WorldWideScience

Sample records for noise temperature theory

  1. Direct-reading dial for noise temperature and noise resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1967-01-01

    An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance.......An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance....

  2. Theory And Working Of Noise And Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Il Rok

    1988-09-01

    This book deals with theory of noise including physical property of noise like term and characteristic of sound, occurrence of sound, characteristic of noise pollution and main cause of occurrence of noise, technique of prevention of noise with noise reduction, construction guide for prevention of noise, and measure of interior noise. It also has the theory of vibration such as an introduction of vibration, and technology of prevention of vibration, official test method of environmental pollution, and summary of protection of the environment.

  3. Ocean Ambient Noise Measurement and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carey, William M

    2011-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ocean ambient noise mechanisms and measurements, and also describes general noise characteristics and computational methods.  It concisely summarizes the vast ambient noise literature using theory combined with key representative results.  The air-sea boundary interaction zone is described in terms of non-dimensional variables requisite for future experiments.  Noise field coherency, rare directional measurements, and unique basin scale computations and methods are presented.  The use of satellite measurements in these basin scale models is demonstrated.  Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments.  With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

  4. Finite temperature field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    1997-01-01

    This book discusses all three formalisms used in the study of finite temperature field theory, namely the imaginary time formalism, the closed time formalism and thermofield dynamics. Applications of the formalisms are worked out in detail. Gauge field theories and symmetry restoration at finite temperature are among the practical examples discussed in depth. The question of gauge dependence of the effective potential and the Nielsen identities are explained. The nonrestoration of some symmetries at high temperature (such as supersymmetry) and theories on nonsimply connected space-times are al

  5. Temperature noise characteristics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The core exit temperature noise RMS is linearly related to the core ΔT at a commercial PWR and LOFT. Test loop observations indicate that this linear behavior becomes nonlinear with blockages, boiling, or power skews. The linear neutron flux to temperature noise phase behavior is indicative of a pure time delay process, which has been shown to be related to coolant flow velocity in the core. Therefore, temperature noise could provide a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection of coolant blockages, boiling, and sensor malfunction under both normal and accident conditions in a PWR

  6. Zero Thermal Noise in Resistors at Zero Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of transistors in logic devices approaches the quantum limit, where Johnson noise and associated error rates are supposed to be strongly enhanced. However, the related theory — asserting a temperature-independent quantum zero-point (ZP) contribution to Johnson noise, which dominates the quantum regime — is controversial and resolution of the controversy is essential to determine the real error rate and fundamental energy dissipation limits of logic gates in the quantum limit. The Callen-Welton formula (fluctuation-dissipation theorem) of voltage and current noise for a resistance is the sum of Nyquist’s classical Johnson noise equation and a quantum ZP term with a power density spectrum proportional to frequency and independent of temperature. The classical Johnson-Nyquist formula vanishes at the approach of zero temperature, but the quantum ZP term still predicts non-zero noise voltage and current. Here, we show that this noise cannot be reconciled with the Fermi-Dirac distribution, which defines the thermodynamics of electrons according to quantum-statistical physics. Consequently, Johnson noise must be nil at zero temperature, and non-zero noise found for certain experimental arrangements may be a measurement artifact, such as the one mentioned in Kleen’s uncertainty relation argument.

  7. Noise thermometry - a new temperature measuring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Rittinghaus, K.F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal Johnson-Niquist noise is the basis of noise thermometry. This temperature measuring method is, e.g., of interest insofar as the noise thermometer gives absolute values as a primary thermometer and is in principle extensively independent of environmental influences and material properties. The resistance values of the measuring probe are about 10 Ohm to a few kOhm. The demands of electronics are high, the self-noise of the measuring apparatus must be as small as possible; a comparative measuring method is advantageous. 1 to 2,500 K are given as a possible temperature range. An accuracy of 0.1% could be achieved in laboratory measurements. Temperature measurements to be used in operation in a few nuclear reactors are mentioned. (HP/LH) [de

  8. High temperature measurement by noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.C.

    1982-06-01

    Noise thermometry has received a lot of attention for measurements of temperatures in the high range around 1000-2000 deg. K. For these measurements, laboratory type experiments have been mostly performed. These have shown the interest of the technique when long term stability, high precision and insensibility to external conditions are concerned. This is particularly true for measurements in nuclear reactors where important drifts due to irradiation effects are experienced with other measurement techniques, as thermocouple for instance. Industrial noise thermometer experiments have not been performed extensively up to now. The subject of the present study is the development of a 1800 deg. K noise thermometer for nuclear applications. The measurement method is based on a generalized noise power approach. The rms noise voltage (Vsub(s)) and noise current (Isub(s)) are successively measured on the resistive sensor. The same quantities are also measured on a dummy short circuited probe (Vsub(d) and Isub(d)). The temperature is then deduced from these measured values by the following formula: cTsub(s) = (Vsub(s) 2 - Vsub(d) 2 )(Vsub(s)/Isub(s) - Vsub(d)/Isub(d)) - 1 , where c is a constant and Tsub(s) the absolute temperature of the sensor. This approach has the particular advantage of greatly reducing the sensibility to environmental perturbations on the leads and to the influence of amplifier noise sources. It also eliminates the necessity of resistance measurement and keeps the electronic circuits as simple as possible

  9. The diversity and unity of reactor noise theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang, Zhifeng

    2001-01-01

    The study of reactor noise theory concerns questions about cause and effect relationships, and the utilisation of random noise in nuclear reactor systems. The diversity of reactor noise theory arises from the variety of noise sources, the various mathematical treatments applied and the various practical purposes. The neutron noise in zero-energy systems arises from the fluctuations in the number of neutrons per fission, the time between nuclear events, and the type of reactions. It can be used to evaluate system parameters. The mathematical treatment is based on the master equation of stochastic branching processes. The noise in power reactor systems is given rise by random processes of technological origin such as vibration of mechanical parts, boiling of the coolant, fluctuations of temperature and pressure. It can be used to monitor the reactor behaviour with the possibility of detecting malfunctions at an early stage. The mathematical treatment is based on the Langevin equation. The unity of reactor noise theory arises from the fact that the useful information from noise is embedded in the second moments of random variables, which lends the possibility of building up a unified mathematical description and analysis of the various reactor noise sources. Exploring such possibilities is the main subject among the three major topics reported in this thesis. The first subject is within the zero power noise in steady media, and we reported on the extension of the existing theory to more general cases. In Paper I, by use of the master equation approach, we have derived the most general Feynman- and Rossi-alpha formulae so far by taking the full joint statistics of the prompt and all the six groups of delayed neutron precursors, and a multiple emission source into account. The involved problems are solved with a combination of effective analytical techniques and symbolic algebra codes. Paper II gives a numerical evaluation of these formulae. An assessment of the

  10. The diversity and unit of reactor noise theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Zhifeng

    The study of reactor noise theory concerns questions about cause and effect relationships, and utilisation of random noise in nuclear reactor systems. The diversity of reactor noise theory arises from the variety of noise sources, the various mathematical treatments applied and various practical purposes. The neutron noise in zero- energy systems arises from the fluctuations in the number of neutrons per fission, the time between nuclear events, and the type of reactions. It can be used to evaluate system parameters. The mathematical treatment is based on the master equation of stochastic branching processes. The noise in power reactor systems is given rise by random processes of technological origin such as vibration of mechanical parts, boiling of the coolant, fluctuations of temperature and pressure. It can be used to monitor reactor behaviour with the possibility of detecting malfunctions at an early stage. The mathematical treatment is based on the Langevin equation. The unity of reactor noise theory arises from the fact that useful information from noise is embedded in the second moments of random variables, which lends the possibility of building up a unified mathematical description and analysis of the various reactor noise sources. Exploring such possibilities is the main subject among the three major topics reported in this thesis. The first subject is within the zero power noise in steady media, and we reported on the extension of the existing theory to more general cases. In Paper I, by use of the master equation approach, we have derived the most general Feynman- and Rossi-alpha formulae so far by taking the full joint statistics of the prompt and all the six groups of delayed neutron precursors, and a multiple emission source into account. The involved problems are solved with a combination of effective analytical techniques and symbolic algebra codes (Mathematica). Paper II gives a numerical evaluation of these formulae. An assessment of the

  11. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1992-01-01

    In the direct white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modeled as a Markov process satisfying an Ito stochastic differential equation, while a finitely additive white noise is used to model the observation noise. In the present work, this asymmetry is removed by modeling

  12. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1994-01-01

    In the existing `direct¿ white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modelled as a Markov process satisfying an Itô stochastic differential equation, while a `finitely additive¿ white noise is used to model the observation noise. We remove this asymmetry by modelling the

  13. Temperature characterization of deep and shallow defect centers of low noise silicon JFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaboldi, Claudio; Fascilla, Andrea; Lund, M.W.; Pessina, Gianluigi

    2004-01-01

    We have selected different low noise JFET processes that have shown outstanding dynamic and noise performance at both room temperature and low temperatures. We have studied JFETs made with a process optimized for cryogenic operation, testing several devices of varying capacitance. For most of them, we have been able to detect the presence of shallow individual traps at low temperature which create low frequency (LF) Generation-Recombination (G-R) noise. For one device type no evidence of traps has been observed at the optimum temperature of operation (around 100 K). It had a very small residual LF noise. This device has been cooled down to 14 K. From below 100 K down to 14 K the noise was observed to increase due to G-R noise originating from donor atoms (dopants) inside the channel. A very simple theoretical interpretation confirms the nature of G-R noise from these very shallow trapping centers. We also studied devices from a process optimized for room temperature operation and found noise corresponding to the presence of a single deep level trap. Even for this circumstance the theory was experimentally confirmed. The measurement approach we used allowed us to achieve a very high accuracy in the modeling of the measured G-R noise. The ratio of the density of the atoms responsible for G-R noise above the doping concentration, N T /N d , has been verified with a sensitivity around 10 -7

  14. Survey on Johnson noise thermometry for temperature instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Moon, B. S.

    2002-01-01

    Johnson Noise Thermometry is an drift-free temperature measurement method which is able to maintain the best accuracy without calibration for a long period. Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and Thermocouples used widely in power plants have the drift problem which causes a measurement error. Despite the advantage of Johnson Noise thermometry, it has not been used because it is very sensitive to electromagnetic noise and environment. It also requires more complicated signal processing methods. This paper presents the characteristics of Johnson Noise thermometry and various implementation method proposed over the past decades time period. The key factor in development of a noise thermometer is how to extract the tiny noise signal from the sensor and discriminate out the unnecessary noise interference from the environments. The new digital technology of fast signal processing skill will useful to challenge the existing problems fir commercialization of noise thermometry

  15. Theory of 1/f noise-a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroupa, V.F.

    2005-01-01

    In the present contribution we will discuss a new mathematical model for generation of the 1/f or flicker noise by introducing the sampling process and emphasizing the necessity for flow of a medium-current, energy, etc. The new theory will be confronted with 1/f noise generated in crystal resonators and oscillators

  16. Some recent results in finitely additive white noise theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Mazumdar, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    We present a short survey of some very recent results on the finitely additive white noise theory. We discuss the Markov property of the solution of a stochastic differential equation driven directly by a white noise, study the Radon-Nikodym derivative of the measure induced by nonlinear

  17. Simulating the temperature noise in fast reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebadze, B.V.; Pykhtina, T.V.; Tarasko, M.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Characteristics of temperature noise at various modes of coolant flow in fast reactor fuel assemblies (FA) and for different points of sensor installation are investigated. Stationary mode of coolant flow and mode with a partial overlapping of FA through cross section, resulting in local temperature increase and sodium boiling, are considered. Numerical simulation permits to evaluate time characteristicsof temperature noise and to formulate requirements for dynamic characteristics of the sensors, and also to clarify the dependence of coolant distribution parameters on the sensor location and peculiarities of stationary temperature profile

  18. Equilibrium finite-frequency noise of an interacting mesoscopic capacitor studied in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the frequency-dependent equilibrium noise of a mesoscopic capacitor in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The capacitor is modeled as a single-level quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to a nearby reservoir. The noise spectra are derived from linear-response conductances via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thereby, we analyze the performance of a recently derived exchange-correlation potential with time-nonlocal density dependence in the finite-frequency linear-response regime. We compare our TDDFT noise spectra with real-time perturbation theory and find excellent agreement for noise frequencies below the reservoir temperature.

  19. MICROWAVE NOISE MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURES IN AFTERGLOW PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, Jr., C. C.; McBee, W. D.

    1963-10-15

    Transient electron temperatures in afterglow plasmas were determined for He (5 and 10 torr), Ne, and Ne plus or minus 5% Ar (2.4 and 24 torr) by combining measurements of plasma microwave noise power, and plasma reflectivity and absorptivity. Use of a low-noise parametric preamplifier permitted continuous detection during the afterglow of noise power at 5.5 Bc in a 1 Mc bandwidth. Electron temperature decays were a function of pressure and gas but were slower than predicted by electron energy loss mechanisms. The addition of argon altered the electron density decay in the neon afterglow but the electron temperature decay was not appreciably changed. Resonances in detected noise power vs time in the afterglow were observed for two of the three plasma waveguide geometries studied. These resonances correlate with observed resonances in absorptivity and occur over the same range of electron densities for a given geometry independent of gas type and pressure. (auth)

  20. Modeling temperature noise in a fast-reactor pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebadze, B.V.; Pykhtina, T.V.; Tarasko, M.Z.

    1987-01-01

    To observe partial overlapping of the heat carrier cross section in piles, leading to local temperature rise or boiling of the sodium, provision is made for individual monitoring of the fuel assemblies with respect to the output temperature. Since the deviation of the mean flow rate through the pile and the output temperature is slight with this anomaly, the temperature fluctuations may provide a more informative index. The change in noise characteristics with partial overlapping of the cross sections occurs because of strong distortion of the temperature profile in the overlap region. The turbulent flow in the upper part of the pile transforms this nonuniformity into temperature pulsations which may be recorded by a sensor at the pile output. In this paper the characteristics of temperature noise are studied for various pile conditions and sensor locations by statistical modeling

  1. Noise temperature measurements for the determination of the thermodynamic temperature of the melting point of palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, F.; Kuhne, M.; Tegeler, E. [Bundesanstalt Physikalisch-Technische, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    The thermodynamic temperature of the melting point of palladium in air was measured by noise thermometric methods. The temperature measurement was based on noise comparison using a two-channel arrangement to eliminate parasitic noises of electronic components by cross correlation. Three miniature fixed points filled with pure palladium (purity: {approx}99.99%, mass: {approx}90 g) were used to realize the melts of the fixed point metal. The measured melting temperature of palladium in air amounted to 1552.95 deg C {+-} 0.21 K (k = 2). This temperature is 0.45 K lower than the temperature of the melting point of palladium measured by radiation thermometry. (authors)

  2. Surprisingly rational: probability theory plus noise explains biases in judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Fintan; Watts, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The systematic biases seen in people's probability judgments are typically taken as evidence that people do not use the rules of probability theory when reasoning about probability but instead use heuristics, which sometimes yield reasonable judgments and sometimes yield systematic biases. This view has had a major impact in economics, law, medicine, and other fields; indeed, the idea that people cannot reason with probabilities has become a truism. We present a simple alternative to this view, where people reason about probability according to probability theory but are subject to random variation or noise in the reasoning process. In this account the effect of noise is canceled for some probabilistic expressions. Analyzing data from 2 experiments, we find that, for these expressions, people's probability judgments are strikingly close to those required by probability theory. For other expressions, this account produces systematic deviations in probability estimates. These deviations explain 4 reliable biases in human probabilistic reasoning (conservatism, subadditivity, conjunction, and disjunction fallacies). These results suggest that people's probability judgments embody the rules of probability theory and that biases in those judgments are due to the effects of random noise. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Quantum Field Theory at non zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.

    1989-01-01

    The formulations of the Φ 4 Quantum Field Theory and of Quantum Electrodynamics in I+d dimensions (d spatial dimensions) at non-zero temperature are reviewed. The behaviours of all those theories in the regime of large distances and high temperatures are surveyed. Only results are reported, all technicalities being omitted. The leading high-temperature contributions to correlation functions, to all perturbative orders, in those theories turn out to be also given by simpler theories, having much milder (superrenormalizable) ultraviolet behaviour and special mass renormalizations. In particular, the triviality/non-triviality issue for the Φ 4 theory in 1+3 dimensions is discussed briefly. (Author)

  4. Noise measurements of YBa2Cu3O7 thin film high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of thin-film YBa2Cu3O7 superconductors were studied from the superconducting region through the transition region and into the normal region. The properties studied included the resistance-temperature, current-voltage, and electrical noise with concentration of measurements in the transition region. The resistance vs. temperature measurements show a zero resistance followed by a small rise in magnitude at the onset of resistance followed by a sharp increase until the resistance tapers off in the fully normal region. The a-axis films had a larger normal resistivity, a lower critical temperature, and a broader transition than the similar c-axis films. The current(I) - voltage(V) measurements were concentrated in the transition region. A power relation between I and V was found to be V varies as I a(T) where a(T) is temperature dependent starting high the onset of vortex formation, approaches 3 at the vortex unbinding temperature, and goes to 1 when fully normal. This behavior was predicted by the Kosterlitz-Thouless theory and was found experimentally in all four films measured. The current-induced electrical noise characteristics were measured for four samples varying in thickness and axis orientation. Each film exhibited a widely varying magnitude of the noise voltage spectral density (S V ) in the transition region with a leveling off when fully normal. The normalized noise (S V /V squared) showed a sharp decrease in magnitude from the onset of measurable noise continually decreasing until flattening out when fully normal. The a-axis films exhibited S V /V squared over 3 order of magnitude larger than the c-axis films in the transition and normal regions. The normalized temperature coefficient of resistance (beta) was plotted against S V /V squared on a log-log scale to see if the noise generated was due to temperature fluctuations (slope = 2)

  5. New applications of neutron noise theory in power reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, Vasiliy

    2000-04-01

    The present thesis deals with neutron noise theory as applied to three comparatively different topics (or problems) in power reactor physics. Namely they are: theoretical investigation of the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the localisation of anomalies; both definition and studies on the point kinetic and adiabatic approximations for the relatively recently proposed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); development of the general theory of linear reactor kinetics and neutron noise in systems with varying size. One important practical problem is to detect and localise a vibrating control rod pin. The significance comes from the operational experience which indicates that individual pins can execute excessive mechanical vibrations that may lead to damage. Such mechanical vibrations induce neutron noise that can be detected. While the detection is relatively easy, the localisation of a vibrating control rod is much more complicated because only one measuring position is available and one needs to have at least three measured quantities. Therefore it has currently been proposed that the fluctuations of the neutron current vector, called the current noise, can be used in addition to the scalar noise in reactor diagnostic problems. The thesis investigates the possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a PWR control assembly by using the scalar neutron noise and the 2-D radial current noise as measured at one central point in the control assembly. An explicit localisation technique is elaborated in which the searched position is determined as the absolute minimum of a minimisation function. The technique is investigated in numerical simulations. The results of the simulation tests show the potential applicability of the method. By design accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and

  6. New applications of neutron noise theory in power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhanov, Vasiliy

    2000-04-01

    The present thesis deals with neutron noise theory as applied to three comparatively different topics (or problems) in power reactor physics. Namely they are: theoretical investigation of the possibility to use a newly proposed current-flux (C/F) detector in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the localisation of anomalies; both definition and studies on the point kinetic and adiabatic approximations for the relatively recently proposed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS); development of the general theory of linear reactor kinetics and neutron noise in systems with varying size. One important practical problem is to detect and localise a vibrating control rod pin. The significance comes from the operational experience which indicates that individual pins can execute excessive mechanical vibrations that may lead to damage. Such mechanical vibrations induce neutron noise that can be detected. While the detection is relatively easy, the localisation of a vibrating control rod is much more complicated because only one measuring position is available and one needs to have at least three measured quantities. Therefore it has currently been proposed that the fluctuations of the neutron current vector, called the current noise, can be used in addition to the scalar noise in reactor diagnostic problems. The thesis investigates the possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a PWR control assembly by using the scalar neutron noise and the 2-D radial current noise as measured at one central point in the control assembly. An explicit localisation technique is elaborated in which the searched position is determined as the absolute minimum of a minimisation function. The technique is investigated in numerical simulations. The results of the simulation tests show the potential applicability of the method. By design accelerator-driven systems would operate in a subcritical mode with a strong external source. This calls for a revision of many concepts and

  7. Probability Theory Plus Noise: Descriptive Estimation and Inferential Judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Fintan; Watts, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We describe a computational model of two central aspects of people's probabilistic reasoning: descriptive probability estimation and inferential probability judgment. This model assumes that people's reasoning follows standard frequentist probability theory, but it is subject to random noise. This random noise has a regressive effect in descriptive probability estimation, moving probability estimates away from normative probabilities and toward the center of the probability scale. This random noise has an anti-regressive effect in inferential judgement, however. These regressive and anti-regressive effects explain various reliable and systematic biases seen in people's descriptive probability estimation and inferential probability judgment. This model predicts that these contrary effects will tend to cancel out in tasks that involve both descriptive estimation and inferential judgement, leading to unbiased responses in those tasks. We test this model by applying it to one such task, described by Gallistel et al. ). Participants' median responses in this task were unbiased, agreeing with normative probability theory over the full range of responses. Our model captures the pattern of unbiased responses in this task, while simultaneously explaining systematic biases away from normatively correct probabilities seen in other tasks. Copyright © 2018 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  8. Finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, J.I.; Landshoff, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    Particle number is not conserved in relativistic theories although both lepton and baryon number are. Therefore when discussing the thermodynamics of a quantum field theory one uses the grand canonical formalism. The entropy S is maximised, keeping fixed the ensemble averages E and N of energy and lepton number. Two lagrange multipliers are introduced. (author)

  9. Regularization of finite temperature string theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.; Knecht, M.; Wallet, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The tachyonic divergences occurring in the free energy of various string theories at finite temperature are eliminated through the use of regularization schemes and analytic continuations. For closed strings, we obtain finite expressions which, however, develop an imaginary part above the Hagedorn temperature, whereas open string theories are still plagued with dilatonic divergences. (orig.)

  10. Some theories of high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a brief review is given of some historical aspects of theoretical research on superconductivity including a discussion of BCS theory and some theoretical proposals for mechanisms which can cause superconductivity at high temperatures

  11. Parquet theory of finite temperature boson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, H.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this dissertation, the author uses the parquet summation for the two-body vertex as the framework for a perturbation theory of finite-temperature homogeneous boson systems. The present formalism is a first step toward a full description of the thermodynamic behavior of a finite temperature boson system through parquet summation. The current approximation scheme focuses on a system below the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature and considers only the contribution from Bogoliubov excitations out of a boson condensate. Comparison with the finite temperature variational theory by Campbell et al. shows strong similarities between variational theory and the current theory. Numerical results from a 4 He system and a nuclear system are discussed

  12. Noise and vibrations theory applied to industrial production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelluccio, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    This work discusses different techniques for the detection and control of incandescent slag slopping in B.O.F. converters (Basic Oxygen Furnace), using on line measures of vibrations and noise.The slag slopping usually occurs during the process which refines the steel and it goes against the production indexes.It was chosen for this work the technique which analyzes the sound coming from the converter.The method requires to measures the sound in gases at high temperatures.For fulfill this requirement it was designed a prototype that allows to take the sound signal from atmospheres at very high temperature (the order of 1000 0 C) and in corrosive conditions.There were carried out test in laboratory scale to validate the concepts proponed and the results were satisfactory.The equipment for measuring allowed recording the sound in gases at 850 ± 50 0 C in a trustable manner [es

  13. Electrochemical corrosion potential and noise measurement in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Clinton; Chen, Yaw-Ming; Chu, Fang; Huang, Chia-Shen

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) is one of the most important methods in boiling water reactor(BWR) system to mitigate and prevent stress corrosion cracking (SCC) problems of stainless steel components. Currently, the effectiveness of HWC in each BWR is mainly evaluated by the measurement of electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECP) and on-line monitoring of SCC behaviors of stainless steels. The objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics and performance of commercially available high temperature reference electrodes. In addition, SCC monitoring technique based on electrochemical noise analysis (ECN) was also tested to examine its crack detection capability. The experimental work on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements reveals that high temperature external Ag/AgCl reference electrode of highly dilute KCl electrolyte can adequately function in both NWC and HWC environments. The high dilution external Ag/AgCl electrode can work in conjunction with internal Ag/AgCl reference electrode, and Pt electrode to ensure the ECP measurement reliability. In simulated BWR environment, the electrochemical noise tests of SCC were carried out with both actively and passively loaded specimens of type 304 stainless steel with various electrode arrangements. From the coupling current and corrosion potential behaviors of the passive loading tests during immersion test, it is difficult to interpret the general state of stress corrosion cracking based on the analytical results of overall current and potential variations, local pulse patterns, statistical characteristics, or power spectral density of electrochemical noise signals. However, more positive SCC indication was observed in the power spectral density analysis. For aqueous environments of high solution impedance, successful application of electrochemical noise technique for SCC monitoring may require further improvement in specimen designs and analytical methods to enhance detection sensitivity

  14. Supersymmetric field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicus, D.A.; Tata, X.R.

    1983-01-01

    We show by explicit calculations to second and third order in perturbation theory, that finite temperature effects do not break the supersymmetry Ward-Takahashi identities of the Wess-Zumino model. Moreover, it is argued that this result is true to all orders in perturbation theory, and further, true for a wide class of supersymmetric theories. We point out, however, that these identities can be broken in the course of a phase transition that restores an originally broken internal symmetry

  15. Johnson-Nyquist noise and the Casimir force between real metals at nonzero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    It has been well known for a long time that all lossy conductors at finite temperature display an electronic noise, the Johnson-Nyquist noise, arising from the thermal agitation of electric charges inside the conductor. The existence of this noise implies that two nearby discharged conductors at finite temperature should repel each other, as a result of the electrodynamic interaction between the Johnson-Nyquist currents in either conductor and the eddy currents they induce in the other. It is suggested that this force is at the origin of the recently discovered large repulsive correction to the thermal Casimir force between two lossy metallic plates. Further support for this physical picture is obtained by studying a simple system of two linear noisy antennas. Using elementary concepts from circuit theory, we show that the repulsive force engendered by the Johnson-Nyquist noise results in the same kind of thermodynamic inconsistencies found in the Casimir problem. We show that all inconsistencies are however resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the antennas. Our findings therefore suggest that capacitive effects resulting from the finite size of the plates may be essential for a resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect

  16. Relationship of core exit-temperature noise to thermal-hydraulic conditions in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Core exit thermocouple temperature noise and neutron detector noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and a Westinghouse, 1148 MW(e) PWR to relate temperature noise to core thermal-hydraulic conditions. The noise analysis results show that the RMS of the temperature noise increases linearly with increasing core δT at LOFT and the commercial PWR. Out-of-core test loop temperature noise has shown similar behavior. The phase angle between core exit temperature noise and in-core or ex-core neutron noise is directly related to the core coolant flow velocity. However, if the thermocouple response time is slow, compared to the coolant transit time between the sensors, velocities inferred from the phase angle are lower than measured coolant flow velocities

  17. The Feynman integrand as a white noise distribution beyond perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grothaus, Martin; Vogel, Anna

    2008-01-01

    In this note the concepts of path integrals and techniques how to construct them are presented. Here we concentrate on a White Noise approach. Combining White Noise techniques with a generalized time-dependent Doss' formula Feynman integrands are constructed as white noise distributions beyond perturbation theory

  18. Amiet theory extension to predict leading-edge generated noise in compact airfoils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Santana, Leandro Dantas; Schram, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the Amiet theory to frequencies where the airfoil can be considered a compact noise source. The original Amiet theory proposes to apply the Schwarzschild theorem in an iterative procedure, which generally leads to noise over-prediction at low-frequencies. To overcome this problem,

  19. Noise and optimum filtering in spectrometers with semiconductor detectors operating at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Korbel, K.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of the excess noise in the semiconductor detectors operating at the elevated temperature is discussed. Under the assumption of a conventional CR-RC type filtration the variancy of the noise output is determined. The new term ''second noise-corner time constant'' was proposed. The expression for relative signal-to-noise ratio as the dependence on the noise as well as circuits time constants was derived. It was also presented in a graphical form. 12 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  20. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  1. Topics on field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eboli, O.J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a first order phase transition through the study of the decay rate of the false vacuum in the high temperature limit are analysed. An alternative approach to obtain the phase diagram of a field theory which is based on the study of the free energy of topological defects, is developed the behavior of coupling constants with the help of the Dyson-Schwinger equations at finite temperature, is evaluated. (author) [pt

  2. Theory and Measurement of Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Continuous-Wave Noise Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Bronisław; Susek, Waldemar

    2018-05-06

    Determination of the signal power-to-noise power ratio on the input and output of reception systems is essential to the estimation of their quality and signal reception capability. This issue is especially important in the case when both signal and noise have the same characteristic as Gaussian white noise. This article considers the problem of how a signal-to-noise ratio is changed as a result of signal processing in the correlation receiver of a noise radar in order to determine the ability to detect weak features in the presence of strong clutter-type interference. These studies concern both theoretical analysis and practical measurements of a noise radar with a digital correlation receiver for 9.2 GHz bandwidth. Firstly, signals participating individually in the correlation process are defined and the terms signal and interference are ascribed to them. Further studies show that it is possible to distinguish a signal and a noise on the input and output of a correlation receiver, respectively, when all the considered noises are in the form of white noise. Considering the above, a measurement system is designed in which it is possible to represent the actual conditions of noise radar operation and power measurement of a useful noise signal and interference noise signals—in particular the power of an internal leakage signal between a transmitter and a receiver of the noise radar. The proposed measurement stands and the obtained results show that it is possible to optimize with the use of the equipment and not with the complex processing of a noise signal. The radar parameters depend on its prospective application, such as short- and medium-range radar, ground-penetrating radar, and through-the-wall detection radar.

  3. Temperature dependence of shot noise in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jiasen; Liu, Liang; Feng, J. F.; Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wei, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Shot noise reveals spin dependent transport properties in a magnetic tunnel junction. We report measurement of shot noise in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions, which shows a strong temperature dependence. The Fano factor used to characterize shot noise increases with decreasing temperature. A sequential tunneling model can be used to account for these results, in which a larger Fano factor results from larger spin relaxation length at lower temperatures.

  4. Theory of deep level trap effects on generation-recombination noise in HgCdTe photoconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, A.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    We present a theory of the effect of deep level centers on the generation-recombination (g-r) noise and responsivity of an intrinsic photoconductor. The deep level centers can influence the g-r noise and responsivity in three main ways: (i) they can shorten the bulk carrier lifetime by Shockley--Read--Hall recombination; (ii) for some values of the capture cross sections, deep level densities, and temperature, the deep levels can trap a significant fraction of the photogenerated minority carriers. This trapping reduces the effective minority carrier mobility and diffusivity and thus reduces the effect of carrier sweep out on both g-r noise and responsivity; (iii) the deep level centers add a new thermal noise source, which results from fluctuations between bound and free carriers. The strength of this new noise source decreases with decreasing temperature at a slower rate than band-to-band thermal g-r noise. Calculations have been performed for a X = 0.21, n-type Hg/sub 1-x/Cd/sub x/Te photoconductor using the parameters of a commonly occurring deep level center in this material. We find that for typical operating conditions photoconductive detector performance begins to degrade as the deep level density begins to exceed 10 16 cm -3

  5. High-Tc Superconducting Bolometer Noise Measurement Using Low Noise Transformers - Theory and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shahid; Jones, Hollis H.

    2011-01-01

    Care must always be taken when performing noise measurements on high-Tc superconducting materials to ensure that the results are not from the measurement system itself. One situation likely to occur is with low noise transformers. One of the least understood devices, it provides voltage gain for low impedance inputs (< 100 ), e.g., YBaCuO and GdBaCuO thin films, with comparatively lower noise levels than other devices for instance field effect and bipolar junction transistors. An essential point made in this paper is that because of the complex relationships between the transformer ports, input impedance variance alters the transformer s transfer function in particular, the low frequency cutoff shift. The transfer of external and intrinsic transformer noise to the output along with optimization and precautions are treated; all the while, we will cohesively connect the transfer function shift, the load impedance, and the actual noise at the transformer output.

  6. Imaging resolution signal-to-noise ratio in transverse phase amplification from classical information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Doug; Huang Zun; Pao, H.-Y.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2009-01-01

    A quantum phase amplifier operated in the spatial domain can improve the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging beyond the classical limit. The scaling of the signal-to-noise ratio with the gain of the quantum phase amplifier is derived from classical information theory

  7. The temperature dependence of 1/f noise in InP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.Y.; Hooge, F.N.; Leijs, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Noise spectra were measured on CBE grown InP samples in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 104 kHz at temperatures from 77 to 500 K. The experimental results show that llfnoise stems from the lattice scattering. The 1/f noise in InP is well characterised by a parameter CtL~,, in this temperature

  8. Subassembly faults diagnostic of an LMFBR type reactor by the measurement of temperature noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokorev, B.V.; Palkin, I.I.; Turchin, N.M.; Pallagi, D.; Horanyi, S.

    1979-09-01

    The subassembly faults detection possibility by temperature noise analysis of an LMFBR is described. The paper contains the results of diagnostical examinations obtained on electrically heated NaK test rigs. On the basis of these results the measurement of temperature noise RMS value seems to be a practicable method to detect local blockages in an early phase. (author)

  9. Stochastic Nuclear Reaction Theory: Breit-Wigner nuclear noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is the application of various statistical tests for the detection of the intermediate structure, which lies immersed in the Breit-Wigner ''noise'' arising from the superposition of many compound nucleus resonances. To this end, neutron capture cross sections are constructed by Monte-Carlo simulations of the compound nucleus, hence providing the ''noise'' component. In a second step intermediate structure is added to the Breit-Wigner noise. The performance of the statistical tests in detecting the intermediate structure is evaluated using mocked-up neutron cross sections as the statistical samples. Afterwards, the statistical tests are applied to actual nuclear cross section data. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  11. Contemporary theories of 1/f noise in motor control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diniz, A.; Wijnants, M.L.; Torre, K.; Barreiros, J.; Crato, N.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Hasselman, F.W.; Cox, R.F.A.; Orden, G.C. van; Delignieres, D.

    2011-01-01

    1/f noise has been discovered in a number of time series collected in psychological and behavioral experiments. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been ignored for a long time and classical models were not designed for accounting for these long-range correlations. The aim of this paper is to present and

  12. Theory and simulation of ion noise in microwave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, W. M.; Freund, H. P.; Levush, B.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    Since there is always some ambient gas in electron beam devices, background ionization is ubiquitous. For long pulse times, the electrostatic potentials associated with this ionization can reach significant levels and give rise to such observed phenomena as phase noise in microwave tubes. This noise is usually associated with the motion of ions in the device; therefore, it is called ion noise. It often manifests itself as a slow phase fluctuation on the output signal. Observations of noise in microwave tubes such as coupled-cavity traveling wave tubes (CC-TWTs) and klystrons have been discussed in the literature. In this paper, a hybrid model is discussed in which the electron beam is described by the beam envelope equation, and the ions generated by beam ionization are treated as discrete particles using the one-dimensional equations of motion. The theoretical model provides good qualitative as well as reasonable quantitative insight into the origin of ion noise phenomena. The numerical results indicate that the model reproduces the salient features of the phase oscillations observed experimentally. That is, the scaling of the frequency of the phase oscillations with gas pressure in the device and the sensitive dependence of the phase oscillations on the focusing magnetic field. Two distinct time scales are observed in simulation. The fastest time scale oscillation is related to the bounce motion of ions in the axial potential wells formed by the scalloping of the electron beam. Slower sawtooth oscillations are observed to correlate with the well-to-well interactions induced by the ion coupling to the electron equilibrium. These oscillations are also correlated with ion dumping to the cathode or collector. As a practical matter, simulations indicate that the low frequency oscillations can be reduced significantly by using a well-matched electron beam propagating from the electron gun into the interaction circuit.

  13. Theory and simulation of ion noise in microwave tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manheimer, W.M.; Freund, H.P.; Levush, B.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Since there is always some ambient gas in electron beam devices, background ionization is ubiquitous. For long pulse times, the electrostatic potentials associated with this ionization can reach significant levels and give rise to such observed phenomena as phase noise in microwave tubes. This noise is usually associated with the motion of ions in the device; therefore, it is called ion noise. It often manifests itself as a slow phase fluctuation on the output signal. Observations of noise in microwave tubes such as coupled-cavity traveling wave tubes (CC-TWTs) and klystrons have been discussed in the literature. In this paper, a hybrid model is discussed in which the electron beam is described by the beam envelope equation, and the ions generated by beam ionization are treated as discrete particles using the one-dimensional equations of motion. The theoretical model provides good qualitative as well as reasonable quantitative insight into the origin of ion noise phenomena. The numerical results indicate that the model reproduces the salient features of the phase oscillations observed experimentally. That is, the scaling of the frequency of the phase oscillations with gas pressure in the device and the sensitive dependence of the phase oscillations on the focusing magnetic field. Two distinct time scales are observed in simulation. The fastest time scale oscillation is related to the bounce motion of ions in the axial potential wells formed by the scalloping of the electron beam. Slower sawtooth oscillations are observed to correlate with the well-to-well interactions induced by the ion coupling to the electron equilibrium. These oscillations are also correlated with ion dumping to the cathode or collector. As a practical matter, simulations indicate that the low frequency oscillations can be reduced significantly by using a well-matched electron beam propagating from the electron gun into the interaction circuit

  14. Temperature noise analysis and sodium boiling detection in the fuel failure mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sides, W.H. Jr.; Fry, D.N.; Leavell, W.H.; Mathis, M.V.; Saxe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Sodium temperature noise was measured at the exit of simulated, fast-reactor fuel subassemblies in the Fuel Failure Mockup (FFM) to determine the feasibility of using temperature noise monitors to detect flow blockages in fast reactors. Also, acoustic noise was measured to determine whether sodium boiling in the FFM could be detected acoustically and whether noncondensable gas entrained in the sodium coolant would affect the sensitivity of the acoustic noise detection system. Information from these studies would be applied to the design of safety systems for operating liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). It was determined that the statistical properties of temperature noise are dependent on the shape of temperature profiles across the subassemblies, and that a blockage upstream of a thermocouple that increases the gradient of the profile near the blockage will also increase the temperature noise at the thermocouple. Amplitude probability analysis of temperature noise shows a skewed amplitude density function about the mean temperature that varies with the location of the thermocouple with respect to the blockage location. It was concluded that sodium boiling in the FFM could be detected acoustically. However, entrained noncondensable gas in the sodium coolant at void fractions greater than 0.4 percent attenuated the acoustic signals sufficiently that boiling was not detected. At a void fraction of 0.1 percent, boiling was indicated only by the two acoustic detectors closest to the boiling site

  15. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Wolf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  16. Noise behaviour of semiinsulating GaAs particle detectors at various temperatures before and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenbusch, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Chu, Z.; Krais, R.; Kubicki, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Pandoulas, D.; Rente, C.; Syben, O.; Toporowski, M.; Wittmer, B.; Xiao, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the noise behaviour of surface barrier detectors (double sided Schottky contact) made of semiinsulating GaAs. Two types of measurements were performed: equivalent noise charge (ENC) and noise power density spectra in a frequency range from 10 Hz to 500 kHz. The shape of the density spectra are a powerful tool to examine the physical origin of the noise, before irradiation it is dominated by generation-recombination processes caused by deep levels. Temperature dependent noise measurements reveal the deep level parameters like activation energy and cross section, which are also extracted by analyzing the time transients of the charge pulse from α-particles. After irradiation with protons, neutrons and pions the influence of the deep levels being originally responsible for the noise is found to decrease and a reduction of the noise over the entire frequency range with increasing fluence is observed. (orig.)

  17. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  18. Stochastic density functional theory at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytter, Yael; Rabani, Eran; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi

    2018-03-01

    Simulations in the warm dense matter regime using finite temperature Kohn-Sham density functional theory (FT-KS-DFT), while frequently used, are computationally expensive due to the partial occupation of a very large number of high-energy KS eigenstates which are obtained from subspace diagonalization. We have developed a stochastic method for applying FT-KS-DFT, that overcomes the bottleneck of calculating the occupied KS orbitals by directly obtaining the density from the KS Hamiltonian. The proposed algorithm scales as O (" close=")N3T3)">N T-1 and is compared with the high-temperature limit scaling O temperature. The method has been implemented in a plane-waves code within the local density approximation (LDA); we demonstrate its efficiency, statistical errors, and bias in the estimation of the free energy per electron for a diamond structure silicon. The bias is small compared to the fluctuations and is independent of system size. In addition to calculating the free energy itself, one can also use the method to calculate its derivatives and obtain the equations of state.

  19. Performance Improvement of Raman Distributed Temperature System by Using Noise Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Li, Yunting; Zhang, Mingjiang; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yan, Baoqiang; Wang, Dong; Jin, Baoquan

    2018-06-01

    In Raman distributed temperature system, the key factor for performance improvement is noise suppression, which seriously affects the sensing distance and temperature accuracy. Therefore, we propose and experimentally demonstrate dynamic noise difference algorithm and wavelet transform modulus maximum (WTMM) to de-noising Raman anti-Stokes signal. Experimental results show that the sensing distance can increase from 3 km to 11.5 km and the temperature accuracy increases to 1.58 °C at the sensing distance of 10.4 km.

