a patient with weakly acidic GER enhances the efficiency of treatment, by positively affecting upper GIT motility. The mainstay of therapy for GERD with a predominance of weakly alkaline refluxes is UDCA, the combination of the latter and the

  4. Usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy using the knee-chest position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Yasushi; Imai, Yukinori; Ota, Shinichi; Fujiwara, Kenji; Miyamae, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) scintigraphy using the knee-chest (KC) position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study subjects were 37 patients with GERD and 8 healthy volunteers (control group). Endoscopically observed esophageal mucosal breaks were evaluated with the Los Angeles classification. For GER scintigraphy, the subjects ingested liquid yogurt labeled with 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and water. Imaging was performed in the supine and KC position, and GER was graded as 1-4 according to the extent of GER assessed by scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed no reflux in the control group (specificity: 100%). In the supine position, gastroesophageal reflux was observed in 49% of the patients with GERD, compared to 76% in the KC position. 21 of 23 (91%) patients with erosive esophagitis were shown to have GER with scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed severe reflux (grade 3 or 4) (83%, 10/12) in the patients who had severe mucosal breaks (the Los Angels classification grade C or D). GER scintigraphy detected grade 1 or 2 reflux in 7 of the 14 patients who were endoscopically negative. There was a correlation between the endoscopically determined severity of mucosa and the reflux grade which was determined with GER scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy can detect gastroesophageal reflux with a high sensitivity in the KC position and might be a useful method in the screening and assessment of the severity of this disease. This method would be useful for the diagnosis of GERD in endoscopically negative patients. (author)

  5. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Hallas, Jesper; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We applied a multivariable Cox regression analysis with adjustment for well-established risk factors associated with COPD exacerbations or gastro-esophageal reflux disease, including COPD severity, and symptoms. Individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease had more chronic bronchitis (31 vs 21%, P = 0.004), more breathlessness (39 vs 22%, P gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Among individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, those who did not use acid inhibitory treatment regularly had an increased risk of COPD exacerbations during follow-up, hazards ratio (HR): HR = 2.7 (1.3-5.4, P = 0.006). Individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease, using acid inhibitory treatment regularly did not have an increased risk of exacerbations, HR = 1.2 (0.6-2.7, P = 0.63). Gastro-esophageal reflux disease was associated with an increased risk of medically treated exacerbations of COPD, but only in those individuals who did not use acid inhibitory treatment regularly. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. A review of pharmacotherapy for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, Edoardo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Marabotto, Elisa; Bodini, Giorgia; Della Coletta, Marco; Frazzoni, Marzio; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Tolone, Salvatore; Pellegatta, Gaia; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    Medical therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is based on the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as first choice treatment. Despite their effectiveness, about 20-30% of patients report an inadequate response and alternative drugs are required. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of current pharmacotherapy for treating GERD by showing the results of PPIs, reflux inhibitors, antidepressants and mucosa protective medications. Expert opinion: Medical therapy of GERD does not definitely cure the disease, because even PPIs are not able to change the key factors responsible for it. However, they remain the mainstay of medical treatment, allowing us to alleviate symptoms, heal esophagitis and prevent complications in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, many patients do not respond, because acid does not play any pathogenetic role. Prokinetics and reflux inhibitors have the potential to control motor abnormalities, but the results of clinical trials are inconsistent. Antidepressant drugs are effective in specific subgroups of NERD patients with visceral hypersensitivity, but larger, controlled clinical studies are necessary. Protective drugs or medical devices have been recently adopted to reinforce mucosal resistance and preliminary trials have confirmed their efficacy either combined with or as add-on medication to PPIs in refractory patients.

  7. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tseng

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD.One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67, non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37, and Barrett's esophagus (BE, n = 8. Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects.All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile, 80.1 (49.8-108.3 vs. 99.4 (65.8-131.9 pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0-120.8 vs. 32.8 (28.7-84.5 pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6-9.3 vs. 9.9 (9.6-10.6 μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1-9.2 vs. 9.2 (7.1-11.2 μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE.Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD. Further studies to clarify the exact role of these hormones

  8. A proposition for the diagnosis and treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children: A report from a working group on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Vandenplas (Yvan); A. Ashkenazi (A.); D. Belli (D.); N. Boige (N.); J. Bouquet (Jan); S. Cadranel (S.); J.P. Cezard (J.); S. Cucchiara (S.); C. Dupont (C.); K. Geboes (K.); F. Gottrand; H.S.A. Heymans (Hugo); C. Jasinski (C.); C.M.F. Kneepkens (Frank); S. Koletzko (Sybille); P. Milla (Peter); J.F. Mougenot (J.); D. Nusslé (D.); J. Navarro (J.); S.J. Newell (S.); E. Olafsdottir (E.); S. Peeters (S.); A. Ravelli (A.); I. Polanco (I.); B. Sandhu; J.J. Tolboom (Jules)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated

  9. Association between respiratory events and nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux events in patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimchariyatam, Nattapong; Tantipornsinchai, Warangkana; Desudchit, Tayard; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2016-06-01

    Literature has addressed the increased prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Significant improvement of GERD has been found after OSA treatment. However, precise mechanisms underlying this correlation remain unclear. We examined the association between nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and sleep events in patients with coexisting OSA and GERD. A case-crossover study among 12 patients with coexisting moderate-severe OSA and GERD was conducted. Participants underwent simultaneous polysomnography and esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. GER subtypes (ie, acid reflux, non-acid reflux) were defined as outcomes. Respective control time points were selected in all eligible control periods. Each sleep event was assessed individually. Estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were analyzed. A p-value of reflux and 28 non-acid reflux. Arousals and awakenings were significantly associated with subsequent GER events. The OR for GER following an arousal was 2.31 (95% CI 1.39-3.68; p  0.05). Both awakening and arousal appear to precipitate any subtype of GER events in patients with coexisting GERD and moderate to severe OSA. However, GER events were significantly less likely to occur after other respiratory events and did not appear to cause sleep-related events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reflux episodes and esophageal impedance levels in patients with typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bi Xing; Jiang, Liu Qin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between baseline impedance levels and gastroesophageal reflux, we retrospectively enrolled 110 patients (54 men and 56 female; mean age, 51 ± 14 years) with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. Patients were stratified according to symptom (typical or atypical) and reflux types (acid reflux, nonacid reflux [NAR], or no abnormal reflux). Mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) were measured 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. Median distal esophageal MNBI was lower in the acid reflux group (1244 Ω; 647–1969 Ω) than in the NAR (2586 Ω; 1368–3666 Ω) or no abnormal reflux groups (3082 Ω; 2495–4472 Ω; all P < .05). Distal MNBI were negatively correlated with DeMeester score and acid exposure time. Atypical symptoms were more frequently associated with NAR than typical symptoms (P < .01). Among patients with positive symptom-association probability (SAP) for NAR, median proximal MNBI tended to be lower in patients with typical symptoms (median, 3013 Ω; IQR, 2535–3410 Ω) than in those with atypical symptoms (median, 3386 Ω; IQR, 3044–3730 Ω, P = .05). Thus, atypical GERD symptoms were more likely to be associated with NAR. The mucosal integrity of the proximal esophagus might be relatively impaired in GERD patients with typical symptoms for NAR. PMID:28906377

  11. Peroral endoscopic cardial constriction in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai-Qing; Li, Hui-Kai; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Zhi, Jun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Ling-Hu, En-Qiang

    2018-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a major digestive health problem with a high and increasing incidence worldwide. Peroral endoscopic cardial constriction (PECC) was developed by our group to provide a less invasive treatment for GERD.In this preliminary follow-up study, 16 patients were enrolled and 13 patients with GERD were targeted for analysis according to the Los Angeles classification of reflux esophagitis. The GERD health-related quality of life (GERD-HRQL) scale and esophageal pH monitoring were applied to assess clinical efficiency at 3 and 6 months after PECC treatment, respectively.All GERD patients successively received PECC, and no severe treatment-related complication was reported. Before PECC treatment, the GERD-HRQL scale was 19.92 ± 7.89. At 3 and 6 months after treatment, the GERD-HRQL scale was 4.46 ± 4.31 and 5.69 ± 5.07, respectively. DeMeester score was 125.50 ± 89.64 before PECC treatment, and 16.97 ± 12.76 and 20.32 ± 15.22 at 3 and 6 months after PECC treatment. Furthermore, the fraction time of a pH below 4 significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months after PECC treatment. Fraction time at pH reflux of stomach contents.

  12. Recent advances in diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a large economic burden with important complications that include esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Despite endoscopy, validated patient questionnaires, and traditional ambulatory pH monitoring, the diagnosis of GERD continues to be challenging. Areas covered: This review will explore the difficulties in diagnosing GERD with a focus on new developments, ranging from basic fundamental changes (histology and immunohistochemistry) to direct patient care (narrow-band imaging, impedance, and response to anti-reflux surgery). We searched PubMed using the noted keywords. We included data from full-text articles published in English. Further relevant articles were identified from the reference lists of review articles. Expert commentary: Important advances in novel parameters in intraluminal impedance monitoring such as baseline impedance monitoring has created some insight into alternative diagnostic strategies in GERD. Recent advances in endoscopic assessment of esophageal epithelial integrity via mucosal impedance measurement is questioning the paradigm of prolonged ambulatory testing for GERD. The future of reflux diagnosis may very well be without the need for currently employed technologies and could be as simple as assessing changes in epithelia integrity as a surrogate marker for GERD. However, future studies must validate such an approach.

  13. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-28

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD.

  14. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukinori; Kameda, Makoto; Nishikido, Tomoki; Takamatu, Isamu; Doi, Satoru

    2008-05-01

    In pediatric intractable asthma, there is occasionally an association with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). It is not clear in which cases GERD should be suspected or how effective the GERD therapy is in treating the asthma. Twenty-seven preschool children (asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy underwent 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. We examined retrospectively the incidence of GERD and the effectiveness of famotidine in GERD positive patients. 18 of the 27 patients (66.7%) had positive results (GERD positive group). In 12 of the 15 patients (80%) who underwent GERD therapy (famotidine), respiratory symptoms were decreased. In the GERD positive group, the incidence of acid reflux during waking hours was more frequent than during sleeping hours. In 8 of 12 patients (66.7%) in whom famotidine was effective, cough and wheeze often occurred during the daytime and corresponded with the time when acid reflux must commonly occurred. We conclude that children suffering from recurrent asthma attack in spite of asthma therapy must be examined for the presence of GERD.

  15. Epidemiology and natural history of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, S J

    1992-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are confounded by the lack of a standardized definition and a diagnostic 'gold-standard' for the disorder. In Western countries, 20-40% of the adult population experience heartburn, which is the cardinal symptom of GORD, but only some 2% of adults have objective evidence of reflux oesophagitis. The incidence of GORD increases with age, rising dramatically after 40 years of age. There is also wide geographical variation in prevalence. Complications, including oesophageal ulcer and stricture, and Barrett's oesophagus, are found in up to 20% of patients with verified reflux oesophagitis. The signs and symptoms of GORD often wax and wane in intensity, and spontaneous remissions have been reported. In most cases, however, GORD is a chronic condition that returns shortly after discontinuing therapy. Although GORD causes substantial morbidity, the annual mortality rate due to GORD is very low (approximately 1 death per 100,000 patients), and even severe GORD has no apparent effect on longevity, although the quality of life can be significantly impaired. There are data to suggest that the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) contributes to oesophagitis and stricture formation in patients with GORD. Although these data are not conclusive, it seems prudent, if possible, to avoid the use of NSAIDs in patients with GORD, particularly those with oesophageal stricture.

  16. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms and reflux-associated respiratory symptoms in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms are common in asthma and have been extensively studied, but less so in the Asian continent. Reflux-associated respiratory symptoms (RARS) have, in contrast, been little-studied globally. We report the prevalence of GORD symptoms and RARS in adult asthmatics, and their association with asthma severity and medication use. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study. A validated interviewer-administered GORD scale was used to assess frequency and severity of seven GORD symptoms. Subjects were consecutive asthmatics attending medical clinics. Controls were matched subjects without respiratory symptoms. Results The mean (SD) composite GORD symptom score of asthmatics was significantly higher than controls (21.8 (17.2) versus 12.0 (7.6); P < 0.001) as was frequency of each symptom and RARS. Prevalence of GORD symptoms in asthmatics was 59.4% (95% CI, 59.1%-59.6%) versus 28.5% in controls (95% CI, 29.0% - 29.4%). 36% of asthmatics experienced respiratory symptoms in association with both typical and atypical GORD symptoms, compared to 10% of controls (P < 0.001). An asthmatic had a 3.5 times higher risk of experiencing a GORD symptom after adjusting for confounders (OR 3.5; 95% CI 2.5-5.3). Severity of asthma had a strong dose-response relationship with GORD symptoms. Asthma medication use did not significantly influence the presence of GORD symptoms. Conclusions GORD symptoms and RARS were more prevalent in a cohort of Sri Lankan adult asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics. Increased prevalence of RARS is associated with both typical and atypical symptoms of GORD. Asthma disease and its severity, but not asthma medication, appear to influence presence of GORD symptoms. PMID:20843346

  17. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... permanent damage of the esophagus and sometimes even cancer. What Causes ... X-rays. A gastric emptying scan can help show whether a person’s ...

  18. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-asthma lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Morehead

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder in Western countries, and its relationship to airways disorders (e.g. asthma has been well established. Lung diseases other than asthma have also been associated with GERD, but the nature and scope of this relationship has not been fully defined. Diseases that have been associated with GERD include bronchiolitis syndromes, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma and nontubercular mycobacterial infection. Diagnostic evaluation centres upon proving both reflux and pulmonary aspiration, which may be accomplished in some cases by lung biopsy. However, in many cases a compatible clinical and radiographic picture coupled with proof of proximal reflux by combined oesophageal probe testing may suffice for a provisional diagnosis and allow institution of anti-reflux measures. Proton-pump inhibitors are the medications of choice for GERD; other interventions shown to reduce reflux are weight loss, elevation of the head of the bed and avoidance of recumbency after meals. However, acid suppression therapy does not address non-acid reflux that may be important in disease pathogenesis in select patients, and lifestyle modifications often fail. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the procedure of choice for medically refractory GERD with excellent short-term results with respect to respiratory symptoms associated with GERD; however, long-term studies document a significant percentage of patients requiring ongoing acid suppression therapy.

  19. Which drugs are risk factors for the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Zeynel; Pınarbaşı Şimşek, Binnur

    2017-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is common in many communities, is associated with structural factors, eating habits, and the use of certain drugs. The use of such drugs can lead to the emergence of GERD and can also exacerbate existing reflux symptoms. These drugs can contribute to GERD by directly causing mucosal damage, by reducing lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), or by affecting esophagogastric motility. In this article, we report our investigation of the relationships between GERD and medications within the scope of the "Turkish GERD Consensus Group." For the medication groups for which sufficient data were obtained (Figure 1), a systematic literature review in English was conducted using the keywords "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "anti-inflammatory agents, non-steroidal" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "acetylsalicylic acid" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [All Fields] and "estrogenic agents" [All Fields], "gastroesophageal reflux" [All Fields] and "progesterones" [All Fields], "gastroesophageal reflux" [All Fields] and "hormone replacement therapy" [All Fields], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "diphosphonates" [MeSH Terms] OR "diphosphonates" [All Fields], "calcium channel blockers" [MeSH Terms] and "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "nitrates" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "antidepressive agents" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "benzodiazepines" [MeSH Terms] and "hypnotic drugs" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "cholinergic antagonists" [MeSH Terms], "gastroesophageal reflux" [MeSH Terms] and "theophylline" [MeSH Terms], and "gastroesophageal reflux [MeSH Terms] AND "anti-asthmatic agents" [MeSH Terms]. The studies were analyzed and the results are presented here.

  20. Predictors of low compliance with treatment in the patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Tikhonov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread pathology requiring a long-term initial and maintaining therapy. Identification of the risk factors of low compliance of the patient with the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux disease may be helpful in optimization of the patient - the doctor contact and thus may improve the compliance. The paper describes the predictors of low compliance that may be disclosed in the period of primary contact with the patients with gastroesophagial reflux pathology.

  1. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Air swallowing, belching, and reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Timmer, Robin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Belching and gastroesophageal reflux share a common physiological mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether air swallowing leads to both belching and reflux. METHODS: Esophageal impedance, pH, and pressure were measured during two 20-min recording periods in 12 controls

  3. Effects of lesogaberan on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter function in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Mertens, Veerle; Denison, Hans; Ruth, Magnus; Adler, John; Silberg, Debra G.; Sifrim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are a major mechanism behind reflux. This study assessed the effects of lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor agonist, on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function when used as

  4. Presentation and Epidemiology of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Joel E; Rubenstein, Joel H

    2018-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, and leads to substantial morbidity, though associated mortality is rare. The prevalence of GERD symptoms appeared to increase until 1999. Risk factors for complications of GERD include advanced age, male sex, white race, abdominal obesity, and tobacco use. Most patients with GERD present with heartburn and effortless regurgitation. Coexistent dysphagia is considered an alarm symptom, prompting evaluation. There is substantial overlap between symptoms of GERD and those of eosinophilic esophagitis, functional dyspepsia, and gastroparesis, posing a challenge for patient management. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Prevalence and Clinical Features of Non-responsive Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease to Practical Proton Pump Inhibitor Dose in Korea: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong Jun; Park, Soo Heon; Shim, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Sung; Kim, Hyun Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Kim, Yong Sik; Bang, Byoung Wook; Kim, Gwang Ha; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Hyung Hun; Park, Seon Young; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-07-25

    In Korea, there are no available multicenter data concerning the prevalence of or diagnostic approaches for non-responsive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) which does not respond to practical dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in Korea. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the symptom pattern of non-responsive GERD. A total of 12 hospitals who were members of a Korean GERD research group joined this study. We used the composite score (CS) as a reflux symptom scale which is a standardized questionnaire based on the frequency and severity of typical symptoms of GERD. We defined "non-responsive GERD" as follows: a subject with the erosive reflux disease (ERD) whose CS was not decreased by at least 50% after standard-dose PPIs for 8 weeks or a subject with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) whose CS was not decreased by at least 50% after half-dose PPIs for 4 weeks. A total of 234 subjects were analyzed. Among them, 87 and 147 were confirmed to have ERD and NERD, respectively. The prevalence of non-responsive GERD was 26.9% (63/234). The rates of non-responsive GERD were not different between the ERD and NERD groups (25.3% vs. 27.9%, respectively, p=0.664). There were no differences between the non-responsive GERD and responsive GERD groups for sex (p=0.659), age (p=0.134), or BMI (p=0.209). However, the initial CS for epigastric pain and fullness were higher in the non-responsive GERD group (p=0.044, p=0.014, respectively). In conclusion, this multicenter Korean study showed that the rate of non-responsive GERD was substantially high up to 26%. In addition, the patients with the non-responsive GERD frequently showed dyspeptic symptoms such as epigastric pain and fullness.

  6. [Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; de Freitas, Carla Lima; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-01-01

    To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16) and 62.1% (n=87) would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux) and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=26) in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122) in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132) and 92.9% (n=130) of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1%) of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia: a condition in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Khek Yu

    2008-05-01

    Widespread epidemiological changes, rising prevalence and gradual shifts in patterns of disease manifestations: this is the changing face of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Asia. Are we witnessing a disease in evolution or merely the result of increased and more accurate case reporting that comes with advancing diagnostic technology, better medical facilities and heightened awareness of the disease? Do the figures reported really reflect the actual scenario or is there more to it than meets the eye? In this article, we take you back in time to review relevant developments over the past decade or so. We will draw on findings from across Asia, take an in-depth look at prevailing trends and patterns and examine some of the most plausible explanations behind the dynamics of this epidemiological transition.

  8. Factors that influence therapeutic outcomes in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    The term "symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD) refers to those patients who present with the typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation, yet do not have endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. The primary goals of managing symptomatic GERD are to control symptoms and improve quality of life. A clinical assessment of the GERD patient can identify important clinical features, such as atypical and extraesophageal symptoms for which acid-suppressive agents tend to be less effective. Performing an endoscopy can further identify the patient as having nonerosive reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, or Barrett\\'s esophagus-diagnoses which can help determine treatment but may not prove predictive of therapeutic response. Determining acid exposure through pH testing can predict therapeutic response, with those revealing an abnormal acid exposure time being more responsive to acid-suppressive therapy. However, the performance of an endoscopy and pH testing on each patient is clearly not practical. Whereas the natural history of symptomatic GERD is still largely undefined, acid-suppressive therapy appears to be the best approach available for both the short-term and long-term management of this disease.

  9. Reflux disease as an etiological factor of dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux is a frequent disease which has a significant influence on the development of dental erosions. Objective The aim of this research was to determine the frequency of dental erosions among the patients with gastroesophageal reflux, as well as to verify the most common symptoms of gastroesophageal disease. Methods The research comprised of two groups, each consisting of 30 patients aged 18-80 years. The experimental group comprised of patients diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, while the control group was composed of patients who were not diagnosed with GERD. Based on the illness history data, all patients of the experimental group were registered to have gastroesophageal and extraesophageal symptoms. Dental erosions were diagnosed during a stomatological inspection by using index system according to Eccles and Jenkins. Data processing was accomplished by the Statgraphics Centurion software package. Results Dental erosions were found in 76.7% of experimental group patients, and in 53.3% of control group patients. Fortynine percent of teeth of the experimental group patients and 31.1% of the control group patients showed erosive changes. On average, the number of teeth with erosions in the experimental group was 15.7 per person and in the control group 10 per person. The teeth of the front region of the upper jaw, as well as the lower first molars had the highest average value of dental erosion index. In the experimental group 12.8% of teeth and 24% of teeth in the control group were diagnosed to have dental erosion index value 1. Furthermore, 23.4% of teeth in the experimental group and 7.1% of teeth in the control group were registered to have dental erosion index value 2. Finally, the dental erosion index value 3 was found in 13.0% of teeth in the experimental group only. The highest average value of regional erosion index in the experimental group was found in the region 13-23 equalling 1

  10. Parent's Take Home Guide to GERD (Gastroesophogeal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or recurrent pneumonia •Hoarseness •Asthma If you have concerns, speak to your healthcare provider. SICK AND TIRED OF BEING SICK (13+ years) Reflux and your Teen Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) occurs during or after a ...

  11. Oesophagitis, signs of reflux, and gastric acid secretion in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, K.E.; Ask, P.; Boeryd, B.; Fransson, S.G.; Tibbling, L.

    1986-01-01

    In a study comprising 100 patients referred to a surgical clinic with symptons suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the value of different diagnostic procedures was investigated. Positive acid perfusion and 24-h pH tests were the commonest findings. Forty-nine per cent showed normal oesophageal mucosa or diffuse oesophagitis at endoscopy. The severity of heartburn and regurgitation did not differ between patients with normal oesophageal mucosa and oesophagitis of various severities. The severity of macroscopic oesophagitis was significantly corelated to the total reflux time, the presence of reflux or a hiatal hernia at radiology, an open cardia or reflux at endoscopy, pressure transmission or reflux, and low lower oesophageal sphincter pressure at manometry. Gastric hypersecretion was found in 66% of the patients. Gastric acid secretion was not correlated to the severity of oesophagitis or to the findings at 24-h pH test. In patients with severe oesophagitis the sensivity for radiologic, manometric and endoscopic signs of incompetence of the gastro-oesophageal junction was 94%.

  12. Oesophagitis, signs of reflux, and gastric acid secretion in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, K.E.; Ask, P.; Boeryd, B.; Fransson, S.G.; Tibbling, L.

    1986-01-01

    In a study comprising 100 patients referred to a surgical clinic with symptons suggestive of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, the value of different diagnostic procedures was investigated. Positive acid perfusion and 24-h pH tests were the commonest findings. Forty-nine per cent showed normal oesophageal mucosa or diffuse oesophagitis at endoscopy. The severity of heartburn and regurgitation did not differ between patients with normal oesophageal mucosa and oesophagitis of various severities. The severity of macroscopic oesophagitis was significantly corelated to the total reflux time, the presence of reflux or a hiatal hernia at radiology, an open cardia or reflux at endoscopy, pressure transmission or reflux, and low lower oesophageal sphincter pressure at manometry. Gastric hypersecretion was found in 66% of the patients. Gastric acid secretion was not correlated to the severity of oesophagitis or to the findings at 24-h pH test. In patients with severe oesophagitis the sensivity for radiologic, manometric and endoscopic signs of incompetence of the gastro-oesophageal junction was 94%

  13. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M Malaty, J Kennard Fraley

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoda M Malaty1, J Kennard Fraley1,2, Suhaib Abudayyeh1, Kenneth W Fairly1, Ussama S Javed1, et al1Department of Medicine, 2Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The association between body mass index (BMI and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been extensively studied among adults but few studies have examined such association in children. Aims: 1 to determine the relationship between BMI in children and GERD, and 2 to use the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS values for BMI as a valid source for comparison. Methods: We identified two cohorts of children aged between two and 17 years who were seen at Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH. The first cohort consisted of children diagnosed with GERD based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopic and histologic evaluation, which was recorded in the Pediatric Endoscopic Database System-Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI at TCH. A diagnosis of GERD was based on the presence of erosive esophagitis or esophageal ulcers. Endoscopic reports that were incomplete or did not include demographic features, indications for endoscopy, or endoscopic findings were excluded. The second cohort consisted of all children with symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER who received outpatient gastrointestinal (GI consultation at TCH for any 9th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 code suggestive of GER. There was no overlap between the two cohorts as each child was indexed only once. Children with any comorbid illnesses were excluded.Measurements: The records for each child namely, age, gender, height, and weight were obtained on the same date as that of the diagnosis. Using the growth curves published by the NCHS, the gender/age specific weight

  14. Advantages and disadvantages of lumping together gastroesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to identify and to balance the arguments in favor of and against lumping together gastroesophageal reflux disease and functional dyspepsia. RECENT FINDINGS: In at least half of the patients diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease no organic

  15. Effect of baclofen on esophagogastric motility and gastroesophageal reflux in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omari, Taher I.; Benninga, Marc A.; Sansom, Lloyd; Butler, Ross N.; Dent, John; Davidson, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of baclofen, a gamma-amino-butyric-acid B receptor agonist that inhibits transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR), on the rates of TLESR, gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and gastric emptying (GE) in children with GER disease. STUDY DESIGN: The efficacy

  16. Relationship between the mechanism of gastro-oesophageal reflux and oesophageal acid exposure in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, R. C. H.; Wassenaar, E. B.; Herwaarden, M. A.; Holloway, R. H.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Akkermans, L. M. A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the oesophageal acid exposure time and the underlying manometric motor events in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). In 31 patients, 3-hour oesophageal motility and pH were measured after a test meal. Ten patients underwent 24-hour

  17. Atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the cardiogastric interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Dominik; Hohl, Mathias; Vollmar, Johanna; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix; Böhm, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple conditions like hypertension, heart failure, diabetes, sleep apnoea, and obesity play a role for the initiation and perpetuation of AF. Recently, a potential association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and AF development has been proposed due to the close anatomic vicinity of the oesophagus and the left atrium. As an understanding of the association between acid reflux disease and AF may be important in the global multimodal treatment strategy to further improve outcomes in a subset of patients with AF, we discuss potential atrial arrhythmogenic mechanisms in patients with GERD, such as gastric and subsequent systemic inflammation, impaired autonomic stimulation, mechanical irritation due to anatomical proximity of the left atrium and the oesophagus, as well as common comorbidities like obesity and sleep-disordered breathing. Data on GERD and oesophageal lesions after AF-ablation procedures will be reviewed. Treatment of GERD to avoid AF or to reduce AF burden might represent a future treatment perspective but needs to be scrutinized in prospective trials. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  19. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathy Chandramohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study was conducted to determine the association of Helicobactor pylori with endoscopic and histological parameters of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken. A total of 79 patients were evaluated prospectively in the endoscopic unit of a gastroenterology department for symptoms compatible with GERD. In all cases, routine endoscopy and Los Angeles grading of GERD were performed. In each subject, biopsies were taken from 3 cm above the squamocolumnar junction and from the antrum and assessed histologically. Results: Majority of the patients presented with complaints of heartburn (84.8% and regurgitation (75.9%. Nonerosive reflux disease was present in only five patients. Endoscopically, the remaining 74 cases were graded as follows: 25 had GERD A, 10 had GERD B, 35 had features of Barrett's esophagus, and 4 had miscellaneous findings. H. pylori positivity was present in 33.3% of patients with GERD A and 4.8% of those with GERD B. Majority of the histological parameters such as elongation of lamina propria papillae, intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrate, ballooning degeneration, lack of surface maturation, and dilatation and congestion of lamina propria capillaries did not show statistically significant association with H. pylori. The overall H. pylori prevalence was found to be 26.58% (21/79. Conclusion: On endoscopy, with the increased GERD severity, H. pylori incidence decreased. H. pylori was found to have no significant association with majority of the histological parameters.

  20. Dental Erosion in Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Patricia Alves Drummond; Paiva, Saul Martins; De Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; Auad, Sheyla Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on dental erosion (DE) in children and analyze the association between dental erosion and diet, oral hygiene, and sociodemographic characteristics. This case-control study encompassed 43 two- to 14-year-olds diagnosed positive for GERD by the 24-hour pH monitoring, paired by age group with 136 healthy controls, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. DE was assessed by one calibrated examiner using the O'Sullivan index. A questionnaire was self-administered by parents collecting information regarding sociodemographics, oral hygiene, and dietary habits. Dental erosion experience was compared between the groups, and a stratified analysis was performed (PDental erosion was diagnosed in 10.6 percent (N equals 19) of all the children; 25.6 percent (N equals 11) of GERD children and 5.9 percent (N equals eight) of children without GERD, P=0.001). Dental erosion was not associated with dietary consumption or sociodemographic characteristics in both groups (P≥0.05). Children who used adult toothpaste had a 5.79 higher chance of having dental erosion in the group with GERD. Children diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease were at an increased risk of having dental erosion when compared to healthy subjects; among the GERD children, dental erosion was associated with the use of adult toothpaste.

  1. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom scores and individual symptom scores correlate with outcomes in esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring. A total of 26 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease-associated symptoms, aged 0-2 years, for whom both esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire survey results were available were included in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire score data were collected from a 7-day recall of parent's responses about the frequency and severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, which determined the individual symptom scores. The composite symptom scores is the sum of all individual symptom scores. Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH study results were compared to Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire data using Pearson correlation. Among 26 patients, a total number of 2817 (1700 acid and 1117 non-acid) reflux episodes and 845 clinical reflux behaviors were recorded. There were significant correlations between the reflux index and the individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.2842, p = 0.005), the impedance score and individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.2482, p = 0.009), the reflux symptom index for acid reflux-related coughing/gagging/choking and the individual symptom scores for coughing/gagging/choking (r 2 = 0.1900, p = 0.026), the impedance score and

  2. PP-16 WEAK ACID REFLUX A TRIGGER FOR RECURRENT RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostovski, Aco; Zdraveska, Nikolina

    2015-10-01

    The main advantage of multichannel intraluminar impedance (MII) compared with pH monitoring is its ability to detect both acid and non-acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and to determine the characteristics of reflux (liquid or gas). To compare the value of pH monitoring and MII for diagnosis of GER in children who present with refractory respiratory symptoms. A prospective study that included 37 patients, aged 4.25 ± 3.15 years, using combined MII-pH monitoring was performed. Patients were referred for investigation because of suspected GER as the etiology of recurrent respiratory diseases, including recurrent obstructive bronchitis, recurrent pneumonia, laryngitis, and chronic cough. We analyzed the percentage of time during which the pH was less than 4, the numeric and percentile values of acid, weak acid, and non-acid reflux episodes, and the values of liquid and mixed reflux. Diagnostic values were determined separately for pH monitoring and MII using Fisher's exact test. Reflux was detected in 31 patients. pH monitoring was positive in 20 patients (% time during which pH acid and weak acid reflux episodes, 3 had only acid reflux, 8 had weak acid reflux, and 3 had non-acid reflux. Sixteen patients had mixed (liquid and gas) reflux, and 14 had both liquid and mixed reflux. This study suggests that significant numbers of GER include weak acid reflux that cannot be detected by pH probes alone. The weak acid reflux could be a trigger for recurrent respiratory symptoms. Combining pH with MII monitoring is a valuable diagnostic method for diagnosing GER in children.

