WorldWideScience

Sample records for noise measurement techniques

  1. Kalman filtering techniques for reducing variance of digital speckle displacement measurement noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghui Li; Li Guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ Target dynamics are assumed to be known in measuring digital speckle displacement. Use is made of a simple measurement equation, where measurement noise represents the effect of disturbances introduced in measurement process. From these assumptions, Kalman filter can be designed to reduce variance of measurement noise. An optical and analysis system was set up, by which object motion with constant displacement and constant velocity is experimented with to verify validity of Kalman filtering techniques for reduction of measurement noise variance.

  2. Challenges and Techniques in Measurements of Noise, Cryogenic Noise and Power in Millimeter-Wave and Submillimeter-Wave Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene

    2014-01-01

    We will present the topic of noise measurements, including cryogenic noise measurements, of Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) and Sub-Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (S-MMIC) amplifiers, both on-wafer, and interfaced to waveguide modules via coupling probes. We will also present an overview of the state-of-the-art in waveguide probe techniques for packaging amplifier chips, and discuss methods to obtain the lowest loss packaging techniques available to date. Linearity in noise measurements will be discussed, and experimental methods for room temperature and cryogenic noise measurements will be presented. We will also present a discussion of power amplifier measurements for millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave amplifiers, and the tools and hardware needed for this characterization.

  3. Measurement of precision oscillator phase noise using the two-oscillator coherent down-conversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnanelli, Christopher J.; Cashin, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of precision frequency standard phase noise and spurious outputs is addressed, using the two-oscillator coherent downconversion technique. Focus is on techniques for making accurate measurements of phase noise and spurious outputs within 100 KHz of a carrier. Significant sources of measurement error related to hardware design problems and inadequate measurement procedures are discussed: measurement errors resulting from system noise sources, phase-locked loop effects, and system bandwidth limitations. In addition, methods and design considerations for minimizing the effects of such errors are presented. Analytic discussions and results are supplemented with actual test data and measurements made using measurement hardware developed at the Ball Corporation, Efratom Division.

  4. Noise Measurements Of Resistors With The Use Of Dual-Phase Virtual Lock-In Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Adam Witold

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of low-frequency noise properties of modern electronic components is a very demanding challenge due to the low magnitude of a noise signal and the limit of a dissipated power. In such a case, an ac technique with a lock-in amplifier or the use of a low-noise transformer as the first stage in the signal path are common approaches. A software dual-phase virtual lock-in (VLI technique has been developed and tested in low-frequency noise studies of electronic components. VLI means that phase-sensitive detection is processed by a software layer rather than by an expensive hardware lock-in amplifier. The VLI method has been tested in exploration of noise in polymer thick-film resistors. Analysis of the obtained noise spectra of voltage fluctuations confirmed that the 1/f noise caused by resistance fluctuations is the dominant one. The calculated value of the parameter describing the noise intensity of a resistive material, C = 1·10−21 m3, is consistent with that obtained with the use of a dc method. On the other hand, it has been observed that the spectra of (excitation independent resistance noise contain a 1/f component whose intensity depends on the excitation frequency. The phenomenon has been explained by means of noise suppression by impedances of the measurement circuit, giving an excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Two—Port Noise Measurement of Active Microwave Devices Using the Modified F50 Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJun; CHENHuilian; TANGGaodi

    2003-01-01

    The overview of traditional measurement techniques of microwave noise indicates that the refiecto-metric and the source-pull tuners methods are all expen-sive and time-consuming because of the use of broad-band tuners and frequent calibration. Moreover, based on the two techniques, a complicated algorithm is usually needed to extract accurately the two-port noise feature parame-ters from the over-determined measured data. Recently, a novel technique is proposed to measure the noise figure at the single source (50Ω). To improve the accuracy, a mod-ified F50 Technique is presented here. And an extraction method of four noise parameters from the single measured data of F50 is also given using the Pospieszalski model of transistor and two-port noise analysis models as the addi-tional information. The experimental results demonstrate the practicability of the presented method as expected by showing the four noise parameters extracted from the sin-gle measurement of F50 are in agreement with the results obtained from source-pull tuners technique with 13 source admittances.

  6. A numerical technique to design blast noise mitigation measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Large weapons, such as armor, artillery or demolitions, create a high-energy blast wave. It has a low frequency content, typically between 15 and 125 Hz, and can propagate over large distances. As a result it is a relative important cause for annoyance. Mitigation measures need to be close to the so

  7. A numerical technique to design blast noise mitigation measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    Large weapons, such as armor, artillery or demolitions, create a high-energy blast wave. It has a low frequency content, typically between 15 and 125 Hz, and can propagate over large distances. As a result it is a relative important cause for annoyance. Mitigation measures need to be close to the

  8. Correlation techniques for the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in measurements with stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, V R; Reddy, T G; Reddy, P Y; Reddy, K R

    2003-01-01

    An AC modulation technique is described to convert stochastic signal variations into an amplitude variation and its retrieval through Fourier analysis. It is shown that this AC detection of signals of stochastic processes when processed through auto- and cross-correlation techniques improve the signal-to-noise ratio; the correlation techniques serve a similar purpose of frequency and phase filtering as that of phase-sensitive detection. A few model calculations applied to nuclear spectroscopy measurements such as Angular Correlations, Mossbauer spectroscopy and Pulse Height Analysis reveal considerable improvement in the sensitivity of signal detection. Experimental implementation of the technique is presented in terms of amplitude variations of harmonics representing the derivatives of normal spectra. Improved detection sensitivity to spectral variations is shown to be significant. These correlation techniques are general and can be made applicable to all the fields of particle counting where measurements ar...

  9. A simple technique for high resolution time domain phase noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Donahoe, T.

    1977-01-01

    A new time domain phase comparator is described. The device uses a novel technique to allow time domain phase measurements to be made with period and time interval counters without the use of offset reference oscillators. The device uses a single reference oscillator and allows measurements with a phase resolution greater than the noise floor of the reference. Data is presented showing a phase resolution of 0.02ps at 5 MHz with a crystal reference. The device has application in measuring the phase stability of systems where approximate phase quadrature can be maintained.

  10. Noise Measurement in Microsensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Moghaddam, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    In this research, spectral coherence noise measurement technique is used to measure noise of capacitive accelerometers, based on measuring the spectral coherence and outputs of two identical sensors exposed to the same input stimulus. This effective technique can be applied to any sensor characterization problem where there is interest in distinguishing instrumental noise from background noise. The simulation study has been done in MATLAB to verify the proposed method reliability to calculate...

  11. Sensitivities of various probe correction techniques to noise and inaccurate channel balance in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivities of various probe correction techniques to noise and inaccurate channel balance in the spherical near-field antenna measurements are investigated. The simulation results show the level of uncertainty in the determination of the directivity of an antenna in the presence of -60 dB noise......, and as a function of the level of error in the channel balance for the different probe correction techniques....

  12. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  13. Application of a Beamforming Technique to the Measurement of Airfoil Leading Edge Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the use of microphone array technology and beamforming algorithms for the measurement and analysis of noise generated by the interaction of a turbulent flow with the leading edge of an airfoil. Experiments were performed using a setup in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel, where the turbulent inflow is provided by different grids. In order to exactly localize the aeroacoustic noise sources and, moreover, to separate airfoil leading edge noise from grid-generated noise, the selected deconvolution beamforming algorithm is extended to be used on a fully three-dimensional source region. The result of this extended beamforming are three-dimensional mappings of noise source locations. Besides acoustic measurements, the investigation of airfoil leading edge noise requires the measurement of parameters describing the incident turbulence, such as the intensity and a characteristic length scale or time scale. The method used for the determination of these parameters in the present study is explained in detail. To demonstrate the applicability of the extended beamforming algorithm and the experimental setup as a whole, the noise generated at the leading edge of airfoils made of porous materials was measured and compared to that generated at the leading edge of a common nonporous airfoil.

  14. A method of measurement of the phase noise of stable oscillators by use of FFT technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Stefan; Hussain, Sabah

    A method of measurement of the power density spectrum of phase noise of stable oscillators is presented. The oscillator under test and the reference are beating with a very low beat frequency. So the use of the phase locking loop is avoided. The time gated phase noise is converted into a digital signal and an FFT algoritm is used to compute the power spectrum. The experimental verification of the method is presented.

  15. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  16. SVD-Based Technique for Interference Cancellation and Noise Reduction in NMR Measurement of Time-Dependent Magnetic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjun; Ma, Hong; Yu, De; Zhang, Hua

    2016-03-04

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment for measurement of time-dependent magnetic fields was introduced. To improve the signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) of NMR data, a new method for interference cancellation and noise reduction (ICNR) based on singular value decomposition (SVD) was proposed. The singular values corresponding to the radio frequency interference (RFI) signal were identified in terms of the correlation between the FID data and the reference data, and then the RFI and noise were suppressed by setting the corresponding singular values to zero. The validity of the algorithm was verified by processing the measured NMR data. The results indicated that, this method has a significantly suppression of RFI and random noise, and can well preserve the FID signal. At present, the major limitation of the proposed SVD-based ICNR technique is that the threshold value for interference cancellation needs to be manually selected. Finally, the inversion waveform of the applied alternating magnetic field was given by fitting the processed experimental data.

  17. Assessment of ultrafine particles and noise measurements using fuzzy logic and data mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Camacho, R; Brito Cabeza, I; Aroba, J; Gómez-Bravo, F; Rodríguez, S; de la Rosa, J

    2015-04-15

    This study focuses on correlations between total number concentrations, road traffic emissions and noise levels in an urban area in the southwest of Spain during the winter and summer of 2009. The high temporal correlation between sound pressure levels, traffic intensity, particle number concentrations related to traffic, black carbon and NOx concentrations suggests that noise is linked to traffic emissions as a main source of pollution in urban areas. First, the association of these different variables was studied using PreFuRGe, a computational tool based on data mining and fuzzy logic. The results showed a clear association between noise levels and road-traffic intensity for non-extremely high wind speed levels. This behaviour points, therefore, to vehicular emissions being the main source of urban noise. An analysis for estimating the total number concentration from noise levels is also proposed in the study. The high linearity observed between particle number concentrations linked to traffic and noise levels with road traffic intensity can be used to calculate traffic related particle number concentrations experimentally. At low wind speeds, there are increases in noise levels of 1 dB for every 100 vehicles in circulation. This is equivalent to 2000 cm(-3) per vehicle in winter and 500 cm(-3) in summer. At high wind speeds, wind speed could be taken into account. This methodology allows low cost sensors to be used as a proxy for total number concentration monitoring in urban air quality networks.

  18. State-of-the-Art Review on Sustainable Design and Construction of Quieter Pavements—Part 1: Traffic Noise Measurement and Abatement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD Ohiduzzaman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Noise pollution due to highway traffic has drawn the attention of transportation agencies worldwide. Noise pollution is an irritant to residents, especially in urban areas near roads with high traffic volume. In addition to its adverse effects on the quality of life, traffic noise can induce stress that could lead to sleep disturbance and anxiety. Traditionally, noise barrier walls have been used for highways to mitigate traffic noise. However, using barrier walls as a noise abatement measure has proven to be very expensive. In addition to the cost, noise barrier walls are not always effective because they must break the line of sight to work properly, which is not always possible in case of intersections or driveways. Therefore, researchers especially from Europe and USA have been very proactive to reduce the noise at source. A number of research studies show traffic noise can be reduced by using an alternative surface type or changing texture of the pavement while complying with other requirements of sustainability, i.e., safety, structural durability, construction and maintenance costs. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the research conducted on this subject. A review of the tire-pavement noise generation and amplification mechanism, various traffic noise measurement methods and correlation among these methods, in addition to the abatement techniques used by various agencies to reduce pavement noise, is also presented.

  19. Effective delayed neutron fraction measurement in the critical VENUS-F reactor using noise techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doligez, X. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, CNRS-IN2P3/Univ. Paris Sud (France); Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Chevret, T.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie-Nourry, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN/Univ. de Caen/CNRS-IN2P3 (France); Fourmentel, D.; Mellier, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, DEN/DER/SPEX (France); Krasa, A.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J. [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    This paper present the measurements of VENUS-F kinetic parameters using the Rossi-Alpha methods. The VENUS-F reactor is a zero-power reactor based in Mol, Belgium at SCK-CEN where the fuel is made of metallic enriched uranium with pure lead in order to simulate the behavior of lead fast reactor. The reactor can be operated under critical when it is coupled with GENEPI-3C. At the beginning of 2014, a measurement campaign was performed in order to estimate the kinetics parameters. In this paper, two measurements are analyzed at two different powers (approximately 2 W and 30 W) with 7 different fission chambers (with a 235-U deposit that varies from 1 g to 10 mg). All the correlation functions needed for the Rossi-Alpha method have been built for each possible set of two detectors in each configuration and values obtained from those functions for the effective delayed neutron fraction are then compared. The absolute necessity to operate at very low power is presented. The final value for the effective delayed neutron fraction is finally estimated to be 730 pcm ± 11 pcm and the prompt neutron generation time is estimated to be equal to 0,041 μseconds ± 0.04 μsec. (authors)

  20. Neutron Noise Measurement at CROCUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, V.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Girardin, G.; Frajtag, P.; Pautz, A. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on the measurements of kinetics parameters at the teaching reactor CROCUS. The prompt decay constant, |α| = (β-ρ)/Λ, was measured in several sub-critical configurations using the Feynman-α reactor noise technique and the reduced generation time Λ/β was deduced. The CROCUS facility is a zero-power reactor operated at EPFL. It is mainly used for educational purposes. Among all neutron noise measurement techniques, the focus was put on the Feynman-α technique. The intrinsic neutron population fluctuations were recorded in macroscopically stable sub-critical states and the prompt decay constants α were derived by fitting the Feynman-α experimental distributions with the point kinetic theoretical expression. The prompt decay constant at critical state α{sub 0}=β/Λ was deduced in two ways: by extrapolation of the sub-critical prompt decay constant to the critical state, and by direct measurement of the sub-critical reactivity using rod-drop techniques. The neutron population was measured by two BF{sub 3} detectors located in the reactor. Data acquisition was performed simultaneously with two ORTEC multichannel scaler cards (MCS-pci) controlled by specially developed LabView programs. The post-processing of the data was done in LabView and Matlab. The prompt decay constant (β/Λ) at criticality was found to be 146.6 ± 6.3 s{sup -1}. Monte Carlo predictions calculated with MCNP5-1.6 are in a good agreement being within 2σ of the experimental results.

  1. Noise reduction in acoustic measurements with a particle velocity sensor by means of a cross-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honschoten, van J.W.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Kuipers, H.; Raangs, R.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a method is presented to reduce the noise level of a particle velocity sensor, a thermal two-wire sensor sensitive to acoustic particle velocities, which yields a reduction of the noise of 30 dB. The method is based on utilisation of cross- instead of auto-correlation spectra of two of

  2. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  3. A novel noise optimization technique for inductively degenerated CMOS LNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geng Zhiqing; Wang Haiyong; Wu Nanjian

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel noise optimization technique. The technique gives analytical formulae for the noise performance of inductively degenerated CMOS low noise amplifier (LNA) circuits with an ideal gate inductor for a fixed bias voltage and nonideal gate inductor for a fixed power dissipation, respectively, by mathematical analysis and reasonable approximation methods. LNA circuits with required noise figure can be designed effectively and rapidly just by using hand calculations of the proposed formulae. We design a 1.8 GHz LNA in a TSMC 0.25 pan CMOS process. The measured results show a noise figure of 1.6 dB with a forward gain of 14.4 dB at a power consumption of 5 mW, demonstrating that the designed LNA circuits can achieve low noise figure levels at low power dissipation.

  4. A novel noise optimization technique for inductively degenerated CMOS LNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiqing, Geng; Haiyong, Wang; Nanjian, Wu

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel noise optimization technique. The technique gives analytical formulae for the noise performance of inductively degenerated CMOS low noise amplifier (LNA) circuits with an ideal gate inductor for a fixed bias voltage and nonideal gate inductor for a fixed power dissipation, respectively, by mathematical analysis and reasonable approximation methods. LNA circuits with required noise figure can be designed effectively and rapidly just by using hand calculations of the proposed formulae. We design a 1.8 GHz LNA in a TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process. The measured results show a noise figure of 1.6 dB with a forward gain of 14.4 dB at a power consumption of 5 mW, demonstrating that the designed LNA circuits can achieve low noise figure levels at low power dissipation.

  5. Acoustic analysis of aft noise reduction techniques measured on a subsonic tip speed 50.8 cm (twenty inch) diameter fan. [quiet engine program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpert, D. L.; Clemons, A.

    1977-01-01

    Sound data which were obtained during tests of a 50.8 cm diameter, subsonic tip speed, low pressure ratio fan were analyzed. The test matrix was divided into two major investigations: (1) source noise reduction techniques; and (2) aft duct noise reduction with acoustic treatment. Source noise reduction techniques were investigated which include minimizing second harmonic noise by varying vane/blade ratio, variation in spacing, and lowering the Mach number through the vane row to lower fan broadband noise. Treatment in the aft duct which includes flow noise effects, faceplate porosity, rotor OGV treatment, slant cell treatment, and splitter simulation with variable depth on the outer wall and constant thickness treatment on the inner wall was investigated. Variable boundary conditions such as variation in treatment panel thickness and orientation, and mixed porosity combined with variable thickness were examined. Significant results are reported.

  6. Nordic Standards for measurement of aircraft noise immission in residential areas and noise reduction of dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svane, Christian; Plovsing, Birger

    Quantification by measurement of aircraft noise in residential areas and air traffic noise reduction of dwellings suffer from sensibility to the measurement technique used. Around the Copenhagen Airport (200.000 opr./year) 3.500 families have been granted from 50% to 90% of sound insulation costs by the Danish Government. Based on experience from evaluation measurements carried out by the Danish Acoustical Institute, the authors have proposed standardized measurement methods for the outdoor aircraft noise in residential areas and for the noise reduction of dwellings. In 1989 both noise measurement methods were accepted as Nordic Standards (NORDTEST ACOU 074 and 075) by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.

  7. Uncorrelated Noise in Turbulence Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    effect is smeared across the entire power spectrum. For this reason, quantities such as variance dissipation may be more conveniently estimated from the structure function than from the spectrum. The modeling results are confirmed by artificially modifying a test time series with Poisson noise......We show that the error variance contributed by random uncorrelated measurement noise can be merged with the error variance contributed by real variation in the atmosphere to obtain a single expression for the total error variance when the sampling time is much less than the integral scale...... of atmospheric variability. The authors assume that the measured signal is a representation of a variable that is continuous on the scale of interest in the atmosphere. Uncorrelated noise affects the autovariance function (or, equivalently, the structure function) only between zero and the first lag, while its...

  8. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: measuring below the noise floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Roger M; Gallun, Frederick J; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-03-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels.

  9. Differential potential noise measurement during crack initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettiarachchi, S. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Sunol, California (United States)]. E-mail: samson.hettiarachchi@gene.ge.com

    2007-07-01

    Electrochemical potential and current noise have been used over the past two decades as methods of detecting general corrosion, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, corrosion in concrete and corrosion under coatings. The methods involved the use of self-generated potential noise/current noise or both, of the material of choice in a given environment. In a variety of these studies, data processing involved techniques such as fast fourier transforms (FFT) to generate the power spectrum that provided the unique signature associated with the type of the corrosion process. This paper deals with a more simplistic method of monitoring differential potential noise measured between two identical slow strain rate test (SSRT) specimens placed close to each other, in a high temperature aqueous environment, while one is being subjected to dynamic strain and the other maintained under static conditions. The differential potential noise (DPN) was monitored as the applied load increased on the slow strain rate test specimen. Unlike self-generated noise, differential potential noise is less affected by electrical noise in the surroundings, and is able to signal the point of oxide film cracking or crack initiation more conveniently without extensive data processing. This method also allows the in-situ detection of crack initiation without interruption of the SSRT test. The DPN signal at the crack initiation stage is different from the signals acquired as cracking progressed due to continuing dynamic strain. Furthermore, the nature of the DPN signal response depends on the type of material used in this study, Type 304 stainless steel or Inconel 182. (author)

  10. Noise and dust emissions from mining activities : a software for a first approach to the measurement management and selection of suitable reduction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigna, C.; Lovera, E.; Patrucco, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    Mining activities are often a matter of concern to local communities due to the potential impacts on the environment and landscape. As such, an effective balance is needed between socio-economic development and environmental protection. Mining activities in populated areas must be carefully planned and managed in order to avoid annoying local populations and to minimize health risks. This study was based on the criteria of the European Communities Commission to promote resource extraction and production methods that encourage eco-efficiency by developing best practice programs. In particular, this study defined and evaluated measurement, analysis and control criteria for the emission of chemical and physical pollutants from non-metal mining industries with particular reference to the reduction of noise and airborne particulates to the surrounding environment. The main focus of the study included on-site measuring campaigns in Italy's Lombardia mining region to collect data on mining techniques and technologies as well as pollutant emissions and propagation. The objective was to test the applicability of a newly proposed simplified monitoring systems and to evaluate the effective results of adopted pollution reduction strategies. A software-based database was also developed to manage detailed information on mining activities and to store the measured emissions data for future evaluation. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  11. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary,...

  12. Advanced Phase noise modeling techniques of nonlinear microwave devices

    OpenAIRE

    Prigent, M.; J. C. Nallatamby; R. Quere

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a coherent set of tools allowing an accurate and predictive design of low phase noise oscillators. Advanced phase noise modelling techniques in non linear microwave devices must be supported by a proven combination of the following : - Electrical modeling of low-frequency noise of semiconductor devices, oriented to circuit CAD . The local noise sources will be either cyclostationary noise sources or quasistationary noise sources. - Theoretic...

  13. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Existing convex relaxation-based approaches to reconstruction in compressed sensing assume that noise in the measurements is independent of the signal of interest. We consider the case of noise being linearly correlated with the signal and introduce a simple technique for improving compressed...... sensing reconstruction from such measurements. The technique is based on a linear model of the correlation of additive noise with the signal. The modification of the reconstruction algorithm based on this model is very simple and has negligible additional computational cost compared to standard...... reconstruction algorithms, but is not known in existing literature. The proposed technique reduces reconstruction error considerably in the case of linearly correlated measurements and noise. Numerical experiments confirm the efficacy of the technique. The technique is demonstrated with application to low...

  14. Vehicle gearbox fault diagnosis using noise measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh M. Metwalley, Nabil Hammad, Shawki A. Abouel-Seoud

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise measurement is one of many technologies for health monitoring and diagnosis of rotating machines such as gearboxes. Although significant research has been undertaken in understanding the potential of noise measurement in monitoring gearboxes this has been solely applied on any types of gears (spur, helical, ..etc.. The condition monitoring of a lab-scale, single stage, gearbox, represents the vehicle real gearbox, using non-destructive inspection methodology and the processing of the acquired waveform with advanced signal processing techniques is the aim of the present work. Acoustic emission was utilized for this purpose. The experimental setup and the instrumentation are present in detail. Emphasis is given on the signal processing of the acquired noise measurement signal in order to extract conventional as well as novel parameters potential diagnostic value from the monitoring waveform. The evolution of selected parameters/features versus test time is provided, evaluated and the parameters with most interesting diagnostic behavior are highlighted. The present work also reports the results concluded by long term (~ 6.0 h experiments to a defected gear system, with a transverse cuts ranged from 0.75 mm to 3.0 mm to simulate the tooth crack. Different parameters, related by the analysis of the recording signals coming from acoustic emission are presented and their diagnostic value is discussed for the development of a condition monitoring system.

  15. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  16. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Rachael L.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Martinsen, Gary L.; Reis, George A.; Heft, Eric L.

    2003-09-01

    Pilots, developers, and other users of night-vision goggles (NVGs) have pointed out that different NVG image intensifier tubes have different subjective noise characteristics. Currently, no good model of the visual impact of NVG noise exists. Because it is very difficult to objectively measure the noise of a NVG, a method for assessing noise subjectively using simple psychophysical procedures was developed. This paper discusses the use of a computer program to generate noise images similar to what an observer sees through an NVG, based on filtered white noise. The images generated were based on 1/f (where f is frequency) filtered white noise with several adjustable parameters. Adjusting each of these parameters varied different characteristics of the noise. This paper discusses a study where observers compared the computer-generated noise images to true NVG noise and were asked to determine which computer-generated image was the best representation of the true noise. This method was repeated with different types of NVGs and at different luminance levels to study what NVG parameters cause variations in NVG noise.

  17. Noise measurement in total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas A Holzer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have been performed to analyze noise levels produced by various surgical instruments in the operating room (OR. The highest levels of noise that have been described were due to instruments used for total knee arthroplasty (TKA. These high levels of noise might be a potential health hazard for patients and medical staff. Therefore, we aimed to measure noise levels of current instruments that are widely used worldwide. During a conventional primary TKA the levels of noise in the OR were measured using a Class 1 integrating-averaging sound level meter. The highest A-weighted equivalent level was produced when using a hammer during the implantation of the femoral and tibial components with 90.2 dBA. In total surgical instruments were used for about 10% of the total time of surgery. Noise exposure due to instrument use during TKA does not seem to be a potential health hazard for medical staff or patients.

  18. Olympus receiver evaluation and phase noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Wang, Huailiang; Sweeney, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    A set of measurements performed by the Michigan Tech Sensing and Signal Processing Group on the analog receiver built by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for propagation measurements using the Olympus Satellite is described. Measurements of local oscillator (LO) phase noise were performed for all of the LOs supplied by JPL. In order to obtain the most useful set of measurements, LO phase noise measurements were made using the complete VPI receiver front end. This set of measurements demonstrates the performance of the receiver from the Radio Frequency (RF) input through the high Intermediate Frequency (IF) output. Three different measurements were made: LO phase noise with DC on the voltage controlled crystal oscillator (VCXO) port; LO phase noise with the 11.381 GHz LO locked to the reference signal generator; and a reference measurement with the JPL LOs out of the system.

  19. Analysis of quantization noise and state estimation with quantized measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The approximate correction of the additive white noise model in quantized Kalman filter is investigated under certain conditions. The probability density function of the error of quantized measurements is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The analysis is based on the probability theory and nonparametric density estimation technique, respectively. The approximator of probability density function of quantized measurement noise is given. The numerical results of nonparametric density estimation algori...

  20. Comparison of Image Processing Techniques using Random Noise Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    pseudo - random noise . The noise waveforms employed by the radar systems 9 are generally white and Gaussian, that is, the waveform’s power...2010. [5] Hardin, Joshua A. “Information Encoding on a Pseudo Random Noise Radar Waveform”, 2013. [6] Jackson, Julie A. “EENG 668/714 Advanced Radar ...COMPARISON OF IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES USING RANDOM NOISE RADAR THESIS Jesse Robert B. Cruz, Capt, USAF AFIT-ENG-14-M-22 DEPARTMENT OF THE

  1. Ocean Ambient Noise Measurement and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carey, William M

    2011-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ocean ambient noise mechanisms and measurements, and also describes general noise characteristics and computational methods.  It concisely summarizes the vast ambient noise literature using theory combined with key representative results.  The air-sea boundary interaction zone is described in terms of non-dimensional variables requisite for future experiments.  Noise field coherency, rare directional measurements, and unique basin scale computations and methods are presented.  The use of satellite measurements in these basin scale models is demonstrated.  Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments.  With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

  2. Cross-spectrum Measurement of Thermal-noise Limited Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Hati, Archita; Howe, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly-used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering noise. It extracts the desired correlated noise from two time series in the presence of uncorrelated interfering noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to AM noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. An oscillator whose thermal noise is primarily set by the 50 ohm source resistance is referred to as a thermally-limited oscillator. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal h...

  3. Automatic exposure control systems designed to maintain constant image noise: effects on computed tomography dose and noise relative to clinically accepted technique charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    To compare computed tomography dose and noise arising from use of an automatic exposure control (AEC) system designed to maintain constant image noise as patient size varies with clinically accepted technique charts and AEC systems designed to vary image noise. A model was developed to describe tube current modulation as a function of patient thickness. Relative dose and noise values were calculated as patient width varied for AEC settings designed to yield constant or variable noise levels and were compared to empirically derived values used by our clinical practice. Phantom experiments were performed in which tube current was measured as a function of thickness using a constant-noise-based AEC system and the results were compared with clinical technique charts. For 12-, 20-, 28-, 44-, and 50-cm patient widths, the requirement of constant noise across patient size yielded relative doses of 5%, 14%, 38%, 260%, and 549% and relative noises of 435%, 267%, 163%, 61%, and 42%, respectively, as compared with our clinically used technique chart settings at each respective width. Experimental measurements showed that a constant noise-based AEC system yielded 175% relative noise for a 30-cm phantom and 206% relative dose for a 40-cm phantom compared with our clinical technique chart. Automatic exposure control systems that prescribe constant noise as patient size varies can yield excessive noise in small patients and excessive dose in obese patients compared with clinically accepted technique charts. Use of noise-level technique charts and tube current limits can mitigate these effects.

  4. Knowing what the brain is seeing in three dimensions: A novel, noninvasive, sensitive, accurate, and low-noise technique for measuring ocular torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Millan, Jorge; Roberts, Dale C; Lasker, Adrian; Zee, David S; Kheradmand, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Torsional eye movements are rotations of the eye around the line of sight. Measuring torsion is essential to understanding how the brain controls eye position and how it creates a veridical perception of object orientation in three dimensions. Torsion is also important for diagnosis of many vestibular, neurological, and ophthalmological disorders. Currently, there are multiple devices and methods that produce reliable measurements of horizontal and vertical eye movements. Measuring torsion, however, noninvasively and reliably has been a longstanding challenge, with previous methods lacking real-time capabilities or suffering from intrusive artifacts. We propose a novel method for measuring eye movements in three dimensions using modern computer vision software (OpenCV) and concepts of iris recognition. To measure torsion, we use template matching of the entire iris and automatically account for occlusion of the iris and pupil by the eyelids. The current setup operates binocularly at 100 Hz with noise <0.1° and is accurate within 20° of gaze to the left, to the right, and up and 10° of gaze down. This new method can be widely applicable and fill a gap in many scientific and clinical disciplines.

  5. Guidelines for a Training Course in Noise Survey Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadley, John; And Others

    The course is designed to train noise survey technicians during a 3-5 day period to make reliable measurements of 75 percent of the noise problems encountered in the community. The more complex noise problems remaining will continue to be handled by experienced specialists. These technicians will be trained to assist State and local governments in…

  6. Magnetic noise measurements using cross-correlated Hall sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, G.; Ocio, M.; Paltiel, Y.; Shtrikman, H.; Zeldov, E.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental technique for measuring magnetic fluctuations by means of a double-layer Hall sensor array is described. The technique relies on cross-correlating Hall signals from two independent sensors positioned one above the other in two separate two-dimensional-electron-gas layers of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated by a reduction of the magnitude of the background noise floor of the correlated sensors with respect to the noise level of the best single sensor.

  7. Development of a highway noise prediction model using an Leq20 s measure of basic vehicular noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamanikabud, P.; Tansatcha, M.; Brown, A. L.

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to build a highway traffic noise simulation model for free-flow traffic conditions in Thailand employing a technique utilizing individual vehicular noise modelling based on the equivalent sound level over 20 s ( Leq20 s). This Leq20 s technique provides a more accurate measurement of noise energy from each type of vehicle under real running conditions. The coefficient of propagation and ground effect for this model was then estimated using a trial-and-error method, and applied to the highway traffic noise simulation model. This newly developed highway traffic noise model was tested for its goodness-of-fit to field observations. The test shows that this new model provides good predictions for highway noise conditions in Thailand. The concepts and techniques that are modeled and tested in this study can also be applied for prediction of traffic noise for local conditions in other countries.

  8. Measurement of Supersonic Jet Noise with Optical Wave Microphone System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masataka KOSAKA; Kunisato SETO; MD. Tawhidul Islam KHAN; Yoichi NAKAZONO

    2005-01-01

    An optical wave microphone system is a new technique of sound measurement. This technique has been developed as a new plasma diagnostic technique to measure electron density fluctuations in the nuclear fusion research. Because the sound wave is a pressure or a density fluctuation, it is possible for this technique to measure the sound wave, too. The acoustical characteristics of the optical wave microphone system were examined by using a speaker as a first step. Next, feasibility of this device to measure jet noise was examined. It was found that the optical wave microphone system could measure the jet noise as well as a sound from speaker.Hence the optical wave microphone system can be considered one of the devices equivalent to condenser microphone. Because of these reason, this device is very convenient to scan the acoustic filed through jet flow from the inside to the out side and more preferable for not disturbing the observation field.

  9. Cancellation of simulated environmental noise as a tool for measuring vocal performance during noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternström, Sten; Södersten, Maria; Bohman, Mikael

    2002-06-01

    It can be difficult for the voice clinician to observe or measure how a patient uses his voice in a noisy environment. We consider here a novel method for obtaining this information in the laboratory. Worksite noise and filtered white noise were reproduced over high-fidelity loudspeakers. In this noise, 11 subjects read an instructional text of 1.5 to 2 minutes duration, as if addressing a group of people. Using channel estimation techniques, the site noise was suppressed from the recording, and the voice signal alone was recovered. The attainable noise rejection is limited only by the precision of the experimental setup, which includes the need for the subject to remain still so as not to perturb the estimated acoustic channel. This feasibility study, with 7 female and 4 male subjects, showed that small displacements of the speaker's body, even breathing, impose a practical limit on the attainable noise rejection. The noise rejection was typically 30 dB and maximally 40 dB down over the entire voice spectrum. Recordings thus processed were clean enough to permit voice analysis with the long-time average spectrum and the computerized phonetogram. The effects of site noise on voice sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, long-term average spectrum centroid, phonetogram area, and phonation time were much as expected, but with some interesting differences between females and males.

  10. Noise Evaluation Technique Based on Surface Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter the relevant theory for the understanding of TE noise modeling is collected. It contains the acoustic formulations of [31] and [57]. Both give a relation for the far field sound pressure in dependence of the frequency wave number spectral density of the pressure on the airfoil...

  11. Coupling of relative intensity noise and pathlength noise to the length measurement in the optical metrology system of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Andreas; the LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the space-based gravitational wave observatory, LISA. It demonstrated that the performance requirements for the interferometric measurement of two test masses in free fall can be met. An important part of the data analysis is to identify the limiting noise sources. [1] This measurement is performed with heterodyne interferometry. The performance of this optical metrology system (OMS) at high frequencies is limited by sensing noise. One such noise source is Relative Intensity Noise (RIN). RIN is a property of the laser, and the photodiode current generated by the interferometer signal contains frequency dependant RIN. From this electric signal the phasemeter calculates the phase change and laser power, and the coupling of RIN into the measurement signal depends on the noise frequency. RIN at DC, at the heterodyne frequency and at two times the heterodyne frequency couples into the phase. Another important noise at high frequencies is path length noise. To reduce the impact this noise is suppressed with a control loop. Path length noise not suppressed will couple directly into the length measurement. The subtraction techniques of both noise sources depend on the phase difference between the reference signal and the measurement signal, and thus on the test mass position. During normal operations we position the test mass at the interferometric zero, which is optimal for noise subtraction purposes. This paper will show results from an in-flight experiment where the test mass position was changed to make the position dependant noise visible.