  20. Finite spatial volume approach to finite temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Nathan

    1981-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature T=β -1 is equivalent to the same field theory at zero temperature but with one spatial dimension of finite length β. This equivalence is discussed for scalars, for fermions, and for gauge theories. The relationship is checked for free field theory. The translation of correlation functions between the two formulations is described with special emphasis on the nonlocal order parameters of gauge theories. Possible applications are mentioned. (auth)

  1. Nonequilibrium Gyrokinetic Fluctuation Theory and Sampling Noise in Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The present state of the theory of fluctuations in gyrokinetic (GK) plasmas and especially its application to sampling noise in GK particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations is reviewed. Topics addressed include the Δf method, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for both classical and GK many-body plasmas, the Klimontovich formalism, sampling noise in PIC simulations, statistical closure for partial differential equations, the theoretical foundations of spectral balance in the presence of arbitrary noise sources, and the derivation of Kadomtsev-type equations from the general formalism

  2. Nonequilibrium Gyrokinetic Fluctuation Theory and Sampling Noise in Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Krommes

    2007-10-09

    The present state of the theory of fluctuations in gyrokinetic GK plasmas and especially its application to sampling noise in GK particle-in-cell PIC simulations is reviewed. Topics addressed include the Δf method, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem for both classical and GK many-body plasmas, the Klimontovich formalism, sampling noise in PIC simulations, statistical closure for partial differential equations, the theoretical foundations of spectral balance in the presence of arbitrary noise sources, and the derivation of Kadomtsev-type equations from the general formalism.

  3. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  4. Noise characteristics of resistors buried in low-temperature co-fired ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolek, A; Ptak, P; Dziedzic, A

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of noise properties of conventional thick film resistors prepared on alumina substrates and resistors embedded in low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCCs) is presented. Both types of resistors were prepared from commercially available resistive inks. Noise measurements of LTCC resistors below 1 kHz show Gaussian 1/f noise. This is concluded from the calculations of the second spectra as well as from studying the volume dependence of noise intensity. It has occurred that noise index of LTCC resistors on average is not worse than that of conventional resistors. A detailed study of co-fired surface resistors and co-fired buried resistors show that burying a resistor within LTCC substrate usually leads to (significant) enhancement of resistance but not of noise intensity. We interpret this behaviour as another argument in favour of tunnelling as the dominant conduction mechanism in LTCC resistors

  5. Note: A temperature-stable low-noise transimpedance amplifier for microcurrent measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Shi, Xueyou; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature stability and noise characteristics often run contradictory in microcurrent (e.g., pA-scale) measurement instruments because low-noise performance requires high-value resistors with relatively poor temperature coefficients. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier with high-temperature stability, which involves an active compensation mechanism to overcome the temperature drift mainly caused by high-value resistors, is presented. The implementation uses a specially designed R-2R compensating network to provide programmable current gain with extra-fine trimming resolution. The temperature drifts of all components (e.g., feedback resistors, operational amplifiers, and the R-2R network itself) are compensated simultaneously. Therefore, both low-temperature drift and ultra-low-noise performance can be achieved. With a current gain of 1011 V/A, the internal current noise density was about 0.4 fA/√Hz, and the average temperature coefficient was 4.3 ppm/K at 0-50 °C. The amplifier module maintains accuracy across a wide temperature range without additional thermal stabilization, and its compact size makes it especially suitable for high-precision, low-current measurement in outdoor environments for applications such as electrochemical emission supervision, air pollution particles analysis, radiation monitoring, and bioelectricity.

  6. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T(e) and n(e) fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ~60,000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60,000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  7. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T e and n e fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained

  8. THE EFFECT OF LINE-OF-SIGHT TEMPERATURE VARIATION AND NOISE ON DUST CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Rahul; Kauffmann, Jens; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Ercolano, Barbara; Schnee, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effect of line-of-sight temperature variations and noise on two commonly used methods to determine dust properties from dust-continuum observations of dense cores. One method employs a direct fit to a modified blackbody spectral energy distribution (SED); the other involves a comparison of flux ratios to an analytical prediction. Fitting fluxes near the SED peak produces inaccurate temperature and dust spectral index estimates due to the line-of-sight temperature (and density) variations. Longer wavelength fluxes in the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the spectrum (∼> 600 μm for typical cores) may more accurately recover the spectral index, but both methods are very sensitive to noise. The temperature estimate approaches the density-weighted temperature, or 'column temperature', of the source as short wavelength fluxes are excluded. An inverse temperature-spectral index correlation naturally results from SED fitting, due to the inaccurate isothermal assumption, as well as noise uncertainties. We show that above some 'threshold' temperature, the temperatures estimated through the flux ratio method can be highly inaccurate. In general, observations with widely separated wavelengths, and including shorter wavelengths, result in higher threshold temperatures; such observations thus allow for more accurate temperature estimates of sources with temperatures less than the threshold temperature. When only three fluxes are available, a constrained fit, where the spectral index is fixed, produces less scatter in the temperature estimate when compared to the estimate from the flux ratio method.

  9. Spatial noise-aware temperature retrieval from infrared sounder data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren-Hansen, David; Laparra, Valero; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2017-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) for dimensionality reduction, and study the compactness and information content of the extracted features. Assessment of the results is done on a big dataset covering many spatial and temporal situations. PCA is widely used...... for these purposes but our analysis shows that one can gain significant improvements of the error rates when using MNF instead. In our analysis we also investigate the relationship between error rate improvements when including more spectral and spatial components in the regression model, aiming to uncover the trade...

  10. Model-based temperature noise monitoring methods for LMFBR core anomaly detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Sonoda, Yukio; Sato, Masuo; Takahashi, Ryoichi.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature noise, measured by thermocouples mounted at each core fuel subassembly, is considered to be the most useful signal for detecting and locating local cooling anomalies in an LMFBR core. However, the core outlet temperature noise contains background noise due to fluctuations in the operating parameters including reactor power. It is therefore necessary to reduce this background noise for highly sensitive anomaly detection by subtracting predictable components from the measured signal. In the present study, both a physical model and an autoregressive model were applied to noise data measured in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The results indicate that the autoregressive model has a higher precision than the physical model in background noise prediction. Based on these results, an 'autoregressive model modification method' is proposed, in which a temporary autoregressive model is generated by interpolation or extrapolation of reference models identified under a small number of different operating conditions. The generated autoregressive model has shown sufficient precision over a wide range of reactor power in applications to artificial noise data produced by an LMFBR noise simulator even when the coolant flow rate was changed to keep a constant power-to-flow ratio. (author)

  11. Quantum dynamics manipulation using optimal control theory in the presence of laser field noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.

    2010-08-01

    We discuss recent advances in optimal control theory (OCT) related to the investigation of the impact of control field noise on controllability of quantum dynamics. Two numerical methods, the gradient method and the iteration method, are paid particular attention. We analyze the problem of designing noisy control fields to maximize the vibrational transition probability in diatomic quantum systems, e.g. the HF and OH molecules. White noise is used as an additive random variable in the amplitude of the control field. It is demonstrated that the convergence is faster in the presence of noise and population transfer is increased by 0.04% for small values of noise compared to the field amplitude.

  12. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, G.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Vega, J.; Santos, M.; Pastor, I.; Fingerhuth, S.; Ascencio, J.

    2014-01-01

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process

  13. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.es [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vega, J., E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, M., E-mail: msantos@ucm.es [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I., E-mail: ignacio.pastor@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fingerhuth, S., E-mail: sebastian.fingerhuth@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Ascencio, J., E-mail: j_ascencio21@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2014-05-15

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process.

  14. The effect of signal to noise ratio on accuracy of temperature measurements for Brillouin lidar in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun; Niu, Qunjie; Wu, Xiangkui; Xu, Jiaqi; Peng, Li; Zhou, Bo

    2017-09-01

    A lidar system with Fabry-Pérot etalon and an intensified charge coupled device can be used to obtain the scattering spectrum of the ocean and retrieve oceanic temperature profiles. However, the spectrum would be polluted by noise and result in a measurement error. To analyze the effect of signal to noise ratio (SNR) on the accuracy of measurements for Brillouin lidar in water, the theory model and characteristics of SNR are researched. The noise spectrums with different SNR are repetitiously measured based on simulation and experiment. The results show that accuracy is related to SNR, and considering the balance of time consumption and quality, the average of five measurements is adapted for real remote sensing under the pulse laser conditions of wavelength 532 nm, pulse energy 650 mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz, pulse width 8 ns and linewidth 0.003 cm-1 (90 MHz). Measuring with the Brillouin linewidth has a better accuracy at a lower temperature (15 °C), based on the classical retrieval model we adopt. The experimental results show that the temperature error is 0.71 °C and 0.06 °C based on shift and linewidth respectively when the image SNR is at the range of 3.2 dB-3.9 dB.

  15. W-Band InP Wideband MMIC LNA with 30K Noise Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, S.; Lai, R.; Erickson, N.; Gaier, T.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describe a millimeter wave low noise amplifier with extraordinary low noise, low consumption, and wide frequency range. These results are achieved utilizing state-of-the-art InP HEMT transistors coupled with CPW circuit design. The paper describes the transistor models, modeled and measured on-wafer and in-module results at both 300K am 24K operating temperatures for many samples of the device.

  16. Theory of the Auger effect in an intense acoustic noise field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Nhat Quang.

    1995-10-01

    A study is given of the effect on Auger processes produced by an intense acoustic noise flux affecting charge carriers via deformation-potential interaction. The calculation of Auger coefficients is carried out within a semiclassical approach to the acoustic noise field and non-degenerate carrier statistics. Simple analytic expressions are then obtained, which expose an exponential dependence of the Auger coefficients on flux intensity. The Auger recombination is found, in analogy with the case of piezoelectric noise field, to be strongly enhanced as compared to that in no-noise conditions by up to several orders of magnitude at high flux intensity, short acoustic wavelength, small carrier concentration and low temperature. (author). 29 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  17. Self-Consistent Theory of Shot Noise Suppression in Ballistic Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulashenko, O. M.; Rubí, J. M.; Kochelap, V. A.

    Shot-noise measurements become a fundamental tool to probe carrier interactions in mesoscopic systems [1]. A matter of particular interest is the significance of Coulomb interaction which may keep nearby electrons more regularly spaced rather than strictly at random and lead to the noise reduction. That effect occurs in different physical situations. Among them are charge-limited ballistic transport, resonant tunneling, single-electron tunneling, etc. In this communication we address the problem of Coulomb correlations in ballistic conductors under the space-charge-limited transport conditions, and present for the first time a semiclassical self-consistent theory of shot noise in these conductors by solving analytically the kinetic equation coupled self-consistently with a Poisson equation. Basing upon this theory, exact results for current noise in a two-terminal ballistic conductor under the action of long-range Coulomb correlations has been derived. The noise reduction factor (in respect to the uncorrelated value) is obtained in a closed analytical form for a full range of biases ranging from thermal to shot-noise limits which describe perfectly the results of the Monte Carlo simulations for a nondegenerate electron gas [2]. The magnitude of the noise reduction exceeds 0.01, which is of interest from the point of view of possible applications. Using these analytical results one may estimate a relative contribution to the noise from different groups of carriers (in energy space and/or real space) and to investigate in great detail the correlations between different groups of carriers. This leads us to suggest an electron energy spectroscopy experiment to probe the Coulomb correlations in ballistic conductors. Indeed, while the injected carriers are uncorrelated, those in the volume of the conductor are strongly correlated, as follows from the derived formulas for the fluctuation of the distribution function. Those correlations may be observed experimentally by

  18. Combined effects of noise, vibration, and low temperature on the physiological parameters of labor employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Chiang Chao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Noise, vibration, and low temperature render specific occupational hazards to labor employees. The purpose of this research was to investigate the combined effects of these three physical hazards on employees' physiological parameters. The Taguchi experimental method was used to simulate different exposure conditions caused by noise, vibration, and low temperature, and their effects on the physiological parameters of the test takers were measured. The data were then analyzed using statistical methods to evaluate the combined effects of these three factors on human health. Results showed that the factor that influenced the finger skin temperature, manual dexterity, and mean artery pressure (MAP most was air temperature, and exposure time was the second most influential factor. Noise was found to be the major factor responsible for hearing loss; in this case, hand–arm vibration and temperature had no effect at all. During the study, the temperature was confined in the 5–25°C range (which was not sufficient to study the effects at extremely high- and low-temperature working conditions because the combined effects of even two factors were very complicated. For example, the combined effects of hand–arm vibration and low temperature might lead to occupational hazards such as vibration-induced white finger syndrome in working labors. Further studies concerning the occupational damage caused by the combined effects of hazardous factors need to be conducted in the future.

  19. Noise and specific detectivity measurements on high-temperature superconducting transition-edge bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, R.D.; Mogro-campero, A.; Turner, L.G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of thermal fluctuation noise in thermal detectors can be lessened by reducing heat capacity and thermal conductance. An attempt to accomplish this with the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) bolometer by making YBCO resistors on thermally isolated membranes is reported. The spectral power of the electrical noise of YBCO films on SrTiO3, bulk silicon with a buffer layer, and in thin dielectric membranes is measured. It is found that 1/f noise predominates in polycrystalline YBCO films on silicon-based substrates. Films on SrTiO3 with good electrical properties are dominated by thermal fluctuation noise, just as in the case of low-temperature superconductors. The implications of these findings for bolometer are addressed. The specific detectivity of a bolometric pixel made on bulk SrTiO3 is reported. 14 refs

  20. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  1. The 136 MHz/400 MHz earth station antenna-noise temperature prediction program documentation for RAE-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulation study to determine the 136 MHz and 400 MHz noise temperature of the ground network antennas which will track the RAE-B satellite during data transmission periods is described. Since the noise temperature of the antenna effectively sets the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received signal, a knowledge of SNR will be helpful in locating the optimum time windows for data transmission during low-noise periods. Antenna-noise temperatures at 136 MHz and 400 MHz will be predicted for selected earth-based ground stations which will support RAE-B. The antenna-noise temperature predictions will include the effects of galactic-brightness temperature, the sun, and the brightest radio stars. Predictions will cover the ten-month period from March 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973. The RAE-B mission will be expecially susceptible to SNR degradation during the two eclipses of the Sun occurring in this period.

  2. The 136 MHZ/400 MHz earth station antenna-noise temperature prediction program for RAE-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Fee, J. J.; Chin, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to determine the 136 MHz and 400 MHz noise temperature of the ground network antennas which will track the RAE-B satellite during data transmission periods. Since the noise temperature of the antenna effectively sets the signal-to-noise ratio of the received signal, a knowledge of SNR will be helpful in locating the optimum time windows for data transmission during low noise periods. Antenna noise temperatures will be predicted for selected earth-based ground stations which will support RAE-B. Telemetry data acquisition will be at 400 MHz; tracking support at 136 MHz will be provided by the Goddard Range and Range Rate (RARR) stations. The antenna-noise temperature predictions will include the effects of galactic-brightness temperature, the sun, and the brightest radio stars. Predictions will cover the ten-month period from March 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973.

  3. Noise-modulated self-polarization effect of impurity doped quantum dots under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-10-01

    We explore the profiles of self-polarization effect (SPE) of doped GaAs QD under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure (HP), temperature and in presence of noise. Noise term carries Gaussian white character and it has been administered to the system via two different pathways; additive and multiplicative. Profiles of SPE have been monitored as a function of HP, temperature and noise strength. Under a given condition of HP and temperature, noise marks its prominent signature on the SPE profile. However, the extent to which noise affects the SPE profile visibly depends on the noise strength and the pathway through which noise is introduced. As interesting observations we have found that SPE exhibits minimization at a pressure of ∼ 170 kbar in absence of noise and at ∼ 150 kbar when noise is present. Furthermore, in presence of multiplicative noise SPE exhibits a very faint decrease with increase in T up to T ∼ 420 K. However, beyond T ∼ 420 K, further increase in temperature causes abrupt fall of SPE in a highly sharp way. The findings highlight viable ways of tuning SPE of doped QD system through subtle interplay between HP, temperature and noise.

  4. Thermo field dynamics: a quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, F.; Marinaro, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of the theory of thermo field dynamics (TFD) is presented. TFD is introduced and developed by Umezawa and his coworkers at finite temperature. The most significant concept in TFD is that of a thermal vacuum which satisfies some conditions denoted as thermal state conditions. The TFD permits to reformulate theories at finite temperature. There is no need in an additional principle to determine particle distributions at T ≠ 0. Temperature and other macroscopic parameters are introduced in the definition of the vacuum state. All operator formalisms used in quantum field theory at T=0 are preserved, although the field degrees of freedom are doubled. 8 refs

  5. Wall deffects in field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeia Filho, D.

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the effect of restauration of simmetry in field theories at finite temperature and its relation with wall deffects which appear as consequence of the instability of the constant field configuration. (M.W.O.) [pt

  6. Theory of high temperature plasmas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Liu, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    This is a report on the technical progress in our analytic studies of high-temperature fusion plasmas. We also emphasize that the research summarized here makes extensive use of computational methods and therefore forms a strong interface with our numerical modeling program which is discussed later in the report

  7. Center-symmetric effective theory for high-temperature SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forcrand, Ph. de; Kurkela, A.; Vuorinen, A.

    2008-01-01

    We construct and study a dimensionally reduced effective theory for high-temperature SU(2) Yang-Mills theory that respects all the symmetries of the underlying theory. Our main motivation is to study whether the correct treatment of the center symmetry can help extend the applicability of the dimensional reduction procedure towards the confinement transition. After performing perturbative matching to the full theory at asymptotically high temperatures, we map the phase diagram of the effective theory using nonperturbative lattice simulations. We find that at lower temperature the theory undergoes a second-order confining phase transition, in complete analogy with the full theory, which is a direct consequence of having incorporated the center symmetry

  8. Finite-temperature behavior of mass hierarchies in supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsparg, P.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's mechanism for producing a large gauge hierarchy in supersymmetric theories leads to a novel symmetry behavior at finite temperature. The exponentially large expectation value in such models develops at a critical temperature of order of the small (supersymmetry-breaking) scale. The phase transition can proceed without need of vacuum tunnelling. Models based on Witten's mechanism thus require a reexamination of the standard cosmological treatment of grand unified theories. (orig.)

  9. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  10. Weak coupling theory of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, J.

    1990-01-01

    Many theories of the high T c superconductors are founded on the hypothesis that the electron-electron correlations are so strong in these materials that, in the absence of doping or internal charge transfer, they should be Mott insulators. The authors consider this hypothesis as unlikely for the following reasons. At first, very strong correlations would arise from a very large repulsive Coulomb energy between electrons within each atom. This would be the case only with very strongly localized atomic orbitals, as for instance the f orbitals in the rare earths, leading to very narrow energy bands. But in the copper oxides, the d orbitals of copper, or the p orbitals of oxygen, are not so strongly localized, and thus the intra-atomic repulsive Coulomb energy has no reason to be much larger than in the simple transitional metals or their other compounds

  11. Turbulent flow and temperature noise simulation by a multiparticle Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.; Overton, R.S.

    1980-10-01

    A statistical method of simulating real-time temperature fluctuations in liquid sodium pipe flow, for potential application to the estimation of temperature signals generated by subassembly blockages in LMFBRs is described. The method is based on the empirical characterisation of the flow by turbulence intensity and macroscale, radial velocity correlations and spectral form. These are used to produce realisations of the correlated motion of successive batches of representative 'marker particles' released at discrete time intervals into the flow. Temperature noise is generated by the radial mixing of the particles as they move downstream from an assumed mean temperature profile, where they acquire defined temperatures. By employing multi-particle batches, it is possible to perform radial heat transfer calculations, resulting in axial dissipation of the temperature noise levels. A simulated temperature-time signal is built up by recording the temperature at a given point in the flow as each batch of particles reaches the radial measurement plane. This is an advantage over conventional techniques which can usually only predict time-averaged parameters. (U.K.)

  12. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  13. Fast, noise-free memory for photon synchronization at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Ran; Poem, Eilon; Michel, Ohad; Lahad, Ohr; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2018-01-01

    Future quantum photonic networks require coherent optical memories for synchronizing quantum sources and gates of probabilistic nature. We demonstrate a fast ladder memory (FLAME) mapping the optical field onto the superposition between electronic orbitals of rubidium vapor. Using a ladder-level system of orbital transitions with nearly degenerate frequencies simultaneously enables high bandwidth, low noise, and long memory lifetime. We store and retrieve 1.7-ns-long pulses, containing 0.5 photons on average, and observe short-time external efficiency of 25%, memory lifetime (1/ e ) of 86 ns, and below 10 -4 added noise photons. Consequently, coupling this memory to a probabilistic source would enhance the on-demand photon generation probability by a factor of 12, the highest number yet reported for a noise-free, room temperature memory. This paves the way toward the controlled production of large quantum states of light from probabilistic photon sources.

  14. Investigation of the local component of power-reactor noise via diffusion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaly, G.

    1975-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to provide a theoretical background for the phenomenological model, which postulates the existence of a local component in the neutron noise of a light water cooled boiling water reactor. After the introductory review of the phenomenological model, noise calculation are performed by help of the one-group and two-group diffusion theory. Only in the two-group diffusion model it is succeeded to find a term in the response to a propagating disturbance of density which results in a small volume of neutrons physical sensivity around the point of observation. The problem, whether this local component can be a dominating term in the solution or not, is investigated in the Appenix. (Sz.Z.)

  15. Topics in quantum field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Y.C.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on four topics in quantum field theories at finite temperature are presented in this thesis. In Chapter 1, it is shown that the chiral anomaly has no finite temperature corrections by Fujikawa's path integral approach. Chapter 2 deals with the chiral condensate in the finite temperature Schwinger model. The cluster decomposition property is employed to find . No finite critical temperature is found and the chiral condensate vanishes only at infinite temperature. In Chapter 3, the finite temperature behavior of the fermion-number breaking (Rubakov-Callan) condensate around a 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole is studied. It is found that the Rubakov-Callan condensate is suppressed exponentially from the monopole core at high temperature. The limitation of the techniques is understanding the behavior of the condensate for all temperature is also discussed. Chapter 4 is on the topological mass terms in (2 + 1)-dimensional gauge theories. The authors finds that if the gauge bosons have no topological mass at tree level, no topological mass induced radiatively up to two-loop order in either Abelian or non-Abelian theories with massive fermions. The Pauli-Villars regularization is used for fermion loops. The one-loop contributions to the topological mass terms at finite temperature are calculated and the quantization constraints in this case are discussed

  16. Blockspin transformations for finite temperature field theories with gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.

    1996-08-01

    A procedure is proposed to study quantum field theories at zero or at finite temperature by a sequence of real space renormalization group (RG) or blockspin transformations. They transform to effective theories on coarser and coarser lattices. The ultimate aim is to compute constraint effective potentials, i.e. the free energy as a function of suitable order parameters. From the free energy one can read off the thermodynamic behaviour of the theory, in particular the existence and nature of phase transitions. In a finite temperature field theory one begins with either one or a sequence of transformations which transform the original theory into an effective theory on a three-dimensional lattice. Its effective action has temperature dependent coefficients. Thereafter one may proceed with further blockspin transformations of the three-dimensional theory. Assuming a finite volume, this can in principle be continued until one ends with a lattice with a single site. Its effective action is the constraint effective potential. In each RG-step, an integral over the high frequency part of the field, also called the fluctuation field, has to be performed. This is done by perturbation theory. It requires the knowledge of bare fluctuation field propagators and of interpolation operators which enter into the vertices. A detailed examination of these quantities is presented for scalar fields, abelian gauge fields and for Higgs fields, finite temperature is admitted. The lattice perturbation theory is complicated because the bare lattice propagators are complicated. This is due to a partial loss of translation invariance in each step. Therefore the use of translation invariant cutoffs in place of a lattice is also discussed. In case of gauge fields this is only possible as a continuum version of the blockspin method. (orig.)

  17. Monitoring temperature reactivity coefficient by noise method in a NPP at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.; Por, G.

    1987-04-01

    A new method based on noise measurement was used to estimate the temperature reactivity coefficient of the PAKS-2 reactor during the entire fuel cycle. Based on the measurements it is possible to measure the dependence of reactivity coefficient on boron concentration. Good agreement was found between the results obtained by the new method and by the conventional ones. Based on this method a new equipment can be develop which assures permanent measurements during operation. (author)

  18. Measurement of reactivity temperature coefficient by noise method in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.

    1986-07-01

    The temperature reactivity coefficient was estimated on the basis of noise measurements performed in a PWR. The magnitude of the coefficient was evaluated by relating the values of the APSD and CPSD between ex-core neutron detector signals and fuel assembly outlet thermocouple in the low frequency range. Comparison with δρ/δT measurements performed in PWR by standard methods supports the validity of the results. (author)

  19. A miniature inductive temperature sensor to monitor temperature noise in the coolant of an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.A.; Sandham, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the design and performance of miniature inductive sensors developed to monitor fast temperature fluctuations in the sodium coolant above the core of a LMFBR. These instruments, designed to be installed within existing thermocouple containment thimbles, also provide a steady-state temperature indication for reactor control purposes. (author)

  20. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale

  1. Applicability of Information Theory to the Quantification of Responses to Anthropogenic Noise by Southeast Alaskan Humpback Whales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ellen Blue

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We assess the effectiveness of applying information theory to the characterization and quantification of the affects of anthropogenic vessel noise on humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae vocal behavior in and around Glacier Bay, Alaska. Vessel noise has the potential to interfere with the complex vocal behavior of these humpback whales which could have direct consequences on their feeding behavior and thus ultimately on their health and reproduction. Humpback whale feeding calls recorded during conditions of high vessel-generated noise and lower levels of background noise are compared for differences in acoustic structure, use, and organization using information theoretic measures. We apply information theory in a self-referential manner (i.e., orders of entropy to quantify the changes in signaling behavior. We then compare this with the reduction in channel capacity due to noise in Glacier Bay itself treating it as a (Gaussian noisy channel. We find that high vessel noise is associated with an increase in the rate and repetitiveness of sequential use of feeding call types in our averaged sample of humpback whale vocalizations, indicating that vessel noise may be modifying the patterns of use of feeding calls by the endangered humpback whales in Southeast Alaska. The information theoretic approach suggested herein can make a reliable quantitative measure of such relationships and may also be adapted for wider application to many species where environmental noise is thought to be a problem.

  2. Determining Ms temperature on a AISI D2 cold work tool steel using magnetic Barkhausen noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huallpa, Edgar Apaza, E-mail: gared1@gmail.com [Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes 2463, 05508-030 SP (Brazil); Sánchez, J. Capó, E-mail: jcapo@usp.br [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Oriente, Av. Patricio Lumumba s/n 90500, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Padovese, L.R., E-mail: lrpadove@usp.br [Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes 2463, 05508-030 SP (Brazil); Goldenstein, Hélio, E-mail: hgoldens@usp.br [Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes 2463, 05508-030 SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► MBN was used to follow the martensite transformation in a tool steel. ► The results were compared with resistivity experiments. ► The Ms was estimated with Andrews equation coupled to ThermoCalc calculations. The experimental results showed good agreement. -- Abstract: The use of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) as a experimental method for measuring the martensite start (Ms) temperature was explored, using as model system a cold-work tool steel (AISI D2) austenitized at a very high temperature (1473 K), so as to transform in sub-zero temperatures. The progress of the transformation was also followed with electrical resistance measurements, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Both MBN and resistivity measurements showed a change near 230 K during cooling, corresponding to the Ms temperature, as compared with 245 K, estimated with Andrews empirical equation applied to the austenite composition calculated using ThermoCalc.

  3. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, β is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit β → ∞. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-β Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-β random matrix theory

  4. Theory of the superconducting proximity effect below the transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvert, W.

    1975-01-01

    The form of the low-temperature theory of the superconducting proximity effect depends on whether the non-linear terms are assumed to depend only on the local value of the gap or on its average value over some finite range. The local assumption leads to smaller values of the gap and to unphysical results at low temperatures. The effect of non-locality is significant even in the Ginsburg-Landau regime. (author)

  5. Novel low-temperature processing of low noise SDDs with on-detector electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonsky, J.; Koornneef, R.; Huizenga, J.; Hollander, R.W.; Nanver, L.K.; Scholtes, T.; Roozeboom, F.; Eijk, C.W.E. van

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a fabrication process (SMART700 deg. process) for monolithic integration of p-channel JFETs and silicon detectors. Processing steps of the SMART700 deg. do not exceed 700 deg. C. The integrated p-JFET has a minimum gate length of 1 μm. A relatively large width can be chosen to achieve a reasonable transconductance, while the JFET capacitance still matches the small capacitance of a detector. The feedback capacitor was also realized on-chip as a double-metal capacitor. In this paper we describe DC and noise characteristics of a silicon drift detector (SDD) with a p-JFET (W/L=100/1) and a feedback capacitor integrated in the read-out anode (smart-SDD). The device has a transconductance of 1-3 mS, a top gate capacitance of ∼140 fF and a low leakage current ( 2 at room temperature). The smart-SDD with an active area of 3.8 mm 2 has reached an energy resolution of ∼50 rms electrons at a temperature of 213 K. This relatively poor energy resolution is due to generation-recombination noise caused by defects produced by a deep n-implantation. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and excimer laser annealing (ELA) techniques are experimented to remove the implantation damage. The noise of p-JFETs annealed with RTA and ELA is also presented

  6. Simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots under the aegis of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of doped quantum dot is studied. • Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) affect DMS. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • DMS also depends on mode of application of noise. - Abstract: We explore the diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise and under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T). Presence of noise and also its mode of application discernibly affect the DMS profile. Application of HP and T invites greater delicacies in the observed DMS profiles. However, whereas the interplay between T and noise comes out to be extremely sensitive in fabricating the DMS profile, the pressure-noise interplay appears to be not that much noticeable. Under all conditions of temperature and pressure, the presence of multiplicative noise diminishes the value of DMS in comparison with that in presence of its additive analogue. The present study renders a deep insight into the remarkable role played by the interplay between noise, hydrostatic pressure and temperature in controlling the effective confinement imposed on the system which bears unquestionable relevance.

  7. Simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots under the aegis of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Surajit [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India); Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731215, West Bengal (India); Bera, Aindrila [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of doped quantum dot is studied. • Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) affect DMS. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • DMS also depends on mode of application of noise. - Abstract: We explore the diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise and under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T). Presence of noise and also its mode of application discernibly affect the DMS profile. Application of HP and T invites greater delicacies in the observed DMS profiles. However, whereas the interplay between T and noise comes out to be extremely sensitive in fabricating the DMS profile, the pressure-noise interplay appears to be not that much noticeable. Under all conditions of temperature and pressure, the presence of multiplicative noise diminishes the value of DMS in comparison with that in presence of its additive analogue. The present study renders a deep insight into the remarkable role played by the interplay between noise, hydrostatic pressure and temperature in controlling the effective confinement imposed on the system which bears unquestionable relevance.

  8. The high temperature phase transition for the φ4 theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetradis, N.

    1994-01-01

    The use of the perturbative temperature dependent effective potential for the study of second order or weakly first order phase transitions is problematic, due to the appearance of infrared divergences. These divergences can be controlled through the method of the effective average action which employs renormalization group ideas. I review work done with C. Wetterich on the study of the high temperature phase transition for the N-component Φ 4 theory. A detailed quantitative picture of the second order phase transition is presented, including the critical exponents for the behaviour in the vicinity of the critical temperature. (orig.)

  9. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  10. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-15

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  11. Goldstone fermions in supersymmetric theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, H.; Boyanovsky, D.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of supersymmetric theories at finite temperature is examined. It is shown that supersymmetry is broken for any T> or =0 because of the different statistics obeyed by bosons and fermions. This breaking is always associated with a Goldstone mode(s). This phenomenon is shown to take place even in a free massive theory, where the Goldstone modes are created by composite fermion-boson bilinear operators. In the interacting theory with chiral symmetry, the same bilinear operators create the chiral doublet of Goldstone fermions, which is shown to saturate the Ward-Takahashi identities up to one loop. Because of this spontaneous supersymmetry breaking, the fermions and the bosons acquire different effective masses. In theories without chiral symmetry, at the tree level the fermion-boson bilinear operators create Goldstone modes, but at higher orders these modes become massive and the elementary fermion becomes the Goldstone field because of the mixing with these bilinear operators

  12. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-01

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  13. Simulations of dimensionally reduced effective theories of high temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hietanen, Ari

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory describing interaction between quarks and gluons. At low temperatures, quarks are confined forming hadrons, e.g. protons and neutrons. However, at extremely high temperatures the hadrons break apart and the matter transforms into plasma of individual quarks and gluons. In this theses the quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase of QCD is studied using lattice techniques in the framework of dimensionally reduced effective theories EQCD and MQCD. Two quantities are in particular interest: the pressure (or grand potential) and the quark number susceptibility. At high temperatures the pressure admits a generalised coupling constant expansion, where some coefficients are non-perturbative. We determine the first such contribution of order g^6 by performing lattice simulations in MQCD. This requires high precision lattice calculations, which we perform with different number of colors N_c to obtain N_c-dependence on the coefficient. The quark number susceptibility is studied by perf...

  14. Temperature measurement: Development work on noise thermometry and improvement of conventional thermocouples for applications in nuclear process heat (PNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Oehmen, J.; Barbonus, P.; Hans, R.

    1982-06-01

    The behaviour was studied of NiCr-Ni sheathed thermocouples (sheath Inconel 600 or Incoloy 800, insulation MgO) in a helium and carbon atmosphere at temperatures of 950-1150 deg. C. All the thermocouples used retained their functional performance. The insulation resistance tended towards a limit value which is dependent on the temperature and quality of the thermocouple. Temperature measurements were loaded with great uncertainty in the temperature range of 950-1150 deg. C. Recalibrations at the temperature of 950 deg. C showed errors of up to 6%. Measuring sensors were developed which consist of a sheathed double thermocouple with a noise resistor positioned between the two hot junctions. Using the noise thermometer it is possible to recalibrate the thermocouple at any time in situ. A helium system with a high temperature experimental area was developed to test the thermocouples and the combined thermocouple-noise thermometer sensors under true experimental conditions

  15. Graph theory applied to noise and vibration control in statistical energy analysis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Oriol; Cortés, Lluís

    2009-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of noise and vibration control in statistical energy analysis (SEA) models consists in first identifying and then reducing the energy flow paths between subsystems. In this work, it is proposed to make use of some results from graph theory to address both issues. On the one hand, linear and path algebras applied to adjacency matrices of SEA graphs are used to determine the existence of any order paths between subsystems, counting and labeling them, finding extremal paths, or determining the power flow contributions from groups of paths. On the other hand, a strategy is presented that makes use of graph cut algorithms to reduce the energy flow from a source subsystem to a receiver one, modifying as few internal and coupling loss factors as possible.

  16. CONSTRUCTION THEORY AND NOISE ANALYSIS METHOD OF GLOBAL CGCS2000 COORDINATE FRAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The definition, renewal and maintenance of geodetic datum has been international hot issue. In recent years, many countries have been studying and implementing modernization and renewal of local geodetic reference coordinate frame. Based on the precise result of continuous observation for recent 15 years from state CORS (continuously operating reference system network and the mainland GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System network between 1999 and 2007, this paper studies the construction of mathematical model of the Global CGCS2000 frame, mainly analyzes the theory and algorithm of two-step method for Global CGCS2000 Coordinate Frame formulation. Finally, the noise characteristic of the coordinate time series are estimated quantitatively with the criterion of maximum likelihood estimation.

  17. Noise and DC balanced outlet temperature signals for monitoring coolant flow in LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, M.

    1977-01-01

    Local cooling disturbances in LMFBR fuel elements may have serious safety implications for the whole reactor core. They have to be detected reliably in an early stage of their formation therefore. This can be accomplished in principle by individual monitoring of the coolant flow rate or the coolant outlet temperature of the sub-assemblies with high precision. In this paper a method is proposed to increase the sensitivity of outlet temperature signals to cooling disturbances. Using balanced temperature signals provides a means for eliminating the normal variations from the original signals which limit the sensitivity and speed of response to cooling disturbances. It is shown that a balanced signal can be derived easily from the original temperature signal by subtracting an inlet temperature and a neutron detector signal with appropriate time shift. The method was tested with tape-recorded noise signals of the KNK I reactor at Karlsruhe. The experimental results confirm the theoretical predictions. A significant reduction of the uncertainty of measured outlet temperatures was achieved. This enables very sensitive and fast response monitoring of coolant flow. Furthermore, it was found that minimizing the variance of the balanced signal offers the possibility for a rough determination of the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel rods during normal reactor operation at power. (author)

  18. Probability theory plus noise: Replies to Crupi and Tentori (2016) and to Nilsson, Juslin, and Winman (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Fintan; Watts, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A standard assumption in much of current psychology is that people do not reason about probability using the rules of probability theory but instead use various heuristics or "rules of thumb," which can produce systematic reasoning biases. In Costello and Watts (2014), we showed that a number of these biases can be explained by a model where people reason according to probability theory but are subject to random noise. More importantly, that model also predicted agreement with probability theory for certain expressions that cancel the effects of random noise: Experimental results strongly confirmed this prediction, showing that probabilistic reasoning is simultaneously systematically biased and "surprisingly rational." In their commentaries on that paper, both Crupi and Tentori (2016) and Nilsson, Juslin, and Winman (2016) point to various experimental results that, they suggest, our model cannot explain. In this reply, we show that our probability theory plus noise model can in fact explain every one of the results identified by these authors. This gives a degree of additional support to the view that people's probability judgments embody the rational rules of probability theory and that biases in those judgments can be explained as simply effects of random noise. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Quasispin model of itinerant magnetism: High-temperature theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    The high-temperature properties of itinerant magnetic systems are examined by using the coherent-potential approximation. We assume a local moment on each atom so that at elevated temperatures there is a number of reversed spins. The coherent potential is solved, and from that the moment on each atom is determined self-consistently. It is found that when the condition for ferromagnetic ordering is satisfied, the local moments persist even above the critical temperature. Conversely, if local moments do not exist at high temperatures, the system can at most condense into a spin-density-wave state. Furthermore, spin-flip scatterings of the conduction electrons from the local moments give rise to additional correlation not treated in the coherent-potential approximation. This correlation energy is an important part of the coupling energy of the local moments. The relations between our work and the theories of Friedel, Hubbard, and others are discussed

  20. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  1. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Born, M; Danzmann, K; Diepholz, I; Auger, G; Binetruy, P; Baird, J; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Fitzsimons, E; Bursi, A; Caleno, M; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Dolesi, R; Ferroni, V; Cruise, M; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations. (paper)

  2. Degradation evaluation of high temperature pipeline material for power plant using ultrasonic noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Chung, Min Hwa; Cho, Yong Sang; Lee, In Cheol

    2001-01-01

    Boiler high-temperature pipelines such as main steam pipe, header and steam drum in fossil power plants are degraded by creep and thermal fatigue damage due to severe operating conditions such as high temperature and high pressure for an extended period time. Conventional measurement techniques for measuring creep damage have such disadvantages as complex preparation and measurement procedures, too many control parameters. And also these techniques have low practicality and applied only to component surfaces with good accessibility. In this paper, artificial degradation test and ultrasonic measurement for their degraded specimens were carried out for the purpose of evaluation for creep and thermal fatigue damage. Absolute measuring method of quantitative ultrasonic measurement for material degradation was established, and long term creep/thermal fatigue degradation tests using life prediction formula were carried out. As a result of ultrasonic tests for crept and thermal fatigued specimens, we conformed that the ultrasonic noise linearly increased in proportion to the increase of degradation.

  3. Using the coolant temperature noise for measuring the flow rate in the RBMK technological channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selivanov, V.M.; Karlov, N.P.; Martynov, A.D.; Prostyakov, V.V.; Lysikov, B.V.; Kuznetsov, B.A.; Pallagi, D.; Khorani, Sh.; Khargitai, T.; Tezher, Sh.

    1983-01-01

    The problems are considered connected with the possibility of using thermometric correlation method to measure the coolant flow rate in the RBMK reactor technological channels. The main attention is paid to the study of the physical nature of the coolant temperature pulsations and to estimation of the effect of parameters of the primary thermaelectrical converter (TEC) on the results of measurements. In the process of reactor inspections made using the thermometric correlation flowmeter of a special design, the temperature noise distribution in the points of flow rate measurement is studied, the noise intensity and physical nature are determined, as well as the effect of different TEC parameters (TEC inertia and base distance between them) on the measurement accuracy. On the basis of the analysis of the effect on the results of the TEC thermal inertia measured value divergence, tausub(α) and transport time, tau sub(T), a conclusion is made on the necessity of choosing the base distance between TEC with tausub(T)>tausub(d)

  4. Combined influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband emission energy of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com

    2016-11-01

    We explore the profiles of interband emission energy (IEE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) under the simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) and in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In this regard, modulation of IEE by the variation of several other relevant quantities such as electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential and aluminium concentration has also been investigated. Gradual alteration of HP and T affects IEE discernibly. Inclusion of noise has been found to enhance or deplete the IEE depending upon its mode of application. Moreover, under given conditions of temperature and pressure, the difference between the impurity-free ground state energy and the binding energy appears to be crucial in determining whether or not the profiles of IEE would resemble that of binding energy. The findings reveal fascinating role played by noise in tailoring the IEE of doped QD system under conspicuous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature. - Highlights: • Interband emission energy (IEE) of doped quantum dot is studied. • Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) affect IEE. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • Noise amplifies and suppresses IEE depending on particular condition.