  3. Insight Into the Relationship Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition that presents with symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation. Asthma is an equally common medical condition that often coexists with GERD. The clinical scenario of difficult-to-treat asthma in the setting of concomitant GERD leads to the possibility of GERD-induced asthma. However, asthma may also induce GERD, so confusion has developed about the role of GERD in patients with moderate to severe asthma. Acid-suppressive therapy may be initiated in patients with asthma, but controlled studies have recently questioned the role of such therapy and, thus, have caused further confusion in this field. Recent advancements in the field of esophageal physiologic testing in GERD have introduced the concept of impedance–pH monitoring, which suggests a possible role of nonacid reflux in those who continue to be symptomatic despite acid-suppressive therapy. However, recent data caution about the role of surgical fundoplication based solely on the results of impedance monitoring. This article reviews current knowledge in the fields of GERD and asthma and suggests a possible treatment option for this group of patients. PMID:28435409

  4. Racial and geographic issues in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prateek; Wani, Sachin; Romero, Yvonne; Johnson, David; Hamilton, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic disorder that is associated with a huge economic burden in the western countries and significantly decreased quality of life. This review focuses on the various multicultural issues in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of GERD. The prevalence of GERD appears to be highest in North America and Europe, whereas epidemiologic data from the Indian subcontinent, Africa, South America, and the Middle East are sparse. A limited number of studies have elucidated ethnic differences in GERD in multiracial populations. African Americans and Asians appear to be at a lower risk for the development of complicated GERD including Barrett's esophagus (BE). Whether the pathophysiology of GERD differs among different populations remains to be answered satisfactorily. It appears that most of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of GERD, as described in western populations, are present in Asians but at a lower scale. The current recommendations for the management of GERD by the American College of Gastroenterology may not meet the need for different ethnic groups or for different geographic regions. Recognition of language barriers in understanding the common terms used to describe reflux symptoms should be borne in mind while treating GERD patients with different ethnic backgrounds. In addition, a universally accepted definition for treatment success in GERD patients is lacking. Given the negative impact on health-related quality of life, significant cost ramifications, and increased risk for BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma, the study of multicultural issues in GERD should be considered.

  5. TREATMENT FOR GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AMONG CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bzarova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the evaluation results of esomeprazol efficacy in the complex therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease among 152 children aged between 3 and 18, suffering from juvenile arthritis. The treatment scheme used in treatment induced the remission of gastro esophageal reflux disease among 45% of patients, conduced to considerable decrease of the esophagus affect intensity among 53% of patients, epithelized erosions of the mucous coat of esophagus among 30 of 32 children. The medication did not cause any clinically significant side responses among the cured children (even younger ones and may be applied to treat gastro esophageal reflux disease among the patients, suffering from juvenile arthritis.Key words: gastroesophageal reflux disease, children, treatment, reflux, esomeprazol, esophagitis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Esophageal motor disease and reflux patterns in patients with advanced pulmonary disease undergoing lung transplant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccombe, J; Mirza, F; Hachem, R; Gyawali, C P

    2013-08-01

    Advanced pulmonary disorders are linked to esophageal hypomotility and reflux disease. However, characterization of esophageal function using high resolution manometry (HRM) and ambulatory pH monitoring, segregation by pulmonary pathology, and comparison to traditional reflux disease are all limited in the literature. Over a 4 year period, 73 patients (55.2 ± 1.3 years, 44F) were identified who underwent esophageal function testing as part of lung transplant evaluation for advanced pulmonary disease (interstitial lung disease, ILD = 47, obstructive lung disease, OLD = 24, other = 2). Proportions of patients with motor dysfunction (≥ 80% failed sequences = severe hypomotility) and/or abnormal reflux parameters (acid exposure time, AET ≥ 4%) were determined, and compared to a cohort of 1081 patients (48.4 ± 0.4 years, 613F) referred for esophageal function testing prior to antireflux surgery (ARS). The proportion of esophageal body hypomotility was significantly higher within advanced pulmonary disease categories (35.6%), particularly ILD (44.7%), compared to ARS patients (12.1%, P esophageal motor pattern or reflux evidence. Interstitial lung disease has a highly significant association with esophageal body hypomotility. Consequently, prevalence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure is high, but implications for post lung transplant chronic rejection remain unclear. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Systematic review: questionnaires for assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolier, E A; Kessing, B F; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous questionnaires with a wide variety of characteristics have been developed for the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Four well-defined dimensions are noticeable in these GERD questionnaires, which are symptoms, response to treatment, diagnosis, and burden on the quality of life of GERD patients. The aim of this review is to develop a complete overview of all available questionnaires, categorized per dimension of the assessment of GERD. A systematic search of the literature up to January 2013 using the Pubmed database and the Embase database, and search of references and conference abstract books were conducted. A total number of 65 questionnaires were extracted and evaluated. Thirty-nine questionnaires were found applicable for the assessment of GERD symptoms, three of which are generic gastrointestinal questionnaires. For the assessment of response to treatment, 14 questionnaires were considered applicable. Seven questionnaires with diagnostic purposes were found. In the assessment of quality of life in GERD patients, 18 questionnaires were found and evaluated. Twenty questionnaires were found to be used for more than one assessment dimension, and eight questionnaires were found for GERD assessment in infants and/or children. A wide variety of GERD questionnaires is available, of which the majority is used for assessment of GERD symptoms. Questionnaires differ in aspects such as design, validation and translations. Also, numerous multidimensional questionnaires are available, of which the Reflux Disease Questionnaire is widely applicable. We provided an overview of GERD questionnaires to aid investigators and clinicians in their search for the most appropriate questionnaire for their specific purposes. © 2013 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. Gender difference in gastro-esophageal reflux diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Iijima, Katsunori; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-07

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen sharply in western countries over the past 4 decades. This type of cancer is considered to follow a transitional process that goes from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) to Barrett's esophagus (BE, a metaplastic condition of the distal esophagus), a precursor lesion and ultimately adenocarcinoma. This spectrum of GERD is strongly predominant in males due to an unidentified mechanism. Several epidemiologic studies have described that the prevalence of GERD, BE and EAC in women is closely related to reproductive status, which suggests a possible association with the estrogen level. Recently, we revealed in an in vivo study that the inactivation of mast cells by the anti-inflammatory function of estrogen may account for the gender difference in the GERD spectrum. Other studies have described the contribution of female steroid hormones to the gender difference in these diseases. Estrogen is reported to modulate the metabolism of fat, and obesity is a main risk factor of GERDs. Moreover, estrogen could confer esophageal epithelial resistance to causative refluxate. These functions of estrogen might explain the approximately 20-year delay in the incidence of BE and the subsequent development of EAC in women compared to men, and this effect may be responsible for the male predominance. However, some observational studies demonstrated that hormone replacement therapy exerts controversial effects in GERD patients. Nevertheless, the estrogen-related endocrine milieu may prevent disease progression toward carcinogenesis in GERD patients. The development of innovative alternatives to conventional acid suppressors may become possible by clarifying the mechanisms of estrogen.

  9. COMBINED 24-HOURS ESOPHAGEAL PH MONITORING AND MULTICHANNEL INTRALUMINAL IMPEDANCE FOR COMPARISON OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX IN CHILDREN WITH TYPICAL VERSUS ATYPICAL SYMPTOMS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Nasri, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    - Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common esophageal disorder in pediatrics. - The aim of this study was to compare reflux parameters of typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease using 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance in pediatric population. - In this prospective study, 43 patients aged less than 18 year with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups based on the main presenting symptoms (typical versus atypical). Twenty four-hour pH monitoring and multichannel intraluminal impedance were performed in all the patients for comparing these two group regarding association of symptoms and reflux. Number of refluxes, pH related reflux, total reflux time, reflux more than 5 minutes, longest time of the reflux, lowest pH at reflux, reflux index were recorded and compared. Data comparison was done using SPSS. - The mean age of the patients was 5.7±3.4 years and 65.1% were male. Out of 43 patients 24 cases had typical symptoms and 19 had atypical symptoms. The mean reflux events detected by multichannel intraluminal impedance was more than mean reflux events detected by pH monitoring (308.4±115.8 vs 69.7±66.6) with P value of 0.037, which is statistically significant. The mean symptom index and symptom association probability were 35.01% ± 20.78% and 86.42% ± 25.79%, respectively in multichannel intraluminal impedance versus 12.73% ± 12.48% and 45.16% ± 42.29% in pH monitoring (P value reflux was 46.26±47.16 and 30.9±22.09 for atypical and typical symptoms respectively. The mean symptom index was 18.12% ± 13.101% and 8.30% ± 10.301% in atypical and typical symptoms respectively (P=0.034). Bolus clearance was longer in atypical symptoms compared typical symptoms(Preflux was found in children with atypical symptoms of reflux. Longer duration of bolus clearance was found in group with atypical symptoms of reflux.

  10. The role of hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2004-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the role of sliding hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The crural diaphragm acts as an external sphincter of the anti-reflux barrier. Contractions of the crural diaphragm increase lower-oesophageal-sphincter (LOS) pressure during each

  11. Effects of anxiety and depression in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessing, Boudewijn F.; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Saleh, Caroline M. G.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of anxiety and depression have been associated with esophageal hyperalgesia and an increased risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We investigated the effects of anxiety and depression on GERD symptoms and the perception of reflux episodes in a well-characterized group of

  12. Prevalence of chronic rhinosinusitis in a population of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnhorst, Idar; Jawad, Samir; Lange, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increased coexistence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has been reported in epidemiologic and register studies, and reflux has been shown more frequently in patients with CRS in studies using esophagus pH manometry compared to participants...

  13. There is no correlation between signs of reflux laryngitis and reflux oesophagitis in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenik, K; Kajzrlikova, I M; Vitek, P; Urban, O; Hanousek, M; Kominek, P

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine if there is correlation between signs of reflux laryngitis (RL) and reflux oesophagitis (RE) in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Laryngeal photography obtained from patients during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy were examined by two otolaryngologists experienced in the field of extra-oesophageal reflux regarding the presence and severity of RL. The presence of RE was evaluated by gastroenterologist. Smokers, heavy drinkers and patients with bronchial asthma were excluded from the statistical analysis. A total of 681 patients were analysed. RL was diagnosed in 367 (53.9%) cases, of whom 182 patients had mild, 118 moderate and 67 severe (Reflux Finding Score > 7) RL. RE was diagnosed in 103 (28.1%) patients with RL and in 80 (25.7%) patients without RL. Neither the difference between the overall group of patients with RL and those without (OR 1.141, 95% CI 0.811-1.605, p = 0.448), nor the differences between the respective subgroups of patients with mild, moderate and severe RL and those without RL were statistically significant. The OR and 95% CI for mild, moderate and severe RL were 1.042, 95% CI 0.712-1.526, p = 0.834, 1.182, 95% CI 0.764-1.831, p = 0.453 and 1.0, 95% CI 0.566-1.766, p = 0.999 respectively. It can be concluded that there is no correlation between RL and RE in patients with GORD symptoms. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  14. Air column in esophagus and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Alijavad; Raji, Hanieh; Teimoori, Mojtaba; Ghourchian, Shadi

    2012-01-01

    During imaging of the normal esophagus, air is often detected. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the appearance of air bubbles on imaging and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) symptoms. The cross-sectional imaging study was conducted at Rasole Akram Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A total of 44 patients underwent X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning; the presence of air in the esophagus and visible on CT imaging was scrutinized. The average age of the subjects was 59 and the male to female ratio was 0.83. We found a significant relationship between the presence of GERD symptoms, the size of air bubbles and esophageal dilation (ED) on the CT scan. Air bubbles in the esophagus may be seen frequently in CT scans, but their size and location can vary. The GERD symptoms can arise when a small diameter air column is present within the esophagus, especially in the middle and lower parts

  15. Prospective randomized controlled trial of an injectable esophageal prosthesis versus a sham procedure for endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fockens, P.; Cohen, L.; Edmundowicz, S.A.; Binmoeller, K.; Rothstein, R.I.; Smith, D.; Lin, E.; Nickl, N.; Overholt, B.; Kahrilas, P.J.; Vakil, N.; Abdel Aziz Hassan, A.M.; Lehman, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether endoscopic implantation of an injectable esophageal prosthesis, the Gatekeeper Reflux Repair System (GK), is a safe and effective therapy for controlling gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A prospective, randomized, sham-controlled, single-blinded,

  16. The value of esophageal histology in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with heartburn and normal endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, Guido N. J.

    2008-01-01

    Histologic markers of reflux-induced mucosal injury are demonstrable in patients with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (neGERD). They include papillary elongation, basal cell hyperplasia, and dilation of intercellular spaces, especially of the prickle layer. These abnormalities are

  17. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, C M G; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20 subjects with reflux symptoms. pH-impedance measurements were used as gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD. Gastro-esophageal reflux measured with the barium study was defined as a positive outcome. 50% of patients presented gastro-esophageal reflux on the barium esophagogram. No significant differences were observed in acid exposure time between subjects with (median: 7.4%; interquartile range, IQR: 8.4%) or without reflux at barium esophagography (median: 5.95%; IQR: 13.05%; p > 0.05). Nor did we find differences in median proximal extent of reflux measured with impedance monitoring between patients with a positive (median: 6.7%; IQR: 1.95%) and negative barium study (median: 7.1%; IQR: 0.68%; p > 0.05). Patients with reflux on barium esophagogram did not have a positive symptom association probability more often than those who did not have reflux at barium esophagography. Lastly, there were no differences in numbers of acid, weakly acidic or total reflux episodes between those with positive or negative barium esophagogram (p > 0.05). No correlations were found between the maximum proximal extent of gastro-esophageal reflux during esophagography and pH-impedance parameters. Presence or absence of gastro-esophageal reflux during barium esophagography does not correlate with incidence or extent of reflux observed during 24-h pH-impedance monitoring and is not of value for the diagnosis of GERD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [The Additional Role of Symptom-Reflux Association Analysis of Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Using Bravo Capsule pH Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Park, Seun Ja; Moon, Won; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2017-10-25

    Since the development of ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring test to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), several parameters have been introduced. The aim of this study was to assess whether using the symptom index (SI), symptom sensitivity index (SSI), and symptom association probability (SAP), in addition to the DeMeester score (DS), would be useful for interpreting the Bravo pH monitoring test. A retrospective study, which included 68 patients with reflux symptoms refractory to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy who underwent a Bravo capsule pH test between October 2006 and May 2015, was carried out. Acid reflux parameters and symptom reflux association parameters were analyzed. The median percent time of total pHvariation in percent time of total pHpH test, diagnosis of GERD, including reflux hypersensitivity, can be improved by performing an analysis of the symptom-reflux association and of the day-to-day variation.

  19. Evaluating outcomes of endoscopic full-thickness plication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with impedance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renteln, Daniel; Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic full-thickness plication allows transmural suturing at the gastroesophageal junction to recreate the antireflux barrier. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) can be used to detect nonacid or weakly acidic reflux, acidic swallows, and esophageal clearance time. This study used MII to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic full-thickness plication. In this study, 12 subsequent patients requiring maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy underwent endoscopic full-thickness plication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. With patients off medication, MII was performed before and 6-months after endoscopic full-thickness plication. The total median number of reflux episodes was significantly reduced from 105 to 64 (p = 0.016). The median number of acid reflux episodes decreased from 73 to 43 (p = 0.016). Nonacid reflux episodes decreased from 23 to 21 (p = 0.306). The median bolus clearance time was 12 s before treatment and 11 s at 6 months (p = 0.798). The median acid exposure time was reduced from 6.8% to 3.4% (p = 0.008), and the DeMeester scores were reduced from 19 to 12 (p = 0.008). Endoscopic full-thickness plication significantly reduced total reflux episodes, acid reflux episodes, and total reflux exposure time. The DeMeester scores and total acid exposure time for the distal esophagus were significantly improved. No significant changes in nonacid reflux episodes and median bolus clearance time were encountered.

  20. Reflux in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your child has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  1. Reflux in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your baby has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  2. Validation of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Oikonomidou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary care physicians face challenges in diagnosing and managing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ meets the standards of validity, reliability, and practicability. This paper reports on the validation of the Greek translation of the RDQ. RDQ is a condition specific instrument. For the validation of the questionnaire, the internal consistency of its items was established using the alpha coefficient of Chronbach. The reproducibility (test-retest reliability was measured by kappa correlation coefficient and the criterion of validity was calculated against the diagnosis of another questionnaire already translated and validated into Greek (IDGP using kappa correlation coefficient. A factor analysis was also performed. Greek RDQ showed a high overall internal consistency (alpha value: 0.91 for individual comparison. All 8 items regarding heartburn and regurgitation, GERD, had good reproducibility (Cohen’s κ 0.60-0.79, while the remaining 4 items about dyspepsia had a moderate reproducibility (Cohen’s κ=’ 0.40-0.59 The kappa coefficient for criterion validity for GERD was rather poor (0.20, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.36 and the overall agreement between the results of the RDQ questionnaire and those based on the IDGP questionnaire was 70.5%. Factor analysis indicated 3 factors with Eigenvalue over 1.0, and responsible for 76.91% of variance. Regurgitation items correlated more strongly with the third component but pain behind sternum and upper stomach pain correlated with the second component. The Greek version of RDQ seems to be a reliable and valid instrument following the pattern of the original questionnaire, and could be used in primary care research in Greece.

  3. Contribution of hiatal hernia to asthma in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Tong; Ji, Feng; Han, Xin-Wei; Gu, Lin-Xia; Wang, Li; Yue, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Zhong-Gao

    2018-05-01

    To determine the correlation between asthma and hiatal hernia (HH) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related asthma requiring laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery. One hundred and thirty-six GERD patients with medically refractory asthma with (80 patients) or without HH (56 patients) were enrolled. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was assessed by endoscopy, esophageal manometry, reflux monitoring and symptom questionnaires, and treated with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) or LNF with concomitant hiatal hernia repair (LNF-HHR). The outcome measures included patients' satisfaction and drug independence. The patients with HH had lower esophageal sphincters (P = .005) and higher DeMeester scores (P = .014) than those without HH. After an average follow-up of 24 months, symptom scores were significantly decreased from the preoperative values (P reflux, but also controlled asthma symptoms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Modern Magnetic Implant for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    A magnetic implant for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was Food and Drug Administration-approved in 2012 and has been extensively evaluated. The device is a ring of magnets that are placed around the gastroesophageal junction, augmenting the native lower esophageal sphincter and preventing reflux yet preserving lower esophageal sphincter physiologic function and allowing belching and vomiting. Magnetic force is advantageous, being permanent and precise, and forces between magnets decrease with esophageal displacement. Multiple patient cohorts have been studied using the magnetic device, and trials establish consistent, long-term improvement in pH data, GERD symptom scores, and proton-pump inhibitor use. A 5-year Food and Drug Administration trial demonstrated that most patients achieved normal pH scores, 85% stopped proton-pump inhibitors, and GERD health-related quality of life symptom scores improved from 27 to 4 at 5 years. Seven studies have compared magnetic augmentation with laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and demonstrated that the magnetic device achieved comparable efficacy with regard to proton-pump inhibitor cessation, GERD symptom score improvement, and heartburn and regurgitation scores. However, to date there have been no randomized, controlled trials comparing the 2 techniques, and the study cohorts are not necessarily comparable regarding hiatal hernia size, severity of reflux, body mass index scores, or esophagitis scores. Dysphagia incidence was similar in both groups. Reoperation rates and safety profiles were also comparable, but the magnetic device demonstrated significant beneficial differences in allowing belching and vomiting. The magnetic device is safe, with the main adverse event being dysphagia with an approximate 3%-5% chronic incidence. Device removals in clinical trials have been between 0% and 7% and were uneventful. There have been no erosions, perforations, or infections in FDA clinical trials

  5. Current Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Nonerosive Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Lin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonerosive reflux disease (NERD is a distinct pattern of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. It is defined as a subcategory of GERD characterized by troublesome reflux-related symptoms in the absence of esophageal mucosal erosions/breaks at conventional endoscopy. In clinical practice, patients with reflux symptoms and negative endoscopic findings are markedly heterogeneous. The potential explanations for the symptom generation in NERD include microscopic inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity (stress and sleep, and sustained esophageal contractions. The use of 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring gives further insight into reflux characteristics and symptom association relevant to NERD. The treatment choice of NERD still relies on acid-suppression therapy. Initially, patients can be treated by a proton pump inhibitor (PPI; standard dose, once daily for 2–4 weeks. If initial treatment fails to elicit adequate symptom control, increasing the PPI dose (standard dose PPI twice daily is recommended. In patients with poor response to appropriate PPI treatment, 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring is indicated to differentiate acid-reflux-related NERD, weakly acid-reflux-related NERD (hypersensitive esophagus, nonacid-reflux-related NERD, and functional heartburn. The response is less effective in NERD as compared with erosive esophagitis.

  6. Impaired Upper Esophageal Sphincter Reflexes in Patients with Supra-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Arash; Venu, Mukund; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Gonzaga, Jason; Lang, Ivan; Massey, Benson; Jadcherla, Sudarshan; Shaker, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Normal responses of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and esophageal body to liquid reflux events prevent esophagopharyngeal reflux and its complications, but abnormal responses have not been characterized. We investigated whether patients with supra-esophageal reflux disease (SERD) have impaired UES and esophageal body responses to simulated reflux events. Methods We performed a prospective study of 25 patients with SERD (19–82 y old, 13 female) and complaints of regurgitation and supra-esophageal manifestations of reflux. We also included 10 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; 32–60 y old, 7 female) without troublesome regurgitation and supra-esophageal symptoms and 24 healthy asymptomatic individuals (controls; 19–49 y old, 13 female). UES and esophageal body pressure responses, along with luminal distribution of infusate during esophageal rapid and slow infusion of air or liquid, were monitored by concurrent high-resolution manometry and intraluminal impedance. Results A significantly smaller proportion of patients with SERD had UES contractile reflexes in response to slow esophageal infusion of acid than controls or patients with GERD. Only patients with SERD had abnormal UES relaxation responses to rapid distension with saline. Diminished esophageal peristaltic contractions resulted in esophageal stasis in patients with GERD or SERD. Conclusions Patients with SERD and complaints of regurgitation have impaired UES and esophageal responses to simulated liquid reflux events. These patterns could predispose them to esophagopharyngeal reflux. PMID:26188682

  7. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy to assess the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menin, R.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Petersen, R.P.; Maier, W.P.; Fisher, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six (36) patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux were studied. Symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were scored as to their severity and compared to quantitative tests of gastroesophageal reflux. Patients were studied with the acid reflux test, fiberoptic endoscopy, exophageal mucosal biopsy with a pinch forceps, esophageal manometry, and radioisotopic gastroesophgeal scintigraphy. Symptoms were scored according to an arbitrary grading system as mild, moderate, or severe. There were significant correlations between symptoms scores and both the degree of endoscopic esophagitis and the gastroesophageal reflux indices as measured by the radioisotopic scintiscan, but not with the degree of histologic esophagitis or lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Review of the findings suggest the following profile for patients who might require antireflux surgery: severe symptoms; presence of endoscopic esophagitis; resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure below 10 mmHg; and gastroesophageal reflux index above 10%

  8. The acid perfusion test in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    An acid perfusion test, isotope scanning, endoscopy, and esophageal biopsy were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. A positive acid perfusion test within 30 min (APT) and within 5 min (TAPT) was found in 70.2% and 37.6% of the patients, respectively. A positive APT was found significantly more often in patients with than without endoscopic esophagitis, whereas a positive TAPT was found significantly more often in patients with severe symptoms than in patients with moderate symptoms, and in a significantly higher proportion of patients with than without GER by scintigraphy. Neither the APT nor the TAPT showed any dependency on the presence of histologic esophagitis. Most (97%) patients with a negative acid perfusion test, in addition to typical symptoms, also presented with scintigraphic, endoscopic, or histologic evidence of GER disease. Although it shows that the acid perfusion test, particularly when early positive, may serve as a weak predictor of the severity of GER disease, the present study gives little support to the test's clinical usefulness

  9. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemenkov Yu.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis. Material and Methods. Features of acidity in esophagus and cardial part of stomach was studied in 175 children aged 4 to 17 years with chronic gastroduodenitis by pH-monitoring. pH-monitoring was carried by «Gastroscan-24». Age and sex characteristics have been identified on examination results. Results. Children of preschool age experience the most unfavorable reflux from the stomach to the esophagus. Boys experience the pathological reflux more severely. Conclusions: Effectiveness of esophageal clearance is lower in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux progresses are more favorably in a standing position, especially in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux occurs more often in the supine position and has a longer and more aggressive course in preschool age boys.

  11. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease on Asthma Control in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Anne E.; Clerisme-Beaty, Emmanuelle M.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Rubin I.; Lang, Jason E.; Brown, Ellen D.; Richter, Joel E.; Irvin, Charles G.; Mastronarde, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for asthma. Obese asthmatics often have poor asthma control and respond poorly to therapy. It has been suggested that co-morbidities associated with obesity, such as reflux and obstructive sleep apnea, could be important factors contributing to poor asthma control in obese patients. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine if (i) reflux and/or (ii) symptoms of sleep apnea contribute to poor asthma control in obesity. Methods We studied asthmatic subjects participating in a trial of reflux treatment. Participants underwent baseline evaluation of asthma symptoms and lung function. 304 participants underwent esophageal pH probe testing. 246 participants were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea symptoms. Results Of 402 participants in this trial, 51% were obese. Role of reflux in asthma control Those with higher body mass index reported a higher prevalence of reflux symptoms, but the prevalence of pH probe acid reflux was similar in all groups. Reflux was not associated with measures of asthma control in obese patients. Role of obstructive sleep apnea in asthma control Symptoms and self-report of obstructive sleep apnea were more common with increasing body mass index and associated with worse asthma control as measured by the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire and Asthma Symptom Utility Index. Conclusions Our data suggest that obstructive sleep apnea, but not gastroesophageal reflux disease may contribute significantly to poor asthma control in obese patients. PMID:21819338

  12. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a complex relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Jennings, Neil; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2013-07-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is rapidly becoming popular as a standalone bariatric operation. At the same time, there are valid concerns regarding its long-term durability and postoperative gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Though gastric bypass remains the gold standard bariatric operation, it is not suitable for all patients. Sleeve gastrectomy is sometimes the only viable option. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease, liver cirrhosis, significant intra-abdominal adhesions involving small bowel and those reluctant to undergo gastric bypass could fall in this category. It is widely recognised that some patients report worsening of their gastro-oesophageal reflux disease after sleeve gastrectomy. Still, others develop de novo reflux. This review examines if it is possible to identify these patients prior to surgery and thus prevent postoperative gastro-oesophageal reflux disease after sleeve gastrectomy.

  13. Review article: oesophageal complications and consequences of persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisegna, J.; Holtmann, G.; Howden, C. W.; Katelaris, P. H.; Sharma, P.; Spechler, S.; Triadafilopoulos, G.; Tytgat, G.

    2004-01-01

    The major oesophageal complications associated with persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include erosive oesophagitis, ulceration, strictures and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Although the causes of these complications are uncertain, studies indicate that erosive oesophagitis may

  14. Surgical reintervention after antireflux surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a prospective cohort study in 130 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furnée, Edgar J. B.; Draaisma, Werner A.; Broeders, Ivo A. M. J.; Smout, Andre J. P. M.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2008-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Surgical reintervention after antireflux surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease is required in 3% to 6% of patients. The subjective outcome after reintervention has been reported in several studies, but objective results after these subsequent operations have rarely been published.

  15. Overlap of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Jensen, Trine Holm; Henriksen, Susanne Lund

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common functional gastrointestinal conditions with significant impact on the daily lives of individuals. The objective was to investigate the prevalence and overlap...

  16. Failure to respond to physiologic challenge characterizes esophageal motility in erosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, C; Sweis, R; Kaufman, E; Fuellemann, A; Anggiansah, A; Fried, M; Fox, M

    2011-06-01

    Non-specific esophageal dysmotility with impaired clearance is often present in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), especially those with erosive disease; however the physio-mechanic basis of esophageal dysfunction is not well defined. Retrospective assessment of patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD; n=20) and endoscopy negative reflux disease (ENRD; n=20) with pathologic acid exposure on pH studies (>4.2% time/24 h) and also healthy controls (n=20) studied by high resolution manometry. Esophageal motility in response to liquid and solid bolus swallows and multiple water swallows (MWS) was analyzed. Peristaltic dysfunction was defined as failed peristalsis, spasm, weak or poorly coordinated esophageal contraction (>3cm break in 30 mmHg isocontour). Peristaltic dysfunction was present in 33% of water swallows in controls, 56% ENRD and 76% ERD respectively (Preflux events and increase exposure to gastric refluxate. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Impact of gastro-esophageal reflux on mucin mRNA expression in the esophageal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roon, Aafke H C; Mayne, George C; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; Watson, David I; Leong, Mary P; Neijman, Gabriëlle E; Michael, Michael Z; McKay, Andrew R; Astill, David; Hussey, Damian J

    2008-08-01

    Changes in the expression of mucin genes in the esophageal mucosa associated with uncomplicated gastro-esophageal reflux disease have not been evaluated even though such changes could be associated with reflux-induced mucosal damage. We therefore sought to identify reflux-induced changes in mucin gene expression using a cell line and biopsies from the esophageal mucosa in patients with and without reflux. MUC-1, MUC-3, MUC-4, and MUC-5AC gene expressions were investigated in the HET-1A cell line following exposure to acid (pH 4) and/or bile (120 muM of a bile salt milieu), and in esophageal mucosal biopsies from controls, subjects with non-erosive gastro-esophageal reflux, and subjects with reflux associated with ulcerative esophagitis (erosive). The mucosal biopsies were also evaluated for IL-6 mRNA expression (inflammatory marker) and CK-14 mRNA expression (mucosal basal cell layer marker). Gene expression was determined using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In the cell line studies, there were differences in mRNA levels for all of the evaluated mucins following treatment with either acid or the acid and bile combination. In the studies which evaluated tissue specimens, IL-6 and CK-14 mRNA levels increased according to degree of reflux pathology. The expression of MUC-1 and MUC-4 in mucosa from patients with erosive reflux was lower than in subjects without reflux and in patients with non-erosive reflux, whereas the expression of MUC-3 and MUC-5AC was increased (although these differences did not reach significance at p reflux groups. The correlation between IL-6 and MUC-3 was significant within the control and erosive reflux groups, and the correlation between MUC-1 and MUC-5AC was significant within the erosive reflux group. The results of this study suggest that the profile of mucin expression in the esophageal mucosa is influenced by the pH and composition of the gastro-esophageal reflux. Further work should explore the

  18. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Anan; Hungin, A Pali S; Wooff, David; Childs, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and its association with the disease. Design Systematic review of studies reporting the prevalence of H pylori in patients with and without gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Data sources Four electronic databases, searched to November 2001, experts, pharmaceutical companies, and journals. Main outcome measure Odds ratio for prevalence of H pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Results 20 studies were included. The pooled estimate of the odds ratio for prevalence of H pylori was 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.78), indicating a lower prevalence in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Substantial heterogeneity was observed between studies. Location seemed to be an important factor, with a much lower prevalence of H pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in studies from the Far East, despite a higher overall prevalence of infection than western Europe and North America. Year of study was not a source of heterogeneity. Conclusion The prevalence of H pylori infection was significantly lower in patients with than without gastro-oesophageal reflux, with geographical location being a strong contributor to the heterogeneity between studies. Patients from the Far East with reflux disease had a lower prevalence of H pylori infection than patients from western Europe and North America, despite a higher prevalence in the general population. What is already known on this topicThe relation between H pylori infection and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is controversialStudies on the prevalence of H pylori in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease have given conflicting resultsRecent guidelines recommend eradication of H pylori in patients requiring long term proton pump inhibitors, essentially for reflux diseaseWhat this study addsDespite heterogeneity between studies, the prevalence of H pylori was

  19. WHAT IS THE REAL IMPAIRMENT ON ESOPHAGEAL MOTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela FALCÃO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Impairment of esophageal motility is a common finding in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD as reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES basal pressure. A very low LES pressure might facilitate the occurrence of more gastroesophageal reflux whereas abnormal esophageal peristalsis may contribute to impaired esophageal clearance after reflux. Objective Evaluate the esophageal motor function of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal body in the various forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods The manometrics records of 268 patients, who had evaluation of the esophageal motility as part of the diagnostic gastroesophageal reflux disease were split into four groups, as follows: 33 patients who had no esophagitis; 92 patients who had erosive esophagitis; 101 patients who had short Barrett's esophagus and 42 patients who had long Barrett's esophagus. Results The group who had long Barrett's esophagus showed smaller mean LES pressure and higher percentage of marked LES hypotonia; in the distal segment of the esophageal body the this group showed higher percentage of marked hypocontractility of the distal segment (<30 mm Hg; this same group showed higher percentage of esophageal motility disorders. Conclusions The most intense esophageal motility disorders and lower pressure of lower esophageal sphincter were noted in the group with long Barrett's esophagus. Those with reflux esophagitis and short Barrett's esophagus had esophageal motility impairment, intermediate among patients with esophagitis and long Barrett's esophagus. Patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux but without esophagitis by endoscopy study showed no impairment of esophageal motility.