  12. Research of Signal De-noising Technique Based on Wavelet

    OpenAIRE

    Shigang Hu; Yinglu Hu; Xiaofeng Wu; Jin Li; Zaifang Xi; Jin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    During the process of signal testing, often exposed to interference and influence of all kinds of noise signal, such as data collection and transmission and so may introduce noise. So in practical applications, before analysis of the data measured, the need for de-noising processing. The signal de-noising is a method for filtering the high frequency  noise of the signal and makes the signal more precise. This paper deals with the general theory of wavelet transform, the application of wavelet...

  13. Advanced DSP Technique to Remove Baseline Noise from ECG Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanhaiya Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart diseases, which are one of the death reasons, are among the several serious problems in this century and as per the latest survey, 60% of the patients die due to Heart problems. In 2011, 10 crores people are suffering from heart diseases in India. Many individuals remain unaware of the symptoms of heart attack or dismiss possible symptoms as being unrelated or not important enough to visit a doctor. Early diagnosis and medical treatment of heart diseases can prevent sudden death of the patient. One of the ways to diagnose heart diseases is to use Electrocardiogram (ECG signals. ECG measures electrical potentials on the body surface via contact electrodes. However, timely and accurate detection of arrhythmias is a complex decision-making process for a cardiologist due to contamination of ECG signals with different frequencies of noise. For reliable interpretation of real-time ECGs, computer based techniques on digital signal processing (DSP of ECG waveform have been reported. ECG signals are non-stationary signals including valuable clinical informations, but frequently these informations are corrupted by noise. Many tools, methods and algorithms based on signal processing theory have been proposed and implemented. In this paper, advanced digital signal processing is carried out in Matlab environment. And the present work basically focuses on implementation and evaluation of methods to remove noise from ECG signal.

  14. Process measuring techniques; Prozessmesstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberger, A.

    2000-07-01

    This introduction into measurement techniques for chemical and process-technical plant in science and industry describes in detail the methods used to measure basic quantities. Most prominent are modern measuring techniques by means of ultrasound, microwaves and the Coriolis effect. Alongside physical and measuring technique fundamentals, the practical applications of measuring devices are described. Calculation examples are given to illustrate the subject matter. The book addresses students of physical engineering, process engineering and environmental engineering at technical schools as well as engineers of other disciplines wishing to familiarize themselves with the subject of process measurement techniques. (orig.) [German] Diese Einfuehrung in die Messtechnik fuer chemische und verfahrens-technische Forschungs- und Produktionsanlagen beschreibt ausfuehrlich die Methoden zur Messung der Basisgroessen. Moderne Messverfahren mit Ultraschall, Mikrowellen und Coriolis-Effekt stehen dabei im Vordergrund. Beruecksichtigung finden sowohl die physikalischen und messtechnischen Grundlagen als auch die praktischen Anwendungen der Geraete. Berechnungsbeispiele dienen der Erlaeuterung und Vertiefung des Stoffes. Angesprochen sind Studenten der Ingenieurstufengaenge Physikalische Technik und Verfahrens- und Umwelttechnik an Fachhochschulen als auch Ingenieure anderer Fachrichtungen, die sich in das Gebiet der Prozessmesstechnik einarbeiten wollen. (orig.)

  15. Measuring the Noise Caused by Tehran Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Abbas Pour

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common and important sources of noise in the residential environments are vehicles such as airplanes and subways. Trafficking of vehicles in streets and highways, psychologically, have damaging impacts on people living close to such areas. The development and expansion of the trading and industrial units is another factor that causes more and more exposure to noise.We have aimed at measuring the noises caused by vibration of subways of the Line of Karaj-Tehran-Mehrshahr and its effect on its surrounding area.To study this effect we designed a mathematical model and put the information of this subway line in the mentioned model. Then we analyzed the findings.This model demonstrated that we can control the harsh noise of the subway by reducing the speed of the train to 60Km/h in some points and increase in other parts to 130Km/h.

  16. Robust terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hajun; Song, Jong-In

    2015-08-10

    We propose and demonstrate a robust terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique. Conventional terahertz self-heterodyne systems suffer from degraded phase noise performance due to phase noise of the laser sources. The proposed phase noise compensation technique uses an additional photodiode and a simple electric circuit to produce phase noise identical to that observed in the terahertz signal produced by the self-heterodyne system. The phase noise is subsequently subtracted from the terahertz signal produced by the self-heterodyne system using a lock-in amplifier. While the terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique offers improved phase noise performance, it also provides a reduced phase drift against ambient temperature variations. The terahertz self-heterodyne system using a phase noise compensation technique shows a phase noise of 0.67 degree in terms of a standard deviation value even without using overall delay balance control. It also shows a phase drift of as small as approximately 10 degrees in an open-to-air measurement condition without any strict temperature control.

  17. Neutron noise measurements on Bugey 2 PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.; Romy, D.; Spadi, J.C.; Assedo, R.; Castello, G.

    1982-01-01

    Following Bugey 2 PWR hot functional tests, dimension measurements of internals hold down spring led to suspect that vibration levels could change with time. Neutron noise measurements runs during the first cycle enabled describing vibration behaviour of internals. Comparisons with previous analytical and experimental results gained on the Safran model as well as on similar reactors were also made.

  18. Research of Signal De-noising Technique Based on Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigang Hu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the process of signal testing, often exposed to interference and influence of all kinds of noise signal, such as data collection and transmission and so may introduce noise. So in practical applications, before analysis of the data measured, the need for de-noising processing. The signal de-noising is a method for filtering the high frequency  noise of the signal and makes the signal more precise. This paper deals with the general theory of wavelet transform, the application of wavelet transform in signal de-noising as well as the analysis of the characteristics of noise-polluted signa1. Matlab is used to be carried out the simu1ation where the different wavelet and different threshold of the same wavelet for signal de-noising are applied. An indicator of wavelet de-noising is presented , it is the indicator of smoothness. Through analysis of the experiment , considered MSE , SNR and smoothness , it can be a good way to evaluate the equality of wavelet de-noising. The results show that the wavelet transform can achieve excellent results in signal de-noising.  

  19. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  20. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  1. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people harmfu

  2. Development of fault diagnostic technique using reactor noise analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, J. S.; Oh, I. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Joo, Y. S.; Choi, S.; Yoon, D. B

    1999-04-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to establish the analysis technique to diagnose the integrity of reactor internals using reactor noise. The reactor noise analyses techniques for the PWR and CANDU NPP(Nuclear Power Plants) were established by which the dynamic characteristics of reactor internals and SPND instrumentations could be identified, and the noise database corresponding to each plant(both Korean and foreign one) was constructed and compared. Also the change of dynamic characteristics of the Ulchin 1 and 2 reactor internals were simulated under presumed fault conditions. Additionally portable reactor noise analysis system was developed so that real time noise analysis could directly be able to be performed at plant site. The reactor noise analyses techniques developed and the database obtained from the fault simulation, can be used to establish a knowledge based expert system to diagnose the NPP's abnormal conditions. And the portable reactor noise analysis system may be utilized as a substitute for plant IVMS(Internal Vibration Monitoring System). (author)

  3. An acoustic mode measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppa, P. D.

    1984-10-01

    Turbomachinery noise propagates in aircraft jet engine ducts in a complicated manner. Measurement of this propagation is useful both to identify source mechanisms and to design efficient linings. A practical method of making these measurements has been developed, using linear arrays of equally spaced microphones mounted flush with the duct wall. Circumferential or axial arrays are analyzed by spatial Fourier transform, giving sound level as a function of spinning order or axial wavenumber respectively. Complex demodulation is used to acquire data in a modest bandwidth around a high frequency of interest. A joint NASA/Boeing test of the system used 32 microphones in a JT15D turbofan engine inlet. A 400-Hz bandwidth centered at blade passage frequency and at half blade passage frequency was studied. The theoretically predicted modes were clearly seen at blade passage frequency; broadband noise at half blade passage frequency was biased towards modes corotating with the fan. Interference between similar modes was not a significant problem. A lining design study indicated a 15 percent improvement in lining efficiency was possible when mode data were used, for this particular engine. The technique has proven reliable and useful for source diagnostics and lining design.

  4. Noise measurement on Preshower Si sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelou, Ioannis; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Elsha, Vladimir; Go, Apollo; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Peisert, Anna; Prouskas, C; Reynaud, Serge; Triantis, Frixos A; Tzoulis, Nikolaos; Zub, E

    2002-01-01

    Throughout the past couple of years when we were designing the Preshower silicon sensors we have noticed that some of them have strips with a noise higher than the average and not correlated to the leakage current. In order to investigate this effect we have developed a set-up for noise measurement on wafers and diced sensors that does not require bonding. The set-up is based on the DeltaStream chip coupled to a probe card with 32 pins at a pitch of 1.9 mm. All the digital electronics, including the analogue-to-digital converter and a microprocessor, is placed on a motherboard which communicates with a PC via an RS232 line. We have tested 45 sensors and found that some strips which have an above average noise, also have a higher relative current increase as a function of voltage, deltaI/(I deltaV), even though their leakage current is below 50 nA. We also observed that on these strips th e breakdown occurs within about 60 V from the onset of the noise. The source of this noise is not yet clear and the investi...

  5. Numerical filtering techniques for the reduction of noise in digital telemetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich-Stone, Thomas M.

    Telemetry data noise is due to the marginal or complete loss of telemetry carrier signal, leading to errors in the PCM data received. Attention is presently given to several postflight numerical filtering techniques for the reduction and/or removal of noise in digital telemetry data, prior to use in automated computer data analysis. The techniques encompass manual filtering, upper/lower bound filtering, mean-plus/minus standard deviation filtering, rate-of-change filtering, multiple-measurement filtering, and multiple filters.

  6. Airframe noise measurements by acoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the noise produced by flow past wind tunnel models are presented. The central objective of these is to find the specific locations within a flow which are noisy, and to identify the fluid dynamic processes responsible, with the expectation that noise reduction principles will be discovered. The models tested are mostly simple shapes which result in types of flow that are similar to those occurring on, for example, aircraft landing gear and wheel cavities. A model landing gear and a flap were also tested. Turbulence has been intentionally induced as appropriate in order to simulate full-scale effects more closely. The principal technique involves use of a highly directional microphone system which is scanned about the flow field to be analyzed. The data so acquired are presented as a pictorial image of the noise source distribution. An important finding is that the noise production is highly variable within a flow field and that sources can be attributed to various fluid dynamic features of the flow. Flow separation was not noisy, but separation closure usually was.

  7. Noise measurements in the specific locations of traffic-engineering measures

    OpenAIRE

    Smejtek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with measurements of noise generated by road traffic. In theoretical part is described physical essence of sound, sound spread, perception of sound by human, effects of noise on human, methods of noise reduction, sources of noise from road traffic, legislation regarding noise and traffic-engineering measures. In practical part the noise was measured. Evaluate the noise at the bus stop, different noise level on straight road and sleeping policeman and different noise level on...

  8. New measurements techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni

    of the pressure encountered by the ‘sensing’ light when traveling through the acoustic field. Far from being a limitation, this integral principle is exploited for sound field visualization using tomography. The most innovative contribution of this PhD project is the applicability of the acousto-optic measuring......Acoustic measurements are traditionally based on transducers, and in particular, the most advanced measurement techniques are nowadays based on transducer arrays. This poses a fundamental problem, namely the influence of the transducer itself on the actual properties of sound when the transducer...... is immersed into the sound field. Typically, this influence is assumed to be negligible when the size of the transducer is small compared to the wavelength of the sound wave, or is rendered negligible by using a transducerbased correction that depends on the frequency. Either solution introduces additional...

  9. An effective noise-suppression technique for surface microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Davidson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The presence of strong surface-wave noise in surface microseismic data may decrease the utility of these data. We implement a technique, based on the distinct characteristics that microseismic signal and noise show in the τ‐p domain, to suppress surface-wave noise in microseismic data. Because most microseismic source mechanisms are deviatoric, preprocessing is necessary to correct for the nonuniform radiation pattern prior to transforming the data to the τ‐p domain. We employ a scanning approach, similar to semblance analysis, to test all possible double-couple orientations to determine an estimated orientation that best accounts for the polarity pattern of any microseismic events. We then correct the polarity of the data traces according to this pattern, prior to conducting signal-noise separation in the τ‐p domain. We apply our noise-suppression technique to two surface passive-seismic data sets from different acquisition surveys. The first data set includes a synthetic microseismic event added to field passive noise recorded by an areal receiver array distributed over a Barnett Formation reservoir undergoing hydraulic fracturing. The second data set is field microseismic data recorded by receivers arranged in a star-shaped array, over a Bakken Shale reservoir during a hydraulic-fracturing process. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and preserves the waveforms at the individual traces. We illustrate that the enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio also results in improved imaging of the microseismic hypocenter.

  10. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...... close to the L10 target, but, due to a doubtful use of C-weighting in the scanning, it may give too low results in case of complex sounds. The Danish method was found to have a high risk of giving results substantially below the target, unless complainants can precisely appoint measurement positions...

  11. New optical technique for bulk magnetostriction measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Samata, H; Uchida, T; Abe, S

    2000-01-01

    A new optical technique was applied to the measurement of magnetostriction in bulk samples. This technique utilizes an optical fiber bundle, AC-modulated light and lock-in detection. Deformation of the sample is determined from the ratio of the incident and reflected light intensities. Noise due to the instability of the light source is eliminated by obtaining the ratio of the incident and reflected light intensities, and the noise caused in the detector circuit can be reduced by lock-in detection. The performance of this method was characterized with a series of measurements using a gold film and crystal disks of pure iron and nickel. This technique offers a resolution of 0.5 nm and is sensitive enough to measure magnetostriction as small as 5x10 sup - sup 7 in 1 mm thick samples.

  12. Jet transport noise - A comparison of predicted and measured noise for ILS and two-segment approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. C.; Bourquin, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    Centerline noise measured during standard ILS and two-segment approaches in DC-8-61 aircraft were compared with noise predicted for these procedures using an existing noise prediction technique. Measured data is considered to be in good agreement with predicted data. Ninety EPNdB sideline locations were calculated from flight data obtained during two-segment approaches and were compared with predicted 90 EPNdB contours that were computed using three different models for excess ground attenuation and a contour with no correction for ground attenuation. The contour not corrected for ground attenuation was in better agreement with the measured data.

  13. Failure in distinguishing colored noise from chaos using the ``noise titration'' technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ubiratan S.; Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2009-03-01

    Identifying chaos in experimental data—noisy data—remains a challenging problem for which conclusive arguments are still very difficult to provide. In order to avoid problems usually encountered with techniques based on geometrical invariants (dimensions, Lyapunov exponent, etc.), Poon and Barahona introduced a numerical titration procedure which compares one-step-ahead predictions of linear and nonlinear models [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 7107 (2001)]. We investigate the aformentioned technique in the context of colored noise or other types of nonchaotic behaviors. The main conclusion is that in several examples noise titration fails to distinguish such nonchaotic signals from low-dimensional deterministic chaos.

  14. Seismometer Self-Noise and Measuring Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Adam; R. Sleeman,; Hutt, Charles R.; Gee, Lind S.

    2014-01-01

    Seismometer self-noise is usually not considered when selecting and using seismic waveform data in scientific research as it is typically assumed that the self-noise is negligibly small compared to seismic signals. However, instrumental noise is part of the noise in any seismic record, and in particular, at frequencies below a few mHz, the instrumental noise has a frequency-dependent character and may dominate the noise. When seismic noise itself is considered as a carrier of information, as in seismic interferometry (e.g., Chaput et al. 2012), it becomes extremely important to estimate the contribution of instrumental noise to the recordings.

  15. Measured and calculated characteristics of wind turbine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of wind turbine noise are presented. Noise calculations indicate that for configurations with the rotor downwind of the support tower, the primary source of noise is the rapid change in rotor loadings which occurs as the rotor passes through the tower wake. Noise measurements are presented for solid and truss type tower models with both upwind and downwind rotors. Upwind rotor configurations are shown to be significantly quieter than downwind configurations. The model data suggest that averaged noise measurements and noise calculations based on averaged tower wake characteristics may not accurately represent the impulsive noise characteristics of downwind rotor configurations.

  16. Tomography of cylindrical objects: comparison of noise property and accuracy of Abel inversion techniques with and without noise filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuiliang

    2011-12-10

    I have analyzed and compared the noise property and accuracy of three kinds of Abel inversion technique, i.e., the polynomial interpolation, versatile polynomial fitting (VPF) and modified Fourier-Hankel (MFH) methods. All these techniques will amplify noise due to the intrinsic property of Abel inversion. A technique that is more sensitive to noise also has a higher inversion accuracy for data without noise. Among the techniques without a noise resisting property, the third-degree polynomial interpolation and MFH methods have comparable performance and give higher inversion accuracies than other techniques. The VPF and MFH methods, which can be used without extra filtering of noise, yield markedly better results compared with those obtained by using noise filters in advance of inversion. Both of these two methods can be considered for applying to experimental data if there are no better smoothing techniques available.

  17. A measurement model for general noise reaction in response to aircraft noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.; Schreckenberg, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a measurement model for general noise reaction (GNR) in response to aircraft noise is developed to assess the performance of aircraft noise annoyance and a direct measure of general reaction as indicators of this concept. For this purpose GNR is conceptualized as a superordinate latent

  18. Vibration measurement with nonlinear converter in the presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozuras, Almantas

    2017-10-01

    Conventional vibration measurement methods use the linear properties of physical converters. These methods are strongly influenced by nonlinear distortions, because ideal linear converters are not available. Practically, any converter can be considered as a linear one, when an output signal is very small. However, the influence of noise increases significantly and signal-to-noise ratio decreases at lower signals. When the output signal is increasing, the nonlinear distortions are also augmenting. If the wide spectrum vibration is measured, conventional methods face a harmonic distortion as well as intermodulation effects. Purpose of this research is to develop a measurement method of wide spectrum vibration by using a converter described by a nonlinear function of type f(x), where x =x(t) denotes the dependence of coordinate x on time t due to the vibration. Parameter x(t) describing the vibration is expressed as Fourier series. The spectral components of the converter output f(x(t)) are determined by using Fourier transform. The obtained system of nonlinear equations is solved using the least squares technique that permits to find x(t) in the presence of noise. This method allows one to carry out the absolute or relative vibration measurements. High resistance to noise is typical for the absolute vibration measurement, but it is necessary to know the Taylor expansion coefficients of the function f(x). If the Taylor expansion is not known, the relative measurement of vibration parameters is also possible, but with lower resistance to noise. This method allows one to eliminate the influence of nonlinear distortions to the measurement results, and consequently to eliminate harmonic distortion and intermodulation effects. The use of nonlinear properties of the converter for measurement gives some advantages related to an increased frequency range of the output signal (consequently increasing the number of equations) that allows one to decrease the noise influence on

  19. Noise Reduction Techniques and Scaling Effects towards Photon Counting CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assim Boukhayma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the read noise in CMOS image sensors (CISs based on four-transistors (4T pixels, column-level amplification and correlated multiple sampling. Starting from the input-referred noise analytical formula, process level optimizations, device choices and circuit techniques at the pixel and column level of the readout chain are derived and discussed. The noise reduction techniques that can be implemented at the column and pixel level are verified by transient noise simulations, measurement and results from recently-published low noise CIS. We show how recently-reported process refinement, leading to the reduction of the sense node capacitance, can be combined with an optimal in-pixel source follower design to reach a sub-0.3 \\(e^{-}_{rms}\\ read noise at room temperature. This paper also discusses the impact of technology scaling on the CIS read noise. It shows how designers can take advantage of scaling and how the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS transistor gate leakage tunneling current appears as a challenging limitation. For this purpose, both simulation results of the gate leakage current and 1/f noise data reported from different foundries and technology nodes are used.

  20. A Gaussian measure of quantum phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1992-01-01

    We study the width of the semiclassical phase distribution of a quantum state in its dependence on the average number of photons (m) in this state. As a measure of phase noise, we choose the width, delta phi, of the best Gaussian approximation to the dominant peak of this probability curve. For a coherent state, this width decreases with the square root of (m), whereas for a truncated phase state it decreases linearly with increasing (m). For an optimal phase state, delta phi decreases exponentially but so does the area caught underneath the peak: all the probability is stored in the broad wings of the distribution.

  1. Pump-probe differencing technique for cavity-enhanced, noise-canceling saturation laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    De Vine, G; Close, J D; Gray, M B; Vine, Glenn de; Clelland, David E. Mc; Close, John D.; Gray, Malcolm B.

    2004-01-01

    We present an experimental technique enabling mechanical-noise free, cavity-enhanced frequency measurements of an atomic transition and its hyperfine structure. We employ the 532nm frequency doubled output from a Nd:YAG laser and an iodine vapour cell. The cell is placed in a traveling-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) with counter-propagating pump and probe beams. The FPI is locked using the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique. Mechanical noise is rejected by differencing pump and probe signals. In addition, this differenced error signal gives a sensitive measure of differential non-linearity within the FPI.

  2. Lidar signal de-noising based on wavelet trimmed thresholding technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Fang(方海涛); Deshuang Huang(黄德双)

    2004-01-01

    Lidar is an efficient tool for remote monitoring, but the effective range is often limited by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). By the power spectral estimation, we find that digital filters are not fit for processing lidar signals buried in noise. In this paper, we present a new method of the lidar signal acquisition based on the wavelet trimmed thresholding technique to increase the effective range of lidar measurements. The performance of our method is investigated by detecting the real signals in noise. The experiment results show that our approach is superior to the traditional methods such as Butterworth filter.

  3. Development of active control technique for engine noise. Engine soon no active seigyo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, H.; Nakao, N.; Butsuen, T. (Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan))

    1994-03-31

    As a measure to reduce engine noise in a car, the active noise control (ANC) technique to eliminate noise by another noise of antiphase has been studied. The conventional filtered-x LMS control algorithm has been generally applied to the ANC, but a large quantity of arithmetic operation used for filtering is practically problematic. This paper proposes the new algorithm of which control effects and practicability have been improved by utilizing periodicity of engine noise and by introducing the idea of error scanning. This algorithm requires only 30-50% of the arithmetic operation of the above LMS method. Concerning the actual system structure, arrangement and the number of microphones have been examined based on the detailed measurement results of the spatial distribution of noise in a car. As a result, the suitable arrangement of only three microphones to reduce noise in the whole interior space of a car is found. Through the experiments, maximum noise reduction of 8dB (A scale) has been achieved at each seat position. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Analysis of Proposed Noise Detection & Removal Technique in Degraded Fingerprint Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Ainul Azura Abdul; Rahim, Mohd Shafry Mohd; Al-Mazyad, Abdulaziz S.; Saba, Tanzila

    2015-12-01

    The quality of fingerprint images is important to ensure good performance of fingerprint recognition since recognition process depends heavily on the quality of fingerprint images. Fingerprint images obtained from the acquisition phase are either contaminated with noise or degraded due to poor quality machines. Several factors such as scars, moist in scanner and many more noises affect the quality of the images during scanning process. This paper performed an analysis and compared noise removal techniques reported in the literature for fingerprint images. We also implemented histogram equalization, median filter, Fourier transform, unsharp mask and grayscale enhancement techniques. The quality of enhanced images is measured by peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) calculation for analysis and comparisons.

  5. Ranking of Reactions Based on Sensitivity of Protein Noise Depends on the Choice of Noise Measure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheta Gokhale

    Full Text Available Gene expression is a stochastic process. Identification of the step maximally affecting noise in the protein level is an important aspect of investigation of gene product distribution. There are numerous experimental and theoretical studies that seek to identify this important step. However, these studies have used two different measures of noise, viz. coefficient of variation and Fano factor, and have compared different processes leading to contradictory observations regarding the important step. In this study, we performed systematic global and local sensitivity analysis on two models of gene expression to investigate relative contribution of reaction rate parameters to steady state noise in the protein level using both the measures of noise. We analytically and computationally showed that the ranking of parameters based on the sensitivity of the noise to variation in a given parameter is a strong function of the choice of the noise measure. If the Fano factor is used as the noise measure, translation is the important step whereas for coefficient of variation, transcription is the important step. We derived an analytical expression for local sensitivity and used it to explain the distinct contributions of each reaction parameter to the two measures of noise. We extended the analysis to a generic linear catalysis reaction system and observed that the reaction network topology was an important factor influencing the local sensitivity of the two measures of noise. Our study suggested that, for the analysis of contributions of reactions to the noise, consideration of both the measures of noise is important.

  6. Noise reduction techniques for the restoration of musical recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappe, Olivier

    The evaluation of short time spectral attenuation techniques using a simplified model of standard noise suppression rules and with elementary test signals is assessed. Signal distortions induced by the restoration process are evaluated analytically, and their audibility is addressed by use of classic psychoacoustics results. Phenomena observed experimentally in previous studies, such as the modification of timbre, the appearance of modulations, and the spreading of transients, are brought to light. Drawing from these results, a noise reduction technique intended for enhancing musical signals is described. In the first step, the noisy signal is analyzed by use of a medium frequency resolution short time transform. The restoration then takes place in each subband in two different ways according to the nature of the subband signal: the processing is carried out block by block when steady signal components are detected, or locally otherwise. This approach was successfully applied to several musical recordings yielding promising results.

  7. Railway noise barriers: Measurements and Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ausejo Prieto, Miguel; Recuero López, Manuel; Fausti, Patrizio; Cremonini, Renzo

    2009-01-01

    Trains Trains passages passages generate generate aa very very annoying annoying noise noise toto the the inhabitants inhabitants ofof their their environs environs.. To To reduce reduce this this annoyance annoyance, noise noise barriers barriers are are installed installed near near several several railway railway lines lines.. Nowadays Nowadays, acoustic acoustic simulation simulation programs programs are are used used inin order order toto optimize optimize the the design design ofof the...

  8. Noise estimation technique to reduce the effects of 1/f noise in Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (OP-TDLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Israa L.; Anderson, Gary T.; Chen, Youhua

    2014-06-01

    Many techniques using high frequency modulation have been proposed to reduce the effects of 1/f noise in tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The instruments and devices used by these techniques are not suitable for space applications that require small, low mass and low power instrumentation. A new noise estimation technique has already been proposed and validated for two lasers to reduce the effect of 1/f noise at lower frequencies. This paper extends the noise estimation technique and applies it using one distribution feedback (DFB) laser diode. In this method a DFB laser diode is excited at two slightly different frequencies, giving two different harmonics that can be used to estimate the total noise in the measurement. Simulations and experimental results on ammonia gas validate that the 1/f noise is effectively reduced by the noise estimation technique using one laser. Outdoor experimental results indicate that the effect of 1/f noise is reduced to more than 1/4 its normal value.

  9. Techniques for the reduction of low frequency noise in buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuada Coelho, B.A.; Koopman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration isolation of buildings is often achieved by introducing spring systems at the foundation level. This can be an effective measure, especially against vibrations induced by noise, but it is also very costly. Due to the current usage of the cities space, where buildings and infrastructures sh

  10. Azimuthally Varying Noise Reduction Techniques Applied to Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Nicholas S.

    An experimental investigation into the effect of azimuthal variance of chevrons and fluidically enhanced chevrons applied to supersonic jets is presented. Flow field measurements of streamwise and cross-stream particle imaging velocimetry were employed to determine the causes of noise reduction, which was demonstrated through acoustic measurements. Results were obtained in the over- and under- expanded regimes, and at the design condition, though emphasis was placed on the overexpanded regime due to practical application. Surveys of chevron geometry, number, and arrangement were undertaken in an effort to reduce noise and/or incurred performance penalties. Penetration was found to be positively correlated with noise reduction in the overexpanded regime, and negatively correlated in underexpanded operation due to increased effective penetration and high frequency penalty, respectively. The effect of arrangement indicated the beveled configuration achieved optimal abatement in the ideally and underexpanded regimes due to superior BSAN reduction. The symmetric configuration achieved optimal overexpanded noise reduction due to LSS suppression from improved vortex persistence. Increases in chevron number generally improved reduction of all noise components for lower penetration configurations. Higher penetration configurations reached levels of saturation in the four chevron range, with the potential to introduce secondary shock structures and generate additional noise with higher number. Alternation of penetration generated limited benefit, with slight reduction of the high frequency penalty caused by increased shock spacing. The combination of alternating penetration with beveled and clustered configurations achieved comparable noise reduction to the standard counterparts. Analysis of the entire data set indicated initial improvements with projected area that saturated after a given level and either plateaued or degraded with additional increases. Optimal reductions

  11. Noise in laser speckle correlation and imaging techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Skipetrov, Sergey E; Cerbino, Roberto; Zakharov, Pavel; Weber, Bruno; Scheffold, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We study the noise of the intensity variance and of the intensity correlation and structure functions measured in light scattering from a random medium in the case when these quantities are obtained by averaging over a finite number N of pixels of a digital camera. We show that the noise scales as 1/N in all cases and that it is sensitive to correlations of signals corresponding to adjacent pixels as well as to the effective time averaging (due to the finite sampling time) and spatial averaging (due to the finite pixel size). Our results provide a guide to estimation of noise level in such applications as the multi-speckle dynamic light scattering, time-resolved correlation spectroscopy, speckle visibility spectroscopy, laser speckle imaging etc.

  12. Application of a pattern recognition technique to the prediction of tire noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jinn-Tong; Tu, Fu-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Tire treads are one of the main sources of car noise. To meet the EU's tire noise regulation ECE-R117, a new method using a pattern recognition technique is adopted in this paper to predict noise from tire tread patterns, thus facilitating the design of low-noise tires. When tires come into contact with the road surface, air pumping may occur in the grooves of tire tread patterns. Using the image of a tread pattern, a matrix is constructed by setting the patterns of tire grooves and tread blocks. The length and width of the contact patch are multiplied by weight functions. The resulting sound pressure as a function of time is subjected to a Fourier transform to simulate a 1/3-octave-band sound pressure level. A particle swarm algorithm is adopted to optimize the weighting parameters for the sound pressure in the frequency domain so that simulated values approach the measured noise level. Two sets of optimal weighting parameters associated with the length and width of the contact patch are obtained. Finally, the weight function is used to predict the tread pattern noise of tires in the same series. A comparison of the prediction and experimental results reveals that, in the 1/3-octave band of frequency (800-2000 Hz), average errors in sound pressure are within 2.5 dB. The feasibility of the proposed application of the pattern recognition technique in predicting noise from tire treads is verified.

  13. Remote Attitude Measurement Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    are other factors which will influence the selection of the communications means. One major factor is the selection of the technology to be used. Aside...electrooptical devices with partitioned focal planes, and the char- acteristics of these techniques influence how the focal planes are partitioned. G. FOCAL...a televison camera). The incident illumination produces a non-uniformity on the scanned side of the sensitive material which can be modeled as an

  14. Methods for clinical evaluation of noise reduction techniques in abdominopelvic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehman, Eric C; Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Hara, Amy K; Shiung, Maria M; Jondal, Dayna; Lake, David S; Paden, Robert G; Blezek, Daniel J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Hough, David M; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Most noise reduction methods involve nonlinear processes, and objective evaluation of image quality can be challenging, since image noise cannot be fully characterized on the sole basis of the noise level at computed tomography (CT). Noise spatial correlation (or noise texture) is closely related to the detection and characterization of low-contrast objects and may be quantified by analyzing the noise power spectrum. High-contrast spatial resolution can be measured using the modulation transfer function and section sensitivity profile and is generally unaffected by noise reduction. Detectability of low-contrast lesions can be evaluated subjectively at varying dose levels using phantoms containing low-contrast objects. Clinical applications with inherent high-contrast abnormalities (eg, CT for renal calculi, CT enterography) permit larger dose reductions with denoising techniques. In low-contrast tasks such as detection of metastases in solid organs, dose reduction is substantially more limited by loss of lesion conspicuity due to loss of low-contrast spatial resolution and coarsening of noise texture. Existing noise reduction strategies for dose reduction have a substantial impact on lowering the radiation dose at CT. To preserve the diagnostic benefit of CT examination, thoughtful utilization of these strategies must be based on the inherent lesion-to-background contrast and the anatomy of interest. The authors provide an overview of existing noise reduction strategies for low-dose abdominopelvic CT, including analytic reconstruction, image and projection space denoising, and iterative reconstruction; review qualitative and quantitative tools for evaluating these strategies; and discuss the strengths and limitations of individual noise reduction methods.

  15. STUDY THE INFLUENCE OF H3BO3 ON THE ZINC ELECTROPLATING USING ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Zhang; C.S.Wu; Q.Y.Cai; Y.L.Cheng; F.H.Cao; J.Q.Zhang; C.N.Cao

    2004-01-01

    The influence of H3BO3 on the zinc electroplating was studied using electrochemical noise technique, cyclic voltammetry and steady-state polarization method. The results showed that,under the experimental conditions, the deposition of zinc followed the mechanism of two-dimensional nucleation and subsequent grain growth. The addition of H3BO3 into the electroplating solution prominently changes the nucleation and growth kinetics of zinc deposits, which is directly related to the features of electrocrystallization noise and the corresponding structure of the elec.trodeposits. The results also shown that the electrochemical noise (EN) technique can give more information about the electrodeposits structure and electroplating mechanism than other normal electrochemical measurements can give, such as steady-state polarization method and cyclic voltammetry technique.

  16. Noise analysis and measurement of time delay and integration charge coupled device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang De-Jiang; Zhang Tao

    2011-01-01

    Time delay and integration(TDI)charge coupled device(CCD)noise sets a fundamental limit on image sensor performance,especially under low illumination in remote sensing applications.After introducing the complete sources of CCD noise,we study the effects of TDI operation mode on noise,and the relationship between different types of noise and number of the TDI stage.Then we propose a new technique to identify and measure sources of TDI CCD noise employing mathematical statistics theory,where theoretical analysis shows that noise estimated formulation converges well.Finally,we establish a testing platform to carry out experiments,and a standard TDI CCD is calibrated by using the proposed method.The experimental results show that the noise analysis and measurement methods presented in this paper are useful for modeling TDI CCDs.

  17. Measurement of the beauty of periodic noises

    CERN Document Server

    Manet, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In this article indicators to describe the "beauty" of noises are proposed. Rhythmic, tonal and harmonic suavity are introduced. They give a characterization of a noise in terms of rhythmic regularity (rhythmic suavity), of auditory pleasure of the "chords" constituting the signal (tonal suavity) and of the transition between the chords (harmonic suavity). These indicators have been developed for periodic noises typically issued from rotating machines such as engines, compressors... and are now used by our industrial customers since two years.

  18. Analysis of noise control measures on outdoor machinery using EQUIP+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Noise control of different types of outdoor machinery covered by EU Directive 2000/14/EC such as construction machines, generators and other equipment powered by internal combustion engines requires knowledge of the noise path model and the potential noise control measures. As there is often a

  19. Measurements on power-conversion gain and noise ratio of the 1N26 crystal rectifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dymanus, A.; Bouwknegt, A.