  5. Stochastic field theory and finite-temperature supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    1988-01-01

    The finite-temperature behavior of supersymmetry is considered from the viewpoint of stochastic field theory. To this end, it is considered that Nelson's stochastic mechanics may be generalized to the quantization of a Fermi field when the classical analog of such a field is taken to be a scalar nonlocal field where the internal space is anisotropic in nature such that when quantized this gives rise to two internal helicities corresponding to fermion and antifermion. Stochastic field theory at finite temperature is then formulated from stochastic mechanics which incorporates Brownian motion in the external space as well as in the internal space of a particle. It is shown that when the anisotropy of the internal space is suppressed so that the internal time ξ 0 vanishes and the internal space variables are integrated out one has supersymmetry at finite temperature. This result is true for T = 0, also. However, at this phase equilibrium will be destroyed. Thus for a random process van Hove's result involving quantum mechanical operators, i.e., that when supersymmetry remains unbroken at T = 0 it will also remain unbroken at Tnot =0, occurs. However, this formalism indicates that when at T = 0 broken supersymmetry results, supersymmetry may be restored at a critical temperature T/sub c/

  6. Observation of distinct, temperature dependent flux noise near bicrystal grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-x films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, K. R.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of the magnetic flux noise in high temperature superconducting thin-films of yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBa2Cu3O7) in the vicinity of artificial grain boundaries have been studied by means of a low critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID...

  7. High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Plakida, Nikolay Maksimilianovich

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their...

  8. High-temperature cuprate superconductors. Experiment, theory, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakida, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their knowledge of this remarkable class of materials. (orig.)

  9. Theory of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.S.; Diamond, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    An analytic theory of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence in tokamaks is presented. Energy-conserving, renormalized spectrum equations are derived and solved in order to obtain the spectra of stationary ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence. Corrections to mixing-length estimates are calculated explicitly. The resulting anomalous ion thermal diffusivity chi/sub i/ = 0.4[(π/2)ln(1 + eta/sub i/)] 2 [(1 + eta/sub i/)/tau] 2 rho/sub s/ 2 c/sub s//L/sub s/ is derived and is found to be consistent with experimentally-deduced thermal diffusivities. The associated electron thermal diffusivity and particle and heat-pinch velocities are also calculated. The effect of impurity gradients on saturated ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence is discussed and a related explanation of density profile steepening during Z-mode operation is proposed. 35 refs., 4 figs

  10. Colored non-gaussian noise driven open systems: generalization of Kramers' theory with a unified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baura, Alendu; Sen, Monoj Kumar; Goswami, Gurupada; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2011-01-28

    In this paper we have calculated escape rate from a meta stable state in the presence of both colored internal thermal and external nonthermal noises. For the internal noise we have considered usual gaussian distribution but the external noise may be gaussian or non-gaussian in characteristic. The calculated rate is valid for low noise strength of non-gaussian noise such that an effective gaussian approximation of non-gaussian noise wherein the higher order even cumulants of order "4" and higher are neglected. The rate expression we derived here reduces to the known results of the literature, as well as for purely external noise driven activated rate process. The latter exhibits how the rate changes if one switches from non-gaussian to gaussian character of the external noise.

  11. Knock probability estimation through an in-cylinder temperature model with exogenous noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, P.; Selmanaj, D.; Guardiola, C.; Onder, C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a new knock model which combines a deterministic knock model based on the in-cylinder temperature and an exogenous noise disturbing this temperature. The autoignition of the end-gas is modelled by an Arrhenius-like function and the knock probability is estimated by propagating a virtual error probability distribution. Results show that the random nature of knock can be explained by uncertainties at the in-cylinder temperature estimation. The model only has one parameter for calibration and thus can be easily adapted online. In order to reduce the measurement uncertainties associated with the air mass flow sensor, the trapped mass is derived from the in-cylinder pressure resonance, which improves the knock probability estimation and reduces the number of sensors needed for the model. A four stroke SI engine was used for model validation. By varying the intake temperature, the engine speed, the injected fuel mass, and the spark advance, specific tests were conducted, which furnished data with various knock intensities and probabilities. The new model is able to predict the knock probability within a sufficient range at various operating conditions. The trapped mass obtained by the acoustical model was compared in steady conditions by using a fuel balance and a lambda sensor and differences below 1 % were found.

  12. Modulating optical rectification, second and third harmonic generation of doped quantum dots: Interplay between hydrostatic pressure, temperature and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-10-01

    We examine the profiles of optical rectification (OR), second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) of impurity doped QDs under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In order to study the above nonlinear optical (NLO) properties the doped dot has been subjected to a polarized monochromatic electromagnetic field. Effect of application of noise is nicely reflected through alteration of peak shift (blue/red) and variation of peak height (increase/decrease) of above NLO properties as temperature and pressure are varied. All such changes again sensitively depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The remarkable influence of interplay between noise strength and its mode of application on the said profiles has also been addressed. The findings illuminate fascinating role played by noise in tuning above NLO properties of doped QD system under the active presence of both hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  13. Josephson oscillations and noise temperatures in YBa2Cu3O7-x grain-boundary junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ya. Divin; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1992-01-01

    The ac Josephson effect was studied in YBa2Cu3O7−x grain-boundary junctions (GBJ) in the temperature range from 4 to 90 K. The temperature dependence of the linewidth of millimeter-wave Josephson oscillations was measured and it is shown that the derived effective noise temperatures may be as low...... as the physical temperature in the temperature range investigated. In the millimeter-wave range, linewidths as low as 380 MHz were found at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  14. Room-temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry and methods of the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charles G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Cunningham, Christopher T.

    2018-05-15

    According to one embodiment, a heterodyne detection system for detecting light, includes: a first input aperture configured to receive first light from a scene input; a second input aperture configured to receive second light from a local oscillator input; a broadband local oscillator configured to provide the second light to the second input aperture; a dispersive element configured to disperse the first light and the second light; and a final condensing lens coupled to a detector. The final condensing lens is configured to concentrate incident light from a primary condensing lens onto the detector. The detector is configured to sense a frequency difference between the first light and the second light; and the final condensing lens comprises a plasmonic condensing lens. Methods for forming a plasmonic condensing lens to enable room temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry are also disclosed.

  15. Kinetic theory of two-temperature polyatomic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlac'h, Jean-Maxime; Giovangigli, Vincent; Novikova, Tatiana; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the kinetic theory of two-temperature plasmas for reactive polyatomic gas mixtures. The Knudsen number is taken proportional to the square root of the mass ratio between electrons and heavy-species, and thermal non-equilibrium between electrons and heavy species is allowed. The kinetic non-equilibrium framework also requires a weak coupling between electrons and internal energy modes of heavy species. The zeroth-order and first-order fluid equations are derived by using a generalized Chapman-Enskog method. Expressions for transport fluxes are obtained in terms of macroscopic variable gradients and the corresponding transport coefficients are expressed as bracket products of species perturbed distribution functions. The theory derived in this paper provides a consistent fluid model for non-thermal multicomponent plasmas.

  16. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to

  17. Reduced density matrix functional theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldsiefen, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is highly successful in many fields of research. There are, however, areas in which its performance is rather limited. An important example is the description of thermodynamical variables of a quantum system in thermodynamical equilibrium. Although the finite-temperature version of DFT (FT-DFT) rests on a firm theoretical basis and is only one year younger than its brother, groundstate DFT, it has been successfully applied to only a few problems. Because FT-DFT, like DFT, is in principle exact, these shortcomings can be attributed to the difficulties of deriving valuable functionals for FT-DFT. In this thesis, we are going to present an alternative theoretical description of quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. It is based on the 1-reduced density matrix (1RDM) of the system, rather than on its density and will rather cumbersomly be called finite-temperature reduced density matrix functional theory (FT-RDMFT). Its zero-temperature counterpart (RDMFT) proved to be successful in several fields, formerly difficult to address via DFT. These fields include, for example, the calculation of dissociation energies or the calculation of the fundamental gap, also for Mott insulators. This success is mainly due to the fact that the 1RDM carries more directly accessible ''manybody'' information than the density alone, leading for example to an exact description of the kinetic energy functional. This sparks the hope that a description of thermodynamical systems employing the 1RDM via FT-RDMFT can yield an improvement over FT-DFT. Giving a short review of RDMFT and pointing out difficulties when describing spin-polarized systems initiates our work. We then lay the theoretical framework for FT-RDMFT by proving the required Hohenberg-Kohn-like theorems, investigating and determining the domain of FT-RDMFT functionals and by deriving several properties of the exact functional. Subsequently, we present a perturbative method to iteratively construct

  18. High frequency green function for aerodynamic noise in moving media. I - General theory. II - Noise from a spreading jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how a high frequency analysis can be made for general problems involving flow-generated noise. In the parallel shear flow problem treated by Balsa (1976) and Goldstein (1982), the equation governing sound propagation in the moving medium could be transformed into a wave equation for a stationary medium with an inhomogeneous index of refraction. It is noted that the procedure of Avila and Keller (1963) was then used to construct a high frequency Green function. This procedure involves matching a solution valid in an inner region around the point source to an outer, ray-acoustics solution. This same procedure is used here to construct the Green function for a source in an arbitrary mean flow. In view of the fact that there is no restriction to parallel flow, the governing equations cannot be transformed into a wave equation; the analysis therefore proceeds from the equations of motion themselves.

  19. Validation of the dynamics of SDS and RRS flux, flow, pressure and temperature signals using noise analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glockler, O.; Cooke, D.F.; Tulett, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, a program was initiated to establish reactor noise analysis as a practical tool for plant performance monitoring and system diagnostics in Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors. Since then, various CANDU-specific noise analysis applications have been developed and validated. The noise-based statistical techniques are being successfully applied as powerful troubleshooting and diagnostic tools to a wide variety of actual operational I and C problems. Critical plant components, instrumentation and processes are monitored on a regular basis, and their dynamic characteristics are verified on-power. Recent applications of noise analysis include (1) validating the dynamics of in-core flux detectors (ICFDS) and ion chambers, (2) estimating the prompt fraction ICFDs in noise measurements at full power and in power rundown tests, (3) identifying the cause of excessive signal fluctuations in certain flux detectors, (4) validating the dynamic coupling between liquid zone control signals, (5) detecting and monitoring mechanical vibrations of detector tubes, reactivity devices and fuel channels induced by moderator/coolant flow, (6) estimating the dynamics and response time of RTD temperature signals, (7) isolating the cause of RTD signal anomalies, (8) investigating the source of abnormal flow signal behaviour, (9) estimating the overall response time of flow and pressure signals, (1 0) detecting coolant boiling in fully instrumented fuel channels, (1 1) monitoring moderator circulation via temperature noise, and (12) predicting the performance of shut-off rods. Some of these applications are performed on an as needed basis. The noise analysis program, in the Pickering-B station alone, has saved Ontario Hydro millions of dollars during its first three years. The results of the noise analysis program have been also reviewed by the regulator (Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada) with favorable results. The AECB have expressed interest in Ontario Hydro further exploiting the

  20. Random-Resistor-Random-Temperature Kirchhoff-Law-Johnson-Noise (RRRT-KLJN Key Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kish Laszlo B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce two new Kirchhoff-law-Johnson-noise (KLJN secure key distribution schemes which are generalizations of the original KLJN scheme. The first of these, the Random-Resistor (RR- KLJN scheme, uses random resistors with values chosen from a quasi-continuum set. It is well-known since the creation of the KLJN concept that such a system could work in cryptography, because Alice and Bob can calculate the unknown resistance value from measurements, but the RR-KLJN system has not been addressed in prior publications since it was considered impractical. The reason for discussing it now is the second scheme, the Random Resistor Random Temperature (RRRT- KLJN key exchange, inspired by a recent paper of Vadai, Mingesz and Gingl, wherein security was shown to be maintained at non-zero power flow. In the RRRT-KLJN secure key exchange scheme, both the resistances and their temperatures are continuum random variables. We prove that the security of the RRRT-KLJN scheme can prevail at a non-zero power flow, and thus the physical law guaranteeing security is not the Second Law of Thermodynamics but the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem. Alice and Bob know their own resistances and temperatures and can calculate the resistance and temperature values at the other end of the communication channel from measured voltage, current and power-flow data in the wire. However, Eve cannot determine these values because, for her, there are four unknown quantities while she can set up only three equations. The RRRT-KLJN scheme has several advantages and makes all former attacks on the KLJN scheme invalid or incomplete.

  1. Theory of neoclassical ion temperature-gradient-driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. B.; Diamond, P. H.; Biglari, H.; Callen, J. D.

    1991-02-01

    The theory of collisionless fluid ion temperature-gradient-driven turbulence is extended to the collisional banana-plateau regime. Neoclassical ion fluid evolution equations are developed and utilized to investigate linear and nonlinear dynamics of negative compressibility ηi modes (ηi≡d ln Ti/d ln ni). In the low-frequency limit (ωB2p. As a result of these modifications, growth rates are dissipative, rather than sonic, and radial mode widths are broadened [i.e., γ˜k2∥c2s(ηi -(2)/(3) )/μi, Δx˜ρs(Bt/Bp) (1+ηi)1/2, where k∥, cs, and ρs are the parallel wave number, sound velocity, and ion gyroradius, respectively]. In the limit of weak viscous damping, enhanced neoclassical polarization persists and broadens radial mode widths. Linear mixing length estimates and renormalized turbulence theory are used to determine the ion thermal diffusivity in both cases. In both cases, a strong favorable dependence of ion thermal diffusivity on Bp (and hence plasma current) is exhibited. Furthermore, the ion thermal diffusivity for long wavelength modes exhibits favorable density scaling. The possible role of neoclassical ion temperature-gradient-driven modes in edge fluctuations and transport in L-phase discharges and the L to H transition is discussed.

  2. Theory of fluctuations and parametric noise in a point nuclear reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.A.; San Miguel, M.; Sancho, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    We present a joint description of internal fluctuations and parametric noise in a point nuclear reactor model in which delayed neutrons and a detector are considered. We obtain kinetic equations for the first moments and define effective kinetic parameters which take into account the effect of parametric Gaussian white noise. We comment on the validity of Langevin approximations for this problem. We propose a general method to deal with weak but otherwise arbitrary non-white parametric noise. Exact kinetic equations are derived for Gaussian non-white noise. (author)

  3. Topics in low-temperature Fermi liquid theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Several topics in quantum liquids are discussed including the elementary excitation spectrum of 3 He under pressure, spin-polarized 3 He, and an early attempt to formulate a Fermi liquid theory to describe the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties of the heavy-electron systems UPt 3 . The elementary excitation spectrum of ordinary liquid 3 He is calculated at several pressures using the polarization potential theory of Aldrich and Pines together with a simple model to describe the effect of multipair excitation. The effective interactions between quasi particles in fully spin-polarized 3 He are obtained from physical arguments and sum rules. The interactions between two down-spin impurities and that between an up and down spin are also deduced. The regime of small polarization is considered next. Using the phenomenological model of Bedell and Sanchez-Castro together with an ansatz form for the spin-flip interaction, a large increase in the singlet scattering rate as a function of polarization is obtained

  4. High Temperature Smart Structures for Engine Noise Reduction and Performance Enhancement, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Noise mitigation for subsonic transports is a continuing high priority, and recent work has identified successful exhaust mixing enhancement devices (chevrons) that...

  5. High Temperature Smart Structures for Engine Noise Reduction and Performance Enhancement, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Noise mitigation for subsonic transports is a continuing high priority, and recent work has identified successful exhaust mixing enhancement devices that have...

  6. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise and unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 1: Theory development and parametric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Typical analytical models for interaction between rotor and stator in a turbofan analyze the effect of wakes from the rotor impinging on the stator, producing unsteady loading, and thereby generating noise. Reflection/transmission characteristics of the rotor are sometimes added in a separate calculation. In those models, there is a one-to-one relationship between wake harmonics and noise harmonics; that is, the BPF (blade passing frequency) wake harmonic causes only the BPF noise harmonic, etc. This report presents a more complete model in which flow tangency boundary conditions are satisfied on two cascades in relative motion for several harmonics simultaneously. By an extension of S.N. Smith's code for two dimensional flat plate cascades, the noise generation/frequency scattering/blade row reflection problem is solved in a single matrix inversion. It is found that the BPF harmonic excitation of the stator scatters considerable energy in the higher BPF harmonics due to relative motion between the blade rows. Furthermore, when swirl between the rotor and stator is modeled, a 'mode trapping' effect occurs which explains observations on fans operating at rotational speeds below BFP cuton: the BPF mode amplifies between blade rows by multiple reflections but cannot escape to the inlet and exit ducts. However, energy scattered into higher harmonics does propagate and dominates the spectrum at two and three times BPF. This report presents the complete derivation of the theory, comparison with a previous (more limited) coupled rotor/stator interaction theory due to Kaji and Okazaki, exploration of the mode trapping phenomenon, and parametric studies showing the effects of vane/blade ratio and rotor/stator interaction. For generality, the analysis applies to stages where the rotor is either upstream or downstream of the stator and to counter rotation stages. The theory has been coded in a FORTRAN program called CUP2D, documented in Volume 2 of this report. It is

  7. The systematic error of temperature noise correlation measurement method and self-calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hong; Tong Yunxian

    1993-04-01

    The turbulent transport behavior of fluid noise and the nature of noise affect on the velocity measurement system have been studied. The systematic error of velocity measurement system is analyzed. A theoretical calibration method is proposed, which makes the velocity measurement of time-correlation as an absolute measurement method. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiments

  8. Z(3)-symmetric effective theory for pure gauge QCD at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, A.

    2007-01-01

    We review the construction and basic properties of a three-dimensional effective field theory for high-temperature SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, which respects its center symmetry and was introduced in Ref. [A. Vuorinen, L.G. Yaffe, Z(3)-symmetric effective theory for SU(3) Yang-Mills theory at high, Phys. Rev. D 74 (2006) 025011, hep-ph/0604100]. We explain why the phase diagram of the new theory is expected to closely resemble the one of the full theory and argue that this implies that it is applicable down to considerably lower temperatures than the usual non-Z(3)-symmetric 3d effective theory EQCD

  9. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, R

    2016-06-17

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz(-1/2), which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise.

  10. An internal reference model-based PRF temperature mapping method with Cramer-Rao lower bound noise performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Pan, Xinyi; Ying, Kui; Zhang, Qiang; An, Jing; Weng, Dehe; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-11-01

    The conventional phase difference method for MR thermometry suffers from disturbances caused by the presence of lipid protons, motion-induced error, and field drift. A signal model is presented with multi-echo gradient echo (GRE) sequence using a fat signal as an internal reference to overcome these problems. The internal reference signal model is fit to the water and fat signals by the extended Prony algorithm and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to estimate the chemical shifts between water and fat which contain temperature information. A noise analysis of the signal model was conducted using the Cramer-Rao lower bound to evaluate the noise performance of various algorithms, the effects of imaging parameters, and the influence of the water:fat signal ratio in a sample on the temperature estimate. Comparison of the calculated temperature map and thermocouple temperature measurements shows that the maximum temperature estimation error is 0.614 degrees C, with a standard deviation of 0.06 degrees C, confirming the feasibility of this model-based temperature mapping method. The influence of sample water:fat signal ratio on the accuracy of the temperature estimate is evaluated in a water-fat mixed phantom experiment with an optimal ratio of approximately 0.66:1. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Unified aeroacoustics analysis for high speed turboprop aerodynamics and noise. Volume 2: Development of theory for wing shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A unified theory for aerodynamics and noise of advanced turboprops is presented. The theory and a computer code developed for evaluation at the shielding benefits that might be expected by an aircraft wing in a wing-mounted propeller installation are presented. Several computed directivity patterns are presented to demonstrate the theory. Recently with the advent of the concept of using the wing of an aircraft for noise shielding, the case of diffraction by a surface in a flow has been given attention. The present analysis is based on the case of diffraction of no flow. By combining a Galilean and a Lorentz transform, the wave equation with a mean flow can be reduced to the ordinary equation. Allowance is also made in the analysis for the case of a swept wing. The same combination of Galilean and Lorentz transforms lead to a problem with no flow but a different sweep. The solution procedures for the cases of leading and trailing edges are basically the same. Two normalizations of the solution are given by the computer program. FORTRAN computer programs are presented with detailed documentation. The output from these programs compares favorably with the results of other investigators.

  12. Low Temperature Noise and Electrical Characterization of the Company Heterojunction Field-Effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Gee, Russell C.; Fossum, Eric R.; Baier, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the electrical properties of the complementary heterojunction field-effect transistor (CHFET) at 4K, including the gate leakage current, the subthreshold transconductance, and the input-referred noise voltage.

  13. Influence of inductance induced noise in an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID at high operation temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P. Å.; Claeson, T.; Hansen, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The voltage modulation depth of a high T(c) dc-SQUID was measured at temperatures close to T(c) and compared to a model by Enpuku et al. where the flux noise from the SQUID inductance is taken into account. The device was an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID made on a bicrystal substrate of SrTiO3. The design w...

  14. Suggestions for the interpretation of temperature noise measurements in a heated linear bundle in a water loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalm, D.

    1975-09-01

    A concept is described how to use temperature noise for the detection and identification of a simulated malfunction (e.g. a blockage) in a heated linear bundle in the preboiling state. At first, methods are proposed how to find an optimal detector position down stream from the bundle exit in such a way that the detector sees the total bundle cross section. In addition some methods are proposed for the identification of the malfunction by making use of random data analysis

  15. Dipolon theory of energy gap parameters at finite temperature and transition temperatures Tc and T* in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.R.

    2006-01-01

    First temperature dependent regular and pseudo-energy gap parameters and regular and pseudo-transition temperatures arising from the same physical origin have been calculated in the strong coupling formalism. Temperature dependent many-body field-theoretic techniques have been developed, as an extension of our previous zero-temperature formalism, to derive temperature dependent general expressions for the renormalized energy gap parameter Δ(k->,ω), the gap renormalization parameter Z(k->,ω) and energy band renormalization parameter χ(k->,ω) for momentum k-> and frequency ω making use of dipolon propagator and electron Green's function taking into account explicitly the dressed dipolons as mediators of superconductivity, the screened Coulomb repulsion and nonrigid electron energy bands considering retardation and damping effects and electron-hole asymmetry. The theory takes into account all necessary and important correlations. Our self-consistent calculations utilize the previously symmetry predicted two energy gap parameters for superconducting cuprates, one being antisymmetric (''as'') with respect to the exchange of the k x and k y components of vector k-> and the other being symmetric (''s'') with respect to the exchange of k x and k y . Our present temperature dependent self-consistent solutions of the real and imaginary parts of the Δ(k->,ω), Z(k->,ω) and χ(k->,ω) confirm the existence of these two (different) solutions and conclude that the antisymmetric solution of the gap parameter corresponds to the observed regular (''reg'') superconducting energy gap whereas the symmetric solution corresponds to the observed pseudo-(''pse-'') energy gap. Explicit temperature dependent self-consistent calculations have been performed here for Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ as well as Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 giving temperature dependent energy gap parameters and corresponding transition temperatures. The calculated results are consistent with the available experimental

  16. Risk Aversion and Effort in an Incentive Pay Scheme with Multiplicative Noise: Theory and Experimental Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.V. Zubanov (Nick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe application of the classical "linear" model of incentive pay to the case when the noise is multiplicative to effort generates two predictions for a given strength of incentives: 1) more risk-averse workers will put in less effort, and 2) setting a performance target will weaken the

  17. Out-of-pile and in-pile temperature noise investigations: a survey of methods results and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dentico, G.; Giovannini, R.; Marseguerra, M.; Pacilio, N.; Taglienti, S.; Tosi, V.; Vigo, A.; Oguma, R.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of the main results obtained from temperature noise measurements performed in out-of-pile sodium loops on fast fuel element mock-ups. Sources of data were thermocouples placed in the central axis of the channel downstream from the bundle end. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models have been applied to several temperature time series; the analysis shows that a simple ARMA (3, 2) model adequately accounts for the observed fluctuations. Finally, highlights of a heat transfer stochastic model are also reported together with a preliminary validation against in-pile experimental data. (author)

  18. Application of a ray theory model to the prediction of noise emissions from isolated wind turbines and wind parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospathopoulos, John M.; Voutsinas, Spyros G.

    2006-01-01

    Various propagation models have been developed to estimate the level of noise near residential areas. Predictions and measurements have proven that proper modelling of the propagation medium is of particular importance. In the present work, calculations are performed using a ray theory methodology. The ray trajectory and transport equations are derived from the linear acoustics equations for a moving medium in three dimensions. Ground and atmospheric absorption, wave refraction and diffraction and atmospheric turbulence are taken into account by introducing appropriate coefficients in the equations. In the case of a wind turbine (W/T) it is assumed that noise is produced by a point source located at the rotor centre. Given the sound power spectrum, the noise spectrum at the receiver is obtained by solving the axisymmetric propagation problem. The procedure consists of (a) finding the eigenrays, (b) calculating the energy losses along the eigenrays and (c) synthesizing the sound pressure level (SPL) by superposing the contributions of the eigenrays. In the case of a wind park the total SPL is calculated by superposing the contributions of all W/Ts. Application is made to five cases of isolated W/Ts in terrains of varying complexity. In flat or even smooth terrain the predictions agree well with the measurements. In complex terrain the predictions can be considered satisfactory, taking into account the assumption of constant wind velocity profile. Application to a wind park shows clearly the influence of the terrain on the wind velocity and consequently on the SPL. (Author)

  19. Theory of semiconductor lasers from basis of quantum electronics to analyses of the mode competition phenomena and noise

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a unified and complete theory for semiconductor lasers, covering topics ranging from the principles of classical and quantum mechanics to highly advanced levels for readers who need to analyze the complicated operating characteristics generated in the real application of semiconductor lasers.   The author conducts a theoretical analysis especially on the instabilities involved in the operation of semiconductor lasers. A density matrix into the theory for semiconductor lasers is introduced and the formulation of an improved rate equation to help understand the mode competition phenomena which cause the optical external feedback noise is thoroughly described from the basic quantum mechanics. The derivation of the improved rate equation will allow readers to extend the analysis for the different types of semiconductor materials and laser structures they deal with.   This book is intended not only for students and academic researchers but also for engineers who develop lasers for the market, ...

  20. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 2. Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    noisiness, Localization and Precedence The ability to determine the location of sound sources is one of the major benefits of having a binaural hearing... binaural hearing is commonly called the Haas. or precedence, effect (ref. 16). This refers to the ability to hear as a single acoustic event the...propellers are operated at slightly different rpm values, beating interference between the two sources occurs, and the noise level in the cabin rises and

  1. Renormalization group analysis of the temperature dependent coupling constant in massless theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hirofumi.

    1987-06-01

    A general analysis of finite temperature renormalization group equations for massless theories is presented. It is found that in a direction where momenta and temperature are scaled up with their ratio fixed the coupling constant behaves in the same manner as in zero temperature and that asymptotic freedom at short distances is also maintained at finite temperature. (author)

  2. Non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger equations: Generalization to real-valued noise using quantum-measurement theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambetta, Jay; Wiseman, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Do stochastic Schroedinger equations, also known as unravelings, have a physical interpretation? In the Markovian limit, where the system on average obeys a master equation, the answer is yes. Markovian stochastic Schroedinger equations generate quantum trajectories for the system state conditioned on continuously monitoring the bath. For a given master equation, there are many different unravelings, corresponding to different sorts of measurement on the bath. In this paper we address the non-Markovian case, and in particular the sort of stochastic Schroedinger equation introduced by Strunz, Diosi, and Gisin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1801 (1999)]. Using a quantum-measurement theory approach, we rederive their unraveling that involves complex-valued Gaussian noise. We also derive an unraveling involving real-valued Gaussian noise. We show that in the Markovian limit, these two unravelings correspond to heterodyne and homodyne detection, respectively. Although we use quantum-measurement theory to define these unravelings, we conclude that the stochastic evolution of the system state is not a true quantum trajectory, as the identity of the state through time is a fiction

  3. Wavelet theory applied to remove noise and movement artifacts from images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, S.; Cabrejas, M.L.; Carpintiero, S.; Costa, A.; Stenborg, J.

    2002-01-01

    The quality of the images is in direct relationship with the accuracy of the diagnosis. There are several physical and technical problems (signal to noise ratio, image distortions, geometrical defects, pattern recognition and movement corrections) associated with acquisition and processing devices, each of which require specific solutions. New generation equipment or appropriate quality control techniques, often solve the problem. The option, is trying to correct for image distortions existing on the reconstructed images using post processing mathematical filtering. In this paper a new developed software is described to correct the images and solve the above mentioned problems. Mathematical tools: To improve the signal to noise ratio, a noise reduction method, based on Multi Resolution Analysis with Wavelets, was used. The use of cubic spline wavelets as mother wavelets, is more convenient because they conform an orthogonal basis. For each multi resolution level, a 'hard thresholding' was applied. This means that the coefficients, which are strongly dependent on the images, are put to zero when they are smaller than a reference value. It is also possible to separate the movement of the structures under study from instrumental constraints or noise. To accomplish this, cross-correlations of particular sub-regions, in consecutive images, were performed. Since a quantitative estimation of the error introduced by both effects is rather difficult, a new technique was developed, a so-called trial and error technique (TET), via the identification of a particular subregion on consecutive images, provided there are sharp fixed features present in the considered subregion. This position, being the one in which the standard deviation is the smallest, is then chosen on the second image. Taking into account the time between images and the dynamic characteristic time, the Gaussian distribution confirms the absence of substantial variability form one image to the other. Results

  4. Microscopic origin of read current noise in TaO{sub x}-based resistive switching memory by ultra-low temperature measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yue; Cai, Yimao, E-mail: caiyimao@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Yefan; Fang, Yichen; Yu, Muxi; Tan, Shenghu; Huang, Ru [Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-04-11

    TaO{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) attracts considerable attention for the development of next generation nonvolatile memories. However, read current noise in RRAM is one of the critical concerns for storage application, and its microscopic origin is still under debate. In this work, the read current noise in TaO{sub x}-based RRAM was studied thoroughly. Based on a noise power spectral density analysis at room temperature and at ultra-low temperature of 25 K, discrete random telegraph noise (RTN) and continuous average current fluctuation (ACF) are identified and decoupled from the total read current noise in TaO{sub x} RRAM devices. A statistical comparison of noise amplitude further reveals that ACF depends strongly on the temperature, whereas RTN is independent of the temperature. Measurement results combined with conduction mechanism analysis show that RTN in TaO{sub x} RRAM devices arises from electron trapping/detrapping process in the hopping conduction, and ACF is originated from the thermal activation of conduction centers that form the percolation network. At last, a unified model in the framework of hopping conduction is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of both RTN and ACF noise, which can provide meaningful guidelines for designing noise-immune RRAM devices.

  5. Microscopic origin of read current noise in TaO_x-based resistive switching memory by ultra-low temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yue; Cai, Yimao; Liu, Yefan; Fang, Yichen; Yu, Muxi; Tan, Shenghu; Huang, Ru

    2016-01-01

    TaO_x-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) attracts considerable attention for the development of next generation nonvolatile memories. However, read current noise in RRAM is one of the critical concerns for storage application, and its microscopic origin is still under debate. In this work, the read current noise in TaO_x-based RRAM was studied thoroughly. Based on a noise power spectral density analysis at room temperature and at ultra-low temperature of 25 K, discrete random telegraph noise (RTN) and continuous average current fluctuation (ACF) are identified and decoupled from the total read current noise in TaO_x RRAM devices. A statistical comparison of noise amplitude further reveals that ACF depends strongly on the temperature, whereas RTN is independent of the temperature. Measurement results combined with conduction mechanism analysis show that RTN in TaO_x RRAM devices arises from electron trapping/detrapping process in the hopping conduction, and ACF is originated from the thermal activation of conduction centers that form the percolation network. At last, a unified model in the framework of hopping conduction is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of both RTN and ACF noise, which can provide meaningful guidelines for designing noise-immune RRAM devices.

  6. Domain walls and perturbation theory in high-temperature gauge theory: SU(2) in 2+1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korthals Altes, C.; Michels, A.; Teper, M.; Stephanov, M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the detailed properties of Z 2 domain walls in the deconfined high-temperature phase of the d=2+1 SU(2) gauge theory. These walls are studied both by computer simulations of the lattice theory and by one-loop perturbative calculations. The latter are carried out both in the continuum and on the lattice. We find that leading order perturbation theory reproduces the detailed properties of these domain walls remarkably accurately even at temperatures where the effective dimensionless expansion parameter g 2 /T is close to unity. The quantities studied include the surface tension, the action density profiles, roughening, and the electric screening mass. It is only for the last quantity that we find an exception to the precocious success of perturbation theory. All this shows that, despite the presence of infrared divergences at higher orders, high-T perturbation theory can be an accurate calculational tool. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Reactor noise analysis based on nonlinear dynamic theory - application to power oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki

    1993-01-01

    The information dimension is one of the simplest quantities that can be used to determine the asymptotic motion of the time evolution of a nonlinear system. The application of this quantity to reactor noise analysis is proposed, and the possibility of its application to power oscillation analysis is examined. The information dimension of this regime is equal to the number of independent oscillating modes, which is an intuitive physical variable. Time series data from computer experiments and experiments with an actual physical system are used for the analysis. The results indicate that the method is useful for a detailed analysis of reactor power oscillation

  8. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  9. Theory of temperature dependent photoemission spectrum of heavy fermion semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseborough, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    The heavy fermion semiconductors are a class of strongly correlated materials, that at high temperatures show properties similar to those of heavy fermion materials, but at low temperatures show a cross-over into a semi-conducting state. The low temperature insulating state is characterized by an anomalously small energy gap, varying between 10 and 100 K. The smallness of the gap is attributed to the result of a many-body renormalization, and is temperature dependent. The temperature dependence of the electronic spectral density of states is calculated, using the Anderson lattice model at half filling. The spectrum is calculated to second order in 1/N, where N is the degeneracy of the 'f' orbitals, using a slave boson technique. The system is an indirect gap semi-conductor, with an extremely temperature dependent electronic spectral density A(k, ω). The indirect gap is subject to a temperature dependent many-body renormalization, and leads to a sharp temperature dependent structure in the angle resolved photo-emission spectrum at the indirect threshold. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations on FeSi. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  10. Identification of Abnormal System Noise Temperature Patterns in Deep Space Network Antennas Using Neural Network Trained Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Pham, Timothy; Liao, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a fuzzy logic function trained by an artificial neural network to classify the system noise temperature (SNT) of antennas in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The SNT data were classified into normal, marginal, and abnormal classes. The irregular SNT pattern was further correlated with link margin and weather data. A reasonably good correlation is detected among high SNT, low link margin and the effect of bad weather; however we also saw some unexpected non-correlations which merit further study in the future.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Receptor Potential and Noise in Fly (Calliphora erythrocephala) Photoreceptor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roebroek, J.G.H.; Tjonger, M. van; Stavenga, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the response to light of photoreceptors of the blowfly Calliphora erythrocephala. The latency and the time-to-peak of the responses become shorter as the temperature increases; Q10 = 2.8 ± 0.6. The response amplitude is independent of the temperature in

  12. Reliability characterization of SiON and MGHK MOSFETs using flicker noise and its correlation with the bias temperature instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samnakay, Rameez; Balandin, Alexander A.; Srinivasan, Purushothaman

    2017-09-01

    Bias temperature instability (BTI) is one of the critical device degradation mechanisms in poly-Si/SiON and metal gate/high-k complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. Using the pre- and post-BTI flicker noise measurements, we investigated the bulk trap density, Nt, in both of these technologies. The low-frequency noise spectra were predominantly of 1/fγ type with γ engineering team at Globalfoundries, Inc. during the summer of 2014. He has currently authored or co-authored 10 journal publications and numerous conference presentations. His current research interests include 1/f noise in high-k dielectrics and fabricated 2D van der Waal thin-film devices Mr. Samnakay's awards and honors include the Dean's Distinguished Fellowship Award (University of California-Riverside) and induction into the IEEE-HKN honors society. He also serves as a reviewer for 6 journals including Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Nanotechnology journals.

  13. On the Measurement of Criterion Noise in Signal Detection Theory: The Case of Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellen, David; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Singmann, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Traditional approaches within the framework of signal detection theory (SDT; Green & Swets, 1966), especially in the field of recognition memory, assume that the positioning of response criteria is not a noisy process. Recent work (Benjamin, Diaz, & Wee, 2009; Mueller & Weidemann, 2008) has challenged this assumption, arguing not only…

  14. Behaviour of coupling constants at high temperature in supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swee Ping Chia.

    1986-04-01

    An analysis is presented of the temperature dependence of the coupling constants using the improved one-loop approximation in the Wess-Zumino model and the supersymmetric O(N) model. It is found that all the coupling constants, both bosonic (Φ 4 type) and Yukawa, approach constant nonzero values as T→∞. The asymptotic values of the bosonic couplings are slightly smaller than the corresponding zero-temperature values, and those of the Yukawa couplings are the same as the zero-temperature values. (author)

  15. Chiral symmetry and finite temperature effects in quantum theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Aa.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation of the harmonic oscillator at finite temperature has been carried out, using the Monte Carlo Metropolis algorithm. Accurate results for the energy and fluctuations have been obtained, with special attention to the manifestation of the temperature effects. Varying the degree of symmetry breaking, the finite temperature behaviour of the asymmetric linear model in a linearized mean field approximation has been studied. In a study of the effects of chiral symmetry on baryon mass splittings, reasonable agreement with experiment has been obtained in a non-relativistic harmonic oscillator model

  16. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit I: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutounji, Mohamad, E-mail: Mtoutounji@uaeu.ac.ae

    2017-02-15

    In an earlier work of the author the time evolution of Morse oscillator was studied analytically and exactly at low temperatures whereupon optical correlation functions were calculated using Morse oscillator coherent states were employed. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit is derived and a closed form of its corresponding canonical partition function is obtained. Both diagonal and off-diagonal forms of Morse oscillator propagator are derived in the high temperature limit. Partition functions of diatomic molecules are calculated. - Highlights: • Derives the quantum propagator of Morse oscillator in the high temperature limit. • Uses the resulting diagonal propagator to derive a closed form of Morse oscillator partition function. • Provides a more sophisticated formula of the quantum propagator to test the accuracy of the herein results.

  17. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2012-02-17

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  18. Theory of laser-induced demagnetization at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien; Li, Q.; Xu, L.; Zhang, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced demagnetization is theoretically studied by explicitly taking into account interactions among electrons, spins, and lattice. Assuming that the demagnetization processes take place during the thermalization of the subsystems, the temperature dynamics is given by the energy transfer between the thermalized interacting baths. These energy transfers are accounted for explicitly through electron-magnon and electron-phonon interactions, which govern the demagnetization time scale. By properly treating the spin system in a self-consistent random phase approximation, we derive magnetization dynamic equations for a broad range of temperature. The dependence of demagnetization on the temperature and pumping laser intensity is calculated in detail. In particular, we show several salient features for understanding magnetization dynamics near the Curie temperature. While the critical slowdown in dynamics occurs, we find that an external magnetic field can restore the fast dynamics. We discuss the implication of the fast dynamics in the application of heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  19. Temperature variance study in Monte-Carlo photon transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorla, J.

    1985-10-01

    We study different Monte-Carlo methods for solving radiative transfer problems, and particularly Fleck's Monte-Carlo method. We first give the different time-discretization schemes and the corresponding stability criteria. Then we write the temperature variance as a function of the variances of temperature and absorbed energy at the previous time step. Finally we obtain some stability criteria for the Monte-Carlo method in the stationary case [fr

  20. 500,000-year temperature record challenges ice age theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, K. Mitchell

    1994-01-01

    Just outside the searing heat of Death Valley lies Devils Hole (fig. 1), a fault-created cave that harbors two remnants of the Earth's great ice ages. The endangered desert pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) has long made its home in the cave. A 500,000-year record of the planet's climate that challenges a widely accepted theory explaining the ice ages also has been preserved in Devils Hole.

  1. Properties of lattice gauge theory models at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1980-01-01

    The Z(N) theory of quark confinement is discussed and how fluctuations of Z(N) gauge fields may continue to be important in the continuum limit. Existence of a model in four dimensions is pointed out in which confinement of (scalar) quarks can be shown to persist in the continuum limit. This article is based on the author's Cargese lectures 1979. Some of its results are published here for the first time. (orig.) 891 HSI/orig. 892 MKO

  2. Water temperature forecasting and estimation using fourier series and communication theory techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, L.L.

    1976-01-01

    Fourier series and statistical communication theory techniques are utilized in the estimation of river water temperature increases caused by external thermal inputs. An example estimate assuming a constant thermal input is demonstrated. A regression fit of the Fourier series approximation of temperature is then used to forecast daily average water temperatures. Also, a 60-day prediction of daily average water temperature is made with the aid of the Fourier regression fit by using significant Fourier components

  3. Discontinuities of Green functions in field theory at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobes, R.L.; Semenoff, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    We derive systematic rules for calculating the imaginary parts of Minkowski space Green functions in quantum field theory at finite temperature and density. Self-energy corrections are used as an example of the application of these rules. (orig.)

  4. Ion currents to cylindrical Langmuir probes for finite ion temperature values: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, J.; Palop, J.I.F.; Colomer, V.; Hernandez, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    As it is known, the experimental ion currents to a cylindrical Langmuir probe fit quite well to the radial motion theory, developed by Allen, Boyd and Reynolds (ABR Model) and generalized by Chen for the cylindrical probe case. In this paper, we are going to develop a generalization of the ABR theory, taking into account the influence of a finite ion temperature value

  5. Theory of the transition temperature of superconducting amorphous transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicknagel, G.