  20. What is the real impairment on esophageal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Angela; Nasi, Ary; Brandão, Jeovana; Sallum, Rubens; Cecconello, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    Impairment of esophageal motility is a common finding in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) basal pressure. A very low LES pressure might facilitate the occurrence of more gastroesophageal reflux whereas abnormal esophageal peristalsis may contribute to impaired esophageal clearance after reflux. Evaluate the esophageal motor function of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal body in the various forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The manometrics records of 268 patients, who had evaluation of the esophageal motility as part of the diagnostic gastroesophageal reflux disease were split into four groups, as follows: 33 patients who had no esophagitis; 92 patients who had erosive esophagitis; 101 patients who had short Barrett's esophagus and 42 patients who had long Barrett's esophagus. The group who had long Barrett's esophagus showed smaller mean LES pressure and higher percentage of marked LES hypotonia; in the distal segment of the esophageal body the this group showed higher percentage of marked hypocontractility of the distal segment (disorders. The most intense esophageal motility disorders and lower pressure of lower esophageal sphincter were noted in the group with long Barrett's esophagus. Those with reflux esophagitis and short Barrett's esophagus had esophageal motility impairment, intermediate among patients with esophagitis and long Barrett's esophagus. Patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux but without esophagitis by endoscopy study showed no impairment of esophageal motility.

  1. Control of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations and reflux by the GABAB agonist baclofen in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Lehmann, A; Rigda, R; Dent, J; Holloway, R H

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLOSRs) are the major cause of gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects and in most patients with reflux disease. The gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor type B agonist, baclofen, is a potent inhibitor of TLOSRs in normal subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of baclofen on TLOSRs and postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease. Methods: In 20 patients with reflux disease, oesophageal motility and pH were measured, with patients in the sitting position, for three hours after a 3000 kJ mixed nutrient meal. On separate days at least one week apart, 40 mg oral baclofen or placebo was given 90 minutes before the meal. Results: Baclofen reduced the rate of TLOSRs by 40% from 15 (13.8–18.3) to 9 (5.8–13.3) per three hours (preflux episodes by 43% from 7.0 (4.0–12.0) to 4.0 (1.5–9) per three hours (median (interquartile range); preflux disease, the GABAB agonist baclofen significantly inhibits gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes by inhibition of TLOSRs. These findings suggest that GABAB agonists may be useful as therapeutic agents for the management of reflux disease. PMID:11772961

  2. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P tolerance to stress and higher frustration, fear, and worry. On the basis of such unfavorable phychoemotional results observed with GERD patients (especially those without hernia) in the different tests, we propose that improving our knowledge of the psychological profile of GERD patients - particularly those without hiatal hernia - could help in designing individualized medical and psychological therapies and increase success rates. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Randomised clinical trial: the clinical efficacy and safety of an alginate-antacid (Gaviscon Double Action) versus placebo, for decreasing upper gastrointestinal symptoms in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Yang, C; Zhao, H; Zheng, P; Wilkinson, J; Ng, B; Yuan, Y

    2015-10-01

    There is a paucity of large-scale studies evaluating the clinical benefit of the Gaviscon Double Action (DA) alginate-antacid formulation for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group study to evaluate efficacy and safety of Gaviscon DA in reducing heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia symptoms in individuals with mild-to-moderate GERD in China. Participants with symptomatic GERD (n = 1107) were randomised to receive Gaviscon DA or placebo (two tablets four times daily) for seven consecutive days. The primary endpoint compared the change in Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) score for the GERD (heartburn + regurgitation) dimension between Gaviscon DA and placebo. Secondary endpoints compared the change in RDQ scores for individual heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia dimensions, overall treatment evaluation (OTE) scores and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Mean RDQ GERD scores: 2.51 for Gaviscon DA and 2.50 for placebo at baseline; 1.25 for Gaviscon DA and 1.46 for placebo post treatment. Gaviscon DA was statistically superior to placebo in reducing GERD and dyspepsia RDQ scores [least-squares mean (LSM) difference: GERD -0.21, P GERD symptoms was observed both in those with non-erosive and those with erosive reflux disease (LSM difference -0.14 [P = 0.038] and -0.29 [P GERD. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01869491. © 2015 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Batool M

    2011-03-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 as compared with 30 healthy patients from a control group that was age and sex matched. Helicobacter pylori CagA+ was identified by an immunological test (Immunochromatography test) (ACON, USA). Helicobacter pyloriCagA+ was present in 42/60 (70%) of the patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in 11/30 (36.6%) patients in the control group (p=0.002). The Odds ratio = 0.8004 with 95% Confidence Interval = from 0.3188 to 2.0094. The relative risk=1.35 that indicates an association between Helicobacter pylori and disease. The presence of Helicobacter pylori is significantly increased in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease as compared with the control group.

  5. Prevalence and Spectrum of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease in Bronchial Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameschandra, Sahoo; Acharya, Vishak; Kunal; Vishwanath, Tantry; Ramkrishna, Anand; Acharya, Preetam

    2015-10-01

    There exists a complex interplay between asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Both these diseases are known to aggravate each other and amelioration of one is necessary for the control of the other. There is a paucity of studies in Indian population on this subject. To evaluate the clinical features and the endoscopic findings of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients with bronchial asthma. Study was conducted at KMC group of hospitals, Mangalore in the Department of chest medicine in association with Department of gastroenterology. Subjects included 50 cases of bronchial asthma and controls were 58 non asthmatic patients with allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria. All patients were queried about presence or absence of symptoms of upper gastro intestinal tract disorders by gastro oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaire and all the included patients underwent upper gastro intestinal endoscopy. The study showed that symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux were significantly more in asthmatics (52%) as compared to the controls (28%). The common presenting features of gastroesophageal reflux in asthmatics were heartburn (40%) retrosternal pain (24%), nocturnal cough (18%), dyspepsia (16%) and regurgitation (14%) and the above symptoms were significantly more common in asthmatics as compared to controls. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was found to be significantly more common in the asthmatics (58%) as compared to the control group where it was present in 32.75% of the subjects. Clinical or endoscopic evidence of any upper gastrointestinal disorder was found in 68% of the asthmatics as compared to 37.93% of the controls. This difference was found to be statistically significant. The study showed that gastroesophageal reflux disease was significantly more in asthmatics as compared to the controls. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms were more common in asthmatics as against controls. Clinical or endoscopic evidence of upper gastrointestinal disorder and

  6. Indications of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring, capsule pH monitoring, combined pH monitoring with multichannel impedance, esophageal manometry, radiology and scintigraphy in gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Rukiye; Keskin, Muharrem

    2017-12-01

    Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring is an essential method in patients exhibiting signs of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) to make an objective diagnosis. Intra-esophageal pH monitoring is important in patients who are non-responsive to medications and in those with extraesophageal symptoms, particularly in NERD, before surgical interventions. With the help of the wireless capsule pH monitoring, measurements can be made under more physiological conditions as well as longer recordings can be performed because the investigation can be better tolerated by patients. Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring can be detected within normal limits in 17%-31.4% of the patients with endoscopic esophagitis; therefore, normal pH monitoring cannot exclude the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Multi-channel intraluminal impedance pH (MII-pH) technology have been developed and currently the most sensitive tool to evaluate patients with both typical and atypical reflux symptoms. The sensitivity of a pH catheter test is 58% for the detection of acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring; further, its sensitivity is 28% for the detection of weak acid reflux compared with MII-pH monitoring. By adding impedance to pH catheter in patients with reflux symptoms, particularly in those receiving PPIs, it has been demonstrated that higher rates of diagnoses and symptom analyses can be obtained than those using only pH catheter. Esophageal manometry is used in the evaluation of patients with functional dysphagia and unexplained noncardiac chest pain and prior to antireflux surgery. The use of esophageal manometry is suitable for the detection of esophageal motor patterns and extreme motor abnormalities (e.g., achalasia and extreme hypomotility). Esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH monitoring are often used in assessments prior to laparoscopic antireflux surgery and in patients with reflux symptoms refractory to medical treatment. Although the esophageal motility is

  7. [Gastric and duodenal secretory and motor-evacuatory activity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with different types of reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhulay, G S; Sekareva, E V

    2016-01-01

    To estimate esophageal and gastric pH values on an empty stomach and after stimulation of gastric secretion and gastric and duodenal motor-evacuatory activity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated with pathological refluxes, such as gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER). The observational cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate and compare the parameters of intraesophageal and intragastric pH metry and peripheral electrogastroenterography in 103 GERD patients with endoscopically positive distal reflux esophagitis in GER and DGER. The patients with GERD developed pathological esophageal refluxes (both GER and DGER) in various degrees of impaired gastric production, from anacidity to hyperacidity. The patients with predominant DGER were found to have gastric hyperacidity and normal acidity slightly less frequently than those with predominant GER. The patients with GERD developing in the presence of predominant GER had moderate gastric stasis with discoordinated antroduodenal propulsion resulting from hypomotor dyskinesia of the stomach and duodenum. When DGER was predominant in the patients with GERD, the signs of gastric stasis and duodenal hyperkinesia were concurrent with discoordinated antroduodenal and duodenojejunal propulsion. The specific features of the esophagogastroduodenal secretory and motor evacuatory disorders found create conditions for the pathological refluxes into the esophagus, which differ in the composition of refluxate.

  8. The Changing Impact of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akst, Lee M; Haque, Omar J; Clarke, John O; Hillel, Alexander T; Best, Simon R A; Altman, Kenneth W

    2017-03-01

    The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) database was utilized to understand evolving national trends in diagnosis and management of reflux. The NAMCS database was queried for visits related to gastroesophageal reflux diagnosis and management. Analysis performed for time periods 1998-2001, 2002-2005, and 2006-2009 was weighted to provide national estimates of care. Results were compared to previously reported time periods from 1990 to 2001 to evaluate patterns in overall visits, age and ethnicity of patients, provider type, and prescriptions provided. The number of ambulatory visits for reflux increased from 8 684 000 in 1998-2001 to 15 750 000 in 2006-2009. Visits increased across each time period for internal medicine, family, and gastroenterology physicians. Among otolaryngologists, absolute visits increased from 1998-2001 to 2002-2005 but decreased in 2006-2009; difference between these time periods did not reach statistical significance. From 1998-2001 to 2006-2009, reflux medication use increased 233%, with continuing trends toward increased proton pump inhibitor use. Reflux visits have increased across all demographic subgroups studied. Knowledge of these trends may inform further paradigm shifts in diagnosis and management of reflux.

  9. Review article: gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broers, C; Tack, J; Pauwels, A

    2018-01-01

    When gastro-oesophageal reflux is causing symptoms or lesions in the oesophagus, this is referred to as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD can manifest itself through typical symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation) or may lead to extra-oesophageal symptoms. Extra-oesophageal manifestations of GERD gained increasing attention over the last decade, especially respiratory disorders, because of the prevalent co-occurrence with GERD. The role of GERD in the pathogenesis of respiratory disorders has become a topic of intense discussion. To provide an overview of the current knowledge on the role of GERD in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PubMed was searched for relevant articles using the keywords: GERD, asthma, COPD, prevalence, treatment. Case reports were excluded, only English language articles were considered. Estimates for the prevalence of GERD in asthma range from 30% to 90%, compared to an average of 24% in controls. In COPD patients, the prevalence of GERD ranges from 19% to 78% compared to an average of 18% in controls. These data indicate an increased prevalence of GERD in patients with asthma and COPD, although causality is not established and GERD treatment yielded inconsistent effects. Literature supports GERD as a risk factor for COPD-exacerbations and a predictor of the 'frequent-exacerbator'-phenotype. Despite the high prevalence of GERD in asthma and COPD, a causal link is lacking. The results of anti-reflux therapy on pulmonary outcome are inconsistent and contradictory. Future studies will need to identify subgroups of asthmatics and COPD patients that may benefit from anti-reflux therapy (nocturnal or silent reflux). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease and malignant progression--equal risk for men and women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, O

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in the Western world. Patients with GERD have a 10 fold increased risk to develop a Barrett's esophagus. Patients with Barrett's esophagus have a higher risk for an esophageal adenocarcinoma. Men have more severe reflux with a higher grade of inflammation and acid reflux. This seems to be the reason why men develop a Barrett's esophagus more frequently--the risk is approximately 2 to 3 fold and the risk for an esophageal adenocarcinoma is even 3 to 6 times higher. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. [Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease and Malignant Progression - Equal Risk for Men and Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, O

    2016-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is highly prevalent in the Western world. Patients with GERD have a 10-fold increased risk to develop a Barrett's esophagus. Patients with Barrett's esophagus have a higher risk for an esophageal adenocarcinoma. Men have more severe reflux with a higher grade of inflammation and acid reflux. This seems to be the reason why men develop a Barrett's esophagus more frequently - the risk is approximately 2-3-fold and the risk for an esophageal adenocarcinoma is even 3-6 times higher. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Histologic definition of gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasoma, Parakrama T

    2013-07-01

    To review recent data supporting the development of new histology-based definitions of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Three precisely definable columnar epithelial types--cardiac, oxyntocardiac and intestinal--may be interposed between esophageal squamous epithelium and gastric oxyntic (acid secreting) mucosa. This enables definition of a new histologic concept: the squamo-oxyntic gap. The squamo-oxyntic gap is zero or very small in autopsies performed on patients without evidence of GERD. The gap progressively increases in length with the severity of GERD, indicating that the squamo-oxyntic gap is a marker for chronic GERD. The distal part of the gap lines gastric-type rugal folds and, therefore, is distal to the present endoscopic definition of the gastro-esophageal junction. I contend that this distal gap segment (which has esophageal submucosal glands) is actually the dilated distal esophagus; this is the pathologic correlate of destruction of the abdominal segment of the lower esophageal sphincter. The dilated distal esophagus is mistaken for 'gastric cardia' by present endoscopic definitions. I believe that these data support the adoption of novel histologic definitions of GERD as follows: the presence of any squamo-oxyntic gap defines GERD; the length of the gap is a measure of severity of chronic GERD; and the presence of intestinal metaplasia in the gap defines Barrett esophagus and cancer risk.

  13. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuwat, Obaidallah Buraykan; Alzahrani, Abdulrahman Ahmad; Alzhrani, Mohammed Abdullah; Alkhathami, Ali Mesfer; Mahfouz, Mohammad Eid Mahmoud

    2018-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic gastrointestinal tract disease. The incidence is higher in Asian and Arab countries. In Saudi Arabia, there are few studies that have assessed the prevalence of GERD among some cities' communities. Hence, this study aims to study the prevalence of GERD among the general population of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was designed to determine the prevalence of GERD among the community of Saudi Arabia. The sample was randomly gathered through self-administered validated GERD questionnaire (GerdQ) to diagnose GERD, during the period from November to December 2016. The sociodemographic data was assessed for all participants. The data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 21.0 (SPSS); the t -test was used to assess the association of GERD and sociodemographic data. The sample was comprised of 2,043 participants. Female and male were 51.8% and 48.2%, respectively. Mean age was 29.6 years with the standard deviation of 10.5 years. The GERD prevalence was 28.7%. It was found statistically significant among divorced/widow (34.9%, P = 0.003). In contrast, there was no association between GERD's prevalence and gender, age, residence status, education level, occupation, and blood group (P > 0.05). The prevalence of GERD among Saudi population is higher than that in Western countries and East Asia. It affects divorced/widow, obese and those with a sedentary lifestyle. It is advocated that national programs and educational campaigns for prevention of this disease and its complications should be established.

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease - Controversies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floria, Mariana; Barboi, Oana; Rezus, Ciprian; Ambarus, Valentin; Cijevschi-Prelipcean, Cristina; Balan, Gheorghe; Drug, Vasile Liviu

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation and gastro-oesophageal reflux are common manifestations in daily practice. The atria and the oesophagus are closely located and have similar nerve innervations. Over the last years, it has been observed that atrial fibrillation development and reflux disease could be related. Atrial fibrillation occurrence could be due to vagal nerve overstimulation. This, in association with vagal nerve-mediated parasympathetic stimulation, has also been observed in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux. These mechanisms, in addition to inflammation, seem to be implicated in the pathophysiology of both diseases. Despite these associations supported by clinical and experimental studies, this relationship is still considered controversial. This review summarizes critical data regarding the association of gastro-oesophageal reflux and atrial fibrillation as well as their clinical implications.

  15. Lifestyle factors affecting gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a cross-sectional study of healthy 19864 adults using FSSG scores

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    Yamamichi Nobutake

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a very common disorder worldwide, comprised of reflux esophagitis (RE and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD. As more than half of GERD patients are classified into the NERD group, precise evaluation of bothersome epigastric symptoms is essential. Nevertheless, compared with many reports targeting endoscopic reflux esophagitis, large-scale studies focusing on GERD symptoms have been very scarce. Methods To elucidate lifestyle factors affecting GERD symptoms, 19,864 healthy adults in Japan were analyzed. Sub-analyses of 371 proton pump inhibitor (PPI users and 539 histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA users were also performed. Using the FSSG (Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD score as a response variable, 25 lifestyle-related factors were univariately evaluated by Student's t-test or Pearson's correlation coefficient, and were further analyzed with multiple linear regression modelling. Results Average FSSG scores were 4.8 ± 5.2 for total subjects, 9.0 ± 7.3 for PPI users, and 8.2 ± 6.6 for H2RA users. Among the total population, positively correlated factors and standardized coefficients (β for FSSG scores are inadequate sleep (β = 0.158, digestive drug users (β = 0.0972 for PPI, β = 0.0903 for H2RA, and β = 0.104 for others, increased body weight in adulthood (β = 0.081, dinner just before bedtime (β = 0.061, the habit of midnight snack (β = 0.055, lower body mass index (β = 0.054, NSAID users (β = 0.051, female gender (β = 0.048, lack of breakfast (β = 0.045, lack of physical exercise (β = 0.035, younger age (β = 0.033, antihyperglycemic agents non-users (β = 0.026, the habit of quick eating (β = 0.025, alcohol drinking (β = 0.025, history of gastrectomy (β = 0.024, history of cardiovascular disease (β = 0.020, and smoking (β = 0.018. Positively correlated factors for PPI users are female gender (β = 0.198, inadequate sleep (β = 0.150, lack of breakfast

  16. The relationship between the numbers of reflux episodes with anatomic changes of the esophagus in children under one year with gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    HamidrezaTalari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the neonatal period, and the main reason for it is the lack of development in the first months of an infant's digestive system and it gets improved with the aging of baby and development of the digestive system. Some studies have shown that there is a relationship between characteristics of anatomic and esophageal reflux. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the characteristics and frequency of reflux in infants under one year old with gastroesophageal reflux disease. This study is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2015 in the hospital of martyr Beheshti. In this study, a group of 120 children with reflux in three age groups less than one month, 1-6 months and 6-12 months were choses and the relationship between reflux episodes with esophagus anatomic characteristics, including distal esophagus distention, Hiss angle, internal angle and length of esophagus were examined. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software and the relationship between the characteristics was compared with the number of reflux in three groups. According to the results, the frequency of reflux and extent of distention of the distal esophageal, Hiss angle, Internal Gastro esophageal angle and length of the esophagus, there was a statistically significant correlation (P <0.001. The correlation between reflux episodes and four parameters, are respectively, 0/95, 0/97, 0/71 and -0/79/. Also there was a direct relation between the frequency of reflux and extent of distention of the distal esophageal, Hiss angle, Internal Gastro esophageal angle and an inverse relation with length of the esophagus. The correlation between the frequency of reflux and esophageal characteristics in separation between all three age groups showed a statistically significant relationship exists between anatomical esophageal characteristics and reflux frequency. Based on the results of this study it

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms) and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD) and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the treatment of GERD in COPD and while extensive studies in this population have not been undertaken, this comorbidity may be amenable to treatment. PMID:26392769

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–3 Roger S Goldstein1,2,4 1West Park Healthcare Centre, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the

  19. Distinguishing the impact of dexlansoprazole on heartburn vs. regurgitation in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peura, D A; Pilmer, B; Hunt, B; Mody, R; Perez, M C

    2013-11-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is characterised by symptomatic heartburn and regurgitation. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) effectively decreases heartburn symptoms, but their effects on symptomatic regurgitation are less clear. To determine the impact of PPI therapy on heartburn and regurgitation severity in patients with either non-erosive GERD (NERD) or erosive oesophagitis (EE). Endoscopically-confirmed NERD patients received dexlansoprazole 30 or 60 mg or placebo in a randomised, blinded, 4-week study. Endoscopically-confirmed EE patients received dexlansoprazole 60 mg or lansoprazole 30 mg in two 8-week, randomised, blinded healing studies. The Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity questionnaire, which includes a heartburn/regurgitation subscale, was administered to assess symptom severity at baseline, and at weeks 2 and 4 of the NERD study and at weeks 4 and 8 during the EE trials. We defined separate subscales for heartburn and regurgitation for this post-hoc analysis. Among patients with both symptoms at baseline, improvements in individual heartburn and regurgitation subscales along with the original combined heartburn/regurgitation subscale were determined. In the NERD and EE studies, 661 and 1909 patients, respectively, had both heartburn and regurgitation at baseline. NERD patients receiving dexlansoprazole 30 and 60 mg experienced significantly greater improvements in symptom severity for both heartburn and regurgitation compared with placebo. EE patients receiving dexlansoprazole 60 mg had significantly greater improvements in heartburn/regurgitation and heartburn-only subscales at week 4 compared with those receiving lansoprazole. Dexlansoprazole appears to be effective in improving both heartburn and regurgitation, and this improvement is maintained for the duration of treatment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Comparison of surgical patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsolt, Simonka; Paszt, Attila; Géczi, Tibor; Abrahám, Szabolcs; Tóth, Illés; Horváth, Zoltán; Pieler, József; Tajti, János; Varga, Akos; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Izbéki, Ferenc; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor; Lázár, György

    2014-10-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the only known precursor of adenocarcinoma occuring in the lower third of the esophagus. According to statistics, severity and elapsed time of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are major pathogenetic factors in the development of Barrett's esophagus. In a retrospective study between 2001 and 2008, we compared the preoperative results (signs and sympthoms, 24 hour pH manometry, esophageal manometry, Bilitec) and treatment efficacy of 176 GERD patients and 78 BE patients, who have undergone laparoscopic Nissen procedure for reflux disease. The two groups of patients had similar demographic features, and elapsed time of reflux sympthoms were also equal. Both groups were admitted for surgery after a median time of 1.5 years (19.87 vs. 19.20 months) of ineffective medical (proton pump inhibitors) treatment. Preoperative functional tests showed a more severe presence of acid reflux in the BE group (DeMeester score 18.9 versus 41.9, p reflux complaints (group I: 73%, group II: 81% of patients), LES functions improved (17.58 vs.18.70 mmHg), and the frequency and exposition of acid reflux decreased (DeMeester score 7.73 vs. 12.72). The severity of abnormal acid reflux occuring parallel with the incompetent function of the damaged LES triggers not only inflammation in the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), but also metaplastic process, and the development of Barrett's esophagus. Laparoscopic Nissen procedure for reflux disease can further improve outcome among patients with GERD not responding to conservative therapy.

  1. Clinical features and prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants attending a pediatric gastroenterology reference service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Yu Kar Ling; Ozaki, Marcos J; Murasca, Kelly; Vidolin, Eliana

    2010-01-01

    In infants, it is not always easy to distinguish between pathological and physiological gastroesophageal reflux based only on clinical criteria. In Brazil, studies about gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants are few and are even rare those that used prolonged esophageal pH monitoring for its evaluation. To describe the clinical features of gastroesophageal reflux disease and to determine its prevalence in infants with gastroesophageal reflux attending a tertiary Pediatric Gastroenterology Service and submitted to esophageal pH monitoring for investigation. Descriptive study in 307 infants in whom esophageal pH monitoring (Mark III Digitrapper, Synectics Medical AB, Sweden) was performed during the period December, 1998-December, 2008. The clinical features studied were age group (1-12 months and 13-24 months), and clinical manifestations that motivated the indication of pH monitoring. One hundred twenty-four (40.4%) were female and 183 (59.6%) male with mean age 12.2 +/- 6.2 months (1-23 months). The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease was 18.2% (56/307). One hundred forty-eight (48.2%) were 1-12 months old and 159 (51.8%), 13-24 months. No significant difference was found between the prevalence of these two age groups (P = 0.3006). Gastroesophageal reflux disease was more frequent in those with digestive manifestations (24.2%), crisis of cyanosis/apnea (23.8%) and mixed manifestations (21.5%). Respiratory manifestations were the most frequent indication (39.1%) of pH monitoring. However, the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease was lower (12.5%) in this group compared with in those with digestive manifestations (P = 0.0574), crisis of cyanosis/apnea (P = 0.0882) and mixed manifestations (P = 0.1377). All infants that presented clinical manifestations as crisis of cyanosis/apnea and abnormal pH-metry were Service, the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with acid reflux in infants revealed elevated. Infants with crisis

  2. Work productivity and activity impairment in gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korean full-time employees: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Gyu; Kim, Jae J; Yim, Da-Hae; Park, Sue K; Park, Soo-Heon

    2012-04-01

    The costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease have not been assessed in Asia, even though the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is gradually increasing. We evaluated work presenteeism and absenteeism as indirect costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korea. This was a cross-sectional and multicentre study using patient-reported outcome instruments. A total of 1009 full-time employees who visited the gastrointestinal department for any reason (281 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and 728 controls) were included. Main outcomes were presenteeism and absenteeism measured as work productivity loss and monetary cost per week. Absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (1.49% vs. 0.46%, P=0.0010; 34.13% vs. 9.23%, Pgastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (33.09% vs. 9.02%; Pgastroesophageal reflux disease group compared with the control group. Assuming average hourly wages of $14.12, the weekly burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease reached $165.07 per person. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was associated with substantial work productivity loss, mainly due to presenteeism rather than absenteeism, in Korean full-time employees. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

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    John K Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h, indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  4. Regenerative medicine in the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease and laryngo-pharyngeal reflux. From research to cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, S E; Mereghetti, G; Bianchetti, M; Mangiavillano, B; Zurlo, T; Lotti, J; La Mantia, I; França, K; Lotti, T

    We present our observational study on 40 patients treated with the medical device containing sodium hyaluronic acid and magnesium alginate, performing a lubricating and hydrating action. This device is in the form of a gel, with topical action to contrast gastroesophageal reflux and to exert a mechanical role of protection of the mucosal tissues (mouth-pharyngo-esophageal mucosa and gastric mucose.). Forty patients were recruited aged between 22- and 72-years-old with painful dyspeptic Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) symptomatology in acute or in clinical phase (25 patients) and with pharyngolaryngo- tracheal symptomatology (15 patients). Patients were divided into two clinical groups: Group A was treated with the medical device, while Group B with conventional treatments without the medical device. Subjects of both groups were also treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Follow-up was at 10, 20 and 30 days and patients were evaluated for reduction of their subjective symptoms, reduction of symptomatic and occasional therapies, reduction of inflammatory process or disappearance of epithelial lesions of the examined mucosa, healing process. The reduction of subjective symptoms was observed at 10 days in the patient with food bolus (disappearance after 5 days) and in patients with a reduction of 70%. A relevant reduction in the use of symptomatic drugs was noted. Our data are relevant considering symptom relief (heartburn, reflux and dyspepsia). New scenarios for the treatment of inflammatory diseases of the digestive and respiratory tract mucosa are at the horizon. Interdisciplinary translational research brings to the development of novel medical devices (as the one described in this study) with a high safety profile, and extremely active on the inflammation-repair-regeneration complex of different tissues and organs.

  5. Clinical and radiological characteristic of the gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, O.; Racheva, G.; Totev, M.; Antonova, D.

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children is a normal physiologic process that can progress to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when pathologic symptoms and complications appear. The pathogenesis of GER is related to a decrease pressure and transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter, which is the most important factors contributing to reflux. If the history and physical examination reveal concerns of GERD further evaluation is necessary: esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, barium swallowing. The gold standard for the diagnosis of GERD is the 24-hour pH probe. Barium contrast radiography is useful to detect anatomic abnormalities, such as gaped cardia, reflux of contrast material, hiatal hernia, esophageal stricture and shortened esophagus. When compared to esophageal pH monitoring, the upper Gl series is less sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of GER, but is helpful as widely used first-step diagnosis in cases with symptomatic GERD. (authors)

  6. Relationship between radiotherapy and gastroesophageal reflux disease in causing tracheoesophageal voice rehabilitation failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocuzza, Salvatore; Bonfiglio, Marco; Chiaramonte, Rita; Serra, Agostino

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to analyze the association of radiotherapy with gastroesophageal reflux as determinant of fistula related pathology, in voice prosthesis patients. Retrospective study. Sixty-one laryngectomy patients were enrolled between 2005 and 2012. All patients underwent phonatory rehabilitation with voice prosthesis, along with evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease, for which proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were prescribed. We analyzed the occurrence of fistula-related problems among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy and those patients who did not. We observed a higher rate of failure of speech rehabilitation in laryngectomy patients with gastroesphageal reflux: this occurred when they had a history of postoperative radiotherapy (45%) compared with patients who did not (17%) (P gastroesophageal reflux for the determinism of fistula-related problems. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics of Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Narika; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Shiba, Masatsugu; Ochi, Masahiro; Fukuda, Takashi; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances; however, the detailed differences in the characteristics of sleep disturbances between GERD and non-GERD patients are unknown. The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics as well as health-related quality of life in GERD and non-GERD patients with sleep disturbances. Methods Three hundred and fifty patients, including 124 patients with GERD and 226 patients without GERD, completed a self-administered questionnaire that evaluated clinical information. The Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and 8-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8) were also used. Sleep disturbance was considered to be present if the PSQI was >5.5. Results The prevalence of sleep disturbances was significantly higher in the GERD patients (66/124, 53.9%) than in the non-GERD patients (89/226, 39.3%). Depression and anxiety were significantly more common in the subjects with sleep disturbances than in those without sleep disturbances, although there were no differences between the GERD and non-GERD patients. Among the subjects with sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness was more common in the GERD patients than in the non-GERD patients. The subjects with sleep disturbances had a poorer health-related quality of life. The physical components of quality of life were impaired, particularly in the GERD patients with sleep disturbances. Conclusion GERD patients with sleep disturbances commonly experience daytime sleepiness and an impaired health-related quality of life, especially in terms of physical components.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with diabetes: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Mariko; Miwa, Takashi; Kawai, Takashi; Odawara, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Some studies report that complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occur more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) than in non-diabetic patients. This study used transnasal endoscopy to elucidate the current status of concurrent GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to examine the associations between intraesophageal pressure and GERD, as well as other neuropathic conditions. The study included 57 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean age was 67 years and the duration of DM was 13 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 6.8%. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation items were (i) the presence or absence of esophagitis and its severity; (ii) intraesophageal pressure; and (iii) Helicobacter pylori status, which was evaluated by endoscopic findings, such as the presence or absence of gastritis and peptic ulcer, and by urea breath test. Of 57 patients, 24 (42.1%) were given a diagnosis of GERD based on endoscopy. Patients with concurrent GERD were younger, had shorter duration of DM, and were taller and heavier. Interestingly, no difference in body mass index was observed. There was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and diabetic complications, including peripheral neuropathy, and infection or non-infection with H. pylori. Although there was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and intraesophageal pressure values, we found aging, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and the presence of autonomic nerve symptoms to correlate with reduced intraesophageal pressure. The results of this study could be used to answer the question of whether or not endoscopic GERD is a diabetic complication; however, further study is required. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Association between sleep bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Dalberto, Charlene da Silveira; Scheeren, Betina; Barros, Sérgio Gabriel Silva de

    2013-11-01

    Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity, including sleep bruxism (SB), can be induced in healthy individuals by experimental esophageal acidification, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, no robust evidence supports the association between SB and GERD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between SB and GERD. Forty-five individuals were eligible to participate in this observational transversal study at the Gastroenterology Service of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The participants were classified into 2 groups, those with and without GERD, according to the Montreal Criteria and pH-metry/endoscopy findings. The diagnosis of SB was not assessed in a sleep laboratory but was based on self-report plus clinical inspection, according to the minimal diagnostic criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory was used to evaluate self-perceived stress. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed with SB as dependent variable and GERD, sex, age, body mass index, and stress as predictors (α=.05; 90% power). The study population included individuals with SB without GERD (13.3%) and individuals with SB with GERD (31.1%). In participants with GERD, the prevalence of SB was 73.7%. Only the variable GERD was significantly associated with SB (P=.017; odds ratio 6.58; 95% confidence interval 1.40-30.98), although adjusted for stress and age. Sleep bruxism is prevalent in GERD patients, and GERD is highly associated with SB. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nickel sensitization in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Tosetti, Cesare; Benedetto, Edoardo; Condoluci, Mario; De Bastiani, Rudi; Cogliandro, Rosanna; Mastronuzzi, Tecla; De Polo, Manuela; Di Mita, Francesco; Napoli, Luigi; Ubaldi, Enzo; Nebiacolombo, Cristina; Cottone, Carmelo; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Zamparella, Maria; Baldi, Elisabetta; Sanna, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) leads to frequent medical visits, and available therapies fail in up to 40% of patients. Food allergies may be involved in GERD pathogenesis; however, allergens other than food have received little attention. Nickel allergy is common in the general population and some high-nickel foods are associated with GERD. However, the potential relationship between nickel allergy and GERD remains unaddressed. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of nickel sensitization in patients with and without GERD and to compare clinical and demographic features. This prospective, multicenter study included 210 adult GERD patients and 140 patients without GERD who presented at the general practitioner. All GERD patients had undergone treatment with proton pump inhibitors and upper digestive endoscopy within the previous five years. Demographic and clinical data were collected by questionnaire and patients underwent a nickel patch allergy test. Patients with and without GERD presented similar characteristics, with the exception of nickel sensitization, which was significantly more prevalent among GERD patients than controls (39.5% vs. 16.4%; p = 0.001). Nickel-positive GERD patients were more frequently female (90.4% vs. 65.4%, p = 0.003) and asthmatic (18.1% vs. 4.7%; p = 0.038), compared to nickel-negative GERD patients. At six-month follow-up, most of the patients, with or without nickel sensitization, reported improved symptoms without differences in drug prescription. Nickel sensitization is particularly prevalent in GERD patients seen in general practice. Whether allergies other than food allergy play a role in GERD remains to be elucidated.