    1960-01-01

    Measurements have been performed on power conversion gain G and noise ratio n of a number of 1N26 silicon rectifiers (Sylvania Co., U.S.A.) using well-known techniques. The noise ratio has been investigated both with microwave excitation (10−6-10−3 W at 24 GHz) and with DC-excitation by currents up

  20. Investigation on experimental techniques to detect, locate and quantify gear noise in helicopter transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Atherton, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A robotic system to automate the detection, location, and quantification of gear noise using acoustic intensity measurement techniques has been successfully developed. Major system components fabricated under this grant include an instrumentation robot arm, a robot digital control unit and system software. A commercial, desktop computer, spectrum analyzer and two microphone probe complete the equipment required for the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System (RAIMS). Large-scale acoustic studies of gear noise in helicopter transmissions cannot be performed accurately and reliably using presently available instrumentation and techniques. Operator safety is a major concern in certain gear noise studies due to the operating environment. The man-hours needed to document a noise field in situ is another shortcoming of present techniques. RAIMS was designed to reduce the labor and hazard in collecting data and to improve the accuracy and repeatability of characterizing the acoustic field by automating the measurement process. Using RAIMS a system operator can remotely control the instrumentation robot to scan surface areas and volumes generating acoustic intensity information using the two microphone technique. Acoustic intensity studies requiring hours of scan time can be performed automatically without operator assistance. During a scan sequence, the acoustic intensity probe is positioned by the robot and acoustic intensity data is collected, processed, and stored.

  1. Accurate MTF measurement in digital radiography using noise response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Rudin, Stephen [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Biomedical Research Building, Room 445, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a new technique to determine the system presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) in digital radiography using only the detector noise response. Methods: A cascaded-linear systems analysis was used to develop an exact relationship between the two-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) and the presampled MTF for a generalized detector system. This relationship was then utilized to determine the two-dimensional presampled MTF. For simplicity, aliasing of the correlated noise component of the NPS was assumed to be negligible. Accuracy of this method was investigated using simulated images from a simple detector model in which the ''true'' MTF was known exactly. Measurements were also performed on three detector technologies (an x-ray image intensifier, an indirect flat panel detector, and a solid state x-ray image intensifier), and the results were compared using the standard edge-response method. Flat-field and edge images were acquired and analyzed according to guidelines set forth by the International Electrotechnical Commission, using the RQA 5 spectrum. Results: The presampled MTF determined using the noise-response method for the simulated detector system was in close agreement with the true MTF with an averaged percent difference of 0.3% and a maximum difference of 1.1% observed at the Nyquist frequency (f{sub N}). The edge-response method of the simulated detector system also showed very good agreement at lower spatial frequencies (less than 0.5 f{sub N}) with an averaged percent difference of 1.6% but showed significant discrepancies at higher spatial frequencies (greater than 0.5 f{sub N}) with an averaged percent difference of 17%. Discrepancies were in part a result of noise in the edge image and phasing errors. For all three detector systems, the MTFs obtained using the two methods were found to be in good agreement at spatial frequencies less than 0.5 f{sub N} with an averaged percent difference of 3

  2. Multidirectional mobilities: Advanced measurement techniques and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Lars Holger

    Today high noise-and-vibration comfort has become a quality sign of products in sectors such as the automotive industry, aircraft, components, households and manufacturing. Consequently, already in the design phase of products, tools are required to predict the final vibration and noise levels. These tools have to be applicable over a wide frequency range with sufficient accuracy. During recent decades a variety of tools have been developed such as transfer path analysis (TPA), input force estimation, substructuring, coupling by frequency response functions (FRF) and hybrid modelling. While these methods have a well-developed theoretical basis, their application combined with experimental data often suffers from a lack of information concerning rotational DOFs. In order to measure response in all 6 DOFs (including rotation), a sensor has been developed, whose special features are discussed in the thesis. This transducer simplifies the response measurements, although in practice the excitation of moments appears to be more difficult. Several excitation techniques have been developed to enable measurement of multidirectional mobilities. For rapid and simple measurement of the loaded mobility matrix, a MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) technique is used. The technique has been tested and validated on several structures of different complexity. A second technique for measuring the loaded 6-by-6 mobility matrix has been developed. This technique employs a model of the excitation set-up, and with this model the mobility matrix is determined from sequential measurements. Measurements on ``real'' structures show that both techniques give results of similar quality, and both are recommended for practical use. As a further step, a technique for measuring the unloaded mobilities is presented. It employs the measured loaded mobility matrix in order to calculate compensation forces and moments, which are later applied in order to compensate for the loading of the

  3. Improved measurement methods for railway rolling noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.; Janssens, M.H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Some of the issues related to railway noise type testing are discussed and potential improvements to existing procedures are put forward. New and improved methods that also go beyond the scope of type testing are presented that help to characterize and analyze rolling noise more accurately. These

  4. Charting environmental pollution. [by noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Bizo, F.; Karacsonyi, Z.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that areas affected by different noxious agents are within the limits traced for high noise level areas; consequently, it is suggested that high noise pressure levels should be used as the primary indication of environmental pollution. A complex methodology is reported for charting environmental pollution due to physical, chemical and biological noxious agents on the scale of an industrial district.

  5. Accurate measurement of spatial noise portraits of photosensors of digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kulakov, M. N.; Starikov, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Method of measurement of accurate portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors is described. The method consists of four steps: creation of spatially homogeneous illumination; shooting light and dark frames; digital processing and filtering. Unlike standard technique, this method uses iterative creation of spatially homogeneous illumination by display, compensation of photosensor dark spatial noise portrait and improved procedure of elimination of dark temporal noise. Portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors of a scientific digital camera were found. Characteristics of the measured portraits were compared with values of photo response and dark signal non-uniformities of camera's photosensor.

  6. Phase-Noise and Amplitude-Noise Measurement of Low-Power Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiola, Enrico; Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the phase fluctuation between a pair of low-power microwave signals, the signals must be amplified before detection. In such cases the phase noise of the amplifier pair is the main cause of 1/f background noise of the instrument. this article proposes a scheme that makes amplification possible while rejecting the close in 1/f (flicker) noise of the two amplifiers. Noise rejection, which relies upon the understanding of the amplifier noise mechanism does not require averaging. Therefore, our scheme can also be the detector of a closed loop noise reduction system. the first prototype, compared to a traditional saturated mixer system under the same condition, show a 24 dB noise reduction of the 1/f region.

  7. Helium II level measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  8. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  9. On-line adaptive line frequency noise cancellation from a nuclear power measuring channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Javed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line software for adaptively canceling 50 Hz line frequency noise has been designed and tested at Pakistan Research Reactor 1. Line frequency noise causes much problem in weak signals acquisition. Sometimes this noise is so dominant that original signal is totally corrupted. Although notch filter can be used for eliminating this noise, but if signal of interest is in close vicinity of 50 Hz, then original signal is also attenuated and hence overall performance is degraded. Adaptive noise removal is a technique which could be employed for removing line frequency without degrading the desired signal. In this paper line frequency noise has been eliminated on-line from a nuclear power measuring channel. The adaptive LMS algorithm has been used to cancel 50 Hz noise. The algorithm has been implemented in labVIEW with NI 6024 data acquisition card. The quality of the acquired signal has been improved much as can be seen in experimental results.

  10. Removal of correlated noise online for in situ measurements by using multichannel magnetic resonance sounding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ling; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other geophysical approaches, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) technique is direct and nondestructive in subsurface water exploration. It provides water content distribution and estimates hydrogeological properties. The biggest challenge is that MRS measurement always suffers bad signal-to-noise ratio, and it can be carried out only far from sources of noise. To solve this problem, a series of de-noising methods are developed. However, most of them are post-processing, leading the data quality uncontrolled for in situ measurements. In the present study, a new approach that removal of correlated noise online is found to overcome the restriction. Based on LabVIEW, a method is provided to enable online data quality control by the way of realizing signal acquisition and noise filtering simultaneously. Using one or more reference coils, adaptive noise cancellation based on LabVIEW to eliminate the correlated noise is available for in situ measurements. The approach was examined through numerical simulation and field measurements. The correlated noise is mitigated effectively and the application of MRS measurements is feasible in high-level noise environment. The method shortens the measurement time and improves the measurement efficiency.

  11. Method for measuring self-noise of vector hydrophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Chen, Hongjuan

    2017-09-01

    The Vector Hydrophone (VH) is widely used to remotely detect underwater targets. Accurately measuring the self-noise of the VH provides an important basis for evaluating the performance of the detection system in which it is utilized, since the ability to acquire weak signals is determined by the VH self-noise level. To accurately measure the VH self-noise level in actual working conditions, the Dual-channel Transfer Function Method (DTFM) is proposed to reduce ambient background noise interference. In this paper, the underlying principles of DTFM in reducing ambient background noise is analyzed. The numerical simulations to determine the influence of ambient background noise, and the sensitivity difference of the two VHs on the measurement results are studied. The results of measuring the VH self-noise level in a small laboratory water tank by using DTMF indicate that ambient background noise interference can be reduced effectively by employing DTMF, more accurate self-noise level can be obtained as well. The DTMF provides an effective method for accurately measuring the self-noise level of VHs and also provides technical support for the practical application of the VH in underwater acoustics.

  12. Dual-microphone and binaural noise reduction techniques for improved speech intelligibility by hearing aid users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefian Jazi, Nima

    Spatial filtering and directional discrimination has been shown to be an effective pre-processing approach for noise reduction in microphone array systems. In dual-microphone hearing aids, fixed and adaptive beamforming techniques are the most common solutions for enhancing the desired speech and rejecting unwanted signals captured by the microphones. In fact, beamformers are widely utilized in systems where spatial properties of target source (usually in front of the listener) is assumed to be known. In this dissertation, some dual-microphone coherence-based speech enhancement techniques applicable to hearing aids are proposed. All proposed algorithms operate in the frequency domain and (like traditional beamforming techniques) are purely based on the spatial properties of the desired speech source and does not require any knowledge of noise statistics for calculating the noise reduction filter. This benefit gives our algorithms the ability to address adverse noise conditions, such as situations where interfering talker(s) speaks simultaneously with the target speaker. In such cases, the (adaptive) beamformers lose their effectiveness in suppressing interference, since the noise channel (reference) cannot be built and updated accordingly. This difference is the main advantage of the proposed techniques in the dissertation over traditional adaptive beamformers. Furthermore, since the suggested algorithms are independent of noise estimation, they offer significant improvement in scenarios that the power level of interfering sources are much more than that of target speech. The dissertation also shows the premise behind the proposed algorithms can be extended and employed to binaural hearing aids. The main purpose of the investigated techniques is to enhance the intelligibility level of speech, measured through subjective listening tests with normal hearing and cochlear implant listeners. However, the improvement in quality of the output speech achieved by the

  13. Fast measurement of temporal noise of digital camera's photosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Rostislav S.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-10-01

    Currently photo- and videocameras are widespread parts of both scientific experimental setups and consumer applications. They are used in optics, radiophysics, astrophotography, chemistry, and other various fields of science and technology such as control systems and video-surveillance monitoring. One of the main information limitations of photoand videocameras are noises of photosensor pixels. Camera's photosensor noise can be divided into random and pattern components. Temporal noise includes random noise component while spatial noise includes pattern noise component. Spatial part usually several times lower in magnitude than temporal. At first approximation spatial noises might be neglected. Earlier we proposed modification of the automatic segmentation of non-uniform targets (ASNT) method for measurement of temporal noise of photo- and videocameras. Only two frames are sufficient for noise measurement with the modified method. In result, proposed ASNT modification should allow fast and accurate measurement of temporal noise. In this paper, we estimated light and dark temporal noises of four cameras of different types using the modified ASNT method with only several frames. These cameras are: consumer photocamera Canon EOS 400D (CMOS, 10.1 MP, 12 bit ADC), scientific camera MegaPlus II ES11000 (CCD, 10.7 MP, 12 bit ADC), industrial camera PixeLink PLB781F (CMOS, 6.6 MP, 10 bit ADC) and video-surveillance camera Watec LCL-902C (CCD, 0.47 MP, external 8 bit ADC). Experimental dependencies of temporal noise on signal value are in good agreement with fitted curves based on a Poisson distribution excluding areas near saturation. We measured elapsed time for processing of shots used for temporal noise estimation. The results demonstrate the possibility of fast obtaining of dependency of camera full temporal noise on signal value with the proposed ASNT modification.

  14. Fixed Pattern Noise Compensation Techniques For Staring Infrared Focal Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrison, C. L.; Foss, N. A.

    1980-10-01

    To utilize the full performance advantages of staring infrared imaging systems currently under development, it is necessary to compensate for the characteristic fixed pattern "noise" which is present at the output from these infrared focal planes. Since many of the applications for staring sensor systems require low power dissipation configurations, it is necessary to develop automatic nonuniformity compensation electronics which have much lower power dissipation requirements than conventional digital compensation techniques. This paper discusses the sources of the nonuniformities and describes the typical characteristics of elevated temperature staring arrays. An analysis is given which shows how detector/charge-coupled device electrical coupling techniques strongly influence the compensation implementation, and finally a review of circuit configurations for the compensation function will be given which shows that very low power dissipation circuitry can be developed which meets the performance power dissipation requirements.

  15. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investi...

  16. Experimental method for reactor-noise measurements of effective beta. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, E.F.

    1981-09-01

    A variance-to-mean noise technique, modified to eliminate systematic errors from drifting of reactor power, has been used to infer integral values of effective beta for uranium and plutonium fueled fast reactor modk-ups. The measurement technique, including corrections for a finite detector-electrometer time response, is described together with preliminary beta measurement results.

  17. Audio-band coating thermal noise measurement for Advanced LIGO with a multimode optical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, S.; Yu, H.; Yam, W.; Martynov, D.; Evans, M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes coresonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10-17 m /√{Hz } in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  18. INFORMATION FUSION STEADY-STATE WHITE NOISE DECONVOLUTION ESTIMATORS WITH TIME-DELAYED MEASUREMENTS AND COLORED MEASUREMENT NOISES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Xiaojun; Deng Zili

    2009-01-01

    White noise deconvolution or input white noise estimation problem has important application backgrounds in oil seismic exploration, communication and signal processing. By the modern time series analysis method, based on the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) innovation model, under the linear minimum variance optimal fusion rules, three optimal weighted fusion white noise deconvolution estimators are presented for the multisensor systems with time-delayed measurements and colored measurement noises. They can handle the input white noise fused filtering, prediction and smoothing problems. The accuracy of the fusers is higher than that of each local white noise estimator. In order to compute the optimal weights, the formula of computing the local estimation error cross-covariances is given. A Monte Carlo simulation example for the system with 3 sensors and the Bernoulli-Gaussian input white noise shows their effectiveness and performances.

  19. Study on low-phase-noise optoelectronic oscillator and high-sensitivity phase noise measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Liu, An-min; Guo, Jian

    2013-08-01

    An analytic model for an injection-locked dual-loop optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is proposed and verified by experiments in this paper. Based on this theoretical model, the effect of injection power on the single-sideband phase noise of the OEO is analyzed, and results suggest that moderate injection is one key factor for a balance between phase noise and spur for OEO. In order to measure superlow phase noise of OEOs, a cross-correlation measurement system based on the fiber delay line is built, in which high linear photodetector and low-phase-noise amplifier are used to improve systematic sensitivity. The cross-correlation measurement system is validated by experiments, and its noise floor for the X band is about -130 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -168 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz after a cross correlation of 200 times.

  20. Impact of measurement precision and noise on superresolution image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sally L; Lee, Shu-Ting; Yang, Gao; Christensen, Marc P; Rajan, Dinesh

    2008-04-01

    The performance of uniform and nonuniform detector arrays for application to the PANOPTES (processing arrays of Nyquist-limited observations to produce a thin electro-optic sensor) flat camera design is analyzed for measurement noise environments including quantization noise and Gaussian and Poisson processes. Image data acquired from a commercial camera with 8 bit and 14 bit output options are analyzed, and estimated noise levels are computed. Noise variances estimated from the measurement values are used in the optimal linear estimators for superresolution image reconstruction.

  1. Filtering with perfectly correlated measurement noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasenberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of (radar) Doppler data which are formed by mi1ing the returning microwave signal with a replica of the transmitted signal, counting the cycles of the beat, and sampling the counter at evenly spaced intervals t sub i. It is shown that the amount of information which can be extracted from a set of data may be larger if the associated noise is perfectly correlated than if it is white, and that the use of the white noise assumption in the filter may result in the loss of some of this information.

  2. Noise exposure assessment with task-based measurement in complex noise environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; YANG Qiu-ling; ZENG Lin; ZHU Liang-liang; TAO Li-yuan; ZHANG Hua; ZHAO Yi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Task-based measurement (TBM) is a method to assess the eight-hour A-weighted equivalent noise exposure level (LAeq. 8h) besides dosimeter. TBM can be better used in factories by non-professional workers and staffs.However, it is still not clear if TBM is equal or similar with dosimeter for LAeq.8h measurement in general. This study considered the measurement with dosimeter as real personal noise exposure level (PNEL) and assessed the accuracy of TBM by comparing the consistencies of TBM and dosimeter in LAeq.8h measurement.Methods The study was conducted in one automobile firm among 387 workers who are exposed to unstable noise.Dosimeters and TBM were used to compare the two strategies and assess the degree of agreement and causes of disagreement. Worker's PNEL was measured via TBM for noise; the real PNEL was also recorded. The TBM for noise was computed with task/position noise levels measured via sound level meter and workers' exposure information collected via working diary forms (WDF) filled by participants themselves. Full-shift noise exposure measurement via personal noise dosimeters were taken as the real PNEL. General linear model (GLM) was built to analyze the accuracy of TBM for noise and the source of difference between TBM for noise and real PNEL.Results The LAeq.8h with TBM were slightly higher than the real PNELs, except the electricians. Differences of the two values had statistical significance in stamping workers (P <0.001), assembly workers (P=0.015) and welding workers (P=0.001). The correlation coefficient of LAeq.8h with TBM and real PNELs was 0.841. Differences of the two results were mainly affected by real PNEL (F=11.27, P=0.001); and work groups (F=3.11, P <0.001) divided by jobs and workshops were also independent factors. PNEL of workers with fixed task/position ((86.53±8.82) dB(A)) was higher than those without ((75.76±9.92) dB(A)) (t=8.84, P <0.01). Whether workers had fixed task/position was another factor on the

  3. Sound quality measures for speech in noise through a commercial hearing aid implementing digital noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y

    2005-05-01

    This brief report discusses the affect of digital noise reduction (DNR) processing on aided speech recognition and sound quality measures in 14 adults fitted with a commercial hearing aid. Measures of speech recognition and sound quality were obtained in two different speech-in-noise conditions (71 dBA speech, +6 dB SNR and 75 dBA speech, +1 dB SNR). The results revealed that the presence or absence of DNR processing did not impact speech recognition in noise (either positively or negatively). Paired comparisons of sound quality for the same speech in noise signals, however, revealed a strong preference for DNR processing. These data suggest that at least one implementation of DNR processing is capable of providing improved sound quality, for speech in noise, in the absence of improved speech recognition.

  4. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity. Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF. We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  5. NORMATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF NOISE AT CNC MACHINES WORK STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Mika

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimisation of noise at a workstation is among fundamental tasks for maintaining safety at work, both in terms of health (the auditory system in particular as well as work comfort. Thus, it is very important to systematically monitor noise levels by carrying out reliable measurements at a workstation. The method of performing noise measurements at workstations of specific machines is normalised so the results of such measurements for different machines is comparable. This paper presents noise measurements for DMC 635 numerically controlled milling machine, performed in accordance with PN ISO 230-5:2002 norm. The results showed that the level of noise at the operator’s workstation significantly exceeds the norm at certain machining parameters. The results of tests are concluded as detailed recommendation for the CNC machine tool operator to use hearing protection when at work.

  6. Neurally based measurement and evaluation of environmental noise

    CERN Document Server

    Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with methods of measurement and evaluation of environmental noise based on an auditory neural and brain-oriented model. The model consists of the autocorrelation function (ACF) and the interaural cross-correlation function (IACF) mechanisms for signals arriving at the two ear entrances. Even when the sound pressure level of a noise is only about 35 dBA, people may feel annoyed due to the aspects of sound quality. These aspects can be formulated by the factors extracted from the ACF and IACF. Several examples of measuring environmental noise—from outdoor noise such as that of aircraft, traffic, and trains, and indoor noise such as caused by floor impact, toilets, and air-conditioning—are demonstrated. According to the noise measurement and evaluation, applications for sound design are discussed. This book provides an excellent resource for students, researchers, and practitioners in a wide range of fields, such as the automotive, railway, and electronics industries, and soundscape, architec...

  7. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  8. Measurement of Noise Level in Enumeration Station in Rubber Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkya, I.; Syahputri, K.; Sari, R. M.; Siregar, I.

    2017-03-01

    This research was conducted in companies engaged in the production of crumb rubber. In the rubber industry, the potential noise occurs in the enumeration station. Stations enumeration use machine and equipment that potentially generated noise. Noise can be defined as an unwanted sound because it does not fit the context of space and time so that may interfere with the comfort and human health. The noise level measured at random during the initial observation station enumeration is 101.8 dB. This value has exceeded the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) Kep-51 / MEN / 1999 and SNI No. 16-7063-2004 so research must be done to measure the level of noise in the enumeration station. Quantitative methods used in the study. Observations made with the calculation method of equivalent noise level. Observations were made on six measurement points for one shift for three days. The results showed the noise level over the Threshold Limit Value is equal to 85 dBA/8 hours. Based on the measurement results, the whole point of observation was far above the threshold Limit Value (TLV). The highest noise level equivalent is in the observation point 6 with a value of 102, 21 dB.

  9. Measurement-based auralization methodology for the assessment of noise mitigation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pieter; Wei, Weigang; Van Renterghem, Timothy; Botteldooren, Dick

    2016-09-01

    The effect of noise mitigation measures is generally expressed by noise levels only, neglecting the listener's perception. In this study, an auralization methodology is proposed that enables an auditive preview of noise abatement measures for road traffic noise, based on the direction dependent attenuation of a priori recordings made with a dedicated 32-channel spherical microphone array. This measurement-based auralization has the advantage that all non-road traffic sounds that create the listening context are present. The potential of this auralization methodology is evaluated through the assessment of the effect of an L-shaped mound. The angular insertion loss of the mound is estimated by using the ISO 9613-2 propagation model, the Pierce barrier diffraction model and the Harmonoise point-to-point model. The realism of the auralization technique is evaluated by listening tests, indicating that listeners had great difficulty in differentiating between a posteriori recordings and auralized samples, which shows the validity of the followed approaches.

  10. FLOW NOISE MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE SHIP WITH TOWED MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a new acoustic test technique using towed model was introduced to study flow noise caused by a surface ship. The project of model test was be properly designed for acoustic signal collecting and with the help of appropriate data processing method different kinds of acoustic sources could be successfully identified. A lot of work about fuid noise could be carried on with the towed model, and the noise corresponding to low frequency which is especially interested for its long distance radiating with small attenuation could also be studied in this way.

  11. In situ noise measurements on ion bombarded thin films: 1/f-noise as a fingerprint for amorphization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noske, Matthias; Trautvetter, Moritz; Ziemann, Paul [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Ulm (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    As has been experimentally demonstrated, the crystalline binary alloy In{sub 2}Au can be transformed into an amorphous state by low temperature ion irradiation. This transformation can be followed by measuring the ion induced increase of the electrical resistance as a function of the ion fluence. While this increase can be attributed to the built-up of static disorder, fluctuating atomic configurations may be present as well leading to resistance fluctuation and, as a consequence, to 1/f noise. To test such a possibility, patterned AuIn{sub 2} films were irradiated with 350 keV Ar{sup +} ions of various fluences up to 10{sup 15}ions/cm{sup 2} at 85 K. During the stepwise amorphization noise density SR spectra of the 1/f noise were taken by applying a correlation measurement technique{sup 2} allowing detection of signals below the thermal noise. It could be shown that the spectral noise density is maximal at the percolation limit whereas the resistance approaches its final value.

  12. Improving the accuracy of smart devices to measure noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Kardous, Chucri; Neitzel, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Occupational noise exposure is one of the most frequent hazards present in the workplace; up to 22 million workers have potentially hazardous noise exposures in the U.S. As a result, noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common occupational injuries in the U.S. Workers in manufacturing, construction, and the military are at the highest risk for hearing loss. Despite the large number of people exposed to high levels of noise at work, many occupations have not been adequately evaluated for noise exposure. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether or not iOS smartphones and other smart devices (Apple iPhones and iPods) could be used as reliable instruments to measure noise exposures. For this experiment three different types of microphones were tested with a single model of iPod and three generations of iPhones: the internal microphones on the device, a low-end lapel microphone, and a high-end lapel microphone marketed as being compliant with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard for a Class 2-microphone. All possible combinations of microphones and noise measurement applications were tested in a controlled environment using several different levels of pink noise ranging from 60-100 dBA. Results were compared to simultaneous measurements made using a Type 1 sound level measurement system. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test were used to determine if the results differed by microphone or noise measurement application. Levels measured with external microphones combined with certain noise measurement applications did not differ significantly from levels measured with the Type 1 sound measurement system. Results showed that it may be possible to use iOS smartphones and smart devices, with specific combinations of measurement applications and calibrated external microphones, to collect reliable, occupational noise exposure data under certain conditions and within the limitations of the

  13. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different......Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...

  14. Characterisation of orientation noise for EBSP technique%EBSP技术取向误差的表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴桂林; 刘庆

    2002-01-01

    @@ Introduction Electron back-scattered pattern (EBSP) analysis in the scanning electron microscope as a tool for investigating microstructure has been well established. This technique has many advantages over transmission electron microscopy. A drawback of this technique is the angular resolution limit associated with noise in the orientation measurements.

  15. 1/f noise and effort on implicit measures of bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Phenomena that vary over time can often be represented as a complex waveform. Fourier analysis decomposes this complex wave into a set of sinusoidal component waves. In some phenomena, the amplitude of these waves varies in inverse relation to frequency. This pattern has been called 1/f noise and, unlike white noise, it reflects nonrandom variation. Latencies in simple computer tasks typically reveal 1/f noise, but the magnitude of the noise decreases as tasks become more challenging. The current work hypothesizes a correspondence between 1/f noise and effort, leading to the prediction that increasing effort will reduce 1/f noise. In 2 studies, the author examined the relationship between an individual's attempts to avoid bias (measured in Study 1, manipulated in Study 2) and 1/f noise in implicit measures of stereotyping and prejudice. In each study, participants who made an effort to modulate the use of racial information showed less 1/f noise than did participants who made less effort. The potential value of this analytic approach to social psychology is discussed.

  16. TEM Cell Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques From 2 MHz to 200 MHz - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Evans, William C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Shimp, Samuel K.; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated in a TEM cell operating with radiated fields from 2 - 200 MHz. It is the first part of a two-paper series. This first paper discusses cable types and shield connections. In the second paper, the effects of load and source resistances and chassis connections are examined. For each topic, well established theories are compared to data from a real-world physical system. Finally, recommendations for minimizing cable susceptibility (and thus cable emissions) are presented. There are numerous papers and textbooks that present theoretical analyses of cable noise reduction techniques. However, empirical data is often targeted to low frequencies (e.g. 100 MHz). Additionally, a comprehensive study showing the relative effects of various noise reduction techniques is needed. These include the use of dedicated return wires, twisted wiring, cable shielding, shield connections, changing load or source impedances, and implementing load- or source-to-chassis isolation. We have created an experimental setup that emulates a real-world electrical system, while still allowing us to independently vary a host of parameters. The goal of the experiment was to determine the relative effectiveness of various noise reduction techniques when the cable is in the presence of radiated emissions from 2 MHz to 200 MHz. The electronic system (Fig. 1) consisted of two Hammond shielded electrical enclosures, one containing the source resistance, and the other containing the load resistance. The boxes were mounted on a large aluminium plate acting as the chassis. Cables connecting the two boxes measured 81 cm in length and were attached to the boxes using standard D38999 military-style connectors. The test setup is shown in Fig. 2. Electromagnetic fields were created using an HP8657B signal generator, MiniCircuits ZHL-42W-SMA amplifier, and an EMCO 5103 TEM cell. Measurements were taken using an Agilent E4401B

  17. Noise measurements in Omerler underground colliery and suggestions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensogut, C.; Eralp, H. [Selcuk Universitesi, Kampus-Konya (Turkey)

    1998-12-31

    People who have been exposed to an excessive noise level over a long period may have a permanent hearing loss. Additionally, due to the noise in workings, the warnings from the alarm devices may be hindered resulting in the prevention of an effective competence for communication. Therefore, it also causes a series of problems in terms of labour, health and safety. Sources of noise encountered in underground collieries were researched in a lignite mine for a period of two months together with the noise intensity both for health and safety aspects. Noise measurements taken between April and June 1997 from Omerler Underground Colliery, Western Lignite Corporation, Turkish Coal Enterprises are given in detail together with the suggestions made to the mine management. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Aeroacoustic Calculations of Wind Turbine Noise with the Actuator Line/ Navier-Stokes Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debertshäuser, Harald; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2016-01-01

    Noise regulations in many countries are becoming extremely strict and wind turbine noise is thus becoming a barrier for further development of onshore wind turbines. Low noise wind turbine airfoil and blade design is an important technique for noise reduction. However, the ow situation of a wind...... turbine in wind farms is very complicated. In order to accurately model the noise generation and propagation from wind turbines in wind farms,it is urgent to develop a high-fidelity noise model to predict the noise features in complex situations. In the present study, we develop a flow-acoustic splitting...... technique where the wind turbine flow is calculated by using the in-house actuator line/LES/Navier-Stokes technique and the acoustics is obtained by solving the acoustic perturbation equations. In the flow solver, the wind turbine blades are modelled by rotating lines with body forces determined according...

  19. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration with Two Antenna Noise Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Meyer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique to calibrate a microwave radiometer and phased array antenna system. This calibration technique uses a radiated noise source in addition to an injected noise sources for calibration. The plane of reference for this calibration technique is the face of the antenna and therefore can effectively calibration the gain fluctuations in the active phased array antennas. This paper gives the mathematical formulation for the technique and discusses the improvements brought by the method over the existing calibration techniques.

  20. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  1. Noise Estimation and Noise Removal Techniques for Speech Recognition in Adverse Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Shrawankar, Urmila; Thakare, Vilas

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Noise is ubiquitous in almost all acoustic environments. The speech signal, that is recorded by a microphone is generally infected by noise originating from various sources. Such contamination can change the characteristics of the speech signals and degrade the speech quality and intelligibility, thereby causing significant harm to human-to-machine communication systems. Noise detection and reduction for speech applications is often formulated as a digital filtering pr...

  2. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui

    2014-01-01

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 μW laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 μW and 1.52 mW.

  3. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui, E-mail: yhzheng@sxu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2014-01-15

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 μW laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 μW and 1.52 mW.

  4. Minimization of errors in narrowband laser phase noise measurements based on reference measurement channels

    CERN Document Server

    Pnev, A B; Dvoretskiy, D A; Zhirnov, A A; Nesterov, E T; Sazonkin, S G; Chernutsky, A O; Shelestov, D A; Fedorov, A K; Svelto, C; Karasik, V E

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for laser phase noise measurements with minimized sensitivity to external fluctuations including interferometer vibration, temperature instability, other low-frequency noise, and relative intensity noise. In order to minimize the effect of these external fluctuations, we employ simultaneous measurement of two spectrally separated channels in the scheme. We present an algorithm for selection of the desired signal to extract the phase noise. Experimental results demonstrate potential of the suggested scheme for a wide range of technological applications.

  5. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW, (United Kingdom); Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul [Metrosol Limited, Plum Park Estate, Watling Street, Paulerspury, Northamptonshire, NN12 6LQ, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  6. Passive coherent discriminator using phase diversity for the simultaneous measurement of frequency noise and intensity noise of a continuous-wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Belleau, V.; Bergeron, H.; Light, P. S.; Hébert, N. B.; Deschênes, J. D.; Luiten, A. N.; Genest, J.

    2016-10-01

    The frequency noise and intensity noise of a laser set the performance limits in many modern photonics applications and, consequently, must often be characterized. As lasers continue to improve, the measurement of these noises however becomes increasingly challenging. Current approaches for the characterization of very high-performance lasers often call for a second laser with equal or higher performance to the one that is to be measured, an incoherent interferometer having an extremely long delay-arm, or an interferometer that relies on an active device. These instrumental features can be impractical or problematic under certain experimental conditions. As an alternative, this paper presents an entirely passive coherent interferometer that employs an optical 90° hybrid coupler to perform in-phase and quadrature detection. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the frequency noise power spectral density of a highly-stable 192 THz (1560 nm) fiber laser over five frequency decades. Simultaneously, we are able to measure its relative intensity noise power spectral density and characterize the correlation between its amplitude noise and phase noise. We correct some common misconceptions through a detailed theoretical analysis and demonstrate the necessity to account for normal imperfections of the optical 90° hybrid coupler. We finally conclude that this passive coherent discriminator is suitable for reliable and simple noise characterization of highly-stable lasers, with bandwidth and dynamic range benefits but susceptibility to additive noise contamination.

  7. Noise characteristics of thermistors: Measurement methods and results of selected devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryger, Ivan; Harber, Dave; Stephens, Michelle; White, Malcolm; Tomlin, Nathan; Spidell, Matthew; Lehman, John

    2017-02-01

    As part of the development of a spectrally uniform room-temperature absolute radiometer, we have studied the electrical noise of several bulk chip thermistors in order to estimate the noise floor and optical dynamic range. Understanding the fundamental limits of the temperature sensitivity leads inevitably to studying the noise background of the complex electro-thermal system. To this end, we employ a measurement technique based on alternating current synchronous demodulation. Results of our analysis show that the combination of a low-current noise Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) preamplifier together with chip thermistors is optimal for our purpose, yielding a root mean square noise temperature of 2.8 μK in the frequency range of 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz.

  8. Noise in two-color electronic distance meter measurements revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.

    2004-01-01

    Frequent, high-precision geodetic data have temporally correlated errors. Temporal correlations directly affect both the estimate of rate and its standard error; the rate of deformation is a key product from geodetic measurements made in tectonically active areas. Various models of temporally correlated errors are developed and these provide relations between the power spectral density and the data covariance matrix. These relations are applied to two-color electronic distance meter (EDM) measurements made frequently in California over the past 15-20 years. Previous analysis indicated that these data have significant random walk error. Analysis using the noise models developed here indicates that the random walk model is valid for about 30% of the data. A second 30% of the data can be better modeled with power law noise with a spectral index between 1 and 2, while another 30% of the data can be modeled with a combination of band-pass-filtered plus random walk noise. The remaining 10% of the data can be best modeled as a combination of band-pass-filtered plus power law noise. This band-pass-filtered noise is a product of an annual cycle that leaks into adjacent frequency bands. For time spans of more than 1 year these more complex noise models indicate that the precision in rate estimates is better than that inferred by just the simpler, random walk model of noise.