    1979-11-01

    In the present paper first the transition temperature Tsub(c) is shown to be a local quantity, which depends on the (average) short range order, and second it is demonstrated how to calculate local electronic properties in the framework of a short range order model and the transition temperature of amorphous systems based on accepted structure models of the amorphous state. In chapter I the theoretical basis of this work is presented in brief. The model used to study the role of short range order (in periodically ordered as well as in disordered system) is described in chapter II. The results of this model for the periodically ordered case are compared in chapter III with band structure calculations. In chapter IV it is shown how to establish short range order models for disordered systems and what kind of information can be obtained with respect to the electronic properties. Finally in chapter V it is discussed to what extend the interpretation of the transition temperature Tsub(c) as being determined by short range order effects can be supported by the electronic properties, which are calculated in the chapters III and IV. (orig.) [de

  6. Theory of high-T{sub C} superconductivity: transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harshman, Dale R [Physikon Research Corporation, Lynden, WA 98264 (United States); Fiory, Anthony T [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Dow, John D, E-mail: drh@physikon.net [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2011-07-27

    It is demonstrated that the transition temperature (T{sub C}) of high-T{sub C} superconductors is determined by their layered crystal structure, bond lengths, valency properties of the ions, and Coulomb coupling between electronic bands in adjacent, spatially separated layers. Analysis of 31 high-T{sub C} materials (cuprates, ruthenates, ruthenocuprates, iron pnictides, organics) yields the universal relationship for optimal compounds, k{sub B}T{sub C0} ={beta}/{iota}{zeta}, where {iota} is related to the mean spacing between interacting charges in the layers, {zeta} is the distance between interacting electronic layers, {beta} is a universal constant and T{sub C0} is the optimal transition temperature (determined to within an uncertainty of {+-} 1.4 K by this relationship). Non-optimum compounds, in which sample degradation is evident, e.g. by broadened superconducting transitions and diminished Meissner fractions, typically exhibit reduced T{sub C} < T{sub C0}. It is shown that T{sub C0} may be obtained from an average of the Coulomb interaction forces between the two layers.

  7. Theory of static friction: temperature and corrugation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchini, A; Brigazzi, M; Santoro, G; Bortolani, V

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of the static friction, as a function of temperature, between two thick solid slabs. The upper one is formed of light particles and the substrate of heavy particles. We focus our attention on the interaction between the phonon fields of the two blocks and on the interface corrugation, among the various mechanisms responsible for the friction. To give evidence of the role played by the dynamical interaction of the substrate with the upper block, we consider both a substrate formed by fixed atoms and a substrate formed by mobile atoms. To study the effect of the corrugation, we model it by changing the range parameter σ in the Lennard-Jones interaction potential. We found that in the case of the mobile substrate there is a large momentum transfer from the substrate to the upper block. This momentum transfer increases on increasing the temperature and produces a large disorder in the upper block favouring a decrease of the static friction with respect to the case for a rigid substrate. Reducing the corrugation, we found that with a rigid substrate the upper block becomes nearly commensurate, producing an enhancement of the static friction with respect to that with a mobile substrate

  8. Measuring temperature coefficient of TRIGA MARK I reactor by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    The transfer function of TRIGA MARK I Reactor is measured at power zero (5w) and power 118Kw, in the frequency range of 0.02 to 0.5 rd/s. The method of intercorrelation between a pseudostochasticbinary signal is used. A simple dynamic model of the reactor is developed and the coefficient of temperature is estimated [pt

  9. Width and string tension of the flux tube in SU(2) lattice gauge theory at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagdaa, S.; Galsandorj, E.; Laermann, E.; Purev, B.

    2018-02-01

    We study the profiles of the flux tube between a static quark and an antiquark in quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory at temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. The physical width of the flux tube and the string tension have been determined from the transverse profiles and the q\\bar{q} potential, respectively. Exploiting the computational power of a GPU accelerator in our flux tube investigation, we achieve much higher statistics through which we can increase the signal to noise ratio of our observables in the simulation. This has allowed the investigation of larger lattices as well as larger separations between the quarks than in our previous work. The improved accuracy gives us better results for the width and the string tension. The physical width of the flux tube increases with the temperature up to around T c while keeping its increasing dependence on the q\\bar{q} separation. The string tension results are compared for two different sizes of the lattice. As the lattice becomes larger and finer together with the improved precision, the temperature dependent string tension tends to have a smaller value than the previous one.

  10. 1/f noise in titanium doped aluminum thin film deposited by electron beam evaporation method and its dependence on structural variation with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, P.; Vedanayakam, S. Victor; Thyagarajan, K.; Nandakumar, N.

    2018-05-01

    A brief review of Titanium doped Aluminum film has many attractive properties such as thermal properties and 1/f noise is highlighted. The thin film devices of Titanium doped alluminium are specially used in aerospace technology, automotive, biomedical fields also in microelectronics. In this paper, we discus on 1/f noise and nonlinear effects in titanium doped alluminium thin films deposited on glass substrate using electron beam evaporation for different current densities on varying temperatures of the film. The plots are dawn for 1/f noise of the films at different temperatures ranging from 300°C to 450°C and the slopes are determined. The studies shows a higher order increment in FFT amplitude of low frequency 1/f noise in thin films at annealing temperature 400°C. In this technology used in aerospace has been the major field of application of titanium doped alluminium, being one of the major challenges of the development of new alloys with improved strength at high temperature, wide chord Titanium doped alluminium fan blades increases the efficiency while reducing 1/f noise. Structural properties of XRD is identified.

  11. A mean field theory of study of lattice gauge theory with finite temperature and with finite fermion density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, S.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a mean field theory technique to study the confinement-deconfinement phase transition and chiral symmetry restoring phase transition with dynamical fermions and with finite chemical potential and finite temperature. The approximation scheme concerns the saddle point scenario and large space dimension. The static quark-antiquark potentials are identified from the Wilson loop correlation functions in both the fundamental and the adjoint representation of the gauge group with different temperatures. The difference between the responses of the chemical potential to the fermion number with singlet and non-singlet isospin configuration is found. We compare our results with recent Monte Carlo data. (orig.)

  12. Pairing theory of high and low temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sang Boo

    1997-01-01

    A scenario which can account for all observed features of both high-Tc superconductors (HTS) and low-Tc superconductors (LTS) is discussed. This scenario is based on the fact that a finite pairing interaction energy range Td is required to have a finite value of Tc and that not all carriers participate in pairings, yielding multiconnected superconductors (MS). A new density of states, derived by keeping the order parameter zero outside of Td, is shown to account for the observed low energy states in HTS and for the temperature dependences in the specific heat, the penetration depth, the optical conductivity, and the tunneling conductance data. I argue that the notion of MS can account for the tunneling data along the a(or b)-, ab-, and c-axis, and the 1/2 flux quantum observed in HTS. The region occupied by unpaired carriers can be considered as a vortex with a fluxoid quantum number equal to 1 (VF), 0 (VZF), or -1 (VAF) when the magnetic flux around the vortex is greater than, equal to, or less than the effective flux produced by the supercurrent, respectively. The Hall anomaly depends on the relative strengths of the contributions via VF and VAF. The fact that the present scenario can account for all observed features of HTS and LTS suggests that the symmetry of the order parameter in HTS may not be different from one in LTS. (author)

  13. Pulling adsorbed polymers at an angle: A low temperature theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Gerasim; Whittington, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    We consider several partially-directed walk models in two- and three-dimensions to study the problem of a homopolymer interacting with a surface while subject to a force at the terminal monomer. The force is applied with a component parallel to the surface as well as a component perpendicular to the surface. Depending on the relative values of the force in each direction, the force can either enhance the adsorption transition or lead to desorption in an adsorbed polymer. For each model, we determine the associated generating function and extract the phase diagram, identifying states where the polymer is thermally desorbed, adsorbed, and under the influence of the force. We note the different regimes that appear in the problem and provide a low temperature approximation to describe them. The approximation is exact at T=0 and models the exact results extremely well for small values of T. This work is an extension of a model considered by S. Whittington and E. Orlandini.

  14. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G. (José M. G.), 1972-; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  15. Thermodynamic dislocation theory of high-temperature deformation in aluminum and steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, K. C. [Ruhr-Univ Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Lehrstuhl fur Mechanik-Materialtheorie; Tran, T. M. [Ruhr-Univ Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Lehrstuhl fur Mechanik-Materialtheorie; Langer, J. S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-07-12

    The statistical-thermodynamic dislocation theory developed in previous papers is used here in an analysis of high-temperature deformation of aluminum and steel. Using physics-based parameters that we expect theoretically to be independent of strain rate and temperature, we are able to fit experimental stress-strain curves for three different strain rates and three different temperatures for each of these two materials. Here, our theoretical curves include yielding transitions at zero strain in agreement with experiment. We find that thermal softening effects are important even at the lowest temperatures and smallest strain rates.

  16. Unified theory of ballooning instabilities and temperature gradient driven trapped ion modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.

    1990-08-01

    A unified theory of temperature gradient driven trapped ion modes and ballooning instabilities is developed using kinetic theory in banana regimes. All known results, such as electrostatic and purely magnetic trapped particle modes and ideal MHD ballooning modes (or shear Alfven waves) are readily derived from our single general dispersion relation. Several new results from ion-ion collision and trapped particle modification of ballooning modes are derived and discussed and the interrelationship between those modes is established. 24 refs

  17. Temperature dependent empirical pseudopotential theory for self-assembled quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Gong, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; He, Lixin

    2012-11-28

    We develop a temperature dependent empirical pseudopotential theory to study the electronic and optical properties of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) at finite temperature. The theory takes the effects of both lattice expansion and lattice vibration into account. We apply the theory to InAs/GaAs QDs. For the unstrained InAs/GaAs heterostructure, the conduction band offset increases whereas the valence band offset decreases with increasing temperature, and there is a type-I to type-II transition at approximately 135 K. Yet, for InAs/GaAs QDs, the holes are still localized in the QDs even at room temperature, because the large lattice mismatch between InAs and GaAs greatly enhances the valence band offset. The single-particle energy levels in the QDs show a strong temperature dependence due to the change of confinement potentials. Because of the changes of the band offsets, the electron wavefunctions confined in QDs increase by about 1-5%, whereas the hole wavefunctions decrease by about 30-40% when the temperature increases from 0 to 300 K. The calculated recombination energies of excitons, biexcitons and charged excitons show red shifts with increasing temperature which are in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  18. Scanning tunnelling microscope light emission: Finite temperature current noise and over cut-off emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J

    2017-06-14

    The spectral distribution of light emitted from a scanning tunnelling microscope junction not only bears its intrinsic plasmonic signature but is also imprinted with the characteristics of optical frequency fluc- tuations of the tunnel current. Experimental spectra from gold-gold tunnel junctions are presented that show a strong bias (V b ) dependence, curiously with emission at energies higher than the quantum cut-off (eV b ); a component that decays monotonically with increasing bias. The spectral evolution is explained by developing a theoretical model for the power spectral density of tunnel current fluctuations, incorporating finite temperature contribution through consideration of the quantum transport in the system. Notably, the observed decay of the over cut-off emission is found to be critically associated with, and well explained in terms of the variation in junction conductance with V b . The investigation highlights the scope of plasmon-mediated light emission as a unique probe of high frequency fluctuations in electronic systems that are fundamental to the electrical generation and control of plasmons.

  19. Completion of Level 4 Milestone M4AT-15OR2301039 for the Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements Work Package AT-15OR230103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-14

    This memorandum constitutes our September 2015 level 4 milestone for the project entitled “Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements” and satisfies the Milestone/Activity (Conclude HFIR field demonstration of JNT prototype). The progress summary describes the work performed to complete the subject milestone.

  20. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  1. On the calculation of finite-temperature effects in field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.T.; Frenkel, J.; Taylor, J.C.

    1991-03-01

    We discuss an alternative method for computing finite-temperature effects in field theories, within the framework of the imaginary-time formalism. Our approach allows for a systematic calculation of the high temperature expansion in terms of Riemann Zeta functions. The imaginary-time result is analytically continued to the complex plane. We are able to obtain the real-time limit of the real and the imaginary parts of the Green functions. (author)

  2. Gutzwiller-RVB theory of high temperature superconductivity. Results from renormalized mean field theory and variational Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edegger, B.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the theory of high temperature superconductivity from the viewpoint of a strongly correlated electron system. In particular, we discuss Gutzwiller projected wave functions, which incorporate strong correlations by prohibiting double occupancy in orbitals with strong on-site repulsion. After a general overview on high temperature superconductivity, we discuss Anderson's resonating valence bond (RVB) picture and its implementation by renormalized mean field theory (RMFT) and variational Monte Carlo (VMC) techniques. In the following, we present a detailed review on RMFT and VMC results with emphasis on our recent contributions. Especially, we are interested in spectral features of Gutzwiller-Bogolyubov quasiparticles obtained by extending VMC and RMFT techniques to excited states. We explicitly illustrate this method to determine the quasiparticle weight and provide a comparison with angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We conclude by summarizing recent successes and by discussing open questions, which must be solved for a thorough understanding of high temperature superconductivity by Gutzwiller projected wave functions. (orig.)

  3. Gutzwiller-RVB theory of high temperature superconductivity. Results from renormalized mean field theory and variational Monte Carlo calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edegger, B.

    2007-08-10

    We consider the theory of high temperature superconductivity from the viewpoint of a strongly correlated electron system. In particular, we discuss Gutzwiller projected wave functions, which incorporate strong correlations by prohibiting double occupancy in orbitals with strong on-site repulsion. After a general overview on high temperature superconductivity, we discuss Anderson's resonating valence bond (RVB) picture and its implementation by renormalized mean field theory (RMFT) and variational Monte Carlo (VMC) techniques. In the following, we present a detailed review on RMFT and VMC results with emphasis on our recent contributions. Especially, we are interested in spectral features of Gutzwiller-Bogolyubov quasiparticles obtained by extending VMC and RMFT techniques to excited states. We explicitly illustrate this method to determine the quasiparticle weight and provide a comparison with angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We conclude by summarizing recent successes and by discussing open questions, which must be solved for a thorough understanding of high temperature superconductivity by Gutzwiller projected wave functions. (orig.)

  4. Integration of ambient seismic noise monitoring, displacement and meteorological measurements to infer the temperature-controlled long-term evolution of a complex prone-to-fall cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, C.; Baillet, L.; Comina, C.; Jongmans, D.; Larose, E.; Valentin, J.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2018-06-01

    Monitoring the temporal evolution of resonance frequencies and velocity changes detected from ambient seismic noise recordings can help in recognizing reversible and irreversible modifications within unstable rock volumes. With this aim, the long-term ambient seismic noise data set acquired at the potentially unstable cliff of Madonna delSasso (NW Italian Alps) was analysed in this study, using both spectral analysis and cross-correlation techniques. Noise results were integrated and compared with direct displacement measurements and meteorological data, to understand the long-term evolution of the cliff. No irreversible modifications in the stability of the site were detected over the monitored period. Conversely, daily and seasonal air temperature fluctuations were found to control resonance frequency values, amplitudes and directivities and to induce reversible velocity changes within the fractured rock mass. The immediate modification in the noise parameters due to temperature fluctuations was interpreted as the result of rock mass thermal expansion and contraction, inducing variations in the contact stiffness along the fractures isolating two unstable compartments. Differences with previous case studies were highlighted in the long-term evolution of noise spectral amplitudes and directivities, due to the complex 3-D fracture setting of the site and to the combined effects of the two unstable compartments.

  5. Handbook Of Noise And Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This book is about noise and vibration. The first chapter has explanations of noise such as basic of sound, influence of noise, assessment of noise, measurement of prevention of noise and technology, case of noise measurement and soundproof. The second chapter describes vibration with outline, theory of vibration, interpretation of vibration, measurement for reduction of vibration, case of design of protection against vibration. It deals with related regulation and method of measurement.

  6. Photon polarization tensor in the light front field theory at zero and finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Charles da Rocha; Perez, Silvana; Strauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, light front quantized field theories have been successfully generalized to finite temperature. The light front frame was introduced by Dirac , and the quantization of field theories on the null-plane has found applications in many branches of physics. In order to obtain the thermal contribution, we consider the hard thermal loop approximation. This technique was developed by Braaten and Pisarski for the thermal quantum field theory at equal times and is particularly useful to extract the leading thermal contributions to the amplitudes in perturbative quantum field theories. In this work, we consider the light front quantum electrodynamics in (3+1) dimensions and evaluate the photon polarization tensor at one loop for both zero and finite temperatures. In the first case, we apply the dimensional regularization method to extract the finite contribution and find the transverse structure for the amplitude in terms of the light front coordinates. The result agrees with one-loop covariant calculation. For the thermal corrections, we generalize the hard thermal loop approximation to the light front and calculate the dominant temperature contribution to the polarization tensor, consistent with the Ward identity. In both zero as well as finite temperature calculations, we use the oblique light front coordinates. (author)

  7. Restoration of symmetry by temperature effect under influence of external electro magnetic field in gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, V.M. de.

    1987-01-01

    We have analysed, within a semi classical approach, the influence of external electromagnetic field on phase transitions in gauge theories. The critical temperature was calculated for an Abelian case, scalar electrodynamics, and for an non Abelian case, the Weinberg Salam model. (author)

  8. Relaxation theory of spin-3/2 Ising system near phase transition temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canko, Osman; Keskin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Dynamics of a spin-3/2 Ising system Hamiltonian with bilinear and biquadratic nearest-neighbour exchange interactions is studied by a simple method in which the statistical equilibrium theory is combined with the Onsager's theory of irreversible thermodynamics. First, the equilibrium behaviour of the model in the molecular-field approximation is given briefly in order to obtain the phase transition temperatures, i.e. the first- and second-order and the tricritical points. Then, the Onsager theory is applied to the model and the kinetic or rate equations are obtained. By solving these equations three relaxation times are calculated and their behaviours are examined for temperatures near the phase transition points. Moreover, the z dynamic critical exponent is calculated and compared with the z values obtained for different systems experimentally and theoretically, and they are found to be in good agrement. (general)

  9. A temperature-dependent theory for HeII: Application to the liquid structure factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1981-08-01

    A temperature-dependent theory is presented for HeII, which is based on both a gauge-theoretic formulation as well as a mean-field (Hartree) approach. A simple model calculation is then performed within this framework for the liquid structure factor of the system. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for the low-momentum-transfer and low-temperature limits, which seem to conform with the available experimental data. Further, the curvature of the structure factor is predicted, under these circumstances, to be only mildly dependent on temperature. Throughout, we compare and contrast with other theoretical attempts, including Feynman's. (author)

  10. Critical Temperature for the $\\LAMBDA (\\PHI^{4})_{4}$ Theory within the $\\DELTA$ -Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Rudnei O.

    1992-01-01

    We apply the $\\delta$-expansion perturbation scheme to the $\\lambda \\phi_{4}$ self-interacting scalar field theory in 3+1 D at finite temperature. In the $\\delta$-expansion the interaction term is written as $\\lambda (\\phi^{2})^{1 + \\delta}$ and $\\delta$ is considered as the perturbation parameter. We compute, in this perturbation approach, the renormalized mass at finite temperature from which we get the critical temperature. The results are compared with the usual loop-expansion at finite t...

  11. Noise thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Brixy, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs.

  12. Noise thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Brixy, H.; Kakuta, Tsunemi.

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs

  13. Critical temperature for shape transition in hot nuclei within covariant density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Niu, Y. F.

    2018-05-01

    Prompted by the simple proportional relation between critical temperature for pairing transition and pairing gap at zero temperature, we investigate the relation between critical temperature for shape transition and ground-state deformation by taking even-even Cm-304286 isotopes as examples. The finite-temperature axially deformed covariant density functional theory with BCS pairing correlation is used. Since the Cm isotopes are the newly proposed nuclei with octupole correlations, we studied in detail the free energy surface, the Nilsson single-particle (s.p.) levels, and the components of s.p. levels near the Fermi level in 292Cm. Through this study, the formation of octupole equilibrium is understood by the contribution coming from the octupole driving pairs with Ω [N ,nz,ml] and Ω [N +1 ,nz±3 ,ml] for single-particle levels near the Fermi surfaces as it provides a good manifestation of the octupole correlation. Furthermore, the systematics of deformations, pairing gaps, and the specific heat as functions of temperature for even-even Cm-304286 isotopes are discussed. Similar to the relation between the critical pairing transition temperature and the pairing gap at zero temperature Tc=0.6 Δ (0 ) , a proportional relation between the critical shape transition temperature and the deformation at zero temperature Tc=6.6 β (0 ) is found for both octupole shape transition and quadrupole shape transition for the isotopes considered.

  14. How to make thermodynamic perturbation theory to be suitable for low temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2009-02-07

    Low temperature unsuitability is a problem plaguing thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) for years. Present investigation indicates that the low temperature predicament can be overcome by employing as reference system a nonhard sphere potential which incorporates one part of the attractive ingredient in a potential function of interest. In combination with a recently proposed TPT [S. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 144518 (2006)] based on a lambda expansion (lambda being coupling parameter), the new perturbation strategy is employed to predict for several model potentials. It is shown that the new perturbation strategy can very accurately predict various thermodynamic properties even if the potential range is extremely short and hence the temperature of interest is very low and current theoretical formalisms seriously deteriorate or critically fail to predict even the existence of the critical point. Extensive comparison with existing liquid state theories and available computer simulation data discloses a superiority of the present TPT to two Ornstein-Zernike-type integral equation theories, i.e., hierarchical reference theory and self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation.

  15. Towards a comprehensive theory for He II: I. A zero-temperature hybrid approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghassib, H.B.; Khudeir, A.M.

    1982-09-01

    A simple hybrid approach based on a gauge theory as well as a Hartree formalism, is presented for He II at zero temperature. Although this is intended to be merely a first step in an all-embracing theory, it already resolves quite neatly several old inconsistencies and corrects a few errors. As an illustration of its feasibility, a crude but instructive calculation is performed for the static structure factor of the system at low momentum transfers. A number of planned extensions and generalizations are outlined. (author)

  16. Phase structure of (φ4)3 field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.

    1992-01-01

    Phase structure of φ 4 field theory in the space-time R 3 is investigated at arbitrary coupling constant and temperature. The critical values of the coupling constant and temperature, corresponding to the phase transitions in the system, are calculated by the canonical transformation method within formalism of thermo field dynamics. The Hamiltonians describing the system in each phase are obtained straightforwardly. Comparison with the two-dimensional case shows a crucial influence of higher order renormalization on the phase structure of the model. 13 refs.; 5 figs

  17. Memory-dependent derivatives theory of thermo-viscoelasticity involving two-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezzat, M. A. [Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); El-Bary, A. A. [Arab Academy for Science and Technology, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    A new model of two-temperature generalized thermo-viscoelasticity theory based on memory-dependent derivative is constructed. The equations of the new model are applied to one-dimensional problem of a half-space. The bounding surface is taken to be traction free and subjected to a time dependent thermal shock. Laplace transforms technique is used. A direct approach is applied to obtain the exact formulas of heat flux, temperature, stresses, displacement and strain in the Laplace transform domain. Application is employed to our problem to get the solution in the complete form. The considered variables are presented graphically and discussions are made.

  18. Noise temperature of an NbN hot-electron bolometric mixer at frequencies from 0.7 THz to 5.2 THz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.; Semenov, A.; Gol'tsman, G.; Huebers, H-W.; Voronov, B.; Gershenzon, E.; Schwaab, G.

    1999-01-01

    We report on noise temperature measurements of an NbN phonon-cooled hot-electron bolometric mixer in the terahertz frequency range. The devices were 3 nm thick films with in-plane dimensions 1.7x0.2μm 2 and 0.9x0.2μm 2 integrated in a complementary logarithmic-spiral antenna. Measurements were performed at seven frequencies ranging from 0.7 THz to 5.2 THz. The measured DSB noise temperatures are 1500 K (0.7 THz), 2200 K (1.4 THz), 2600 K (1.6 THz), 2900 K (2.5 THz), 4000 K (3.1 THz), 5600 K (4.3 THz) and 8800 K (5.2 THz). (author)

  19. C2 Swan spectrum used as a molecular pyrometer in transferred arc and the influence noise to signal ratio on the temperature values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, H

    2014-01-01

    The C 2 Swan system molecular emission spectrum is frequently observed in arc plasmas containing hydrocarbons. The spectra emitted from 5 kw in the transferred arc reactor at atmospheric pressure by CH 4 /CO 2 /Ar mixture are recorded with the help of an optical system consisting of a linear CCD array coupled with 2m spectrometer. The rotational temperature of 4300±300 K is found from the experimental Abel inverted spectra in the arc center after a point-to-point comparison of the spectrum with a computer simulated one. The influence of the noise to signal ratio has been studied, if the noise to signal ratio is about 10% we found an error of 7% at temperature 3000 K and 10% at 6000 K.

  20. A self consistent study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.; Mack, G.; Palma, G.

    1994-12-01

    We propose the study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature by a two-step method. It combines i) dimensional reduction to a 3-dimensional lattice theory via perturbative blockspin transformation, and ii) either further real space renormalization group transformations, or solution of gap equations, for the 3d lattice theory. A gap equation can be obtained by using the Peierls inequality to find the best quadratic approximation to the 3d action. This method avoids the lack of self consistency of the usual treatments which do not separate infrared and UV-problems by introduction of a lattice cutoff. The effective 3d lattice action could also be used in computer simulations. (orig.)

  1. A self consistent study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.

    1995-01-01

    We propose the study of the phase transition in the scalar electroweak theory at finite temperature by a two-step method. It combines i) dimensional reduction to a 3-dimensional lattice theory via perturbative blockspin transformation, and ii) either further real space renormalization group transformations, or solution of gap equations, for the 3d lattice theory. A gap equation can be obtained by using the Peierls inequality to find the best quadratic approximation to the 3d action. This method avoids the lack of self consistency of the usual treatments which do not separate infrared and UV-problems by introduction of a lattice cutoff. The effective 3d lattice action could also be used in computer simulations. ((orig.))

  2. Theory of tunneling in metal--superconductor devices: Supercurrents in the superconductor gap at zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.; Flores, F.; Guinea, F.

    1988-01-01

    Tunneling experiments in metal-oxide superconductor have shown the existence of ''leakage'' currents for applied voltages V smaller than one-half of the superconductor gap Δ. These currents are independent of temperature T. Recently experiments with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and squeezable tunnel junctions have shown that the observation of the superconductor gap depends strongly on the resistance in the junction. In fact only for resistances larger than ∼10 6 Ω the gap is clearly observable. These experiments have been explained in terms of the perturbative Hamiltonian formalism of Bardeen. However, it may happen that this theory while applicable for very large resistances may not be so for small tunnel resistances. We present here a nonperturbative theory in all orders of the transmitivity chemical bondTochemical bond 2 and show the existence of supercurrents for values of V 2 . We believe that experiments in STM and other junctions should be interpreted in the frame of this theory

  3. Towards a comprehensive theory for He II: II. A temperature-dependent field-theoretic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1982-09-01

    New experimental aspects of He II are used as a guide towards a comprehensive theory in which non-zero temperature U(1) and SU(2) gauge fields are incorporated into a gauge hierarchy of effective Lagrangians. We conjecture that an SU(n) gauge-theoretic description of the superfluidity of 4 He may be obtained in the limit n→infinity. We indicate, however, how experiments may be understood in the zeroth, first and second order of the hierarchy. (author)

  4. Three loop HTL perturbation theory at finite temperature and chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, Michael [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242 (United States); Andersen, Jens O. [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Bandyopadhyay, Aritra; Haque, Najmul; Mustafa, Munshi G. [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Su, Nan [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    In this proceedings contribution we present a recent three-loop hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) calculation of the thermodynamic potential for a finite temperature and chemical potential system of quarks and gluons. We compare the resulting pressure, trace anomaly, and diagonal/off-diagonal quark susceptibilities with lattice data. We show that there is good agreement between the three-loop HTLpt analytic result and available lattice data.

  5. Shape evolution of 72,74Kr with temperature in covariant density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Yi-Fei Niu

    2017-01-01

    The rich phenomena of deformations in neutron-deficient krypton isotopes,such as shape evolution with neutron number and shape coexistence,have attracted the interest of nuclear physicists for decades.It is interesting to study such shape phenomena using a novel way,e.g.by thermally exciting the nucleus.In this work,we develop the finite temperature covariant density functional theory for axially deformed nuclei with the treatment of pairing correlations by the BCS approach,and apply this approach for the study of shape evolution in 72,74Kr with increasing temperature.For 72Kr,with temperature increasing,the nucleus firstly experiences a relatively quick weakening in oblate deformation at temperature T~0.9 MeV,and then changes from oblate to spherical at T~2.1 MeV.For 74Kr,its global minimum is at quadrupole deformationβ2 ~-0.14 and abruptly changes to spherical at T~ 1.7 MeV.The proton pairing transition occurs at critical temperature 0.6 MeV following the rule Tc=0.6Ap(0),where △p(0) is the proton pairing gap at zero temperature.The signatures of the above pairing transition and shape changes can be found in the specific heat curve.The single-particle level evolutions with temperature are presented.

  6. Effective theory for heavy quark QCD at finite temperature and density with stochastic quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis we presented the derivation as well as the numerical and analytical treatment of an effective theory for lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD). We derived the effective theory directly from LQCD, which allows us to systematically introduce further improvements. The derivation was performed by means of an expansion around the limit of infinite quark masses and infinite gauge coupling. Using this theory we were able to derive results in the region of large densities. This region is, due to the sign problem, inaccessible to standard LQCD approaches. Although LQCD simulations at large densities have been performed recently by applying stochastic quantization, those are still limited to lattice with low numbers of timeslices and therefor can not reach the low temperature region. Furthermore, they can not be crosschecked with Monte-Carlo simulations. Since the equivalence between stochastic quantization and Monte-Carlo is unproven for the case of finite density systems, new approaches to access the cold dense region of the QCD phase diagram are desirable. The effective theory presented in this thesis provides such an approach. We introduced continuum QCD in chapter 2. In chapter 3 we presented how LQCD, i.e. QCD in a discretized space-time, can be formulated and used as a tool to explore the non-perturbative regions of the QCD phase diagram. Special emphasis was placed on simulations at finite baryon densities and the numerical problems that arise in this region. These problems are caused by the complexification of the action and are known as the sign problem. We gave a detailed presentation of the derivation of our effective theory in chapter 4. For this we performed expansions around the limit of strong coupling and static quarks, κ=β=0, introducing corrections order by order in the expansion parameters κ and β. Truncating the theory at different orders allowed us to determine the parameter region where the convergence to full LQCD is good. The gauge

  7. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    -spin. The interaction is mediated by an effective alloy medium calculated using the CPA theory and elliptic densities of states. Es wird gezeigt, daß die Temperaturabhängigkeit der magnetischen Momente und die Curie-Temperatur sowie die Temperatur der ferrimagnetischen Kompensation für Gd1-xTx (T = Co, Ni und Fe) und Y......1-xCox durch ein einfaches Model1 erklärt werden können, das eine RKKY-Wechsel-wirkung zwischen den Momenten der Seltenen Erden und des Pseudo-Spins des Übergangsmetalls annimmt. Die Wechselwirkung wird durch ein effektives Legierungsmedium übermittelt, das mit der CPA-Theorie und elliptischen......It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo...

  8. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  9. Perfect 3-dimensional lattice actions for 4-dimensional quantum field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.; Mack, G.; Palma, G.

    1994-12-01

    We propose a two-step procedure to study the order of phase transitions at finite temperature in electroweak theory and in simplified models thereof. In a first step a coarse grained free energy is computed by perturbative methods. It is obtained in the form of a 3-dimensional perfect lattice action by a block spin transformation. It has finite temperature dependent coefficients. In this way the UV-problem and the infrared problem is separated in a clean way. In the second step the effective 3-dimensional lattice theory is treated in a nonperturbative way, either by the Feynman-Bololiubov method (solution of a gap equation), by real space renormalization group methods, or by computer simulations. In this paper we outline the principles for φ 4 -theory and scalar electrodynamics. The Balaban-Jaffe block spin transformation for the gauge field is used. It is known how to extend this transformation to the nonabelian case, but this will not be discussed here. (orig.)

  10. Elevated temperature inelastic analysis of metallic media under time varying loads using state variable theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Mukherjee, S.

    1977-01-01

    In the present paper a general time-dependent inelastic analysis procedure for three-dimensional bodies subjected to arbitrary time varying mechanical and thermal loads using these state variable theories is presented. For the purpose of illustrations, the problems of hollow spheres, cylinders and solid circular shafts subjected to various combinations of internal and external pressures, axial force (or constraint) and torque are analyzed using the proposed solution procedure. Various cyclic thermal and mechanical loading histories with rectangular or sawtooth type waves with or without hold-time are considered. Numerical results for these geometrical shapes for various such loading histories are presented using Hart's theory (Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology 1976). The calculations are performed for nickel in the temperature range of 25 0 C to 400 0 C. For integrating forward in time, a method of solving a stiff system of ordinary differential equations is employed which corrects the step size and order of the method automatically. The limit loads for hollow spheres and cylinders are calculated using the proposed method and Hart's theory, and comparisons are made against the known theoretical results. The numerical results for other loading histories are discussed in the context of Hart's state variable type constitutive relations. The significance of phenomena such as strain rate sensitivity, Bauschinger's effect, crep recovery, history dependence and material softening with regard to these multiaxial problems are discussed in the context of Hart's theory

  11. Perturbation theory of the quark-gluon plasma at finite temperature and baryon number density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    At very high energy densities, hadronic matter becomes an almost ideal gas of quarks and gluons. In these circumstances, the effects of particle interactions are small, and to some order in perturbation theory are computable by methods involving weak coupling expansions. To illustrate the perturbative methods which may be used to compute the thermodynamic potential, the results and methods which are employed to compute to first order in α/sub s/ are reviewed. The problem of the plasmon effect, and the necessity of using non-perturbative methods when going beyond first order in α/sub s/ in evaluating the thermodynamic potential are discussed. The results at zero temperature and finite baryon number density to second order in α/sub s/ are also reviewed. The method of renormalization group improving the weak coupling expansions by replacing the expansion by an expansion in a temperature and baryon number density dependent coupling which approaches zero at high energy densities is discussed. Non-perturbative effects such as instantons are briefly mentioned and the breakdown of perturbation theory for the thermodynamical at order α/sub s/ 3 for finite temperature is presented

  12. Solar Wind Proton Temperature Anisotropy: Linear Theory and WIND/SWE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison between WIND/SWE observations (Kasper et al., 2006) of beta parallel to p and T perpendicular to p/T parallel to p (where beta parallel to p is the proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to p and T parallel to p are the perpendicular and parallel proton are the perpendicular and parallel proton temperatures, respectively; here parallel and perpendicular indicate directions with respect to the ambient magnetic field) and predictions of the Vlasov linear theory. In the slow solar wind, the observed proton temperature anisotropy seems to be constrained by oblique instabilities, by the mirror one and the oblique fire hose, contrary to the results of the linear theory which predicts a dominance of the proton cyclotron instability and the parallel fire hose. The fast solar wind core protons exhibit an anticorrelation between beta parallel to c and T perpendicular to c/T parallel to c (where beta parallel to c is the core proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to c and T parallel to c are the perpendicular and parallel core proton temperatures, respectively) similar to that observed in the HELIOS data (Marsch et al., 2004).

  13. The quantum open system theory for quarkonium during finite temperature medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao

    2015-01-01

    This paper explains theoretical studies on the dynamics of heavy quarkonium in a finite temperature medium. As a first step of understanding the dynamics of heavy quarkonium in a medium, it explains firstly the definition of potential acting between heavy quarks in a finite temperature medium, and next the stochastic potential and decoherence. While the conventional definition based on thermodynamics lacks theoretical validity, theoretically reasonable definition can be obtained by the spectral decomposition of Wilson loop in the medium. When calculating the potential with this definition, the imaginary part appears, leading to the lacking of theoretical integrity when used in the potential terms of Schroedinger equation, but it is eliminated by the concept of stochastic potential. Decoherence given by thermal fluctuation to wave function is an important physical process of the dynamics of heavy quarkonium in a finite temperature medium. There is a limit of stochastic potential that cannot describe the irreversible process, and this limitation can be overcome by a more comprehensive system based on the theory of quantum open system. By dealing with the heavy quarkonium as quantum open system, phenomena such as color shielding, thermal fluctuation, and dissipation in the quark-gluon plasma, become describable in the way of quantum theory. (A.O.)

  14. Local chemical potential, local hardness, and dual descriptors in temperature dependent chemical reactivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2017-05-31

    In this work we establish a new temperature dependent procedure within the grand canonical ensemble, to avoid the Dirac delta function exhibited by some of the second order chemical reactivity descriptors based on density functional theory, at a temperature of 0 K. Through the definition of a local chemical potential designed to integrate to the global temperature dependent electronic chemical potential, the local chemical hardness is expressed in terms of the derivative of this local chemical potential with respect to the average number of electrons. For the three-ground-states ensemble model, this local hardness contains a term that is equal to the one intuitively proposed by Meneses, Tiznado, Contreras and Fuentealba, which integrates to the global hardness given by the difference in the first ionization potential, I, and the electron affinity, A, at any temperature. However, in the present approach one finds an additional temperature-dependent term that introduces changes at the local level and integrates to zero. Additionally, a τ-hard dual descriptor and a τ-soft dual descriptor given in terms of the product of the global hardness and the global softness multiplied by the dual descriptor, respectively, are derived. Since all these reactivity indices are given by expressions composed of terms that correspond to products of the global properties multiplied by the electrophilic or nucleophilic Fukui functions, they may be useful for studying and comparing equivalent sites in different chemical environments.

  15. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  16. Infrared problem in gΦ4 theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-11-01

    We study the infrared problem in gΦ 4 theory in 4 dimensions at finite temperature in the context of the real-time formalism. We perform a complete 2-loop analysis of the mass-shift in this model, as a N-loop calculation for a specific class of diagrams. In the case of massless particles, we find the same problems as for hot QCD, that is, the natural infrared cutoff which emerges as a thermal mass, m 2 ∼gT 2 , is too small to act as a good cutoff and the perturbation theory breaks down beyond some order in the coupling constant g. However, we find that an explicit summation of the leading infrared divergent diagrams gives a result which is not very different from the perturbative approach

  17. Renormalization in self-consistent approximation schemes at finite temperature I: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hees, H. van; Knoll, J.

    2001-07-01

    Within finite temperature field theory, we show that truncated non-perturbative self-consistent Dyson resummation schemes can be renormalized with local counter-terms defined at the vacuum level. The requirements are that the underlying theory is renormalizable and that the self-consistent scheme follows Baym's Φ-derivable concept. The scheme generates both, the renormalized self-consistent equations of motion and the closed equations for the infinite set of counter terms. At the same time the corresponding 2PI-generating functional and the thermodynamic potential can be renormalized, in consistency with the equations of motion. This guarantees the standard Φ-derivable properties like thermodynamic consistency and exact conservation laws also for the renormalized approximation scheme to hold. The proof uses the techniques of BPHZ-renormalization to cope with the explicit and the hidden overlapping vacuum divergences. (orig.)

  18. Phase structure of 3DZ(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V.; Cortese, G.; Gravina, M.; Papa, A.; Surzhikov, I.

    2013-01-01

    We perform a numerical study of the phase transitions in three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature for N>4. Using the dual formulation of the models and a cluster algorithm we locate the position of the critical points and study the critical behavior across both phase transitions in details. In particular, we determine various critical indices, compute the average action and the specific heat. Our results are consistent with the two transitions being of infinite order. Furthermore, they belong to the universality class of two-dimensional Z(N) vector spin models

  19. Correspondence between imaginary-time and real-time finite-temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobes, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is known that one-particle-irreducible graphs found using the imaginary-time formalism of finite-temperature field theory differ in general with those of the real-time formalism. Here it is shown that within the real-time formalism one can consider a sum of graphs, motivated by causality arguments, which at least in a number of simple examples agree with the corresponding analytically continued imaginary-time result. The occurrence of multiple statistical factors in this sum of graphs is discussed

  20. Towards a comprehensive theory for He II: A temperature-dependent field-theoretic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghassib, H.B.; Chela-Flores, J.

    1983-07-01

    New experimental aspects of He II, as well as recent developments in particle physics, are invoked to construct the rudiments of a comprehensive theory in which temperature-dependent U(1) and SU(2) gauge fields are incorporated into a hierarchy of effective Lagrangians. It is conjectured that an SU(n) gauge-theoretic description of superfluidity may be obtained in the limit n→infinity. However, it is outlined how experiments can be understood in the zeroth, first and second order of the hierarchy. (author)

  1. Possible higher order phase transition in large-N gauge theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi

    2017-08-07

    We analyze the phase structure of SU(¥) gauge theory at finite temperature using matrix models. Our basic assumption is that the effective potential is dominated by double-trace terms for the Polyakov loops. As a function of the temperature, a background field for the Polyakov loop, and a quartic coupling, it exhibits a universal structure: in the large portion of the parameter space, there is a continuous phase transition analogous to the third-order phase transition of Gross,Witten and Wadia, but the order of phase transition can be higher than third. We show that different confining potentials give rise to drastically different behavior of the eigenvalue density and the free energy. Therefore lattice simulations at large N could probe the order of phase transition and test our results. Critical

  2. Hawking temperature: an elementary approach based on Newtonian mechanics and quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinochet, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In 1974, the British physicist Stephen Hawking discovered that black holes have a characteristic temperature and are therefore capable of emitting radiation. Given the scientific importance of this discovery, there is a profuse literature on the subject. Nevertheless, the available literature ends up being either too simple, which does not convey the true physical significance of the issue, or too technical, which excludes an ample segment of the audience interested in science, such as physics teachers and their students. The present article seeks to remedy this shortcoming. It develops a simple and plausible argument that provides insight into the fundamental aspects of Hawking’s discovery, which leads to an approximate equation for the so-called Hawking temperature. The exposition is mainly intended for physics teachers and their students, and it only requires elementary algebra, as well as basic notions of Newtonian mechanics and quantum theory.