  11. Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhong; Sun, Changxian; Lin, Zheng; Lin, Lin; Wang, Meifeng; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease with a high incidence worldwide. The various symptoms have substantial impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. A long-term self-management program can increase the ability of patients to make behavioral changes, and health outcomes can improve as a consequence. This study's aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for gastroesophageal reflux disease. A total of 115 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were allocated to the experimental group and the control group. The former received self-management intervention along with conventional drug therapy, whereas the latter received standard outpatient care and conventional drug therapy. After the clinical trial, the control group also received the same self-management intervention. The levels of self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, and psychological condition were compared. Those in the experimental group demonstrated significantly higher self-efficacy for managing their illness, showed positive changes in self-management behaviors, and had comparatively better remission of symptoms and improvement in psychological distress. The program helped patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease self-manage their illness as possible.

  12. Maior prevalência de obesidade na doença do refluxo gastroesofagiano erosiva Higher prevalence of obesity in erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz N. Biccas

    2009-03-01

    macroscopic erosion on the esophageal mucosa. Hiatal hernia was considered when the gastroesophageal junction was positioned 2 cm or more above the diaphragm. Patients with Barrett's esophagus or esophageal peptic stenosis were excluded. The population was categorized according to body mass index as normal weight (body mass index between 20 and 24.9; over-weight (between 25 and 29.9, and obese (greater than 30. The diagnosis as well as the intensity of abnormal gastroesophageal reflux were obtained through the analysis of the results of pH monitoring in patients with and without erosive esophagitis and in the various categories of body mass index. RESULTS: Among the 362 patients there were 148 (41% with erosive esophagitis and 214 (59% without erosive esophagitis, while the pH monitoring was abnormal in 100% and 57%, respectively. Among the 148 individuals with erosive esophagitis (61% male, median age 50 years, 41 (28% had normal weight, 82 (55% had over-weight and 25 (17% were obese. There were 88 (60% patients with hiatal hernia, which was present in 29 (71% of patients with normal weight, 45 (55% of patients with over-weight and 14 (56% of obese individuals. In 121 patients without erosive esophagitis who had abnormal pH monitoring, diagnosed as non erosive reflux disease (38% male, median age 50 years, 51 (42% patients had normal weight, 55 (46% had over-weight and 15 (12% were obese. Hiatal hernia was detected in 52 out of 121 (43% patients and in 21 (41% out of 51 individuals with normal weight, 24 (44% of over-weight and 7 (47% of obese. In the group of 93 patients without erosive esophagitis and normal pH monitoring (29% male, median age 43 years, 26 (28% had hiatal hernia and there were 43 (46% individuals with normal weight, 38 (41% with over-weight and 12 (13% were obese. The number of patients with obesity and over-weight was significantly higher in the group with erosive esophagitis compared to the ones without erosive esophagitis. The prevalence of hiatal

  13. Extra-esophageal presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease: new understanding in a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; Albano, Eleonora; Marchi, Santino; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2017-09-01

    Associations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with extraesophageal manifestations, such as chronic cough, asthma, and laryngitis, are reported frequently, and there is a strong evidence of biological plausibility in support of this relationship. On the other hand, extraesophageal reflux disease (EERD) is usually multifactorial in nature with reflux being just one of the several potential contributing cofactors. Moreover, the accuracy of currently available diagnostic tests for EERD is suboptimal, and therefore the causal relationship between GERD and EERD remains far from being conclusively proven. In addition, there is a general paucity of data supporting a beneficial effect of anti-reflux treatments on symptoms of patients with suspected EERD. Therefore, diagnostic as well as therapeutic management of EERD remains largely empirical. Current guidelines suggest an initial empiric trial of proton pump inhibitors in patients without alarm features, who present also typical GERD symptoms. For those patients who improve with PPIs, GERD is presumed to be the etiology. In patients with refractory reflux, combined impedance/pH monitoring might provide the single best strategy for evaluating reflux symptoms. In this context, as symptoms ascribable to GERD may depend on other causes, investigations that excludes GERD can help to redirect the diagnostic and treatment efforts to other pathological conditions. The present review intends to discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the challenging diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with suspected EERD, emphasizing the points of strengths and limitations of currently available diagnostic options, and to provide an update on major diagnostic innovations in this area.

  14. Effect of sodium alginate on acid gastroesophageal reflux disease in preterm infants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasay, Begum; Erdeve, Omer; Arsan, Saadet; Türmen, Tomris

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the antireflux barrier formed by Na alginate on pH-metry-defined acid reflux events in preterms. Four times/day, 1 mL/kg of Na alginate was administered as an intervention to the preterm infants whose gastroesophageal reflux disease was confirmed by 24-hour pH monitoring, and the measurement was repeated after 48 hours. The major outcomes were improvement in the number of reflux events per 24 hours, the duration of the longest episode, the number of episodes >5 minutes per 24 hours, and reflux index on pH-metry. Thirty-four (83%) of 41 preterm infants who completed the study had pathologic measurement on 24-hour pH monitoring; 27 (83%) of the patients responded to treatment, whereas 7 patients (17%) did not. Na alginate treatment significantly improved the number of episodes with pH reflux index, the number of episodes >5 minutes with pH reflux disease in preterm infants seems to be safe and effective.

  15. Ambulatory reflux monitoring for diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Update of the Porto consensus and recommendations from an international consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, S; Gyawali, C P; Savarino, E; Yadlapati, R; Zerbib, F; Wu, J; Vela, M; Tutuian, R; Tatum, R; Sifrim, D; Keller, J; Fox, M; Pandolfino, J E; Bredenoord, A J

    2017-10-01

    An international group of experts evaluated and revised recommendations for ambulatory reflux monitoring for the diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Literature search was focused on indications and technical recommendations for GERD testing and phenotypes definitions. Statements were proposed and discussed during several structured meetings. Reflux testing should be performed after cessation of acid suppressive medication in patients with a low likelihood of GERD. In this setting, testing can be either catheter-based or wireless pH-monitoring or pH-impedance monitoring. In patients with a high probability of GERD (esophagitis grade C and D, histology proven Barrett's mucosa >1 cm, peptic stricture, previous positive pH monitoring) and persistent symptoms, pH-impedance monitoring should be performed on treatment. Recommendations are provided for data acquisition and analysis. Esophageal acid exposure is considered as pathological if acid exposure time (AET) is greater than 6% on pH testing. Number of reflux episodes and baseline impedance are exploratory metrics that may complement AET. Positive symptom reflux association is defined as symptom index (SI) >50% or symptom association probability (SAP) >95%. A positive symptom-reflux association in the absence of pathological AET defines hypersensitivity to reflux. The consensus group determined that grade C or D esophagitis, peptic stricture, histology proven Barrett's mucosa >1 cm, and esophageal acid exposure greater >6% are sufficient to define pathological GERD. Further testing should be considered when none of these criteria are fulfilled. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and coeliac disease: no role for routine duodenal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Peter D; Evans, Kate E; Kurien, Matthew; Hopper, Andrew D; Sanders, David S

    2015-06-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) has been linked to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Previous studies have demonstrated an increased prevalence of reflux in patients with CD. However data on the risk for CD in patients presenting with reflux are conflicting. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of CD in patients with GORD and to elucidate the mechanisms for reflux symptoms in newly diagnosed CD patients. Group A: patients who had undergone routine duodenal biopsy were prospectively recruited between 2004 and 2014. Diagnostic yield was compared with that of a screening cohort. Group B: 32 patients with newly diagnosed CD who had undergone oesophageal manometry and 24-h pH studies were prospectively recruited. Group A: 3368 patients (58.7% female, mean age 53.4 years) underwent routine duodenal biopsy. Of these patients, 850 (25.2%) presented with GORD. The prevalence of CD among GORD patients was 1.3% (0.7-2.4%), which was not significantly higher than that in the general population (P=0.53). Within the context of routine duodenal biopsy at endoscopy (when corrected for concurrent symptoms, age and sex), reflux was found to be negatively associated with CD [adjusted odds ratio 0.12 (0.07-0.23), Preflux. On manometry, 9% had a hypotensive lower oesophageal sphincter and 40.6% had oesophageal motor abnormalities, with 25% significantly hypocontractile. On pH studies, 33% demonstrated reflux episodes. The prevalence of undiagnosed CD among GORD patients is similar to that in the general population, and routine duodenal biopsy cannot be recommended. A significant number of patients with newly diagnosed CD were found to have reflux and/or oesophageal dysmotility on pH/manometry studies; this may explain the high prevalence of reflux symptoms in CD.

  17. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  18. The comparative analyses of different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Nina; Milovanovic, Ivan; Radusinovic, Milica; Stevic, Marija; Ristic, Milos; Ristic, Maja; Kisic Tepavcevic, Darija; Alempijevic, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children presented with symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease. The study design was cross sectional. The study retrospectively included all children who underwent combined multiple intraluminal impedance and pH (pH-MII) monitoring due to gastrointestinal and/or extraesophageal symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease at University Children's Hospital in Belgrade, from July 2012 to July 2016. A total of 218 (117 boys/101 girls), mean age 6.7 years (range 0.06-18.0 years), met the inclusion criteria. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was found in 128 of 218 children (57.4%) by pH-MII and in 76 (34.1%) children by pH metry alone. Using pH-MII monitoring as gold standard, sensitivity of pH-metry was lowest in infants (22.9%), with tendency to increase in older age groups (reaching 76.4% in children ≥ 9 years). The sensitivity of pH-metry alone in children with extraesophageal symptoms was 38.1%, while the sensitivity of pH-metry in children with gastrointestinal symptoms was 63.8%. Reflux esophagitis was identified in 31 (26.1%) of 119 children who underwent endoscopy. Logistic regression analysis showed that best predictors of endoscopic reflux esophagitis are the longest acid episode (OR = 1.52, preflux composite score (OR = 3.31, preflux composite score ≥ 29 (AUC 0.786, CI 0.695-0.877, preflux ≥ 18 minutes (AUC 0.784, CI 0.692-0.875, pgastroesophageal reflux disease, especially in infants. Our findings also showed that pH-MII parameters correlated significantly with the endoscopically confirmed erosive esophagitis.

  19. The comparative analyses of different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ristic

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the different diagnostic approaches in detection of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children presented with symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease.The study design was cross sectional. The study retrospectively included all children who underwent combined multiple intraluminal impedance and pH (pH-MII monitoring due to gastrointestinal and/or extraesophageal symptoms suggesting gastroesophageal reflux disease at University Children's Hospital in Belgrade, from July 2012 to July 2016.A total of 218 (117 boys/101 girls, mean age 6.7 years (range 0.06-18.0 years, met the inclusion criteria. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was found in 128 of 218 children (57.4% by pH-MII and in 76 (34.1% children by pH metry alone. Using pH-MII monitoring as gold standard, sensitivity of pH-metry was lowest in infants (22.9%, with tendency to increase in older age groups (reaching 76.4% in children ≥ 9 years. The sensitivity of pH-metry alone in children with extraesophageal symptoms was 38.1%, while the sensitivity of pH-metry in children with gastrointestinal symptoms was 63.8%. Reflux esophagitis was identified in 31 (26.1% of 119 children who underwent endoscopy. Logistic regression analysis showed that best predictors of endoscopic reflux esophagitis are the longest acid episode (OR = 1.52, p<0.05 and DeMeester reflux composite score (OR = 3.31, p<0.05. The significant cutoff values included DeMeester reflux composite score ≥ 29 (AUC 0.786, CI 0.695-0.877, p<0.01 and duration of longest acid reflux ≥ 18 minutes (AUC 0.784, CI 0.692-0.875, p<0.01.The results of our study suggested that compared with pH-metry alone, pH-MII had significantly higher detection rate of gastroesophageal reflux disease, especially in infants. Our findings also showed that pH-MII parameters correlated significantly with the endoscopically confirmed erosive esophagitis.

  20. [Effect analysis on Deanxit combined with Shuganjieyu capsule in the treatment of refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X Y; Guo, C Y; Zhang, X; Zhong, Y Q; Tian, C

    2017-11-28

    Objective: To investigate the curative effect of Deanxit combined with Shuganjieyu capsule on the treatment of refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods: A total of 125 patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease who had failed in standard lansolazole capsule treatment in the Department of Gastroenterology, First People's Hospital of Neijiang were selected. According to the symptom scores and mood scores of gastroesophageal reflux disease, patients were randomly and double-blindly divided into five groups. Group A(Lansoprazole Capsules + Mosapride Citrate + Deanxit), B(Lansoprazole Capsules + Mosapride Citrate + Shuganjieyu capsule), C(Lansoprazole Capsules + Mosapride Citrate+ Deanxit + Shuganjieyu capsule) and D(Deanxit) groups are study groups, the other was control group (Lansoprazole Capsules + Mosapride Citrate). The scores of symptoms and mood were compared after 4 weeks and 8 weeks of treatment. Results: The clinical symptoms score, HAMA and HAMD scores were significantly lower in the all study groups in comparison to the control group after 4 weeks and 8 weeks therapy. The clinical symptoms score, HAMA and HAMD scores in group C were significantly lower than those in group A and B ( P 0.05). The HAMA and HAMD scores of group D were significantly higher than those of group A, B, C and control group, and the differences were statistically significant ( P gastroesophageal reflux disease, which can effectively improve the total treatment efficiency, reduce the symptom scores and mood scores of gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  1. The acid pocket: a target for treatment in reflux disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; McColl, Kenneth; Fox, Mark; O'Rourke, Lisa; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J. P. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The nadir esophageal pH of reflux observed during pH monitoring in the postprandial period is often more acidic than the concomitant intragastric pH. This paradox prompted the discovery of the "acid pocket", an area of unbuffered gastric acid that accumulates in the proximal stomach after meals and

  2. Small volume acid reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with hiatal hernia is only detectable by pH-metry but not by multichannel intraluminal impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, J; Malfertheiner, P

    2013-07-01

    Until now, it is uncertain if the so-called pH-only reflux episodes that consist of a pH drop without evidence of retrograde bolus movement in multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) represent reflux episodes or artifacts. Hiatal hernia (HH) may allow reflux of small volumes to occur that can be detected by pH-metry but not by MII. The aim was to search for a mechanism that can explain pH-only reflux, 20 patients (12 females and 8 males, median age 52 years, interquartile range [IQR]: 40.5-60.75 years) were investigated with MII-pH off PPI. Impedance and pH-metry data were analyzed separately. The differences in detection rate of acid reflux between pH-metry and MII were correlated with the presence of HH. In an in vitro experiment, MII-pH probes were flushed with citric acid in plastic tubes of different size with capillary diameter and diameters of 2.5 mm and 4.5 mm, while recording pH values and impedance. HH was present in six patients and absent in 14 patients. In patients with HH in comparison with patients with absent HH, the difference of acid reflux detection between pH-metry and MII is significantly higher (70%, IQR: 15-88% and 3.6%, IQR: 0-31%, respectively). In vitro all simulated reflux lead to a fall in pH whereas a corresponding decrease in impedance was only recognizable in the 4.5-mm plastic tubes. Acid reflux episodes in patients with HH are more frequently detected by pH-metry than by MII. Small volume reflux that does not lead to a decrease in impedance is the likely explanation for this phenomenon. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and respiratory disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazia, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is: to identify any possible relationship between recurrent lower respiratory tract infection and GER, to identify any possible relationship between asthma and GER, to determine the prevalence of GER in children suffering from RLRTI and bronchial asthma, and to evaluate the sensitivity and accuracy of different GER diagnostic modalities. Thirty children with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection and bronchial asthma were evaluated for possible presence of the GER. Radionuclide gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed in all these 30 patients (age range 6 months - 10 years). Patients also underwent ultrasonography and/or barium swallow or fluoroscopy on separate day. Patients were grouped according to presenting coinplaints and investigative modalities. Group A was the patients of RLRTI, which underwent GER scintigraphy, barium studies and ultrasonography. Group B patients were patients with bronchial asthma who underwent all 3 investigations. Group C was patients with RLRTI who under went GER scintigraphy and barium studies only. Patients with bronchial asthma who underwent barium studies and GER scintigraphy were included in group D. Group E and F were patients with RLRTI and bronchial asthma who underwent ultrasonography and GER scintigraphy only respectively. For each group, reflux index was calculated in all positive patients. GER reflux of varying degrees was observed in 20 % patients. The severity of the clinical symptoms was directly proportional to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux index was positively correlating with clinical symptoms as well. When compared with other investigative modalities employed GER scintigraphy was found to be more superior in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Objective assessment of gastroesophageal reflux with the help of GER scintigraphy is feasible and is superior to other modalities and it should be employed much more frequently as an initial investigative procedure

  4. Gaviscon and domperidon responsive apnea episodes associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Huseyin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    The possible pathophysiology of the relationship between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and apnea of prematurity has been widely investigated. Various physiological protective reflex responses provide a plausible biological link between gastro-esophageal reflux and apnea of prematurity. It is uncertain whether or not there is a causal relationship between the two diseases. PATIENT'S FINDINGS: Twins were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit due to feeding problems. Physical examination was normal except for reticulated, blueviolet skin changes. Short apneic attacks occurred on the first day in twin 1 and on the second day in twin 2, and these were initially treated by stimulation and increased ambient O2 concentration. Then, we conducted methylxanthine and continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Laboratory and radiological analysis were normal. As gastro-esophageal reflux disease was thought to be the causes of the treatment-refractory apnea, therapy with gaviscon and domperidon was begun for both cases. Apneic attacks did not recur after gaviscon and domperidon therapy. Pharmacological therapy for gastro-esophageal reflux disease has not definitively been shown to be effective in improving symptoms and hence, should be reserved especially for infants with treatment refractory apnea episodes suspected as being gastro-esophageal reflux in premature infants.

  5. Is scintigraphy of value in the diagnosis of gastrooesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellen, G.; Brudin, L.; Haakansson, H.O. (Centrallasarettet, Kalmar (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    110 patients with suspected oesophageal symptoms were investigated by means of oesophageal endoscopy (OE), 24-h pH- metry, and oesophageal scintigraphy (ES). When 24-h pH-metry formed the basis for diagnosis of gastrooesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the sensitivity for ES at abdominal compression was 64%, but no statistically significant differences were found among erect refluxers, supine refluxers, and comibined refluxers. Only 4% of the GERD patients had pathologic oesophageal clearing at ES. The more severe the macroscopic oesophagitis found by OE, the more pronounced were the abnormal findings at 24-h pH-metry and at ES with abdominal compression. Increased postprandial reflux was associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia at ES with abdominal compression and the most severe form of oesophagitis, respectively. It is concluded that ES has too low sensitivity to be recommended as a screening test for GERD. Nevertheless, the specificity of 76% can to some extent help us to rule out GERD in patients. 19 refs., 7 tabs.

  6. Oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing prevent gastrooesophageal reflux disease in dogs after oesophageal anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ji-Gang; Liu, Quan-Xing; Den, Xu-Feng; Min, Jia-Xin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine the efficiency of oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique in decreasing the rate of postoperative gastrooesophageal reflux disease in a dog model. METHODS: We operated on 10 dogs in this study. First, we resected a 5-cm portion of the distal oesophagus and then restored the continuity of the oesophageal and gastric walls by end-to-end anastomosis. A group of five dogs was subjected to the oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique, whereas another group (control) of five dogs was subjected to the stapling technique after oesophagectomy. The symptom of gastrooesophageal reflux was recorded by 24-h pH oesophageal monitoring. Endoscopy and barium swallow examination were performed on all dogs. Anastomotic leakage was observed by X-ray imaging, whereas benign anastomotic stricture and mucosal damage were observed by endoscopy. RESULTS: None of the 10 dogs experienced anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy. Four dogs in the new technology group resumed regular feeding, whereas only two of the dogs in the control group tolerated solid food intake. pH monitoring demonstrated that 25% of the dogs in the experimental group exhibited reflux and that none had mucosal damage consistent with reflux. Conversely, both reflux and mucosal damage were observed in all dogs in the control group. CONCLUSION: The oesophageal flap valvuloplasty and wrapping suturing technique can improve the postoperative quality of life through the long-term elimination of reflux oesophagitis and decreased stricture formation after primary oesophageal anastomosis. PMID:25516655

  7. Salivary Pepsin Lacks Sensitivity as a Diagnostic Tool to Evaluate Extraesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Fei; Amirault, Janine; Mitchell, Paul D; Rosen, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    To determine the sensitivity of salivary pepsin compared with multichannel intraluminal impedance with pH testing (pH-MII), endoscopy, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) questionnaires. We prospectively recruited 50 children from Boston Children's Hospital who were undergoing pH-MII to evaluate for GERD. The patients completed 24-hour pH-MII testing, completed symptom and quality of life questionnaires, and provided a saliva specimen that was analyzed using the PepTest lateral flow test. A subset of patients also underwent bronchoscopy and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of salivary pepsin compared with each reference standard. Twenty-one of the 50 patients (42%) were salivary pepsin-positive, with a median salivary pepsin concentration of 10 ng/mL (IQR, 10-55 ng/mL). There was no significant difference in the distributions of acid, nonacid, total reflux episodes, full column reflux, or any other reflux variable in patients who were pepsin-positive compared with those who were pepsin-negative (P > .50). There was no significant correlation between the number of reflux episodes and pepsin concentration (P > .10). There was no positive relationship between salivary pepsin positivity, any extraesophageal symptoms or quality of life scores, or inflammation on bronchoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy (P > .30). Salivary pepsin measurement has a low sensitivity for predicting pathological gastroesophageal reflux in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Oesophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's disease, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    The most important novel findings presented on oesophageal disease in DDW 2015 were the following: 1) GERD: a) hypervigilance seems to be a key pathogenic factor in reflux symptoms refractory to PPI; b) post-reflux swallowing-induced peristaltic waves could be an excellent diagnostic criterion for GERD; c) laryngeal pH-metry is not useful in the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal symptoms; d) the recommendation of weight loss adequately recorded in the clinical reports of patients with GERD and obesity or overweight is an excellent quality indicator and is associated with better outcomes. 2) Barrett's oesophagus: a) persistent low-grade dysplasia in more than one endoscopy and a diagnosis of "indefinite for dysplasia" are associated with a high risk of neoplastic progression; b) narrow-band imaging allows areas of dysplasia on Barrett's oesophagus to be identified with high sensitivity and specificity; c) initial endoscopy fails to identify a high percentage of advanced neoplasms in Barrett's oesophagus. Early re-endoscopy should be considered; d) endoscopists specialized in Barret's oesophagus obtain a much higher yield in the diagnosis of advanced lesions. Patients at high risk-men, older patients, smokers and those with long-segment Barrett's oesophagus-could benefit from follow-up in a referral center. 3) Achalasia: POEM seems safe and effective, independently from patient characteristics (age, comorbidity) and the technical variations used. 4) Eosinophilic esophagitis: topical budesonide and exclusion diets are reasonably effective in PPI non-responders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The gastric accommodation response to meal intake determines the occurrence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and reflux events in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, A; Altan, E; Tack, J

    2014-04-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), the retrograde flow of gastric contents into the esophagus is a physiologic phenomenon, which can evoke symptoms and/or lesions in the esophagus (=gastro-esophageal reflux disease or GERD). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduce gastric acidity; however, as they are unable to control transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), the main mechanism for reflux in GERD, they do not abolish reflux. TLESRs occur predominantly in the postprandial period, and they are believed to be triggered by gastric distention. Gastric accommodation (GA) is the physiologic response to gastric distention and serves to prevent a rise in gastric wall tension during food intake. We aimed to study the relationship between GA and TLESRs, as they both are triggered by gastric distention. We studied 12 GERD patients (average age 37 years [range 18-62], 7m/5f) and nine healthy volunteers (average age 27 years [range 22-36], 2m/7f) using high resolution manometry-impedance measurement before and after a mixed meal challenge. We determined the number of TLESRs (with or without reflux) and measured pre- and postprandial IGP. The change in IGP between the pre- and postprandial period (ΔIGP) is used as surrogate for GA. We also measured LES pressure before and after the meal and calculated the change (ΔLESp). There were no statistical differences between pre- and postprandial IGP in GERD and healthy volunteers and similarly, there was no significant difference between pre- and postprandial LES pressures in GERD patients and healthy volunteers. The number of TLESRs (with or without reflux) was similar in GERD and healthy volunteers. More importantly, we did observe a negative correlation between ΔIGP and the number of TLESRs, irrespective of whether they were associated with reflux or not, in the GERD patients (without reflux r = -0.67, p = 0.017; with reflux r = -0.81, p = 0.0014). The same observations were found in healthy volunteers, where ΔIGP and

  10. Investigation of pepsin in tears of children with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Giannicola; Di Nardo, Giovanni; Plateroti, Rocco; Rossi, Paolo; Plateroti, Andrea Maria; Mariani, Paola; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Numerous investigations postulated that laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is implicated in the pathogenesis of various upper airway inflammatory diseases as sinusitis or dacryostenosis. The presence of pepsin in tears might be confirmed the presuntive hypothesis of the arrival in the nasolacrimal ducts and precorneal tears film through the laryngopharyngeal reflux of either gastric acid or stomach secretions (pepsin) with inflammatory potentialities. The aim of this preliminary study was to identify the presence or absence of pepsin in the tears collected from children with a high suspicion of LPR who underwent 24-h pH (MII-pH) monitoring to confirm the disease. This study enrolled 20 patients suffering from symptoms of laryngopharyngeal reflux that underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)-pH monitoring to confirm the disease. The findings of the study group were compared with those of a control group of patients with negative pH monitoring. The quantitative analysis of human pepsin concentration in the tear samples was performed by ELISA method in both groups. Four children (20%) of the study group showed pepsin in the tears. All of the subjects belonging to the control group were negative for its presence. No difference differences in the total number of reflux episodes and the number of weakly basic reflux in the pepsin positive patients vs. pepsin negative children were present. 20% of the children with diagnosed LPR showed pepsin in the tears. Our specific investigation might provide information regarding sinusitis or dacryostenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Association Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Giorgi, Michel R. M.; Helder, Herman M.; Lindeman, Robbert-Jan S.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Dikkers, Frederik G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: Antireflux therapy is incorporated in many treatment protocols for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) because gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is thought to worsen the disease course of RRP. It is unclear if GERD really aggravates the disease course. The aims of this

  12. FEATURES OF CLINICAL COURSE OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN NEWLY RECRUITED WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE UNDIFFERENTIATED DYSPLASIA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Kashkina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of connective tissue undifferentiated dysplasia syndrome against a background of psychological stress at newly recruited can promote the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease occurrence. To the utmost, correlation between the gastroesophageal reflux disease and such manifestations of connective tissue undifferentiated dysplasia syndrome as asthenic constitution, chest deformation, Gothic palate and hypermobility of joints was found

  13. Optimization of the Treatment Protocol in Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.O. Kriuchko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the substantiation and assessment of the effectiveness of the inclusion of ursodeoxycholic acid preparation Ukrliv suspension in the treatment protocol of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Taking into account the results of the studies, the use of ursodeoxycholic acid drug can be recommended as a pathogenetic therapy in the combination treatment of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The findings suggest both the efficiency and the high level of safety and tolerability of ursodeoxycholic acid, in particular Ukrliv suspension, during long-term use to prevent recurrences.

  14. EXTRAOESOPHAGEAL MANIFESTATIONS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN THE PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Asmanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a chronic recurrent disorder with esophageal and extraesophageal symptoms and a variety of morphological changes of the mucous membrane of the esophagus caused by retrograde reflux of the gastric or gastro-intestinal contents. Extraesophageal (atypical symptoms are mainly complaints which indicate involvement in the process of bronchopulmonary, cardiovascular diseases and ENT-organs. This article discusses the pathogenesis of extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, and recommendations on diagnosis and treatment based on the author’s own experience and data of international publications.

  15. Knowledge of pediatrician on gastroesophageal reflux/gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Surjono

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux (OER is involuntary movement of gastric content into esophagus due to transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This condition usually ignored by physician. Many GER cases have severe complication before properly managed. Ten years after incorporating GER into Indonesia pediatric training curriculum, the knowledge of GER among pediatrician need to be measured. Objectives To measure pediatrician's knowledge of GER/GERD in children. Methods This was a cross sectional study using questionnaire and interview. Result There were 387 respondents who filled the questionnaire and being interviewed. The majority of respondents were between 25-45 years old (33.6%. Respondents who graduated before the year 2000 were 48.3%, and after 2000 were 51.7%. Majority of respondents were general pediatrician (90.2% and 41.3% working in teaching hospitals Among pediatricians graduated after year 2000,6 6%,5 0.5% and 57.5% could gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about general knowledge, diagnosis and management of GERD as compared to 49.2%, 42.2% and 47% subjects graduated before year 2000. More pediatricians graduated before year 2000 answered the questions on general knowledge, diagnosis and management < 60% correctly compared to those graduated after year 2000 (42.2%, 25.2% and 28.3% vs. 14%,11.5% and 12%, respectively. Fifty five of 160 (34.4% respondents who working in teaching hospital gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about GERD. Compared to those working in non-teaching hospitals, only 17.6% were able to correctly answer more than 80% of questions. Conclusions Better knowledge about GER/GERD are found among pediatricians graduated after the topics has been introduced to the curriculum and among those practicing in teaching hospitals.

  16. The effect of baclofen on gastro-oesophageal reflux, lower oesophageal sphincter function and reflux symptoms in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, M. A.; Samsom, M.; Rydholm, H.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Baclofen decreases gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes in healthy subjects by reducing the incidence of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations. AIM: To investigate the effect of baclofen on reflux symptoms, oesophageal pH and lower oesophageal sphincter manometry in patients

  17. Evaluation of the serum zinc level in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, N; Mehdipour, M; Najafi, Sh; Bahramian, A; Garjani, Sh; Khoeini Poorfar, H

    2014-06-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory immunologic-based disease involving skin and mucosa. This disease is generally divided into two categories: erosive and non-erosive. Many etiologic factors are deliberated regarding the disease; however, the disorders of immune system and the role of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and monocytes are more highlighted. Zinc is an imperative element for the growth of epithelium and its deficiency induces the cytotoxic activity of T-helper2 cells, which seems to be associated with lichen planus. This study was aimed to evaluate the levels of serum zinc in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) and to compare it with the healthy control group to find out any feasible inference. A total of 22 patients with erosive oral lichen planus, 22 patients with non erosive OLP and 44 healthy individuals as the control group were recruited in this descriptive-comparative study. All the participants were selected from the referees to the department of oral medicine, school of dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Serum zinc level was examined for all the individuals with liquid-stat kit (Beckman Instruments Inc.; Carlsbad, CA). Data were analyzed by adopting the ANOVA and Tukey tests, using SPSS 16 statistical software. The mean age of patients with erosive and non-erosive LP was 41.7 and 41.3 years, respectively. The mean age of the healthy control group was 34.4 years .The mean serum zinc levels in the erosive and non erosive lichen planus groups and control groups were 8.3 (1.15), 11.15 (0.92) and 15.74 (1.75) μg/dl respectively. The difference was statistically significant (poral lichen planus. This finding may probably indicate the promising role of zinc in development of oral lichen planus.