  9. Atmospheric Ice Accretion Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Virk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric icing on structures has proven to be an area of concern in many cold climate geographical regions like arctic and alpine. Difficulties encountered by the communication, construction and power industries in these areas are the subject of intense investigations for researchers from decades. Three main methods of investigation are generally employed by researchers to study atmospheric ice accretion on structures: a continuous field measurements, b lab based simulations using icing wind tunnel & c numerical modelling. This paper presents a brief review study of various techniques to understand and measure the atmospheric ice accretion on structures, anti/de icing techniques and important parameters for numerical modelling of atmospheric ice accretion.

  10. Distance Measurement Error in Time-of-Flight Sensors Due to Shot Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illade-Quinteiro, Julio; Brea, Víctor M.; López, Paula; Cabello, Diego; Doménech-Asensi, Gines

    2015-01-01

    Unlike other noise sources, which can be reduced or eliminated by different signal processing techniques, shot noise is an ever-present noise component in any imaging system. In this paper, we present an in-depth study of the impact of shot noise on time-of-flight sensors in terms of the error introduced in the distance estimation. The paper addresses the effect of parameters, such as the size of the photosensor, the background and signal power or the integration time, and the resulting design trade-offs. The study is demonstrated with different numerical examples, which show that, in general, the phase shift determination technique with two background measurements approach is the most suitable for pixel arrays of large resolution. PMID:25723141

  11. Distance Measurement Error in Time-of-Flight Sensors Due to Shot Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Illade-Quinteiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other noise sources, which can be reduced or eliminated by different signal processing techniques, shot noise is an ever-present noise component in any imaging system. In this paper, we present an in-depth study of the impact of shot noise on time-of-flight sensors in terms of the error introduced in the distance estimation. The paper addresses the effect of parameters, such as the size of the photosensor, the background and signal power or the integration time, and the resulting design trade-offs. The study is demonstrated with different numerical examples, which show that, in general, the phase shift determination technique with two background measurements approach is the most suitable for pixel arrays of large resolution.

  12. Novel Engineering and Fabrication Techniques Tested in Low-Noise- Research Fan Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cameron C.

    2003-01-01

    failure), shake tests, rap tests, and nondestructive inspection. Acoustic testing of the ANCF fan using TEB has been ongoing since January of 2001. The fan has completed about 100 hr of testing with no structural, vibrational, or fatigue problems. Far-field acoustic measurements, in-duct mode measurements, precise hot wire surveys, and detailed performance measurements are providing data for evaluating the concept. The far-field noise data show that tone noise was reduced significantly with the initial ANCF TEB fan design. In addition, a significant reduction in unsteady stator loading has been measured, indicating the potential for stator broadband noise reduction. The acoustic benefits will be assessed and important design parameters identified to improve the ability to fully exploit any benefit provided by this technique. On the basis of the success of trailing edge blowing, Glenn plans to continue this research with a higher speed, higher pressure ratio fan operating in an acoustic wind tunnel to simulate flight conditions.

  13. Improving Software Quality Prediction by Noise Filtering Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taghi M. Khoshgoftaar; Pierre Rebours

    2007-01-01

    Accuracy of machine learners is affected by quality of the data the learners are induced on. In this paper,quality of the training dataset is improved by removing instances detected as noisy by the Partitioning Filter. The fit datasetis first split into subsets, and different base learners are induced on each of these splits. The predictions are combined insuch a way that an instance is identified as noisy if it is misclassified by a certain number of base learners. Two versionsof the Partitioning Filter are used: Multiple-Partitioning Filter and Iterative-Partitioning Filter. The number of instancesremoved by the filters is tuned by the voting scheme of the filter and the number of iterations. The primary aim of thisstudy is to compare the predictive performances of the final models built on the filtered and the un-filtered training datasets.A case study of software measurement data of a high assurance software project is performed. It is shown that predictiveperformances of models built on the filtered fit datasets and evaluated on a noisy test dataset are generally better than thosebuilt on the noisy (un-filtered) fit dataset. However, predictive performance based on certain aggressive filters is affected bypresence of noise in the evaluation dataset.

  14. Measurement of noise associated with model transformer cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David [Cogent Power Ltd., Development and Market Research, Orb Electrical Steels, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Dave.snell@cogent-power.com

    2008-10-15

    The performance of a transformer core may be considered in terms of power loss and by the noise generated by the core, both of which should be minimised. This paper discusses the setting up of a suitable system for evaluation of noise in a large model transformer core (500 kV A) and issues associated with noise measurement. The equivalent continuous sound pressure level (LAeq) was used as a measure of the A-weighted sound level and measurements were made in the range 16 Hz-25 kHz for various step lap core configurations. The selection of optimum sound insulation materials between core and ground support and for enclosing the transformer is essential for minimisation of background noise. Core clamping pressure must be optimised in order to minimise noise. The use of two laminations per layer instead of one leads to an increase in noise arising from the core. Provided care is taken in building the core, good reproducibility of results can be obtained for analysis.

  15. Application of signal processing techniques to the detection of tip vortex cavitation noise in marine propeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Jeung-Hoon; HAN Jae-Moon; PARK Hyung-Gil; SEO Jong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The tip vortex cavitation and its relevant noise has been the subject of extensive researches up to now.In most cases of experimental approaches,the accurate and objective decision of cavitation inception is primary,which is the main topic of this paper.Although the conventional power spectrum is normally adopted as a signal processing tool for the analysis of cavitation noise,a faithful exploration cannot be made especially for the cavitation inception.Alternatively,the periodic occurrence of bursting noise induced from tip vortex cavitation gives a diagnostic proof that the repeating frequency of the bursting contents can be exploited as an indication of the inception.This study,hence,employed the Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) analysis and the Detection of Envelope Modulation On Noise (DEMON) spectrum analysis,both which are appropriate for finding such a repeating frequency.Through the acoustical measurement in a water tunnel,the two signal processing techniques show a satisfactory result in detecting the inception of tip vortex cavitation.

  16. Noise power spectrum measurements under nonuniform gains and their compensations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Eun; Shin, Choul Woo

    2016-03-01

    The fixed pattern noise, which is due to the nonuniform amplifier gains and scintillator sensitivities, should be alleviated in radiography imaging and should have less influence on measuring the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the radiography detector. In order to reduce the influence, background trend removing methods, which are based on low-pass filtering, polynomial fitting, and subtracting the average image of the uniform exposure images, are traditionally employed in the literature. In terms of removing the fixed pattern noise, the subtraction method shows a good performance. However, the number of images to be averaged is practically finite and thus the noise contained in the average image contaminates the image difference and inflates the NPS curve. In this paper, an image formation model considering the nonuniform gain is constructed and two measuring methods, which are based on the subtraction and gain correction, respectively, are considered. In order to accurately measure a normalized NPS (NNPS) in the measuring methods, the number of images to be averaged is considered for NNPS compensations. For several flat-panel radiography detectors, the NNPS measurements are conducted and compared with conventional approaches, which have no compensation stages. Through experiments it is shown that the compensation can provide accurate NNPS measurements less influenced by the fixed pattern noise.

  17. A measurement technique for hydroxyacetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C{double{underscore}bond}CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NOx. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water, the authors developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one they reported earlier, namely, derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, they adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island, New York. The authors report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  18. Laser phase and frequency noise measurement by Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Yang, Fei; Chen, Dijun; Wei, Fang; Cai, Haiwen; Fang, Zujie; Qu, Ronghui

    2015-08-24

    A laser phase and frequency noise measurement method by an unbalanced Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler is proposed. The relations and differences of the power spectral density (PSD) of differential phase and frequency fluctuation, PSD of instantaneous phase and frequency fluctuation, phase noise and linewidth are derived strictly and discussed carefully. The method obtains the noise features of a narrow linewidth laser conveniently without any specific assumptions or noise models. The technique is also used to characterize the noise features of a narrow linewidth external-cavity semiconductor laser, which confirms the correction and robustness of the method.

  19. Feasibility of Johnson Noise Thermometry based on Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Koo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang Mo [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This paper presents an implementation strategy of noise thermometry based on a digital signal processing technique and demonstrates its feasibilities. A key factor in its development is how to extract the small thermal noise signal from other noises, for example, random noise from amplifiers and continuous electromagnetic interference from the environment. The proposed system consists of two identical amplifiers and uses a cross correlation function to cancel the random noise of the amplifiers. Then, the external interference noises are eliminated by discriminating the difference in the peaks between the thermal signal and external noise. The gain of the amplifiers is estimated by injecting an already known pilot signal. The experimental simulation results of signal processing methods have demonstrated that the proposed approach is an effective method in eliminating an external noise signal and performing gain correction for development of the thermometry.

  20. Developments in luminescence measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Denby, Phil M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our continuing investigation and development of new measurement facilities for use in irradiation, optical stimulation and luminescence signal detection; these facilities have potential application to all forms of luminescence-based retrospective dosimetry, and are particularly...... intended for use with the Riso TL/OSL reader. We have investigated the potential of new more powerful blue (455 nm) and green (530nm) LEDs, and of gated counting combined with pulsed stimulation light techniques using conventional LEDs. Measurement of time-resolved OSL has resulted in a method of real......; both types are very stable and reproducible. Other recent developments include the modification of a Riso reader to measure both thermally and optically stimulated electrons (TSE and OSE) from granular or chip phosphors. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Using technical noise to increase the signal to noise ratio in weak measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kedem, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    The advantages of weak measurements, and especially measurements of imaginary weak values, for precision enhancement, are discussed. A situation is considered in which the initial state of the measurement device varies randomly on each run, and is shown to be in fact beneficial when imaginary weak values are used. The result is supported by numerical calculation and also provides an explanation for the reduction of technical noise in some recent experimental results. A connection to quantum metrology formalism is made.

  2. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  3. Techniques for noise removal from EEG, EOG and air flow signals in sleep patients

    CERN Document Server

    Berryman, M J; Allison, A; Abbott, D; Berryman, Matthew J.; Messer, Sheila; Allison, Andrew; Abbott, Derek

    2004-01-01

    Noise is present in the wide variety of signals obtained from sleep patients. This noise comes from a number of sources, from presence of extraneous signals to adjustments in signal amplification and shot noise in the circuits used for data collection. The noise needs to be removed in order to maximize the information gained about the patient using both manual and automatic analysis of the signals. Here we evaluate a number of new techniques for removal of that noise, and the associated problem of separating the original signal sources.

  4. Indoor measurements of low-frequency noise for annoyance assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    was found to have a high risk of significantly underestimating the noise present in a room, unless complainants can precisely appoint the measurement positions. It was found that a very good estimate of the L10 target level can be obtained by measuring only in four three-dimensional corners....

  5. A hybrid fringe analysis technique for the elimination of random noise in interferometric wrapped phase maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Gopalakrishna K.

    1994-10-01

    A fringe analysis technique, which makes use of the spatial filtering property of the Fourier transform method, for the elimination of random impulsive noise in the wrapped phase maps obtained using the phase stepping technique, is presented. Phase noise is converted into intensity noise by transforming the wrapped phase map into a continuous fringe pattern inside the digital image processor. Fourier transform method is employed to filter out the intensity noise and recover the clean wrapped phase map. Computer generated carrier fringes are used to preserve the sign information. This technique makes the two dimensional phase unwrapping process less involved, because it eliminates the local phase fluctuations, which act as pseudo 2π discontinuities. The technique is applied for the elimination of noise in a phase map obtained using electro-optic holography.

  6. A MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR HYDROXYACETONE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KLOTZ,P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C=CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NO{sub x}. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water (it's Henry's law constant being {approx}2 x 10{sup 4} M atm{sup -1} at 20 C, Zhou and Lee, unpublished data), we developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one we reported earlier (Lee and Zhou, 1993), namely, based on derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, we adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island (LI), New York. We report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  7. Investigations of the Measurement of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-10-31

    roquiro n manual adjustment for oach rooding. 3. For ooso of measurement, a diodo circuit is probably tho bost, but tho roadings aro affoctod by both...Random Noiso ?e \\avo not investigated tho rosponso of tho diodo to random noiso. .’■nvov, oxoollent artiolos on this subject cro availablo v9|10,U...Tho output is usable up to 300 no. Tho froquoncy range is limitod by transit tino and tho internal L and C of tho diodo . It is not noeosoary to

  8. Low Frequency Noise Measurement and Analysis of Capacitive Micro-Accelerometers: Temperature Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Nagel, David J.; Ong, D. S.; Korman, Can E.; Chuah, H. T.

    2008-06-01

    A noise measurements of micro-accelerometers were performed using a special measurement system. A common spectral behavior of noise is found, with 1/ f noise dominating at low frequencies and white thermal noise being the limiting factor at higher frequencies. A temperature dependent and an acceleration dependant of the noise are found in the accelerometers, in agreement and contract of the theories, respectively.

  9. Low-noise moisture meter with high-speed LED techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikio, Rami; Lindström, Hannu; Suopajärvi, Pekka; Malinen, Jouko; Mäntylä, Markku

    2010-04-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy can provide inexpensive, rapid and contact-free chemical content measurements for on-line, hand-held and laboratory applications. Traditionally multiwavelength NIR analyzers are based on incandescent lamp light sources with rotating filter wheels, even though designs relying on lamp technology and moving parts mean larger size, require frequent maintenance and eventually limit measurement speed of the system. Today, optical power and available wavelength range of LEDs enable their use in chemical content analyzers. In this publication, a paper moisture meter with high speed LED techniques is presented. A prototype developed at VTT utilizes an extended InGaAs detector to measure diffuse reflection at four NIR wavelengths ranging from 1.2 to 2.1 μm. Source LED currents are amplitude modulated with fixed sinusoidal frequencies. Optical signals at each wavelength are demodulated from the detector signal using real-time digital lock-in detection method on an FPGA. Moisture content is calculated and displayed on the embedded platform. The design allows very high speed operation, where the result is updated every 1 ms. Performance of the prototype system was studied by measuring a set of known sealed paper samples. Paper moisture measurement accuracy was 0.14, repeatability 0.01 and 2σ noise 0.04 moisture percent. Laboratory tests showed that channel crosstalk after detection is below background noise level. The measured signal-to-noise ratios per channel were 70 - 85 dB when all LEDs were on. The overall performance equals the level of incandescent lamp based on-line moisture meters currently in use in paper mill and process automation. The developed system forms a good basis also for other content measurements.

  10. POSIVA groundwater flow measuring techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehberg, A. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Rouhiainen, P. [PRG-Tec Oy (Finland)

    2000-08-01

    Posiva Oy has carried out site characterisation for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland since 1987. To meet the demanding needs to measure the hydraulic parameters in bedrock Posiva launched development of new flowmeter techniques including measuring methods and equipment in co-operation with PRG-Tec Oy. The techniques have been tested and used in the ongoing site investigations in Finland, in the underground Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) at Aespoe in Sweden and in URL in Canada. The new methods are called difference flow and transverse flow methods. The difference flow method includes two modes, normal and detailed flow logging methods. In the normal mode the flow rate measurement is based on thermal pulse and thermal dilution methods, in the detailed logging mode only on thermal dilution method. The measuring ranges for flow rate with thermal pulse and dilution methods are 0.1-10 ml/min and 2-5000 ml/min, respectively. The difference flow method(normal mode) for small flows (0.1-10 ml/min) is based on measuring the pulse transit time and direction of a thermal pulse in the sensor. For high flows (2-5000 ml/min) the method is based on thermal dilution rate of a sensor. Direction is measured with monitoring thermistors. Inflow or outflow in the test interval is created due to natural or by pumping induced differences between heads in the borehole water and groundwater around the borehole. The single point resistance (and the temperature of borehole water) measurement is carried out simultaneously with the difference flow measurements, both in normal and detailed flow logging modes, while the tool is moving. The result is utilised for checking the exact depth of the tool. As the result a continuous log is obtained from which single fractures can be detected. The transverse flowmeter is able to measure the groundwater flow across a borehole. A special packer system guides the flow through the flow sensors. Four inflatable seals between conventional

  11. Mitigating the effects of measurement noise on Granger causality

    CERN Document Server

    Nalatore, Hariharan; Ding, Mingzhou

    2007-01-01

    Computing Granger causal relations among bivariate experimentally observed time series has received increasing attention over the past few years. Such causal relations, if correctly estimated, can yield significant insights into the dynamical organization of the system being investigated. Since experimental measurements are inevitably contaminated by noise, it is thus important to understand the effects of such noise on Granger causality estimation. The first goal of this paper is to provide an analytical and numerical analysis of this problem. Specifically, we show that, due to noise contamination, (1) spurious causality between two measured variables can arise and (2) true causality can be suppressed. The second goal of the paper is to provide a denoising strategy to mitigate this problem. Specifically, we propose a denoising algorithm based on the combined use of the Kalman filter theory and the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the den...

  12. An open-loop RFOG based on harmonic division technique to suppress LD's intensity modulation noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Diqing; Wang, Zeyu; Mao, Jianmin; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-11-01

    A harmonic division technique is proposed for an open-loop resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) to suppress semiconductor laser diode's (LD's) intensity modulation noise. The theoretical study indicates the RFOG with this technique is immune to the intensity noise. The simulation and experimental results show this technique would lead to a diminished linear region, which still could be acceptable for an RFOG applied to low rotation rate detection. The tests for the gyro output signal are carried out with/without noise suppressing methods, including the harmonic division technique and previously proposed signal compensation technique. With the harmonic division technique at the rotation rate of 10 deg/s, the stability of gyro output signal is improved from 1.07 deg/s to 0.0361 deg/s, whose noise suppressing ratio is more than 3 times as that of the signal compensation technique. And especially, a 3.12 deg/s signal jump is significantly removed with the harmonic division technique; in contrast, a residual 0.36 deg/s signal jump still exists with the signal compensation technique. It is concluded the harmonic division technique does work in intensity noise suppressing under dynamic condition, and it is superior to the signal compensation technique.

  13. Comparison of direct measurement methods for headset noise exposure in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora G Nassrallah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of noise exposure from communication headsets poses a methodological challenge. Although several standards describe methods for general noise measurements in occupational settings, these are not directly applicable to noise assessments under communication headsets. For measurements under occluded ears, specialized methods have been specified by the International Standards Organization (ISO 11904 such as the microphone in a real ear and manikin techniques. Simpler methods have also been proposed in some national standards such as the use of general purpose artificial ears and simulators in conjunction with single number corrections to convert measurements to the equivalent diffuse field. However, little is known about the measurement agreement between these various methods and the acoustic manikin technique. Twelve experts positioned circum-aural, supra-aural and insert communication headsets on four different measurement setups (Type 1, Type 2, Type 3.3 artificial ears, and acoustic manikin. Fit-refit measurements of four audio communication signals were taken under quiet laboratory conditions. Data were transformed into equivalent diffuse-field sound levels using third-octave procedures. Results indicate that the Type 1 artificial ear is not suited for the measurement of sound exposure under communication headsets, while Type 2 and Type 3.3 artificial ears are in good agreement with the acoustic manikin technique. Single number corrections were found to introduce a large measurement uncertainty, making the use of the third-octave transformation preferable.

  14. A study of poultry processing plant noise characteristics and potential noise control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvill, J. C.; Jape, A. D.; Moriarity, L. J.; Atkins, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The noise environment in a typical poultry processing plant was characterized by developing noise contours for two representative plants: Central Soya of Athens, Inc., Athens, Georgia, and Tip Top Poultry, Inc., Marietta, Georgia. Contour information was restricted to the evisceration are of both plants because nearly 60 percent of all process employees are stationed in this area during a normal work shift. Both plant evisceration areas were composed of tile walls, sheet metal ceilings, and concrete floors. Processing was performed in an assembly-line fashion in which the birds travel through the area on overhead shackles while personnel remain at fixed stations. Processing machinery was present throughout the area. In general, the poultry processing noise problem is the result of loud sources and reflective surfaces. Within the evisceration area, it can be concluded that only a few major sources (lung guns, a chiller component, and hock cutters) are responsible for essentially all direct and reverberant sound pressure levels currently observed during normal operations. Consequently, any effort to reduce the noise problem must first address the sound power output of these sources and/or the absorptive qualitities of the room.

  15. epsnoise: Pixel noise in ellipticity and shear measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Peter; Viola, Massimo

    2012-04-01

    epsnoise simulates pixel noise in weak-lensing ellipticity and shear measurements. This open-source python code can efficiently create an intrinsic ellipticity distribution, shear it, and add noise, thereby mimicking a "perfect" measurement that is not affected by shape-measurement biases. For theoretical studies, we provide the Marsaglia distribution, which describes the ratio of normal variables in the general case of non-zero mean and correlation. We also added a convenience method that evaluates the Marsaglia distribution for the ratio of moments of a Gaussian-shaped brightness distribution, which gives a very good approximation of the measured ellipticity distribution also for galaxies with different radial profiles. We provide four shear estimators, two based on the ɛ ellipticity measure, two on χ. While three of them are essentially plain averages, we introduce a new estimator which requires a functional minimization.

  16. Urban traffic noise assessment by combining measurement and model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Graafland, F.; Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    A model based monitoring system is applied on a local scale in an urban area to obtain a better understanding of the traffic noise situation. The system consists of a scalable sensor network and an engineering model. A better understanding is needed to take appropriate and cost efficient measures,

  17. General quantum constraints on detector noise in continuous linear measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Haixing

    2017-01-01

    In quantum sensing and metrology, an important class of measurement is the continuous linear measurement, in which the detector is coupled to the system of interest linearly and continuously in time. One key aspect involved is the quantum noise of the detector, arising from quantum fluctuations in the detector input and output. It determines how fast we acquire information about the system and also influences the system evolution in terms of measurement backaction. We therefore often categorize it as the so-called imprecision noise and quantum backaction noise. There is a general Heisenberg-like uncertainty relation that constrains the magnitude of and the correlation between these two types of quantum noise. The main result of this paper is to show that, when the detector becomes ideal, i.e., at the quantum limit with minimum uncertainty, not only does the uncertainty relation takes the equal sign as expected, but also there are two new equalities. This general result is illustrated by using the typical cavity QED setup with the system being either a qubit or a mechanical oscillator. Particularly, the dispersive readout of a qubit state, and the measurement of mechanical motional sideband asymmetry are considered.

  18. Carrier recovery techniques for semiconductor laser frequency noise for 28 Gbd DP-16QAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Olmedo, Miguel; Pang, Xiaodan; Piels, Molly

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first experimental comparison of DD-PLL, two-stage feed forward, and two variations of extended Kalman filtering for tracking semiconductor laser frequency noise. We identify which carrier phase recovery technique works best depending on the carrier induced frequency noise profile....

  19. Environmentally friendly pavements: Results from noise measurements 2005-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Truls Svenn; Haukland, Frode; Ustad, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    CPX-measurements (tyre A) have been performed on a wide range of ordinary dense Norwegian road pavements and special test pavements, as part of the R&D project “Environmental friendly pavements” initiated by the Norwegian Public Roads Administration. The following conclusions can be made from the investigation:- New dense asphalt concrete pavements can give a tyre/road noise level (CPX) of 4-8 dB(A) lower noise level, compared to a chosen reference level for a pavement of type AC 0/11 and SMA...

  20. Estimation of noise-free variance to measure heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Tilo; Melo, Marcos F Vidal; Degani-Costa, Luiza H; Harris, R Scott; Correia, John A; Musch, Guido; Venegas, Jose G

    2015-01-01

    Variance is a statistical parameter used to characterize heterogeneity or variability in data sets. However, measurements commonly include noise, as random errors superimposed to the actual value, which may substantially increase the variance compared to a noise-free data set. Our aim was to develop and validate a method to estimate noise-free spatial heterogeneity of pulmonary perfusion using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans. On theoretical grounds, we demonstrate a linear relationship between the total variance of a data set derived from averages of n multiple measurements, and the reciprocal of n. Using multiple measurements with varying n yields estimates of the linear relationship including the noise-free variance as the constant parameter. In PET images, n is proportional to the number of registered decay events, and the variance of the image is typically normalized by the square of its mean value yielding a coefficient of variation squared (CV(2)). The method was evaluated with a Jaszczak phantom as reference spatial heterogeneity (CV(r)(2)) for comparison with our estimate of noise-free or 'true' heterogeneity (CV(t)(2)). We found that CV(t)(2) was only 5.4% higher than CV(r)2. Additional evaluations were conducted on 38 PET scans of pulmonary perfusion using (13)NN-saline injection. The mean CV(t)(2) was 0.10 (range: 0.03-0.30), while the mean CV(2) including noise was 0.24 (range: 0.10-0.59). CV(t)(2) was in average 41.5% of the CV(2) measured including noise (range: 17.8-71.2%). The reproducibility of CV(t)(2) was evaluated using three repeated PET scans from five subjects. Individual CV(t)(2) were within 16% of each subject's mean and paired t-tests revealed no difference among the results from the three consecutive PET scans. In conclusion, our method provides reliable noise-free estimates of CV(t)(2) in PET scans, and may be useful for similar statistical problems in experimental data.

  1. Examining ambient noise using colocated measurements of rotational and translational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziioannou, Celine; Gaebler, Peter; Schreiber, Ulrich; Wassermann, Joachim; Igel, Heiner

    2012-10-01

    In the past decade, a number of studies have reported the observation of rotational motion associated with seismic events. We report a first observation of rotational motion in the microseismic ambient noise band. A striking feature of rotational motion measurements is that the information about the seismic phase velocity and source back azimuth is contained in the amplitude ratio of a point measurement of rotation rate and transverse acceleration. We investigate the possibility of applying this method to ambient noise measured with a ring laser and a broadband seismometer at the Wettzell Geodetic Observatory in Germany. Using data in the secondary microseismic band, we recover local phase velocities as well as the back azimuth of the strongest noise source for two different time periods. In order to confirm these findings, we additionally compare the results with classical array processing techniques of the Gräfenberg array located nearby.

  2. A comparative study of varying fan noise mitigation techniques in relation to sustainable design goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overweg, Cornelis; Fullerton, Jeff L.

    2005-04-01

    Green building design promotes effective use of materials and energy, improved indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and enhanced occupant comfort. These ``green'' goals can occasionally conflict with common acoustical approaches used for fan noise control. A design striving for low noise levels from the ventilation system to benefit occupant comfort can inadvertently introduce elements that are contradictory to other green building objectives. For example, typical fan noise control devices introduce higher energy consumption or less beneficial indoor environmental quality. This paper discusses the acoustical, mechanical, environmental, and relative cost impacts of various fan noise control techniques.

  3. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  4. SVD-Based Optimal Filtering Technique for Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids Using Two Microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Marc

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new SVD-based (Singular value decomposition strategy for noise reduction in hearing aids. This technique is evaluated for noise reduction in a behind-the-ear (BTE hearing aid where two omnidirectional microphones are mounted in an endfire configuration. The behaviour of the SVD-based technique is compared to a two-stage adaptive beamformer for hearing aids developed by Vanden Berghe and Wouters (1998. The evaluation and comparison is done with a performance metric based on the speech intelligibility index (SII. The speech and noise signals are recorded in reverberant conditions with a signal-to-noise ratio of and the spectrum of the noise signals is similar to the spectrum of the speech signal. The SVD-based technique works without initialization nor assumptions about a look direction, unlike the two-stage adaptive beamformer. Still, for different noise scenarios, the SVD-based technique performs as well as the two-stage adaptive beamformer, for a similar filter length and adaptation time for the filter coefficients. In a diffuse noise scenario, the SVD-based technique performs better than the two-stage adaptive beamformer and hence provides a more flexible and robust solution under speaker position variations and reverberant conditions.

  5. SVD-Based Optimal Filtering Technique for Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids Using Two Microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Jean-Baptiste; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan

    2002-12-01

    We introduce a new SVD-based (Singular value decomposition) strategy for noise reduction in hearing aids. This technique is evaluated for noise reduction in a behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid where two omnidirectional microphones are mounted in an endfire configuration. The behaviour of the SVD-based technique is compared to a two-stage adaptive beamformer for hearing aids developed by Vanden Berghe and Wouters (1998). The evaluation and comparison is done with a performance metric based on the speech intelligibility index (SII). The speech and noise signals are recorded in reverberant conditions with a signal-to-noise ratio of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] and the spectrum of the noise signals is similar to the spectrum of the speech signal. The SVD-based technique works without initialization nor assumptions about a look direction, unlike the two-stage adaptive beamformer. Still, for different noise scenarios, the SVD-based technique performs as well as the two-stage adaptive beamformer, for a similar filter length and adaptation time for the filter coefficients. In a diffuse noise scenario, the SVD-based technique performs better than the two-stage adaptive beamformer and hence provides a more flexible and robust solution under speaker position variations and reverberant conditions.

  6. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, G; Jammes, C; Geslot, B; Di Salvo, J; Destouches, C

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β(eff) parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  7. Measurements of mechanical thermal noise and energy dissipation in optical dielectric coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tianjun; Geitner, Mickael; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Dolique, Vincent; Degallaix, Jérôme; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Danièle; Granata, Massimo; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Bellon, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    In recent years an increasing number of devices and experiments are shown to be limited by mechanical thermal noise. In particular sub-Hertz laser frequency stabilization and gravitational wave detectors, that are able to measure fluctuations of 1E-18 m/rtHz or less, are being limited by thermal noise in the dielectric coatings deposited on mirrors. In this paper we present a new measurement of thermal noise in low absorption dielectric coatings deposited on micro-cantilevers and we compare it with the results obtained from the mechanical loss measurements. For the first time the coating thermal noise is measured on a wide range of frequencies with high signal to noise ratio. In addition we present a novel technique to deduce the coating mechanical losses from the measurement of the mechanical quality factor which does not rely on the knowledge of the coating and substrate Young moduli. The dielectric coatings are deposited by ion beam sputtering. The results presented here give a frequency independent loss a...

  8. Preliminary results of ground reflectivity measurements using noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślikowski, Łukasz; Krysik, Piotr; Dąbrowska-Zielińska, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Wanda; Bartold, Maciej

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes experimental L-band ground reflectivity measurement using noise radar demonstrator working as a scatterometer. The radar ground return is usually described with a scattering coefficient, a quantity that is independent from the scatterometer system. To calculate the coefficient in a function of incidence angle, range profile values obtained after range compression were used. In order to improve dynamic range of the measurement, antenna cross-path interference was removed using lattice filter. The ground return was measured at L band both for HH and VV polarizations of radar wave as well as for HV and VH crosspolarizations using log-periodic antennas placed at a 10 m high mast directed towards a meadow surface. In the paper the theoretical considerations, noise radar setup, measurement campaign and the results are described.

  9. Improved grid-noise removal in single-frame digital moiré 3D shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kofman, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A single-frame grid-noise removal technique was developed for application in single-frame digital-moiré 3D shape measurement. The ability of the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) to prevent oscillation artifacts near discontinuities, and the ability of the Fourier transform (FFT) applied to wavelet coefficients to separate grid-noise from useful image information, were combined in a new technique, SWT-FFT, to remove grid-noise from moiré-pattern images generated by digital moiré. In comparison to previous grid-noise removal techniques in moiré, SWT-FFT avoids the requirement for mechanical translation of optical components and capture of multiple frames, to enable single-frame moiré-based measurement. Experiments using FFT, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), DWT-FFT, and SWT-FFT were performed on moiré-pattern images containing grid noise, generated by digital moiré, for several test objects. SWT-FFT had the best performance in removing high-frequency grid-noise, both straight and curved lines, minimizing artifacts, and preserving the moiré pattern without blurring and degradation. SWT-FFT also had the lowest noise amplitude in the reconstructed height and lowest roughness index for all test objects, indicating best grid-noise removal in comparison to the other techniques.

  10. Noise Reduction Analysis of Radar Rainfall Using Chaotic Dynamics and Filtering Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the filtering techniques which can remove the noise involved in the time series. For this, Logistic series which is chaotic series and radar rainfall series are used for the evaluation of low-pass filter (LF and Kalman filter (KF. The noise is added to Logistic series by considering noise level and the noise added series is filtered by LF and KF for the noise reduction. The analysis for the evaluation of LF and KF techniques is performed by the correlation coefficient, standard error, the attractor, and the BDS statistic from chaos theory. The analysis result for Logistic series clearly showed that KF is better tool than LF for removing the noise. Also, we used the radar rainfall series for evaluating the noise reduction capabilities of LF and KF. In this case, it was difficult to distinguish which filtering technique is better way for noise reduction when the typical statistics such as correlation coefficient and standard error were used. However, when the attractor and the BDS statistic were used for evaluating LF and KF, we could clearly identify that KF is better than LF.

  11. Deep sub electron noise readout in CCD systems using digital filtering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Cancelo, Gustavo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernandez; Treptow, Ken; Zmuda, Ted; Diehl, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Scientific CCDs designed in thick high resistivity silicon (Si) are excellent detectors for astronomy, high energy and nuclear physics, and instrumentation. Many applications can benefit from CCDs ultra low noise readout systems. The present work shows how sub electron noise CCD images can be achieved using digital signal processing techniques. These techniques allow readout bandwidths of up to 10 K pixels per second and keep the full CCD spatial resolution and signal dynamic range.

  12. Bayesian flaw characterization from eddy current measurements with grain noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Jerry A.; Aldrin, John C.; Shell, Eric; Oneida, Erin

    2017-02-01

    The Bayesian approach to inference from measurement data has the potential to provide highly reliable characterizations of flaw geometry by quantifying the confidence in the estimate results. The accuracy of these confidence estimates depends on the accuracy of the model for the measurement error. Eddy current measurements of electrically anisotropic metals, such as titanium, exhibit a phenomenon called grain noise in which the measurement error is spatially correlated even with no flaw present. We show that the most commonly used statistical model for the measurement error, which fails to account for this correlation, results in overconfidence in the flaw geometry estimates from eddy current data, thereby reducing the effectiveness of the Bayesian approach. We then describe a method of modeling the grain noise as a Gaussian process (GP) using spectral mixture kernels, a type of non-parametric model for the covariance kernel of a GP This provides a broadly applicable, data-driven way of modeling correlation in measurement error. Our results show that incorporation of this noise model results in a more reliable estimate of the flaw and better agreement with the available validation data.

  13. Audio-band Coating Thermal Noise Measurement for Advanced LIGO with a Multi-mode Optical Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Gras, S; Yam, W; Martynov, D; Evans, M

    2016-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes co-resonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10^-17 m\\rtHz in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  14. Approaches to Adaptive Active Acoustic Noise Control at a Point Using Feedforward Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulch, Peter A.

    Active acoustic noise control systems have been of interest since their birth in the 1930's. The principle is to superimpose on an unwanted noise wave shape its inverse with the intention of destructive interference. This work presents two approaches to this idea. The first approach uses a direct design method to develop a controller using an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model that will be used to condition the primary noise to produce the required anti-noise for cancellation. The development of this approach has shown that the stability of the controller relies heavily on a non-minimum phase model of the secondary noise path. For this reason, a second approach, using a controller consisting of two parts was developed. The first part of the controller is designed to cancel broadband noise and the second part is an adaptive controller designed to cancel periodic noise. A simple technique for identifying the parameters of the broadband controller is developed. An ARMA model is used, and it is shown that its stability is improved by prefiltering the test signal with a minimum-phase inverse of the secondary noise channel. The periodic controller uses an estimate of the fundamental frequency to cancel the first few harmonics of periodic noise. A computationally efficient adaptive technique based on least squares is developed for updating the harmonic controller gains at each time step. Experimental results are included for the broadband controller, the harmonic controller, and the combination of the two algorithms. The advantages of using both techniques in conjunction are shown using test cases involving both broadband noise and periodic noise.