  3. The zero-action hypothesis and high-temperature thermodynamics in the heterotic superstring theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, M. D.

    2005-07-01

    The effective action S for the Einstein theory of gravity coupled to massless scalar fields phi, spinor fields ψ and gauge vector fields Fij describing radiation, so that FijFij = 0, vanishes identically after substitution from the classical equations of motion, thus allowing a perfect fluid for which the energy density ρ and pressure p = (γ - 1)ρ are related by values of the adiabatic index throughout the range 4/3 high-temperature limit T Gt TH, after Euclideanizing the time coordinate, where TH is the Hagedorn temperature. The response of the action to the operators T, C and P is also discussed, T-invariance requiring γ = 2 and hence S = 0, and P-invariance requiring S = 0, showing that the zero-action hypothesis can be understood in terms of these discrete symmetries.

  4. Nonlinear theory of trapped electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in flat density H-mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1990-12-01

    Ion temperature gradient turbulence based transport models have difficulties reconciling the recent DIII-D H-mode results where the density profile is flat, but χ e > χ i in the core region. In this work, a nonlinear theory is developed for recently discovered ion temperature gradient trapped electron modes propagating in the electron diamagnetic direction. This instability is predicted to be linearly unstable for L Ti /R approx-lt κ θ ρ s approx-lt (L Ti /R) 1/4 . They are also found to be strongly dispersive even at these long wavelengths, thereby suggesting the importance of the wave-particle-wave interactions in the nonlinear saturation phase. The fluctuation spectrum and anomalous fluxes are calculated. In accordance with the trends observed in DIII-D, the predicted electron thermal diffusivity can be larger than the ion thermal diffusivity. 17 refs., 3 figs

  5. A Mixed-Methods Trial of Broad Band Noise and Nature Sounds for Tinnitus Therapy: Group and Individual Responses Modeled under the Adaptation Level Theory of Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; Searchfield, Grant D

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized cross-over trial in 18 participants tested the hypothesis that nature sounds, with unpredictable temporal characteristics and high valence would yield greater improvement in tinnitus than constant, emotionally neutral broadband noise. Study Design: The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary measures were: loudness and annoyance ratings, loudness level matches, minimum masking levels, positive and negative emotionality, attention reaction and discrimination time, anxiety, depression and stress. Each sound was administered using MP3 players with earbuds for 8 continuous weeks, with a 3 week wash-out period before crossing over to the other treatment sound. Measurements were undertaken for each arm at sound fitting, 4 and 8 weeks after administration. Qualitative interviews were conducted at each of these appointments. Results: From a baseline TFI score of 41.3, sound therapy resulted in TFI scores at 8 weeks of 35.6; broadband noise resulted in significantly greater reduction (8.2 points) after 8 weeks of sound therapy use than nature sounds (3.2 points). The positive effect of sound on tinnitus was supported by secondary outcome measures of tinnitus, emotion, attention, and psychological state, but not interviews. Tinnitus loudness level match was higher for BBN at 8 weeks; while there was little change in loudness level matches for nature sounds. There was no change in minimum masking levels following sound therapy administration. Self-reported preference for one sound over another did not correlate with changes in tinnitus. Conclusions: Modeled under an adaptation level theory framework of tinnitus perception, the results indicate that the introduction of broadband noise shifts internal adaptation level weighting away from the tinnitus signal, reducing tinnitus magnitude. Nature sounds may modify the affective components of tinnitus via a secondary, residual pathway, but this appears to be less important

  6. Understanding jet noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  7. The theory, direction, and magnitude of ecosystem fire probability as constrained by precipitation and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Richard; Stambaugh, Michael C; Dey, Daniel; Muzika, Rose Marie

    2017-01-01

    The effects of climate on wildland fire confronts society across a range of different ecosystems. Water and temperature affect the combustion dynamics, irrespective of whether those are associated with carbon fueled motors or ecosystems, but through different chemical, physical, and biological processes. We use an ecosystem combustion equation developed with the physical chemistry of atmospheric variables to estimate and simulate fire probability and mean fire interval (MFI). The calibration of ecosystem fire probability with basic combustion chemistry and physics offers a quantitative method to address wildland fire in addition to the well-studied forcing factors such as topography, ignition, and vegetation. We develop a graphic analysis tool for estimating climate forced fire probability with temperature and precipitation based on an empirical assessment of combustion theory and fire prediction in ecosystems. Climate-affected fire probability for any period, past or future, is estimated with given temperature and precipitation. A graphic analyses of wildland fire dynamics driven by climate supports a dialectic in hydrologic processes that affect ecosystem combustion: 1) the water needed by plants to produce carbon bonds (fuel) and 2) the inhibition of successful reactant collisions by water molecules (humidity and fuel moisture). These two postulates enable a classification scheme for ecosystems into three or more climate categories using their position relative to change points defined by precipitation in combustion dynamics equations. Three classifications of combustion dynamics in ecosystems fire probability include: 1) precipitation insensitive, 2) precipitation unstable, and 3) precipitation sensitive. All three classifications interact in different ways with variable levels of temperature.

  8. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W.; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model

  9. Flicker (1/f) noise in tunnel junction DC SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Martinis, J.M.; Pegrum, C.M.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the spectral density of the 1/f voltage noise in current-biased resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions and dc SQUIDs. A theory in which fluctuations in the temperature give rise to fluctuations in the critical current and hence in the voltage predicts the magnitude of the noise quite accurately for junctions with areas of about 2 x 10 4 μm 2 , but significantly overestimates the noise for junctions with areas of about 6 μm 2 . DC SQUIDs fabricated from these two types of junctions exhibit substantially more 1/f voltage noise than would be predicted from a model in which the noise arises from critical current fluctuations in the junctions. This result was confirmed by an experiment involving two different bias current and flux modulation schemes, which demonstrated that the predominant 1/f voltage noise arises not from critical current fluctuations, but from some unknown source that can be regarded as an apparent 1/f flux noise. Measurements on five different configurations of dc SQUIDs fabricated with thin-film tunnel junctions and with widely varying areas, inductances, and junction capacitances show that the spectral density of the 1/f equivalent flux noise is roughtly constant, within a factor of three of (10 -10 /f)phi 2 0 Hz -1 . It is emphasized that 1/f flux noise may not be the predominant source of 1/f noise in SQUIDS fabricated with other technologies

  10. Accurate mean-field modeling of the Barkhausen noise power in ferromagnetic materials, using a positive-feedback theory of ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.

    2015-07-01

    A mean-field positive-feedback (PFB) theory of ferromagnetism is used to explain the origin of Barkhausen noise (BN) and to show why it is most pronounced in the irreversible regions of the hysteresis loop. By incorporating the ABBM-Sablik model of BN into the PFB theory, we obtain analytical solutions that simultaneously describe both the major hysteresis loop and, by calculating separate expressions for the differential susceptibility in the irreversible and reversible regions, the BN power response at all points of the loop. The PFB theory depends on summing components of the applied field, in particular, the non-monotonic field-magnetization relationship characterizing hysteresis, associated with physical processes occurring in the material. The resulting physical model is then validated by detailed comparisons with measured single-peak BN data in three different steels. It also agrees with the well-known influence of a demagnetizing field on the position and shape of these peaks. The results could form the basis of a physics-based method for modeling and understanding the significance of the observed single-peak (and in multi-constituent materials, multi-peak) BN envelope responses seen in contemporary applications of BN, such as quality control in manufacturing, non-destructive testing, and monitoring the microstructural state of ferromagnetic materials.

  11. Noise measurements on proximity effect bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, S.K.; Mercereau, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Audio frequency noise density measurements were performed on weakly superconducting proximity effect bridges on using a cooled transformer and room temperature low noise preamplifier. The noise temperature of the measuring system is approximately 4 0 K for a 0.9 Ω resistor. Noise density was measured as a function of bias current and temperature for the bridges. Excess noise above that expected from Johnson noise for a resistor equal to the dynamic resistance of the bridges was observed in the region near the critical current of the device. At high currents compared to the critical current, the noise density closely approaches that given by Johnson noise

  12. A Definition of the Magnetic Transition Temperature Using Valence Bond Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornet-Somoza, Joaquim; Deumal, Mercè; Borge, Juan; Robb, Michael A

    2018-03-01

    Macroscopic magnetic properties are analyzed using Valence Bond theory. Commonly the critical temperature T C for magnetic systems is associated with a maximum in the energy-based heat capacity C p (T). Here a more broadly applicable definition of the magnetic transition temperature T C is described using the spin moment expectation value (i.e., applying the spin exchange density operator) instead of energy. Namely, the magnetic capacity C s (T) reflects variation in the spin multiplicity as a function of temperature, which is shown to be related to ∂[χT(T)]/∂T. Magnetic capacity C s (T) depends on long-range spin interactions that are not relevant in the energy-based heat capacity C p (T). Differences between C s (T) and C p (T) are shown to be due to spin order/disorder within the crystal that can be monitored via a Valence Bond analysis of the corresponding magnetic wave function. Indeed the concept of the Boltzmann spin-alignment order is used to provide information about the spin correlation between magnetic units. As a final illustration, the critical temperature is derived from the magnetic capacity for several molecular magnets presenting different magnetic topologies that have been experimentally studied. A systematic shift between the transition temperatures associated with C s (T) and C p (T) is observed. It is demonstrated that this shift can be attributed to the loss of long-range spin correlation. This suggests that the magnetic capacity C s (T) can be used as a predictive tool for the magnetic topology and thus for the synthetic chemists.

  13. Theory of Quasi-Equilibrium Nucleosynthesis and Applications to Matter Expanding from High Temperature and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bradley S.; Krishnan, Tracy D.; Clayton, Donald D.

    1998-05-01

    Our first purpose is construction of a formal theory of quasi-equilibrium. We define quasi-equilibrium, in its simplest form, as statistical equilibrium in the face of an extra constraint on the nuclear populations. We show that the extra constraint introduces a uniform translation of the chemical potentials for the heavy nuclei and derive the abundances in terms of it. We then generalize this theory to accommodate any number of constraints. For nucleosynthesis, the most important constraint occurs when the total number of heavy nuclei Yh within a system of nuclei differs from the number that would exist in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) under the same conditions of density and temperature. Three situations of high relevance are (1) silicon burning, wherein the total number of nuclei exceeds but asymptotically approaches the NSE number; (2) alpha-rich freezeout expansions of high entropy, wherein Yh is less than the NSE number; and (3) expansions from high temperature of low-entropy matter, in which Yh exceeds the NSE number. These are of importance, respectively, within (1) supernova shells, (2) Type II supernova cores modestly outside the mass cut, and (3) Type Ia supernova cores in near-Chandrasekhar-mass events. Our next goal is the detailed analysis of situation (2), the high-entropy alpha-rich neutron-rich freezeout. We employ a nuclear reaction network, which we integrate, to compare the actual abundances with those obtained at the same thermal conditions by the quasi-equilibrium (QSE) theory and by the NSE theory. For this detailed comparison, we choose a high-entropy photon-to-nucleon ratio φ = 6.8, for which we conduct expansions at initial bulk neutron excess η0 = 0.10. We demonstrate that the abundance populations, as they begin expansion and cooling from temperature 10 × 109 K, are characterized by three distinct phases: (1) NSE, (2) QSE having Yh smaller than the NSE value, and (3) final reaction rate-dependent freezeout modifications of the

  14. The theory, direction, and magnitude of ecosystem fire probability as constrained by precipitation and temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Guyette

    Full Text Available The effects of climate on wildland fire confronts society across a range of different ecosystems. Water and temperature affect the combustion dynamics, irrespective of whether those are associated with carbon fueled motors or ecosystems, but through different chemical, physical, and biological processes. We use an ecosystem combustion equation developed with the physical chemistry of atmospheric variables to estimate and simulate fire probability and mean fire interval (MFI. The calibration of ecosystem fire probability with basic combustion chemistry and physics offers a quantitative method to address wildland fire in addition to the well-studied forcing factors such as topography, ignition, and vegetation. We develop a graphic analysis tool for estimating climate forced fire probability with temperature and precipitation based on an empirical assessment of combustion theory and fire prediction in ecosystems. Climate-affected fire probability for any period, past or future, is estimated with given temperature and precipitation. A graphic analyses of wildland fire dynamics driven by climate supports a dialectic in hydrologic processes that affect ecosystem combustion: 1 the water needed by plants to produce carbon bonds (fuel and 2 the inhibition of successful reactant collisions by water molecules (humidity and fuel moisture. These two postulates enable a classification scheme for ecosystems into three or more climate categories using their position relative to change points defined by precipitation in combustion dynamics equations. Three classifications of combustion dynamics in ecosystems fire probability include: 1 precipitation insensitive, 2 precipitation unstable, and 3 precipitation sensitive. All three classifications interact in different ways with variable levels of temperature.

  15. Nonlinear theory for the parametric instability with comparable electron and ion temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberman, C.

    1972-01-01

    The basic linear theory of the parametric instability driven by a pump E 0 sin ω 0 t oscillating near the electron plasma frequency is reviewed. An expression is derived for the temporal nonlinear development of the fluctuation spectrum of the excited waves. For plasma with comparable electron and ion temperatures nonlinear Landau damping of electron plasma waves on ions provides the dominant nonlinearity. The steady state solutions are examined both analytically and numerically in the limit when the spontaneous emission term is small. The characteristics of the plasma wave spectrum agrees well with the general features of ionospheric observations. The enhanced dissipation rate of the pump due to the presence of the fluctuations agrees with laboratory observations. (U.S.)

  16. Critical behavior of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O., E-mail: oleg@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Chelnokov, V., E-mail: chelnokov@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Cortese, G., E-mail: cortese@unizar.es [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gravina, M., E-mail: gravina@cs.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Papa, A., E-mail: papa@cs.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Surzhikov, I., E-mail: i_van_go@inbox.ru [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-02-15

    Three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at zero temperature are studied for various values of N. Using a modified phenomenological renormalization group, we explore the critical behavior of the generalized Z(N) model for N=2,3,4,5,6,8. Numerical computations are used to simulate vector models for N=2,3,4,5,6,8,13,20 for lattices with linear extension up to L=96. We locate the critical points of phase transitions and establish their scaling with N. The values of the critical indices indicate that the models with N>4 belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional XY model. However, the exponent α derived from the heat capacity is consistent with the Ising universality class. We discuss a possible resolution of this puzzle.

  17. Critical behavior of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V.; Cortese, G.; Gravina, M.; Papa, A.; Surzhikov, I.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at zero temperature are studied for various values of N. Using a modified phenomenological renormalization group, we explore the critical behavior of the generalized Z(N) model for N=2,3,4,5,6,8. Numerical computations are used to simulate vector models for N=2,3,4,5,6,8,13,20 for lattices with linear extension up to L=96. We locate the critical points of phase transitions and establish their scaling with N. The values of the critical indices indicate that the models with N>4 belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional XY model. However, the exponent α derived from the heat capacity is consistent with the Ising universality class. We discuss a possible resolution of this puzzle

  18. Towards an understanding of the large-U Hubbard model and a theory for high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.C.T.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes work on a large-U Hubbard model theory for high temperature superconductors. After an introduction to recent developments in the field, the author reviews experimental results. At the same time he introduces the holon-spinon model and comment on its successes and shortcomings. Using this heuristic model he then describes a holon pairing theory of superconductivity and list some experimental evidence for this interlayer coupling theory. The latter part of the thesis is devoted to projected fermion mean field theories. They are introduced by applying this theory and some recently developed computational techniques to anisotropic antiferromagnets. This scheme is shown to give quantitatively good results for the two dimensional square lattice Heisenberg AFM. The results have definite implications for a spinon theory of quantum antiferromagnets. Finally he studies flux phases and other variational prescriptions for obtaining low lying states of the Hubbard model

  19. Molecular evolutionary rates are not correlated with temperature and latitude in Squamata: an exception to the metabolic theory of ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Jonathan; Loiseau, Oriane; Romiguier, Jonathan; Salamin, Nicolas

    2016-05-20

    The metabolic theory of ecology stipulates that molecular evolutionary rates should correlate with temperature and latitude in ectothermic organisms. Previous studies have shown that most groups of vertebrates, such as amphibians, turtles and even endothermic mammals, have higher molecular evolutionary rates in regions where temperature is high. However, the association between molecular evolutionary rates and temperature or latitude has never been tested in Squamata. We used a large dataset including the spatial distributions and environmental variables for 1,651 species of Squamata and compared the contrast of the rates of molecular evolution with the contrast of temperature and latitude between sister species. Using major axis regressions and a new algorithm to choose independent sister species pairs, we found that temperature and absolute latitude were not associated with molecular evolutionary rates. This absence of association in such a diverse ectothermic group questions the mechanisms explaining current pattern of species diversity in Squamata and challenges the presupposed universality of the metabolic theory of ecology.

  20. Relation of extended Van Hove singularities to high-temperature superconductivity within strong-coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R.J.; Norman, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments have indicated that the electronic dispersion in some of the cuprates possesses an extended saddle point near the Fermi level which gives rise to a density of states that diverges like a power law instead of the weaker logarithmic divergence usually considered. We investigate whether this strong singularity can give rise to high transition temperatures by computing the critical temperature T c and isotope effect coefficient α within a strong-coupling Eliashberg theory which accounts for the full energy variation of the density of states. Using band structures extracted from ARPES measurements, we demonstrate that, while the weak-coupling solutions suggest a strong influence of the strength of the Van Hove singularity on T c and α, strong-coupling solutions show less sensitivity to the singularity strength and do not support the hypothesis that band-structure effects alone can account for either the large T c 's or the different T c 's within the copper oxide family. This conclusion is supported when our results are plotted as a function of the physically relevant self-consistent coupling constant, which shows universal behavior at very strong coupling

  1. Extension of the Kohn-Sham formulation of density functional theory to finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonis, A.; Däne, M.

    2018-05-01

    Based on Mermin's extension of the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems to non-zero temperature, the Kohn-Sham formulation of density functional theory (KS-DFT) is generalized to finite temperature. We show that present formulations are inconsistent with Mermin's functional containing expressions, in particular describing the Coulomb energy, that defy derivation and are even in violation of rules of logical inference. More; current methodology is in violation of fundamental laws of both quantum and classical mechanics. Based on this feature, we demonstrate the impossibility of extending the KS formalism to finite temperature through the self-consistent solutions of the single-particle Schrödinger equation of T > 0. Guided by the form of Mermin's functional that depends on the eigenstates of a Hamiltonian, determined at T = 0, we base our extension of KS-DFT on the determination of the excited states of a non-interacting system at the zero of temperature. The resulting formulation is consistent with that of Mermin constructing the free energy at T > 0 in terms of the excited states of a non-interacting Hamiltonian (system) that, within the KS formalism, are described by Slater determinants. To determine the excited states at T = 0 use is made of the extension of the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems to excited states presented in previous work applied here to a non-interacting collection of replicas of a non-interacting N-particle system, whose ground state density is taken to match that of K non-interacting replicas of an interacting N-particle system at T = 0 . The formalism allows for an ever denser population of the excitation spectrum of a Hamiltonian, within the KS approximation. The form of the auxiliary potential, (Kohn-Sham potential), is formally identical to that in the ground state formalism with the contribution of the Coulomb energy provided by the derivative of the Coulomb energy in all excited states taken into account. Once the excited states are determined, the

  2. Temperature-dependent study of isotropic-nematic transition for a Gay-Berne fluid using density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ram Chandra

    2007-01-01

    We have used the density-functional theory to study the effect of varying temperature on the isotropic-nematic transition of a fluid of molecules interacting via the Gay-Berne intermolecular potential. The nematic phase is found to be stable with respect to isotropic phase in the temperature range 0.80≤T*≤1.25. Pair correlation functions needed as input information in density-functional theory is calculated using the Percus-Yevick integral equation theory. We find that the density-functional theory is good for studying the isotropic-nematic transition in molecular fluids if the values of the pair-correlation functions in the isotropic phase are known accurately. We have also compared our results with computer simulation results wherever they are available

  3. Calculation of temperature rise for cable conductor of DCS cabinet power based on theory of numerical thermal transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yong; Zhang Longqiang; Yang Zhen; Yu Bin

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure a long-term reliable operation of the DCS cabinet's 220 V AC power cable, it was needed to confirm whether the conductor temperature rise of power cable meet the requirement of the cable specification. Based on the actual data in site and the theory of numerical heat transfer, conservative model was established, and the conductor temperature was calculated. The calculation results show that the cable arrangement on the cable tray will not lead to the conductor temperature rise of power cable over than the required temperature in technical specification. (authors)

  4. High-temperature expansion along the self-dual line of three-dimensional Z(2) spin-gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanot, G.

    1981-01-01

    We exploit the self-duality of the three-dimensional Ising spin-gauge theory to develop an eighth-order high-temperature expansion for the partition function along the self-dual line. This generates a high-temperature series for the gauge-invariant, nearest-neighbor spin-spin correlation function. A Pade analysis of this series reveals a pole along the self-dual line. Recent Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this theory has a first-order self-dual line emerging from a triple point. We interpret the Pade pole as a theoretical estimate of the end point of this self-dual line

  5. Symmetry restoration at high-temperature in two-color and two-flavor lattice gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong-Wan [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, SA2 8PP, Swansea, Wales (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Pusan National University,Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Extreme Physics Institute, Pusan National University,Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, SA2 8PP, Swansea, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-07

    We consider the SU(2) gauge theory with N{sub f}=2 flavors of Dirac fundamental fermions. We study the high-temperature behavior of the spectra of mesons, discretizing the theory on anisotropic lattices, and measuring the two-point correlation functions in the temporal direction as well as screening masses in various channels. We identify the (pseudo-)critical temperature as the temperature at which the susceptibility associated with the Polyakov loop has a maximum. At high temperature both the spin-1 and spin-0 sectors of the light meson spectra exhibit enhanced symmetry properties, indicating the restoration of both the global SU(4) and the axial U(1){sub A} symmetries of the model.

  6. Phase structure of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature: Large-N and continuum limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O., E-mail: oleg@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Chelnokov, V., E-mail: chelnokov@bitp.kiev.ua [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Gravina, M., E-mail: gravina@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Papa, A., E-mail: papa@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    We study numerically three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature, for N=5,6,8,12,13 and 20 on lattices with temporal extension N{sub t}=2,4,8. For each model, we locate phase transition points and determine critical indices. We propose also the scaling of critical points with N. The data obtained enable us to verify the scaling near the continuum limit for the Z(N) models at finite temperatures.

  7. Phase structure of 3D Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature: Large-N and continuum limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V.; Gravina, M.; Papa, A.

    2014-01-01

    We study numerically three-dimensional Z(N) lattice gauge theories at finite temperature, for N=5,6,8,12,13 and 20 on lattices with temporal extension N t =2,4,8. For each model, we locate phase transition points and determine critical indices. We propose also the scaling of critical points with N. The data obtained enable us to verify the scaling near the continuum limit for the Z(N) models at finite temperatures

  8. Predicting critical temperatures of iron(II) spin crossover materials: Density functional theory plus U approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yachao, E-mail: yczhang@nano.gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018, Guizhou (China)

    2014-12-07

    A first-principles study of critical temperatures (T{sub c}) of spin crossover (SCO) materials requires accurate description of the strongly correlated 3d electrons as well as much computational effort. This task is still a challenge for the widely used local density or generalized gradient approximations (LDA/GGA) and hybrid functionals. One remedy, termed density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) approach, introduces a Hubbard U term to deal with the localized electrons at marginal computational cost, while treats the delocalized electrons with LDA/GGA. Here, we employ the DFT+U approach to investigate the T{sub c} of a pair of iron(II) SCO molecular crystals (α and β phase), where identical constituent molecules are packed in different ways. We first calculate the adiabatic high spin-low spin energy splitting ΔE{sub HL} and molecular vibrational frequencies in both spin states, then obtain the temperature dependent enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH and ΔS), and finally extract T{sub c} by exploiting the ΔH/T − T and ΔS − T relationships. The results are in agreement with experiment. Analysis of geometries and electronic structures shows that the local ligand field in the α phase is slightly weakened by the H-bondings involving the ligand atoms and the specific crystal packing style. We find that this effect is largely responsible for the difference in T{sub c} of the two phases. This study shows the applicability of the DFT+U approach for predicting T{sub c} of SCO materials, and provides a clear insight into the subtle influence of the crystal packing effects on SCO behavior.

  9. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regulated by EPA EPA or a designated Federal agency regulates noise sources, such as rail and motor carriers, low noise emission products, construction equipment, transport equipment, trucks, motorcycles, and the labeling of hearing ...

  10. Application of SQUIDs to low temperature and high magnetic field measurements—Ultra low noise torque magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, F.; Naumann, M.; Lühmann, Th.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Hassinger, E.

    2018-02-01

    Torque magnetometry is a key method to measure the magnetic anisotropy and quantum oscillations in metals. In order to resolve quantum oscillations in sub-millimeter sized samples, piezo-electric micro-cantilevers were introduced. In the case of strongly correlated metals with large Fermi surfaces and high cyclotron masses, magnetic torque resolving powers in excess of 104 are required at temperatures well below 1 K and magnetic fields beyond 10 T. Here, we present a new broadband read-out scheme for piezo-electric micro-cantilevers via Wheatstone-type resistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 15 T and temperatures down to 200 mK. By using a two-stage superconducting-quantum interference device as a null detector of a cold Wheatstone bridge, we were able to achieve a magnetic moment resolution of Δm = 4 × 10-15 J/T at maximal field and 700 mK, outperforming conventional magnetometers by at least one order of magnitude in this temperature and magnetic field range. Exemplary de Haas-van Alphen measurement of a newly grown delafossite, PdRhO2, was used to show the superior performance of our setup.

  11. Sustaining a "culture of silence" in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: a grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, S; Ramesh, A; Nagapoornima, M; Fernandes, Lavina M; Jisina, C; Rao, P N Suman; Swarnarekha, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP) during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians). Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to "sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations" (core category). The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The "culture of silence" reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a "noisy culture" prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs with resource constraints.

  12. Basic concepts on the theory of high temperature superconductivity. The importance of the isotope effect. Grundvorstellungen zur Theorie der Hochtemperatur-Supraleitung. Die Rolle des Isotopieeffektes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der, R.; Schumacher, W. (Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung, Leipzig (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-01-01

    With the experimental detection of high temperature superconduction (HTSC) a lot of different new concepts for the explanation of this phenomenon have been developed. After a short reminiscence of the conventional theory of superconduction these new approaches are outlined and discussed. Contrarely to the conventional superconductors the isotopic effect in HTSC is generally very small or absent. The role of the isotopic effects in the investigation of new HTSC mechanisms is discussed. (orig.).

  13. Community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  14. The prediction of stellar effective temperatures from the mixing-length theory of convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, B.B.; Vandenberg, D.A.; Irwin, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized version of the mixing-length theory (MLT) of convection, along with simplifications in the limits of high and low convective efficiency, is described. This forms the basis for a study of the effects of proposed modifications to the original (Boehm-Vitense, 1958) form of the MLT on the predicted effective temperatures of cool stars. These modifications include the parameters y and m. It is found that none of the suggested refinements to the MLT affect the location and shape of an evolutionary track on the H-R diagram in ways that cannot be mimicked to high accuracy by a suitable choice of mixing length parameters alone. Thus, if mixing length parameters is calibrated by comparing stellar models with observed main-sequence stars with well-determined properties, then the subsequent evolutionary tracks and isochrones are uniquely defined, regardless of what version of the MLT is used in the calculations. A careful examination of the Revised Yale Isochrones suggests that the Teff scale of these isochrones is inconsistent with the assumed MLT, thereby resolving much of the known discrepancies between these calculations and those of VandenBerg and Bell (1958). 44 refs

  15. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, T; Grabowski, B; Körmann, F; Neugebauer, J

    2012-02-08

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  16. Effective field theories of QCD for heavy quarkonia at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo

    2011-01-01

    Quarkonia, i.e. heavy quark-antiquark bound states, represent one of the most important probes in the experimental investigation, through heavy-ion collisions, of the high-temperature region of the phase diagram of QCD, where the onset of a deconfined medium, the quark-gluon plasma, is expected. Such bound states were hypothesized to dissociate in this plasma due to the screening of the colour charges and experimental data from SPS, RHIC and very recently also LHC indeed show a suppression pattern. In this thesis we extend the well-established and successful zero temperature framework of Non-Relativistic (NR) Effective Field Theories (EFTs) (NRQCD, pNRQCD) for the study of heavy quarkonia (production, spectroscopy, decays,..) to finite temperatures. This is achieved by integrating out in sequence the scales that characterize a NR bound state and those that are typical of a thermal medium, in the possible hierarchies that are relevant for quarkonia in the quark-gluon plasma. Within this framework we show how the potential that governs the evolution of the quark-antiquark pair is derived from QCD in a modern and rigorous way, thereby bridging the gap between phenomenological potential models and QCD. We show how the EFTs can be systematically improved and how effects that cannot be encoded in a potential arise naturally in the EFT, giving rise to new mechanisms of dissociation. We use this EFT framework to compute the spectrum and width of quarkonia in a particular setting that is relevant for the phenomenology of the ground states of bottomonium at the LHC. We also analyze within this framework the correlator of Polyakov loops, which is related to the thermodynamical free energy of heavy quark-antiquark pairs in the medium. As such, lattice computations thereof were frequently used as input for potential models. With our approach we are able to clarify the relation between these free energies and the real-time potential describing the dynamics of quarkonia, finding

  17. Effective field theories of QCD for heavy quarkonia at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo

    2011-07-27

    Quarkonia, i.e. heavy quark-antiquark bound states, represent one of the most important probes in the experimental investigation, through heavy-ion collisions, of the high-temperature region of the phase diagram of QCD, where the onset of a deconfined medium, the quark-gluon plasma, is expected. Such bound states were hypothesized to dissociate in this plasma due to the screening of the colour charges and experimental data from SPS, RHIC and very recently also LHC indeed show a suppression pattern. In this thesis we extend the well-established and successful zero temperature framework of Non-Relativistic (NR) Effective Field Theories (EFTs) (NRQCD, pNRQCD) for the study of heavy quarkonia (production, spectroscopy, decays,..) to finite temperatures. This is achieved by integrating out in sequence the scales that characterize a NR bound state and those that are typical of a thermal medium, in the possible hierarchies that are relevant for quarkonia in the quark-gluon plasma. Within this framework we show how the potential that governs the evolution of the quark-antiquark pair is derived from QCD in a modern and rigorous way, thereby bridging the gap between phenomenological potential models and QCD. We show how the EFTs can be systematically improved and how effects that cannot be encoded in a potential arise naturally in the EFT, giving rise to new mechanisms of dissociation. We use this EFT framework to compute the spectrum and width of quarkonia in a particular setting that is relevant for the phenomenology of the ground states of bottomonium at the LHC. We also analyze within this framework the correlator of Polyakov loops, which is related to the thermodynamical free energy of heavy quark-antiquark pairs in the medium. As such, lattice computations thereof were frequently used as input for potential models. With our approach we are able to clarify the relation between these free energies and the real-time potential describing the dynamics of quarkonia, finding

  18. Post commissioning noise study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heraud, P.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation described a wind farm post-commissioning study conducted at a wind farm owned by Helimax Energy Inc. The farm was located in a partly-forested, partly cultivated region in Quebec that featured gently rolling hills. Over 600 dwellings were located within 2 km of the wind farm, and 44 dwellings were within the wind farm's boundaries. The noise impact assessments were conducted at various points near the wind farm. The wind farm was designed using an International Standards Organization (ISO) noise propagation model and a 40 dBA to provide adequate setbacks. The study was conducted using 10 days of continuous measurements at selected points of a wind farm. Points of reception included points from 650 m to 800 m. Noise over 2 km was not thought to be contributed by the wind turbine. The nearest dwelling was 512 m from one of the farm's wind turbines. The study also considered ground factor, temperature, relative humidity, and the height of the receptors. Quebec noise level limits are 40 dBA at night, and 45 dBA during the day. Noise level limits are independent of wind speed. Measured noise contributions over 40 dBA were not observed during the measurement program. The wind turbines were only audible for 1 night out of the 30 night study period. It was concluded that the ISO noise propagation model is a reliable tool for conducting noise impact assessments. tabs., figs

  19. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  20. Study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide under high temperature and pressure with density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mu; Wang Feng; Zheng Zhou; Liu Xiankun; Jiang Tao

    2013-01-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of UO 2 under extreme physical condition are studied by using the density functional theory and quasi-harmonic Debye model. Results show that UO 2 is still stable ionic crystal under high temperatures, and pressures. Tetragonal shear constant is steady under high pressures and temperatures, while elastic constant C 44 is stable under high temperatures, but rises with pressure sharply. Bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus increase with pressure rapidly, but temperature would not cause evident debasement of the moduli, all of which indicate that UO 2 has excellent mechanical properties. Heat capacity of different pressures increases with temperature and is close to the Dulong-Petit limit near 1000 K. Debye temperature decreases with temperature, and increases with pressure. Under low pressure, thermal expansion coefficient raises with temperature rapidly, and then gets slow at higher pressure and temperature. Besides, the thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 is much lower than that of other nuclear materials. (authors)

  1. Reversal time of jump-noise magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets via Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Arun; Rakheja, Shaloo

    2018-06-01

    The jump-noise is a nonhomogeneous Poisson process which models thermal effects in magnetization dynamics, with special applications in low temperature escape rate phenomena. In this work, we develop improved numerical methods for Monte Carlo simulation of the jump-noise dynamics and validate the method by comparing the stationary distribution obtained empirically against the Boltzmann distribution. In accordance with the Néel-Brown theory, the jump-noise dynamics display an exponential relaxation toward equilibrium with a characteristic reversal time, which we extract for nanomagnets with uniaxial and cubic anisotropy. We relate the jump-noise dynamics to the equivalent Landau-Lifshitz dynamics up to second order correction for a general energy landscape and obtain the analogous Néel-Brown theory's solution of the reversal time. We find that the reversal time of jump-noise dynamics is characterized by Néel-Brown theory's solution at the energy saddle point for small noise. For large noise, the magnetization reversal due to jump-noise dynamics phenomenologically represents macroscopic tunneling of magnetization.

  2. Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA Lewis Research Center space qualified hybrid high temperature superconducting/semiconducting 7.4 GHz low-noise downconverter for NRL HTSSE-II program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadi, H.H.S.; Bowen, J.G.; Rascoe, D.L.; Chorey, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    A deep space satellite downconverter receiver was proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) for the Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) high temperature superconductivity space experiment, phase-II (HTSSE-II) program. Space qualified low-noise cryogenic downconverter receivers utilizing thin-film high temperature superconducting (HTS) passive circuitry and semiconductor active devices were developed and delivered to NRL. The downconverter consists of an HTS preselect filter, a cryogenic low-noise amplifier, a cryogenic mixer, and a cryogenic oscillator with an HTS resonator. HTS components were inserted as the front-end filter and the local oscillator resonator for their superior 77 K performance over the conventional components. The semiconducting low noise amplifier also benefited from cooling to 77 K. The mixer was designed specifically for cryogenic applications and provided low conversion loss and low power consumption. In addition to an engineering model, two space qualified units (qualification, flight) were built and delivered to NRL. Manufacturing, integration and test of the space qualified downconverters adhered to the requirements of JPL class-D space instruments and partially to MIL-STD-883D specifications. The qualification unit has ∼50 K system noise temperature which is a factor of three better than a conventional downconverter at room temperature

  3. Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT) Provides a Thermodynamics Rationale to Underpin the Convergent Temperature Response in Plant Leaf Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L. L.; Arcus, V. L.; Heskel, M.; O'Sullivan, O. S.; Weerasinghe, L. K.; Creek, D.; Egerton, J. J. G.; Tjoelker, M. G.; Atkin, O. K.; Schipper, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature is a crucial factor in determining the rates of ecosystem processes such as leaf respiration (R) - the flux of plant respired carbon dioxide (CO2) from leaves to the atmosphere. Generally, respiration rate increases exponentially with temperature as modelled by the Arrhenius equation, but a recent study (Heskel et al., 2016) showed a universally convergent temperature response of R using an empirical exponential/polynomial model whereby the exponent in the Arrhenius model is replaced by a quadratic function of temperature. The exponential/polynomial model has been used elsewhere to describe shoot respiration and plant respiration. What are the principles that underlie these empirical observations? Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), based on transition state theory for chemical kinetics, is equivalent to the exponential/polynomial model. We re-analyse the data from Heskel et al. 2016 using MMRT to show this equivalence and thus, provide an explanation based on thermodynamics, for the convergent temperature response of R. Using statistical tools, we also show the equivalent explanatory power of MMRT when compared to the exponential/polynomial model and the superiority of both of these models over the Arrhenius function. Three meaningful parameters emerge from MMRT analysis: the temperature at which the rate of respiration is maximum (the so called optimum temperature, Topt), the temperature at which the respiration rate is most sensitive to changes in temperature (the inflection temperature, Tinf) and the overall curvature of the log(rate) versus temperature plot (the so called change in heat capacity for the system, ). The latter term originates from the change in heat capacity between an enzyme-substrate complex and an enzyme transition state complex in enzyme-catalysed metabolic reactions. From MMRT, we find the average Topt and Tinf of R are 67.0±1.2 °C and 41.4±0.7 °C across global sites. The average curvature (average

  4. Survey, applications, and prospects of Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blalock, T.V.; Shepard, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Significant progress in the field of Johnson noise thermometry has occurred since the 1971 survey of Kamper. This paper will review the foundation work of Johnson noise thermometry, survey the basic methods which do not utilize quantum devices for noise thermometry for industrial temperatures, and present some applications of noise thermometry in temperature scale metrology and process temperature instrumentation. 35 references

  5. Application of the error propagation theory in estimates of static formation temperatures in geothermal and petroleum boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Andaverde, Jorge; Santoyo, E.

    2006-01-01

    We used the error propagation theory to calculate uncertainties in static formation temperature estimates in geothermal and petroleum wells from three widely used methods (line-source or Horner method; spherical and radial heat flow method; and cylindrical heat source method). Although these methods commonly use an ordinary least-squares linear regression model considered in this study, we also evaluated two variants of a weighted least-squares linear regression model for the actual relationship between the bottom-hole temperature and the corresponding time functions. Equations based on the error propagation theory were derived for estimating uncertainties in the time function of each analytical method. These uncertainties in conjunction with those on bottom-hole temperatures were used to estimate individual weighting factors required for applying the two variants of the weighted least-squares regression model. Standard deviations and 95% confidence limits of intercept were calculated for both types of linear regressions. Applications showed that static formation temperatures computed with the spherical and radial heat flow method were generally greater (at the 95% confidence level) than those from the other two methods under study. When typical measurement errors of 0.25 h in time and 5 deg. C in bottom-hole temperature were assumed for the weighted least-squares model, the uncertainties in the estimated static formation temperatures were greater than those for the ordinary least-squares model. However, if these errors were smaller (about 1% in time and 0.5% in temperature measurements), the weighted least-squares linear regression model would generally provide smaller uncertainties for the estimated temperatures than the ordinary least-squares linear regression model. Therefore, the weighted model would be statistically correct and more appropriate for such applications. We also suggest that at least 30 precise and accurate BHT and time measurements along with

  6. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids

  7. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  8. White noise on bialgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Stochastic processes with independent increments on a group are generalized to the concept of "white noise" on a Hopf algebra or bialgebra. The main purpose of the book is the characterization of these processes as solutions of quantum stochastic differential equations in the sense of R.L. Hudsonand K.R. Parthasarathy. The notes are a contribution to quantum probability but they are also related to classical probability, quantum groups, and operator algebras. The Az ma martingales appear as examples of white noise on a Hopf algebra which is a deformation of the Heisenberg group. The book will be of interest to probabilists and quantum probabilists. Specialists in algebraic structures who are curious about the role of their concepts in probablility theory as well as quantum theory may find the book interesting. The reader should havesome knowledge of functional analysis, operator algebras, and probability theory.

  9. Fluctuation and dissipation in nonequilibrium quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Rudnei O.

    1994-01-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of a scalar field is studied using perturbation theory and a real time finite temperature formulation. The evolution equation for the scalar field is explicitly obtained, and terms responsible for noise (fluctuations) and dissipation are identified and studied in the high temperature limit. (author)

  10. Theory of relaxation phenomena in a spin-3/2 Ising system near the second-order phase transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Canko, Osman

    2005-01-01

    The relaxation behavior of the spin-3/2 Ising model Hamiltonian with bilinear and biquadratic interactions near the second-order phase transition temperature or critical temperature is studied by means of the Onsager's theory of irreversible thermodynamics or the Onsager reciprocity theorem (ORT). First, we give the equilibrium case briefly within the molecular-field approximation in order to study the relaxation behavior by using the ORT. Then, the ORT is applied to the model and the kinetic equations are obtained. By solving these equations, three relaxation times are calculated and examined for temperatures near the second-order phase transition temperature. It is found that one of the relaxation times goes to infinity near the critical temperature on either side, the second relaxation time makes a cusp at the critical temperature and third one behaves very differently in which it terminates at the critical temperature while approaching it, then showing a 'flatness' property and then decreases. We also study the influences of the Onsager rate coefficients on the relaxation times. The behavior of these relaxation times is discussed and compared with the spin-1/2 and spin-1 Ising systems

  11. Noise measurements on NbN thin films with a negative temperature resistance coefficient deposited on sapphire and on SiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leroy, G.; Gest, J.; Vandamme, L.K.J.; Bourgeois, O.