  18. Effects of anxiety and depression in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Boudewijn F; Bredenoord, Albert J; Saleh, Caroline M G; Smout, André J P M

    2015-06-01

    Increased levels of anxiety and depression have been associated with esophageal hyperalgesia and an increased risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We investigated the effects of anxiety and depression on GERD symptoms and the perception of reflux episodes in a well-characterized group of patients. We performed a prospective study of 225 consecutive patients who had symptoms of GERD evaluated. Patients underwent ambulatory 24-hour pH impedance monitoring, and levels of anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. GERD was diagnosed in 147 patients (78 patients had functional heartburn); 36 patients were hypersensitive to gastroesophageal reflux. Among patients with GERD, increased levels of anxiety were associated with more severe retrosternal pain and retrosternal burning. Furthermore, increased levels of anxiety and depression each were associated with lower scores of the mental component of quality of life questionnaire. Levels of anxiety or depression were not associated with the number of reflux symptoms reported during 24-hour pH impedance monitoring or with the number of symptoms associated with a reflux event. Among GERD patients with hypersensitivity to reflux, levels of anxiety and depression and decreases in quality of life were similar to those of other patients with GERD. Patients with functional heartburn had higher levels of anxiety than patients with GERD. In patients with GERD, increased levels of anxiety are associated with increased severity of retrosternal pain and heartburn and reduced quality of life. Patients with GERD with hypersensitivity to gastroesophageal reflux have similar levels of anxiety and similar quality-of-life scores as other patients with GERD. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pneumopatias e doença de refluxo gastroesofágico Lung diseases and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Cláudio Barroso Pereira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A doença do refluxo gastro esofágico decorre do refluxo patológico do estômago para o esófago. Quando esse refluxo ocorre fora do esófago denomina-se doença de refluxo extraesofágico. O autor propõe uma revisão sobre as doenças pulmonares associadas ao refluxo. É avaliado, previamente, de forma resumida o conceito de cada doença e, em seguida, de modo sistemático, são discutidos a prevalência do refluxo sobre as pneumopatias, os mecanismo que explicam essas interações e o impacto do tratamento do refluxo gastroesofagiano sobre as doenças pulmonares. O autor conclui que é inegável a existência de uma conexão entre doença de refluxo gastro esofágico e várias doenças pulmonares, sendo mister estudos complementares para corroborar essa associação.Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease is a consequence of pathological reflux from stomach to oesophagus. Whenever the refluxed contents extended beyond the oesophagus itself, is called Extraoesophageal Reflux Disease. The author proposes a review about pulmonary disorders and gastroesophageal reflux. Previously, it is evaluated in an abridged way, the concepts of each diseases and after that, in a systematic form, it is discussed the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in lung diseases, all the mechanisms studies and the impact of gastro-oesophageal treatment on lung disorders. The author concludes that is undeniable the link between Gastro-oesophageal reflux and lung diseases and further reaserch is mandatory in order to corroborate this association.

  20. Gender is a risk factor in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhre Yaseri, Hashem

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in the last decades, and it is now one of the most common chronic and recurrent diseases. The present study aimed at determining the frequency of gender (sex) and age in Iranian patients with GERD symptoms. Methods: In this study, 803 patients aged 11 to 84 years, with erosive and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux diseases, based on the questionnaire and esophagogastroduodenoscopy findings, participated. The female group was compared with the male group with respect to age, symptoms, esophageal injury, and hiatus hernia. Results: Of the 803 participants, 60.5% (n= 486) were female, and 69.2% (n= 555) were younger than 50 years. Of those patients older than 50 years, 32.8% (n= 81) were female. Moreover, 31.0% (n= 249) of the patients had erosive esophagitis (ERD), and 69.0% (n= 254) had normal esophageal mucosa (NERD).The female to male ratio was 1/1.06 and 1.94/1 in ERD and NERD patients, respectively. Hiatal hernia was more prevalent in females than in males. Conclusion: Nonerosive reflux disease, as a gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), was more common in females than in males. GERD became more prevalent with increase in age. Gender and hiatal hernias were 2 potential risk factors of GERD.

  1. Increased proximal reflux in a hypersensitive esophagus might explain symptoms resistant to proton pump inhibitors in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roelof J; de Jonge, Hugo; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-10-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have symptoms resistant to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Several mechanisms such as esophageal hypersensitivity, increased mucosal permeability, and possibly the position of the gastric acid pocket might underlie a partial response to PPIs. To what extent these mechanisms interact and contribute to PPI-resistant symptoms, however, has not been investigated previously. In 18 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients (9 PPI responders and 9 PPI partial responders), esophageal sensitivity, mucosal permeability, and postprandial reflux parameters were determined during PPI use. Esophageal sensitivity for distension was measured by gradual balloon inflation at 5 and 15 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. The mucosal permeability of 4 esophageal biopsy specimens per patient was determined in Ussing chambers by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance and transmucosal flux of fluorescein. Postprandial reflux parameters were determined using concurrent high-resolution manometry/pH impedance after a standardized meal. In addition, the acid pocket was visualized using scintigraphy. No difference in the rate of postprandial acid reflux, in the pH of the acid pocket (PPI responders 3.7 ± 0.7 vs PPI partial responders 4.2 ± 0.4; P = .54), or in the position of the acid pocket was observed in PPI partial responders compared with PPI responders. In addition, the permeability of the esophageal mucosa was similar in both groups, as shown by a similar transepithelial electrical resistance and flux of fluorescein. PPI partial responders had more reflux episodes with a higher mean proximal extent, compared with PPI responders, and were more sensitive to balloon distension, both in the upper and lower esophagus. PPI-resistant symptoms most likely are explained by increased proximal reflux in a hypersensitive esophagus and less likely by increased mucosal permeability or the position of

  2. A Case of Frequent Arousal Following Nocturnal Dyspnea Caused by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Wui Yoon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder that is associated with many esophageal syndromes and complications. Most cases of reflux event occur during the day, but reflux during sleep can cause not only esophageal problems, but also sleep problems, such as arousal and poor sleep quality. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who had been referred to us with frequent arousal following sudden dyspnea. On polysomnography, no respiratory disturbances and periodic limb movements were found during the sleep study, but frequent events of arousal were reported (arousal index: 12.3/h. On a 24-hr esophageal pH monitoring test, his DeMeester score was 176.43 and the total reflux time was 1120.9 min (76.9%, indicating the presence of significant acid reflux. After treatment with a proton-pump inhibitor, the arousals following nocturnal dyspnea and fatigue in the morning disappeared in the patient. GERD should be considered as a cause of spontaneous arousal or awakening not accompanying respiratory disturbances.

  3. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermelstein, Joseph; Chait Mermelstein, Alanna; Chait, Maxwell M

    2018-01-01

    A significant percentage of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) will not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. The causes of PPI-refractory GERD are numerous and diverse, and include adherence, persistent acid, functional disorders, nonacid reflux, and PPI bioavailability. The evaluation should start with a symptom assessment and may progress to imaging, endoscopy, and monitoring of esophageal pH, impedance, and bilirubin. There are a variety of pharmacologic and procedural interventions that should be selected based on the underlying mechanism of PPI failure. Pharmacologic treatments can include antacids, prokinetics, alginates, bile acid binders, reflux inhibitors, and antidepressants. Procedural options include laparoscopic fundoplication and LINX as well as endoscopic procedures, such as transoral incisionless fundoplication and Stretta. Several alternative and complementary treatments of possible benefit also exist. PMID:29606884

  4. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in premature infants using a radionuclide method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Michiomi

    2001-01-01

    The cases of 36 very low birthweight infants (premature group) and 52 mature infants with birth weights as low as 1500 g (mature group) with gastro-esephageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed. These infants received 24 hour pH monitoring, reflux scintigraphy, gastric emptying, and antrum motility measurement. The results of 24-hour pH monitoring of the premature group are not different from these of the mature group. Time required for reflux scintigraphy of the premature group is higher than that of the mature group. Emptying time of premature group is slower than that of the mature group. Dietary management in premature infants with GERD is important. Using a nasoduodenal feeding tube is quite effective. Radionuclide method, in addition to 24-hour pH monitoring, should be used to evaluate total gastroesophageal function. (author)

  5. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in premature infants using a radionuclide method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Michiomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Ohkubo (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    The cases of 36 very low birthweight infants (premature group) and 52 mature infants with birth weights as low as 1500 g (mature group) with gastro-esephageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed. These infants received 24 hour pH monitoring, reflux scintigraphy, gastric emptying, and antrum motility measurement. The results of 24-hour pH monitoring of the premature group are not different from these of the mature group. Time required for reflux scintigraphy of the premature group is higher than that of the mature group. Emptying time of premature group is slower than that of the mature group. Dietary management in premature infants with GERD is important. Using a nasoduodenal feeding tube is quite effective. Radionuclide method, in addition to 24-hour pH monitoring, should be used to evaluate total gastroesophageal function. (author)

  6. The role of hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, MA; Samsom, M; Smout, AJPM

    This article gives an overview of the role of sliding hiatus hernia in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). The crural diaphragm acts as an external sphincter of the antireflux barrier. Contractions of the crural diaphragm increase lower-oesophageal-sphincter (LOS) pressure during each

  7. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Long-term Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsold, Marieke G.; Kneepkens, C. M. F. Frank; Heij, Hugo A.; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Tibboel, Dick; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized consequence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Results of studies examining predictive factors for early and late GERD are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of early ( <2 years) and late GERD

  8. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Long-term Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsold, M.G.; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; Heij, H.A.; IJsselstijn, H.; Tibboel, D.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a well-recognized consequence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Results of studies examining predictive factors for early and lateGERDare inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of early (<2 years) and late GERD

  9. Four-year follow-up of endoscopic gastroplication for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Schreinemakers, J. Rieneke C.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of Endocinch treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After unblinding and crossover, 50 patients (32 males, 18 females; mean age 46 years) with pH-proven chronic GERD were recruited from an initial randomized, placebo-controlled, single-center study,

  10. [The proteomic profiling of blood serum of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkotashvili, L V; Kolesov, S A; Jukova, E A; Vidmanova, T A; Kankova, N Yu; Bashurova, I A; Sidorova, A M; Kulakova, E V

    2015-03-01

    The mass-spectra of proteome of blood serum from healthy children and children with gastroesophageal reflux disease were received. The technology platform including direct proteome mass-spectrometer profiling after pre-fractional rectification using magnetic particles MB WCX was applied. The significant differences in mass-spectra were established manifesting in detection of more mass-spectrometer peaks and higher indicators of their intensity and area in group of healthy children. The study detected 39 particular peptides and low-molecular proteins predominantly intrinsic to healthy or ill children. It was established that two peptides with molecular mass 925 and 909 Da. are registered only in healthy patients and have no traces in group ofpatients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The peptide 1564 Da is detected only in blood of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease and totally is absent in healthy children. The research data permitted to reveal specific patterns (signatures) of low-molecular proteins and peptides specific for blood serum of healthy children and patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results testify the availability of singularities in metabolism of low-molecular proteins and can be used as a basis for development of minimally invasive mass-spectrometer system for its diagnostic.

  11. The Role of Vegetative Dysfunction and Its Correction in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Osyodlo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the findings regarding the effect of vegetative dysfunction on the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease, the expediency of autonomic imbalance correction by phenibut on the background of antisecretory therapy with pantoprazole is shown, it helps to improve the immediate and long-term results.

  12. Variations in Definitions and Outcome Measures in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singendonk, Maartje M. J.; Brink, Anna J.; Steutel, Nina F.; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S.; van Wijk, Michiel P.; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is defined as GER disease (GERD) when it leads to troublesome symptoms and/or complications. We hypothesized that definitions and outcome measures in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on pediatric GERD would be heterogeneous. OBJECTIVES: Systematically assess

  13. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux disease : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oor, Jelmer E; Roks, David J; Ünlü, Çagdas; Hazebroek, Eric J

    BACKGROUND: The effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains unclear. We aimed to outline the currently available literature. DATA SOURCES: All relevant databases were searched for publications examining the effect of laparoscopic SG on GERD.

  14. Canadian Consensus Conference on the Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Adults – Update 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is the most prevalent acid-related disorder in Canada and is associated with significant impairment of health-related quality of life. Since the last Canadian Consensus Conference in 1996, GERD management has evolved substantially.

  15. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI test...

  16. Predictive value of routine esophageal high-resolution manometry for gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, F. B.; Smout, A. J.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using conventional manometry, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) was associated with a reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure and impaired peristalsis. However, with a large overlap between GERD patients and controls, these findings are of limited clinical relevance. It is uncertain

  17. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, C. M. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20

  18. Diagnostic value of the proton pump inhibitor test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Numans, M. E.; de Wit, N. J.; Baron, A.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the proton pump inhibitor test in a primary care population as well as its additional value over reflux history, using the symptom association probability outcome during 24-h oesophageal pH recording as reference test for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  19. Epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A general population-based study in Xi’an of Northwest China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jin-Hai; Luo, Jin-Yan; Dong, Lei; Gong, Jun; Tong, Ming

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in the Western population, but detailed population-based data in China are limited. The aim of this study was to understand the epidemiology of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (SGER) in adults of Xi’an, a northwestern city of China, and to explore the potential risk factors of GERD.

  20. Concomitant functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome decrease health-related quality of life in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Durk R.; van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Baron, Astrid; Smout, André J. P. M.; Samsom, Melvin

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have reported an overlap between gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of FD and IBS in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the effect on

  1. Classification of esophageal motor findings in gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Conclusions from an international consensus group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyawali, C. P.; Roman, S.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Fox, M.; Keller, J.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Sifrim, D.; Tatum, R.; Yadlapati, R.; Savarino, E.; Azpiroz, Fernando; Babaei, Arash; Bhatia, Shobna; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Bor, Serhat; Carlson, Dustin; Castell, Donald; Cicala, Michele; Clarke, John; de Bortoli, Nicola; Drug, Vasile; Frazzoni, Marzio; Holloway, Richard; Kahrilas, Peter; Kandulski, Arne; Katz, Phil; Katzka, David; Mittal, Ravinder; Mion, Francois; Novais, Luis; Patel, Amit; Penagini, Roberto; Ribolsi, Mentore; Richter, Joel; Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Vincenzo; Serra, Jordi; Schnoll-Sussman, Felice; Smout, Andre; Soffer, Edy; Sweis, Rami; Tack, Jan; Tolone, Salvatore; Tutuian, Radu; Vaezi, Michael; Vela, Marcelo; Woodland, Philip; Wu, Justin; Xiao, Yinglian; Zerbib, Frank

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundHigh-resolution manometry (HRM) has resulted in new revelations regarding the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of new HRM motor paradigms on reflux burden needs further definition, leading to a modern approach to motor testing in GERD. MethodsFocused

  2. Dose-dependent effects of lesogaberan on reflux measures in patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Philip B; Silberg, Debra G; Ruth, Magnus; Miller, Frank; Pandolfino, John

    2014-11-18

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type B-receptor agonist lesogaberan (AZD3355) has been developed for use in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy (partial responders). This study aimed to explore the dose-response effect of lesogaberan on reflux episodes in partial responders. In this randomized, single-centre, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study, partial responders taking optimised PPI therapy were given 30, 90, 120 and 240 mg doses of lesogaberan. Each dose was given twice (12 h apart) during a 24-h period, during which impedance-pH measurements were taken. Twenty-five patients were included in the efficacy analysis and 27 in the safety analysis. The effect of lesogaberan on the mean number of reflux episodes was dose-dependent, and all doses significantly reduced the mean number of reflux episodes relative to placebo. Lesogaberan also dose-dependently reduced the mean number of acid reflux episodes (except the 30 mg dose) and weakly acid reflux episodes (all doses) significantly, relative to placebo. Regardless of dose, lesogaberan had a similar effect on the percentage of time with esophageal pH < 4 [mean reduction: 68.5% (30 mg), 54.2% (90 mg), 65.9% (120 mg), 72.1% (240 mg); p < 0.05 except 90 mg dose]. No adverse events led to discontinuation and no serious adverse events occurred during active treatment. Lesogaberan inhibited reflux in a dose-dependent manner in partial responders taking optimised PPI therapy, and these effects were significant versus placebo. All lesogaberan doses were well tolerated and were not associated with clinically relevant adverse events. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01043185.

  3. Efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-de-la-Tijera, Fátima

    2018-03-14

    Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, but their onset of action may be slow. To assess the available literature regarding the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate in gastroesophageal reflux patients. A systematic review was conducted. A systematic literature search starting from 2000. Reviewed manuscripts concerning the effectiveness of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease were reviewed and the data were extracted. Data were subsequently analyzed with descriptive statistics. This review included information of four studies. Two trials compared the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate versus omeprazole. One study compared the efficacy of once-daily morning or nighttime dosing. And another study compared omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate/alginate versus omeprazole. In total, there was no difference between omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate and omeprazole. However, there is a trend towards more sustained response and a greater proportion of patients with sustained total relief by 30 minutes with omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate. Omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate therapy is not more effective than omeprazole in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, data obtained suggest that it can have a more sustained response and sustained total relief.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux disease vs. Panayiotopoulos syndrome: an underestimated misdiagnosis in pediatric age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Pasquale; Pacchiarotti, Claudia; Ferretti, Alessandro; Bianchi, Simona; Paolino, Maria Chiara; Barreto, Mario; Principessa, Luigi; Villa, Maria Pia

    2014-12-01

    Autonomic signs and symptoms could be of epileptic or nonepileptic origin, and the differential diagnosis depends on a number of factors which include the nature of the autonomic manifestations themselves, the occurrence of other nonictal autonomic signs/symptoms, and the age of the patient. Here, we describe twelve children (aged from ten months to six years at the onset of the symptoms) with Panayiotopoulos syndrome misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Panayiotopoulos syndrome may represent an underestimated diagnostic challenge. When the signs/symptoms occur mainly during sleep, a sleep EEG or, if available, a polysomnographic evaluation may be the most useful investigation to make a differential diagnosis between autonomic epileptic and nonepileptic disorders. An early detection can reduce both the high morbidity related to mismanagement and the high costs to the national health service related to the incorrect diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. To decide if antiseizure therapy is required, one should take into account both the frequency and severity of epileptic seizures and the tendency to have potentially lethal autonomic cardiorespiratory involvement. In conclusion, we would emphasize the need to make a differential diagnosis between gastroesophageal reflux disease and Panayiotopoulos syndrome in patients with "an unusual" late-onset picture of GERD and acid therapy-resistant gastroesophageal reflux, especially if associated with other autonomic symptoms and signs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Follow-up of a cohort of children and adolescents with gastro-esophageal reflux disease who were free of reflux esophagitis at initial diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigómez, Ana; Lundborg, Per; Johansson, Saga; Wallander, Mari-Ann; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2010-08-01

    Few studies have examined the incidence of complications from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children and adolescents in primary care. Here we aimed to describe the natural history of GERD in a pediatric population with no reflux esophagitis at initial diagnosis, assessing diagnoses of new esophageal complications and extra-esophageal conditions. We used The Health Improvement Network UK primary care database (which includes data on more than 2 million patients) to identify individuals aged 1-17 years with a first diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux or heartburn in the period 2000-2005, via a computerized search followed by a manual review of the patient records. This search identified 1242 individuals with an incident diagnosis of GERD but no record of esophagitis. This cohort was followed-up to detect new diagnoses of esophageal complications and extra-esophageal conditions. During a mean follow-up period of almost 4 years, 40 children and adolescents had a confirmed new diagnosis of reflux esophagitis (incidence: 10.9 per 1000 person-years). No cases of Barrett's esophagus, esophageal stricture or esophageal ulcer were reported. Individuals with GERD had double the risk of an extra-esophageal condition such as asthma, pneumonia, cough or chest pain compared with children and adolescents with no diagnosis of GERD. Children and adolescents with GERD may be at risk of developing reflux esophagitis and a range of other extra-esophageal conditions, but more severe esophageal complications are rare.

  6. Treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: the new kids to block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, K

    2010-08-01

    Refractory gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as persistent symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, is an increasingly prevalent condition and is becoming a major challenge for the clinician. Since non-acidic reflux may be associated with symptoms persisting during PPI treatment, the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the most important barrier protecting against reflux, has become an important target for the treatment of (refractory) GERD. Preclinical research has identified several receptors that are involved in the control of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), the predominant mechanism of both acid and non-acidic reflux events, and several drugs have now been tested in humans. The GABA(B) agonist baclofen has demonstrated to effectively reduce the rate of TLESRs and the amount of reflux in both GERD patients and healthy volunteers. Nevertheless, the occurrence of central side effects limits its clinical use for the treatment of GERD. Several analogues are being developed to overcome this limitation and have shown promising results. Additionally, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) receptor antagonists have shown to reduce both acid and non-acidic reflux in GERD patients and several molecules are currently being evaluated. Although CB(1) antagonists have been shown to reduce TLESRs, they are also associated with central side effects, limiting their clinical applicability. Despite the identification of several potentially interesting drugs, the main challenge for the future remains the reduction of central side effects. Moreover, future studies will need to demonstrate the efficacy of these treatments in patients with refractory GERD.

  7. Prevalence and demographic determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the Turkish general population: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Zeynel

    2012-08-01

    We aimed to establish the prevalence and demographic determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the Turkish general population using the Turkish version of the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire. A total of 8143 volunteers (mean age: 38.5 (13.3) years; 52.3% males) were included in this cross-sectional questionnaire study conducted via face-to-face administration of the questionnaire forms including items on sociodemographic features, past history of gastric disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, the influence of reflux symptoms on patients' lives, physician visits, diagnostic tests, and reflux medications. A past history of gastric symptoms was reported in half of the population. More female participants (p<0.001) had a past history of gastric symptoms that yielded a previous diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in 19.1% of the population. The likelihood of gastroesophageal reflux disease was low in the majority (75.3%) of the subjects evaluated. Gastroesophageal reflux disease with an inconveniencing or disrupting impact on the patient's life was present in 17.9% and 6.8% of the population. Total gastroesophageal reflux disease-questionnaire scores and reflux prevalence were higher in older age groups (p<0.001). Females were more likely to have gastroesophageal reflux disease prevalence based on reflux symptoms. The impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on sleep and psychological/emotional well-being was more pronounced in older and female patients, whereas the impact on eating/drinking behaviors and physical-social activities was more marked among females independent of their age (p<0.001). Reflux prevalence was higher in subjects from East Anatolia, Central Anatolia, Mediterranean, and Black Sea regions of Turkey (p<0.001 for each). Prevalence and demographic determinants of gastroesophageal reflux disease are compatible with the profile of the disease in the other Western populations, with a predilection for females and

  8. Validation of the GerdQ questionnaire for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, C; Wernersson, B; Hoff, D A L; Hatlebakk, J G

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains a challenge as both invasive methods and symptom-based strategies have limitations. The symptom-based management of GERD in primary care may be further optimised with the use of a questionnaire. To assess the diagnostic validity of the GerdQ questionnaire in patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD. Patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD without alarm features, underwent upper endoscopy, and if normal, pH-metry. Patients were followed for 4 weeks and GerdQ was completed blinded to the investigator at both visits. Reflux oesophagitis or pathological acid exposure was used as diagnostic references for GERD. The diagnostic accuracy for GERD on symptom response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) was assessed. Among the 169 patients, a GerdQ cutoff ≥9 gave the best balance with regard to sensitivity, 66% (95% CI: 58-74), and specificity, 64% (95% CI: 41-83), for GERD. The high prevalence of reflux oesophagitis (81%) resulted in a high proportion of true positives, but at the same time a high proportion of false-negatives. Consequently, GerdQ had a high positive predictive value, 92% (95% CI: 86-97), but a low negative predictive value, 22% (95% CI: 13-34), for GERD. Symptom resolution on PPI therapy had high sensitivity, 76% (95% CI: 66-84), but low specificity, 33% (95% CI: 17-53), for GERD. GerdQ is a useful complementary tool for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in primary care. The implementation of GerdQ could reduce the need for upper endoscopy and improve resource utilisation. Symptom resolution on proton pump inhibitor did not predict gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. [The characteristics of esophagogastric junction contractile index in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease or functional heartburn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Duan, L P; Ge, Y; Xia, Z W; Xu, Z J

    2016-04-01

    To study the role of esophagogastric junction contractile index (EGJ-CI) in evaluating the function of anti-reflux barrier, and in differentiating patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) from those with functional heartburn (FH). A total of 115 patients presenting heartburn were enrolled in the study from January 2012 to June 2015.All subjects had completed Gerd-Q questionnaire and undergone gastroscopy, 24-hour pH-impedance monitoring and esophageal high-resolution manometry. GERD patients were divided into as reflux esophagitis, acid-nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) and weakly acid-NERD groups. Patients with normal esophageal mucosa, normal acid exposure and negative proton pump inhibitor test were enrolled in FH group. EGJ-CI (mmHg·cm) as well as EGJ rest pressure and 4s integrated relaxation pressure (IRP 4s) were measured. Among the 115 patients, 18 were reflux esophagitis [(49.0±18.9) years, M∶F=10∶8], 25 were acid-NERD [(48.7±14.4) years, M∶F=13∶12], 37 were weakly acid-NERD [(52.0±14.8) years, M∶F=15∶22] and 35 were FH [(53.6±14.8), M∶F=8∶27]. No differences of Gerd-Q scores were noticed between the four groups. (1)Negative correlations were demonstrated between EGJ-CI and esophageal acid exposure time (r=-0.283, P=0.002), EGJ-CI and acid reflux events (r=-0.233, P=0.012), EGJ-CI and weakly acid reflux events (r=-0.213, P=0.022), EGJ-CI and non-acid reflux events (r=-0.200, P=0.032). (2)The value of EGJ-CI was significantly higher in FH patients than in the three subgroups of GERD(all P<0.01). EGJ rest pressure of FH group was higher than that of acid-NERD (P<0.01). IRP 4s in acid-NERD group was lower than that of FH and weakly acid-NERD (P<0.05). (3)The area under curve (AUC) of EGJ-CI was higher than that of EGJ-CIT, EGJ rest pressure or IRP 4s(0.686 vs 0.678, 0.641 and 0.578). The cut-off value of EGJ-CI to differentiate GERD from FH was 9.74 mmHg·cm with sensitivity 82.86% and specificity 51.52%. The EGJ-CI values are

  10. Electroacupuncture to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gajin; Leem, Jungtae; Lee, Hojung; Lee, Junhee

    2016-05-17

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease lowers the quality of life and increases medical costs. Electroacupuncture has been used to ease symptoms and improve gastrointestinal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The main purposes of this study are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this procedure. This is a protocol for a randomized, patient-blinded, assessor-blinded, sham-controlled trial. Sixty participants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, who have previously undergone standard treatment, will be recruited from August 2015 at Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital. The participants will be allocated to either the electroacupuncture (n = 30) or the sham electroacupuncture group (n = 30); the allocation will be concealed from both the participants and the assessors. The EA group will undergo penetrating acupuncture at 18 fixed points and two optional points chosen using the pattern identification for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Electrical stimulation will be applied at some of the acupoints. The sham electroacupuncture group will undergo nonpenetrating acupuncture without electrical stimulation at 18 nonspecific points, each of which will be only 2 cm away from the true acupoints used in the electroacupuncture group. In both groups, the procedure will be performed using the Park device. The treatment will last for 6 weeks (with two sessions each week), and the outcome will be evaluated at baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks. The primary outcome will be the proportion of responders with adequate symptom relief, whereas the secondary outcomes will comprise the results of the Nepean dyspepsia index; the Korean gastrointestinal symptom rating scale; the EQ-5D™; levels of gastrin, motilin, and inflammatory cytokines; the perceived stress scale; the qi-stagnation questionnaire; the patient global impression of change; and the spleen qi deficiency questionnaire. The results of this trial will provide information

  11. Preoperative endoscopy may reduce the need for revisional surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhok, B M; Carr, W R J; McCormack, C; Boyle, M; Jennings, N; Schroeder, N; Balupuri, S; Small, P K

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric operation, but postoperative reflux symptoms can sometimes necessitate revisional surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred operation in morbidly obese patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In 2011, we introduced preoperative endoscopy to assess for hiatus hernia or evidence of oesophagitis in conjunction with an assessment of gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery with a view to avoid sleeve gastrectomy for these patients. A prospectively maintained database was used to identify patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy before and after we changed the unit policy. The need for revisional surgery in patients with troublesome gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was examined. Prior to 2011, 130 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 11 (8.5%) of them required conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for symptomatic reflux disease. Following the policy change, 284 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and to date, only five (1.8%) have required revisional surgery (p = 0.001). Baseline demographics were comparable between the groups, and average follow-up period was 47 and 33 months, respectively, for each group. Preoperative endoscopy and a detailed clinical history regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms may improve patient selection for sleeve gastrectomy. Avoiding sleeve gastrectomy in patients with reflux disease and/or hiatus hernia may reduce the incidence of revisional surgery. © 2016 World Obesity.

  12. Dilated intercellular space diameter as marker of reflux-related mucosal injury in children with chronic cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, O; Mancini, V; Thapar, N; Ribolsi, M; Emerenziani, S; de'Angelis, G; Bizzarri, B; Lindley, K J; Cicala, M

    2014-04-01

    The diagnostic corroboration of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic cough remains challenging. To compare oesophageal mucosal intercellular space diameter (ISD) in children with GERD, children with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER)-related cough (GrC) and a control group, and to explore the relationship between baseline impedance levels and dilated ISD in children with GER-related cough. Forty children with GERD, 15 children with GrC and 12 controls prospectively underwent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with oesophageal biopsies taken 2-3 cm above squamocolumnar junction. ISD were quantified using transmission electron microscopy. Impedance-pH monitoring with evaluation of baseline impedance in the most distal impedance channel was performed in both patient groups. A significant difference in mean ISD values was found between GrC patients (0.9 ± 0.2 μm) and controls (0.5 ± 0.2 μm, P reflux parameter. Finally, there was no correlation between ISD and distal baseline impedance values (r:-0.35; NS). In children with reflux-related cough, dilated intercellular space diameter appears to be an objective and useful marker of oesophageal mucosal injury regardless of acid exposure, and its evaluation should be considered for those patients where the diagnosis is uncertain. In children with reflux-related cough, baseline impedance levels have no role in identifying reflux-induced oesophageal mucosal ultrastructural changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The role of gastroesophageal reflux in relation to symptom onset in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory nonerosive reflux disease accompanied by an underlying esophageal motor disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Shinya; Funaki, Yasushi; Iida, Akihito; Tokudome, Kentaro; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Sasaki, Makoto; Kasugai, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The symptom improvement rate is low with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). The underlying pathogenic mechanism is complex. Esophageal motility disorders (EMDs) are thought to be a factor, but their prevalence, type, symptoms and the role played by gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in symptom onset have not been fully investigated. To investigate the role of GER in symptom onset in PPI-refractory NERD patients with EMDs. This study comprised 76 patients with PPI-refractory NERD. Manometry was performed during PPI treatment and patients were divided into an EMD group and normal motility (non-EMD) group. Then, multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring was performed and medical interviews were conducted. Nineteen patients (25%) had an EMD. Data were compared between 17 patients, excluding 2 with achalasia and 57 non-EMD patients. No significant differences were observed between groups in 24-hour intraesophageal pH <4 holding time (HT), mean number of GER episodes or mean number of proximal reflux episodes. The reflux-related symptom index (≥50%) showed a relationship between reflux and symptoms in 70.5% of EMD patients and 75% of non-EMD patients. In the EMD group, the score for FSSG (Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD) question (Q)10 was significantly correlated with the number of GER episodes (r = 0.58, p = 0.02) and the number of proximal reflux episodes (r = 0.63, p = 0.02). In addition, the score for Q9 tended to be correlated with the number of GER episodes (r = 0.44, p = 0.06). Our results suggest that some PPI-refractory NERD patients have EMDs, and that GER plays a role in symptom onset.