  15. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  16. Novel design techniques for noise-tolerant power-gated CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rumi; Pandey, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the single phase sleep signal modulation technique, step-wise {V}{gs} technique and the three-phase reactivation technique to evaluate the noise characteristics of multi-threshold CMOS circuits used in communication systems. The stacking technique is also implemented in this paper for the sleep transistor. The stacking approach helps to minimize leakage power. The mode transition noise minimization techniques have been applied to 32-bit dynamic TSPC adder with stacked sleep transistors in a standard 45-nm CMOS process. The reactivation noise, delay and energy consumption of all the three techniques have been evaluated. It has been shown that the three phase modulation technique significantly minimizes the reactivation delay when the peak noise level is maintained the same for all three techniques. The three phase modulation technique shows 67.3% and 35% reduction in delay compared to the single phase and step-wise {V}{gs} modulation techniques respectively. The reactivation energy is also suppressed by 49.3% and 39.14% with respect to the single-phase and stepwise {V}{gs} techniques.

  17. A jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Dorland, Wade D; Maung, Thein; Nesman, Tom; Wang, Ten-See

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an innovative jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool. The tool measures sound-pressure levels and frequency spectra in the far field. In addition, the tool provides predicted results while the measurements are being made. The predictions are based on an existing computational fluid dynamics database coupled to an empirical acoustic radiation model based on the far-field approximation to the Lighthill acoustic analogy. Preliminary tests of this acoustic measurement and prediction tool produced very encouraging results.

  18. The Discrete Wavelet Transform and Its Application for Noise Removal in Localized Corrosion Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio Ramos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work discusses the problem of induced external electrical noise as well as its removal from the electrical potential obtained from Scanning Vibrating Electrode Technique (SVET in the pitting corrosion process of aluminum alloy A96061 in 3.5% NaCl. An accessible and efficient solution of this problem is presented with the use of virtual instrumentation (VI, embedded systems, and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT. The DWT is a computational algorithm for digital processing that allows obtaining electrical noise with Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR superior to those obtained with Lock-In Amplifier equipment. The results show that DWT and the threshold method are efficient and powerful alternatives to carry out electrical measurements of potential signals from localized corrosion processes measured by SVET.

  19. Handbook of microwave component measurements with advanced VNA techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsmore, Joel P

    2012-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art coverage for making measurements on RF and Microwave Components, both active and passive. A perfect reference for R&D and Test Engineers, with topics ranging from the best practices for basic measurements, to an in-depth analysis of errors, correction methods, and uncertainty analysis, this book provides everything you need to understand microwave measurements. With primary focus on active and passive measurements using a Vector Network Analyzer, these techniques and analysis are equally applicable to measurements made with Spectrum Analyzers or Noise Figure

  20. Application of Machine Learning Techniques for Amplitude and Phase Noise Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; de Carvalho, Luis Henrique Hecker; Piels, Molly

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, tools from machine learning community, such as Bayesian filtering and expectation maximization parameter estimation, are presented and employed for laser amplitude and phase noise characterization. We show that phase noise estimation based on Bayesian filtering outperforms...... conventional time-domain approach in the presence of moderate measurement noise. Additionally, carrier synchronization based on Bayesian filtering, in combination with expectation maximization, is demonstrated for the first time experimentally....

  1. Phase noise measurements of the 400-kW, 2.115-GHz (S-band) transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, P.; Hoppe, D.; Bhanji, A.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement theory is described and a test method to perform phase noise verification using off-the-shelf components and instruments is presented. The measurement technique described consists of a double-balanced mixer used as phase detector, followed by a low noise amplifier. An FFT spectrum analyzer is then used to view the modulation components. A simple calibration procedure is outlined that ensures accurate measurements. A block diagram of the configuration is presented as well as actual phase noise data from the 400 kW, 2.115 GHz (S-band) klystron transmitter.

  2. Hearing aid measurements with speech and noise signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrlund, Ole; Ludvigsen, Carl; Olofsson, Åke

    1994-01-01

    to evaluate three different broad-band measuring methods. The results revealed that these methods were meaningful in estimating average frequency response obtained with a specific input signal, but none of the three methods used in the study was able to evaluate separately the effects of the most important...... signal modifications: memoryless non-linearity like peak clipping, time-varying gain from AGC and additive internal noise....

  3. Filtering Additive Measurement Noise with Maximum Entropy in the Mean

    CERN Document Server

    Gzyl, Henryk

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to show how the method of maximum entropy in the mean (MEM) may be used to improve parametric estimation when the measurements are corrupted by large level of noise. The method is developed in the context on a concrete example: that of estimation of the parameter in an exponential distribution. We compare the performance of our method with the bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches.

  4. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-09-01

    Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners).

  5. Material loss angles from direct measurements of broadband thermal noise

    CERN Document Server

    Principe, Maria; Pierro, Vincenzo; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Taurasi, Ilaria; Villar, Akira E; Black, Eric D; Libbrecht, Kenneth G; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the loss angles of the materials currently used in the highly reflective test-mass coatings of interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, namely Silica, Tantala, and Ti-dop ed Tantala, from direct measurement of coating thermal noise in an optical interferometer testbench, the Caltech TNI. We also present a simple predictive theory for the material properties of amorphous glassy oxide mixtures, which gives results in good agreement with our measurements on Ti-doped Tantala. Alternative measure ment methods and results are reviewed, and some critical issues are discussed.

  6. 40 CFR 201.25 - Measurement location and weather conditions for measurement on receiving property of the noise of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... conditions for measurement on receiving property of the noise of retarders, car coupling, locomotive load... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION... conditions for measurement on receiving property of the noise of retarders, car coupling, locomotive...

  7. Measurement Techniques for Electrothermal-Chemical Gun Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    conductors of a circuit ( Askeland 1985). This technique has been successfully applied to other experimental work including the pressure measurements made in...Fe2O4 ( Askeland 1985). Ferrites are implemented by wrapping the power cords and coaxial data lines of all electronics equipment tightly for several... Askeland , D. R. The Sciece and Engineering of Materials. Prindle, Weber, and Schmidt, 1985. Burden. H. S., and D. D. Shear. "Transient Noise in Electronic

  8. A new VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems. [voice operated keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. F.; Morgan, W. C.; Shack, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    A VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems is described which is based on the separation of voice signals into contiguous frequency-band components with the aid of an adaptive VOX in each band. It is shown that this processing scheme can effectively reduce both wideband and narrowband quasi-periodic noise since the threshold levels readjust themselves to suppress noise that exceeds speech components in each band. Results are reported for tests of the adaptive VOX, and it is noted that improvements can still be made in such areas as the elimination of noise pulses, phoneme reproduction at high-noise levels, and the elimination of distortion introduced by phase delay.

  9. Reducing coherent noise in interference systems using the phase modulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ji-Wen; Tao, Zhang; Liu, Zhao-Bo; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-08-20

    The phase modulation technique is adopted to reduce the coherent noise that arises from spurious interference. By choosing an appropriate driving signal, the method can reduce the coherent function of coherent noise to a great degree while keeping the coherent function of a coherent signal nearly unchanged. Simulation results show that for the grating interferometer, the phase error caused by coherent noise is reduced by 81.53% on average. For the Twyman interferometer, the fringe quality and contrast deteriorated by coherent noise are significantly improved. Furthermore, an experiment is set up in the phase-modulated Twyman interferometer to verify the feasibility of the principle. It is concluded that the method is effective to reduce the coherent noise in interference systems.

  10. Analyses and Measures of GPR Signal with Superimposed Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicarella, Simone; Ferrara, Vincenzo; D'Atanasio, Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Pajewski, Lara; Pavoncello, Settimio; Prontera, Santo; Tedeschi, Nicola; Zambotti, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The influence of EM noises and environmental hard conditions on the GPR surveys has been examined analytically [1]. In the case of pulse radar GPR, many unwanted signals as stationary clutter, non-stationary clutter, random noise, and time jitter, influence the measurement signal. When GPR is motionless, stationary clutter is the most dominant signal component due to the reflections of static objects different from the investigated target, and to the direct antenna coupling. Moving objects like e.g. persons and vehicles, and the swaying of tree crown, produce non-stationary clutter. Device internal noise and narrowband jamming are e.g. two potential sources of random noises. Finally, trigger instabilities generate random jitter. In order to estimate the effective influence of these noise signal components, we organized some experimental setup of measurement. At first, we evaluated for the case of a GPR basic detection, simpler image processing of radargram. In the future, we foresee experimental measurements for detection of the Doppler frequency changes induced by movements of targets (like physiological movements of survivors under debris). We obtain image processing of radargram by using of GSSI SIR® 2000 GPR system together with the UWB UHF GPR-antenna (SUB-ECHO HBD 300, a model manufactured by Radarteam company). Our work includes both characterization of GPR signal without (or almost without) a superimposed noise, and the effect of jamming originated from the coexistence of a different radio signal. For characterizing GPR signal, we organized a measurement setup that includes the following instruments: mod. FSP 30 spectrum analyser by Rohde & Schwarz which operates in the frequency range 9 KHz - 30 GHz, mod. Sucoflex 104 cable by Huber Suhner (10 MHz - 18 GHz), and HL050 antenna by Rohde & Schwarz (bandwidth: from 850 MHz to 26.5 GHz). The next analysis of superimposed jamming will examine two different signal sources: by a cellular phone and by a

  11. Quantum noise limited interferometric measurement of atomic noise: towards spin squeezing on the Cs clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Oblak, D; Tittel, W; Vershovski, A K; Sørensen, J L; Petrov, P G; Alzar, C L G; Polzik, E S; Oblak, Daniel; Mikkelsen, Jens K.; Tittel, Wolfgang; Vershovski, Anton K.; Sorensen, Jens L.; Petrov, Plamen G.; Alzar, Carlos L. Garrido; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally a nondestructive interferometric measurement of the state population of an ensemble of laser cooled and trapped atoms. This study is a step towards generation of (quasi-) spin squeezing of cold atoms targeted at the improvement of the Caesium clock performance beyond the limit set by the quantum projection noise of atoms. We propose a protocol for the sequence of operations required to generate and utilize spin squeezing for the improved microwave clock performance via a quantum nondemolition measurement (qnd) on the probe light. We calculate the phase shift and the quantum noise of a near resonant optical probe pulse propagating through a cloud of cold 133Cs atoms. We analyze the figure of merit for a qnd measurement of the collective quasi-spin and show that it can be expressed simply as a product of the ensemble optical depth and the probability of the spontaneous emission caused by the off-resonant probe light. In the experimental part we report on the preli...

  12. Application of MEMS Microphone Array Technology to Airframe Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Shams, Qamar A.; Graves, Sharon S.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    Current generation microphone directional array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity data on a variety of aircraft components, resulting in significant gains in test productivity. However, with this gain in productivity has come the desire to install larger and more complex arrays in a variety of ground test facilities, creating new challenges for the designers of array systems. To overcome these challenges, a research study was initiated to identify and develop hardware and fabrication technologies which could be used to construct an array system exhibiting acceptable measurement performance but at much lower cost and with much simpler installation requirements. This paper describes an effort to fabricate a 128-sensor array using commercially available Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones. The MEMS array was used to acquire noise data for an isolated 26%-scale high-fidelity Boeing 777 landing gear in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Stability Tunnel across a range of Mach numbers. The overall performance of the array was excellent, and major noise sources were successfully identified from the measurements.

  13. PREDICTION TECHNIQUES OF CHAOTIC TIME SERIES AND ITS APPLICATIONS AT LOW NOISE LEVEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun-hai; WANG Zhi-qiang; CHEN Yu-shu

    2006-01-01

    The paper not only studies the noise reduction methods of chaotic time series with noise and its reconstruction techniques, but also discusses prediction techniques of chaotic time series and its applications based on chaotic data noise reduction. In the paper, we first decompose the phase space of chaotic time series to range space and null noise space. Secondly we restructure original chaotic time series in range space. Lastly on the basis of the above, we establish order of the nonlinear model and make use of the nonlinear model to predict some research. The result indicates that the nonlinear modelhas very strong ability of approximation function, and Chaos predict method has certain tutorial significance to the practical problems.

  14. Prediction of galaxy ellipticities and reduction of shape noise in cosmic shear measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Croft, Rupert A C; Schuster, Thomas S; Schafer, Chad M

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic scatter in the ellipticities of galaxies about the mean shape, known as "shape noise," is the most important source of noise in weak lensing shear measurements. Several approaches to reducing shape noise have recently been put forward, using information beyond photometry, such as radio polarization and optical spectroscopy. Here we investigate how well the intrinsic ellipticities of galaxies can be predicted using other, exclusively photometric parameters. These parameters (such as galaxy colours) are already available in the data and do not necessitate additional, often expensive observations. We apply two regression techniques, generalized additive models (GAM) and projection pursuit regression (PPR) to the publicly released data catalog of galaxy properties from CFHTLenS. In our simple analysis we find that the individual galaxy ellipticities can indeed be predicted from other photometric parameters to better precision than the scatter about the mean ellipticity. This means that without addit...

  15. An Enhanced Two-Stage Impulse Noise Removal Technique based on Fast ANFIS and Fuzzy Decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Saradhadevi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement plays a vital role in various applications. There are many techniques to remove the noise from the image and produce the clear visual of the image. Moreover, there are several filters and image smoothing techniques available in the literature. All these available techniques have certain limitations. Recently, neural networks are found to be a very efficient tool for image enhancement. A novel two-stage noise removal technique for image enhancement and noise removal is proposed in this paper. In noise removal stage, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS with a Modified Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm was used to eliminate the impulse noise. The usage of Modified Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm will reduce the execution time. In the image enhancement stage, the fuzzy decision rules inspired by the Human Visual System (HVS are used to categorize the image pixels into human perception sensitive class and nonsensitive class, and to enhance the quality of the image. The Hyper trapezoidal fuzzy membership function is used in the proposed technique. In order to improve the sensitive regions with higher visual quality, a Neural Network (NN is proposed. The experiment is conducted with standard image. It is observed from the experimental result that the proposed FANFIS shows significant performance when compared to existing methods.

  16. Decoherence of entangled states by colored noise: application to precision measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Axel; Sorensen, Anders; Lukin, Mikhail; van der Wal, Caspar

    2003-05-01

    Controlled manipulation of quantum systems can lead to a number of exciting new applications in quantum information science, from quantum computation to applications in precision measurements. In many such applications, decoherence is a key factor to take into account and ultimately determines the feasibility or usefulness of the proposal. The decoherence of quantum mechanical degrees of freedom is usually modeled through their interaction with a bath consisting of a large number of harmonic oscillators. The separation of energy scales between the energy of the oscillators and the interaction energy leads to separation of time scales so that the decoherence process can be modeled effectively by a markovian process (infinitely short reservoir correlation time). Low-lying state are long-lived and are therefore ideally suited for storage of quantum information and long-lived quantum memory. Due to their long lifetime, these states are sensitive to the low frequency noise of the environment. In particular 1/f noise is dominating at low frequencies and this changes the form of the decoherence. In this case, non-exponential decay is to be expected so that the importance of decoherence depends on the time-scale. We consider the accuracy of frequency measurements using the Ramsey technique when the ensemble of atoms is subject to colored noise during the measurement. It has been shown that the use of entangled states of atomic ensembles (so-called spin squeezed states) may lead to an improvement in the accuracy of frequency measurements when the system is noiseless [1]. To assess the usefulness in a real setup decoherence has to be taken into account. It has been shown that for white noise spectra the net improvement is very small [2], this conclusion is however changed significantly when the system is influenced by colored noise. We study phase noise of the reference oscillator in frequency measurements and show that for non-white noise spectra (e.g. when the noise power

  17. Evaluation of Diesel Engine Noise Reduction Measures Based on Hierarchy Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Effect of different noise reduction measures for diesel engines was evaluated based on hierarchy diagnosis. The hierarchy diagnosis chart and hierarchy judgment matrix were given.Through evaluation of noise reduction measures, the main strategies of noise reduction were found.The result shows that the noise reduction level of different frequency belts varies from measure to measure. The reduction capacity of different measures could not add simply, which relates to the problem of parameter matching.

  18. Phase Noise and Intensity Noise of the Pulse Train Generated from Mode-locked Lasers in the Demodulation Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Kan WU; Shum, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The phase noise and intensity noise of a pulse train are theoretically analyzed in the demodulation measurement. The effect of pulse asymmetry is discussed for the first time using Fourier series. Experimentally, photodetectors with different bandwidth and incident power levels are compared to achieve minimum pulse distortion.

  19. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  20. A technique for the generation of customizable ultra-wideband pseudo-noise waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Russell; Erisman, David; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2011-06-01

    Noise excitation sources in radar systems have become increasingly useful in applications requiring wideband spectral responses and covertness. However, in applications requiring spectral controllability, traditional analog noise sources prove troublesome and require additional hardware such as sets of digital filters whose own spectral characteristics must also be accounted for. In an effort to reduce these issues and increase the applications of noise waveforms, a technique for generating a fully controllable pseudo-noise waveform is presented. This pseudo-noise waveform will be generated through the use of a multi-tone waveform. By randomizing the phase angles and setting the appropriate amplitudes to the individual tones, the result is a waveform whose temporal pattern resembles noise and frequency response is broadband. The capabilities of this digitally produced pseudo-noise multi-tone waveform is presented by optimization via a water-filling technique, thereby producing a flat spectral response for a user defined amplitude, effectively removing the spectral effects of the radar components. This optimized waveform is used to present methods for increasing signal to noise ratio (SNR) of cross-correlated responses of the waveform through the application of window functions to the waveform. As a whole, this paper showcases the ability to use this pseudo-noise multi-tone waveform for complete ultra-wideband (UWB) spectral control through water-filling and a method for increasing SNR of the cross correlated response of the transmitted and received radar waveform for a bandwidth of 2.5 GHz ranging from 2 to 4.5 GHz.

  1. Surveying techniques in vibration measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuras Przemyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the actual dynamic characteristics of engineering structures, it is necessary to perform direct measurements. The paper focuses on the problem of using various devices to measure vibration, with particular emphasis on surveying instruments. The main tool used in this study is the radar interferometer, which has been compared to: robotic total station, GNSS receivers and sensors (accelerometer and encoder. The results of four dynamic experiments are presented. They were performed on: industrial chimney, drilling tower, railway bridge and pedestrian footbridge. The obtained results have been discussed in terms of the requirements imposed by the standard ISO 4866:2010.

  2. NOISE REMOVAL TECHNIQUES FOR MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING RADAR DATA AND ITS EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Misra

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Microwave Remote Sensing data acquired by a RADAR sensor such as SAR(Synthetic Aperture Radar is affected by a peculiar kind of noise called speckle. This noise not only renders the data ineffective for classification, texture analysis, segmentation etc. which are used for image analysis purposes, but also degrades the overall contrast and radiometric quality of the image. Here we discuss the various noise removal techniques which have been widely used by scientists all over the world. Different filtering methods have their pros and cons, and no single method can give the most satisfactory result. In order to circumvent those issues, better and better methods are being attempted. One of the recent methods is that based on Wavelet technique. This paper discusses the denoising techniques based on Wavelets and the results from some of those methods. The relative merits and demerits of the filters and their evaluation is also done.

  3. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation - prospects for real time NMR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of a spin system is usually calculated using the density matrix. However, the usual formulation in terms of the density matrix predicts that the signal will decay to zero, and does not address the stochastic dynamics of individual spins. Spin fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments, and are observed as ``spin noise'' in the absence of any radio frequency (RF) excitation. Using stochastic calculus we develop a dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation whose origins lie in the component spin fluctuations. This entails consideration of random pure states for individual protons, and how these pure states are correctly combined when the density matrix is formulated. Both the lattice and the spins are treated quantum mechanically. Such treatment incorporates both the processes of spin-spin and (finite temperature) spin-lattice relaxation. Our results reveal the intimate connections between spin noise and conventional spin relaxation, in terms of a modified spin density (MSD), distinct from the density matrix, which is necessary to describe non-ensemble averaged properties of spin systems. With the prospect of ultra-fast digitization, the role of spin noise in real time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this presentation we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin noise measurement, with attention to real time properties.

  4. Simple digital phase-measuring algorithm for low-noise heterodyne interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kokuyama, Wataru; Ohta, Akihiro; Hattori, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    We present a digital algorithm for measuring the phase difference between two sinusoidal signals that combines the modified fringe-counting method with two-sample zero crossing to enable sequential signal processing. This technique can be applied to a phase meter for measuring dynamic phase differences with high resolution, particularly for heterodyne interferometry. The floor noise obtained from a demonstration with an electrical apparatus is $5\\times10^{-8} \\mathrm{rad/\\sqrt{Hz}}$ at frequencies above approximately 0.1 Hz. In addition, by applying this method to a commercial heterodyne interferometer, the floor-noise level is confirmed to be $7\\times10^{-14} \\mathrm{m/\\sqrt{Hz}}$ from 4 kHz to 1 MHz. We also confirm the validity of the algorithm by comparing its results with those from a standard homodyne interferometer for measuring shock-motion peak acceleration greater than 5000 m/s^2 and a 10 mm stroke.

  5. Measuring the Virgo area tilt noise with a laser gyroscope

    CERN Document Server

    Belfi, Jacopo; Bosi, Filippo; Carelli, Giorgio; Di Virgilio, Angela; Maccioni, Enrico; Stefani, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurements of tilt noise performed at the Virgo site with a ring laser gyroscope. The apparatus is a He-Ne laser operating in a square cavity mounted on a vertical plane perpendicular to the north-south arm of the inteferometer. We discuss the possibility of using the ring laser signal to improve the performances of the control system of the Virgo seismic suspensions. The comparison between the ring laser signal and the control signals for the longitudinal translations of the inverted pendulum (IP) shows remarkable coherence in the frequency range 20-200 mHz.

  6. Low magnetic Johnson noise electric field plates for precision measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Rabey, I M; Hinds, E A; Sauer, B E

    2016-01-01

    We describe a parallel pair of high voltage electric field plates designed and constructed to minimise magnetic Johnson noise. They are formed by laminating glass substrates with commercially available polyimide (Kapton) tape, covered with a thin gold film. Tested in vacuum, the outgassing rate is less than $5\\times10^{-5}$ mbar.l/s. The plates have been operated at electric fields up to 8.3 kV/cm, when the leakage current is at most a few hundred pA. The design is discussed in the context of a molecular spin precession experiment to measure the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron.

  7. Photonic Delay-line Phase Noise Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    combined 500-m and 6-km delay-line measurement system. Noise floor data are shown for the system with and without an EDFA . The laser power was 10 dBm...The optical power into the photodiode was 0 dBm without the EDFA and 11 dBm with it...data are shown for the system with and without an EDFA as well as with a high-power laser. The output optical powers of the low and high-power

  8. Advanced in-flight measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Nicholas; Jentink, Henk; Kompenhans, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The book presents a synopsis of the main results achieved during the 3 year EU-project "Advanced Inflight Measurement Techniques (AIM)" which applied advanced image based measurement techniques to industrial flight testing. The book is intended to be not only an overview on the AIM activities but also a guide on the application of advanced optical measurement techniques for future flight testing. Furthermore it is a useful guide for engineers in the field of experimental methods and flight testing who face the challenge of a future requirement for the development of highly accurate non-intrusive in-flight measurement techniques.

  9. On noise treatment in radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, F G; Arteaga, J C; Asch, T; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Link, K; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J

    2010-01-01

    Precise measurements of the radio emission by cosmic ray air showers require an adequate treatment of noise. Unlike to usual experiments in particle physics, where noise always adds to the signal, radio noise can in principle decrease or increase the signal if it interferes by chance destructively or constructively. Consequently, noise cannot simply be subtracted from the signal, and its influence on amplitude and time measurement of radio pulses must be studied with care. First, noise has to be determined consistently with the definition of the radio signal which typically is the maximum field strength of the radio pulse. Second, the average impact of noise on radio pulse measurements at individual antennas is studied for LOPES. It is shown that a correct treatment of noise is especially important at low signal-to-noise ratios: noise can be the dominant source of uncertainty for pulse height and time measurements, and it can systematically flatten the slope of lateral distributions. The presented method can ...

  10. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottinger, S. J.; Lamprou, D.; Knoll, A. K.; Lappas, V. J.

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

  11. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  12. Measuring elastic constants using non-contact ultrasonic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. S.; Perry, R.; Cleanthous, D.; Backhouse, D. J.; Moore, I. J.; Clough, A. R.; Stone, D. I.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasound for measuring elastic constants and phase transitions is well established. Standard measurements use piezoelectric transducers requiring couplant and contact with the sample. Recently, non-destructive testing (NDT) has seen an increase in the use of non-contact ultrasonic techniques, for example electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) and laser ultrasound, due to their many benefits. For measurements of single crystals over a range of temperatures non-contact techniques could also bring many benefits. These techniques do not require couplant, and hence do not suffer from breaking of the bond between transducer and sample during thermal cycling, and will potentially lead to a simpler and more adaptable measurement system with lower risk of sample damage. We present recent work adapting EMAT advances from NDT to measurements of single crystals at cryogenic temperatures and illustrate this with measurements of magnetic phase transitions in Gd64Sc36 using both contact and non-contact transducers. We discuss the measurement techniques implemented to overcome noise problems, and a digital pulse-echo-overlap technique, using data analysis in the frequency domain to measure the velocity.

  13. Low frequency noise elimination technique for 24-bit Σ-Δ data acquisition systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Robert, Olivier; Lognonné, Philippe; Zhou, Ze-Bing; Yang, Shan-Qing

    2015-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is one of the key limiting factors of high precision measurement instruments. In this paper, digital correlated double sampling is implemented to reduce the offset and low frequency 1/f noise of a data acquisition system with 24-bit sigma delta (Σ-Δ) analog to digital converter (ADC). The input voltage is modulated by cross-coupled switches, which are synchronized to the sampling clock, and converted into digital signal by ADC. By using a proper switch frequency, the unwanted parasitic signal frequencies generated by the switches are avoided. The noise elimination processing is made through the principle of digital correlated double sampling, which is equivalent to a time shifted subtraction for the sampled voltage. The low frequency 1/f noise spectrum density of the data acquisition system is reduced to be flat down to the measurement frequency lower limit, which is about 0.0001 Hz in this paper. The noise spectrum density is eliminated by more than 60 dB at 0.0001 Hz, with a residual noise floor of (9 ± 2) nV/Hz1/2 which is limited by the intrinsic white noise floor of the ADC above its corner frequency.

  14. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using a discrete wavelet transform-based image fusion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Sung Yun

    2015-01-01

    Here, the speckle noise in ultrasonic images is removed using an image fusion-based denoising method. To optimize the denoising performance, each discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and filtering technique was analyzed and compared. In addition, the performances were compared in order to derive the optimal input conditions. To evaluate the speckle noise removal performance, an image fusion algorithm was applied to the ultrasound images, and comparatively analyzed with the original image without the algorithm. As a result, applying DWT and filtering techniques caused information loss and noise characteristics, and did not represent the most significant noise reduction performance. Conversely, an image fusion method applying SRAD-original conditions preserved the key information in the original image, and the speckle noise was removed. Based on such characteristics, the input conditions of SRAD-original had the best denoising performance with the ultrasound images. From this study, the best denoising technique proposed based on the results was confirmed to have a high potential for clinical application.

  15. Absolute calibration of a wideband antenna and spectrometer for sky noise spectral index measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Alan E E

    2012-01-01

    A new method of absolute calibration of sky noise temperature using a three-position switched spectrometer, measurements of antenna and low noise amplifier impedance with a vector network analyzer, and ancillary measurements of the amplifier noise waves is described. The details of the method and its application to accurate wideband measurements of the spectral index of the sky noise are described and compared with other methods.

  16. Assessing the effects of noise abatement measures on health risks: A case study in Istanbul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongel, Aybike, E-mail: aybike.ongel@eng.bahcesehir.edu.tr [Bahcesehir University, Department of Civil Engineering, Istanbul 34353 (Turkey); Sezgin, Fatih, E-mail: fatih.sezgin@ibb.gov.tr [Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, Environmental Protection Agency, Istanbul 34169 (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    In recent decades, noise pollution caused by industrialization and increased motorization has become a major concern around the world because of its adverse effects on human well-being. Therefore, transportation agencies have been implementing noise abatement measures in order to reduce road traffic noise. However, limited attention is given to noise in environmental assessment of road transportation systems. This paper presents a framework for a health impact assessment model for road transportation noise emissions. The model allows noise impacts to be addressed with the health effects of air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from road transportation. The health damages assessed in the model include annoyance, sleep disturbance, and cardiovascular disease in terms of acute myocardial infarction. The model was applied in a case study in Istanbul in order to evaluate the change in health risks from the implementation of noise abatement strategies. The noise abatement strategies evaluated include altering pavement surfaces in order to absorb noise and introducing speed limits. It was shown that significant improvements in health risks can be achieved using open graded pavement surfaces and introducing speed limits on highways. - Highlights: • Transportation noise has a significant effect on health. • Noise should be included in the environmental assessment of transportation systems. • Traffic noise abatement measures include noise reducing pavements and speed limits. • Noise abatement measures help reduce the health risks of transportation noise. • Speed limit reduction on uncongested roads is an effective way to reduce health risks.

  17. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  18. Measurement Error with Different Computer Vision Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icasio-Hernández, O.; Curiel-Razo, Y. I.; Almaraz-Cabral, C. C.; Rojas-Ramirez, S. R.; González-Barbosa, J. J.

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this work is to offer a comparative of measurement error for different computer vision techniques for 3D reconstruction and allow a metrological discrimination based on our evaluation results. The present work implements four 3D reconstruction techniques: passive stereoscopy, active stereoscopy, shape from contour and fringe profilometry to find the measurement error and its uncertainty using different gauges. We measured several dimensional and geometric known standards. We compared the results for the techniques, average errors, standard deviations, and uncertainties obtaining a guide to identify the tolerances that each technique can achieve and choose the best.

  19. MEASUREMENT ERROR WITH DIFFERENT COMPUTER VISION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Icasio-Hernández

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is to offer a comparative of measurement error for different computer vision techniques for 3D reconstruction and allow a metrological discrimination based on our evaluation results. The present work implements four 3D reconstruction techniques: passive stereoscopy, active stereoscopy, shape from contour and fringe profilometry to find the measurement error and its uncertainty using different gauges. We measured several dimensional and geometric known standards. We compared the results for the techniques, average errors, standard deviations, and uncertainties obtaining a guide to identify the tolerances that each technique can achieve and choose the best.

  20. A Low Phase Noise CMOS Quadrature Voltage Control Oscillator Using Clock Gated Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothi Baskar A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This project presents the low phase noise cmos quadrature voltage control oscillator using clock gating technique. Here the colpitts vco is used to split the capacitance in the Qvco circuit producing quadrature output. The startup condition in the oscillator is improved by using enhancement [12].This QVCO performs the operation anti phase injection locking fordevice reuse [8]. The new clock gating technique is used to reduce the power with thepower supply 1.5v. The QVCO uses a 0.5mwith phase error of 0.4 and exhibits a phase noise of -118dBc/HZ at 1MHZ offset at the centre frequency of 500MHZ. Index terms: current switching, clock gating, phase noise, Qvco

  1. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  2. Suppression of interferometric crosstalk and ASE noise using a polarization multiplexing technique and an SOA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Xueyan; Liu, Fenghai; Wolfson, David

    2000-01-01

    Noise suppression at 10 Gbit/s and 20 Gbit/s is demonstrated using a gain saturated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and a polarization multiplexing technique, where no impairments like waveform distortion and extinction ratio degradation caused by the gain saturation of the SOA appear...

  3. TEM Cell Testing of Cable Noise Reduction Techniques from 2 MHz to 200 MHz -- Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Evans, William C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Shimp, Samuel K., III; Fitzpatrick, Fred D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents empirical results of cable noise reduction techniques as demonstrated in a TEM cell operating with radiated fields from 2 - 200 MHz. It is the second part of a two-paper series. The first paper discussed cable types and shield connections. In this second paper, the effects of load and source resistances and chassis connections are examined. For each topic, well established theories are compared to data from a real-world physical system. Finally, recommendations for minimizing cable susceptibility (and thus cable emissions) are presented. There are numerous papers and textbooks that present theoretical analyses of cable noise reduction techniques. However, empirical data is often targeted to low frequencies (e.g. 100 MHz). Additionally, a comprehensive study showing the relative effects of various noise reduction techniques is needed. These include the use of dedicated return wires, twisted wiring, cable shielding, shield connections, changing load or source impedances, and implementing load- or source-to-chassis isolation. We have created an experimental setup that emulates a real-world electrical system, while still allowing us to independently vary a host of parameters. The goal of the experiment was to determine the relative effectiveness of various noise reduction techniques when the cable is in the presence of radiated emissions from 2 MHz to 200 MHz.

  4. Measurement of Thermal Noise in Multilayer Coatings with Optimized Layer Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Villar, Akira E; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

  5. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  6. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is large

  7. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures... Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures. (a) The highway agency shall determine and... environmental effects. (b) The traffic noise analysis shall include the following for each alternative...

  8. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  9. Measuring and interpreting the mechanical thermal noise spectrum in a MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2005-07-01

    The meta-stability of the pull-in displacement of an electrostatically operated parallel plate micromechanical structure is used for the capacitive measurement of the mechanical-thermal noise spectrum in a MEMS. Pull-in time depends on force and is not affected by the input-referred noise of the readout circuit. Repeatedly bringing the microstructure to pull-in while measuring the pull-in time followed by FFT enables the measurement of the mechanical noise spectrum with a non-mechanical noise level set primarily by the resolution of the time measurement. The white noise level is found to be in agreement with the theory on damping. The 1/f noise spectrum is found to be independent of ambient gas pressure with a 1/f noise-white noise cross-over frequency at 0.007 Hz for a 1 bar gas pressure and is reproducible for devices fabricated in the same process and the same run.

  10. Seismic coherent and random noise attenuation using the undecimated discrete wavelet transform method with WDGA technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Alireza; Riahi, Mohammad Ali

    2012-12-01

    One of the most crucial challenges in seismic data processing is the reduction of the noise in the data or improving the signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, the 1D undecimated discrete wavelet transform (UDWT) has been acquired to attenuate random noise and ground roll. Wavelet domain ground roll analysis (WDGA) is applied to find the ground roll energy in the wavelet domain. The WDGA will be a substitute method for thresholding in seismic data processing. To compare the effectiveness of the WDGA method, we apply the 1D double density discrete wavelet transform (DDDWT) using soft thresholding in the random noise reduction and ground roll attenuation processes. Seismic signals intersect with ground roll in the time and frequency domains. Random noise and ground roll have many undesirable effects on pre-stack seismic data, and result in an inaccurate velocity analysis for NMO correction. In this paper, the UDWT by using the WDGA technique and DDDWT (using the soft thresholding technique) and the regular Fourier based method as f-k transform will be used and compared for seismic denoising.