    2007-01-01

    We characterize granular NbNx thin cermet films deposited on either sapphire substrate or on SiO2 and compare the 1/f noise at 300 K and 80 K. The films were characterized with an impedance analyzer from 20 Hz to 1 MHz and analyzed as a resistor R in parallel with a capacitor C. The calculated noise

  12. 14. informal meeting on reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The present booklet contains abstracts of papers from the 14th informal meeting on reactor noise held at St. Englmar in April 1981. The main topics dealt with are vibration and loose part monitoring, leak detection, noise theory and noise applications and in the final part data processing and pattern recognition techniques. (orig.)

  13. Noise from wind power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljunggren, S.

    2001-12-01

    First, the generation of noise at wind power plants and the character of the sound is described. The propagation of the sound and its dependence on the structure of the ground and on wind and temperature is treated next. Models for calculation of the noise emission are reviewed and examples of applications are given. Different means for reducing the disturbances are described

  14. Theory and application of high temperature superconducting eddy current probes for nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James Ronald

    1998-10-01

    Several High-T c Superconducting (HTS) eddy current probes have been developed for applications in electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of conducting materials. The probes utilize high-T c SUperconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers to detect the fields produced by the perturbation of induced eddy currents resulting from subsurface flaws. Localized HTS shields are incorporated to selectively screen out environmental electromagnetic interference and enable movement of the instrument in the Earth's magnetic field. High permeability magnetic shields are employed to focus flux into, and thereby increase the eddy current density in the metallic test samples. NDE test results are presented, in which machined flaws in aluminum alloy are detected by probes of different design. A novel current injection technique performing NDE of wires using SQUIDs is also discussed. The HTS and high permeability shields are designed based on analytical and numerical finite element method (FEM) calculations presented here. Superconducting and high permeability magnetic shields are modeled in uniform noise fields and in the presence of dipole fields characteristic of flaw signals. Several shield designs are characterized in terms of (1) their ability to screen out uniform background noise fields; (2) the resultant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and (3) the extent to which dipole source fields are distorted. An analysis of eddy current induction is then presented for low frequency SQUID NDE. Analytical expressions are developed for the induced eddy currents and resulting magnetic fields produced by excitation sources above conducting plates of varying thickness. The expressions derived here are used to model the SQUID's response to material thinning. An analytical defect model is also developed, taking into account the attenuation of the defect field through the conducting material, as well as the current flow around the edges of the flaw. Time harmonic

  15. Two-temperature theory in magneto-thermoelasticity with fractional order dual-phase-lag heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezzat, Magdy A., E-mail: maezzat2000@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters in Al Bukayriyyah, Al-Qassim University, Al-Qassim (Saudi Arabia); El-Karamany, Ahmed S., E-mail: qaramani@gmail.com [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Nizwa University, P.O. Box 1357, Nizwa 611 (Oman); Ezzat, Shereen M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters in Al Bukayriyyah, Al-Qassim University, Al-Qassim (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model fractional order dual-phase-lag heat conduction law. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We applied the model on a perfect conducting half-space of elastic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some theories of generalized thermoelasticity follow as limit cases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer State space approach is adopted for the solution of one-dimensional problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model will improve the efficiency of thermoelectric material. - Abstract: A new mathematical model of two-temperature magneto-thermoelasticity is constructed where the fractional order dual-phase-lag heat conduction law is considered. The state space approach developed in Ezzat (2008) is adopted for the solution of one-dimensional application for a perfect conducting half-space of elastic material, which is thermally shocked in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The Laplace transform technique is used. A numerical method is employed for the inversion of the Laplace transforms. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the new theory has been constructed. Some theories of generalized thermoelasticity follow as limit cases. Some comparisons have been shown in figures to estimate effects of temperature discrepancy and fractional order parameter on all the studied fields.

  16. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual: Rotorcraft System Noise Prediction System (ROTONET), part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Donald S.; Jumper, Stephen J.; Burley, Casey L.; Golub, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the theoretical methods used in the rotorcraft noise prediction system (ROTONET), which is a part of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). The ANOPP code consists of an executive, database manager, and prediction modules for jet engine, propeller, and rotor noise. The ROTONET subsystem contains modules for the prediction of rotor airloads and performance with momentum theory and prescribed wake aerodynamics, rotor tone noise with compact chordwise and full-surface solutions to the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equations, semiempirical airfoil broadband noise, and turbulence ingestion broadband noise. Flight dynamics, atmosphere propagation, and noise metric calculations are covered in NASA TM-83199, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

  17. Single-particle thermal diffusion of charged colloids: Double-layer theory in a temperature gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhont, J.K.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The double-layer contribution to the single-particle thermal diffusion coefficient of charged, spherical colloids with arbitrary double-layer thickness is calculated and compared to experiments. The calculation is based on an extension of the Debye-Hückel theory for the double-layer structure that

  18. Dynamical response of the Ising model to the time dependent magnetic field with white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıncı, Ümit

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the white noise in time dependent magnetic field on the dynamic behavior of the Ising model has been investigated within the effective field theory based on Glauber type of stochastic process. Discrete white noise has been chosen from both Gaussian and uniform probability distributions. Detailed investigation on probability distribution of dynamical order parameter results that, both type of noise distributions yield the same probability distribution related to the dynamical order parameter, namely Gaussian probability distribution. The variation of the parameters that describe the probability distribution of dynamical order parameter (mean value and standard deviation) with temperature and strength of the noise have been inspected. Also, it has been shown that, rising strength of the noise can induce dynamical phase transition in the system.

  19. Estimations of temperature deviations in chromatographic columns using isenthalpic plots. I. Theory for isocratic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Iraneta, Pamela; Guiochon, Georges; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Poe, Donald P

    2014-10-31

    We propose to use constant enthalpy or isenthalpic diagrams as a tool to estimate the extent of the temperature variations caused by the mobile phase pressure drop along a chromatographic column, e.g. of its cooling in supercritical fluid and its heating in ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Temperature strongly affects chromatographic phenomena. Any of its variations inside the column, whether intended or not, can lead to significant changes in separation performance. Although instruments use column ovens in order to keep constant the column temperature, operating conditions leading to a high pressure drop may cause significant variations of the column temperature, both in the axial and the radial directions, from the set value. Different ways of measuring these temperature variations are available but they are too inconvenient to be employed in many practical situations. In contrast, the thermodynamic plot-based method that we describe here can easily be used with only a ruler and a pencil. They should be helpful in developing methods or in analyzing results in analytical laboratories. Although the most effective application area for this approach should be SFC (supercritical fluid chromatography), it can be applied to any chromatographic conditions in which temperature variations take place along the column due to the pressure drop, e.g. in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC). The method proposed here is applicable to isocractic conditions only. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diffusion of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion behaviors of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an internal white noise and an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise are investigated through numerical simulation. In contrast to the case when the bias force is smaller or absent, the diffusion coefficient exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the correlation time of the external noise when bias force is large. A mechanism different from locked-to-running transition theory is presented for the diffusion enhancement by a bias force in intermediate to large damping. In the underdamped regime and the presence of external noise, the diffusion coefficient is a monotonically decreasing function of low temperature rather than a nonmonotonic function when external noise is absent. The diffusive process undergoes four regimes when bias force approaches but is less than its critical value and noises intensities are small. These behaviors can be attributed to the locked-to-running transition of particles.

  1. Shot noise of a quantum shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotny, Tomas; Donarini, Andrea; Flindt, Christian

    2004-01-01

    We formulate a theory for shot noise in quantum nanoelectromechanical systems. As a specific example, the theory is applied to a quantum shuttle, and the zero-frequency noise, measured by the Fano factor F, is computed. F reaches very low values (Fsimilar or equal to10(-2)) in the shuttling regim...

  2. Vibration analysis of rotating functionally graded Timoshenko microbeam based on modified couple stress theory under different temperature distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Shafiei, Navvab

    2016-04-01

    In this study, thermal vibration of rotary functionally graded Timoshenko microbeam has been analyzed based on modified couple stress theory considering temperature change in four types of temperature distribution on thermal environment. Material properties of FG microbeam are supposed to be temperature dependent and vary continuously along the thickness according to the power-law form. The axial forces are also included in the model as the thermal and true spatial variation due to the rotation. Governing equations and boundary conditions have been derived by employing Hamiltonian's principle. The differential quadrature method is employed to solve the governing equations for cantilever and propped cantilever boundary conditions. Validations are done by comparing available literatures and obtained results which indicate accuracy of applied method. Results represent effects of temperature changes, different boundary conditions, nondimensional angular velocity, length scale parameter, different boundary conditions, FG index and beam thickness on fundamental, second and third nondimensional frequencies. Results determine critical values of temperature changes and other essential parameters which can be applicable to design micromachines like micromotor and microturbine.

  3. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 98 August. Tunneling reaction and its theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru [eds.

    1998-10-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 4th Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in August 3 and 4, 1998. The main subject of the meeting is `Tunneling Reaction and Its Theory`. In the present meeting the theoretical aspects of tunneling phenomena in the chemical reaction were discussed intensively as the main topics. Ten reports were presented on the quantum diffusion of muon and proton in the metal and H{sub 2}{sup -} anion in the solid para-hydrogen, the theory of tunnel effect in the nuclear reaction and the tunneling reaction in the organic compounds. One special lecture was presented by Prof. J. Kondo on `Proton Tunneling in Solids`. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of the HIAD TPS Coupon in the NASA 8' High Temperature Tunnel: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Scott, Robert C,; Dowell, Earl H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a set of theoretical and experimental techniques to characterize the aeroelasticity of the thermal protection system (TPS) on the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). A square TPS coupon experiences trailing edge oscillatory behavior during experimental testing in the 8' High Temperature Tunnel (HTT), which may indicate the presence of aeroelastic flutter. Several theoretical aeroelastic models have been developed, each corresponding to a different experimental test configuration. Von Karman large deflection theory is used for the plate-like components of the TPS, along with piston theory for the aerodynamics. The constraints between the individual TPS layers and the presence of a unidirectional foundation at the back of the coupon are included by developing the necessary energy expressions and using the Rayleigh Ritz method to derive the nonlinear equations of motion. Free vibrations and limit cycle oscillations are computed and the frequencies and amplitudes are compared with accelerometer and photogrammetry data from the experiments.

  5. High level white noise generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Blalock, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application

  6. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  7. MIMO scheme performance and detection in epsilon noise

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Sander

    2006-01-01

    New approach for analysis and decoding MIMO signaling is developed for usual model of nongaussion noise consists of background and impulsive noise named epsilon - noise. It is shown that non-gaussion noise performance significantly worse than gaussion ones. Stimulation results strengthen out theory. Robust in statistical sense detection rule is suggested for such kind of noise features much best robust detector performance than detector designed for Gaussian noise in impulsive environment and...

  8. Theory-based transport simulations of TFTR L-mode temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature profiles from a selection of TFTR L-mode discharges are simulated with the 1-1/2-D BALDUR transport code using a combination of theoretically derived transport models, called the Multi-Mode Model. The present version of the Multi-Mode Model consists of effective thermal diffusivities resulting from trapped electron modes and ion temperature gradient (η i ) modes, which dominate in the core of the plasma, together with resistive ballooning modes, which dominate in the periphery. Within the context of this transport model and the TFTR simulations reported here, the scaling of confinement with heating power comes from the temperature dependence of the η i and trapped electron modes, while the scaling with current comes mostly from resistive ballooning modes. 24 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs

  9. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22: Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the dynamo theory method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  10. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22 - Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Using the 'dynamo theory' method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  11. High temperature expansions for the free energy of vortices respectively the string tension in lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenster, G.

    1980-05-01

    We derive high temperature cluster expansions for the free energy of vortices in SU(2) and Z 2 lattice gauge theories in 3 and 4 dimensions. The expected behaviour of the vortex free energy is verified. It obeys an area law behaviour. The coefficient of the area is shown to be equal to the string tension between static quarks. We calculate its expansion up to 12th order. For SU(2) in 4 dimensions the result is compared with Monte Carlo calculations of Creutz and is in good agreement at strong and intermediate coupling. (orig.)

  12. Kinetic theory of neutrals in a bounded plasma slab with inhomogeneous temperature and density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.B.; Agren, O.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of neutral hydrogen atoms in a hydrogen plasma slab is considered. The influence of the inhomogeneous ion temperature profile on the neutral density and distribution is discussed as well as the influence of the neutral edge energy, charge exchange, and ionization rates. The analytical solutions for the neutral density and distribution function are obtained and compared with the numerical results. The effects due to the inhomogeneous temperature profile are discussed. The recommen-dations from the viewpoint of the effects mentioned previously for the purposes of the cold-gas mantle system have been given

  13. Noise Considerations in Resistance Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1963-01-01

    A signal-to-noise analysis is made of the Wheatstone bridge, where the unknown and standard resistors may be at different temperatures, a situation which occurs in resistance thermometry. The limiting condition is assumed to be dissipation in the unknown resistor. It is shown that the ratio arms...... thermometry, where the noise in the unknown resistor will predominate strongly. An impedance step-up device (transformer or tuned circuit) is valuable in raising the bridge signal and noise level above the noise of the first amplifier tube. However, as the step-up ratio is increased, two counterfactors appear....... With certain assumptions about the noise and grid current of the first tube it is found that the equivalent temperature of a unity ratio (Mueller) bridge used for liquid helium measurements may be 400°K....

  14. Perturbative study in quantum field theory at finite temperature, application to lepton pair production from a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-12-01

    The main topic of this thesis is a perturbative study of Quantum Field Theory at Finite Temperature. The real-time formalism is used throughout this work. We show the cancellation of infrared and mass singularities in the case of the first order QCD corrections to lepton pair production from a quark-gluon plasma. Two methods of calculation are presented and give the same finite result in the limit of vanishing quark mass. These finite terms are analysed and give small corrections in the region of interest for ultra-relativistic heavy ions collisions, except for a threshold factor. Specific techniques for finite temperature calculations are explicited in the case of the fermionic self-energy in QED [fr

  15. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  16. Boundary conditions in Ginsburg Landau theory and critical temperature of high-T superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykov, A. N.

    2008-06-01

    New mixed boundary conditions to the Ginsburg-Landau equations are found to limit the critical temperature ( T) of high- T superconductors. Moreover, the value of the pseudogap in these superconductors can be explained by using the method. As a result, the macroscopic approach is proposed to increase T of cuprate superconductors.

  17. Boundary conditions in Ginsburg-Landau theory and critical temperature of high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykov, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    New mixed boundary conditions to the Ginsburg-Landau equations are found to limit the critical temperature (T c ) of high-T c superconductors. Moreover, the value of the pseudogap in these superconductors can be explained by using the method. As a result, the macroscopic approach is proposed to increase T c of cuprate superconductors

  18. Drone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Charles; Sirohi, Jayant; University of Texas at Austin Team

    2017-11-01

    A basic understanding of the noise produced by single and multirotor drones operating at static thrust conditions is presented. This work acts as an extension to previous efforts conducted at The University of Texas at Austin (Tinney et al. 2017, AHS Forum 73). Propeller diameters ranging from 8 inch to 12 inch are examined for configurations comprising an isolated rotor, a quadcopter configuration and a hexacopter configuration, and with a constant drone pitch of 2.25. An azimuthal array of half-inch microphones, placed between 2 and 3 hub-center diameters from the drone center, are used to assess the acoustic near-field. Thrust levels, acquired using a six degree-of-freedom load cell, are then used to correlate acoustic noise levels to aerodynamic performance for each drone configuration. The findings reveal a nearly logarithmic increase in noise with increasing thrust. However, for the same thrust condition, considerable noise reduction is achieved by increasing the number of propeller blades thereby reducing the blade passage frequency and both the thickness and loading noise sources that accompany it.

  19. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  20. Vortex creep and the internal temperature of neutron stars. I - General theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, M. A.; Pines, D.; Anderson, P. W.; Shaham, J.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of a neutron star superfluid coupled to normal matter via thermal creep against pinning forces is developed in some detail. General equations of motion for a pinned rotating superfluid and their form for vortex creep are given. Steady state creep and the way in which the system approaches the steady state are discussed. The developed formalism is applied to the postglitch relaxation of a pulsar, and detailed models are developed which permit explicit calculation of the postglitch response. The energy dissipation associated with creep and glitches is considered.

  1. Correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in SU(2) gauge theory at finite temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K.; Karsch, F.; Pica, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We calculate correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition of (3+1)-dimensional SU(2) gauge theory and discuss their critical behavior in the vicinity of the second order deconfinement transition. We show that correlation functions...... of the trace of the energy momentum tensor diverge uniformly at the critical point in proportion to the specific heat singularity. Correlation functions of the pressure, on the other hand, stay finite at the critical point. We discuss the consequences of these findings for the analysis of transport...... coefficients, in particular the bulk viscosity, in the vicinity of a second order phase transition point....

  2. Can Holstein-Kondo lattice model be used as a candidate for the theory of high transition temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nourafkan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   It is a common knowledge that the formation of electron pairs is a necessary ingredient of any theoretical work describing superconductivity. Thus, finding the mechanism of the formation of the electron pairs is of utmost importance. There are some experiments on high transition temperature superconductors which support the electron-phonon (e-ph interactions as the pairing mechanism (ARPES, and there are others which support the spin fluctuations as their pairing mechanism (tunneling spectroscopy. In this paper, we introduce the Holstein-Kondo lattice model (H-KLM which incorporates the e-ph as well as the Kondo exchange interaction. We have used the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT to describe heavy fermion semiconductors and have employed the exact-diagonalization technique to obtain our results. The phase diagram of these systems in the parameter space of the e-ph coupling, g, and the Kondo exchange coupling, J, show that the system can be found in the Kondo insulating phase, metallic phase or the bi-polaronic phase. It is shown that these systems develop both spin gap and a charge gap, which are different and possess energies in the range of 1-100 meV. In view of the fact that both spin excitation energies and phonon energies lie in this range, we expect our work on H-KLM opens a way to formalize the theory of the high transition temperature superconductors .

  3. Explanation for the temperature dependence of plasma frequencies in SrTiO3 using mixed-polaron theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagles, D.M.; Georgiev, M.; Petrova, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of mixed polarons is used to interpret the published experimental results of Gervais et al. on temperature-dependent plasma frequencies in Nb-doped SrTiO 3 . For given polaron masses before mixing, the appropriate average mixed-polaron mass at any temperature T depends on two quantities, δ and b, which are measures of the separation between the bottoms of large and nearly small polaron bands before mixing and of a mixing matrix element; δ and b are assumed to have arbitrary linear dependences on T, probably related to a T dependence of the bare mass, and a term quadratic in T is included in δ, determined from the T dependence of large-polaron binding energies. Including a constraint on the ratio δ/|b| at low T from known masses from specific-heat data, satisfactory agreement is obtained with masses determined from plasma frequencies. This gives further support for the theory of mixed polarons in SrTiO 3 in addition to that already published. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Combined Heat Transfer in High-Porosity High-Temperature Fibrous Insulations: Theory and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Miller, Steve D.; Knutson, Jeffry R.

    2010-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through various high-temperature, high-porosity, unbonded (loose) fibrous insulations was modeled based on first principles. The diffusion approximation was used for modeling the radiation component of heat transfer in the optically thick insulations. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were derived from experimental data. Semi-empirical formulations were used to model the solid conduction contribution of heat transfer in fibrous insulations with the relevant parameters inferred from thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures in a vacuum. The specific extinction coefficient for radiation heat transfer was obtained from high-temperature steady-state thermal measurements with large temperature gradients maintained across the sample thickness in a vacuum. Standard gas conduction modeling was used in the heat transfer formulation. This heat transfer modeling methodology was applied to silica, two types of alumina, and a zirconia-based fibrous insulation, and to a variation of opacified fibrous insulation (OFI). OFI is a class of insulations manufactured by embedding efficient ceramic opacifiers in various unbonded fibrous insulations to significantly attenuate the radiation component of heat transfer. The heat transfer modeling methodology was validated by comparison with more rigorous analytical solutions and with standard thermal conductivity measurements. The validated heat transfer model is applicable to various densities of these high-porosity insulations as long as the fiber properties are the same (index of refraction, size distribution, orientation, and length). Furthermore, the heat transfer data for these insulations can be obtained at any static pressure in any working gas environment without the need to perform tests in various gases at various pressures.

  5. Theory of tunneling and photoemission spectroscopy for high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, K.; Coffey, L.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis is presented of the tunneling conductance and angle-resolved photoemission spectra in high-temperature superconductors. It is shown that unexplained features of the tunneling and photoemission spectra such as broad backgrounds, dips, and asymmetry of the tunneling conductance can arise in a model of spin-fluctuation mediated inelastic tunneling. Effects of directionality in tunneling play an important role in determining the behavior of the tunneling conductance. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Solar wind proton temperature anisotropy: Linear theory and WIND/SWE observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2006), L09101/1-L09101/4 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3042403 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS 98024; NASA (US) NAG-10915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * in situ observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2006

  7. Semiquantitative theory for high-field low-temperature properties of a distorted diamond spin chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Derzhko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a distorted diamond chain and use the localized-magnon picture adapted to a distorted geometry to discuss some of its high-field low-temperature properties. More specifically, in our study we assume that the partition function for a slightly distorted geometry has the same form as for ideal geometry, though with slightly dispersive one-magnon energies. We also discuss the relevance of such a description to azurite.

  8. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction: Beyond the mean-field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millev, Y.; Faehnle, M.

    1994-05-01

    The first nonvanishing magnetic anisotropy coefficient is calculated as a function of temperature for any spin quantum number and all temperatures below the Curie temperature for the case of face-centred cubic symmetry within the random-phase approximation (RPA). A detailed and instructive comparison between the mean-field and the RPA predictions is carried out. The RPA magnetization curves are also given for the first time for spins S>1/2. Most of the theoretical considerations are quite general as regard lattice type and even decoupling scheme and can thus be applied straightforwardly to other cases of interest. The progress reported here has been attained with the help of a new simplified and improved parametric approach and of a recent calculation of the average occupation number of magnons within the RPA. In particular, the new approach makes unnecessary the solving of integral equations so that the proposed procedure is especially simple and practically versatile in applications to any particular anisotropic material. (author). Refs, 6 figs

  9. Shape theory. Functional connections of information, energy, and temperature in phasics and physiology; Gestalttheorie. Funktionelle Zusammenhaenge von Information, Energie und Temperatur in Physik und Physiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengel, Claus

    2012-11-01

    Starting from the phenomenon of the information input and the information output system in the central nervous system, which was conceived in physiology, as well as from the phenomenon of the disturbance oc consciousness, which was in neuropsychiatry psychopathometrically and by this quantitatively determinable, the author was occupied by the general question: How systems can be described, which possess and exchange temperature, energy, and information? A connection of thermodynamics and information theory was found and presented in this work. It came to the redefinition of several quantities, which can be applied both in mathematical physics and in mathematical physiology. First the negentropy was defined in fact as first partial derivation of the total information on the absolute temperature. Further definitions follow: That of the shape (measured in bit.J/K), that of the action (measured in bit.J), as well that of the structure (measured in bit.J/K{sup 2}). Functional connections of information, energy, and temperature as well as of further quantities became recognizable and were written. Mathematical physics were thereby enriched, also by conservation laws. But also mathematical physiology was extended. Here diseases like the inflammatory diseases catatonia, epilepsy, tumor, vegetative dystonies, anorexy, dementia, as well as the phenomenon vitality and the phenomenon sleeping were comprehended by formulas. As consequences resulted proposals resulted for the prophylaxis and for the therapy and for the design of a live-preserving and live-elongating way of life. These proposals are in the sections, which treat the diseases, detailedly listed and derived. Furthermore a first law of psychodynamics was formulated - in analogy to the first law of thermodynamics.

  10. Correlation functions in finite temperature field theories: formalism and applications to quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelis, Francois

    1998-12-01

    The general framework of this work is thermal field theory, and more precisely the perturbative calculation of thermal Green's functions. In a first part, I consider the problems closely related to the formalism itself. After two introductory chapters devoted to set up the framework and the notations used afterwards, a chapter is dedicated to a clarification of certain aspects of the justification of the Feynman rules of the real time formalism. Then, I consider in the chapter 4 the problem of cutting rules in the real time formalisms. In particular, after solving a controversy on this subject, I generalize these cutting rules to the 'retarded-advanced' version of this formalism. Finally, the last problem considered in this part is that of the pion decay into two photons in a thermal bath. I show that the discrepancies found in the literature are due to peculiarities of the analytical properties of the thermal Green's functions. The second part deals with the calculations of the photons or dilepton (virtual photon) production rate by a quark gluon plasma. The framework of this study is the effective theory based on the resummation of hard thermal loops. The first aspects of this study is related to the production of virtual photons, where we show that important contributions arise at two loops, completing the result already known at one loop. In the case of real photon production, we show that extremely strong collinear singularities make two loop contributions dominant compared to one loop ones. In both cases, the importance of two loop contributions can be interpreted as weaknesses of the hard thermal loop approximation. (author)

  11. Thermo-Acoustic Properties of a Burner with Axial Temperature Gradient: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Kosztin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for thermo-acoustic effects in a gas turbine combustor. A quarter-wavelength burner with rectangular cross-section has been built and studied from an experimental and theoretical perspective. It has a premixed methane-air flame, which is held by a bluff body, and spans the width of the burner. The flame is compact, i.e. its length is much smaller than that of the burner. The fundamental mode of the burner is unstable; its frequency and pressure distribution have been measured. The complex pressure reflection coefficients at the upstream and downstream end of the burner were also measured. For the theoretical considerations, we divide the burner into three regions (the cold pre-combustion chamber, the flame region and the hot outlet region, and assume one-dimensional acoustic wave propagation in each region. The acoustic pressure and velocity are assumed continuous across the interface between the precombustion chamber and flame region, and across the interface between the flame region and outlet region. The burner ends are modelled by the measured pressure reflection coefficients. The mean temperature is assumed to have the following profile: uniformly cold and uniformly hot in the pre-combustion chamber and outlet region, respectively, and rising continuously from cold to hot in the flame region. For comparison, a discontinuous temperature profile, jumping directly from cold to hot, is also considered. The eigenfrequencies are calculated, and the pressure distribution of the fundamental mode is predicted. There is excellent agreement with the experimental results. The exact profile of the mean temperature in the flame region is found to be unimportant. This study gives us an experimentally validated Green's function, which is a very useful tool for further theoretical studies.

  12. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  13. Temperature dependent magnon-phonon coupling in bcc Fe from theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmann, F; Grabowski, B; Dutta, B; Hickel, T; Mauger, L; Fultz, B; Neugebauer, J

    2014-10-17

    An ab initio based framework for quantitatively assessing the phonon contribution due to magnon-phonon interactions and lattice expansion is developed. The theoretical results for bcc Fe are in very good agreement with high-quality phonon frequency measurements. For some phonon branches, the magnon-phonon interaction is an order of magnitude larger than the phonon shift due to lattice expansion, demonstrating the strong impact of magnetic short-range order even significantly above the Curie temperature. The framework closes the previous simulation gap between the ferro- and paramagnetic limits.

  14. Low-frequency noise behavior of polysilicon emitter bipolar junction transistors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, M. Jamal; Pascal, Fabien

    2003-05-01

    For many analog integrated circuit applications, the polysilicon emitter bipolar junction transistor (PE-BJT) is still the preferred choice because of its higher operational frequency and lower noise performance characteristics compared to MOS transistors of similar active areas and at similar biasing currents. In this paper, we begin by motivating the reader with reasons why bipolar transistors are still of great interest for analog integrated circuits. This motivation includes a comparison between BJT and the MOSFET using a simple small-signal equivalent circuit to derive important parameters that can be used to compare these two technologies. An extensive review of the popular theories used to explain low frequency noise results is presented. However, in almost all instances, these theories have not been fully tested. The effects of different processing technologies and conditions on the noise performance of PE-BJTs is reviewed and a summary of some of the key technological steps and device parameters and their effects on noise is discussed. The effects of temperature and emitter geometries scaling is reviewed. It is shown that dispersion of the low frequency noise in ultra-small geometries is a serious issue since the rate of increase of the noise dispersion is faster than the noise itself as the emitter geometry is scaled to smaller values. Finally, some ideas for future research on PE-BJTs, some of which are also applicable to SiGe heteorjunction bipolar transistors and MOSFETs, are presented after the conclusions.

  15. Progress in Noise Thermometry at 505 K and 693 K Using Quantized Voltage Noise Ratio Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, W. L.; Benz, S. P.; Dresselhaus, P. D.; Coakley, K. J.; Rogalla, H.; White, D. R.; Labenski, J. R.

    2010-09-01

    Technical advances and new results in noise thermometry at temperatures near the tin freezing point and the zinc freezing point using a quantized voltage noise source (QVNS) are reported. The temperatures are derived by comparing the power spectral density of QVNS synthesized noise with that of Johnson noise from a known resistance at both 505 K and 693 K. Reference noise is digitally synthesized so that the average power spectra of the QVNS match those of the thermal noise, resulting in ratios of power spectra close to unity in the low-frequency limit. Three-parameter models are used to account for differences in impedance-related time constants in the spectra. Direct comparison of noise temperatures to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is achieved in a comparison furnace with standard platinum resistance thermometers. The observed noise temperatures determined by operating the noise thermometer in both absolute and relative modes, and related statistics together with estimated uncertainties are reported. The relative noise thermometry results are combined with results from other thermodynamic determinations at temperatures near the tin freezing point to calculate a value of T - T 90 = +4(18) mK for temperatures near the zinc freezing point. These latest results achieve a lower uncertainty than that of our earlier efforts. The present value of T - T 90 is compared to other published determinations from noise thermometry and other methods.

  16. BWR noise spectra and application of noise analysis to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1975-01-01

    Work related to noise analysis, in Tokyo Shibaura Electric Co. Ltd. (Toshiba) and Nippon Atomic Industry Group Co. Ltd. (NAIG) for the past several years is reviewed. After considering the Japan-United States Seminar on Reactor Noise Analysis in 1968, other subjects discussed were boiling water reactor noise analysis and work in relation to FBR. Parts of these are related to each other. For example, boiling detection and temperature fluctuations are problems pertinent to both fields. As the main problems in zero-power-reactor noise are now basically understood, only a brief description of the experiments involving the advanced two detector method is made. Focus is rather placed on the area of power plant noise. (author)

  17. Molecular-dynamics theory of the temperature-dependent surface phonons of W(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Z.; Fasolino, A.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-04-01

    We study the temperature-dependent zone-boundary surface phonons across the c(2x2)→1x1 reconstruction phase transition of the clean W(001) surface. Velocity-velocity correlations and hence the phonon spectral densities are calculated by molecular dynamics for the surface atoms of a finite thickness (001) slab, with interatomic potentials established in a previous study of the surface statics. Our calculated k = (1/2,1/2)(2π/a) surface phonon are dominated by three main low-frequency modes. Of these, the longitudinal and the shear horizontal are reconstruction-related and display critical broadening and softening at the phase transition, while the third, the shear vertical, is basically unaffected. The reconstruction phase mode, shear horizontal, appears to be responsible for the phase fluctuations which destroy long-range order at the transition. (author). 30 refs, 12 figs

  18. Thermal models of buildings. Determination of temperatures, heating and cooling loads. Theories, models and computer programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellblad, K

    1998-05-01

    The need to estimate indoor temperatures, heating or cooling load and energy requirements for buildings arises in many stages of a buildings life cycle, e.g. at the early layout stage, during the design of a building and for energy retrofitting planning. Other purposes are to meet the authorities requirements given in building codes. All these situations require good calculation methods. The main purpose of this report is to present the authors work with problems related to thermal models and calculation methods for determination of temperatures and heating or cooling loads in buildings. Thus the major part of the report deals with treatment of solar radiation in glazing systems, shading of solar and sky radiation and the computer program JULOTTA used to simulate the thermal behavior of rooms and buildings. Other parts of thermal models of buildings are more briefly discussed and included in order to give an overview of existing problems and available solutions. A brief presentation of how thermal models can be built up is also given and it is a hope that the report can be useful as an introduction to this part of building physics as well as during development of calculation methods and computer programs. The report may also serve as a help for the users of energy related programs. Independent of which method or program a user choose to work with it is his or her own responsibility to understand the limits of the tool, else wrong conclusions may be drawn from the results 52 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  19. Universal Majorana thermoelectric noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2018-04-01

    Thermoelectric phenomena resulting from an interplay between particle flows induced by electric fields and temperature inhomogeneities are extremely insightful as a tool providing substantial knowledge about the microscopic structure of a given system. By tuning, e.g., parameters of a nanoscopic system coupled via tunneling mechanisms to two contacts, one may achieve various situations where the electric current induced by an external bias voltage competes with the electric current excited by the temperature difference of the two contacts. Even more exciting physics emerges when the system's electronic degrees freedom split to form Majorana fermions which make the thermoelectric dynamics universal. Here, we propose revealing these unique universal signatures of Majorana fermions in strongly nonequilibrium quantum dots via noise of the thermoelectric transport beyond linear response. It is demonstrated that whereas mean thermoelectric quantities are only universal at large-bias voltages, the noise of the electric current excited by an external bias voltage and the temperature difference of the contacts is universal at any bias voltage. We provide truly universal, i.e., independent of the system's parameters, thermoelectric ratios between nonlinear response coefficients of the noise and mean current at large-bias voltages where experiments may easily be performed to uniquely detect these truly universal Majorana thermoelectric signatures.

  20. Deconfinement and universality in the 3DU(1) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature: study in the dual formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisenko, O.; Chelnokov, V. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine,UA-03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Gravina, M.; Papa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, and INFN - Gruppo collegato di Cosenza,I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-09-10

    We study analytically and numerically the three-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature in the dual formulation. For an appropriate disorder operator, we obtain the renormalization group equations describing the critical behavior of the model in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition. These equations are used to check the validity of the Svetitsky-Yaffe conjecture regarding the critical behavior of the lattice U(1) model. Furthermore, we perform numerical simulations of the model for N{sub t}=1,2,4,8 and compute, by a cluster algorithm, the dual correlation functions and the corresponding second moment correlation length. In this way we locate the position of the critical point and calculate critical indices.

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory for the charging kinetics of electric double layer containing room-temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Cheng; Zhao, Shuangliang; Liu, Honglai; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-11-28

    Understanding the charging kinetics of electric double layers is of fundamental importance for the design and development of novel electrochemical devices such as supercapacitors and field-effect transistors. In this work, we study the dynamic behavior of room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical time-dependent density functional theory that accounts for the molecular excluded volume effects, the electrostatic correlations, and the dispersion forces. While the conventional models predict a monotonic increase of the surface charge with time upon application of an electrode voltage, our results show that dispersion between ions results in a non-monotonic increase of the surface charge with the duration of charging. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of van der Waals attraction between electrode/ionic-liquid interactions on the charging processes.

  2. Stochastic synchronization of neuronal populations with intrinsic and extrinsic noise.

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C; Lai, Yi Ming

    2011-01-01

    We extend the theory of noise-induced phase synchronization to the case of a neural master equation describing the stochastic dynamics of an ensemble of uncoupled neuronal population oscillators with intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The master

  3. Weak turbulence theory of ion temperature gradient modes for inverted density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1989-09-01

    Typical profiles measured in H-mode (''high confinement'') discharges from tokamaks such as JET and DIII-D suggest that the ion temperature gradient instability threshold parameter η i (≡dlnT i /dlnn i ) could be negative in many cases. Previous linear theoretical calculations have established the onset conditions for these negative η i -modes and the fact that their growth rate is much smaller than their real frequency over a wide range of negative η i values. This has motivated the present nonlinear weak turbulence analysis to assess the relevance of such instabilities for confinement in H-mode plasmas. The nonlinear eigenmode equation indicates that the 3-wave coupling to shorter wavelength modes is the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism. It is found that both the saturation level for these fluctuations and the magnitude of the associated ion thermal diffusivity are considerably smaller than the strong turbulence mixing length type estimates for the more conventional positive-η i -instabilities. 19 refs., 3 figs

  4. Evolution of sp2 networks with substrate temperature in amorphous carbon films: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago, R.; Vinnichenko, M.; Jaeger, H.U.; Maitz, M.F.; Belov, A.Yu.; Jimenez, I.; Huang, N.; Sun, H.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of sp 2 hybrids in amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited at different substrate temperatures was studied experimentally and theoretically. The bonding structure of a-C films prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc was assessed by the combination of visible Raman spectroscopy, x-ray absorption, and spectroscopic ellipsometry, while a-C structures were generated by molecular-dynamics deposition simulations with the Brenner interatomic potential to determine theoretical sp 2 site distributions. The experimental results show a transition from tetrahedral a-C (ta-C) to sp 2 -rich structures at ∼500 K. The sp 2 hybrids are mainly arranged in chains or pairs whereas graphitic structures are only promoted for sp 2 fractions above 80%. The theoretical analysis confirms the preferred pairing of isolated sp 2 sites in ta-C, the coalescence of sp 2 clusters for medium sp 2 fractions, and the pronounced formation of rings for sp 2 fractions >80%. However, the dominance of sixfold rings is not reproduced theoretically, probably related to the functional form of the interatomic potential used

  5. Longitudinal beam dynamics with rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Cogburn, R.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Dome-Krinsky-Wang (DKW) diffusion-inaction theory for rf-noise-induced emittance dilution is reviewed and related to recent work on the approximation of stochastic processes by Markov processes. An accurate and efficient numerical procedure is developed to integrate the diffusion equation of the DKW theory. Tracking simulations are undertaken to check the validity of the theory in the parameter range of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and to provide additional information. The study of effects of rf noise is applied to two problems of interest at the SSC: (1) determination of noise tolerance levels in the rf system, and (2) feasibility of beam extraction using crystal channeling

  6. A practical approach to temperature effects in dissociative electron attachment cross sections using local complex potential theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugioka, Yuji; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dissociative electron attachment cross sections for polyatomic molecules are calculated by a simple theoretical approach. ► Temperature effects can be reasonably reproduced with the present model. ► All the degrees-of-freedom are taken into account in the present dynamics approach. -- Abstract: We propose a practical computational scheme to obtain temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment cross sections to polyatomic molecules within a local complex potential theory formalism. First we perform quantum path-integral molecular dynamics simulations on the potential energy surface for the neutral molecule in order to sample initial nuclear configurations as well as momenta. Classical trajectories are subsequently integrated on the potential energy surface for the anionic state and survival probabilities are simultaneously calculated along the obtained trajectories. We have applied this simple scheme to dissociative electron attachment processes to H 2 O and CF 3 Cl, for which several previous studies are available from both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  7. A practical approach to temperature effects in dissociative electron attachment cross sections using local complex potential theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugioka, Yuji [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Takayanagi, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tako@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2012-09-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissociative electron attachment cross sections for polyatomic molecules are calculated by a simple theoretical approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature effects can be reasonably reproduced with the present model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the degrees-of-freedom are taken into account in the present dynamics approach. -- Abstract: We propose a practical computational scheme to obtain temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment cross sections to polyatomic molecules within a local complex potential theory formalism. First we perform quantum path-integral molecular dynamics simulations on the potential energy surface for the neutral molecule in order to sample initial nuclear configurations as well as momenta. Classical trajectories are subsequently integrated on the potential energy surface for the anionic state and survival probabilities are simultaneously calculated along the obtained trajectories. We have applied this simple scheme to dissociative electron attachment processes to H{sub 2}O and CF{sub 3}Cl, for which several previous studies are available from both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  8. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  9. A 94GHz Temperature Compensated Low Noise Amplifier in 45nm Silicon-on-Insulator Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (SOI CMOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ring oscillator based temperature sensor will be designed to compensate for gain variations over temperature. For comparison to a competing solution...Simulated (Green) Capacitance of the GSG Pads ........................ 9 Figure 6: Die Picture and Schematic of the L-2L Coplanar Waveguides...complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. A ring oscillator based temperature sensor was designed to compensate for gain variations

  10. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  11. Noise pollution resources compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  12. Yesterday's noise - today's signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdula, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Plant performance can be improved by noise analysis. This paper describes noise characteristics, imposed noise and response functions, a case history of cost benefits derived from application of noise analysis techniques, areas for application of noise analysis techniques with special reference to the Gentilly-1 nuclear generating station, and the validity of noise measurement results. (E.C.B.)

  13. Effects of Colored Noise on Stochastic Resonance in Sensory Neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, D.; Mar, D.J.; Collins, J.J.; Grigg, P.