  14. Heartburn during sleep: a clinical marker of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, F; Madalosso, C A S; Callegari-Jacques, S M; Gurski, R R

    2009-02-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and morbid obesity are entities with increasing prevalence. New clinical strategies are cornerstones for their management. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of heartburn during sleep (HDS) and whether this symptom predicts the presence of objective GORD parameters and increased heartburn perception in morbidly obese patients. Ninety-one consecutive morbidly obese patients underwent clinical evaluation, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and oesophageal pH monitoring. HDS was characterized when patients replied positively to the question, 'Does heartburn wake you from sleep?'. A General Score for Heartburn (GSH) ranging between 0 and 5 was assessed with the question 'How bad is your heartburn?'. HDS was reported by 33 patients (36%). More patients with HDS had abnormal acid contact time or reflux oesophagitis than patients without HDS (94%vs 57%, P heartburn preceded by acid reflux in diurnal (39%vs 9%; P heartburn. HDS occurs in a significant minority of patients with morbid obesity and has high positive predictive value for GORD. Symptomatic reflux during the sleep seems to be a marker of increased heartburn perception in this population.

  15. The effect of itopride combined with lansoprazole in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Byung-Joon; Lee, Dong-Soo

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the efficacy of adding a prokinetic agent to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) for the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease. A prospective, randomized open trial comparing lansoprazole plus itopride to lansoprazole single therapy was performed for 12 weeks. Sixty-four patients with a reflux finding score (RFS) >7 and a reflux symptom index (RSI) >13 were enrolled and received either lansoprazole 30 mg once daily with itopride 50 mg three times daily or lansoprazole 30 mg once daily for 12 weeks. RSI and RFS were completed at baseline, after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. During the treatment period, RSI and RFS were significantly improved compared with the pretreatment scores in both study groups. Reductions of total RSI and globus symptom were significantly higher in the lansoprazole plus itopride group compared to the lansoprazole group. In the RFS, however, there were no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, itopride in addition to PPI did not show any superior RFS improvement compared to PPI single therapy, but was helpful in speeding up relief of reflux symptoms in LPR patients. Thus, itopride may be considered as the secondary additive agent in the PPI treatment of LPR patients.

  16. Helicobacter pylori eradication and reflux disease onset: did gastric acid get "crazy"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2013-02-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is highly prevalent in the general population. In the last decade, a potential relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication and GORD onset has been claimed. The main putative mechanism is the gastric acid hypersecretion that develops after bacterial cure in those patients with corpus-predominant gastritis. We performed a critical reappraisal of the intricate pathogenesis and clinical data available in this field. Oesophagitis onset after H. pylori eradication in duodenal ulcer patients has been ascribed to a gastric acid hypersecretion, which could develop following body gastritis healing. However, the absence of an acid hypersecretive status in these patients is documented by both pathophysiology and clinical studies. Indeed, duodenal ulcer recurrence is virtually abolished following H. pylori eradication. In addition, intra-oesophageal pH recording studies failed to demonstrated increased acid reflux following bacterial eradication. Moreover, oesophageal manometric studies suggest that H. pylori eradication would reduce--rather than favor--acid reflux into the oesophagus. Finally, data of clinical studies would suggest that H. pylori eradication is not significantly associated with either reflux symptoms or erosive oesophagitis onset, some data suggesting also an advantage in curing the infection when oesophagitis is already present. Therefore, the legend of "crazy acid" remains--as all the others--a fascinating, but imaginary tale.

  17. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients – focus on esomeprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang RS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Raymond SY Tang, Justin CY Wu Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong Abstract: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy. Keywords: elderly patients, peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and its association with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Mohammed; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Saleemi, Sarfraz; Khan, Mohammed Qaseem; Khan, Basha; Ahmed, Shad; Ibrahim, Khalid El Tayeb; Mobeireek, Abdullah; Al Mohareb, Fahad; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2013-06-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is a significant postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant problem. Recent data in lung transplant patients suggest an association with gastroesophageal reflux disease and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We studied posthematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its response to a proton pump inhibitor. Seven postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome were studied. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was assessed by 24-hour pH monitoring with a Bravo catheter-free radio pH capsule. Patients with positive gastroesophageal reflux disease were started on omeprazole. Pretreatment and posttreatment pulmonary function tests were done at 3-month intervals. Of 7 patients, 5 had positive results for gastroesophageal reflux disease (71%). Omeprazole had a disease-stabilizing effect on the patients' pulmonary function tests. Our study shows a significant association between bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease in postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Use of omeprazole may have a disease-stabilizing effect in short-term follow-up.

  19. Correlation between duodenogastric reflux and symptoms of digestive system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leja, M.; Reinholds, E.; Brezinskis, G.; Aboltins, A.; Lejnieks, A.

    2004-01-01

    The symptoms of digestive origin potentially indicative for duodenogastric reflux (DGR) have been compared to the results obtained by scintigraphic method, elaborated by the group of authors. The symptoms were registred bu using a specially elaborated questionnaire according to preliminary determined intervals of time with respect to the scintigraphic investigation. No correlation was found between DGR and the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, regurgitation with sour and bitter content, belching, heartburn, burning sensation in the epigastric area, early satiety, flatulence, constipation, dyspepsia and abdominal pain. Diarrhoea in the morning of the investigation and month prior to the investigation was statistically significantly correlating to DGR, while no correlation was confirmed to the symptom a day and a week prior to the investigation. Bittertaste in the mouth had the best correlation to DGR in all the analysed intervals. The conclusion is made that bitter taste in the mouth is the best correlating symptom for DGR, still the low sensitivity and low positive and negative predictive values of the symptom does not make it a useful guide for symptom-based diagnosis of DGR

  20. Improvement of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Japanese patients with spinal kyphotic deformity who underwent surgical spinal correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Nishino, Masafumi; Sahara, Shu; Uotani, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Sugimoto, Ken; Yamato, Yu; Togawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Sho; Hoshino, Hironobu; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Furuta, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Spinal kyphotic deformity occasionally results in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The effects of acid reflux on the esophagus in kyphotic patients are unclear, however, and it is unknown whether acid reflux, endoscopic GERD, and reflux-related symptoms improve following surgical spinal correction in these patients. Herein, we investigated the characteristics of GERD in kyphotic patients and the improvement in GERD following surgical correction. In 48 patients with severe kyphotic deformity scheduled for surgical spinal correction, we conducted esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 24-h pH monitoring and three questionnaire surveys, including the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG). We repeated these measurements after surgical correction and compared pre- and post-surgery values. Of 48 patients, 70.8% [95% CI: 55.9-83.0%, 34/48] had endoscopically evaluated esophageal mucosal injury. Regarding pH before surgery, 64.9% (CI: 47.5-79.8%, 24/37) had abnormal acid reflux (intraesophageal pH reflux decreased from 66.7% (95% CI: 41.0-86.7%) to 33.3% (95% CI: 13.3-59.0%) (P = 0.045). Surgical spinal correction in kyphosis patients improves not only kyphotic deformity-related disorders but also esophageal mucosal injury, abnormal acid reflux, and reflux-related symptoms. © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  1. Classification of esophageal motor findings in gastro-esophageal reflux disease: Conclusions from an international consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C P; Roman, S; Bredenoord, A J; Fox, M; Keller, J; Pandolfino, J E; Sifrim, D; Tatum, R; Yadlapati, R; Savarino, E

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has resulted in new revelations regarding the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of new HRM motor paradigms on reflux burden needs further definition, leading to a modern approach to motor testing in GERD. Focused literature searches were conducted, evaluating pathophysiology of GERD with emphasis on HRM. The results were discussed with an international group of experts to develop a consensus on the role of HRM in GERD. A proposed classification system for esophageal motor abnormalities associated with GERD was generated. Physiologic gastro-esophageal reflux is inherent in all humans, resulting from transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations that allow venting of gastric air in the form of a belch. In pathological gastro-esophageal reflux, transient LES relaxations are accompanied by reflux of gastric contents. Structural disruption of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) barrier, and incomplete clearance of the refluxate can contribute to abnormally high esophageal reflux burden that defines GERD. Esophageal HRM localizes the LES for pH and pH-impedance probe placement, and assesses esophageal body peristaltic performance prior to invasive antireflux therapies and antireflux surgery. Furthermore, HRM can assess EGJ and esophageal body mechanisms contributing to reflux, and exclude conditions that mimic GERD. Structural and motor EGJ and esophageal processes contribute to the pathophysiology of GERD. A classification scheme is proposed incorporating EGJ and esophageal motor findings, and contraction reserve on provocative tests during HRM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Achalasia following reflux disease: coincidence, consequence, or accommodation? An experience-based literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vereczkei A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available András Vereczkei, Laura Bognár, András Papp, Örs Péter Horváth Department of Surgery, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary Abstract: Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by the defective peristaltic activity of the esophageal body and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter due to the degeneration of the inhibitory neurons in the myenteric plexus of the esophageal wall. The histopathological and pathophysiological changes in achalasia have been well described. However, the exact etiological factors leading to the disease still remain unclear. Currently, achalasia is believed to be a multifactorial disease, involving both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Based on our experience and the review of literature, we believe that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD might be one of the triggering factors leading to the development of achalasia. However, it is also stated that the two diseases can simultaneously appear independently from each other. Considering the large number and routine treatment of patients with GERD and achalasia, the rare combination of the two may even remain unnoticed; thus, the analysis of larger patient groups with this entity is not feasible. In this context, we report four cases where long-standing reflux symptoms preceded the development of achalasia. A literature review of the available data is also given. We hypothesize that achalasia following the chronic acid exposure of the esophagus is not accidental but either a consequence of a chronic inflammation or a protective reaction of the organism in order to prevent aspiration and lessen reflux-related symptoms. This hypothesis awaits further clinical confirmation. Keywords: achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus, Nissen fundoplication

  3. Risk factors and prescription patterns of gastroesophageal reflux disease: HEAL study in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Arshad Kamal; Hashemy, Irfan

    2014-07-01

    To determine the frequency of the use of proton-pump inhibitor therapy in patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease and evaluate its risk factors. The cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2010 and February 2011 across 10 cities of Pakistan. Adult patients giving a current history of typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were included. Information on patient demography, medical history, family history, prescription patterns, lifestyle factors and dietary habits were collected. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analysis and descriptive statistics were used for the analysis of categorical and continuous variables. Of the 1010 patients enrolled, 954 (94.45%) formed the study population. Of them, 520 (54.5%) were men. The overall mean age was 41.9 +/- 12.5 years, and 439 (46%) had body mass index > or = 25 kg/m2. Further, 805 (84.4%) reported history of dyspepsia while 692 (72.5%) had gastroesophageal reflux disease during the preceding year. Family history of acid peptic disease was reported by 231 (24.2%) patients. Prior to consultation, 505 (52.9%) patients were on proton-pump inhibitors. Following consultation, 923 (96.8%) patients were prescribed proton-pump inhibitors, with omeprazole being the preferred choice in 577 (60.5%). Associated risk factors included regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 355 (37.2%) and current smoking in 210 (22.0%). Consuming spicy meals was reported by 666 (70.0%). Nearly half the patients with typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were overweight, and a majority consumed spicy meals. Proton-pump inhibitors were widely prescribed, and omeprazole was the preferred choice of drug.

  4. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on daily life: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China (SILC epidemiological study

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    Kang Xiaoping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease imposes a significant burden of illness in Western populations. However, data on the impact of reflux symptoms on daily life in Asian populations are scarce. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of GERD (defined on the basis of symptoms on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL in individuals from five regions in China, as part of the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China (SILC study. Methods In total, 18 000 residents were randomly selected from across five regions of China and asked to complete a general information questionnaire and a Chinese version of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ. A randomly selected subsample of one-fifth of subjects (20% from each region completed Chinese versions of the 36-item self-administered (SF-36 questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS questionnaire. Reflux symptoms were defined as the presence of heartburn and/or regurgitation. Symptom-defined GERD was diagnosed as mild heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥2 days per week, or moderate/severe heartburn and/or regurgitation ≥1 day a week, based on the Montreal Definition of GERD for population-based studies. Results The response rate was 89.4% for the total sample (16 091/18 000, and for the 20% subsample (3219/3600. Meaningful impairment was observed in all 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with symptom-defined GERD, in 7 of the 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with troublesome reflux symptoms, and in 6 of the 8 SF-36 dimensions in participants with reflux symptoms below the threshold for symptom-defined GERD. Meaningful daytime sleepiness was also observed in each of these groups. The proportion of individuals reporting troublesome symptoms increased as reflux symptom frequency and severity approached the threshold for symptom-defined GERD, and this was associated with concomitant decreases in all HRQoL measures. Troublesome symptoms were reported by 68.2% (75

  5. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in 20 dogs (2012 to 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenster, M; Hoerauf, A; Vieth, M

    2017-05-01

    To describe the clinical features of canine gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. A search of our medical records produced 20 dogs with clinical signs attributable to oesophageal disease, hyper-regeneratory oesophagopathy and no other oesophageal disorders. The clinical, endoscopic and histological findings of the dogs were analysed. The 3-year incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease was 0·9% of our referral dog population. Main clinical signs were regurgitation, discomfort or pain (each, 20/20 dogs) and ptyalism (18/20 dogs). Oesophagoscopy showed no (5/20 dogs) or minimal (13/20 dogs) mucosal lesions. In oesophageal mucosal biopsy specimens, there were hyperplastic changes of the basal cell layer (13/20 dogs), stromal papillae (14/20 dogs) and entire epithelium (9/20 dogs). Eleven dogs received omeprazole or pantoprazole and regurgitation and ptyalism improved in eight and pain diminished in six of these dogs within three to six weeks. Our findings suggest that canine gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a more common clinical problem than hitherto suspected. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is prevalent worldwide, particularly in developed countries. It is estimated that the prevalence of GERD in the United States is approximately 20% and that it is increasing because of the epidemic of obesity. To review the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of GERD. A search of PubMed was conducted for the years spanning 1985 to 2015 and included the following terms: heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, cough, aspiration, laryngitis, GERD, GORD, endoscopy, manometry, pH monitoring, proton pump inhibitors, open fundoplication, and laparoscopic fundoplication. Only articles in English were included. Lifestyle modifications, proton pump inhibitors, and laparoscopic fundoplication are proven treatment modalities for GERD. Endoscopic procedures have not been proven as effective. A Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the procedure of choice when GERD and morbid obesity coexist. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly prevalent disease. Once the diagnosis has been established, the best results are obtained by a multidisciplinary team with the goal of individualizing treatment for patients.

  7. Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance differentiates gastroesophageal reflux disease from functional heartburn.

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    Kandulski, Arne; Weigt, Jochen; Caro, Carlos; Jechorek, Doerthe; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Mucosal integrity can be assessed in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by measuring intraluminal baseline impedance (BI). However, it is not clear whether BI is abnormal in patients with functional heartburn (FH), or can be used to distinguish them from patients with GERD. We compared differences in BI between patients with FH vs GERD. We performed a prospective study of 52 patients (16 men; mean age, 55 y; range, 23-78 y) seen at a tertiary university hospital from February 2009 through December 2012. Thirty-five patients had GERD (19 had nonerosive reflux disease [NERD], 16 had erosive reflux disease [ERD]) and 17 had FH. All patients discontinued proton pump inhibitor therapy and then underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. BI was assessed at 3, 5, 7, 9, 15, and 17 cm proximal to the lower esophageal sphincter in recumbent patients. Biopsy specimens were taken from 3 cm above the gastroesophageal junction; histology analysis was performed to identify and semiquantitatively score (scale, 0-3) dilated intercellular spaces. Baseline impedance in the distal esophagus was significantly lower in patients with NERD or erosive reflux disease (ERD) than FH (P = .0006). At a cut-off value of less than 2100 Ω, BI measurements identified patients with GERD with 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity, with positive and negative predictive values of 75%. Also in the proximal esophagus, reduced levels of BI levels were found only in patients with ERD. There were negative correlations between level of BI and acid exposure time (r = -0.45; P = .0008), number of acidic reflux episodes (r = -0.45; P = .001), and proximal extent (r = -0.40; P = .004). Biopsy specimens from patients with NERD or ERD had significant increases in dilation of intercellular spaces, compared with those from patients with FH; there was an inverse association between dilated intercellular spaces and BI in the distal esophagus

  8. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and obesity, where is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, Sara; Rescio, Maria Paola; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    The confluence between the increased prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) and of obesity has generated great interest in the association between these two conditions. Several studies have addressed the potential relationship between GERD and obesity, but the exact mechanism by which obesity causes reflux disease still remains to be clearly defined. A commonly suggested pathogenetic pathway is the increased abdominal pressure which relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter, thus exposing the esophageal mucosal to gastric content. Apart from the mechanical pressure, visceral fat is metabolically active and it has been strongly associated with serum levels of adipo-cytokines including interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor α, which may play a role in GERD or consequent carcinogenesis. This summary is aimed to explore the potential mechanisms responsible for the association between GERD and obesity, and to better understand the possible role of weight loss as a therapeutic approach for GERD.

  9. Impacts of endoscopic gastroesophageal flap valve grading on pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chi Chang

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV endoscopic grading is reported to be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in adults; however its role in pediatric groups remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the significance of GEFV grading and the associations to multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH in children with GERD.A total of 48 children with GERD symptoms who received esophagogastroduodenoscopy and MII-pH monitoring were enrolled. The degree of GEFV was graded from I to IV according to the Hill classification, and classified into two groups: normal GEFV (Hill grades I and II, and abnormal GEFV (Hill grades III and VI. Endoscopic findings and MII-pH monitoring were analyzed among the groups.Thirty-six patients had normal GEFV while 12 had abnormal GEFV. The presence of erosive esophagitis was significantly more common in the patients with abnormal GEFV (p = 0.037, OR 9.84, 95% CI 1.15-84.42. Pathological acidic gastroesophageal reflux (GER determined by MII-pH was more prevalent in the patients with loosened GEFV geometry (p = 0.01, OR 7.0, 95% CI 1.67-27.38. There were significant positive correlations between GEFV Hill grading I to IV and the severity of erosive esophagitis (r = 0.49, p<0.001, percentage of supine acid reflux (r = 0.37, p = 0.009, percentage of total acid reflux (r = 0.3284, p = 0.023, and DeMeester score (r = 0.36, p = 0.01 detected by pH monitoring. In the impedance study, GEFV Hill grading also positively correlated to median number of acid reflux events (r = 0.3015, p = 0.037.GEFV dysfunction highly associated with acid GER and severe erosive esophagitis. An abnormal GEFV is a sign of acid GER in children.

  10. Study of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Nitish L; Khan, Naushad A; Kumar, Naresh; Nayak, Hemanta K; Daga, Mradul K

    2013-04-01

    To study the incidence and pattern of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using dual-probe 24-h oesophageal pH recording. This was a prospective study of 50 patients with mild-to-moderate stage COPD based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines. A detailed history of illness along with spirometry was done in all patients. In the study group, reflux symptoms were measured using a validated scoring system. All the patients underwent oesophageal manometry and dual-probe 24-h oesophageal pH recording. Symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux were present in 38 patients. Twenty-four-hour oesophageal pH monitoring revealed pathological reflux in 31 out of 38 symptomatic and 8 out of 12 asymptomatic patients. The overall rate of GORD was 78% in our study. Only distal GORD was observed in 11 (28.9%), and both distal and proximal GORD was observed in 20 (52.6%) out of the 38 symptomatic subjects. In the remaining 12 asymptomatic patients, eight had GORD. Distal GORD was present in six (50%) patients, and two (16.6%) had both distal and proximal GORD in this group. Isolated proximal GORD was not observed in any patient. There is an increased occurrence of GORD in patients with even mild-to-moderate COPD. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. The role of factors of the hemostasis system and fibrinolysis in the development of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Інна Володимирівна Дудка

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD belong to common pathological conditions comorbid in 25–60 % of cases.Objective: to find probable mechanisms of GERD progressing against the ground of COPD by means of learning various links of the blood clotting system, anticoagulative blood activity and fibrinolysis for further improvement of the ways to correct the disorders found.Methods. 124 patients with COPD were examined including 90 with comorbid GERD. The control group included 24 practically healthy individuals of an appropriate age and sex. Clinical, biochemical, instrumental and statistical methods of examination were applied.Results. The patients were divided into the following groups: the 1st group – 34 patients with COPD, the 2nd group – 30 patients with COPD with endoscopically negative GERD, the 3rd group – 30 patients with COPD and endoscopically positive non-erosive GERD, the 4th group – 30 patients with COPD and endoscopically positive erosive GERD. The following results were found: while examining coagulation hemostasis – decrease of prothrombin time, fibrinogen content; while examining anticoagulation blood potential – decrease of thrombin time, activity of antithrombin III; while examining fibrinolytic blood activity – inhibition of the total fibrinolytic activity (at the expense of enzymatic activity decrease and compensatory increase of non-enzymatic fibrinolytic activity, decrease of Hageman-dependent fibrinolysis activity.Conclusions. Disorders of coagulation hemostasis, anti-coagulation potential and fibrinolytic blood activity are intensified with the increase of severity of bronchial obstructive syndrome and promote the development of endoscopically positive erosive GERD

  12. Identifying Minimal Changes in Nonerosive Reflux Disease: Is the Pay Worth the Labor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Scott L; Fass, Ronnie; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold Belfer, Rachel; Dickman, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease has a variable presentation on upper endoscopy. Gastroesophageal reflux disease can be divided into 3 endoscopic categories: Barrett's esophagus, erosive esophagitis, and normal mucosa/nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). Each of these phenotypes behave in a distinct manner, in regards to symptom response to treatment, and risk of development of complications such as esophageal adenocarcinoma. Recently, it has been proposed to further differentiate NERD into 2 categories: those with and those without "minimal changes." These minimal changes include endoscopic abnormalities, such as villous mucosal surface, mucosal islands, microerosions, and increased vascularity at the squamocolumnar junction. Although some studies have shown that patients with minimal changes may have higher rates of esophageal acid exposure compared with those without minimal changes, it is currently unclear if these patients behave differently than those currently categorized as having NERD. The clinical utility of identifying these lesions should be weighed against the cost of the requisite equipment and the additional time required for diagnosis, compared with conventional white light endoscopy.

  13. Salivary parameters and teeth erosions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Maria Carolina Canteras Scarillo Falotico Corrêa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, a highly prevalent digestive disorder, gastric content may return to the esophagus and reach the mouth, thus leading to a small number of carious lesions and high incidence of dental erosion. Since saliva plays a major role in oral homeostasis, evaluating salivary parameters is necessary in attempting to explain such outcome. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at analyzing salivary parameters (salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity, bacterial count, caries index and dental erosion in patients with GERD. MATERIALS: Sixty patients were studied, and of these, 30 had GERD (group 1, and 30 were controls (group 2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease diagnosis confirmation was achieved by means of endoscopy, manometry and pH metric esophageal monitoring. The above mentioned salivary parameters were evaluated in patients from groups 1 and 2. RESULTS: The number of erosions in patients with GERD (group 1 was larger than in controls (P<0.001. The number of carious teeth was smaller in group 1 than in group 2 (P<0.001. Salivary flow (non-stimulated and stimulated and pH did not show differences between the 2 groups (P = 0.49; P = 0.80 and P = 0.85, respectively. Salivary buffering capacity in patients with GERD showed lower values in controls (P = 0.018. The number of bacteria (Lactobacilli and Streptococci was smaller in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease than in controls (P = 0.0067 and P = 0.0017, respectively. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that the large number of erosions must be a result of GERD patients reduced salivary buffering capacity. The reduced number of caries of patients in group 1 can be explained by the low prevalence of bacteria (Lactobacilli and Streptococci, observed in the saliva of patients with chronic reflux.

  14. COMPARISON OF SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF LEVOSULPIRIDE AND ITOPRIDE IN TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

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    Syed Ibrahim Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD is a common condition caused by reflux of the liquid acidic contents of the stomach into the oesophagus. Prokinetic medications can be used to treat or control the disease. Such medications can have mild-toserious adverse effects. Levosulpiride and itopride are two such medications, which are used for treating GERD. The aim of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy of levosulpiride and itopride in the management of GERD and to study the side effects and treatment outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total 210 patients aged 18 to 90 years, 99 males and 111 females (male:female ratio of 1:1.1 with reflux oesophagitis were divided into three groups and an endoscopy test was done before starting treatment. The control group received rabeprazole and the two test groups received levosulpiride and itopride. Clinical adverse events were recorded at the end of week 1 and week 2. Following treatment, relief of symptoms was assessed at the end of 2 weeks. RESULTS There were total 210 patients (99 males and 111 females. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.1. GERD was more common in the 31-50 year age group. Most common symptoms were of dyspepsia, regurgitation, vomiting and heartburn. Improvement of symptoms during the treatment was seen in 53% levosulpiride and 41% itopride patients, respectively. The main adverse effects were abdominal pain and nausea. The percentage of nausea was high with itopride than levosulpiride. CONCLUSION Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common problem frequently seen in both genders and in younger people. Symptomatic relief and endoscopic recovery is early with levosulpiride than itopride. Levosulpiride gives better quality of life earlier in the treatment than itopride and has lesser side effects and better healing outcome.

  15. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations Are Influenced by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigatao, Amilcar M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Del Grande, Leonardo M; Nascimento, Oliver A; Jardim, Jose R; Patti, Marco G

    2018-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with different pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether GERD is contributory to COPD severity remains unclear. This study aims to evaluate the contribution of GERD to the clinical manifestation of COPD based on ventilatory parameters and yearly clinical exacerbations. We studied 48 patients (56% females, age 66 years) with COPD. All patients underwent high-resolution manometry and esophageal pH monitoring. The patients were separated into two groups according to the presence of GERD. GERD was present in 21 (44%) patients. GERD + and GERD - groups did not differ in regard to gender, age, and body mass index. Pulmonary parameters were not different in the absence or presence of GERD. The number of yearly exacerbations was higher in patients GERD+. The severity of GERD (as measured by DeMeester score) correlated with the number of exacerbations. Our results show the following: 1) GERD does not influence pulmonary parameters and 2) GERD is associated with a higher number of annual clinical exacerbations. We believe GERD must be objectively tested in patients with COPD because the prevalence of GERD in these patients is underestimated when only symptoms are considered. GERD treatment might decrease the frequency of episodes of exacerbation.

  16. Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J H-E; Kang, J Y

    2015-03-01

    Several lifestyle and dietary factors are commonly cited as risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and modification of these factors has been advocated as first-line measures for the management of GORD. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 2005 to the present relating to the effect of these factors and their modification on GORD symptoms, physiological parameters of reflux as well as endoscopic appearances. Conflicting results existed for the association between smoking, alcohol and various dietary factors in the development of GORD. These equivocal findings are partly due to methodology problems. There is recent good evidence that weight reduction and smoking cessation are beneficial in reducing GORD symptoms. Clinical and physiological studies also suggest that some physical measures as well as modification of meal size and timing can also be beneficial. However, there is limited evidence for the role of avoiding alcohol and certain dietary ingredients including carbonated drinks, caffeine, fat, spicy foods, chocolate and mint.

  17. Cough associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD): Japanese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Akio

    2017-12-01

    Differences in the aetiology as well as patient background of chronic cough have been recognised among US, UK, and Japan. One of the marked differences has been the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), which has been one of the top three causes in Western countries. It was indeed uncommon or rare in Japan, but, with the increasing prevalence of GOR itself, chronic cough associated with GORD seems to have become more common. In this article, cough associated with GORD will be reviewed based on literature and our Japanese experience. Further, potentially broader relevance of GORD in chronic cough will also be mentioned, highlighting the potential importance of dysmotiliy/non-acid reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The spectrum of motor function abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus.

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    Ang, D; Blondeau, K; Sifrim, D; Tack, J

    2009-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has traditionally been regarded as the most severe end of the spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease and is of great clinical importance in view of the association with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Studies have documented high levels of esophageal acid exposure in Barrett's esophagus. Various pathogenetic mechanisms underlie this phenomenon. These include abnormalities in esophageal peristalsis, defective lower esophageal sphincter pressures, gastric dysmotility and bile reflux. Whilst these factors provide evidence for an acquired cause of Barrett's esophagus, an underlying genetic predisposition cannot be ruled out. Although the past decade has brought about many new discoveries in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus, it has also added further controversy to this complex disorder. A detailed analysis of the gastrointestinal motor abnormalities occurring in Barrett's esophagus follows, with a review of the currently available literature and an update on this condition that continues to be of interest to the gastroenterologist.

  19. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux in children with chronic respiratory diseases by radionuclide gastroesophageal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ruifang; Zeng Jihua; Shi Yumin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children with chronic respiratory diseases (CRD) by radionuclide gastroesophageal imaging and to investigate the therapeutic effect of Cisapride. Methods: 45 patients were studied with 99 Tc m -DTPA gastroesophageal imaging, and compared the results with those obtained from 8 normal children. The repeated imagings were performed on some of the cases at the end of a three months' Cisapride therapy. Results: 25 (55%) among 45 patients were diagnosed as GER by imaging, while none of 8 normal children. 10 cases with GER received Cisapride therapy for 3 months. At the end of the treatment, the second imaging revealed that GER completely disappeared in 7 of them, and clinical follow-up showed marked improvement of CRD symptoms. Conclusions: The incidence of GER among with CRD children is rather great. Cisapride therapy not only remarkably relieve reflux, but also improve the symptoms of CRD

  20. Psychometric evaluation of a daily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptom measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Reimer, Christina; Smith, Gary

    2017-01-01

    was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with ReQuest™ change scores and time with symptoms. An HRDQ cut-off value of 0.70 for definition of ‘bad day’ was also evaluated. Conclusions: Based on existing evidence, the HRDQ is a valid and reliable measure of GORD symptoms that can be used as a study outcome...... (Cronbach’s alpha range.83–.88) and test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient range.71–.90). Convergent and discriminant validity were supported by high correlations with ReQuest™ and ability to differentiate between groups based on ReQuest™ cut-off values. Responsiveness of HRDQ......Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ), a newly developed measure of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Specifically, the HRDQ was developed for patients, who still experience symptoms with proton...

  1. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

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    Ozlem Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE and gastro-esophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE. Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders. In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts.

  2. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with upper gastrointestinal symptoms without heartburn and regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish; Wernersson, Börje; Ohlsson, Lis; Dent, John

    2014-06-01

    Symptomatically 'silent' gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) may be underdiagnosed. To determine the prevalence of untreated GORD without heartburn and/or regurgitation in primary care. Patients were included if they had frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms and had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months (Diamond study: NCT00291746). GORD was diagnosed based on the presence of reflux oesophagitis, pathological oesophageal acid exposure, and/or a positive symptom-acid association probability. Patients completed the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) and were interviewed by physicians using a prespecified symptom checklist. GORD was diagnosed in 197 of 336 patients investigated. Heartburn and/or regurgitation were reported in 84.3% of patients with GORD during the physician interviews and in 93.4% of patients with GORD when using the RDQ. Of patients with heartburn and/or regurgitation not identified at physician interview, 58.1% (18/31) reported them at a 'troublesome' frequency and severity on the RDQ. Nine patients with GORD did not report heartburn or regurgitation either at interview or on the RDQ. Structured patient-completed questionnaires may help to identify patients with GORD not identified during physician interview. In a small proportion of consulting patients, heartburn and regurgitation may not be present in those with GORD.

  3. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-03-21

    To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients' GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms.