  11. Recent developments in firearms noise and hearing conservation: hearing protection fit testing,noise measurement and hearing surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David McBride

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL continues to be a prevalent problem in Military Service. Purpose To assess the ‘SureFire’ earplug, a Hearing Protective Device (HPD, within the context of a hearing conservation programme. Methods The ‘VeriPro’ system was used to test the HPD attenuation, with Otoacoustic emission (OAE ‘base-line’ hearing tests. Noise exposure was measured during test firing, and a post exposure OAE test was carried out to measure any deterioration in hearing due to excess noise exposure. Results Better attenuation was achieved in right ears. The HPDs were rated to reduce the noise by at least 15 dB in 84% of those exposed, the actual attenuation lying in the range between 8.4 and 23.6 dBA. The median noise level was 110 dBA. The OAE testing did not show any significant before and after differences. Discussion. Some individuals achieved good HPD fit, some quite poor. The average noise levels received were excessive, but the daily noise dose was within acceptable limits because of the short duration of exposure, possibly explaining the non-significant differences in OAEs. We recommend that individuals should only use HPDs which are ‘fit proven’. Additional testing under more typical conditions with a larger group is required, but OAEs show promise as a practical monitoring tool.

  12. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed.

  13. Application of chaotic noise reduction techniques to chaotic data trained by ANN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Chandra Shekara Bhat; M R Kaimal; T R Ramamohan

    2001-10-01

    We propose a novel method of combining artificial neural networks (ANNs) with chaotic noise reduction techniques that captures the metric and dynamic invariants of a chaotic time series, e.g. a time series obtained by iterating the logistic map in chaotic regimes. Our results indicate that while the feedforward neural network is capable of capturing the dynamical and metric invariants of chaotic time series within an error of about 25%, ANNs along with chaotic noise reduction techniques, such as Hammel’s method or the local projective method, can significantly improve these results. This further suggests that the effort on the ANN to train data corresponding to complex structures can be significantly reduced. This technique can be applied in areas like signal processing, data communication, image processing etc.

  14. Technique Based on Image Pyramid and Bayes Rule for Noise Reduction in Unsupervised Change Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-qiang; HUO hong; FANG Tao; ZHU Ju-lian; GE Wei-li

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a technique based on image pyramid and Bayes rule for reducing noise effects in unsupervised change detection is proposed. By using Gaussian pyramid to process two multitemporal images respectively, two image pyramids are constructed. The difference pyramid images are obtained by point-by-point subtraction between the same level images of the two image pyramids. By resizing all difference pyramid images to the size of the original multitemporal image and then making product operator among them, a map being similar to the difference image is obtained. The difference image is generated by point-by-point subtraction between the two multitemporal images directly. At last, the Bayes rule is used to distinguish the changed pixels. Both synthetic and real data sets are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. Experimental results show that the map from the proposed technique is more robust to noise than the difference image.

  15. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents' Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Anabela; Arezes, Pedro; Bernardo, Carlos; Dias, Hernâni; Pinto, Lígia M Costa

    2017-07-11

    Wind turbines' noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities' objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes' noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people's decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance.

  16. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents’ Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Anabela; Bernardo, Carlos; Dias, Hernâni; Pinto, Lígia M. Costa

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbines’ noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities’ objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes’ noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people’s decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance. PMID:28696404

  17. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents’ Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Botelho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines’ noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities’ objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes’ noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people’s decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance.

  18. CORROSION MONITORING OF LY12 IN SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTION WITH ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q. Zhang; Z. Zhang; J.M. Wang; H.B. Shao; C.N. Cao

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous electrochemical noise (EN) can be a rich source of information concerning the processes simultaneously occurring on a corroding interface. But the noise signal is often difficult to be analyzed due to the complicated nature of the specific systems being investigated. In this paper, the potential noise fluctuations during the free corrosion of commercial aluminum alloy LY12 in sodium chloride solution was recorded and analyzed with different techniques. The typical results showed that the fractal dimension (D,n) obtained from spectral power density (SPD) is mainly directly proportional to the intensity of pitting corrosion and to the value of pitting parameter (SE) derived from dimensional analysis, while the fractal dimension (DE) obtained from EIS is mainly related to the uniform corrosion.

  19. A new technique to measure the differential XAFS spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Zheng, Li-Rong; Chu, Sheng-Qi; Zhou, Ai-Yu; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tian-Dou

    2016-04-01

    A new technique has been developed for direct measurement of the differential X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum by the energy-modulation method. To acquire the energy-oscillating incident X-ray beam, a piezoelectric actuator is used to control the double-crystal monochromator. A logarithmic converter circuit and a lock-in amplifier are used to extract the modulated signals. The normal and differential XAFS spectra of the Mn K-edge of Li2MnO3 have been collected. The X-ray-absorption near-edge-structure (XANES) spectra verify that the signal-to-noise ratio has been greatly improved by the new technique, and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra demonstrate that this new technique can efficiently enhance the signals of the backscattering atoms. Supported by NSFC (11175202)

  20. [Novel method of noise power spectrum measurement for computed tomography images with adaptive iterative reconstruction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hara, Takanori; Terakawa, Shoichi; Yokomachi, Kazushi; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Ishifuro, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive iterative reconstruction techniques (IRs) can decrease image noise in computed tomography (CT) and are expected to contribute to reduction of the radiation dose. To evaluate the performance of IRs, the conventional two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) is widely used. However, when an IR provides an NPS value drop at all spatial frequency (which is similar to NPS changes by dose increase), the conventional method cannot evaluate the correct noise property because the conventional method does not correspond to the volume data natures of CT images. The purpose of our study was to develop a new method for NPS measurements that can be adapted to IRs. Our method utilized thick multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images. The thick images are generally made by averaging CT volume data in a direction perpendicular to a MPR plane (e.g. z-direction for axial MPR plane). By using this averaging technique as a cutter for 3D-NPS, we can obtain adequate 2D-extracted NPS (eNPS) from 3D NPS. We applied this method to IR images generated with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR-3D, Toshiba) to investigate the validity of our method. A water phantom with 24 cm-diameters was scanned at 120 kV and 200 mAs with a 320-row CT (Acquilion One, Toshiba). From the results of study, the adequate thickness of MPR images for eNPS was more than 25.0 mm. Our new NPS measurement method utilizing thick MPR images was accurate and effective for evaluating noise reduction effects of IRs.

  1. 地铁列车振动和噪声源分析及减振降噪措施%Subway Train Vibration and Noise Source Analysis and Vibration and Noise Reduction Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴刚

    2014-01-01

    地铁列车的振动与噪声涉及到多个学科,是一个整体的系统工程。研究列车振动和噪声控制首先需要了解噪声产生机理和噪声单元的声贡献,从而了解所有振动和噪声的特性,进而加强地铁机车的噪声控制和预测,减小地铁列车噪声污染。阐述了地铁列车振动和噪声源的产生原理,列举了现如今地铁列车噪声预测的方法、列车噪声的测量技术和减振降噪技术。%The vibration and noise subway train involves multiple disciplines, is a whole system works. Train vibration and noise control research first need to understand the mechanism of noise and noise sound unit contribution to understand the characteristics of all the vibration and noise, noise control and predict further strengthen metro locomotives, subway trains to reduce noise pollution. Describes the generation principle subway train vibration and noise sources, is now listed subway train noise prediction methods, measurement techniques and train noise vibration and noise reduction technology.

  2. An examination of the parametric properties of four noise sensitivity measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kamp, Irene; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Lopez-Barrio, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    -report measures assessing responses to noise (perception; reaction; mood) in both noise conditions,reaction to noise from various sources at home, and moderating variables (e.g. sensitivity to non-auditory stimuli, health status, mood, personality, environmental attitudes, socially desirable responding...

  3. Residual phase noise measurements of the input section in a receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavric, Uros; Chase, Brian; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    If not designed properly, the input section of an analog down-converter can introduce phase noise that can prevail over other noise sources in the system. In the paper we present residual phase noise measurements of a simplified input section of a classical receiver that is composed of various commercially available mixers and driven by an LO amplifier.

  4. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  5. Measurement of solid concentration using Terahertz technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yi'an; Huang Zhiyao; Ji Haifeng; Wang Baoliang; Li Haiqing

    2007-01-01

    Terahertz(THz)technique is a new measurement technique that has emerged in recent years. For the measurement of solid concentration, a radiation attenuation method and a phase delay method were developed, which are based on the Beer-Lambert law. Experimental work was carried out on a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system (THz-TDS). Results obtained verify that the terahertz technique may provide a possible new solution to the problem of solid concentration measurement and the two proposed measurement methods are effective. Experiment results also indicate that the phase delay method is more accurate than the radiation attenuation method and the size of the particles affects the measurement results of both methods.

  6. A study on the fault diagnostic techniques for reactor internal structures using neutron noise analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ryong; Jeong, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Ho; Park, Jin Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    The unfavorable phenomena, such as flow induced vibration and aging process in reactor internals, cause degradation of structural integrity and may result in loosing some mechanical binding components which might impact other equipments and components or cause flow blockage. Since these malfunctions and potential failures change reactor noise signal, it is necessary to analyze reactor noise signal for early fault diagnosis in the point of few of safety and plant economics. The objectives of this study are to establish fault diagnostic and TS(thermal shield), and to develop a data acquisition and signal processing software system. In the first year of this study, an analysis technique for the reactor internal vibration using the reactor noise was proposed. With the technique proposed and the reactor noise signals (ex-core neutron and acceleration), the dynamic characteristics of Ulchin-1 reactor internals were obtained, and compared with those of Tricastin-1 which is the prototype of Ulchin-1. In the second year, a PC-based expert system for reactor internals fault diagnosis is developed, which included data acquisition, signal processing, feature extraction function, and represented diagnostic knowledge by the IF-THEN rule. To know the effect of the faults, the reactor internals of Ulchin-1 is modeled using FEM and simulated with an artificial defect given in the hold-down spring. Trend in the dynamic characteristics of reactor internals is also observed during one fuel cycle to know the effect of boron concentration. 100 figs, 7 tabs, 18 refs. (Author).

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  8. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  9. Measurement of Device Parameters Using Image Recovery Techniques in Large-Scale IC Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheick, Leif; Edmonds, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Devices that respond to radiation on a cell level will produce histograms showing the relative frequency of cell damage as a function of damage. The measured distribution is the convolution of distributions from radiation responses, measurement noise, and manufacturing parameters. A method of extracting device characteristics and parameters from measured distributions via mathematical and image subtraction techniques is described.

  10. High-voltage test and measuring techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, Wolfgang; Lemke, Eberhard

    2014-04-01

    Reflects the unit of both HV testing and measuring technique. Intended as an ''application guide'' for the relevant IEC standards. Refers also to future trends in HV testing and measuring technique. With numerous illustrations. It is the intent of this book to combine high-voltage (HV) engineering with HV testing technique and HV measuring technique. Based on long-term experience gained by the authors as lecturer and researcher as well as member in international organizations, such as IEC and CIGRE, the book will reflect the state of the art as well as the future trends in testing and diagnostics of HV equipment to ensure a reliable generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy. The book is intended not only for experts but also for students in electrical engineering and high-voltage engineering.

  11. Design and analysis of a K-band low-phase-noise phase-locked loop with subharmonically injection-locked technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hong-Yeh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and analysis of a K-band (18 to 26.5 GHz) low-phase-noise phase-locked loop (PLL) with the subharmonically injection-locked (SIL) technique. The phase noise of the PLL with subharmonic injection is investigated, and a modified phase noise model of the PLL with SIL technique is proposed. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental results. Moreover, the phase noise of the PLL can be improved with the subharmonic injection. To achieve K-band operation with low dc power consumption, a divide-by-3 injection-locked frequency divider (ILFD) is used as a frequency prescaler. The measured phase noise of the PLL without injection is -110 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset at the operation frequency of 23.08 GHz. With the subharmonic injection, the measured phase noises at 1 MHz offset are -127, -127, and -119 dBc/Hz for the subharmonic injection number NINJ = 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Moreover, the performance of the proposed PLL with and without SIL technique can be compared with the reported advanced CMOS PLLs.

  12. Vibration frequency measurement using a local multithreshold technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Belen; Espinosa, Julian; Roig, Ana B; Perez, J; Mas, D

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a video camera for measuring the frequency of small-amplitude vibration movements. The method is based on image acquisition and multilevel thresholding and it only requires a video camera with high enough acquisition rate, not being necessary the use of targets or auxiliary laser beams. Our proposal is accurate and robust. We demonstrate the technique with a pocket camera recording low-resolution videos with AVI-JPEG compression and measuring different objects that vibrate in parallel or perpendicular direction to the optical sensor. Despite the low resolution and the noise, we are able to measure the main vibration modes of a tuning fork, a loudspeaker and a bridge. Results are successfully compared with design parameters and measurements with alternative devices.

  13. Optical measurement techniques - A push for digitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2016-12-01

    Over the years, optical measurement techniques have been the problem-solving backbone of many engineering applications such as nondestructive testing of materials, measurement of various material properties, structural analysis and experimental mechanics [1-3]. Probably the most important advantage associated with any optical measurement system over other systems is its non-contact type of measurement capability. Apart from their non-contact nature, the optical measurement systems are capable of providing full-field measurements at scales ranging from milli-meters to nano-meters.

  14. Phase stability in fMRI time series: effect of noise regression, off-resonance correction and spatial filtering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Brainovich, Valentina; Cassara, Antonino Mario; Maraviglia, Bruno

    2012-02-15

    Although the majority of fMRI studies exploit magnitude changes only, there is an increasing interest regarding the potential additive information conveyed by the phase signal. This integrated part of the complex number furnished by the MR scanners can also be used for exploring direct detection of neuronal activity and for thermography. Few studies have explicitly addressed the issue of the available signal stability in the context of phase time-series, and therefore we explored the spatial pattern of frequency specific phase fluctuations, and evaluated the effect of physiological noise components (heart beat and respiration) on the phase signal. Three categories of retrospective noise reduction techniques were explored and the temporal signal stability was evaluated in terms of a physiologic noise model, for seven fMRI measurement protocols in eight healthy subjects at 3T, for segmented CSF, gray and white matter voxels. We confirmed that for most processing methods, an efficient use of the phase information is hampered by the fact that noise from physiological and instrumental sources contributes significantly more to the phase than to the magnitude instability. Noise regression based on the phase evolution of the central k-space point, RETROICOR, or an orthonormalized combination of these were able to reduce their impact, but without bringing phase stability down to levels expected from the magnitude signal. Similar results were obtained after targeted removal of scan-to-scan variations in the bulk magnetic field by the dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) method and by the temporal off-resonance alignment of single-echo time series technique (TOAST). We found that spatial high-pass filtering was necessary, and in vivo a Gaussian filter width of 20mm was sufficient to suppress physiological noise and bring the phase fluctuations to magnitude levels. Stronger filters brought the fluctuations down to levels dictated by thermal noise contributions, and for 62

  15. Comparison of the polynomial model against explicit measurements of noise components for different mammography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2014-10-01

    Given the adverse impact of image noise on the perception of important clinical details in digital mammography, routine quality control measurements should include an evaluation of noise. The European Guidelines, for example, employ a second-order polynomial fit of pixel variance as a function of detector air kerma (DAK) to decompose noise into quantum, electronic and fixed pattern (FP) components and assess the DAK range where quantum noise dominates. This work examines the robustness of the polynomial method against an explicit noise decomposition method. The two methods were applied to variance and noise power spectrum (NPS) data from six digital mammography units. Twenty homogeneously exposed images were acquired with PMMA blocks for target DAKs ranging from 6.25 to 1600 µGy. Both methods were explored for the effects of data weighting and squared fit coefficients during the curve fitting, the influence of the additional filter material (2 mm Al versus 40 mm PMMA) and noise de-trending. Finally, spatial stationarity of noise was assessed. Data weighting improved noise model fitting over large DAK ranges, especially at low detector exposures. The polynomial and explicit decompositions generally agreed for quantum and electronic noise but FP noise fraction was consistently underestimated by the polynomial method. Noise decomposition as a function of position in the image showed limited noise stationarity, especially for FP noise; thus the position of the region of interest (ROI) used for noise decomposition may influence fractional noise composition. The ROI area and position used in the Guidelines offer an acceptable estimation of noise components. While there are limitations to the polynomial model, when used with care and with appropriate data weighting, the method offers a simple and robust means of examining the detector noise components as a function of detector exposure.

  16. Velocity measurements in jets with application to noise source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Philip J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the statistical properties of turbulent velocity fluctuations in an axisymmetric jet. The focus is on those properties that are relevant to the prediction of noise. Measurements are performed using two single hot-wire anemometers as well as a two-component anemometer. Two-point cross correlations of the axial velocity fluctuations and of the fluctuations in the square of the axial velocity fluctuations are presented. Several reference locations in the jet are used including points on the jet lip and centerline. The scales of the turbulence and the convection velocity are determined, both in an overall sense as well as a function of frequency. The relationship between the second and fourth order correlations is developed and compared with the experimental data. The implications of the use of dimensional as well as non-dimensional correlations are considered. Finally, a comparison is made between the length scales deduced from the flow measurements and a RANS CFD calculation.

  17. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  18. Filtering of measurement noise with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, Cecilia; Pivnenko, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Two different antenna models are set up in GRASP and CHAMP, and noise is added to the radiated field. The noisy field is then given as input to the 3D reconstruction of DIATOOL and the SWE coefficients and the far-field radiated by the reconstructed currents are compared with the noise-free results...

  19. Bayesian Compressed Sensing with Unknown Measurement Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn; Pedersen, Niels Lovmand

    2013-01-01

    In sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) approximate Bayesian inference is applied to find sparse estimates from observations corrupted by additive noise. Current literature only vaguely considers the case where the noise level is unknown a priori. We show that for most state-of-the-art reconstruction a...

  20. Bayesian Compressed Sensing with Unknown Measurement Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn; Pedersen, Niels Lovmand

    2013-01-01

    algorithms based on the fast inference scheme noise precision estimation results in increased computational complexity and reconstruction error. We propose a three-layer hierarchical prior model which allows for the derivation of a fast inference algorithm that estimates the noise precision...

  1. Retrieval of reflections from seismic background‐noise measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganov, D.S.; Wapenaar, K.; Mulder, W.; Singer, J.; Verdel, A.

    2007-01-01

    The retrieval of the earth's reflection response from cross‐correlations of seismic noise recordings can provide valuable information, which may otherwise not be available due to limited spatial distribution of seismic sources. We cross‐correlated ten hours of seismic background‐noise data acquired

  2. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  3. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise Measurements Using Tetrapole Probe Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairnay, Paul

    A magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) testing system was developed for Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) to perform MBN measurements on the Royal Canadian Navy's Victoria class submarine hulls that can be correlated with material properties, including residual stress. The DRDC system was based on the design of a MBN system developed by Steven White at Queen's University, which was capable of performing rapid angular dependent measurements through the implementation of a flux controlled tetrapole probe. In tetrapole probe designs, the magnetic excitation field is rotated in the surface plane of the sample under the assumption of linear superposition of two orthogonal magnetic fields. During the course of this work, however, the validity of flux superposition in ferromagnetic materials, for the purpose of measuring MBN, was brought into question. Consequently, a study of MBN anisotropy using tetrapole probes was performed. Results indicate that MBN anisotropy measured under flux superposition does not simulate MBN anisotropy data obtained through manual rotation of a single dipole excitation field. It is inferred that MBN anisotropy data obtained with tetrapole probes is the result of the magnetic domain structure's response to an orthogonal magnetization condition and not necessarily to any bulk superposition magnetization in the sample. A qualitative model for the domain configuration under two orthogonal magnetic fields is proposed to describe the results. An empirically derived fitting equation, that describes tetrapole MBN anisotropy data, is presented. The equation describes results in terms of two largely independent orthogonal fields, and includes interaction terms arising due to competing orthogonally magnetized domain structures and interactions with the sample's magnetic easy axis. The equation is used to fit results obtained from a number of samples and tetrapole orientations and in each case correctly identifies the samples' magnetic easy axis.

  4. Fuzzy techniques for noise removal in image sequences and interval-valued fuzzy mathematical morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Mélange, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Image sequences play an important role in today's world. They provide us a lot of information. Videos are for example used for traffic observations, surveillance systems, autonomous navigation and so on. Due to bad acquisition, transmission or recording, the sequences are however usually corrupted by noise, which hampers the functioning of many image processing techniques. A preprocessing module to filter the images often becomes necessary. After an introduction to fuzzy set theory and ...

  5. Measurement and Assessment of Noise Within Passenger Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARDY, A. E. J.

    2000-03-01

    Railways are becoming increasingly market-driven. Consequently, it is important that passengers are provided with a comfortable environment that reflects the operator's desired image for the service. A major factor in determining how passengers perceive the environment within trains is the level and nature of sound to which they are exposed. Unfortunately, the subject of noise within railway vehicles has had less attention in recent years, and is therefore less well developed, than external “environmental” noise. Two specific areas that merit investigation are methods for its quantification and assessment. A variety of criteria are used for assessing the noise environment within buildings, and may be considered appropriate for the quantification of internal train noise. These include “noise criteria” (NC), “preferred noise criteria” (PNC), “noise rating” (NR), and “room criterion” (RC). Recently, the automotive industry has also been using loudness level. Simple descriptors, such as the A-weighted sound level, have not been found to correlate well with perceived acoustic comfort. A complicating factor when considering internal rail vehicle noise is that its level and quality is not constant, with significant variability likely to occur over the duration of a journey. This difficulty is compounded by acoustic spatial variation within a vehicle. The paper considers the problems inherent in the quantification of noise within rail vehicles, and in the determination of the relationship between this noise and passenger response. Methods by which these problems may be overcome are discussed, drawing on real data and on long experience of study in this field.

  6. Experimental Study of Active Techniques for Blade/Vortex Interaction Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiki, Noboru; Murashige, Atsushi; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi

    This paper presents the experimental results of the effect of Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Active Flap on the Blade/Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Wind tunnel tests were performed with a 1-bladed rotor system to evaluate the simplified BVI phenomenon avoiding the complicated aerodynamic interference which is characteristically and inevitably caused by a multi-bladed rotor. Another merit to use this 1-bladed rotor system is that the several objective active techniques can be evaluated under the same condition installed in the same rotor system. The effects of the active techniques on the BVI noise reduction were evaluated comprehensively by the sound pressure, the blade/vortex miss distance obtained by Laser light Sheet (LLS), the blade surface pressure distribution and the tip vortex structure by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The correlation among these quantities to describe the effect of the active techniques on the BVI conditions is well obtained. The experiments show that the blade/vortex miss distance is more dominant for BVI noise than the other two BVI governing factors, such as blade lift and vortex strength at the moment of BVI.

  7. VALUATION TECHNIQUES USED IN FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina-Aurora, BUNEA-BONTAS

    2013-01-01

    Valuation of assets and liabilities involves significant judgements and estimates, especially when fair value measurement is required. Currently, IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement offers a single and more comprehensive source of guidance that is applied to almost all fair value estimates. When measuring fair value of fixed assets, intangible assets, specified financial assets or liabilities, different valuation techniques may be used: the market approach, the cost approach and the income appr...

  8. Suppression of phase-induced intensity noise in fibre optic delay line signal processors using an optical phase modulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Erwin H W

    2010-10-11

    A technique that can suppress the dominant phase-induced intensity noise in fibre optic delay line signal processors is presented. It is based on phase modulation of the optical carrier to distribute the phase noise at the information band into a high frequency band which can be filtered out. This technique is suitable for suppressing the phase noise in various delay line structures and for integrating in the conventional fibre optic links. It can also suppress the coherent interference effect at the same time. A model for predicting the amount of phase noise reduction in various delay line structures using the optical phase modulation technique is presented for the first time and is experimentally verified. Experimental results demonstrate the technique can achieve a large phase noise reduction in various fibre optic delay line signal processors.

  9. Detection of pitch failures in wind turbines using environmental noise recognition techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Marhadi, Kun S.; Gomez, Robert

    2015-01-01

    of various origin, such as from loose covers, can be generated, complicating the assessment of the impact nature. In this work, detection of pitch issues is performed by analysing vibration impacts from main bearing accelerometers and applying environmental noise and speech recognition techniques......, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. that the frequency band of maximum crest factor presents the best classification performance employing K-means clustering, which is an unsupervised clustering technique. The highest correct classification rate...

  10. A review on creatinine measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr; Ganbari, Ahmad

    2012-08-15

    This paper reviews the entire recent global tendency for creatinine measurement. Creatinine biosensors involve complex relationships between biology and micro-mechatronics to which the blood is subjected. Comparison between new and old methods shows that new techniques (e.g. Molecular Imprinted Polymers based algorithms) are better than old methods (e.g. Elisa) in terms of stability and linear range. All methods and their details for serum, plasma, urine and blood samples are surveyed. They are categorized into five main algorithms: optical, electrochemical, impedometrical, Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistor (ISFET) based technique and chromatography. Response time, detection limit, linear range and selectivity of reported sensors are discussed. Potentiometric measurement technique has the lowest response time of 4-10 s and the lowest detection limit of 0.28 nmol L(-1) belongs to chromatographic technique. Comparison between various techniques of measurements indicates that the best selectivity belongs to MIP based and chromatographic techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. VALUATION TECHNIQUES USED IN FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina-Aurora, BUNEA-BONTAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Valuation of assets and liabilities involves significant judgements and estimates, especially when fair value measurement is required. Currently, IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement offers a single and more comprehensive source of guidance that is applied to almost all fair value estimates. When measuring fair value of fixed assets, intangible assets, specified financial assets or liabilities, different valuation techniques may be used: the market approach, the cost approach and the income approach. This article reviews these techniques and points out that different valuation practices may provide different results depending on the item being fair valued and on the inputs used. Also it emphasizes that, in particular circumstances, there is the possibility that a certain technique may be more appropriate than other.

  12. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  13. Quality and noise measurements in mobile phone video capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Doina; Pincenti, John

    2011-02-01

    The quality of videos captured with mobile phones has become increasingly important particularly since resolutions and formats have reached a level that rivals the capabilities available in the digital camcorder market, and since many mobile phones now allow direct playback on large HDTVs. The video quality is determined by the combined quality of the individual parts of the imaging system including the image sensor, the digital color processing, and the video compression, each of which has been studied independently. In this work, we study the combined effect of these elements on the overall video quality. We do this by evaluating the capture under various lighting, color processing, and video compression conditions. First, we measure full reference quality metrics between encoder input and the reconstructed sequence, where the encoder input changes with light and color processing modifications. Second, we introduce a system model which includes all elements that affect video quality, including a low light additive noise model, ISP color processing, as well as the video encoder. Our experiments show that in low light conditions and for certain choices of color processing the system level visual quality may not improve when the encoder becomes more capable or the compression ratio is reduced.

  14. STATE OF THE ART TECHNIQUES USED FOR NOISE SOURCE IDENTIFICATION ON COMPLEX BODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, many approaches have been undertaken in order to asses detailed noise source identification on complex bodies, i.e. aircrafts, cars, machinery. Noise source identification implies to accurately obtain the position and frequency of the dominant noise sources. There are cases where traditional testing methods can not be applied at all or their use involves some limitations. Optical systems used for near field analysis require a line of sight that may not be available. The state-of-the-art technology for this purpose is the use of a large number of microphones whose signals are acquired simultaneously, i.e. microphone phased array. Due to the excessive cost of the instruments and the data acquisition system required, the implementation of this technology was restricted to governmental agencies (NASA, DLR and big companies such as Boeing and Airbus. During the past years, this technique was developed in wind tunnels and some universities to perform noise source identification on scale airframes, main landing gear models, and aerodynamic profiles (used on airplanes, helicopter rotors and wind mills.

  15. Physiological, Psychological, and Social Effects of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryter, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The physiological, and behavioral effects of noise on man are investigated. Basic parameters such as definitions of noise, measuring techniques of noise, and the physiology of the ear are presented prior to the development of topics on hearing loss, speech communication in noise, social effects of noise, and the health effects of noise pollution. Recommendations for the assessment and subsequent control of noise is included.

  16. Numerical Results for the System Noise Temperature of an Aperture Array Tile and Comparison with Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ivashina, M V; Bakker, L; Witvers, R H

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the noise performance of a complex beamforming array antenna system and to characterize the recently developed noise measurement facility called THACO, which was developed at ASTRON. The receiver system includes the array antenna of strongly coupled 144 TSA elements, 144 Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) (Tmin =35-40K) and the data recording/storing facilities of the initial test station that allow for off-line digital beamforming. The primary goal of this study is to compare the measured receiver noise temperatures with the simulated values for several practical beamformers, and to predict the associated receiver noise coupling contribution, antenna thermal noise and ground noise pick-up (due to the back radiation).

  17. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Summary The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density D Δ f(f m) is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL) detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure D Δ f(f m) for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops.

  18. Energy-Based Acoustic Measurement System for Rocket Noise Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate estimates of the vibroacoustic loading placed on space vehicles and payloads during launch require knowledge of the rocket noise source properties. Given...

  19. Objective Measures of Listening Effort: Effects of Background Noise and Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. Method: To address this, the hypothesis…

  20. Objective Measures of Listening Effort: Effects of Background Noise and Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. Method: To address this, the hypothesis…

  1. Magnetic Barkhausen noise measurement by resonant coil method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capo-Sanchez, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Oriente, Av. Patricio Lumumba s/n, 90500 Santiago de Cuba (Cuba)], E-mail: jcapo@usp.br; Padovese, L. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    This paper describes a powerful new technique for nondestructive evaluation of ferromagnetic material. A method has been developed for measuring magnetic Barkhausen signals under different coil resonance frequencies. The measurements allow one to establish the behavior relating the power spectral density maximum and the resonant coil frequency. Time-frequency analysis of Barkhausen signals puts in evidence the tuning regions for each coil, and allows clear identification of each contribution to the Barkhausen signal spectrum. This concept was used in order to evaluate the relation between the degree of plastic deformation in carbon steel samples, and the power spectral density maximum at different resonance frequencies. This result also makes it possible to the selectively modify measurement sensibility to the magnetic Barkhausen signal by using different resonance frequencies.

  2. Measurement and Analysis of the Noise Radiated by Low Mach Number Centrifugal Blowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, David Marvin

    An investigation was performed of the broad band, aerodynamically generated noise in low tip-speed Mach number, centrifugal air moving devices. An interdisciplinary experimental approach was taken which involved investigation of the aerodynamic and acoustic fields, and their mutual relationship. The noise generation process was studied using two experimental vehicles: (1) a scale model of a homologous family of centrifugal blowers typical of those used to cool computer and business equipment, and (2) a single blade from a centrifugal blower impeller placed in a known, controllable flow field. The radiation characteristics of the model blower were investigated by measuring the acoustic intensity distribution near the blower inlet and comparing it with the intensity near the inlet to an axial flow fan. Results showed that the centrifugal blower is a distributed, random noise source, unlike an axial fan which exhibited the effects of a coherent, interacting source distribution. Aerodynamic studies of the flow field in the inlet and at the discharge to the rotating impeller were used to assess the mean flow distribution through the impeller blade channels and to identify regions of excessive turbulence near the rotating blade row. Both circumferential and spanwise mean flow nonuniformities were identified along with a region of increased turbulence just downstream of the scroll cutoff. The fluid incidence angle, normally taken as an indicator of blower performance, was estimated from mean flow data as deviating considerably from an ideal impeller design. An investigation of the noise radiated from the single, isolated airfoil was performed using modern correlation and spectral analysis techniques. Radiation from the single blade in flow was characterized using newly developed expressions for the correlation area and the dipole source strength per unit area, and from the relationship between the blade surface pressure and the incident turbulent flow field. Results

  3. Proposal of up-to-date standards on methods of measuring noise in linear twoports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, G.; Sannino, M. [Univ. of Palermo (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    One of the most interesting topics for microwave community is the characterization of low-noise transistors. After so many years, the Standards suggested by IEEE in 1960 arc considered obsolete by the experimenters. A new methodology is here proposed as a standard. To support this proposal, an original measuring system for the complete characterization of microwave transistors in terms of noise, gain and scattering parameters from noise figure measurements only is presented.

  4. Measurement of noise and its correlation to performance and geometry of small aircraft propellers

    OpenAIRE

    Štorch Vít; Nožička Jiří; Brada Martin; Gemperle Jiří; Suchý Jakub

    2016-01-01

    A set of small model and UAV propellers is measured both in terms of aerodynamic performance and acoustic noise under static conditions. Apart from obvious correlation of noise to tip speed and propeller diameter the influence of blade pitch, blade pitch distribution, efficiency and shape of the blade is sought. Using the measured performance data a computational model for calculation of aerodynamic noise of propellers will be validated. The range of selected propellers include both propeller...

  5. Comparison of cardiac output measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, K; Jensen, E W; Rosenborg, D;

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneously measured cardiac output obtained by thermodilution (TD), transcutaneous suprasternal ultrasonic Doppler (DOP), CO2-rebreathing (CR) and the direct Fick method (FI) were compared in eleven healthy subjects in a supine position (SU), a sitting position (SI), and during sitting exercise...... at a workload of 50 W (EX). The agreements between the techniques, two by two, were expressed as the bias calculated as the averaged differences between the techniques. Precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the bias. The overall agreement (bias +/- precision) between TD, DOP and CR respectively...... and CR, respectively, and TD were 2.5 +/- 2.2 and 2.6 +/- 1.6 l/min. The overall agreement between DOP and CR was 0.1 +/- 1.6 l/min. In conclusion, TD overestimated cardiac output compared to the other techniques and the poor agreement has to be taken into consideration especially in measures of low...

  6. Ionospheric Measurements Using Environmental Sampling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeau, R. E.; Jackson, J. E.; Kane, J. A.; Serbu, G. P.

    1960-01-01

    Two rockets were flown to peak altitudes of 220 km in September 1959 to test various methods planned for future measurements of ionization parameters in the ionosphere, exosphere, and interplanetary plasma. The experiments used techniques which sample the ambient environment in the immediate vicinity of the research vehicle. Direct methods were chosen since indirect propagation techniques do not provide the temperatures of charged particles, are insensitive to ion densities, and cannot measure local electron densities under all conditions. Very encouraging results have been obtained from a preliminary analysis of data provided by one of the two flights. A new rf probe technique was successfully used to determine the electron density profile. This was indicated by its agreement with the results of a companion cw propagation experiment, particularly when the probe data were corrected for the effects of the ion sheath which surrounds the vehicle. The characteristics of this sheath were determined directly in flight by an electric field meter which provided the sheath field, and by a Langmuir probe which measured the total potential across the sheath. The electron temperatures deduced from the Langmuir probe data are greater than the neutral gas temperatures previously measured for the same location and season, but these measurements possibly were taken under different atmospheric conditions. Ion densities were calculated from the ion trap data for several altitudes ranging from 130 to 210 km and were found to be within 20 percent of the measured electron densities.