    1999-01-01

    Noise can assist neurons in the detection of weak signals via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). We demonstrate experimentally that SR-type effects can be obtained in rat sensory neurons with white noise, 1/f noise, or 1/f 2 noise. For low-frequency input noise, we show that the optimal noise intensity is the lowest and the output signal-to-noise ratio the highest for conventional white noise. We also show that under certain circumstances, 1/f noise can be better than white noise for enhancing the response of a neuron to a weak signal. We present a theory to account for these results and discuss the biological implications of 1/f noise. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  14. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions

  15. Travelling Bubble Cavitation and Resulting Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-02

    pp. 22-26, 1968. 16. Il’ichev, V. I. "Statistical Model of the Onset of Hydrodynamic Cavitation Noise," Sixth All-Union Acoustic Conference...Collected Papers, Moscow, 1968. 17. Lyamshev, L. M. "On the Theory of Hydrodynamic Cavitation Noise," Soviet Physics-Acoustics, Vol. 15, pp. 494-498, 1970. 18

  16. Quantum Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, C W J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schroedinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  17. Stochastic resonance in an asymmetric bistable system driven by multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bingchang; Xu Wei

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system driven by multiplicative colored and additive white noises and a periodic rectangular signal with a constant component is studied by using the unified colored noise approximation and the theory of signal-to-noise (SNR) in the adiabatic limit. The analytic expression of the SNR is obtained for arbitrary signal amplitude without being restricted to small amplitudes. The SNR is a non-monotonic function of intensities of multiplicative colored and additive white noises and correlation time of multiplicative colored noise, so SR exhibits in the bistable system. The effects of potential asymmetry r and correlation time τ of multiplicative colored noise on SNR are opposite. Moreover, It is more sensitive to control SR through adjusting the additive white noise intensity D than adjusting the multiplicative colored noise intensity Q

  18. Quantum noise in a terahertz hot electron bolometer mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Khosropanah, P.; Gao, J. R.; Kollberg, E. L.; Yngvesson, K. S.; Bansal, T.; Barends, R.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the noise temperature of a single, sensitive superconducting NbN hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer in a frequency range from 1.6 to 5.3 THz, using a setup with all the key components in vacuum. By analyzing the measured receiver noise temperature using a quantum noise (QN) model

  19. Analytical theory and nonlinear δf perturbative simulations of temperature anisotropy instability in intense charged particle beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Startsev

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In plasmas with strongly anisotropic distribution functions (T_{∥b}/T_{⊥b}≪1 a Harris-like collective instability may develop if there is sufficient coupling between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom. Such anisotropies develop naturally in accelerators and may lead to a deterioration of beam quality. This paper extends previous numerical studies [E. A. Startsev, R. C. Davidson, and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3138 (2002] of the stability properties of intense non-neutral charged particle beams with large temperature anisotropy (T_{⊥b}≫T_{∥b} to allow for nonaxisymmetric perturbations with ∂/∂θ≠0. The most unstable modes are identified, and their eigenfrequencies, radial mode structure, and nonlinear dynamics are determined. The simulation results clearly show that moderately intense beams with s_{b}=ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/2γ_{b}^{2}ω_{β⊥}^{2}≳0.5 are linearly unstable to short-wavelength perturbations with k_{z}^{2}r_{b}^{2}≳1, provided the ratio of longitudinal and transverse temperatures is smaller than some threshold value. Here, ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}=4πn[over ^]_{b}e_{b}^{2}/γ_{b}m_{b} is the relativistic plasma frequency squared, and ω_{β⊥} is the betatron frequency associated with the applied smooth-focusing field. A theoretical model is developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations which describes the essential features of the linear stages of instability. Both the simulations and the analytical theory predict that the dipole mode (azimuthal mode number m=1 is the most unstable mode. In the nonlinear stage, tails develop in the longitudinal momentum distribution function, and the kinetic instability saturates due to resonant wave-particle interactions.

  20. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2017-05-05

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD), in order to understand the effect of temperature on electron emission spots in image morphology (as indicated by ring like structures) and electron emission spot intensity of the emitters. Moreover, the field electron emission images can be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 is 4.5x107 and, the actual number emitters per cm2 present for electron emission calculated from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2x1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics obey the Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current are recorded at different temperatures and, temperature dependence of power spectral density obeys power law relation s(f)=I2/f2 with that of emission current and frequency.

  1. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  2. Analysis of modeling aircraft noise with the Nord2000 noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    This report provides comparisons between AEDT/INM and the Nord 2000 Noise Models for the following parameters: ground type, simple terrain (downward slope, upward slope, hill), temperature and humidity, temperature gradients (positive and negative), ...

  3. Research of shot noise based on realistic nano-MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Jia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental measurements and simulation results have shown that the dominant noise source of current noise changes from thermal noise to shot noise with scaling of MOSFET, and shot noise were suppressed by Fermi and Coulomb interactions. In this paper, Shot noise test system is established, and experimental results proved that shot noise were suppressed, and the expressions of shot noise in realistic nano-MOSFETs are derived with considering Fermi effect, Coulomb interaction and the combination of the both co-existence, respectively. On this basis, the variation of shot noise with voltage, temperature and source-drain doping were researched. The results we obtained are consistent with those from experiments and the theoretically explanation is given. At the same time, the shot noise test system is suitable for traditional nanoscale electronic components; the shot noise model is suitable for nanoscale MOSFET.

  4. Phase noise of dispersion-managed solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, Elaine T.; Biondini, Gino

    2009-01-01

    We quantify noise-induced phase deviations of dispersion-managed solitons (DMS) in optical fiber communications and femtosecond lasers. We first develop a perturbation theory for the dispersion-managed nonlinear Schroedinger equation (DMNLSE) in order to compute the noise-induced mean and variance of the soliton parameters. We then use the analytical results to guide importance-sampled Monte Carlo simulations of the noise-driven DMNLSE. Comparison of these results with those from the original unaveraged governing equations confirms the validity of the DMNLSE as a model for many dispersion-managed systems and quantify the increased robustness of DMS with respect to noise-induced phase jitter.

  5. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  6. Environmental/Noise Effects on VHF/UHF UWB SAR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ralston, James

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a straightforward approach to estimating the impact of natural environmental noise on an overall system noise temperature for very high frequency/ultrahigh frequency synthetic aperture radar (VHF/UHF SAR...

  7. Signal processing method for Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. G.; Moon, B. S.; Kinser, Rpger

    2003-01-01

    The development of Johnson Noise Thermometry requires a high sensitive preamplifier circuit to pick up the temperature-related noise on the sensing element. However, the random noise generated in this amplification circuit causes a significant erroneous influence to the measurement. This paper describes signal processing mechanism of the Johnson Noise Thermometry system which is underway of development in collaboration between KAERI and ORNL. It adopts two identical amplifier channels and utilizes a digital signal processing technique to remove the independent noise of each channel. The CPSD(Cross Power Spectral Density) function is used to cancel the independent noise and the differentiation of narrow or single frequency peak from the CPSD data separates the common mode electromagnetic interference noise

  8. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Patil, Sumati; Yoo, J.B.; Dharmadhikari, C.V.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1

  9. Correlation Feature Selection and Mutual Information Theory Based Quantitative Research on Meteorological Impact Factors of Module Temperature for Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The module temperature is the most important parameter influencing the output power of solar photovoltaic (PV systems, aside from solar irradiance. In this paper, we focus on the interdisciplinary research that combines the correlation analysis, mutual information (MI and heat transfer theory, which aims to figure out the correlative relations between different meteorological impact factors (MIFs and PV module temperature from both quality and quantitative aspects. The identification and confirmation of primary MIFs of PV module temperature are investigated as the first step of this research from the perspective of physical meaning and mathematical analysis about electrical performance and thermal characteristic of PV modules based on PV effect and heat transfer theory. Furthermore, the quantitative description of the MIFs influence on PV module temperature is mathematically formulated as several indexes using correlation-based feature selection (CFS and MI theory to explore the specific impact degrees under four different typical weather statuses named general weather classes (GWCs. Case studies for the proposed methods were conducted using actual measurement data of a 500 kW grid-connected solar PV plant in China. The results not only verified the knowledge about the main MIFs of PV module temperatures, more importantly, but also provide the specific ratio of quantitative impact degrees of these three MIFs respectively through CFS and MI based measures under four different GWCs.

  10. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  11. White noise calculus and Fock space

    CERN Document Server

    Obata, Nobuaki

    1994-01-01

    White Noise Calculus is a distribution theory on Gaussian space, proposed by T. Hida in 1975. This approach enables us to use pointwise defined creation and annihilation operators as well as the well-established theory of nuclear space.This self-contained monograph presents, for the first time, a systematic introduction to operator theory on fock space by means of white noise calculus. The goal is a comprehensive account of general expansion theory of Fock space operators and its applications. In particular,first order differential operators, Laplacians, rotation group, Fourier transform and their interrelations are discussed in detail w.r.t. harmonic analysis on Gaussian space. The mathematical formalism used here is based on distribution theory and functional analysis , prior knowledge of white noise calculus is not required.

  12. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  13. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  14. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Noise and Hearing Protection Noise and Hearing Protection Patient ... it is. How can I tell if a noise is dangerous? People differ in their sensitivity to ...

  15. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  16. Study of low noise preamplifier systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Del Duca, A.; Schenpple, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of different preamplification systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide x-ray detectors has been performed. Resistor-, drain-, and light-feedback preamplifiers have been studied. Energy resolution of 295 eV (FWHM) for Fe-55 source (5.9 keV) and 225 eV (FWHM) for the pulser have been obtained with both the detector and the input FET at room temperature using the pulsed-light feedback preamplifier. It has been shown that cooling the input FET using a small Peltier element allows the energy resolution to be improved up to 25%

  17. An aerodynamic noise propagation model for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2005-01-01

    A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from temperat......A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from...... temperature and airflow. At a given receiver point, the sound pressure is corrected by taking into account these propagation effects. As an overall assumption, the noise field generated by the wind turbine is simplified as a point source placed at the hub height of the wind turbine. This assumtion...... is reasonable, for the receiver is located in the far field, at distances from the wind turbine that are much longer than the diameter of the rotor....

  18. Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    . In many cases, this bias problem causes the cancellation system to fail. The traditional probe noise approach, where a noise signal is added to the loudspeaker signal can, in theory, prevent the bias. However, in practice, the probe noise level must often be so high that the noise is clearly audible...... and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise approaches...... the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10....

  19. Phenomenon of entropic stochastic resonance with asymmetric dichotomous noise and white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Shao-Fu; Cheng, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) in a confined system subject to asymmetric dichotomous noise, white noise, and a periodic square-wave signal is investigated. Under the adiabatic approximation condition, by use of the properties of the dichotomous noise, we obtain the expression of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) based on two-state theory. The SNR is shown to be a nonmonotonic function of the strength and asymmetry of the dichotomous noise, the intensity of the white noise, and the amplitude of the square-wave signal. The SNR varies non-monotonically with increases in the parameters of the confined structure. The influence of the correlation rate of the dichotomous noise and the frequency of the external constant force on the SNR is also discussed.

  20. A comparison of the real-time and the imaginary-time formalisms of finite temperature field theory for 2,3, and 4-point Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurenche, P.; Becherrawy, T.

    1991-07-01

    The predictions of the real-time and the imaginary-time formalisms of Finite Temperature Field Theory is compared. Retarded and advanced amplitudes are constructed in the real-time formalism which are linear combinations of the usual time-ordered thermo-field dynamics amplitudes. These amplitudes can be easily compared to the various analytically continued amplitudes of the imaginary-time formalism. Explicit calculation of the 2,3 and 4-point Green's functions in φ 3 field theory is done in the one and two-loop approximations, and the compatibility of the two formalisms is shown. (author) 17 refs., 12 figs

  1. 1/f noise: diffusive systems and music

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.

    1975-11-01

    Measurements of the 1/f voltage noise in continuous metal films are reported. At room temperature, samples of pure metals and bismuth (with a carrier density smaller by 10/sup 5/) of similar volume had comparable noise. The results suggest that the noise arises from equilibrium temperature fluctuations modulating the resistance. Spatial correlation of the noise implied that the fluctuations obey a diffusion equation. The empirical inclusion of an explicit 1/f region and appropriate normalization lead to excellent agreement with the measured noise. If the fluctuations are assumed to be spatially correlated, the diffusion equation can yield an extended 1/f region in the power spectrum. The temperature response of a sample to delta and step function power inputs is shown to have the same shape as the autocorrelation function for uncorrelated and correlated temperature fluctuations, respectively. The spectrum obtained from the cosine transform of the measured step function response is in excellent agreement with the measured 1/f voltage noise spectrum. Spatially correlated equilibrium temperature fluctuations are not the dominant source of 1/f noise in semiconductors and metal films. However, the agreement between the low-frequency spectrum of fluctuations in the mean-square Johnson noise voltage and the resistance fluctuation spectrum measured in the presence of a current demonstrates that in these systems the 1/f noise is also due to equilibrium resistance fluctuations. Loudness fluctuations in music and speech and pitch fluctuations in music also show the 1/f behavior. 1/f noise sources, consequently, are demonstrated to be the natural choice for stochastic composition. 26 figures, 1 table. (auth)

  2. On the microwave background spectrum and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.

    1982-01-01

    We show that the combined measurement of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) intensity and noise can provide direct information on the temperature and the emissivity of the source responsible for the CBR. (orig.)

  3. Improvement of calculation method for temperature coefficient of HTTR by neutronics calculation code based on diffusion theory. Analysis for temperature coefficient by SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru; Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi

    2007-03-01

    The HTTR temperature coefficients required for the core dynamics calculations had been calculated from the HTTR core calculation results by the diffusion code with which the corrections had been performed using the core calculation results by the Monte-Carlo code MVP. This calculation method for the temperature coefficients was considered to have some issues to be improved. Then, the calculation method was improved to obtain the temperature coefficients in which the corrections by the Monte-Carlo code were not required. Specifically, from the point of view of neutron spectrum calculated by lattice calculations, the lattice model was revised which had been used for the calculations of the temperature coefficients. The HTTR core calculations were performed by the diffusion code with the group constants which were generated by the lattice calculations with the improved lattice model. The core calculations and the lattice calculations were performed by the SRAC code system. The HTTR core dynamics calculation was performed with the temperature coefficient obtained from the core calculation results. In consequence, the core dynamics calculation result showed good agreement with the experimental data and the valid temperature coefficient could be calculated only by the diffusion code without the corrections by Monte-Carlo code. (author)

  4. When noise becomes voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; McCarthy, John

    2014-01-01

    are distinctive because of the spontaneous, uninhibited behavior exhibited. In crowds, extreme soci- ality and the experience of performing identity in public emerge spontaneously. By bridging crowd theory and pragmatics of experience, we establish an understanding of crowd experience as a distinct sociality...... within interaction design that unfolds through imitation and invention. We deploy that understanding in an exploration of spectator experiences at three football matches in which an experi- mental prototype, BannerBattle, was deployed. Banner- Battle is an interactive banner on which spectators can grab...... space in competition with their rivals. The more noise and movement they make, the more screen real estate they gain. BannerBattle therefore enabled us to explore the emergence of imitative and at times inventive behavior in enriched crowd experience, by augmenting and supporting spectator performance...

  5. Noise amplification of plant gravisensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    A common problem in sensory physiology is the detection of weak signals, such as that produced by the repositioning of statoliths (amyloplasts) in gravisensing cells, from a noisy background. As in other studied biological mechanosensory systems, it is conceivable that the gravisensing process may be amplified by stochastic resonance and nonlinear noise-assisted effects. We therefore investigated the possible dependency of gravisensing on vibrational or thermodynamic noise by examining the effect of external oscillation and temperature on the rate of gravitropic curvature in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) roots. Roots were oscillated for 15 min prior to or during gravistimulation, either parallel or perpendicular to the root axis. The effect of oscillation was dependent on its direction as well as frequency and amplitude. Initial curvature was most effectively enhanced by vertical oscillations of 5 Hz and 0.5 mm amplitude prior to reorientation. Vertically oscillated roots reached half-maximal curvature 32 min after reorientation, about 18 min earlier than non-oscillated roots. The enhancing effect of vibration on curvature subsided with a half-time of about 20 min. The temperature dependency of the graviresponse indicated that thermodynamic noise also impacted gravity perception. For vibrations and temperature studies, the presentation times decreased almost 6-fold. Our data indicate that gravisensing may depend on or be enhanced by thermodynamic or mechanical noise.

  6. Sustaining a “culture of silence” in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: A grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Swathi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians. Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to “sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations” (core category. The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The “culture of silence” reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a “noisy culture” prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs

  7. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  8. Frequency spectrum of Calder Hall reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.D.

    1960-01-01

    The frequency spectrum of the noise power of Calder Hall reactor No. 1 has been obtained by analysing a tape recording of the backed off power. The root mean square noise power due to all frequencies above 0.001 cycles per second was found to be 0.13%. The noise power for this reactor, is due mainly to modulations of the power level by reactivity variations caused in turn by gas temperature changes. These gas temperature changes are caused by a Cyclic variation in the feedwater regulator to the heat exchanger. The apparatus and method used to determine the noise power are described in this memorandum. It is shown that for frequencies in the range 0.001 to 0.030 cycles per second the noise spectrum falls at 60 decibels per decade of frequency. (author)

  9. Non-Markovian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulinski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The properties of non-Markovian noises with exponentially correlated memory are discussed. Considered are dichotomic noise, white shot noise, Gaussian white noise, and Gaussian colored noise. The stationary correlation functions of the non-Markovian versions of these noises are given by linear combinations of two or three exponential functions (colored noises) or of the δ function and exponential function (white noises). The non-Markovian white noises are well defined only when the kernel of the non-Markovian master equation contains a nonzero admixture of a Markovian term. Approximate equations governing the probability densities for processes driven by such non-Markovian noises are derived, including non-Markovian versions of the Fokker-Planck equation and the telegrapher's equation. As an example, it is shown how the non-Markovian nature changes the behavior of the driven linear process

  10. Operational methods of thermodynamics. Volume 1 - Temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, F. X.

    The principles of thermometry are examined, taking into account the concept of temperature, the Kelvin scale, the statistical theory of heat, negative absolute temperatures, the thermodynamic temperature scale, the thermodynamic temperature scale below 1 K, noise thermometry, temperature scales based on black-body radiation, acoustical thermometry, and the International Practical Temperature Scale 1968. Aspects of practical temperature measurement are discussed, giving attention to thermometers based on the expansion of a gas or a liquid, instruments utilizing the relative thermal expansion of two different metals, devices measuring the vapor pressure of a liquid, thermocouples, resistance thermometers, radiation pyrometers of various types, instruments utilizing the temperature dependence of a number of material characteristics, devices for temperature control, thermometer calibration, and aspects of thermometer installation and inertia. A description is presented of the approaches employed for the measurement of low temperatures.

  11. Sensor locations and noise reduction in high-purity batch distillation control loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oisiovici R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the sensor locations on the composition control of high-purity batch distillation columns has been investigated. Using concepts of the nonlinear control theory, an input-output linearizing controller was implemented to keep the distillate composition constant at a desired value by varying the reflux ratio. An Extended Kalman Filter was developed to estimate the compositions required in the control algorithm using temperature measurements. In the presence of measurement noise, the control performance depended greatly on the sensor locations. Placing the sensors further from the top stages reduced the detrimental effects of noise but increased the inference error. To achieve accurate composition control, both noise reduction and composition estimate accuracy should be considered in the selection of the sensor locations.

  12. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Assessment and prediction of wind turbine noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, M.V.

    1993-01-01

    The significance of basic aerodynamic noise sources for wind turbine noise are assessed, using information on the aero-acoustic mechanisms of other rotors, which have been studied in depth for many years. From the analysis, areas of potential improvement in wind turbine noise prediction are defined. Suggestions are made for approaches to wind turbine noise control which separate the noise problems at cut-in from those at rated power. Some of these offer the possibility of noise reduction without unfavourable effects on performance. Based on this analysis, a new model for prediction of wind turbine noise is presented and comparisons made between prediction and experiment. The model is based on well established aeroacoustic theory and published laboratory data for the two principal sources, inflow turbulence and boundary layer trailing edge interaction. The new method gives good agreement with experiment with the case studied so far. Parametric trends and sensitivities for the model are presented. Comparisons with previous prediction methods are also given. A consequence of the new model is to put more emphasis on boundary layer trailing edge interaction as a noise source. There are prospects for reducing noise from this source detail changes to the wind turbine design. (author)

  14. Theory of the temperature dependence of positron bulk lifetimes-implications for vacancy formation enthalpy measurements via positron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Sinha, S.K.; Siegel, R.W.

    1977-02-01

    Temperature dependent effects, which may have a bearing on determinations of vacancy formation enthalpies in metals by positron annihilation, have been observed in certain metals. These effects have been observed to occur both at temperatures below those at which positron annihilation is most sensitive to equilibrium vacancies and at temperatures well within the vacancy-sensitive region. The effect of thermal lattice displacements on positron lifetimes in metals was investigated to help understand these phenomena

  15. A Ratiometric Method for Johnson Noise Thermometry Using a Quantized Voltage Noise Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S. W.; Benz, S. P.; Martinis, J. M.; Dresselhaus, P.; Tew, W. L.; White, D. R.

    2003-09-01

    Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) involves the measurement of the statistical variance of a fluctuating voltage across a resistor in thermal equilibrium. Modern digital techniques make it now possible to perform many functions required for JNT in highly efficient and predictable ways. We describe the operational characteristics of a prototype JNT system which uses digital signal processing for filtering, real-time spectral cross-correlation for noise power measurement, and a digitally synthesized Quantized Voltage Noise Source (QVNS) as an AC voltage reference. The QVNS emulates noise with a constant spectral density that is stable, programmable, and calculable in terms of known parameters using digital synthesis techniques. Changes in analog gain are accounted for by alternating the inputs between the Johnson noise sensor and the QVNS. The Johnson noise power at a known temperature is first balanced with a synthesized noise power from the QVNS. The process is then repeated by balancing the noise power from the same resistor at an unknown temperature. When the two noise power ratios are combined, a thermodynamic temperature is derived using the ratio of the two QVNS spectral densities. We present preliminary results where the ratio between the gallium triple point and the water triple point is used to demonstrate the accuracy of the measurement system with a standard uncertainty of 0.04 %.

  16. Application of system concept in vibration and noise reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Meiping

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although certain vibration and noise control technologies are maturing, such as vibration absorption, vibration isolation, sound absorption and sound insulation, and new methods for specific frequency bands or special environments have been proposed unceasingly, there is still no guarantee that practical effective vibration and noise reduction can be obtained. An important constraint for vibration and noise reduction is the lack of a system concept, and the integrity and relevance of such practical systems as ship structure have not obtained enough attention. We have tried to use the system engineering theory in guiding vibration and noise reduction, and have already achieved certain effects. Based on the system concept, the noise control of a petroleum pipeline production workshop has been completed satisfactorily, and the abnormal noise source identification of an airplane has been accomplished successfully. We want to share our experience and suggestions to promote the popularization of the system engineering theory in vibration and noise control.

  17. Tunnel diode amplifiers and their background noise as a function of the polarization point, the temperature, and the bandwidth; Amplificateurs a diode tunnel et leur bruit de fond, en fonction du point de polarisation, de la temperature et de la bande passante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozveaminian, K [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The author presents mathematical and graphical methods for the study of the stability of tunnel diode circuits. He gives an application to the realization of three amplifiers. Then he describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of these amplifiers and of its variations with the bias, the temperature and the bandwidth. (author) [French] L'auteur presente deux methodes, l'une theorique l'autre graphique, pour l'etude de la stabilite des circuits a diode tunnel, dont il fait une application a la realisation de trois amplificateurs. Il effectue ensuite une etude theorique et experimentale du bruit de fond de ces amplificateurs, en fonction du point de polarisation, de la temperature et de la bande passante. (auteur)

  18. Stochastic resonance and MFPT in an asymmetric bistable system driven by correlated multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pei-Ming; Li, Qun; Han, Dong-Ying

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates a new asymmetric bistable model driven by correlated multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise. The mean first-passage time (MFPT) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the indexes of evaluating the model are researched. Based on the two-state theory and the adiabatic approximation theory, the expressions of MFPT and SNR have been obtained for the asymmetric bistable system driven by a periodic signal, correlated multiplicative colored noise and additive noise. Simulation results show that it is easier to generate stochastic resonance (SR) to adjust the intensity of correlation strength λ. Meanwhile, the decrease of asymmetric coefficient r2 and the increase of noise intensity are beneficial to realize the transition between the two steady states in the system. At the same time, the twice SR phenomena can be observed by adjusting additive white noise and correlation strength. The influence of asymmetry of potential function on the MFPTs in two different directions is different.

  19. Noise in ecosystems: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, B; Valenti, D; Fiasconaro, A

    2004-06-01

    Noise, through its interaction with the nonlinearity of the living systems, can give rise to counter-intuitive phenomena such as stochastic resonance, noise-delayed extinction, temporal oscillations, and spatial patterns. In this paper we briefly review the noise-induced effects in three different ecosystems: (i) two competing species; (ii) three interacting species, one predator and two preys, and (iii) N-interacting species. The transient dynamics of these ecosystems are analyzed through generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. The interaction parameter between the species is random in cases (i) and (iii), and a periodical function, which accounts for the environmental temperature, in case (ii). We find noise-induced phenomena such as quasi-deterministic oscillations, stochastic resonance, noise-delayed extinction, and noise-induced pattern formation with nonmonotonic behaviors of patterns areas and of the density correlation as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity. The asymptotic behavior of the time average of the i(th) population when the ecosystem is composed of a great number of interacting species is obtained and the effect of the noise on the asymptotic probability distributions of the populations is discussed.

  20. Noise suppression via generalized-Markovian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffrey; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    It is by now well established that noise itself can be useful for performing quantum information processing tasks. We present results which show how one can effectively reduce the error rate associated with a noisy quantum channel by counteracting its detrimental effects with another form of noise. In particular, we consider the effect of adding on top of a purely Markovian (Lindblad) dynamics, a more general form of dissipation, which we refer to as generalized-Markovian noise. This noise has an associated memory kernel and the resulting dynamics are described by an integrodifferential equation. The overall dynamics are characterized by decay rates which depend not only on the original dissipative time scales but also on the new integral kernel. We find that one can engineer this kernel such that the overall rate of decay is lowered by the addition of this noise term. We illustrate this technique for the case where the bare noise is described by a dephasing Pauli channel. We analytically solve this model and show that one can effectively double (or even triple) the length of the channel, while achieving the same fidelity, entanglement, and error threshold. We numerically verify this scheme can also be used to protect against thermal Markovian noise (at nonzero temperature), which models spontaneous emission and excitation processes. A physical interpretation of this scheme is discussed, whereby the added generalized-Markovian noise causes the system to become periodically decoupled from the background Markovian noise.

  1. Self-noise in interferometers - radio and infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    A complete theory of noise in a synthesis image is proposed for a source of arbitrary strength. In the limit of faint sources, the standard estimates of noise in a synthesis image are recovered, while in the limit of strong sources, the noise in the synthesis image is found to be dominated by either self noise or by the noise generated by the source signal itself. It is found that the best VLBI maps (with noise approaching the thermal noise) may in fact be limited by self noise, and that there is a negligible bias in the standard definitions of the bispectrum phasor and the closure phase. The results suggest that at the low signal levels which are characteristic of infrared interferometers, it is best to fit the model to all the closure phases and fringe amplitudes. 13 refs

  2. NASA Jet Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  3. Electronic quantum noise and microwave photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bize-Reydellet, L.H.

    2003-06-01

    This work is devoted to the experimental study of quantum electronic noise in mesoscopic conductors. In the first part of this thesis, we studied shot noise in a one-dimensional ballistic conductor: a quantum point contact (QPC). We showed experimentally that, when one of the QPC contacts is irradiated with microwave photons, we observe partition noise in the absence of net current flowing through the sample. Thus, we validate the scattering theory of photo-assisted shot noise first by measuring the Fano factor without bias voltage across the conductor, and then by measuring shot noise in the doubly non equilibrium situation, where both a bias voltage and a microwave modulation are applied. In the second part, we realized the first tests of a new experimental set-up which will be able to measure high frequency noise of a mesoscopic conductor and the photon statistics emitted by this conductor in the measurement circuit. These tests consist in realizing Hanbury-Brown and Twiss type experiments (intensity interferometry) with two kinds of microwave photon source. First, we used a thermal incoherent source (macroscopic 50 Ohms resistor). It showed super-Poissonian noise, since the power fluctuations are proportional to the square of the mean photon power. Secondly, we studied a classical monochromatic source, which shows a Poissonian statistics. The giant Fano factor measured is perfectly explained by the attenuator and amplifier noise. (author)

  4. Temperature dependence of the magnetostriction in polycrystalline PrFe1.9 and TbFe2 alloys: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y. M.; Chen, L. Y.; Huang, H. F.; Xia, W. B.; Zhang, S. Y.; Wei, J.; Tang, S. L.; Du, Y. W.; Zhang, L.

    2014-01-01

    A remarkable magnetostriction λ 111 as large as 6700 ppm was found at 70 K in PrFe 1.9 alloy. This value is even larger than the theoretical maximum of 5600 ppm estimated by the Steven's equivalent operator method. The temperature dependence of λ 111 for PrFe 1.9 and TbFe 2 alloys follows well with the single-ion theory rule, which yields giant estimated λ 111 values of about 8000 and 4200 ppm for PrFe 1.9 and TbFe 2 alloys, respectively, at 0 K. The easy magnetization direction of PrFe 1.9 changes from [111] to [100] as temperature decreases, which leads to the abnormal decrease of the magnetostriction λ. The rare earth sublattice moment increases sharply in PrFe 1.9 alloy with decreasing temperature, resulting in the remarkably largest estimated value of λ 111 at 0 K according to the single-ion theory

  5. Testing the Metabolic Theory of Ecology with marine bacteria: Different temperature sensitivity of major phylogenetic groups during the spring phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor

    2017-08-24

    Although temperature is a key driver of bacterioplankton metabolism, the effect of ocean warming on different bacterial phylogenetic groups remains unclear. Here, we conducted monthly short-term incubations with natural coastal bacterial communities over an annual cycle to test the effect of experimental temperature on the growth rates and carrying capacities of four phylogenetic groups: SAR11, Rhodobacteraceae, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. SAR11 was the most abundant group year-round as analysed by CARD-FISH, with maximum abundances in summer, while the other taxa peaked in spring. All groups, including SAR11, showed high temperature-sensitivity of growth rates and/or carrying capacities in spring, under phytoplankton bloom or post-bloom conditions. In that season, Rhodobacteraceae showed the strongest temperature response in growth rates, estimated here as activation energy (E, 1.43 eV), suggesting an advantage to outcompete other groups under warmer conditions. In summer E values were in general lower than 0.65 eV, the value predicted by the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE). Contrary to MTE predictions, carrying capacity tended to increase with warming for all bacterial groups. Our analysis confirms that resource availability is key when addressing the temperature response of heterotrophic bacterioplankton. We further show that even under nutrient-sufficient conditions, warming differentially affected distinct bacterioplankton taxa. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Noise Reduction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  7. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  8. Effect of Si doping on the thermal conductivity of bulk GaN at elevated temperaturestheory and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Paskov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Si doping on the thermal conductivity of bulk GaN was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thermal conductivity of samples grown by Hydride Phase Vapor Epitaxy (HVPE with Si concentration ranging from 1.6×1016 to 7×1018 cm-3 was measured at room temperature and above using the 3ω method. The room temperature thermal conductivity was found to decrease with increasing Si concentration. The highest value of 245±5 W/m.K measured for the undoped sample was consistent with the previously reported data for free-standing HVPE grown GaN. In all samples, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature. In our previous study, we found that the slope of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity gradually decreased with increasing Si doping. Additionally, at temperatures above 350 K the thermal conductivity in the highest doped sample (7×1018 cm-3 was higher than that of lower doped samples. In this work, a modified Callaway model adopted for n-type GaN at high temperatures was developed in order to explain such unusual behavior. The experimental data was analyzed with examination of the contributions of all relevant phonon scattering processes. A reasonable match between the measured and theoretically predicted thermal conductivity was obtained. It was found that in n-type GaN with low dislocation densities the phonon-free-electron scattering becomes an important resistive process at higher temperatures. At the highest free electron concentrations, the electronic thermal conductivity was suggested to play a role in addition to the lattice thermal conductivity and compete with the effect of the phonon-point-defect and phonon-free-electron scattering.

  9. Aircrafts' taxi noise emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, C.; Pagan Munoz, Raul; López, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted, with the objective of creating a database of inputs that can be used with noise prediction software, to evaluate noise of aircraft taxing movements and community noise exposure levels. The acoustic consultant can use these data with any of the software packages,

  10. Study on the temperature gradient evolution of large size nonlinear crystal based on the fluid-solid coupling theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, F. Z.; Zhang, P.; Liang, Y. C.; Lu, L. H.

    2014-09-01

    In the non-critical phase-matching (NCPM) along the Θ =90° direction, ADP and DKDP crystals which have many advantages, including a large effective nonlinear optical coefficient, a small PM angular sensitivity and non beam walk-off, at the non-critical phase-matching become the competitive candidates in the inertial confinement fusion(ICF) facility, so the reasonable temperature control of crystals has become more and more important .In this paper, the fluid-solid coupling models of ADP crystal and DKDP crystal which both have anisotropic thermal conductivity in the states of vacuum and non-vacuum were established firstly, and then simulated using the fluid analysis software Fluent. The results through the analysis show that the crystal surface temperature distribution is a ring shape, the temperature gradients in the direction of the optical axis both the crystals are 0.02°C and 0.01°C due to the air, the lowest temperature points of the crystals are both at the center of surface, and the temperatures are lower than 0.09°C and 0.05°C compared in the vacuum and non-vacuum environment, then propose two designs for heating apparatus.

  11. Two-time temperature Green functions in kinetic theory and molecular hydrodynamics. 3. Account of interactions of hydrodynamic fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tserkovnikov, Yu.A.

    2001-01-01

    The regular method for deriving the equations for the Green functions in the tasks on the molecular hydrodynamics and kinetics, making it possible to account consequently the contribution into the generalized kinetics coefficients, conditioned by interaction of two, three and more hydrodynamic modes. In contrast to the general theory of perturbations by the interaction constant the consequent approximations are accomplished by the degree of accounting for the higher correlations, described by the irreducible functions [ru

  12. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannous, C; Langlois, J

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems. (review)

  13. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  14. Finite-temperature second-order many-body perturbation and Hartree–Fock theories for one-dimensional solids: An application to Peierls and charge-density-wave transitions in conjugated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao; Ryu, Shinsei; Hirata, So

    2014-01-01

    Finite-temperature extensions of ab initio Gaussian-basis-set spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (HF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories are implemented for infinitely extended, periodic, one-dimensional solids and applied to the Peierls and charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene. The HF theory predicts insulating CDW ground states for both systems in their equidistant structures at low temperatures. In the same structures, they turn metallic at high temperatures. Starting from the “dimerized” low-temperature equilibrium structures, the systems need even higher temperatures to undergo a Peierls transition, which is accompanied by geometric as well as electronic distortions from dimerized to non-dimerized forms. The conventional finite-temperature MP2 theory shows a sign of divergence in any phase at any nonzero temperature and is useless. The renormalized finite-temperature MP2 (MP2R) theory is divergent only near metallic electronic structures, but is well behaved elsewhere. MP2R also predicts CDW and Peierls transitions occurring at two different temperatures. The effect of electron correlation is primarily to lower the Peierls transition temperature

  15. First-principles calculation of the transition temperature Tc for HgBa2CuO4+δ high-temperature superconductors via dipolon theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, D.; Sharma, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    First numerical evaluations of T c for oxygenated and argon-reduced single-layered HgBa 2 CuO 4+δ superconductors have been presented. Our calculations are based on the dipolon theory and are found to provide an explanation for the occurrence of superconductivity in single-layered high-T c superconductors. Relevant expressions useful for the evaluation of T c have been given. Since the polarizabilities of the ions are not known exactly for the present systems we have performed calculations making use of Pauling's as well as Tessman, Kahn, and Shockley's polarizabilities in order to estimate the uncertainties in the calculated values of T c associated with uncertainties in the polarizabilities. The effective charges on the ions required for the evaluation of dipoles and dipolon frequencies have been obtained by means of the bond-valence sums. Without fitting with any parameters, our calculations yield T c values equal to 80±21 K for the oxygenated and 50±27 K for the argon-reduced HgBa 2 CuO 4+δ superconductors, in agreement with the corresponding experimental values 95 and 59 K. The uncertainties in the calculated values of T c arise because of the uncertainties in various physical parameters (including polarizabilities) used and due to errors involved in the calculations. The present results are consistent with the observed electronic Raman-scattering intensities which show anomalously broad peaks extended up to several electron volts in cuprate high-T c superconductors. Our calculated dipolon density of states predict four optical absorption peaks at about 77 cm -1 , 195 cm -1 , 1.6 eV, and 2.5 eV

  16. Combat aircraft noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgarbozza, M.; Depitre, A.

    1992-04-01

    A discussion of the characteristics and the noise levels of combat aircraft and of a transport aircraft in taking off and landing are presented. Some methods of noise reduction are discussed, including the following: operational anti-noise procedures; and concepts of future engines (silent post-combustion and variable cycle). Some measurement results concerning the noise generated in flight at great speeds and low altitude will also be examined. Finally, the protection of the environment of French air bases against noise will be described and the possibilities of regulation examined.

  17. pi-dimerization of pleiadiene radical cations at low temperatures revealed by UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry and quantum theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van het Goor, Layo; van Duijnen, Piet Th.; Koper, Carola; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Hartl, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of the non-alternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pleiadiene and related cyclohepta[c,d]pyrene and cyclohepta[c,d]fluoranthene in THF produces corresponding radical cations detectable in the temperature range of 293-263 K only on the subsecond time scale of cyclic

  18. Sensor response time monitoring using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Thie, J.A.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Holbert, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Random noise techniques in nuclear power plants have been developed for system surveillance and for analysis of reactor core dynamics. The noise signals also contain information about sensor dynamics, and this can be extracted using frequency, amplitude and time domain analyses. Even though noise analysis has been used for sensor response time testing in some nuclear power plants, an adequate validation of this method has never been carried out. This paper presents the results of limited work recently performed to examine the validity of the noise analysis for sensor response time testing in nuclear power plants. The conclusion is that noise analysis has the potential for detecting gross changes in sensor response but it cannot be used for reliable measurement of response time until more laboratory and field experience is accumulated. The method is more advantageous for testing pressure sensors than it is for temperature sensors. This is because: 1) for temperature sensors, a method called Loop Current Step Response test is available which is quantitatively more exact than noise analysis, 2) no method currently exists for on-line testing of pressure transmitters other than the Power-Interrupt test which is applicable only to force balance pressure transmitters, and 3) pressure sensor response time is affected by sensing line degradation which is inherently taken into account by testing with noise analysis. (author)

  19. Noise suppression in duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Barfeh, M.A.G.

    2001-01-01

    In air-conditioning system the noise generated by supply fan is carried by conditioned air through the ductwork. The noise created in ductwork run may be transmission, regenerative and ductborne. Transmission noise is fan noise, regenerative noise is due to turbulence in flow and ductborne noise is the noise radiating from duct to surroundings. Some noise is attenuated in ducts also but if noise level is high then it needs to be attenuated. A simple mitre bend can attenuate-noise. This principle is extended to V and M-shape ducts with inside lining of fibreglass, which gave maximum attenuation of 77 dB and 62 dB respectively corresponding to 8 kHz frequency as compared to mitre, bend giving maximum 18 dB attenuation. Sound level meter measured sound levels with octave band filter and tests were conducted in anechoic room. A V-shape attenuator can be used at fan outlet and high frequency noise can be minimized greatly. (author)

  20. Noise as a Probe of Ising Spin Glass Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare

    2009-03-01

    Noise is ubiquitous and and is often viewed as a nuisance. However, we propose that noise can be used as a probe of the fluctuations of microscopic entities, especially in the vicinity of a phase transition. In recent work we have used simulations to show that the noise increases in the vicinity of phase transitions of ordered systems. We have recently turned our attention to noise near the phase transitions of disordered systems. In particular, we are studying the noise near Ising spin glass transitions using Monte Carlo simulations. We monitor the system as a function of temperature. At each temperature, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization. We look at different quantities, such as the noise power spectrum and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations.

  1. Surveillance of instruments by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Random fluctuations of neutron flux, temperature, and pressure in a reactor provide multifrequency excitation of the corresponding instrumentation chains. Mathematical descriptors suitable for characterizing the output, or noise, of the instrumentation are reviewed with a view toward using such noise in detecting instrument faults. Demonstrations of the feasibility of this approach in a number of reactors provide illustrative examples. Comparisons with traditional surveillance testing are made, and a number of advantages and some disadvantages of using noise analysis as a supplementary technique are pointed out

  2. Reactor sensor surveillance using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Thie, J.A.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Reactor noise signals, as measured by neutron detectors and process sensors, contain information about the dynamics of the process and sensor characteristics. The extent of sensor characteristics that can be determined from such measurements depends on the sensor type, the property of the process noise exciting the sensor and its location. This paper addresses degradation monitoring of temperature and pressure sensors, analysis methods and results of application to operating pressurized water reactors. In addition, the use of noise analysis for monitoring of pressure sensing lines in nuclear power plants is discussed

  3. Active3 noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-01-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Power reactor noise measurements in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallagi, D.; Horanyi, S.; Hargitai, T.

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the history of reactor noise research in Hungary. A brief description is given of studies in the WWR-SM reactor, a modified version of the original WWR-S thermal reactor, for the detection of in-core simulated boiling by analysis of the noise of out-of-core ionization chambers. Coolant velocity measurements by transit time analysis of temperature fluctuations are described. (U.K.)