  4. The Characteristics of Postprandial Proximal Gastric Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Dong; Feng, Cheng; Luo, Yumei; Nian, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Background Postprandial proximal gastric acid pocket (PPGAP) plays important roles in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of PPGAP in GERD. Material/Methods There were 17 normal participants and 20 GERD patients who completed a gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GerdQ) and underwent a gastroscopy, a high-resolution manometry, an esophageal 24-hour pH monitoring, and a station pull-through pH monitoring to assess their symptomatic degree, endoscopic change, acid exposure, and PPGAP. Results PPGAP was present in all participants. Compared with normal participants, the PPGAP in GERD patients was significantly different, thus the disappearing time was significantly later (pGERD patients was positively correlated with GerdQ score (pGERD patients was positively correlated with the DeMeester score (pGERD patients was negatively correlated with the DeMeester score (pGERD patients had characteristics of long time period, long length, and high acidity. Its length was positively correlated with subjective symptomatic degree. Its period, length, and acidity were positively correlated with the objective acid exposure. PPGAP seems to be the originator of acid reflux events and plays important roles in GERD. PMID:29309401

  5. Frequency distribution of gastro esophageal reflux disease in inhalation injury: A historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasi, Ashraf; Aliannejad, Rasoul; Ghanei, Mostafa; Sanamy, Mehran Noory; Alaeddini, Farshid; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2015-07-01

    There is no data on the prevalence and the association of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) with toxic fume inhalation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the frequency distribution of GERD symptoms among the individuals with mild respiratory disorder due to the past history of toxic fume exposure to sulfur mustard (SM). In a historical cohort study, subjects were randomly selected from 7000 patients in a database of all those who had a history of previous exposure to a single high dose of SM gas during war. The control group was randomly selected from adjacent neighbors of the patients, and two healthy male subjects were chosen per patient. In this study, we used the validated Persian translation of Mayo Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire to assess the frequency distribution of reflux disease. Relative frequency of GERD symptoms, was found to be significantly higher in the inhalation injury patients with an odds ratio of 8.30 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.73-14.55), and after adjustment for cigarette smoking, tea consumption, age, and body mass index, aspirin and chronic cough the odds ratio was found to be 4.41 (95% CI: 1.61-12.07). The most important finding of our study was the major GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation once or more per week) among the individuals with the past history of exposure to SM toxic gas is substantially higher (4.4-fold) than normal populations.

  6. A prospective cross-sectional study of laparoscopic subtotal Lind fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease--a durable and effective anti-reflux procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapey, I M; Agrawal, S; Peacock, A; Super, P

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic partial fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is reported to have fewer side effects when compared to Nissen fundoplication, but doubts remain over its long term durability in controlling reflux. The aim of this study was to assess outcome of symptoms for all patients presenting with GORD undergoing routine laparoscopic subtotal Lind fundoplication. All patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication between August, 1999 and November, 2007 performed by a single surgeon were included in the study. The anti-reflux procedure studied was laparoscopic Lind (300°) fundoplication with crural repair in all cases. Patients completed pre and post-operative questionnaires containing validated scoring systems for heartburn, gas bloat, dysphagia and overall patient satisfaction. Over the 100-month period, 320 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic subtotal Lind fundoplication. Of these, 256 (80%) replied to the questionnaire at a mean of 31 months (range 3-96 months) following surgery. 91.4% of respondents had an improvement in heartburn symptom score with a significant reduction in score from 7.74 preoperatively to 1.25 postoperatively (preflux control (heartburn and regurgitation) from 3.49 preoperatively to 1.48 after surgery (preflux symptoms with half of these reporting their recurrence within two years following surgery. Because of this all were tested with post-operative pH testing, yet only one had a 24-h pH time outside the normal range. Overall patient satisfaction was high with a visual analogue score of 9 and 88% of the patients claimed they would have the operation again. Laparoscopic Lind fundoplication demonstrates excellent reflux control when performed routinely for all patients presenting with GORD. This technique is both durable and efficacious in controlling reflux symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist mavoglurant (AFQ056) reduces the incidence of reflux episodes in dogs and patients with moderate to severe gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzade-Dominguez, M-L; Pezous, N; David, O J; Tutuian, R; Bruley des Varannes, S; Tack, J; Malfertheiner, P; Allescher, H-D; Ufer, M; Rühl, A

    2017-08-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) induced by gastric distension are modulated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) that influences the vagal reflex loop. We therefore aimed to examine the effects of the selective mGluR5 antagonist mavoglurant (AFQ056) on the number of TLESRs in dogs and reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In a dog model, the number of meal-induced TLESRs was determined after intravenous (0.03, 0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg kg -1 ) and oral (1, 3, and 10 mg kg -1 ) doses of mavoglurant with reference to vehicle. In a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-period crossover study, the incidence of meal-induced reflux episodes was assessed by esophageal impedance monitoring after single, oral doses of mavoglurant (50 and 400 mg) or baclofen (40 mg) in 30 patients with moderate to severe GERD. In dogs, mavoglurant reduced the number of TLESRs after intravenous and oral administration. In patients with GERD, the incidence of postprandial reflux episodes was significantly lower at a dose of 400 mg mavoglurant (-37.5% ; 90% confidence interval [CI]: -57.8, -17.2), whereas there was no significant difference at 50 mg of mavoglurant compared to placebo. A significantly lower incidence of reflux episodes was also noted with the active comparator baclofen (-50.3%; 90% CI: -66.2, -34.3), thereby validating this study. These data suggest a potential clinical benefit of mGluR5 antagonists such as mavoglurant in patients with GERD, particularly in those with persisting symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA AND CONSTIPATION PREDOMINANT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: CLINICAL FEATURES AND EFFICACY OF LACTULOSE AND ITOPRIDE HYDROCHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Krapivnaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The frequent coexistence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD with functional dyspepsia (FD and an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS has been described in the literature. Aim: To study the specific features of GERD clinical course and diagnosis in patients with GERD in combination with FD and constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C in comparison to patients with isolated GERD; to assess the efficacy of lactulose and itopride hydrochloride. Materials and methods: A total of 60 patients with GERD, FD (Rome criteria III, and IBS-C (Rome criteria III and 29 patients with isolated GERD were examined. GERD diagnosis was based on clinical, endoscopic, and pH-metric criteria. For 4 weeks 10 patients with combination of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD, FD and IBS-C received lactulose monotherapy and other 10 patients received combination of lactulose with itopride hydrochloride. Clinical symptoms and pH-metric parameters were assessed before and 4 weeks after treatment. Results: Combination of GERD, FD and IBS-C was noted more frequently in women under 40 with normal body mass index (р<0.05. Classic GERD symptoms were absent in 43.4% of patients with gastrointestinal comorbidity and in 10.3% of patients with isolated GERD (р=0.004. A higher prevalence of belching and nausea was found in patients, suffering from GERD, FD and IBS-C, than in those with isolated GERD (р<0.05. After 4-week lactulose and itopride hydrochloride treatment all the patients with GERD, FD and IBS-C showed a reduction of clinical symptoms (p<0.05 and normalization of pH-metric parameters (р<0.001. Conclusion: GERD course in patients with concomitant FD and IBS-C has the following peculiarities: predominance of women, absence of classic GERD-symptoms in almost half of these patients, and frequent combination with other functional symptoms. Combination therapy with lactulose and itopride hydrochloride enables successful control of GERD and FD symptoms as well as

  9. A causal relationship between cough and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been established: a pro/con debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Smith, Jaclyn A; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2014-02-01

    Along with upper airway cough syndrome (formerly, postnasal drip syndrome) and eosinophilic airway inflammation (asthma, nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is generally considered among the most common etiologies of chronic cough. Indeed, cough management guidelines published by numerous respiratory societies worldwide recommend evaluation and treatment of GERD as an integral component of the diagnostic/therapeutic algorithm for the management of chronic cough. However, a significant number of patients with chronic cough presumed due to GERD do not report improvement despite aggressive acid-suppressive therapy. Some of these refractory cases may be due to the recently appreciated entity of nonacid or weakly acidic reflux. Further contributing to the controversy are recent studies that demonstrate that patients with chronic cough do not have excessive reflux events relative to healthy volunteers. Although a temporal relationship between cough and reflux events has been suggested by studies utilizing impedance-pH monitoring of reflux events and objective cough recording, consensus is lacking in terms of whether this temporal relationship proves a causal link between reflux and cough. The fourth American Cough Conference (New York, June 2013) provided an ideal forum for the debate of this issue between two internationally recognized experts in the field of reflux and chronic cough.

  10. An alginate-antacid formulation localizes to the acid pocket to reduce acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, Wout O.; Bennink, Roel J.; Smout, Andre J. P. M.; Thomas, Edward; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.

    2013-01-01

    Alginate rafts (polysaccharide polymers that precipitate into a low-density viscous gel when they contact gastric acid) have been reported to form at the acid pocket, an unbuffered pool of acid that floats on top of ingested food and causes postprandial acid reflux. We studied the location of an

  11. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and positive maxillary antral cultures in children with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Javan; Kaufman, Michael; Allen, Meredith; Sheyn, Anthony; Coticchia, James

    2014-02-01

    Studies have shown that gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs more frequently than expected in children with chronic rhinosinusitis. The objective of this study is to further understand the relationship of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with symptoms of rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough. A retrospective chart review of 63 children, ages 6 months to 10 years old with rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough. The patients underwent maxillary cultures, adenoidectomy, and distal third esophageal biopsies. Children with esophageal biopsies showing esophagitis were classified as positive for gastroesophageal reflux disease, and maxillary antral swabs growing a high density of bacteria were classified as positive for chronic rhinosinusitis. Six months to 5 years old children (n=43), 6 (14%) had simultaneous positive maxillary antral cultures and positive esophageal biopsies, 11 (26%) had positive esophageal biopsies alone, 23 (53%) had positive maxillary antral cultures alone, and 3 (7%) had neither. Six to 10 years old children (n=20), 9 (45%) had simultaneous positive maxillary antral cultures and positive esophageal biopsies, 1 (5%) patient had positive esophageal biopsies alone, 3 (15%) patients had positive maxillary antral cultures alone, and 7 (35%) patients had neither. Twenty-seven (42%) of the patients from the whole study had gastroesophageal reflux positive biopsies. The younger children were statistically likely to have chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease independently of each other (p=0.0002). A direct group comparison found the younger group to have independent chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the older group to have simultaneous chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (p=0.0006). In children with the presenting symptoms of rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough, younger children tend to have either chronic

  12. Clinical curative effect of electroacupuncture combined with zhizhukuanzhong capsules for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoxian; Guo, Like; Guo, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xiaohe; Li, Guangyan

    2012-09-01

    To study the clinical curative effect, safety and mechanism of action of electroacupuncture combined with Zhizhukuanzhong capsules (ZZKZC) in treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 480 patients with confirmed GERD were randomly divided into four groups: the electroacupuncture group, the ZZKZC group, the combined therapy group, and the control group, with 120 cases in each group. Each case in the electroacupuncture group was treated with electroacupuncture on Zusanli (ST 36), Zhongwan (CV 12), Neiguan (PC 6),Taichong (LR 3) and Gongsun (SP 4) once daily for 6 weeks. Each case in the ZZKZC group was treated with oral administration of 1.29 g ZZKZC three times daily. The combined therapy group had electroacupuncture and ZZKZC. The control group was given oral administration of 5 mg mosapride three times and 20 mg pantoprazole twice daily. The 24-hour intraesophageal total number of reflux episodes with pH or = 0.14), the number of long-term (> or = 5 min) reflux episodes, the percentage of upright time, the percentage of supine time, the percentage of total time of pH or = 0.14), endoscopic grading score, symptom score, quality of life score, and adverse reactions were observed before treatment, at the end of treatment and 54 weeks after treatment in the four groups. The 24-hour intraesophageal pH and bile reflux, endoscopic grading score and symptom score were all significantly decreased at the end of treatment in every group, while the scores of 8 dimensions of quality of life were all increased compared with those before treatment (Pelectroacupuncture group 54 weeks after treatment compared with the end of treatment (P>0.05); however, these indices all significantly deteriorated in the ZZKZC and control groups (P>0.05). The short and long-term total efficacy rates in the combined therapy group showed significant superiority to those in the other groups (PElectroacupuncture and ZZKZC play an important role in inhibiting intraesophageal acid and

  13. Dental erosions and other extra-oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: Evidence, treatment response and areas of uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ans

    2015-04-01

    Extra-oesophageal symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) are often studied, but remain a subject of debate. It has been clearly shown that there is a relationship between the extra-oesophageal symptoms chronic cough, asthma, laryngitis and dental erosion and GORD. Literature is abundant concerning reflux-related cough and reflux-related asthma, but much less is known about reflux-related dental erosions. The prevalence of dental erosion in GORD and vice versa, the prevalence of GORD in patients with dental erosion is high but the exact mechanism of reflux-induced tooth wear erosion is still under review.

  14. Psychological Dysadaptation in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Review and Own Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Mosiichuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available he article presents up-to-date data concerning psychosomatic problem in medicine, in particular world experience of studying disorders of psychological of adaptation in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, as well as own researches data. When using psychological tests, detection rate of anxiety and depression in patients with GERD was 100 and 91.2 %, respectively. Follow-up research studies revealed that presence of psychological dysadaptation in patients with GERD makes it impossible to achieve a stable remission of the underlying disease and necessitates appropriate correction.

  15. What makes individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease dissatisfied with their treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Despite the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as therapeutics for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in randomized controlled trials, a number of studies have shown that a proportion of patients with GERD are not satisfied with their treatment....... This article reviews the possible reasons why patients are dissatisfied with the way their disease is managed. METHODS: Studies published between 1970 and 2007 were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, and the author's existing database. The 2708 publications were reviewed, and irrelevant ones were excluded. Eleven...

  16. ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE, PEPTIC ULCER AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED STUDY

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    Pavel Skok

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. A possible association of esophageal reflux disease with peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection or the results of eradication, has not been elucidated. It is an alarming fact that in developed countries the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is associated with reflux disease, is increasing.Aim. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of esophageal reflux disease after eradication of H. pylori infection in patients with hemorrhaging and nonhemorrhaging peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum.Patients and methods. Study was approved in 1998 by the Slovenian Medical Ethics Committee (No. 90/09/98. Prospective, controlled and randomized, carried out between 1998– 2000.The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av. age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22–80 years in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and HP infection. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av. age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 years with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and H.pylori infection in the same period of time. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. One year later, in the course of follow-up, in patients with endoscopic investigations, 24-hour pH-metry or fiberoptic spectrophotometric bilirubin determination, bilimetry, we tried to establish signs of esophageal reflux disease.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group while in the control group reached 91.25%, p > 0

  17. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease; Funktionsstoerungen des Oesophagus. Radiologische Diagnostik

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    Schima, W. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Konservative Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Pokieser, P. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Chirurgische Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Schober, E. [Abt. Roentgen fuer Konservative Faecher, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    1995-10-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die radiologische Untersuchung des Oesophagus kann nicht nur strukturelle Veraenderungen, sondern auch funktionelle Stoerungen mit einer hohen Treffsicherheit nachweisen. Die Videokinematographie ist hierbei der konventionellen Roentgenuntersuchung aufgrund der Moeglichkeit der wiederholten Analyse ueberlegen. Ziel der vorliegenden Uebersicht ist es, prinzipiell das radiologische Erscheinungsbild der normalen Funktion sowie diagnostische Kriterien fuer verschiedene Motilitaetsstoerungen zu demonstrieren. Weiterhin werden auch die verschiedenen Moeglichkeiten der radiologischen Refluxpruefung zur Untersuchung der Funktion des gastrooesophagealen Sphinkters verglichen und deren Wert diskutiert. Die Pruefung der Funktion von Oesophagus und gastrooesophagealem Sphinkter als ein integraler Bestandteil der Roentgenuntersuchung der Speiseroehre verbessert deren Treffsicherheit, wodurch die radiologische Untersuchung die primaere diagnostische Methode bei Patienten mit Schluckstoerungen darstellt. (orig.)

  18. Improved control of hypertension following laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Chen, Meiping; Wu, Jimin; Song, Qing; Yan, Chao; Du, Xing; Wang, Zhonggao

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to determine whether successful laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can improve the control of hypertension. We conducted an observational study of GERD patients with hypertension. The esophageal and gastroesophageal symptoms of these patients were successfully treated with laparoscopic fundoplication, as measured by the reduced GERD symptoms and proton pump inhibitor consumption. A hypertension control scale was used to classify the use of antihypertensive medications and the quality of blood pressure control before and after anti-reflux surgery.Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used for the statistical analyses. Seventy GERD patients were included in the analysis and followed up for a mean period of 3.5 ± 1.4 years. Prior to surgery, all participating patients were taking at least one class of antihypertensive medication, and 56 patients (80%) had intermittently high blood pressure. After surgery, the mean number of antihypertensive medication classes per patient was significantly reduced from 1.61 ± 0.77 pre-procedure to 1.27 ± 0.88 post-procedure (P gastroesophageal reflux and hypertension.

  19. Surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: total or partial fundoplication? Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F Ramos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Although the high incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the population, there is much controversy in this topic, especially in the surgical treatment. The decision to use of a total or partial fundoplication in the treatment of GERD is still a challenge to many surgeons because the few evidence found in the literature. OBJECTIVE: To bring more clear evidence in the comparison between total and partial fundoplication. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review of the literature and metaanalysis with randomized controlled trials accessed from MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Controlled Trials Database was done. The outcomes remarked were: dysphagia, inability to belch, bloating, recurrence of acid reflux, heartburn and esophagitis. For data analysis the odds ratio was used with corresponding 95% confidence interval. Statistical heterogeneity in the results of the metaanalysis was assessed by calculating a test of heterogeneity. The software Review Manager 5 (Cochrane Collaboration was utilized for the data gathered and the statistical analysis. Sensitive analysis was applied using only trials that included follow-up over 2 years. RESULTS: Ten trials were included with 1003 patients: 502 to total fundoplication group and 501 to partial fundoplication group. The outcomes dysphagia and inability to belch had statistical significant difference (P = 0.00001 in favor of partial fundoplication. There was not statistical difference in outcomes related with treatment failure. There were no heterogeneity in the outcomes dysphagia and recurrence of the acid reflux. CONCLUSION: The partial fundoplication has lower incidence of obstructive side effects.

  20. Alginate controls heartburn in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Zentilin, Patrizia; Martinucci, Irene; Bruzzone, Luca; Furnari, Manuele; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2012-08-28

    To evaluate the effect of a novel alginate-based compound, Faringel, in modifying reflux characteristics and controlling symptoms. In this prospective, open-label study, 40 patients reporting heartburn and regurgitation with proven reflux disease (i.e., positive impedance-pH test/evidence of erosive esophagitis at upper endoscopy) underwent 2 h impedance-pH testing after eating a refluxogenic meal. They were studied for 1 h under basal conditions and 1 h after taking 10 mL Faringel. In both sessions, measurements were obtained in right lateral and supine decubitus positions. Patients also completed a validated questionnaire consisting of a 2-item 5-point (0-4) Likert scale and a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) in order to evaluate the efficacy of Faringel in symptom relief. Tolerability of the treatment was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale ranging from very good (1) to very poor (6). Faringel decreased significantly (P heartburn, based on both the Likert scale [3.1 (range 1-4) vs 0.9 (0-2); P heartburn by modifying esophageal acid exposure time, number of acid refluxes and their proximal migration.

  1. Management of failure after surgery for gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronnier, C; Degrandi, O; Collet, D

    2018-04-01

    Surgical treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (ST-GERD) is well-codified and offers an alternative to long-term medical treatment with a better efficacy for short and long-term outcomes. However, failure of ST-GERD is observed in 2-20% of patients; management is challenging and not standardized. The aim of this study is to analyze the causes of failure and to provide a treatment algorithm. The clinical aspects of ST-GERD failure are variable including persistent reflux, dysphagia or permanent discomfort leading to an important degradation of the quality of life. A morphological and functional pre-therapeutic evaluation is necessary to: (i) determine whether the symptoms are due to recurrence of reflux or to an error in initial indication and (ii) to understand the cause of the failure. The most frequent causes of failure of ST-GERD include errors in the initial indication, which often only need medical treatment, and surgical technical errors, for which surgical redo surgery can be difficult. Multidisciplinary management is necessary in order to offer the best-adapted treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Immunohistochemical Study of p53 Expression in Patients with Erosive and Non-Erosive Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, Atena; Zamanian, Ali; Arab, Shahin; Boloki, Mahsa

    2018-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Oral lichen planus is a common mucocutaneous lesion with a chronic inflammatory process mediated by immune factors while a few cases of the disease become malignant. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the frequency of p53 marker as a tumor suppressor in patients with erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) by using immunohistochemical methods. Materials and Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study investigated the p53 expression in 16 erosive OLP, 16 non-erosive OLP samples, and 8 samples of normal oral mucosa through immunohistochemistry. The percentage of stained cells in basal and suprabasal layers, and inflammatory infiltrate were graded according to the degree of staining; if 0%, 50% of the cells were stained, they were considered as (-), (+), (++), (+++) and (++++), respectively. The obtained data was statistically analyzed and compared by using Chi square and Fisher’s exact test. Results: The mean percentage of p53 positive cells in erosive OLP (34.5±14.2) was considerably higher than that in non-erosive OLP (23.8±10.4) and normal mucosa (17.5±17). There was a significant difference among the three groups of erosive, non-erosive and control in terms of staining intensity. No significant difference existed between the patients’ age and sex in the two OLP groups. Conclusion: The increased incidence of p53 from normal mucosa to erosive OLP indicated the difference between biological behavior of erosive and non-erosive OLP. It can be claimed that the erosive OLP has great premalignant potential compared with the non-erosive one.

  3. Critical appraisal of Rome IV criteria: hypersensitive esophagus does belong to gastroesophageal reflux disease spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; Frazzoni, Marzio; de Bortoli, Nicola; Tolone, Salvatore; Martinucci, Irene; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    The Rome IV Committee introduced a major change in the classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders, proposing a more restrictive definition of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was suggested that hypersensitive esophagus (HE) may sit more firmly within the functional realm. It was suggested that GERD diagnosis should be based upon abnormal acid exposure time (AET) only, implying no advantage of impedance-pH over pH monitoring. Symptom association probability (SAP), symptom index (SI) and heartburn relief with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy were regarded as unreliable, whereas a lack of response to PPI was considered as evidence of functional heartburn. These assumptions are contradicted by numerous studies showing the clinical relevance of weakly acidic refluxes and the diagnostic utility of SAP, SI and new impedance parameters, namely the post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and the mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI). The PSPW index and MNBI provide significant diagnostic advantage, particularly in patients with normal AET who can be classified as HE when both parameters are abnormal, even though SAP and SI are negative. Visceral pain modulators are recommended by the Rome IV Committee despite scanty evidence of efficacy, but a positive outcome with medical or surgical anti-reflux treatment has been reported by several studies of HE patients. Therefore, we believe that patients with endoscopy-negative heartburn should be investigated by means of impedance-pH monitoring with analysis of PSPW index and MNBI: such an approach provides accurate identification of HE cases, who remain, in our opinion, within the realm of GERD and should be treated accordingly. PMID:29333061

  4. Laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus anterior 180° fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; Wu, Ji-Min; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has been the gold standard for the surgical management of Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic anterior 180° fundoplication (180° LAF) is reported to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications while obtaining similar control of reflux. The present meta-analysis was conducted to confirm the value of the 2 techniques. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Springerlink, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Platform databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and 180° LAF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of 2 techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Results: Six eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 266) and 180° LAF (n = 265) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and 180° LAF with regard to operating time, perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, willingness to undergo surgery again, quality of life, postoperative heartburn, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, postoperative DeMeester scores, postoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, postoperative gas-bloating, unable to belch, diarrhea, or overall reoperation. LNF was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative dysphagia compared with 180° LAF, while 180° LAF was followed by more reoperation for recurrent reflux symptoms. Conclusion: LNF and 180° LAF are equally effective in controlling reflux symptoms and obtain a comparable prevalence of patient satisfaction. 180° LAF can reduce the incidence of postoperative dysphagia while this is offset by a higher risk of reoperation for recurrent symptoms. The risk of recurrent symptoms should need to be balanced against the risk of dysphagia when surgeons choose surgical procedures for each individual with GERD. PMID:28906412

  5. Proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Button, Brenda M; Denehy, Linda; Roberts, Stuart J; Bamford, Tiffany L; Ellis, Samantha J; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Heine, Ralf G; Stirling, Robert G; Wilson, John W

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this observational study were (i) to examine the prevalence of symptomatic and clinically silent proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis, (ii) the presence of gastric aspiration, and (iii) to explore the possible clinical significance of this comorbidity in these conditions. Twenty-seven participants with COPD, 27 with bronchiectasis and 17 control subjects completed reflux symptom evaluation and dual-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring. In those with lung disease, pepsin levels in sputum samples were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with disease severity (lung function and high-resolution computed tomography) also measured. The prevalence of GOR in COPD was 37%, in bronchiectasis was 40% and in control subjects was 18% (P = 0.005). Of those diagnosed with GOR, clinically silent reflux was detected in 20% of participants with COPD and 42% with bronchiectasis. While pepsin was found in 33% of COPD and 26% of bronchiectasis participants, the presence of pepsin in sputum was not related to a diagnosis of GOR based on oesophageal pH monitoring in either condition. Neither a diagnosis of GOR nor the presence of pepsin was associated with increased severity of lung disease in COPD or bronchiectasis. The prevalence of GOR in COPD or bronchiectasis is twice that of the control population, and the diagnosis could not be based on symptoms alone. Pepsin was detected in sputum in COPD and bronchiectasis, suggesting a possible role of pulmonary aspiration, which requires further exploration. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in menopausal women suffering from diabetes mellitus type II

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    Semikina Т.М.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop criteria for the selection of optimal tactics of supporting treatment of nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease with proton pump inhibitors in menopausal women suffering from diabetes mellitus type II. Material and Methods. 186 patients aged 45-59 who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease have been followed up, 46 of which suffer from diabetes mellitus type II as well. The climacteric syndrome's morbidity has been assessed in accordance with the modified menopause index; the level of glycated hemoglobin has been measured by the Abbott analyzer produced in the USA. Results. It is established that irrespective of the supporting treatment, the gastroesophageal reflux disease remittance was shorter in direct proportion with increase of the HbA1c level and the value of the modified menopause index in menopausal women suffering from diabetes mellitus type II. Conclusion. When the climacteric syndrome was mild or moderate, taking 20 mg Omeprazole once a day and "on demand" has comparable results, therefore this group of women prefer the "on demand" regimen as it lowers the risk of osteoporosis progression and further bone fracture. Taking 20 mg Omeprazole once a day, every other day, and "on demand" allows the disease remittance to prolong for a year and longer in less than 30% of women suffering from severe climacteric syndrome and having HbA1c>9.0%; however, this number may grow up to 70% of women in case they follow medical advice and reduce their carbohydrate input to 11 carbohydrate units and less.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: A clinical overview for primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sudha; Boktor, Moheb; Alexander, Jonathan S; Becker, Felix; Morris, James

    2018-03-01

    GERD is among the most common outpatient disease processes encountered by clinicians on a daily basis. This review provides insights about how to approach GERD in terms of disease management and treatment. Review articles were searched using PUBMED and MEDLINE using criteria that included English language articles published in the last 5 years concerning studies carried out only in humans. The key words used in the searches were GERD, PPI, and erosive esophagitis. Recommendations from the American College of Gastroenterology are also included in this manuscript. The search resulted in ∼260 articles. The manuscript brings together and presents the results of recent recommendations from professional societies and recently published review articles on GERD. GERD is one of the most common diagnoses made by gastroenterologists and primary care physicians. It is important to recognize the typical and atypical presentations of GERD. This paper helps primary care physicians understand the disease's pathophysiology, and when, how, and with what to treat GERD before referring patients to gastroenterologists or surgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypersensitivity to acid is associated with impaired esophageal mucosal integrity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with and without esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijenborg, Pim W; Smout, André J P M; Verseijden, Caroline; van Veen, Henk A; Verheij, Joanne; de Jonge, Wouter J; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2014-08-01

    Increased esophageal sensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity have both been described in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, but the relationship between hypersensitivity and mucosal integrity is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate acid sensitivity in patients with erosive and nonerosive reflux disease and control subjects to determine the relation with functional esophageal mucosal integrity changes as well as to investigate cellular mechanisms of impaired mucosal integrity in these patients. In this prospective experimental study, 12 patients with nonerosive reflux disease, 12 patients with esophagitis grade A or B, and 11 healthy control subjects underwent an acid perfusion test and upper endoscopy. Mucosal integrity was measured during endoscopy by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and biopsy specimens were analyzed in Ussing chambers for transepithelial electrical resistance, transepithelial permeability and gene expression of tight junction proteins and filaggrin. Patients with nonerosive reflux disease and esophagitis were more sensitive to acid perfusion compared with control subjects, having a shorter time to perception of heartburn and higher perceived intensity of heartburn. In reflux patients, enhanced acid sensitivity was associated with impairment of in vivo and vitro esophageal mucosal integrity. Mucosal integrity was significantly impaired in patients with esophagitis, displaying higher transepithelial permeability and lower extracellular impedance. Although no significant differences in the expression of tight junction proteins were found in biopsies among patient groups, mucosal integrity parameters in reflux patients correlated negatively with the expression of filaggrin. In conclusion, sensitivity to acid is enhanced in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, irrespective of the presence of erosions, and is associated with impaired esophageal mucosal integrity. Mucosal integrity of the esophagus

  9. Recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease correlated with a short dinner-to-bedtime interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Hoon; Kang, Ho Suk; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Jin, Choon Jo

    2014-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be classified into erosive reflux disease (ERD) and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). We aimed to compare the recurrence rates of ERD and NERD and determine the risk factors related to the recurrence. This prospective study comprised 337 consecutive adults who completed questionnaires on their GERD symptoms, height, weight, sleeping position, dinner time, and bedtime. During upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the presence of a hiatal hernia and mucosal breaks in the low esophagus, esophageal length (the distance between the Z-line and the incisors), and the esophageal length-to-height ratio were recorded. Recurrence was diagnosed when the patient required additional proton pump inhibitor medication after initial recovery with 4-8 weeks of treatment. Recurrence was experienced by 47 (26.0%) of 181 GERD patients. The recurrence rate did not differ between the 48 ERD (27.1%) and 133 NERD (25.6%) patients (P = 0.849). Of the various factors studied, recurrence was found to be correlated with a dinner-to-bedtime interval of less than 3 h (P = 0.002), globus sensation (P = 0.031), and old age (P = 0.047). Logistic regression analysis revealed that a short interval between dinner and bedtime was the only factor significantly related to the recurrence (P = 0.002). Both ERD and NERD patients who sleep within 3 h after eating have a higher risk of GERD recurrence. Our findings highlight the impact of a short dinner-to-bedtime interval on the recurrence of GERD (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: KCT0000134). © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. [Specific features of gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with obesity and overweight].

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    Livzan, M A; Lapteva, I V; Krolevets, T S; Kiselev, I E

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the specific features of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated with obesity and overweight, by investigating the clinical and endoscopic manifestations of the disease, 24-hour pH-metry scores, and leptin levels. A total of 131 patients with GERD were examined. The data about complaints and those from life and medical histories were collected; anthropometric measurements and the results of blood biochemical tests, esophagoduodenoscopy (EPDS), and pH-metry were assessed; and the serum levels of leptin and its receptor were estimated. The patients were allocated into a study group (104 obese and/or overweight patients) and a comparison one (27 normal weight people). Waist circumference, hip circumference, and blood glucose levels proved to be statistically significantly higher in the study group (pstudy group and 5.47 (3.35-7.68) ng/ml in the comparison group; the median levels of the receptors were 18.83 (14.98-25.11) ng/ml and 30.93 (24.68-33.53) ng/ml, respectively). This group showed a moderate negative correlation between these indicators (rs=-0.451; pstudy group displayed higher pH values in the gastric cardia and body (prefluxate having with a low pH value (refluxate having a pH below 4.0 (rs=0.543; preflux episodes longer than 5 minutes in the esophagus, and to the De Meester index for this indicator (rs=0.471; pdisease, which determines the specific features of the disease (alkaline or mixed refluxate) and the need for individualized therapy.

  11. Residence of liquids in the infra-junctional portion of the proximal stomach in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

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    Barbieri C.L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may have disturbances of gastric motility, which could play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Recent studies have suggested that the gastric region just below the gastroesophageal junction may have a distinct physiological behavior. We determined whether patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have abnormal residence of food in the infra-junctional portion of the stomach after ingesting a liquid nutrient meal. Fasted adult patients with reflux disease (N = 11 and healthy volunteers (N = 10 ingested a liquid meal (320 ml; 437 kcal labeled with 99m technetium-phytate and their total gastric emptying half-time and regional emptying from the stomach infra-junctional region were determined. In 8 patients, episodes of postprandial acidic reflux to the esophagus were measured for 2 h using pH monitoring. There were no differences between reflux patients and controls regarding total gastric emptying time (median: 68 min; range: 39-123 min vs 65 min and 60-99 min, respectively; P > 0.50. Food residence in the infra-junctional area was similar for patients and controls: 23% (range: 20-30 vs 27% (range: 19-30%; P = 0.28 and emptying from this area paralleled total gastric emptying (Rs = 0.79; P = 0.04. There was no correlation between residence of food in the infra-junctional area and episodes of gastroesophageal reflux (Rs = 0.06; P = 0.88. We conclude that it is unlikely that regional motor disturbances involving the infra-junctional region of the stomach play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of acidic gastroesophageal reflux.