  7. Fourier transform approach in modulation technique of experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazimullin, M V; Lebedev, Yu A

    2010-04-01

    An application of Fourier transform approach in modulation technique of experimental studies is considered. This method has obvious advantages compared with traditional lock-in amplifiers technique--simple experimental setup, a quickly available information on all the required harmonics, high speed of data processing using fast Fourier transform algorithm. A computationally simple, fast and accurate Fourier coefficients interpolation (FCI) method has been implemented to obtain a useful information from harmonics of a multimode signal. Our analysis shows that in this case FCI method has a systematical error (bias) of a signal parameters estimation, which became essential for the short data sets. Hence, a new differential Fourier coefficients interpolation (DFCI) method has been suggested, which is less sensitive to a presence of several modes in a signal. The analysis has been confirmed by simulations and measurements of a quartz wedge birefringence by means of the photoelastic modulator. The obtained bias, noise level, and measuring speed are comparable and even better than in lock-in amplifier technique. Moreover, presented DFCI method is expected to be promised candidate for using in actively developing imaging systems based on the modulation technique requiring fast digital signal processing of large data sets.

  8. Prediction of galaxy ellipticities and reduction of shape noise in cosmic shear measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Rupert A. C.; Freeman, Peter E.; Schuster, Thomas S.; Schafer, Chad M.

    2017-08-01

    The intrinsic scatter in the ellipticities of galaxies about the mean shape, known as `shape noise', is the most important source of noise in weak lensing shear measurements. Several approaches for reducing shape noise have recently been put forward, using information beyond photometry, such as radio polarization and optical spectroscopy. Here we investigate how well the intrinsic ellipticities of galaxies can be predicted using other exclusively photometric parameters. These (such as galaxy colours) are already available in the data and do not necessitate additional, often expensive observations. We apply a regression technique, generalized additive models to the publicly released galaxy property data from CFHTLenS. We find that the individual galaxy ellipticities can be predicted from other photometric parameters to better precision than the scatter about the mean ellipticity. The ellipticity contribution to the shear can apparently therefore be measured to higher precision, comparable to using a larger sample of galaxies. Using only parameters unaffected by lensing (e.g. surface brightness, colour), our best-fitting model leads to a gain (for the ellipticity contribution only) equivalent to having 12 per cent more galaxies in the sample. Allowing parameters correlated with lensing increases the apparent gains (we find 52.5 per cent), but these would likely be negated by correlations between the predictor and measured shear. We caution that the ultimate usefulness of this method will depend on careful treatment of the effect of the point spread function and input parameter measurement. This is to avoid information on the ellipticity contaminating the estimated ellipticity through observational effects rather than true physical correlations.

  9. An examination of the parametric properties of four noise sensitivity measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kamp, Irene; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Lopez-Barrio, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    Noise sensitivity (NS) is a personality trait with a strong influence on reactions to noise. Studies of reaction should include a standard measure of NS that is founded on a theoretically justified definition of NS, and examination of existing NS measures' parametric properties (internal consiste...

  10. Phase noise measurement of high-power fiber amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Xiao; Xiaolin Wang; Yanxing Ma; Bing He; Pu Zhou; Jun Zhou; Xiaojun Xu

    2011-01-01

    We measure the phase fluctuation in a high-power fiber amplifier using a multi-dithering technique. Its fluctuation property is qualitatively analyzed by the power spectral density and integrated spectral density.Low frequency fluctuations caused by the environment are dominant in the phase fluctuations in an amplifier, whereas the high frequency components related to laser power affect the control bandwidth. The bandwidth requirement of the active phase-locking is calculated to be 300 Hz, 670 Hz, 1.6 kHz, and 3.9 kHz under the output power of 25,55, 125, and 180W, respectively. The approximately linear relationship between the control bandwidth and laser power needs to be further investigated.%@@ We measure the phase fluctuation in a high-power fiber amplifier using a multi-dithering technique.Its fluctuation property is qualitatively analyzed by the power spectral density and integrated spectral density.Low frequency fluctuations caused by the environment are dominant in the phase fluctuations in an am-plifier, whereas the high frequency components related to laser power affect the control bandwidth.The bandwidth requirement of the active phase-locking is calculated to be 300 Hz, 670 Hz, 1.6 kHz, and 3.9kHz under the output power of 25, 55, 125, and 180 W, respectively.The approximately linear relationship between the control bandwidth and laser power needs to be further investigated.

  11. The development of a CPX measurement set-up capable of measuring tire-road noise effectively

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekke, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the Directive 2001/43 limits are put on the maximum noise level of a pass-by noise measurement on an ISO 10844 surface. This prescribed measurement set-up only gives an LAmax level of the total passage of a whole vehicle equipped with four tires and does not provide enough information for a probl

  12. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic fi eld experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal’s orientation in the sound fi eld affect the reliability of on-animal rec......In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic fi eld experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal’s orientation in the sound fi eld affect the reliability of on......-animal recordings as proxies for actual exposure. Here, we quantify sound exposure levels recorded with a DTAG-3 tag on a captive harbor porpoise exposed to vessel noise in a controlled acoustic environment. Results show that fl ow noise is limiting onboard noise recordings, whereas no evidence of body shading has...

  13. High-voltage test and measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Hauschild, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    It is the intent of this book to combine high-voltage (HV) engineering with HV testing technique and HV measuring technique. Based on long-term experience gained by the authors as lecturer and researcher as well as member in international organizations, such as IEC and CIGRE, the book will reflect the state of the art as well as the future trends in testing and diagnostics of HV equipment to ensure a reliable generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy. The book is intended not only for experts but also for students in electrical engineering and high-voltage engineering.

  14. Unsteady measurement techniques for turbomachinery flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffa, Nicholas Andrew

    Accurate unsteady measurements are required for studying the flows in high speed turbomachines, which rely on the interaction between rotating and stationary components. Using statistics of phase locked ensembles simplifies the problem, but accurate frequency response in the 10-100 kHz range significantly limits the applicable techniques. This research advances the state of the art for phase resolved measurement techniques using for high speed turbomachinery flows focusing on the following areas: development, validation, and uncertainty quantification. Four methods were developed and implemented: an unsteady total pressure probe, the multiple overheat hot-wire method, the slanted hot-wire method, and the phase peak yaw hot-wire method. These methods allow for the entire phase locked average flow field to be measured (temperature, pressure, and velocity components, swirl angle, etc.). No trusted reference measurement or representative canonical flow exists for comparison of the phase resolved quantities, making validation challenging. Five different validation exercises were performed to increase the confidence and explore the range of applicability. These exercises relied on checking for consistency with expected flow features, comparing independent measurements, and cross validation with CFD. The combined uncertainties for the measurements were quantified using uncertainty estimates from investigations into the elemental error sources. The frequency response uncertainty of constant temperature hot-wire system was investigated using a novel method of illuminating the wire with a laser pulse. The uncertainty analysis provided estimates for the uncertainty in the measurements as well as showing the sensitivity to various sources of error.

  15. Cross-correlation measurement techniques for cavity-based axion and weakly interacting slim particle searches

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Stephen R; Ivanov, Eugene N; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), such as axions, are highly motivated dark matter candidates. The most sensitive experimental searches for these particles exploit WISP-to-photon conversion mechanisms and use resonant cavity structures to enhance the resulting power signal. For WISPs to constitute Cold Dark Matter their required masses correspond to photons in the microwave spectrum. As such, searches for these types of WISPs are primarily limited by the thermal cavity noise and the broadband first-stage amplifier noise. In this work we propose and then verify two cross-correlation measurement techniques for cavity-based WISP searches. These are two channel measurement schemes where the cross-spectrum is computed, rejecting uncorrelated noise sources while still retaining correlated signals such as those generated by WISPs. The first technique allows for the cavity thermal spectrum to be observed with an enhanced resolution. The second technique cross-correlates two individual cavity/amplifier system...

  16. Measurement of noise and its correlation to performance and geometry of small aircraft propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štorch, Vít; Nožička, Jiří; Brada, Martin; Gemperle, Jiří; Suchý, Jakub

    2016-03-01

    A set of small model and UAV propellers is measured both in terms of aerodynamic performance and acoustic noise under static conditions. Apart from obvious correlation of noise to tip speed and propeller diameter the influence of blade pitch, blade pitch distribution, efficiency and shape of the blade is sought. Using the measured performance data a computational model for calculation of aerodynamic noise of propellers will be validated. The range of selected propellers include both propellers designed for nearly static conditions and propellers that are running at highly offdesign conditions, which allows to investigate i.e. the effect of blade stall on both noise level and performance results.

  17. Measurement of noise and its correlation to performance and geometry of small aircraft propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štorch Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of small model and UAV propellers is measured both in terms of aerodynamic performance and acoustic noise under static conditions. Apart from obvious correlation of noise to tip speed and propeller diameter the influence of blade pitch, blade pitch distribution, efficiency and shape of the blade is sought. Using the measured performance data a computational model for calculation of aerodynamic noise of propellers will be validated. The range of selected propellers include both propellers designed for nearly static conditions and propellers that are running at highly offdesign conditions, which allows to investigate i.e. the effect of blade stall on both noise level and performance results.

  18. Measurement of BSR noise of cockpit module materials for automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, C.; Park, H.

    2016-04-01

    Today, the interior noise perceived by occupants is becoming an important factor driving design standards for the design of most of interior assemblies in an automotive vehicles. BSR(Buzz, Squeak and Rattle) is a major contributor towards the perceived noise of annoyance to vehicle occupants. One method of minimizing the possibility of squeak and rattle is by making use of the judicious selection of mating materials pairs. In this paper, the BSR test system was designed and built. Also described is a test instrument that has been developed for such material pair compatibility studies.

  19. Measuring the spectrum of colored noise by dynamical decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-12-02

    Decoherence is one of the most important obstacles that must be overcome in quantum information processing. It depends on the qubit-environment coupling strength, but also on the spectral composition of the noise generated by the environment. If the spectral density is known, fighting the effect of decoherence can be made more effective. Applying sequences of inversion pulses to the qubit system, we developed a method for dynamical decoupling noise spectroscopy. We generate effective filter functions that probe the environmental spectral density without requiring assumptions about its shape. Comparing different pulse sequences, we recover the complete spectral density function and distinguish different contributions to the overall decoherence.

  20. On the use of mobile phones and wearable microphones for noise exposure measurements: Calibration and measurement accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Romain

    Despite the fact that noise-induced hearing loss remains the number one occupational disease in developed countries, individual noise exposure levels are still rarely known and infrequently tracked. Indeed, efforts to standardize noise exposure levels present disadvantages such as costly instrumentation and difficulties associated with on site implementation. Given their advanced technical capabilities and widespread daily usage, mobile phones could be used to measure noise levels and make noise monitoring more accessible. However, the use of mobile phones for measuring noise exposure is currently limited due to the lack of formal procedures for their calibration and challenges regarding the measurement procedure. Our research investigated the calibration of mobile phone-based solutions for measuring noise exposure using a mobile phone's built-in microphones and wearable external microphones. The proposed calibration approach integrated corrections that took into account microphone placement error. The corrections were of two types: frequency-dependent, using a digital filter and noise level-dependent, based on the difference between the C-weighted noise level minus A-weighted noise level of the noise measured by the phone. The electro-acoustical limitations and measurement calibration procedure of the mobile phone were investigated. The study also sought to quantify the effect of noise exposure characteristics on the accuracy of calibrated mobile phone measurements. Measurements were carried out in reverberant and semi-anechoic chambers with several mobiles phone units of the same model, two types of external devices (an earpiece and a headset with an in-line microphone) and an acoustical test fixture (ATF). The proposed calibration approach significantly improved the accuracy of the noise level measurements in diffuse and free fields, with better results in the diffuse field and with ATF positions causing little or no acoustic shadowing. Several sources of errors

  1. Simple digital phase-measuring algorithm for low-noise heterodyne interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokuyama, Wataru; Nozato, Hideaki; Ohta, Akihiro; Hattori, Koichiro

    2016-08-01

    We present a digital algorithm for measuring the phase of a sinusoidal signal that combines the modified digital fringe-counting method with two-sample zero crossing to enable sequential signal processing. This technique can be applied to a phase meter for measuring dynamic phase differences between two sinusoidal signals with high resolution, particularly for heterodyne interferometry. The floor noise obtained from a demonstration with an electrical apparatus is 5× {{10}-8} \\text{rad}\\text{/}{{\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}}{}} at frequencies above approximately 0.1 Hz for 80 kHz signal frequency. In addition, by applying this method to a commercial heterodyne interferometer with a modulation frequency of 80 MHz, the floor-noise level is confirmed to be 7× {{10}-14}\\text{m}\\text{/}{{\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}}{}} from 4 kHz to 1 MHz. We also confirm the validity of the algorithm by comparing its results with those from a standard homodyne interferometer for measuring shock-motion peak acceleration greater than 5000 \\text{m} {{\\text{s}}-2} and a 10 mm stroke.

  2. Laser Feedback Technique for Precise Retardation Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Li-Gang; ZHANG Shu-Lian

    2006-01-01

    @@ A simple and precise retardation measurement based on laser feedback is demonstrated. The measurement principle is based on polarization flipping induced by optical feedback from an external birefringence cavity.The measured wave plate is located in the external cavity. When the length of the external cavity is tuned,the polarization states of laser will flip between two eigenstates, and the position of polarization flipping in one period of intensity modulation will vary with retardation of the wave plate. The duty ratio of two eigenstates is used to determine the retardation. Main advantages of the technique are that it is compact, low cost, fast and flexible. Especially, it is insensitive to a fluctuation of laser intensity and is suitable for on-line measurement. The experimental results have shown that the measurement uncertainty is better than 0.03° in the range 30°-150°.

  3. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin' ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  4. On noise treatment in radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.G., E-mail: frank.schroeder@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Apel, W.D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus South, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Asch, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita, Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus South, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Universitaet Siegen, Fachbereich Physik (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita, Torino (Italy); INAF Torino, Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (Italy); and others

    2012-01-11

    Precise measurements of the radio emission by cosmic ray air showers require an adequate treatment of noise. Unlike to usual experiments in particle physics, where noise always adds to the signal, radio noise can in principle decrease or increase the signal if it interferes by chance destructively or constructively. Consequently, noise cannot simply be subtracted from the signal, and its influence on amplitude and time measurement of radio pulses must be studied with care. First, noise has to be determined consistently with the definition of the radio signal which typically is the maximum field strength of the radio pulse. Second, the average impact of noise on radio pulse measurements at individual antennas is studied for LOPES. It is shown that a correct treatment of noise is especially important at low signal-to-noise ratios: noise can be the dominant source of uncertainty for pulse height and time measurements, and it can systematically flatten the slope of lateral distributions. The presented method can also be transferred to other experiments in radio and acoustic detection of cosmic rays and neutrinos.

  5. Techniques to measure testosterone in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G; Heser, D W

    2000-01-01

    In today's clinical and research settings, there is an unfortunate lack of consistency for the term "measuring testosterone status." This term is often used to refer to a measure of biologic androgen activity rather than the specific measurement of the chemical concentration of the testosterone steroid molecule. Even the measurements of chemical concentrations show considerable methodologic differences. This is true for measurements in elderly men, as well as in other populations, including women. All of the current methods for measuring total testosterone have limitations, especially with regard to low concentrations. In addition, unresolved questions concerning the active form of the hormone preclude definitive determination of which form of testosterone and which other androgen hormones are best suited for measuring androgen activity. When measurement techniques are compared, the numbers correlate with each other but certainly do not represent the same value. There is a need for a consensus as to which forms of hormones should be measured to best assess androgen status, and there is a need to standardize the procedures used to measure these hormones.

  6. A combined aeroelastic-aeroacoustic model for wind turbine noise: Verification and analysis of field measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, semi-empirical engineering models for the three main wind turbine aerodynamic noise sources, namely, turbulent inflow, trailing edge and stall noise, are introduced. They are implemented into the in-house aeroelastic code HAWC2 commonly used for wind turbine load calculations...... and design. The results of the combined aeroelastic and aeroacoustic model are compared with field noise measurements of a 500kW wind turbine. Model and experimental data are in fairly good agreement in terms of noise levels and directivity. The combined model allows separating the various noise sources...... and highlights a number of mechanisms that are difficult to differentiate when only the overall noise from a wind turbine is measured....

  7. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Tian, Liang; Zou, Hongxin

    2010-06-01

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise can be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.

  8. Apparatus, Method, and Computer Program for a Resolution-Enhanced Pseudo-Noise Code Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Steven X. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus, method, and computer program for a resolution enhanced pseudo-noise coding technique for 3D imaging is provided. In one embodiment, a pattern generator may generate a plurality of unique patterns for a return to zero signal. A plurality of laser diodes may be configured such that each laser diode transmits the return to zero signal to an object. Each of the return to zero signal includes one unique pattern from the plurality of unique patterns to distinguish each of the transmitted return to zero signals from one another.

  9. AN UNSYMMETRICAL TRIMMED MEDIAN USING DISTANCE MEASURE AND MIDPOINT FILTER FOR THE REMOVAL OF SALT AND PEPPER NOISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chithra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Image denoising was a preprocessing step in image processing used to remove the noise while retaining as much as possible the important features. The fluctuations in the pixel value caused by the unwanted disturbance were known as noise. Hence, noise reduction techniques have to be used to improve the quality of the image. This article reports on the results of a research algorithm that uses median, midpoint and mean for the reduction of salt and pepper noise from the grayscale images. The median value was calculated for the uncorrupted pixels which are having the minimum distance. The proposed algorithm was tested using Euclidean distance, D4 distance and D8 distance as the distance measures. In this approach, the 3x3 window was selected as initial window size and the window size was made adaptive based on the noise density. The proposed filter was experimented using standard Lena image, 200 iris images, sample Plant images, sample MRI images and sample CT images in JPG/JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group format. These grayscale images used as a test image were induced with salt and pepper noise density ranging from 10% to 90%. The simulated results proved that the proposed approach performs better than the MDBUTMF, AMMF, MNF, IUTMMF, and HYBRID filtering algorithms reported in the literature in terms of PSNR, IEF and MSE

  10. Uncovering signals from measurement noise by electro mechanical amplitude modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present an electromechanical parametric scheme to improve the low-frequency signal-to-noise ratio of energy buffering type transducers. The method is based on periodic modulation of the stiffness in the sensory system which produces upconverted replicas of the signals of interest at frequencies

  11. Pseudo-random noise-continuous-wave laser radar for surface and cloud measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin

    2005-03-01

    Laser radar (lidar) application may require an instrument with compact size, long life of the components, low consumption and eye-safety. One possibility to achieve these features is to use a continuous-wave (cw) diode laser as lidar transmitter. A practical way to perform range-resolved measurements with a cw laser diode is the pseudo-random noise (PRN) modulation. This paper presents a compact PRN-cw lidar, using a 370-mW cw diode laser and an APD as detector. Daytime measurements of cloud base and topographic surface are demonstrated with the PRN-cw lidar technique, where the range detection exceeds 2 km. The detection of the topographic surface is performed with integration time of some tens of milliseconds during daytime and some tens of microseconds during night-time.

  12. Seminar on Detectors and measurements techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, E. (ed.) [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-07-01

    A Nordic Seminar on detectors and radionuclide measurement techniques was held in Lund, Sweden, May 3-4, 2001. The objective was to highlight recent progress and problems for techniques to study environmental radioactivity. It covered the aspect of detector sample geometry's and methods for evaluation of gamma gamma pulse height distributions. Within the field of alpha-spectrometric techniques gridded ionisation chambers, semiconductor detectors and a general description for analysis of alpha-particle-spectra were presented. Recent development in mass spectrometric techniques, AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) and ICPMS (Inductively Coupled Plasma mass Spectrometry) for long-lived radionuclides was described. Principles for analysis of beta particle emitters, especially by liquid scintillation were presented. The seminar also covered radiochemistry such advantages and disadvantages between ion exchange, solvent extraction and extraction chromatography. The use of controlled laboratory conditions for discerning the dynamics of accumulation in organisms was demonstrated. Other techniques such as neutron activation were also shown to be useful analytical tool for certain long-lived radionuclides. The results of the intercalibration exercises within the Nordic countries showed the importance of such analytical quality control. (au)

  13. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  14. Source of statistical noises in the Monte Carlo sampling techniques for coherently scattered photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Detailed comparisons of the predictions of the Relativistic Form Factors (RFFs) and Modified Form Factors (MFFs) and their advantages and shortcomings in calculating elastic scattering cross sections can be found in the literature. However, the issues related to their implementation in the Monte Carlo (MC) sampling for coherently scattered photons is still under discussion. Secondly, the linear interpolation technique (LIT) is a popular method to draw the integrated values of squared RFFs/MFFs (i.e. A(Z, v(i)²)) over squared momentum transfer (v(i)² = v(1)²,......, v(59)²). In the current study, the role/issues of RFFs/MFFs and LIT in the MC sampling for the coherent scattering were analyzed. The results showed that the relative probability density curves sampled on the basis of MFFs are unable to reveal any extra scientific information as both the RFFs and MFFs produced the same MC sampled curves. Furthermore, no relationship was established between the multiple small peaks and irregular step shapes (i.e. statistical noise) in the PDFs and either RFFs or MFFs. In fact, the noise in the PDFs appeared due to the use of LIT. The density of the noise depends upon the interval length between two consecutive points in the input data table of A(Z, v(i)²) and has no scientific background. The probability density function curves became smoother as the interval lengths were decreased. In conclusion, these statistical noises can be efficiently removed by introducing more data points in the A(Z, v(i)²) data tables.

  15. Single spin measurement using cellular automata techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Delgado, C A; Cory, D G; Mosca, M; Cappellaro, Paola; Cory, David G.; Mosca, Michele; Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an approach for single spin measurement. Our method uses techniques from the theory of quantum cellular automata to correlate a large amount of ancillary spins to the one to be measured. It has the distinct advantage of being efficient, and to a certain extent fault-tolerant. Under ideal conditions, it requires the application of only order of cube root of N steps (each requiring a constant number of rf pulses) to create a system of N correlated spins. It is also fairly robust against pulse errors, imperfect initial polarization of the ancilla spin system, and does not rely on entanglement. We study the scalability of our scheme through numerical simulation.

  16. High resolution temperature measurement technique for measuring marine heat flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN; YangYang; YANG; XiaoQiu; WU; BaoZhen; SUN; ZhaoHua; SHI; XiaoBin

    2013-01-01

    High resolution temperature measurement technique is one of the key techniques for measuring marine heat flow. Basing on Pt1000 platinum resistance which has the characteristics of high accuracy and good stability, we designed a bridge reversal excitation circuit for high resolution temperature measurement. And the deep ocean floor in-situ test results show that: (1) temperature deviation and peak-to-peak resolution of the first version circuit board (V1) are 1.960-1.990 mK and 0.980-0.995 m Kat 1.2-2.7°C, respectively; and temperature deviation and peak-to-peak resolution of the second circuit board (V2) are 2.260mK and 1.130 mK at 1.2-1.3°C, respectively; (2) During the 2012NSFC-IndOcean cruise, seafloor geothermal gradient at Ind2012HF03,-07 and-12 stations (water depth ranges from 3841 to 4541 m) were successfully measured, the values are 59.1,75.1 and 71.6°C/km, respectively. And the measurement errors of geothermal gradient at these three stations are less than 3.0% in terms of the peak-to-peak resolution. These indicate that the high resolution temperature measurement technique based on Pt1000 platinum resistance in this paper can be applied to marine heat flow measurement to obtain high precision geothermal parameters.

  17. Improving the accuracy of mirror measurements by removing noise and lens distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhou

    2016-11-01

    Telescope mirrors determine the imaging quality and observation ability of telescopes. Unfortunately, manufacturing highly accurate mirrors remains a bottleneck problem in space optics. One main factor is the lack of a technique for measuring the 3D shapes of mirrors accurately for inverse engineering. Researchers have studied and developed techniques for testing the quality of telescope mirrors and methods for measuring the 3D shapes of mirrors for centuries. Among these, interferometers have become popular in evaluating the surface errors of manufactured mirrors. However, interferometers are unable to measure some important mirror parameters directly and accurately, e.g. the paraxial radius, geometry dimension and eccentric errors, and these parameters are essential for mirror manufacturing. In this paper, we aim to remove the noise and lens distortion inherent in the system to improve the accuracy of a previously proposed one-shot projection mirror measurement method. To this end, we propose a ray modeling and a pattern modeling method. The experimental results show that the proposed ray modeling and pattern modeling method can improve the accuracy of the one-shot projection method significantly, making it feasible as a commercial device to measure the shapes of mirrors quantitatively and accurately.

  18. Measurement and analyses of spectral noise power in computed tomography; Medida y analisis del espectro de potencias del ruido en imagenes de tomografia computarizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Tejero, P.; Garayoa Roca, J.

    2014-07-01

    Noise is an important feature of image quality. The standard deviation of pixel value in a uniform region has been frequently used as a metric to characterize noise. However, this measure does not provide any information about the noise spatial distribution. A more complete description is given by the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) which provides both the amount and the spatial correlation of noise. The objective of the present work is to present a methodology and a computing tool to obtain the NPS, in order to analyze its components and study their behaviour for computed tomography (TC) images. Our results show that the major contribution to NPS is a random source for all the explored working conditions. The structural component is constrained to the low frequency region, where it can be as important as the random component. Moreover, we observe that the reconstruction filter and the acquisition technique, axial or helical, have a clear impact on the image noise. (Author)

  19. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  20. On the Scaling of Small, Heat Simulated Jet Noise Measurements to Moderate Size Exhaust Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dennis K.; Bridges, James; Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center- in partnership with GE Aviation is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to validate methodology for using data obtained from small and moderate scale experiments to reliably predict the most important components of full scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small scale and moderate scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. Unresolved issues however are identified that are currently receiving our attention, in particular the effect of the small bypass ratio airflow. Future activities will identify and test promising noise reduction techniques in an effort to predict how well such concepts will work with full scale engines in flight conditions.

  1. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensor with interferometric readout for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve both for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result, for example, is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is 70 mHz with a Q = 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning. Results on the readout system based on polarimetric homodyne Michelson interferometer is discussed.

  2. A DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Steinmann, Philipp; Bochud, François; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2014-09-16

    The toxicity of heavy metals in natural waters is strongly dependent on the local chemical environment. Assessing the bioavailability of radionuclides predicts the toxic effects to aquatic biota. The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is largely exploited for bioavailability measurements of trace metals in waters. However, it has not been applied for plutonium speciation measurements yet. This study investigates the use of DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements in chemically different environments. We used a diffusion cell to determine the diffusion coefficients (D) of plutonium in polyacrylamide (PAM) gel and found D in the range of 2.06-2.29 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). It ranged between 1.10 and 2.03 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) in the presence of fulvic acid and in natural waters with low DOM. In the presence of 20 ppm of humic acid of an organic-rich soil, plutonium diffusion was hindered by a factor of 5, with a diffusion coefficient of 0.50 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). We also tested commercially available DGT devices with Chelex resin for plutonium bioavailability measurements in laboratory conditions and the diffusion coefficients agreed with those from the diffusion cell experiments. These findings show that the DGT methodology can be used to investigate the bioaccumulation of the labile plutonium fraction in aquatic biota.

  3. Metrology of vibration measurements by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Martens, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Metrology as the art of careful measurement has been understood as uniform methodology for measurements in natural sciences, covering methods for the consistent assessment of experimental data and a corpus of rules regulating application in technology and in trade and industry. The knowledge, methods and tools available for precision measurements can be exploited for measurements at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology. A metrological approach to the preparation, execution and evaluation (including expression of uncertainty) of measurements of translational and rotational motion quantities using laser interferometer methods and techniques will be presented. The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and upgraded ISO standards are reviewed with respect to their suitability for ensuring traceable vibration measurements and calibrations in an extended frequency range of 0.4 Hz to higher than 100 kHz. Using adequate vibration exciters to generate sufficient displacement or velocity amplitudes, the upper frequency limits of the laser interferometer methods specified in ISO 16063-11 for frequencies procedures (i.e. measurement uncertainty 0.05 % at frequencies <= 10 kHz, <= 1 % up to 100 kHz).

  4. Measuring the effectiveness of methods for evaluating noise jammers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Fang; HUANG Jian-guo

    2007-01-01

    Reliable evaluations of a noise jammer's effectiveness are necessary to properly design, manufacture, and operate one, so it is important to have an evaluation model. Based on their characteristics and principles, relevant factors were classified in terms of their contribution to a unit's effectiveness. In this way an evaluation index system was established. In the proposed mathematical model a noise jammer is analyzed by combining the model of system effectiveness with the method of analytic hierarchical process. A simulation of underwater acoustic countermeasures was used to test the rationality and feasibility of the model. The results showed that this model is an effective way to solve the challenge of evaluating the effectiveness of non-offensive weapons under single working phase.

  5. Uncertainties and noise in coupling measurements at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wierichs, David Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This report demonstrates the influence of noise in turn-by-turn data on the analysis of the coupling. Noise is shown to be an important source of errors on the determined coupling parameter $f_{1001}$ and using several new formulae, the necessity to introduce an errorbar based on the noise is shown. Examples for critical influence of noise on the results are octupole noise and measurements after coupling corrections with very small $C^-$. We propose an estimation of the errorbars on $f_{1001}$ and the coupling using the noise in the spectra between the resonance lines. The proposed concepts are validated using simulations and shown to make a big step towards the computation of $\\sigma_{C^-}$. Subsequent steps to finish this development are summarized in the outlook.

  6. Recognition of the noise sources and measurement in educational hospital s General Intensive Care Unit (GICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Abolhasannejad

    2014-11-01

    Results: Mean sound pressure level for GICU was 60.9±1/6 dBA that is more than the standard level. The mean of maximum noise level was obtained 82.5±2 dBA and the highest noise level was measured at nursing station. There was significant difference in Noise Pollution level based on different months, level of patient's conciseness and number of ventilator using (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Being more noise pollution in the ICU and stations on all shifts may cause to diminish health and well-being of the staff in long-term and produce some problems for the patient. According to the highest level of noise produced in nursing stations and the different activities doing by the staff as a main noise pollution factor, it's necessary to perform required training in relationship with doing the works in right manner so that we can produce quiet and silence environment for patience.

  7. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise using a binocular display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, George A.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Heft, Eric L.

    2004-09-01

    Users of night vision goggles (NVGs) have reported differences in perceived noise across various NVGs. To understand these differences, we need to measure NVG noise in a psychophysical context. In the precursory study, subjects attempted to characterize NVG noise by examining choices across different parameters of filtered white noise generated on a computer monitor. Subjects adjusted parameters of the filtered noise to match the noise for each combination of two goggles and two luminance levels. Significant differences were found between luminance levels, NVG type, and parameter relationships. Concerns from the previous experiment have yielded this study to better understand if this characterization process has merit. In the previous study, the parameter sequence was constant across trials. We increased the number of trials and subjects, and we included an accounting for parameter sequence. In addition, we used a modified Wheatstone stereoscope to simulate NVG tube independence. We discuss our results in terms of luminance levels, parameter sequence, subject variability, and relationships between parameters.

  8. Full-field wafer warpage measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, H. L.; Lee, J. Y.; Huang, Y. G.; Liang, A. J.; Sun, B. Y.

    2017-06-01

    An innovative moiré technique for full-field wafer warpage measurement is proposed in this study. The wafer warpage measurement technique is developed based on moiré method, Talbot effect, scanning profiling method, stroboscopic, instantaneous phase-shift method, as well as four-step phase shift method, high resolution, high stability and full-field measurement capabilities can be easily achieved. According to the proposed full-field optical configuration, a laser beam is expanded into a collimated beam with a 2-inch diameter and projected onto the wafer surface. The beam is reflected by the wafer surface and forms a moiré fringe image after passing two circular gratings, which is then focused and captured on a CCD camera for computation. The corresponding moiré fringes reflected from the wafer surface are obtained by overlapping the images of the measuring grating and the reference grating. The moiré fringes will shift when wafer warpage occurs. The phase of the moiré fringes will change proportionally to the degree of warpage in the wafer, which can be measured by detecting variations in the phase shift of the moiré fringes in each detection points on the surface of the entire wafer. The phase shift variations of each detection points can be calculated via the instantaneous phase-shift method and the four-step phase-shift method. By adding up the phase shift variations of each detection points along the radii of the circular gratings, the warpage value and surface topography of the wafer can be obtained. Experiments show that the proposed method is capable of obtaining test results similar to that of a commercial sensor, as well as performing accurate measurements under high speed rotation of 1500rpm. As compared to current warpage measurement methods such as the beam optical method, confocal microscopy, laser interferometry, shadow moiré method, and structured light method, this proposed technique has the advantage of full-field measurement, high

  9. Evaluation of the interim measurement protocol for railway noise source description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, M.H.A.; Jansen, H.W.; Dittrich, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The Dutch national calculation scheme for railway noise has been declared the default interim method for railway noise calculation by the EU, until the introduction of results from the Harmonoise project. It includes a measurement protocol for determining emission input data in the format suitable

  10. Estimation of MIMO channel capacity from phase-noise impaired measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Yin, Xuefeng; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2008-01-01

    phase noise samples affecting measurement samples collected with real TDMMIMO channel sounders are correlated. In this contribution a capacity estimator that accounts for the phase noise correlation is proposed. The estimator is based on a linear minimum mean square error estimate of the MIMO channel...

  11. Thermoluminescence measurement technique using millisecond temperature pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Michael E; Gabriel, Nicholas T; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Talghader, Joseph J

    2010-06-01

    A measurement technique, pulsed thermoluminescence, is described which uses short thermal pulses to excite trapped carriers leading to radiative recombination. The pulses are obtained using microstructures with approximately 500 micros thermal time constants. The technique has many of the advantages of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence without the need for optical sources and filters to isolate the luminescent signal. Charge carrier traps in alpha-Al(2)O(3):C particles on microheaters were filled using 205 nm light. Temperature pulses of 10 and 50 ms were applied to the heaters and compared with a standard thermoluminescence curve taken at a ramp rate of 5 K s(-1). This produced curves of intensity verses temperature similar to standard thermoluminescence except shifted to higher temperatures. The luminescence of single particles was read multiple times with negligible loss of population. The lower limit of the duration of useful pulses appears to be limited by particle size and thermal contact between the particle and heater.

  12. A Two-Step A/D Conversion and Column Self-Calibration Technique for Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Bae

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a 120 frames per second (fps low noise CMOS Image Sensor (CIS based on a Two-Step Single Slope ADC (TS SS ADC and column self-calibration technique is proposed. The TS SS ADC is suitable for high speed video systems because its conversion speed is much faster (by more than 10 times than that of the Single Slope ADC (SS ADC. However, there exist some mismatching errors between the coarse block and the fine block due to the 2-step operation of the TS SS ADC. In general, this makes it difficult to implement the TS SS ADC beyond a 10-bit resolution. In order to improve such errors, a new 4-input comparator is discussed and a high resolution TS SS ADC is proposed. Further, a feedback circuit that enables column self-calibration to reduce the Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN is also described. The proposed chip has been fabricated with 0.13 μm Samsung CIS technology and the chip satisfies the VGA resolution. The pixel is based on the 4-TR Active Pixel Sensor (APS. The high frame rate of 120 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution. The measured FPN is 0.38 LSB, and measured dynamic range is about 64.6 dB.