  5. Copepod community growth rates in relation to body size, temperature, and food availability in the East China Sea: a test of metabolic theory of ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Y. Lin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton play an essential role in marine food webs, and understanding how community-level growth rates of zooplankton vary in the field is critical for predicting how marine ecosystem function may vary in the face of environmental changes. Here, we used the artificial cohort method to examine the effects of temperature, body size, and chlorophyll concentration (a proxy for food on weight-specific growth rates for copepod communities in the East China Sea. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that copepod community growth rates can be described by the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE, linking spatio-temporal variation of copepod growth rate with temperature and their body size. Our results generally agree with predictions made by the MTE and demonstrate that weight-specific growth rates of copepod communities in our study area are positively related with temperature and negatively related to body size. However, the regression coefficients of body size do not approach the theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we find that the deviation from the MTE predictions may be partly attributed to the effect of food availability (which is not explicitly accounted for by the MTE. In addition, significant difference in the coefficients of temperature and body size exists among taxonomic groups. Our results suggest that considering the effects of food limitation and taxonomy is necessary to better understand copepod growth rates under in situ conditions, and such effects on the MTE-based predictions need further investigation.

  6. Correlation functions in finite temperature field theories: formalism and applications to quark-gluon plasma; Fonctions de correlations en theorie des champs a temperature finie: aspects formels et applications au plasma de quarks et de gluons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelis, Francois [Savoie Univ., 73 - Chambery (France)

    1998-12-01

    The general framework of this work is thermal field theory, and more precisely the perturbative calculation of thermal Green`s functions. In a first part, I consider the problems closely related to the formalism itself. After two introductory chapters devoted to set up the framework and the notations used afterwards, a chapter is dedicated to a clarification of certain aspects of the justification of the Feynman rules of the real time formalism. Then, I consider in the chapter 4 the problem of cutting rules in the real time formalisms. In particular, after solving a controversy on this subject, I generalize these cutting rules to the `retarded-advanced` version of this formalism. Finally, the last problem considered in this part is that of the pion decay into two photons in a thermal bath. I show that the discrepancies found in the literature are due to peculiarities of the analytical properties of the thermal Green`s functions. The second part deals with the calculations of the photons or dilepton (virtual photon) production rate by a quark gluon plasma. The framework of this study is the effective theory based on the resummation of hard thermal loops. The first aspects of this study is related to the production of virtual photons, where we show that important contributions arise at two loops, completing the result already known at one loop. In the case of real photon production, we show that extremely strong collinear singularities make two loop contributions dominant compared to one loop ones. In both cases, the importance of two loop contributions can be interpreted as weaknesses of the hard thermal loop approximation. (author) 366 refs., 109 figs.

  7. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  8. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  9. Research on the Method of Noise Error Estimation of Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. J.; Dong, S. W.; Li, W.; Zhang, J. H.; Jing, Y. J.

    2017-05-01

    The simulation methods of different noises of atomic clocks are given. The frequency flicker noise of atomic clock is studied by using the Markov process theory. The method for estimating the maximum interval error of the frequency white noise is studied by using the Wiener process theory. Based on the operation of 9 cesium atomic clocks in the time frequency reference laboratory of NTSC (National Time Service Center), the noise coefficients of the power-law spectrum model are estimated, and the simulations are carried out according to the noise models. Finally, the maximum interval error estimates of the frequency white noises generated by the 9 cesium atomic clocks have been acquired.

  10. A temperature and mass dependence of the linear Boltzmann collision operator from group theory point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveliev, V.

    1996-01-01

    The Lie group of the transformations affecting the parameters of the linear Boltzmann collision operator such as temperature of background gas and ratio of masses of colliding particles and molecules is discovered. The group also describes the conservation laws for collisions and main symmetries of the collision operator. New algebraic properties of the collision operator are derived. Transformations acting on the variables and parameters and leaving the linear Boltzmann kinetic equation invariant are found. For the constant collision frequency the integral representation of solutions for nonuniform case in terms of the distribution function of particles drifting in a gas with zero temperature is deduced. The new exact relaxation solutions are obtained too. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. High-pressure and high-temperature physical properties of LiF studied by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Quan, Wei-Long; Song, Ting; Khenata, Rabah; Bin-Omran, Saad

    2018-05-01

    Using the revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation based on first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory, the high-pressure structural phase transition of LiF is explored. From the analysis of Gibbs free energies, we find that no phase transition occurs for LiF in the presented pressure range from 0 to 1000 GPa, and this result is consistent with the theoretical prediction obtained via ab initio calculations [N.A. Smirnov, Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011) 014109]. Using the classical molecular dynamics technique with effective pair potentials which consist of the Coulomb, dispersion, and repulsion interaction, the melting phase diagram of LiF is determined. The obtained normalized volumes under pressure are in good agreement with our density functional theory results and the available experimental data. Meanwhile, with the help of the quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the phononic effects are considered, the thermodynamic properties of interest, including the volume thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal bulk modulus and its first and second pressure derivatives, heat capacity at constant volume, entropy, Debye temperature, and Grüneisen parameter of LiF are predicted systematically. All the properties of LiF with the stable NaCl-type structure in the temperature range of 0-4900 K and the pressure up to 1000 GPa are summarized.

  12. Theory, Electro-Optical Design, Testing, and Calibration of a Prototype Atmospheric Supersaturation, Humidity, and Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-15

    Voltage versus Aspirated Dew Point 94 Hygrometer Reading in Degrees Celsius (10 Second Averages) Fig. (7.5)(b) Scatter Diagram - NCAR Lyman-Alpha...Hygrometer Output Voltage versus Aspirated Dew Point Hygrometer Reading in Degrees Celsius (10 Second Averages) Fig. (7.6) Ophir Air Temperature...goal thus translates to an absolute humidity accuracy of 1% of reading or better over a dynamic r-dnj(! ,(f i(jul. 4 uder. of magnitude. 29 - ITI VAP

  13. Theory of Correlated Pairs of Electrons Oscillating in Resonant Quantum States to Reach the Critical Temperature in a Metal

    OpenAIRE

    Aroche, Raúl Riera; Rosas-Cabrera, Rodrigo Arturo; Burgos, Rodrigo Arturo Rosas; Betancourt-Riera, René; Betancourt-Riera, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    The formation of Correlated Electron Pairs Oscillating around the Fermi level in Resonant Quantum States (CEPO-RQS), when a metal is cooled to its critical temperature T=Tc, is studied. The necessary conditions for the existence of CEPO-RQS are analyzed. The participation of electron-electron interaction screened by an electron dielectric constant of the form proposed by Thomas Fermi is considered and a physical meaning for the electron-phonon-electron interaction in the formation of the CEPO...

  14. Estimations of Kappa parameter using quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy: Applications on Wind spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović, M.

    2017-12-01

    Quasi-thermal noise (QTN) spectroscopy is an accurate technique for in situ measurements of electron density and temperature in space plasmas. The QTN spectrum has a characteristic noise peak just above the plasma frequency produced by electron quasi-thermal fluctuations, which allows a very accurate measurement of the electron density. The size and shape of the peak are determined by suprathermal electrons. Since this nonthermal electron population is well described by a generalized Lorentzian - Kappa velocity distribution, it is possible to determinate the distribution properties in the solar wind from a measured spectrum. In this work, we discuss some basic properties of the QTN spectrum dependence of the Kappa distribution parameters - total electron density, temperature and the Kappa index, giving an overview on how instrument characteristics and environment conditions affect quality of the measurements. Further on, we aim to apply the method to Wind Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR) measurements. However, the spectra observed by this instrument usually contain contributions from nonthermal phenomena, like ion acoustic waves below, or galactic noise above the plasma frequency. This is why, besides comparison of the theory with observations, work with Wind data requires development of a sophisticated algorithm that distinguish parts of the spectra that are dominated by the QTN, and therefore can be used in our study. Postulates of this algorithm, as well as major results of its implementation, are also presented.

  15. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  16. Noise investigations in boiling water and pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaly, G.

    1979-08-01

    The paper begins with the general discussion of the neutron noise measured by in-core and ex-core detectors. The theory of BWR noise is surveyed in detail. After the theoretical survey the physical background of the measuring methods applied in the fluctuation analysis of BWRs is discussed. The section on PWR noise discusses the information content of the neutron, pressure and displacement signals about the vibration of the vessel and its internals. (author)

  17. Digital signal processing for the Johnson noise thermometry: a time series analysis of the Johnson noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byung Soo; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chong Eun; Kwon, Kee Choon; David, E. H.; Kisner, R.A.

    2004-06-01

    In this report, we first proved that a random signal obtained by taking the sum of a set of signal frequency signals generates a continuous Markov process. We used this random signal to simulate the Johnson noise and verified that the Johnson noise thermometry can be used to improve the measurements of the reactor coolant temperature within an accuracy of below 0.14%. Secondly, by using this random signal we determined the optimal sampling rate when the frequency band of the Johnson noise signal is given. Also the results of our examination on how good the linearity of the Johnson noise is and how large the relative error of the temperature could become when the temperature increases are described. Thirdly, the results of our analysis on a set of the Johnson noise signal blocks taken from a simple electric circuit are described. We showed that the properties of the continuous Markov process are satisfied even when some channel noises are present. Finally, we describe the algorithm we devised to handle the problem of the time lag in the long-term average or the moving average in a transient state. The algorithm is based on the Haar wavelet and is to estimate the transient temperature that has much smaller time delay. We have shown that the algorithm can track the transient temperature successfully

  18. Possibilities of an efficient noise damping in the large gas-fueled boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report describes a series of tests with the objective to develop a technique for active control, and suppression of unstable conditions of combustion in gas-fired boiler systems. The primary target group for this report are persons within the energy sector, including especially users of natural gas. Focus has been given more to the practical possibilities and limitations than to complicated acoustical theory. The technical background for this work is constituted by the latest innovations within active noise cancelling methods for low frequent noise in channel- and pipe shaped systems, such as heating-, air-and exhaust systems. The fundamental idea has been to implement already functioning and commercial available systems for active noise cancellation in an modified setup to a gasfired boiler system. A few examples of similar attempts are given. Latest a relatively successful example of actively controlling an unstable combustion in a channel shaped burner system (CNRS Paris 1993). The conclusion of the project is anyway, that unstable combustion in larger gasfired boilers can not be controlled by the active methods and systems known today. The reasons for this are: the flame and thus the noise source are distributed in space, the acoustical wave-propagation in the combustion chamber is complex and with low damping, several loops for unstable combustion are possible. Within this project special sensors for high temperatures are developed, e.g.: probe microphones, high temperature turbulence screens and a system for measuring of the variations in UV-light emission form the flame. These systems are applicable also for more 'traditional active noise cancellation' of low-frequent noise in exhaust pipes and chimneys. (au)

  19. Low-frequency noise properties in Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide Schottky diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Zhang, Linqing; Ma, Xiaochen; Wilson, Joshua [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jin, Jidong [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Du, Lulu; Xin, Qian [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Song, Aimin, E-mail: A.Song@manchester.ac.uk [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-08-31

    The low-frequency noise properties of Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) Schottky diodes at different forward biases are investigated. The IGZO layer and Pt contact were deposited by RF sputtering at room temperature. The diode showed an ideality factor of 1.2 and a barrier height of 0.94 eV. The current noise spectral density exhibited 1/f behavior at low frequencies. The analysis of the current dependency of the noise spectral density revealed that for the as-deposited diode, the noise followed Luo's mobility and diffusivity fluctuation model in the thermionic-emission-limited region and Hooge's empirical theory in the series-resistance-limited region. A low Hooge's constant of 1.4 × 10{sup −9} was found in the space-charge region. In the series-resistance-limited region, the Hooge's constant was 2.2 × 10{sup −5}. After annealing, the diode showed degradation in the electrical performance. The interface-trap-induced noise dominated the noise spectrum. By using the random walk model, the interface-trap density was obtained to be 3.6 × 10{sup 15 }eV{sup −1 }cm{sup −2}. This work provides a quantitative approach to analyze the properties of Pt-IGZO interfacial layers. These low noise properties are a prerequisite to the use of IGZO Schottky diodes in switch elements in memory devices, photosensors, and mixer diodes.

  20. Temperature and compositional dependence of solid-liquid interfacial energy: application of the Cahn-Hilliard theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, I.; Takei, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic method to estimate the solid-liquid interfacial energy (or interfacial tension) is proposed, based on the Cahn-Hilliard theory. In the model, the liquid is treated as a regular solution, and the interfacial layers are assumed to have liquid-like thermodynamic properties. In eutectic systems, interfacial adsorption occurs within a few atomic layers, and interfacial energy monotonously increases with decreasing concentration of the solid species in the liquid phase. If non-ideal atomic interaction is strong and the liquid immiscibility region appears in the phase diagrams (this is the case of monotectic systems), the interfacial thickness drastically increases and the interfacial energy is reduced around the immiscibility gap

  1. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    re above the recommended limit of 85 dB(A) and these high noise intensit related health ... multiple workplaces i.e. steel pipe and a unit factory ... construction material. However .... selected workers, particularly the machine operators. In some ...

  2. Determination of Transport Properties From Flowing Fluid Temperature Logging In Unsaturated Fractured Rocks: Theory And Semi-Analytical Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2008-01-01

    Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has been recently proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this paper, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock, and develop a semianalytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. Based on the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this paper is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel paper (Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008), we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. We also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks

  3. Squeezed noise in precision force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocko, M.F.; Bordoni, F.; Fuligni, F.; Johnson, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    The effort to build gravitational radiation antennae with sensitivity sufficient to detect bursts of radiation from supernovae in the Virgo cluster of galaxies has caused a consideration of the fundamental limits for the detection of weak forces. The existing Weber bar detectors will be eventually limited, by the phase insensitive transducers now used, to noise temperatures no better than that of the first amplifier which follows the transducer. Even for a quantum limited amplifier this may not give the sensitivity required to definitively detect gravitational radiation. In a 'back action evasion' measurement a specific phase sensitive transducer would be used. It is believed that by the technique of measuring one of the two antenna phases it is possible to reach an effective noise temperature for the measured phase which is far below the amplifier noise temperature. This is at the expense of an infinite noise temperature in the unmeasured antenna phase and is thus described as squeezing the noise. The authors outline the theoretical model for the behavior of such systems and present data from several experiments which demonstrate the main features of a back action evasion measurement. (Auth.)

  4. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  5. Adaptive noise cancellation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, N.

    1999-01-01

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique. (author)

  6. Theory of ortho-para conversion in hydrogen adsorbed on metal and paramagnetic surfaces at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to explain the experimental results on Cu(100), Ag(111), Ag thin films, graphite, and H 2 bubbles in Cu, the ortho-para conversion rates of H 2 and D 2 adsorbed on metal and paramagnetic surfaces at low temperatures have been considered. The conversion rates due to magnetic dipole-dipole, Fermi contact, and spin-orbit interaction between the conduction electrons, and nuclear spins of H 2 (D 2 ) are calculated to elucidate the role of the metal surface. Although the rates on clean metal surfaces are found to be too slow to account for the observed rates on Ag, they may explain the catalytic conversion on H 2 bubble surfaces at 1.3 K. Additionally, effects of impurities and defects on the surface are investigated by calculating the conversion rate in two-dimensional solid D 2 (H 2 ) by emission of one (two) phonon(s). Fast conversion rates observed on Ag and graphite surfaces as well as on the surfaces of H 2 bubbles may be accounted for by paramagnetic impurities or defects. On Grafoil, both in (√3 x √3)R30 0 commensurate and incommensurate solid phase, a temperature-independent conversion rate is predicted if the mobility of the molecules is high enough to prevent concentration gradients

  7. Quantum noise in a terahertz hot electron bolometer mixer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, W.; Khosropanah, P.; Gao, J. R.; Kollberg, E. L.; Yngvesson, K. S.; Bansal, T.; Barends, R.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the noise temperature of a single, sensitive superconducting NbN hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer in a frequency range from 1.6 to 5.3 THz, using a setup with all the key components in vacuum. By analyzing the measured receiver noise temperature using a quantum noise (QN) model for HEB mixers, we confirm the effect of QN. The QN is found to be responsible for about half of the receiver noise at the highest frequency in our measurements. The ?-factor (the quantum efficiency ...

  8. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  9. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  10. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  11. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaquiere, A.; Pachowska, R.

    1961-06-01

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [fr

  12. Visibility of wavelet quantization noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Solomon, J. A.; Villasenor, J.

    1997-01-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) decomposes an image into bands that vary in spatial frequency and orientation. It is widely used for image compression. Measures of the visibility of DWT quantization errors are required to achieve optimal compression. Uniform quantization of a single band of coefficients results in an artifact that we call DWT uniform quantization noise; it is the sum of a lattice of random amplitude basis functions of the corresponding DWT synthesis filter. We measured visual detection thresholds for samples of DWT uniform quantization noise in Y, Cb, and Cr color channels. The spatial frequency of a wavelet is r 2-lambda, where r is display visual resolution in pixels/degree, and lambda is the wavelet level. Thresholds increase rapidly with wavelet spatial frequency. Thresholds also increase from Y to Cr to Cb, and with orientation from lowpass to horizontal/vertical to diagonal. We construct a mathematical model for DWT noise detection thresholds that is a function of level, orientation, and display visual resolution. This allows calculation of a "perceptually lossless" quantization matrix for which all errors are in theory below the visual threshold. The model may also be used as the basis for adaptive quantization schemes.

  13. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...

  14. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  15. Jet Noise Scaling in Dual Stream Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    Power spectral laws in dual stream jets are studied by considering such flows a superposition of appropriate single-stream coaxial jets. Noise generation in each mixing region is modeled using spectral power laws developed earlier for single stream jets as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. Similarity arguments indicate that jet noise in dual stream nozzles may be considered as a composite of four single stream jets representing primary/secondary, secondary/ambient, transition, and fully mixed zones. Frequency filter are designed to highlight spectral contribution from each jet. Predictions are provided at an area ratio of 2.0--bypass ratio from 0.80 to 3.40, and are compared with measurements within a wide range of velocity and temperature ratios. These models suggest that the low frequency noise in unheated jets is dominated by the fully mixed region at all velocity ratios, while the high frequency noise is dominated by the secondary when the velocity ratio is larger than 0.80. Transition and fully mixed jets equally dominate the low frequency noise in heated jets. At velocity ratios less than 0.50, the high frequency noise from primary/bypass becomes a significant contributing factor similar to that in the secondary/ambient jet.

  16. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  17. Cross Linked Metal Particles for Low Noise Bolometer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-12

    Our results indicate that the CLMPs can simultaneously have a high temperature coefficient of resistivity and a low noise, and therefore have a...indicate that the CLMPs can simultaneously have a high temperature co- efficient of resistivity and a low noise, and therefore have a great potential...current as a function of the inverse of applied bias for CLMP films at different temperatures. It is seen that the I-V curves are highly nonlinear as 7 0

  18. Local noise in a diffusive conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, E. S.; Shovkun, D. V.; Ercolani, D.; Rossella, F.; Rocci, M.; Sorba, L.; Roddaro, S.; Khrapai, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The control and measurement of local non-equilibrium configurations is of utmost importance in applications on energy harvesting, thermoelectrics and heat management in nano-electronics. This challenging task can be achieved with the help of various local probes, prominent examples including superconducting or quantum dot based tunnel junctions, classical and quantum resistors, and Raman thermography. Beyond time-averaged properties, valuable information can also be gained from spontaneous fluctuations of current (noise). From these perspective, however, a fundamental constraint is set by current conservation, which makes noise a characteristic of the whole conductor, rather than some part of it. Here we demonstrate how to remove this obstacle and pick up a local noise temperature of a current biased diffusive conductor with the help of a miniature noise probe. This approach is virtually noninvasive for the electronic energy distributions and extends primary local measurements towards strongly non-equilibrium regimes.

  19. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  20. Selected papers on noise and stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    1954-01-01

    Six classic papers on stochastic process, selected to meet the needs of physicists, applied mathematicians, and engineers. Contents: 1.Chandrasekhar, S.: Stochastic Problems in Physics and Astronomy. 2. Uhlenbeck, G. E. and Ornstein, L. S.: On the Theory of the Browninan Motion. 3. Ming Chen Wang and Uhlenbeck, G. E.: On the Theory of the Browninan Motion II. 4. Rice, S. O.: Mathematical Analysis of Random Noise. 5. Kac, Mark: Random Walk and the Theory of Brownian Motion. 6. Doob, J. L.: The Brownian Movement and Stochastic Equations. Unabridged republication of the Dover reprint (1954). Pre

  1. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  2. Noise, buildings and people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croome, D J

    1977-01-01

    This book covers the physics of acoustics necessary to understand the analytical aspects of acoustical design and noise control in buildings. The major part is devoted to the problems of noise and man, and other chapters cover features of noise control in and around buildings. In an introduction, building environmental engineering is dealth with in general terms of architecture, creativity, systms design, etc. Aspects of the acoustical environment, noise sources in buildings, control of airborne and structure-borne noise and acoustical design techniques are covered in Part II. Items include: comfort, physiological response to noise and vibrations, noise criteria, human performance, speech communication, landscaped offices, sound generation by air-conditioning and heating equipment, building structure and noise attenuation, acoustical design. Part III gives some fundamentals of acoustics; mechanical vibration, wave motion, propagation of sound, structure-borne sound, behavior of sound in rooms, transmission of sound through structure. References include lists of British standards and booklets on health and safety at work.

  3. Low frequency noise study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    This report documents a study to investigate human response to the low-frequency : content of aviation noise, or low-frequency noise (LFN). The study comprised field : measurements and laboratory studies. The major findings were: : 1. Start-of-takeof...

  4. Noise Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Lavaroni, Charles W.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on noise pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of noise pollution and involves students in processes of…

  5. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model is tested and validated by comparing with other results from the literature. Finally, this model is used in the optimization process of two reference airfoils in order to reduce their noise signature: the RISOE-B1-18 and the S809 airfoils. (au)

  6. Analytical expressions for transition edge sensor excess noise models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Daniel; Fraser, George W.

    2010-01-01

    Transition edge sensors (TESs) are high-sensitivity thermometers used in cryogenic microcalorimeters which exploit the steep gradient in resistivity with temperature during the superconducting phase transition. Practical TES devices tend to exhibit a white noise of uncertain origin, arising inside the device. We discuss two candidate models for this excess noise, phase slip shot noise (PSSN) and percolation noise. We extend the existing PSSN model to include a magnetic field dependence and derive a basic analytical model for percolation noise. We compare the predicted functional forms of the noise current vs. resistivity curves of both models with experimental data and provide a set of equations for both models to facilitate future experimental efforts to clearly identify the source of excess noise.

  7. Noise from wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.; Larsen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Denmark has 3200 wind turbines with an installed maximum capacity of 418MW. The most important Danish research projects into wind turbine noise and the main results are listed. These date from 1983. Two comprehensive studies are currently in progress. The first is an analytical and empirical investigation of aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors and has so far dealt mainly with tip noise. The measurement method, using a hard board mounted microphone on the ground near the turbine, is described. Four different tip designs have been tested. Some examples of reference sound power level spectra for three of the designs are presented. During the past two years a computerbased data acquisition system has been used for real-time determination of sound power levels. The second study, which has just commenced, is on annoyance from wind turbine noise. It will include noise measurements, masking calculations and a social survey on the perceived nuisance. (UK)

  8. Noise from wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.; Jakobsen, J.

    1992-11-01

    Based on a previous project concerning the calculation of the amount of noise emanating from wind turbine arrays, this one examines the subject further by investigating whether there could be significant differences in the amount of noise made by individual wind turbines in an array, and whether the noise is transmitted in varying directions - so that when it is carried in the same direction as the wind blows it would appear to be louder. The aim was also to determine whether the previously used method of calculation lacked precision. It was found that differences in noise niveaux related to individual wind turbines were insignificant and that noise was not so loud when it was not borne in the direction of the wind. It was necessary to change the method of calculation as reckoning should include the influence of the terrain, wind velocity and distance. The measuring and calculation methods are exemplified and the resulting measurements are presented in detail. (AB)

  9. Reactor noise monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Hiroto.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor noise monitoring device by detecting abnormal sounds in background noises. Vibration sounds detected by accelerometers are applied to a loose parts detector. The detector generates high alarm if there are sudden impact sounds in the background noises and applies output signals to an accumulation device. If there is slight impact sounds in the vicinity of any of the accelerometers, the accumulation device accumulates the abnormal sounds assumed to be generated from an identical site while synchronizing the waveforms for all of the channels. Then, the device outputs signals in which the background noises are cancelled, as detection signals. Therefore, S/N ratio can be improved and the abnormal sounds contained in the background noises can be detected, to thereby improve the accuracy for estimating the position where the abnormal sounds are generated. (I.S.)

  10. Noise Enhanced Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spagnolo, B.; Agudov, N.V.; Dubkov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The noise can stabilize a fluctuating or a periodically driven metastable state in such a way that the system remains in this state for a longer time than in the absence of white noise. This is the noise enhanced stability phenomenon, observed experimentally and numerically in different physical systems. After shortly reviewing all the physical systems where the phenomenon was observed, the theoretical approaches used to explain the effect are presented. Specifically the conditions to observe the effect in systems: (a) with periodical driving force, and (b) with random dichotomous driving force, are discussed. In case (b) we review the analytical results concerning the mean first passage time and the nonlinear relaxation time as a function of the white noise intensity, the parameters of the potential barrier, and of the dichotomous noise. (author)

  11. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  12. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  13. 1/f noise in metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Shahed; Huynh, Quyen T.; Bosman, Gijs; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2006-11-01

    The charge transport and noise properties of three terminal, gated devices containing multiple single-wall metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes were measured at room temperature. Applying a high voltage pulsed bias at the drain terminal the metallic tubes were ablated sequentially, enabling the separation of measured conductance and 1/f noise into metallic and semiconducting nanotube contributions. The relative low frequency excess noise of the metallic tubes was observed to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the semiconductor tubes.

  14. Noise figure of amplified dispersive Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    Amplified dispersive Fourier transformation (ADFT) is a powerful tool for fast real-time spectroscopy as it overcomes the limitations of traditional optical spectrometers. ADFT maps the spectrum of an optical pulse into a temporal waveform using group-velocity dispersion and simultaneously amplifies it in the optical domain. It greatly simplifies spectroscopy by replacing the diffraction grating and detector array in the conventional spectrometer with a dispersive fiber and single-pixel photodetector, enabling ultrafast real-time spectroscopic measurements. Following our earlier work on the theory of ADFT, here we study the effect of noise on ADFT. We derive the noise figure of ADFT and discuss its dependence on various parameters.

  15. Advanced digital signal processing and noise reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vaseghi, Saeed V

    2008-01-01

    Digital signal processing plays a central role in the development of modern communication and information processing systems. The theory and application of signal processing is concerned with the identification, modelling and utilisation of patterns and structures in a signal process. The observation signals are often distorted, incomplete and noisy and therefore noise reduction, the removal of channel distortion, and replacement of lost samples are important parts of a signal processing system. The fourth edition of Advanced Digital Signal Processing and Noise Reduction updates an

  16. Stochastic mean-field theory: Method and application to the disordered Bose-Hubbard model at finite temperature and speckle disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissbort, Ulf; Hofstetter, Walter; Thomale, Ronny

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the stochastic mean-field theory (SMFT) method, which is a new approach for describing disordered Bose systems in the thermodynamic limit including localization and dimensional effects. We explicate the method in detail and apply it to the disordered Bose-Hubbard model at finite temperature, with on-site box disorder, as well as experimentally relevant unbounded speckle disorder. We find that disorder-induced condensation and re-entrant behavior at constant filling are only possible at low temperatures, beyond the reach of current experiments [M. Pasienski, D. McKay, M. White, and B. DeMarco, e-print arXiv:0908.1182]. Including off-diagonal hopping disorder as well, we investigate its effect on the phase diagram in addition to pure on-site disorder. To make connection to present experiments on a quantitative level, we also combine SMFT with an LDA approach and obtain the condensate fraction in the presence of an external trapping potential.

  17. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  18. THE EFFECT OF COMPRESSIBILITY FOR DISPLACEMENT NOISE FROM THE HELICOPTER ROTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Kritskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of noise generation of rotor due to the thickness of blades - displacement noise is considered. The method of calculating the displacement noise, which is based on linear acoustic theory for the changes in the effective thickness of the blade over time due to the compressibility of the flow are described.

  19. AM to PM noise conversion in a cross-coupled quadrature harmonic oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurhuus, Torsten; Krozer, Viktor; Vidkjær, Jens

    2006-01-01

    We derive the dynamic equations governing the cross-coupled quadrature oscillator, perturbed by noise, leading to an expression for the close-in phase noise. The theory shows that a nonlinear coupling transconductance results in AM-PM noise conversion close to the carrier, which increases...

  20. Theory and Experimental and Chemical Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-31

    Thresholds, Hysteresis, and Neuromodulation of Signal-to-Noise; and Statistical-Mechanical Theory of Many-body Effects in Reaction Rates. T Ic 2 UL3...submitted to the Journal of Physical Chemistry. 6. Noise in Neural Networks: Thresholds, Hysteresis, and Neuromodulation of Signal-to-Noise. We study a...neural-network model including Gaussian noise, higher-order neuronal interactions, and neuromodulation . For a first-order network, there is a

  1. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Language: English (US) Español ( ... when hazardous noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog ...

  2. Active noise control technique and its application on ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Kean

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid development during past three decades, Active Noise Control(ANC has become a highly complementary noise control approach in comparison with traditional approaches, and has formed a complete system including basic theory, investigation approach, key techniques and system implementation. Meanwhile, substantial progress has been achieved in such fields as the practical application, industrialization development and commercial popularization of ANC, and this developed technique provides a practical and feasible choice for the active control of ship noise. In this review paper, its sound field analysis, system setup and key techniques are summarized, typical examples of ANC-based engineering applications including control of cabin noise and duct noise are briefly described, and a variety of forefronts and problems associated with the applications of ANC in ship noise control, such as active sound absorption, active sound insulation and smart acoustic structure, are subsequently discussed.

  3. Wind turbine airfoil design method with low noise and experimental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Quan; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the noise characteristic of wind turbine airfoils, the airfoil optimal design mathematic model was built based on airfoil functional integrated theory and noise calculated model. The new optimized objective function of maximizing lift/drag to noise was developed on the design......, though there is a certain difference between the theory results and experiment data. Compared with NACA-64-618 airfoil, the CQU-DTU-B18 airfoil exhibits lower noise, which validates the feasibility of this design method. It is a guide to design wind turbine airfoil with lower noise and to reduce airfoil...

  4. Numerical modeling of wind turbine aerodynamic noise in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Soogab

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a wind turbine is numerically modeled in the time domain. An analytic trailing edge noise model is used to determine the unsteady pressure on the blade surface. The far-field noise due to the unsteady pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy theory. By using a strip theory approach, the two-dimensional noise model is applied to rotating wind turbine blades. The numerical results indicate that, although the operating and atmospheric conditions are identical, the acoustical characteristics of wind turbine noise can be quite different with respect to the distance and direction from the wind turbine.

  5. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available or (by remaining at the 'alarm' level) prevents us from sleeping or resting. Some noise comes into buildings from outside, such as when a passing jet plane drowns a telephone conversation or when traffic noise prevents one from hearing an interesting... on aircraft that make too much noise. Motor cars, buses, buzz-bikes and vacuum deaners can be effectively quietened but until now the public has not been prepared to pay the price of legislation. Also, many young sports-car enthusiasts still think...

  6. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  7. Hypermedicalization in White Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Josef

    2015-09-01

    The Nazis hijacked Germany's medical establishment and appropriated medical language to hegemonize their ideology. In White Noise, shifting medical information stifles the public into docility. In Nazi Germany the primacy of language and medical authority magnified the importance of academic doctors. The muddling of identities caused complex insecurities and the need for psychological doubles. In White Noise, Professor Gladney is driven by professional insecurities to enact a double in Murray. Through the manipulation of language and medical overreach the U.S., exemplified in the novel White Noise, has become a hypermedicalized society where the spirit of the Hippocratic Oath has eroded.

  8. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  9. Noise adaptation in integrate-and fire neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, M E; Brown, L G

    1997-07-01

    The statistical spiking response of an ensemble of identically prepared stochastic integrate-and-fire neurons to a rectangular input current plus gaussian white noise is analyzed. It is shown that, on average, integrate-and-fire neurons adapt to the root-mean-square noise level of their input. This phenomenon is referred to as noise adaptation. Noise adaptation is characterized by a decrease in the average neural firing rate and an accompanying decrease in the average value of the generator potential, both of which can be attributed to noise-induced resets of the generator potential mediated by the integrate-and-fire mechanism. A quantitative theory of noise adaptation in stochastic integrate-and-fire neurons is developed. It is shown that integrate-and-fire neurons, on average, produce transient spiking activity whenever there is an increase in the level of their input noise. This transient noise response is either reduced or eliminated over time, depending on the parameters of the model neuron. Analytical methods are used to prove that nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons totally adapt to any constant input noise level, in the sense that their asymptotic spiking rates are independent of the magnitude of their input noise. For leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, the long-run noise adaptation is not total, but the response to noise is partially eliminated. Expressions for the probability density function of the generator potential and the first two moments of the potential distribution are derived for the particular case of a nonleaky neuron driven by gaussian white noise of mean zero and constant variance. The functional significance of noise adaptation for the performance of networks comprising integrate-and-fire neurons is discussed.

  10. LTP interferometer-noise sources and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, David; Killow, Christian; Ward, Harry; Hough, Jim; Heinzel, Gerhard; Garcia, Antonio; Wand, Vinzenz; Johann, Ulrich; Braxmaier, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The LISA Technology Package (LTP) uses laser interferometry to measure the changes in relative displacement between two inertial test masses. The goals of the mission require a displacement measuring precision of 10 pm Hz -1/2 at frequencies in the 3-30 mHz band. We report on progress with a prototype LTP interferometer optical bench in which fused silica mirrors and beamsplitters are fixed to a ZERODUR (registered) substrate using hydroxide catalysis bonding to form a rigid interferometer. The couplings to displacement noise of this interferometer of two expected noise sources-laser frequency noise and ambient temperature fluctuations-have been investigated, and an additional, unexpected, noise source has been identified. The additional noise is due to small amounts of signal at the heterodyne frequency arriving at the photodiode preamplifiers with a phase that quasistatically changes with respect to the optical signal. The phase shift is caused by differential changes in the external optical paths the beams travel before they reach the rigid interferometer. Two different external path length stabilization systems have been demonstrated and these allowed the performance of the overall system to meet the LTP displacement noise requirement

  11. The CEA program on boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guillou, G.; Brunet, M.; Girard, J.P.; Flory, D.

    1982-01-01

    The research program on the application of noise analysis on boiling detection in a fast subassembly began 10 years ago at the CEA, mainly in the Nuclear Center of Cadarache. Referring exclusively to the aspects of premature detection of the boiling phenomenon it can be said that this program is organized around the following three detection techniques: acoustic noise analysis; neutron noise analysis; temperature noise analysis. Its development is in conjunction with in-pile experiments in Phenix or Rapsodie as well as 'ex-pile' (boiling experiments through electric heating). Three detection techniques were developed independent of each other, but that they were regrouped during the execution of the most important experiments and with the 'Super Phenix' project. The noise analysis system ANABEL with which Superphenix will be equipped with shows the industrial interest in detection methods based on noises. One of the results of the CEA program today is the possibility to evaluate the potential capacity for boiling detection in the subassembly. But in order to obtain the necessary funds from the commercial nuclear plant operators it is mandatory to have successful demonstrations which will be the objective of the future program

  12. Phase-dependent noise in Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Forrest; Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In addition to the usual superconducting current, Josephson junctions (JJs) support a phase-dependent conductance related to the retardation effect of tunneling quasi-particles. This introduces a dissipative current with a memory-resistive (memristive) character that should also affect the current noise. By means of the microscopic theory of tunnel junctions we compute the complete current autocorrelation function of a Josephson tunnel junction and show that this memristive component gives rise to both a previously noted phase-dependent thermal noise, and an undescribed non-stationary, phase-dependent dynamic noise. As experiments are approaching ranges in which these effects may be observed, we examine the form and magnitude of these processes. Their phase dependence can be realized experimentally as a hysteresis effect and may be used to probe defects present in JJ based qubits and in other superconducting electronics applications.

  13. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  14. Alien Noise Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Full FEXT Cancellation. Expectation Maximization based Algorithms. Partial Cancellation. Optimal Choice of what to Cancel and what not to! Alien Noise Cancellation. Efficient Crosstalk channel estimation. In addition:

  15. Induced Noise Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maidanik, G

    2002-01-01

    The induced noise control parameter is defined in terms of the ratio of the stored energy in a master dynamic system, when it is coupled to an adjunct dynamic system, to that stored energy when the coupling is absent...

  16. Hot Spot Temperature and Grey Target Theory-Based Dynamic Modelling for Reliability Assessment of Transformer Oil-Paper Insulation Systems: A Practical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a novel dynamic correction method for the reliability assessment of large oil-immersed power transformers. First, with the transformer oil-paper insulation system (TOPIS as the target of evaluation and the winding hot spot temperature (HST as the core point, an HST-based static ageing failure model is built according to the Weibull distribution and Arrhenius reaction law, in order to describe the transformer ageing process and calculate the winding HST for obtaining the failure rate and life expectancy of TOPIS. A grey target theory based dynamic correction model is then developed, combined with the data of Dissolved Gas Analysis (DGA in power transformer oil, in order to dynamically modify the life expectancy calculated by the built static model, such that the corresponding relationship between the state grade and life expectancy correction coefficient of TOPIS can be built. Furthermore, the life expectancy loss recovery factor is introduced to correct the life expectancy of TOPIS again. Lastly, a practical case study of an operating transformer has been undertaken, in which the failure rate curve after introducing dynamic corrections can be obtained for the reliability assessment of this transformer. The curve shows a better ability of tracking the actual reliability level of transformer, thus verifying the validity of the proposed method and providing a new way for transformer reliability assessment. This contribution presents a novel model for the reliability assessment of TOPIS, in which the DGA data, as a source of information for the dynamic correction, is processed based on the grey target theory, thus the internal faults of power transformer can be diagnosed accurately as well as its life expectancy updated in time, ensuring that the dynamic assessment values can commendably track and reflect the actual operation state of the power transformers.

  17. Approximations to camera sensor noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaodan; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2013-02-01

    Noise is present in all image sensor data. Poisson distribution is said to model the stochastic nature of the photon arrival process, while it is common to approximate readout/thermal noise by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN). Other sources of signal-dependent noise such as Fano and quantization also contribute to the overall noise profile. Question remains, however, about how best to model the combined sensor noise. Though additive Gaussian noise with signal-dependent noise variance (SD-AWGN) and Poisson corruption are two widely used models to approximate the actual sensor noise distribution, the justification given to these types of models are based on limited evidence. The goal of this paper is to provide a more comprehensive characterization of random noise. We concluded by presenting concrete evidence that Poisson model is a better approximation to real camera model than SD-AWGN. We suggest further modification to Poisson that may improve the noise model.

  18. Noise frame duration, masking potency and whiteness of temporal noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Heljä; Rovamo, Jyrki; Donner, Kristian; Tammikallio, Marja; Raninen, Antti

    2002-09-01

    Because of the limited contrast range, increasing the duration of the noise frame is often the only option for increasing the masking potency of external, white temporal noise. This, however, reduces the high-frequency cutoff beyond which noise is no longer white. This study was conducted to determine the longest noise frame duration that produces the strongest masking effect and still mimics white noise on the detection of sinusoidal flicker. Contrast energy thresholds (E(th)) were measured for flicker at 1.25 to 20 Hz in strong, purely temporal (spatially uniform), additive, external noise. The masking power of white external noise, characterized by its spectral density at zero frequency N0, increases with the duration of the noise frame. For short noise frame durations, E(th) increased in direct proportion to N0, keeping the nominal signal-to-noise ratio [SNR = (E(th)/N0)(0.5)] constant at threshold. The masking effect thus increased with the duration of the noise frame and the noise mimicked white noise. When noise frame duration and N0 increased further, the nominal SNR at threshold started to decrease, indicating that noise no longer mimicked white noise. The minimum number of noise frames per flicker cycle needed to mimic white noise decreased with increasing flicker frequency from 8.3 at 1.25 Hz to 1.6 at 20 Hz. The critical high-frequency cutoff of detection-limiting temporal noise in terms of noise frames per signal cycle depends on the temporal frequency of the signal. This is opposite to the situation in the spatial domain and must be taken into consideration when temporal signals are masked with temporal noise.

  19. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  20. Power reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    This book concentrates on the different types of noise present in power reactors and how the analysis of this noise can be used as a tool for reactor monitoring and diagnostics. Noise analysis is a growing field that offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost, and natural multivariable interactions. A major advantage, continuous and undisturbed monitoring, supplies a means of obtaining early warnings of possible reactor malfunctions thus preventing further complications by alerting operators to a problem - and aiding in the diagnosis of that problem - before it demands major repairs. Following an introductory chapter, the theoretical basis for the various methods of noise analysis is explained, and full chapters are devoted to the fundamentals of statistics for time-domain analysis and Fourier series and related topics for frequency-domain analysis. General experimental techniques and associated theoretical considerations are reviewed, leading to discussion of practical applications in the latter half of the book. Besides chapters giving examples of neutron noise and acoustical noise, chapters are also devoted to extensive examples from pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor power plants