  12. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with duodenogastroesophageal reflux in patients with biliary pathology: the specific features of the course and esophagogastroduodenal microbial biocenosis].

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    Dzhulai, G S; Sekareva, E V; Chervinets, V M; Mikhailova, E S; Dzhulai, T E

    2014-01-01

    To study the specific features of the clinical course of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) associated with duodenogastroesophageal reflux (DGER) in patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) and cholelithiasis (CL), as well as qualitative and quantitative characteristics. The clinical, morphological, motor tonic characteristics of the esophagogastroduodenal area, mucosal microbial biocenosis in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum were studied in detail in 83 patients with GERD that was associated with DGER and ran concurrently with CAC or CL. Impaired duodenal propulsive activity as a concomitance of the signs of gastrostasis and duodenal dyskinesia with dyscoordination of both anthroduodenal and duodenojejunal propulsion and with the development of duodenogastric reflux and DGER, which in turn determine esophageal and gastric pH values is shown to be of importance in CAC and CL, which match GERD. Abnormal microbiocenosis in the upper digestive tract is characterized by the higher quantitative and qualitative content of the mucous microflora. Opportunistic microorganisms exhibit cytotoxic, hemolytic, lecithinase, caseinolytic, urease, and RNAase activities. The found specific features of the course of GERD associated with DGER in patients with biliary tract abnormalities lead us to search for novel therapeutic approaches based on the correction of digestive motor tonic disorders and abnormal microbiocenoses of the mucous flora in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.

  13. The Relationship of the Post-reflux Swallow-induced Peristaltic Wave Index and Esophageal Baseline Impedance with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Kyu; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Su Jin; Park, Sang Joon; Jeon, Seong Ran; Kim, Hyun Gun; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and esophageal baseline impedance (BI) are novel impedance parameters used to evaluate esophageal chemical clearance and mucosal integrity. However, their relationship with reflux symptoms is not known. We aim to evaluate the correlations of PSPW index and esophageal BI with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Methods We performed a retrospective review of multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) tracings in patients with suspected GERD. Reflux symptoms were also analyzed from checklists using ordinal scales. The PSPW index and esophageal BIs in 6 spots (z1–z6) were measured. Bivariate (Spearman) correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the PSPW index or esophageal BI, and the degree of GERD symptoms measured. Results The MII-pH records of 143 patients were analyzed. The PSPW index was significantly lower in patients who had heartburn and negatively correlated with the degree of heartburn (r = −0.186, P < 0.05). On the contrary, the PSPW index was not significantly correlated with the degree of dysphagia (r = −0.013, P = 0.874). Distal esophageal BI was not significantly correlated with heartburn, but negatively correlated with the degree of dysphagia (z3: r = −0.328, z4: r = −0.361, z5: r = −0.316, z6: r = −0.273; P < 0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that delayed chemical clearance of the esophagus may induce heartburn, but that it is not related to dysphagia. However, a lack of esophageal mucosal integrity may be related to dysphagia. PMID:28044052

  14. Dental complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: guidance for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J; Aminian, Amin; Brunton, Paul

    2017-06-01

    There is potential for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) to be under-diagnosed by physicians. A quick, focused examination, requiring no special equipment, of a patients' dentition can assist in making a more accurate diagnosis where GORD is suspected. Guidance is provided for physicians as to what intra-oral signs are suggestive of intrinsic dental erosion, which is a clinical feature of GORD and its associated conditions. Use of this information will, it is suggested, improve outcomes for patients where GORD is suspected. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Motility Disorders in Women, Gastroparesis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Jasmine K; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the sex differences in upper gastrointestinal (GI) motility for both healthy and common dysmotility conditions. It focuses on gastroesophageal reflux disease and other esophageal motor disorders for the esophagus and on gastroparesis and accelerated gastric emptying for the stomach. It also describes differences in upper GI motility signs and symptoms during each female hormonal stage (ie, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause) for both healthy participants and those suffering from one of the aforementioned upper GI dysmotility conditions. More research still needs to be conducted to better understand sex differences in upper GI motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Evaluating an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with hiatal hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozharovskiy, V V; Tsyganov, A A; Mozharovskiy, K V; Tarasov, A A

    To assess an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) combined with hiatal hernia (HH). The trial included 96 patients with GERD and HH who were divided into 2 groups. The principal difference between groups was the use of surgery in the main group and therapeutic treatment in the comparison group. The effectiveness of surgical treatment is superior to therapeutic treatment of GERD by more than 2.5 times. HH combined with GERD is an indication for surgical treatment. Fundoplication cuff should not lead to angular and rotational esophageal deformation. Nissen procedure in Donahue modification (Short Floppy Nissen) simulates optimally the geometry of esophago-gastric junction and His angle.

  17. The role of baseline impedance as a marker of mucosal integrity in children with gastro esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilic, Denisa; Hankel, Saskia; Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula; Hamelmann, Eckard; Schmidt-Choudhury, Anjona

    2013-07-01

    Diagnosis of gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children is challenging. 24-h-pH-multichannel-intraluminal-impedance measurement (pH-MII) is the best diagnostic tool to display gastro esophageal reflux whereas esophageal endoscopy indicates mucosal lesions. The aim of this study was to compare esophageal endoscopy results with reflux parameters such as acid exposure time (reflux index RI), bolus exposure time (bolus index BI), baseline impedance level (BIL) detected by pH-MII in children with suspected GERD. Analysis of data from 285 children (38 infants) referred to our hospital with suspected GERD. Division into three 'reflux esophagitis' (RE)-stages depending on the severity of endoscopic and histological findings and comparison with reflux parameters in these stages. Further categorization into four groups based on the pH-MII-results. Children with high-grade esophagitis had a significantly lower BIL; otherwise there was no significant association between elevated reflux parameters and esophagitis. Pathological pH-MII results (RI and BI) were associated with lower BIL in the distal impedance channel. The BIL was significantly lower in infants compared to children >1 year regardless of the RI or BI. The main difference between these groups regarding reflux parameters was a longer BI and a higher number of retrograde bolus movements. Pathologic pH-MII results are not predictive for an erosive esophagitis and vice versa. Therefore, these two procedures cannot replace each other. A lower BIL is associated with esophagitis ≥ LA-grade B and may be caused by longer acid but also by longer bolus exposure and thus may be another useful parameter in GERD monitoring.

  18. Comorbidities in severe asthma: frequency of rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis

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    Carla Bisaccioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Severe asthma is found in approximately 10% of patients with asthma. Some factors associated with worse asthma control include rhinitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction (VCD, nasal polyposis and bronchiectasis. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of these illnesses in patients with severe asthma. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained from electronic medical records of patients with severe asthma between January 2006 and June 2008. Symptoms of rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were evaluated as well as intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We evaluated the results of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, videolaryngoscopy and CT scans of the chest in order to confirm gastroesophageal reflux disease, nasal polyposis, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients. Rhinitis symptoms were present in 224 patients (91.4%; 18 (7.3% had intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 8 (3.3% had nasal polyposis. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were reported for 173 (70.6% patients, although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease was confirmed based on esophagogastroduodenoscopy or laryngoscopy findings in just 58 (33.6% patients. Vocal cord dysfunction was suspected in 16 (6.5% and confirmed through laryngoscopy in 4 (1.6%. The patient records provided CT scans of the chest for 105 patients, and 26 (24.8% showed bronchiectasis. DISCUSSION: Rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were the most common comorbidities observed, in addition to bronchiectasis. Therefore, in patients with severe asthma, associated diseases should be investigated as the cause of respiratory symptoms and uncontrolled asthma.

  19. Investigation of gastric motility in patients with the overlap syndrome of the gastroesophageal reflux disease and functional dyspepsia

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    V. D. Pasechnikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale:  The phenomenon of overlap  of two disorders, non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD and functional dyspepsia (FD is an important clinical problem,  while the  symptoms in such  patients  are  more  severe  and  prevalent than  in those  with non-overlapping NERD or FD. This phenomenon may lead to treatment failure, if therapy  does not take into account  the specific pathophysiological mechanisms  of the NERD and FD overlap.Aim: To study motility of the proximal and  distal parts  of the  stomach  in patients  with the overlap syndrome of NERD with FD.Materials and  methods:  The  study  enrolled  56  patients (34 women and 22 men, aged from 18 to 45 years, who met the diagnostic  criteria for NERD and FD (the Rome criteria III, esophageal endoscopy, 24-hour  pH  measurement  or  24-hour  impedance pH measurement, and  had  both  NERD  and  FD symptoms  simultaneously  (overlap; 46 healthy volunteers. The accommodation of the  proximal (fundal part  of the  stomach  and  motility of the distal gastric part  was assessed  by ultrasonography (Aixplorer, SuperSonic Imagine, France, with convex probe  1–6 MHz before  and  after the  intake of the liquid test food. The patients  filled in questionnaires to assess the symptoms  and their severity (scored from 0 to 3. The difference  between their mean ± standard  deviation (SD values was assessed  by Students  t-test  and  was considered  significant at p < 0.05.Results: After intake of the  liquid test  food, the  patients  with the  FD and NERD overlap syndrome demonstrated an advanced and statistically significant gastric motility abnormality  both  in its proximal and distal parts, compared to healthy control: accommodation disturbances and its reduction, decreased amplitude  (61.4 ± 7.5 vs 90.2 ± 6.9%, p < 0.05, frequency of contractions of the antrum during 3-minute interval (4.3 ± 1.5 vs 9.7 ± 1

  20. Treating acid reflux disease in patients with Down syndrome: pharmacological and physiological approaches

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    Francesco Macchini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Macchini, Ernesto Leva, Maurizio Torricelli, Alberto ValadèPediatric Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Down syndrome (DS is often accompanied by gastrointestinal disease, occurring mainly in early infancy and frequently requiring therapy. Among motility disorders, the most frequent is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, which may often be misdiagnosed because of its atypical manifestations. Early diagnosis of esophageal functional disorders is essential to prevent respiratory problems, growth retardation in children, weight loss in adults, and to establish the correct type of surgery if needed. Furthermore, the involvement of the enteric nervous system in the pathophysiology of GERD in DS is not yet completely understood but seems supported by much evidence. In fact DS is often associated with motor disorders and this evidence must be considered in the choice of therapy: in particular all options available to improve motility seem to be effective in these patients. The effectiveness of therapy is strictly related to the rate of mental impairment, so that modulating therapy is essential, especially in view of the severity of the neurological status.Keywords: gastro-esophageal reflux disease, chromosome 21, Down syndrome

  1. Surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingliang; Strong, Andrew T; Sharma, Gautam; Gabbard, Scott; Thota, Prashanti; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2018-02-12

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is frequently associated with both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and simultaneous esophageal dysmotility. Anti-reflux procedures in this patient population must account for the existing physiology of each patient and likely disease progression. We aim to compare perioperative and intermediate outcomes of fundoplication versus gastric bypass for the treatment of GERD. After IRB approval, patients with systemic sclerosis undergoing fundoplication or gastric bypass for the treatment of GERD from 2004 to 2016 were identified. Demographics, perioperative data, immediate complications, and symptom improvement were retrieved and analyzed. Fourteen patients with systemic sclerosis underwent surgical treatment of GERD during the defined study period. Average body mass index was 26 kg/m 2 . Seven fundoplications (2 Nissens, 4 Toupets, and 1 Dor) and 7 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RYGB) were performed. No 30-day mortality was observed in either group. Median follow-up was 97 months for the fundoplication group (range 28-204 months), and 19 months for the RYGB group (range 1-164 months). Preoperatively, dysphagia, heartburn, and regurgitation were present in 71% (n = 10), 86% (n = 12), and 64% (n = 9) of patients, respectively. Eleven patients had pH study prior to surgical intervention, and 91% of them had abnormal acid exposure. Esophagitis was evident in 85% (n = 11) of patients during preoperative upper endoscopy, and two patients had Barrett's esophagus. Impaired esophageal motility was present in all RYGB patients and 71% of fundoplication patients. Of the patients who had assessment of their GERD symptoms at follow-up, all five patients in the RYGB group and only 3 (50%) patients in the fundoplication group reported symptom improvement or resolution. Laparoscopic RYGB as an anti-reflux procedure is safe and may provide an alternative to fundoplication in the treatment of GERD for systemic sclerosis patients

  2. Predictive value of routine esophageal high-resolution manometry for gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, F B; Smout, A J; Bredenoord, A J

    2015-07-01

    Using conventional manometry, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) was associated with a reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure and impaired peristalsis. However, with a large overlap between GERD patients and controls, these findings are of limited clinical relevance. It is uncertain whether the more detailed information of high-resolution manometry (HRM) can discriminate GERD patients. Therefore, we aimed to determine to which extent HRM findings can predict GERD. HRM measurements in 69 patients with GERD and 40 healthy subjects were compared and the predictive value of HRM for the diagnosis of GERD was explored. GERD patients had a significantly lower contraction amplitude (55 vs 64 mmHg; p = 0.045) and basal LES pressure (10 vs 13.2 mmHg; p = 0.034) than healthy controls. GERD patients more often had a hiatal hernia than healthy subjects (30% vs 7%; p = 0.005). Patients with reflux esophagitis had a lower DCI than patients without reflux esophagitis (558 vs 782 mmHg cm s; p = 0.045). No significant difference was seen in contractile front velocity, distal latency, number of peristaltic breaks, residual LES pressure and LES length. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, both esophagogastric junction type I (OR 4.971; 95% CI 1.33-18.59; p = 0.017) and mean wave amplitude (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90-0.98; p = 0.013) were found to be independent predictors of GERD. However, the sensitivity and specificity of these findings were low. Hiatal hernia, low contraction amplitude and LES pressure are associated with GERD, but do not predict the disease with sufficient accuracy. Routine esophageal HRM can therefore not be used to distinguish GERD patients from healthy subjects. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. LINX®, a novel treatment for patients with refractory asthma complicated by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; Kivler, Celeste; Vidovszky, Tamas J; Yoneda, Ken Y; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Murin, Susan; Louie, Samuel

    2016-05-24

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with asthma. Gastroesophageal reflux disease can be linked to difficult-to-control asthma. Current management includes gastric acid suppression therapy and surgical antireflux procedures. The LINX® procedure is a novel surgical treatment for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease refractory to medical therapy. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of successful treatment of refractory asthma secondary to gastroesophageal reflux disease using the LINX® procedure. Our patient was a 22-year-old white woman who met the American Thoracic Society criteria for refractory asthma that had remained poorly controlled for 5 years despite progressive escalation to step 6 treatment as recommended by National Institutes of Health-National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines, including high-dose oral corticosteroids, high-dose inhaled corticosteroid plus long-acting β2-agonist, leukotriene receptor antagonist, and monthly omalizumab. Separate trials with azithromycin therapy and roflumilast did not improve her asthma control, nor did bronchial thermoplasty help. Additional consultations with two other university health systems left the patient with few treatment options for asthma, which included cyclophosphamide. Instead, the patient underwent a LINX® procedure after failure of maximal medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease with the additional aim of improving asthma control. After she underwent LINX® treatment, her asthma improved dramatically and was no longer refractory. She had normal exhaled nitric oxide levels and loss of peripheral eosinophilia after LINX® treatment. Prednisone was discontinued without loss of asthma control. The only immediate adverse effects due to the LINX® procedure were bloating, nausea, and vomiting. LINX® is a viable alternative to the Nissen fundoplication procedure for the treatment of patients with

  4. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach). Problems with these muscles can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This surgery can also be done during a ... Anti-reflux surgery is usually done to treat GERD in children only after medicines have not worked ...

  5. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and effects of esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikoshi, Tamehachi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hatta, Hidekazu; Tokura, Takehiko; Oshiro, Yoshiyuki; Nishizaki, Tetsuichi; Obata, Takahiro; Mori, Masahiro; Fueki, Takaaki; Fujimoto, Sohachi; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Kuwabara, Atsunori; Yorimitsu, Daisuke; Ihoriya, Chieko; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Itano, Seiji; Fujimoto, Yasuo; Komai, Norio; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms has not been investigated in patients on maintenance hemodialysis in Japan, and few studies have reported the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in hemodialysis patients with GERD symptoms. Here, we investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and the effects of the PPI esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This was a cross-sectional/cohort study of hemodialysis outpatients implemented in 10 Japanese medical facilities from October 2012 to March 2014. The trial was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000009124). Forty-one of 385 patients (11%) reported GERD symptoms on the Global Overall Symptom (GOS) questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the independent prognostic factors for GERD symptoms as a history of gastric ulcer and use of sevelamer hydrochloride or calcium polystyrene sulfonate. Participants with GERD symptoms completed the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia, Japanese version (QOLRAD-J) questionnaire and were assigned to receive 4-week esomeprazole treatment (20 mg/day). This PPI therapy significantly improved all QOLRAD-J domains in the full analysis set (n = 28) and improved the GERD symptoms listed in the GOS questionnaire. Significantly impaired disease-specific quality of life (QOL) in the QOLRAD-J domains was observed in 44.4-74.1% of patients who had symptoms before treatment. The mean GOS and QOLRAD-J scores correlated significantly. Therapy with 20 mg/day esomeprazole appears to be efficacious for improving disease-specific QOL and GERD symptoms in Japanese patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  6. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease: pros and cons.

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    DeMaria, E J; Siuta, M; Widmeyer, J; Zfass, A M

    1997-03-01

    The advent of the laparoscopic approach to Nissen fundoplication has led to a resurgence in enthusiasm for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, controversy exists as to which subgroups of GERD patients are best treated surgically. The relative success of treatment with medical and surgical intervention in terms of both symptom control and objective resolution of esophageal injury must be weighed against the relative costs of each therapeutic strategy in both the short and long term, given that GERD tends to be a lifelong disorder. The following is the transcribed text of a debate held at the Medical College of Virginia as part of a continuing medical education program in which the statement "Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is superior to medical treatment for severe gastroesophageal reflux disease" was contested. Representatives from the departments of surgery and gastroenterology provided arguments supporting their respective sides of this issue. The purpose was not to promote polarization in treatment selection, but to review the available data in a forum that could promote development of a rational algorithm for clinical decision-making in patients with GERD who might benefit from antireflux surgery. Final comments from the authors are provided in an attempt to synthesize the arguments into a reasonable strategy for individual case management.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease-related and functional heartburn: pathophysiology and treatment.

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    Miwa, Hiroto; Kondo, Takashi; Oshima, Tadayuki

    2016-07-01

    Patients who continue to experience heartburn symptoms despite adequate-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy have unmet clinical needs. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings related to the mechanism of heartburn symptom generation, and on the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease-related and functional heartburn. The immunological mechanism in the esophageal mucosa has been addressed as a potential mechanism of the onset of esophageal mucosa damage and the generation of heartburn symptoms. Peripheral or central hypersensitivity in viscera is a potentially unifying pathophysiological concept in functional heartburn. Vonoprazan, a novel and potent first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker, is expected to prove useful in the treatment of reflux disease. New findings in the mechanisms of heartburn symptom generation are emerging, including the immunological mediation of esophageal mucosal damage and the development of visceral hypersensitivity in functional heartburn. In the future, we anticipate the emergence of new and specific therapeutic options based on these mechanisms, with less dependence on acid-suppressing agents.

  8. CLINICAL CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AND CHILDREN'S THROAT AND LARYNX CONDITION

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    Yu.L. Soldatskiy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the impact exerted by the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERB on the throat and larynx status, the authors examined 39 children (main group, suffering from GERB, and 15 patients (control group, suffering from the chronic gastrointestinal tract pathology, who did not confirm GERB. All the patients underwent a 24'hour рН-monitoring of the esophagus and laryngeal part of the throat and upper airways endoscopy. They discovered that for the children, suffering from the extraesophageal GERB (i.e. regurgitation of the sourreflux substance above the upper esophageal sphincter into the hypopharynx, it is also typical for chronic throat and larynx pathology: the endoscopy identified the accompanied pathology among 80%, chronic pharyngitis among 62,5%, and their combination among 48% of patients. Normalization of an mucous membrane of esophagus is highly likely to correlate (r = 0,54, р<0,01 with the throat and larynx status normalization. Thus, it is very likely that GERB and its extraesophageal variant in particular plays a great role in pathogenesis of the throat and larynx disease development. This circumstance should be consider both in therapy of the patients with GERB and detection of pathologies in the ENT organs.Key words: gastroesophageal reflux, chronic pharyngitis, chronic laryngitis, children.

  9. The prevalence and extent of gastroesophageal reflux disease correlates to the type of lung transplantation.

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    Fisichella, Piero Marco; Davis, Christopher S; Shankaran, Vidya; Gagermeier, James; Dilling, Daniel; Alex, Charles G; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Joehl, Raymond J; Love, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Evidence is increasingly convincing that lung transplantation is a risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, it is still not known if the type of lung transplant (unilateral, bilateral, or retransplant) plays a role in the pathogenesis of GERD. The records of 61 lung transplant patients who underwent esophageal function tests between September 2008 and May 2010, were retrospectively reviewed. These patients were divided into 3 groups based on the type of lung transplant they received: unilateral (n=25); bilateral (n=30), and retransplant (n=6). Among these groups we compared: (1) the demographic characteristics (eg, sex, age, race, and body mass index); (2) the presence of Barrett esophagus, delayed gastric emptying, and hiatal hernia; and (3) the esophageal manometric and pH-metric profile. Distal and proximal reflux were more prevalent in patients with bilateral transplant or retransplant and less prevalent in patients after unilateral transplant, regardless of the cause of their lung disease. The prevalence of hiatal hernia, Barrett esophagus, and the manometric profile were similar in all groups of patients. Although our data show a discrepancy in prevalence of GERD in patients with different types of lung transplantation, we cannot determine the exact cause for these findings from this study. We speculate that the extent of dissection during the transplant places the patients at risk for GERD. On the basis of the results of this study, a higher level of suspicion of GERD should be held in patients after bilateral or retransplantation.

  10. Quality of life scales for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: A literature review

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    Xiao-Li Guan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract that occurs in 3.1% of the Chinese population [1]. Heartburn, acid regurgitation and epigastric pain are typical clinical symptoms of GERD. These symptoms can affect patients' work productivity, sleep, diet and daily activities, thus resulting in a reduced quality of life (QOL [2]. Although patient QOL is increasingly being considered as a medical outcome index in the evaluation of the impact of GERD symptoms on patients' health status, measuring patient QOL in clinical trials can be challenging due to the lack of a standard assessment tool. Therefore, we aim to review the commonly used generic, disease-specific and hybrid QOL questionnaires to evaluate patients with GERD to provide a reference for clinical nursing work.

  11. Japanese apricot improves symptoms of gastrointestinal dysmotility associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

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    Maekita, Takao; Kato, Jun; Enomoto, Shotaro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Hanamitsu, Toshiko; Inoue, Izumi; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moribata, Kosaku; Muraki, Yosuke; Shingaki, Naoki; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-07-14

    To investigate the effects of Japanese apricot (JA) consumption on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-related symptoms. Participants included individuals living in Minabe-cho, a well-known JA-growing region, who received specific medical check-ups by the local community health service in 2010. GERD-related symptoms were examined in 1303 Japanese individuals using a validated questionnaire, the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), which consists of 7 questions associated with acid reflux symptoms and 5 questions asking about gastrointestinal dysmotility symptoms. Each question was answered using a 4-point scale, with higher scores indicating more severe GERD-related symptoms. Subjects were divided into two groups according to their intake of dried and pickled JA: daily intake (≥ 1 JA daily) (392 subjects) and none or occasional intake (reflux score did not differ between subjects with and without daily intake of JA (1.08 ± 1.90 vs 1.24 ± 2.11, P = 0.177). Subanalysis indicated that improvement in dysmotility by JA intake was specifically observed in non-elderly (1.24 ± 1.68 vs 1.62 ± 2.22, P = 0.005) and H. pylori-negative subjects (0.99 ± 1.58 vs 1.57 ± 2.06, P < 0.001). GERD patients (total FSSG score ≥ 8) were less frequently observed among subjects with daily intake of JA as compared to those without daily intake of JA (6.1% vs 9.7%, P = 0.040). Daily JA intake may improve digestive dysmotility symptoms, resulting in relief of GERD symptoms. The effect is more obvious in non-elderly and H. pylori-negative subjects.

  12. Scintigraphy in laryngopharyngeal and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a definitive diagnostic test?

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    Falk, Gregory L; Beattie, John; Ing, Alvin; Falk, S E; Magee, Michael; Burton, Leticia; Van der Wall, Hans

    2015-03-28

    To investigate the utility of scintigraphic studies in predicting response to laparoscopic fundoplication (LF) for chronic laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms. Patients with upper aero-digestive symptoms that remained undiagnosed after a period of 2 mo were studied with conventional pH and manometric studies. Patients mainly complained of cough, sore throat, dysphonia and globus. These patients were imaged after ingestion of 99m-technetium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid. Studies were quantified with time activity curves over the pharynx, upper and lower oesophagus and background. Late studies of the lungs were obtained for aspiration. Patients underwent LF with post-operative review at 3 mo after surgery. Thirty four patients (20 F, 14 M) with an average age of 57 years and average duration of symptoms of 4.8 years were studied. Twenty four hour pH and manometry studies were abnormal in all patients. On scintigraphy, 27/34 patients demonstrated pharyngeal contamination and a rising or flat pharyngeal curve. Lung aspiration was evident in 50% of patients. There was evidence of pulmonary aspiration in 17 of 34 patients in the delayed study (50%). Pharyngeal contamination was found in 27 patients. All patients with aspiration showed pharyngeal contamination. In the 17 patients with aspiration, graphical time activity curve showed rising activity in the pharynx in 9 patients and a flat curve in 8 patients. In those 17 patients without pulmonary aspiration, 29% (5 patients) had either a rising or flat pharyngeal graph. A rising or flat curve predicted aspiration with a positive predictive value of 77% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Over 90% of patients reported a satisfactory symptomatic response to LF with an acceptable side-effect profile. Scintigraphic reflux studies offer a good screening tool for pharyngeal contamination and aspiration in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and odds of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in North Carolina.

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    Busch, Evan L; Zevallos, Jose P; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to excess gastric acid resulting from gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as acid reflux or heartburn, might contribute to initiation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, particularly laryngeal cancer. Prior epidemiologic studies have reported inconsistent results. We sought to clarify this relationship using an observational study with a larger available sample size and better-characterized exposure information than most prior studies. A population-based case-control study of head and neck cancer in North Carolina with 1,340 newly diagnosed cases and 1,378 controls matched on age, race, and sex. We used unconditional logistic regression to examine associations between self-reported heartburn and development of overall head and neck cancer as well as development of cancer at specific tumor sites. Subgroup analysis by smoking and alcoholic drinking status was used to make comparisons with a previous study that used a similar study design. Overall, an increased odds of head and neck cancer was not associated with either self-reported history of heartburn symptoms (odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval 0.68, 1.06) or self-reported medical diagnosis of GERD (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.71, 1.11). These patterns held for specific tumor sites. For laryngopharyngeal cancer, we did not detect any associations regardless of joint smoking and alcoholic drinking status. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to play a role in development of head and neck cancer. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:1091-1096, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Effectiveness of a transluminal endoscopic fundoplication for the treatment of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

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    Chen, Stephanie; Jarboe, Marcus D; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2012-03-01

    Although laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the standard surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), surgical complications and post-operative pain are not uncommon, especially for those patients who are neurologically impaired (NI) or undergoing re-operative procedures. To address this challenge, we utilized the transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) procedure to treat GERD via an endoscopic approach. Eleven TIF patients were included with an average age of 16.5 ± 5.1 years and weight of 45.7 ± 13.3 kg. NI was present in nine patients (82%), including a predominant number of patients with a history of seizures and gastrostomy tube feeding. Five patients had a history of a previous failed fundoplication requiring a re-operative procedure (45%). A retrospective chart review evaluated patient outcomes and post-operative complications. The length of the TIF procedure was 113.3 ± 31.3 min with minimal blood loss. The length of stay was 1.2 ± 0.4 days, although one TIF patient was re-admitted for endoscopic clipping for gastric bleeding. At a follow-up of 8.2 ± 4.2 months, TIF effectively resolved GERD in 10 out of 11 children. A few of the patient's families reported complaints of gagging or dysphagia (30%, 3/11); however it was difficult to determine if complaints were due the procedures itself or baseline NI. All patients who had a follow-up upper GI or pH probe study showed no evidence of reflux. One TIF patient had no recurrent reflux but required an esophago-gastric disconnection for retching. The TIF procedure can complement the current surgically and medically available options for children with GERD, especially in complicated patients such as those with NI. However, complications including hemorrhage emphasize the potential risk of the procedure. Further studies with more patients and a longer follow-up course must be conducted to better assess efficacy.

  15. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

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    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Minimal access surgery compared with medical management for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: five year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial (REFLUX)

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    Cotton, S C; Boachie, C; Ramsay, C R; Krukowski, Z H; Heading, R C; Campbell, M K

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the long term clinical effectiveness of laparoscopic fundoplication as an alternative to drug treatment for chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Design Five year follow-up of multicentre, pragmatic randomised trial (with parallel non-randomised preference groups). Setting Initial recruitment in 21 UK hospitals. Participants Responders to annual questionnaires among 810 original participants. At entry, all had had GORD for >12 months. Intervention The surgeon chose the type of fundoplication. Medical therapy was reviewed and optimised by a specialist. Subsequent management was at the discretion of the clinician responsible for care, usually in primary care. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was self reported quality of life score on disease-specific REFLUX questionnaire. Other measures were health status (with SF-36 and EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaires), use of antireflux medication, and complications. Results By five years, 63% (112/178) of patients randomised to surgery and 13% (24/179) of those randomised to medical management had received a fundoplication (plus 85% (222/261) and 3% (6/192) of those who expressed a preference for surgery and for medical management). Among responders at 5 years, 44% (56/127) of those randomised to surgery were taking antireflux medication versus 82% (98/119) of those randomised to medical management. Differences in the REFLUX score significantly favoured the randomised surgery group (mean difference 8.5 (95% CI 3.9 to 13.1), Preflux-related operations—most often revision of the wrap. Long term rates of dysphagia, flatulence, and inability to vomit were similar in the two randomised groups. Conclusions After five years, laparoscopic fundoplication continued to provide better relief of GORD symptoms than medical management. Adverse effects of surgery were uncommon and generally observed soon after surgery. A small proportion had re-operations. There was no evidence of long term adverse

  17. Insights into the genetics of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and GERD-related disorders.

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    Böhmer, A C; Schumacher, J

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with obesity and hiatal hernia, and often precedes the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Epidemiological studies show that the global prevalence of GERD is increasing. GERD is a multifactorial disease with a complex genetic architecture. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided initial insights into the genetic background of GERD. The present review summarizes current knowledge of the genetics of GERD and a possible genetic overlap between GERD and BE and EA. The review discusses genes and cellular pathways that have been implicated through GWAS, and provides an outlook on how future molecular research will enhance understanding of GERD pathophysiology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Efficacy of noofen use in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in schoolchildren

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    S.L. Nyankovskyy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined 40 children aged 10–18 years, who were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. According to a survey by O.M. Vein, all patients had manifestations of autonomic dysfunction. The children were divided into 2 groups. The control group consisted of 20 patients, who received standard antisecretory therapy. The main group consisted of 20 children, who received standard antisecretory therapy and phenibut (Noofen®, OlainFarm, Latvia at a dose of 250 mg 2 times a day for 21 days. After 1 month of starting the treatment, an evaluation of its efficacy was conducted. Clinical evaluation of the dynamics of autonomic nervous system status in schoolchildren with GERD suggests that inclusion of Noofen into the complex of therapy for this disease provides good stabilizing effect, which manifests by a restoration of autonomic nervous system balance in schoolchildren.

  19. Psychometric evaluation of a daily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptom measure.

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    Bytzer, Peter; Reimer, Christina; Smith, Gary; Anatchkova, Milena D; Hsieh, Ray; Wilkinson, Joanne; Thomas, S Jane; Lenderking, William R

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ), a newly developed measure of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Specifically, the HRDQ was developed for patients, who still experience symptoms with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. The psychometric properties of HRDQ were evaluated based on data from two clinical trials of patients with GORD with a partial response to PPIs, one from the UK and one from Denmark and Germany. The HRDQ had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha range .83-.