  13. Measurement of Allan variance and phase noise at fractions of a millihertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Bruce L.; Le, Duc

    1990-01-01

    Although the measurement of Allan variance of oscillators is well documented, there is a need for a simplified system for finding the degradation of phase noise and Allan variance step-by-step through a system. This article describes an instrumentation system for simultaneous measurement of additive phase noise and degradation in Allan variance through a transmitter system. Also included are measurements of a 20-kW X-band transmitter showing the effect of adding a pass tube regulator.

  14. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources.

  15. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam eAshtiani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for 1/3rd Octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low frequency noise sources.

  16. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  17. Progress in automation, robotics and measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent progresses in control, automation, robotics, and measuring techniques. It includes contributions of top experts in the fields, focused on both theory and industrial practice. The particular chapters present a deep analysis of a specific technical problem which is in general followed by a numerical analysis and simulation, and results of an implementation for the solution of a real world problem. The presented theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines will be useful for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and for practitioners solving industrial problems.    .

  18. Measured Aperture-Array Noise Temperature of the Mark II Phased Array Feed for ASKAP

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, A P; Beresford, R J; Hampson, G A; Shaw, R D; Hayman, D B; Macleod, A; Forsyth, A R; Hay, S G; Leach, M; Cantrall, C; Brothers, M L; Hotan, A W

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  19. Efficiency and internal noise for detection of suprathreshold patterns measured using simple reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William A; Findlay, Kellyanne; Manahilov, Velitchko

    2003-05-01

    Studies of the detection of simple visual patterns at threshold contrast have found that human performance is limited by the addition of internal noise and by the sub-optimal sampling efficiency of the visual system. Many common visual tasks require the detection of a signal having a contrast well above threshold, and we sought to measure the internal noise and sampling efficiency for such signals using simple reaction time (RT). Observers were presented with suprathreshold Gabors in dynamic Gaussian white noise and were required to hit a button as soon as each was detected. By comparing the RT variances from humans to those of an ideal observer, visuomotor internal noise and sampling efficiency were measured. The internal noise remains constant and the sampling efficiency increases as the signal contrast increases.

  20. Noise Induce Stress Assessment via Salivary Cortisol Measuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Result: On the rest day and work day, between morning salivary cortisol was no significant difference in two groups. Comparing evening cortisol concentrations in work day with rest day a significant difference was observed, in worker group, but it was not significant in the other group. The evening cortisol in the working day in was significantly higher among workers than officers. .Conclusion: This study revealed that industrial noise exposure with levels higher than 80 dBA has a significant effect on salivary cortisol elevation.

  1. Measuring of noise and wearing of quiet surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Raitanen, Nina

    2005-01-01

    When using surfaces with special qualities, there is a need for tools to assess these qualities. Two methods, SPB (Statistical Pass-by) and CPX (Close Proximity), have been used for testing the noise properties of the surfaces in the other countries. Both of these methods had to be modified to suit the Finnish environment. SPBmod-method adheres to the ISO-standard quite closely. It was decided that heavy vehicles are not included in the test, as stipulated in the standard. The normalisation s...

  2. Measurements of Operational Wind Turbine Noise in UK Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesman, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The effects of wind farm operational noise have not been addressed to the same extent as their construction methods such as piling and drilling of the foundations despite their long operational lifetimes compared with weeks of construction. The results of five postconstruction underwater sound-monitoring surveys on wind farms located throughout the waters of the British Isles are discussed. These wind farms consist of differing turbine power outputs, from 3 to 3.6 MW, and differing numbers of turbines. This work presents an overview of the results obtained and discusses both the levels and frequency components of the sound in several metrics.

  3. Object reconstruction from thermal and shot noises corrupted block-based compressive ultra-low-light-level imaging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sen; Ke, Jun

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, block-based compressive ultra low-light-level imaging (BCU-imaging) is studied. Objects are divided into blocks. Features, or linear combinations of block pixels, instead of pixels, are measured for each block to improve system measurement SNR and thus object reconstructions. Thermal noise and shot noise are discussed for object reconstruction. The former is modeled as Gaussian noise. The latter is modeled as Poisson noise. Linear Wiener operator and linearized iterative Bregman algorithm are used to reconstruct objects from measurements corrupted by thermal noise. SPIRAL algorithm is used to reconstruct object from measurements with shot noise. Linear Wiener operator is also studied for measurements with shot noise, because Poisson noise is similar to Gaussian noise at large signal level and feature values are large enough to make this assumption feasible. Root mean square error (RMSE) is used to quantify system reconstruction quality.

  4. Microphone Handling Noise: Measurements of Perceptual Threshold and Effects on Audio Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kendrick

    Full Text Available A psychoacoustic experiment was carried out to test the effects of microphone handling noise on perceived audio quality. Handling noise is a problem affecting both amateurs using their smartphones and cameras, as well as professionals using separate microphones and digital recorders. The noises used for the tests were measured from a variety of devices, including smartphones, laptops and handheld microphones. The signal features that characterise these noises are analysed and presented. The sounds include various types of transient, impact noises created by tapping or knocking devices, as well as more sustained sounds caused by rubbing. During the perceptual tests, listeners auditioned speech podcasts and were asked to rate the degradation of any unwanted sounds they heard. A representative design test methodology was developed that tried to encourage everyday rather than analytical listening. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the handling noise events was shown to be the best predictor of quality degradation. Other factors such as noise type or background noise in the listening environment did not significantly affect quality ratings. Podcast, microphone type and reproduction equipment were found to be significant but only to a small extent. A model allowing the prediction of degradation from the SNR is presented. The SNR threshold at which 50% of subjects noticed handling noise was found to be 4.2 ± 0.6 dBA. The results from this work are important for the understanding of our perception of impact sound and resonant noises in recordings, and will inform the future development of an automated predictor of quality for handling noise.

  5. Microphone Handling Noise: Measurements of Perceptual Threshold and Effects on Audio Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Paul; Jackson, Iain R; Fazenda, Bruno M; Cox, Trevor J; Li, Francis F

    2015-01-01

    A psychoacoustic experiment was carried out to test the effects of microphone handling noise on perceived audio quality. Handling noise is a problem affecting both amateurs using their smartphones and cameras, as well as professionals using separate microphones and digital recorders. The noises used for the tests were measured from a variety of devices, including smartphones, laptops and handheld microphones. The signal features that characterise these noises are analysed and presented. The sounds include various types of transient, impact noises created by tapping or knocking devices, as well as more sustained sounds caused by rubbing. During the perceptual tests, listeners auditioned speech podcasts and were asked to rate the degradation of any unwanted sounds they heard. A representative design test methodology was developed that tried to encourage everyday rather than analytical listening. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the handling noise events was shown to be the best predictor of quality degradation. Other factors such as noise type or background noise in the listening environment did not significantly affect quality ratings. Podcast, microphone type and reproduction equipment were found to be significant but only to a small extent. A model allowing the prediction of degradation from the SNR is presented. The SNR threshold at which 50% of subjects noticed handling noise was found to be 4.2 ± 0.6 dBA. The results from this work are important for the understanding of our perception of impact sound and resonant noises in recordings, and will inform the future development of an automated predictor of quality for handling noise.

  6. Distinguishing signal from noise: New techniques for gravitational wave data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul Thomas

    The principal problem of gravitational wave detection is distinguishing true gravitational wave signals from non-Gaussian noise artifacts. We describe two methods to deal with the problem of non-Gaussian noise in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO). Perturbed black holes (BH) are known to vibrate at determinable quasi-normal mode frequencies. These vibrational modes are strongly excited during the inspiral and merger of binary BH systems. We will develop a template based search for gravitational waves from black hole ringdowns: the final stage of binary merger. Past searches for gravitational waves developed ad hoc detection statistics in an attempt to separate the expected gravitational wave signals from noise. We show how using the output of a multi-variate statistical classifier trained to directly probe the high dimensional parameter space of gravitational waves can improve a search over more traditional means. We conclude by placing preliminary upper limits on the rate of ringdown producing binary BH mergers. LIGO data contains frequent, non-Gaussian, instrument artifacts or glitches. Current LIGO searches for un-modeled gravitational wave bursts are primarily limited by the presence of glitches in analyzed data. We describe the BayesWave algorithm, wherein we model gravitational wave signals and detector glitches simultaneously in the wavelet domain. Using bayesian model selection techniques and a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo, we are able determine whether data is consistent with the presence of gravitational waves, detector glitches, or both. We demonstrate BayesWave's utility as a data quality tool by fitting glitches non-Gaussian LIGO data. Finally, we discuss how BayesWave can be extended into a full-fledged search for gravitational wave bursts.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H; Schneider, M

    2010-05-07

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  8. Alternative techniques for beam halo measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Welsch, CP; Burel, B; Lefèvre, T; Chapman, T; Pilon, MJ

    2006-01-01

    In future high intensity, high energy accelerators it must be ensured that particle losses are minimized, as activation of the vacuum chambers or other components makes maintenance and upgrade work time consuming and costly. It is imperative to have a clear understanding of the mechanisms that can lead to halo formation and to have the possibility to test available theoretical models with an adequate experimental setup. Measurements based on optical transition radiation (OTR) are a well-established technique for measurements of the transverse beam profile. However, in order to be suitable for halo measurements as well, the dynamic range of the final image acquisition system needs to be high, being able to cover at least five orders of magnitude in intensity changes. Here, the performance of a standard acquisition system as it is used in the CLIC test facility (CTF3) is compared to a step-by-step measurement with a small movable photo multiplier tube and an innovative camera system based on charge injection de...

  9. Analysis of 31.4GHz Atmospheric Noise Temperature Measurements at Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambayati, S.; Keihm, S.

    1998-01-01

    The atmospheric noise temperature at 31.4GHz was measured at NASA's Deep Space Communications Complex at Madrid from September 1990 to December 1996 excluding February 1991 and May 1992 using a Water Vapor Radiometer.

  10. Optimal filtering for uncertain systems with stochastic nonlinearities, correlated noises and missing measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Zhang,Yan Zhao,Min Li,; Jianhui Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The global y optimal recursive filtering problem is stu-died for a class of systems with random parameter matrices, stochastic nonlinearities, correlated noises and missing measure-ments. The stochastic nonlinearities are presented in the system model to reflect multiplicative random disturbances, and the addi-tive noises, process noise and measurement noise, are assumed to be one-step autocorrelated as wel as two-step cross-correlated. A series of random variables is introduced as the missing rates governing the intermittent measurement losses caused by un-favorable network conditions. The aim of the addressed filtering problem is to design an optimal recursive filter for the uncertain systems based on an innovation approach such that the filtering error is global y minimized at each sampling time. A numerical simulation example is provided to il ustrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Low-noise correlation measurements based on software-defined-radio receivers and cooled microwave amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Tan, Zhenbing; Cox, Daniel; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a microwave correlation measurement system based on two low-cost USB-connected software defined radio dongles modified to operate as coherent receivers by using a common local oscillator. Existing software is used to obtain I/Q samples from both dongles simultaneously at a software tunable frequency. To achieve low noise, we introduce an easy low-noise solution for cryogenic amplification at 600-900 MHz based on single discrete HEMT with 21 dB gain and 7 K noise temperature. In addition, we discuss the quantization effects in a digital correlation measurement and determination of optimal integration time by applying Allan deviation analysis.

  12. Rainbow technique for multi-parameter measurement of absorbing cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feihu Song; Chuanlong Xu; Shimin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Rainbow refractometry is widely used to measure the radius and real part of refractive index of a cylinder.However,studies on the detection of imaginary part of the refractive index with rainbow technique were scarce.This paper presents a new method for simultaneously measuring the radius,real and imaginary part of the refractive index of a cylinder,on the basis of the Airy theory and the Bouguer theory.The rainbows produced by the illuminated cylinder at a capillary exit are captured by a CCD camera in a labscale system,and then processed by the proposed method.Experimental results showed that the radius,real and imaginary part of the refractive index can be accurately determined when the SNR (signal to noise ratio) of the ripple structure is sufficiently high.However,the SNR of the ripple structure gradually decreases with decreasing scattering intensity of the cylinder,leading to larger measurement errors of the radius and real part of the refractive index.The relative error of the imaginary part of the refractive index derived from the measurement errors of the radius and real part of the refractive index,is less than 3.4%.

  13. Characterization of site-effects in the urban area of Canakkale, Turkey, using ambient noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Alper; Bekler, Tolga; Karagöz, Özlem

    2010-05-01

    The local site conditions can cause variations in the ground motion during the earthquake events. These local effects can be estimated by Nakamura method (1989) which is based on the analysis and treatment of earth vibration records by calculating the ratio of horizontal spectrum to vertical spectrum (H/V). This approach uses ambient noises and aids to estimate the dynamic soil conditions like fundamental vibration period and soil amplification of the surface layers, to characterize the seismic hazard during earthquakes and to provide detailed information for seismic microzonation in small scale urban areas. Due to these advantages, the method has been frequently used by a great number of seismologists and engineers. In this study, we aimed at explaining the soil conditions in Çanakkale and Kepez basins by using H/V technique. Çanakkale and Kepez (NW, Turkey) have fairly complex tectonic structure and have been exposed to serious earthquake damages in historical and instrumental period. Active faults, which have influence on the Çanakkale and Kepez settlements, are the Yenice-Gönen fault, Saroz-Gaziköy fault and Etili fault. It is well known that, these faults have produced high magnitude earthquakes such as 7.2 in 1912 and 7.3 in 1953. The surface geology of the surveyed area is covered by quaternary aged sediments. Sarıçay river, which originates from the eastern hilly area, accumulates sediment deposits and forms this alluvial basin. Considering the geological conditions, ambient noises were recorded at 88 measurement points which were selected to provide good coverage of the study area. All records were acquired during the midnight (between 1:00 am and 6:00 am) to reduce the artificial effects in the urban area. Taking into account the effects of undesirable traffic and industrial noises in the vicinity of measurements stations, record lengths were chosen in the range of 25-75 minutes with the sampling rate of 100 Hz. Once the required signal processes

  14. Measuring noise and vibration in the cockpit of the Mi-8 helicopter

    OpenAIRE

    STOJANOVIC IVICA S.

    2016-01-01

    Noise and vibration are among the main negative elements of the working environment. The aim of this study was to determine the measurement of the size of their effect on helicopter pilots and crew members. The results were compared with the warning and limit values determined by the existing Directives of the European Commission in the field of noise and vibration. The comparison of the results has led to the conclusion that the measured values are unacceptable in terms of safety and health ...

  15. Formation of uniform fringe pattern free from diffraction noise at LDA measurement volume using holographic imaging configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have proposed a technique for improving fringe quality at laser Doppler anemometry measurement volume in real time using single hololens imaging configuration over conventional imaging configuration with Gaussian beam optics. In order to remove interference fringe gradients as well as higher order diffraction noise formed at measurement volume in the former approach, a combined hololens imaging system has also been proposed. For qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of fringes formed at measurement volume, atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been performed.

  16. Feasibility of automated dropsize distributions from holographic data using digital image processing techniques. [particle diameter measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, S. P.; Girard, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automated technique for measuring particle diameters and their spatial coordinates from holographic reconstructions is being developed. Preliminary tests on actual cold-flow holograms of impinging jets indicate that a suitable discriminant algorithm consists of a Fourier-Gaussian noise filter and a contour thresholding technique. This process identifies circular as well as noncircular objects. The desired objects (in this case, circular or possibly ellipsoidal) are then selected automatically from the above set and stored with their parametric representations. From this data, dropsize distributions as a function of spatial coordinates can be generated and combustion effects due to hardware and/or physical variables studied.

  17. Microbial consortium influence upon steel corrosion rate, using polarisation resistance and electrochemical noise techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Gayosso, M.J.; Zavala Olivares, G.; Ruiz Ordaz, N.; Juarez Ramirez, C.; Garcia Esquivel, R.; Padilla Viveros, A

    2004-10-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a process, which affects the oil industry, particularly the hydrocarbons extraction, transport and storage. MIC evaluation has been normally based upon microbiological tests, and just a few references mention alternating methods, such as the electrochemical techniques, which can be used as criteria for their evaluation. In this work, two different electrochemical laboratory techniques, polarisation resistance and electrochemical noise were used, in order to determine the corrosion behaviour of a microbial consortium, obtained from a gas transporting pipeline, located in the southeast of Mexico. The bacteria population growth was found to be different for sessile and plancktonic microorganisms. Moreover, long incubation times were required to reach the maximum concentration of sessile bacteria. The electrochemical techniques used in this study exhibited a similar tendency on the corrosion rate behaviour with time, and values above 0.3 mm year{sup -1} were observed at the end of the experiments. The experiments were complemented with surface analysis. Scanning electron microscope observation of APIXL52 steel coupons, exposed to the consortium action, revealed bacteria presence, as well as a damaged steel surface. A type of localized corrosion was observed on the metal surface, and it was associated to the bacteria effect.

  18. Validation of an Aero-Acoustic Wind Turbine Noise Model Using Advanced Noise Source Measurements of a 500kW Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of a 500 kW stall-regulated wind turbine is investigated. Microphones located relatively close to the wind turbine are used to measure its acoustic emission. The operational conditions of the turbine, such as wind speed, are simultaneously monitored. In parallel, a wind turbine....... A good qualitative agreement is found. When wind speed increases, the rotor noise model shows that at high frequencies the stall noise becomes dominant. It also shows that turbulent inflow noise is dominant at low frequencies for all wind speeds and that trailing edge noise is dominant at low wind speeds...... and at frequencies above 200 Hz....

  19. Investigating optimal technique in the presence of motor system noise: application to the double layout somersault dismount on high bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiley, Michael J; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Minimising joint torque is often used as an optimisation criterion when investigating human movement. Alternatively, an aspect of performance may be chosen to be maximised when investigating sporting movements. The aim of the study was to optimise the technique in the backward giant circle prior to a double layout somersault dismount from the high bar using various criteria to determine which best characterised the technique adopted by a gymnast. Ten recorded gymnast trials were used to determine bar release parameters and the level of noise in the gymnast's movements. A computer simulation model of a gymnast and bar was used to optimise giant circle technique under three criteria: minimising joint torques, maximising the release window and maximising success in the presence of motor system noise. Local and global optimisations of technique were performed using the three criteria starting from the average technique of the 10 recorded trials. All global optimum solutions diverged from the gymnast's technique. The local optimum for maximising success in the presence of noise had a success rate comparable with the global optimum (98% vs. 100%, respectively). It is concluded that the gymnast's technique is characterised by maximising success despite operating with motor system noise.

  20. Optical Fiber Sensors for Infrasonic Wind Noise Reduction and Earth Strain Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Scott

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. This work presents the development and results from four new systems: one in atmospheric acoustics and three in Earth strain. Turbulent pressure fluctuations (wind noise) are a significant limiting factor in low-frequency atmospheric acoustic measurements. The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor (OFIS) provides an alternative to traditional infrasonic wind noise reduction (WNR) techniques by providing an instantaneous average over a large spatial extent. This study shows that linear OFISs ranging in length from 30 to 270 m provide a WNR of up to 30 dB in winds up to 5 m/s, in good agreement with a new analytical model. Arrays of optical fiber strainmeters were deployed to measure sediment compaction at two sites in Bangladesh. One array at Jamalganj (in the north) consists of 20, 40, 60, and 100 m long strainmeters, while the second near Khulna (in the south) also includes lengths of 80 and 300 m. Two years of weekly measurements show a clear seasonal signal and subsidence at both sites that is in reasonable agreement with collocated GPS receivers. A new 250-meter, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the prototyping, design, and deployment at the Pinon Flat Observatory (PFO) are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 epsilon/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio of 0.26. Two prototype horizontal strainmeters were also developed to explore the use of similar interferometric optical fiber

  1. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  2. Particle filters for probability hypothesis density filter with the presence of unknown measurement noise covariance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xinhui; Huang Gaoming; Gao Jun

    2013-01-01

    In Bayesian multi-target filtering, knowledge of measurement noise variance is very important. Significant mismatches in noise parameters will result in biased estimates. In this paper, a new particle filter for a probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter handling unknown measure-ment noise variances is proposed. The approach is based on marginalizing the unknown parameters out of the posterior distribution by using variational Bayesian (VB) methods. Moreover, the sequential Monte Carlo method is used to approximate the posterior intensity considering non-lin-ear and non-Gaussian conditions. Unlike other particle filters for this challenging class of PHD fil-ters, the proposed method can adaptively learn the unknown and time-varying noise variances while filtering. Simulation results show that the proposed method improves estimation accuracy in terms of both the number of targets and their states.

  3. Optimal Linear Filters for Pulse Height Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, K.

    1966-07-15

    For measurements of nuclear pulse height spectra a linear filter is used between the pulse amplifier and the pulse height recorder so as to improve the signal/noise ratio. The problem of finding the optimal filter is investigated with emphasis on technical realizability. The maximum available signal/noise ratio is theoretically calculated on the basis of all the information which can be found in the output of the pulse amplifier, and on an assumed a priori knowledge of the pulse time of arrival. It is then shown that the maximum available signal/noise ratio can be obtained with practical measurements without any a priori knowledge of pulse time of arrival, and a general description of the optimal linear filter is given. The solution is unique, technically realizable, and based solely on data (noise power spectrum and pulse shape) which can be measured at the output terminals of the pulse amplifier used.

  4. Intrinsic noise of a superheated droplet detector for neutron background measurements in massively shielded facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana C.; Morlat, Tomoko A.; Felizardo, Miguel; Kling, Andreas; Marques, José G.; Prudêncio, Maria I.; Marques, Rosa; Carvalho, Fernando P.; Roche, Ignácio Lázaro; Girard, Thomas A.

    2017-09-01

    Superheated droplet detectors are a promising technique to the measurement of low-intensity neutron fields, as detectors can be rendered insensitive to minimum ionizing radiations. We report on the intrinsic neutron-induced signal of C2ClF5 devices fabricated by our group that originate from neutron- and alpha-emitting impurities in the detector constituents. The neutron background was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX-PoliMi code in order to extract the recoil distributions following neutron interaction with the atoms of the superheated liquid. Various nuclear techniques were employed to characterise the detector materials with respect to source isotopes (238U, 232Th and 147Sm) for the normalisation of the simulations and also light elements (B, Li) having high (α, n) neutron production yields. We derived a background signal of 10-3 cts/day in a 1 liter detector of 1-3 wt.% C2ClF5, corresponding to a detection limit in the order of 10-8 n cm-2s-1. Direct measurements in a massively shielded underground facility for dark matter search have confirmed this result. With the borosilicate detector containers found to be the dominant background source in current detectors, possibilities for further noise reduction by 2 orders of magnitude based on selected container materials are discussed.

  5. Source modelling of train noise - Literature review and some initial measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xuetao; Jonasson, Hans; Holmberg, Kjell

    2000-07-01

    A literature review of source modelling of railway noise is reported. Measurements on a special test rig at Surahammar and on the new railway line between Arlanda and Stockholm City are reported and analyzed. In the analysis the train is modelled as a number of point sources with or without directivity and each source is combined with analytical sound propagation theory to predict the sound propagation pattern best fitting the measured data. Wheel/rail rolling noise is considered to be the most important noise source. The rolling noise can be modelled as an array of moving point sources, which have a dipole-like horizontal directivity and some kind of vertical directivity. In general it is necessary to distribute the point sources on several heights. Based on our model analysis the source heights for the rolling noise should be below the wheel axles and the most important height is about a quarter of wheel diameter above the railheads. When train speeds are greater than 250 km/h aerodynamic noise will become important and even dominant. It may be important for low frequency components only if the train speed is less than 220 km/h. Little data are available for these cases. It is believed that aerodynamic noise has dipole-like directivity. Its spectrum depends on many factors: speed, railway system, type of train, bogies, wheels, pantograph, presence of barriers and even weather conditions. Other sources such as fans, engine, transmission and carriage bodies are at most second order noise sources, but for trains with a diesel locomotive engine the engine noise will be dominant if train speeds are less than about 100 km/h. The Nord 2000 comprehensive model for sound propagation outdoors, together with the source model that is based on the understandings above, can suitably handle the problems of railway noise propagation in one-third octave bands although there are still problems left to be solved.

  6. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  7. Measurement of SQUID noise levels for SuperCDMS SNOLAB detectors - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Maxwell [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB is a second generation direct dark matter search. In the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, detectors are able to pick up from signals from dark matter nuclear recoil interactions which occur inside the bulk of the detectors. These interactions produce both phonon and charge signals. HEMTs read out charge signals whereas TES are used to detect phonon signals which are then read out by SQUID amplifiers. SQUID amplifiers must add negligible noise to the TES intrinsic noise which has been previously measured and is approximately 50pA/√Hz down to 100Hz for ease of signal distinguishability in dark matter nuclear interactions. The intrinsic noise level of the SQUID was tested in the SLAC 300mK fridge and determined to provide adequately low levels of noise with a floor of approximately 3pA/√Hz. Furthermore, a 10x amplifier was tested for addition of extraneous noise. This noise was investigated with and without this amplifier, and it was found that it did not add a significant amount of noise to the intrinsic SQUID noise.

  8. Measurement of low signal-to-noise-ratio solar p modes in spatially-resolved helioseismic data

    CERN Document Server

    Salabert, D; Appourchaux, T; Hill, F

    2009-01-01

    We present an adaptation of the rotation-corrected, m-averaged spectrum technique designed to observe low signal-to-noise-ratio, low-frequency solar p modes. The frequency shift of each of the 2l+1 m spectra of a given (n,l) multiplet is chosen that maximizes the likelihood of the m-averaged spectrum. A high signal-to-noise ratio can result from combining individual low signal-to-noise-ratio, individual-m spectra, none of which would yield a strong enough peak to measure. We apply the technique to GONG and MDI data and show that it allows us to measure modes with lower frequencies than those obtained with classic peak-fitting analysis of the individual-m spectra. We measure their central frequencies, splittings, asymmetries, lifetimes, and amplitudes. The low-frequency, low- and intermediate-angular degrees rendered accessible by this new method correspond to modes that are sensitive to the deep solar interior down to the core and to the radiative interior. Moreover, the low-frequency modes have deeper upper ...

  9. Numerical computation of tyre radiaion noise: a comparative study of different techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karthik, B.; Makwana, B.K.; Patel, C.; Bekke, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly stringent noise regulations concerning automotive vehicles particularly in Europe are forcing Tyre manufacturers as well as the automotive manufacturers to reduce radiated noise. With the future moving towards electric/hybrid vehicles, the ever present tyre noise will become more domina

  10. Influence of laser scanner range measurement noise on the quantification of rock surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshelham, Kourosh; Altundag, Dogan

    2010-05-01

    The roughness of rock surfaces is traditionally measured by using manual tools such as carpenter's comp and compass and disc clinometers. The manual measurements are limited to small samples at accessible parts of the rock. Terrestrial laser scanning is an attractive alternative measurement technique, which offers large coverage, high resolution, and the ability to reach inaccessible high rock faces. The application of laser scanning to the study of rock surface roughness faces a major challenge: the inherent range imprecision hinders the quantification of roughness parameters. In practice, when roughness is in millimeter scale it is often lost in the range measurement noise. The parameters derived from the data, therefore, reflect noise rather than the actual roughness of the surface. In this paper, we investigate the influence of laser scanner range measurement noise on the quantification of rock surfaces roughness. We show that measurement noise leads to the overestimation of roughness parameters. We also demonstrate the application of wavelet de-noising method to eliminating noise from laser scanner data and deriving realistic roughness parameters. A slightly metamorphosed limestone rock in the east bank of the Meuse River in southern Belgium was scanned with a Faro LS880 terrestrial laser scanner. The scanner was positioned at approximately 5 meters distance to the rock surface, and operated at the highest possible angular resolution, i.e. 0.009 degrees. The resulting point cloud contained about 1.2 million points on the rock surface with a point-spacing of 1 mm on average. According to the technical specifications of the laser scanner, the nominal range precision at a perpendicular incidence angle, which was roughly the case in our scan, is between 0.7 mm and 5.2 mm respectively for objects of 90% and 10% reflectivity at a distance of 10 m. To serve as reference roughness data were also collected manually along three profiles on the rock surface by using a

  11. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  12. Simulation of reactor noise analysis measurement for light-water critical assembly TCA using MCNP-DSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis methods using Monte Carlo technique have been proposed and developed in the field of nuclear criticality safety. The Monte Carlo simulation for noise analysis can be made by simulating physical phenomena in the course of neutron transport in a nuclear fuel as practically as possible. MCNP-DSP was developed by T. Valentine of ORNL for this purpose and it is a modified version of MCNP-4A. The authors applied this code to frequency analysis measurements performed in light-water critical assembly TCA. Prompt neutron generation times for critical and subcritical cores were measured by doing the frequency analysis of detector signals. The Monte Carlo simulations for these experiments were carried out using MCNP-DSP, and prompt neutron generation times were calculated. (author)

  13. Towards measuring the off-resonant thermal noise of a pendulum mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, V [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Ribichini, L [Albert Einstein Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Aussenstelle Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Kloevekorn, P [Albert Einstein Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Aussenstelle Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Willke, B [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Lueck, H [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Danzmann, K [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2002-04-07

    Thermal noise is one of the dominant noise sources in interferometric length measurements and can limit the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors. Our goal is to analyse the off-resonant thermal noise of a high Q pendulum. Therefore we interferometrically detect the length changes of a 2.3 cm long optical resonator, which for good seismic isolation consists of two multiple stage pendulums. We are able to lock the length of this optical resonator to a frequency-stabilized laser beam and as a result get the spectral density of the differential mirror movement.

  14. Measures for noise pollution abatement in existing cooling tower systems; Massnahmen zur Geraeuschminderung an bestehenden Kuehlturmanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, R. [Sulzer-Escher Wyss GmbH, Lindau (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The operator`s order discussed by the paper was for planning and performance of backfitting measures for noise pollution abatement in an existing cooling tower system equipped with sound attenuation devices. Although the existing plant was operating in compliance with the legal noise emission limits, residents of neighbouring dwellings had been complaining about noise pollution. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Aufgabe, eine nachtraegliche Massnahme zur Laermminderung an einer bestehenden, mit Schalldaempfern ausgeruesteten Anlage zu planen und durchzufuehren, wurde vom Betreiber einer Rueckkuehlanlage gestellt. Der vom Gesetzgeber definierte Grenzwert fuer den Nachtbetrieb wurde mit der bestehenden Anlage zwar erreicht, doch die Anwohner fuehlten eine Belaestigung durch den Anlagenbetrieb. (orig./GL)

  15. Modeling and Measurement of Phase Noise in GaAs HBT Ka-Band Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Friedrich; Schott, Matthias; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    Accurate oscillator phase-noise simulation is a key problem in MMIC design, which is not solved satisfactory so far and needs further investigation. In this paper, a Ka-band MMIC oscillator with GaInP/GaAs HBT and on-chip resonator is treated as an example. Measured phase noise reaches -90 dBc/Hz and below at 100 kHz offset. To evaluate phase-noise predic-tion, the circuit is simulated using different commercial simulation tools and HBT models. Con-siderable differences in simulation results ...

  16. Optimal state estimation for networked systems with random parameter matrices, correlated noises and delayed measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Águila, R.; Hermoso-Carazo, A.; Linares-Pérez, J.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the optimal least-squares state estimation problem is addressed for a class of discrete-time multisensor linear stochastic systems with state transition and measurement random parameter matrices and correlated noises. It is assumed that at any sampling time, as a consequence of possible failures during the transmission process, one-step delays with different delay characteristics may occur randomly in the received measurements. The random delay phenomenon is modelled by using a different sequence of Bernoulli random variables in each sensor. The process noise and all the sensor measurement noises are one-step autocorrelated and different sensor noises are one-step cross-correlated. Also, the process noise and each sensor measurement noise are two-step cross-correlated. Based on the proposed model and using an innovation approach, the optimal linear filter is designed by a recursive algorithm which is very simple computationally and suitable for online applications. A numerical simulation is exploited to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed filtering algorithm.

  17. Distributed Fusion Filtering in Networked Systems with Random Measurement Matrices and Correlated Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Caballero-Águila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The distributed fusion state estimation problem is addressed for sensor network systems with random state transition matrix and random measurement matrices, which provide a unified framework to consider some network-induced random phenomena. The process noise and all the sensor measurement noises are assumed to be one-step autocorrelated and different sensor noises are one-step cross-correlated; also, the process noise and each sensor measurement noise are two-step cross-correlated. These correlation assumptions cover many practical situations, where the classical independence hypothesis is not realistic. Using an innovation methodology, local least-squares linear filtering estimators are recursively obtained at each sensor. The distributed fusion method is then used to form the optimal matrix-weighted sum of these local filters according to the mean squared error criterion. A numerical simulation example shows the accuracy of the proposed distributed fusion filtering algorithm and illustrates some of the network-induced stochastic uncertainties that can be dealt with in the current system model, such as sensor gain degradation, missing measurements, and multiplicative noise.

  18. A reliable ground bounce noise reduction technique for nanoscale CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Pattanaik, Manisha

    2015-11-01

    Power gating is the most effective method to reduce the standby leakage power by adding header/footer high-VTH sleep transistors between actual and virtual power/ground rails. When a power gating circuit transitions from sleep mode to active mode, a large instantaneous charge current flows through the sleep transistors. Ground bounce noise (GBN) is the high voltage fluctuation on real ground rail during sleep mode to active mode transitions of power gating circuits. GBN disturbs the logic states of internal nodes of circuits. A novel and reliable power gating structure is proposed in this article to reduce the problem of GBN. The proposed structure contains low-VTH transistors in place of high-VTH footer. The proposed power gating structure not only reduces the GBN but also improves other performance metrics. A large mitigation of leakage power in both modes eliminates the need of high-VTH transistors. A comprehensive and comparative evaluation of proposed technique is presented in this article for a chain of 5-CMOS inverters. The simulation results are compared to other well-known GBN reduction circuit techniques at 22 nm predictive technology model (PTM) bulk CMOS model using HSPICE tool. Robustness against process, voltage and temperature (PVT) variations is estimated through Monte-Carlo simulations.

  19. Cross-Spectrum PM Noise Measurements, Thermal Energy and Metamaterial Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Gruson, Yannick; Rohde, Ulrich L; Poddar, Ajay K; Rubiola, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all commercial instruments for the measurement of the oscillator PM noise make use of the Cross Spectrum method (arXiv:1004.5539 [physics.ins-det], 2010). High sensitivity is achieved by correlation and averaging on two equal channels which measure the same input, and reject the background of the instrument. We show that a systematic error is always present if the thermal energy of the input power splitter is not accounted for. Such error can result in noise under estimation up to a few dB in the lowest-noise quartz oscillators, and in a complete nonsense in the case of cryogenic oscillators. As another alarming fact, the presence of metamaterial components in the oscillator results in unpredictable behavior and large errors, even in well controlled experimental conditions. We observed a spread of 40 dB in the phase noise spectra of an oscillator, just replacing the output filter.

  20. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  1. Noise level measurement, a new method to evaluate effectiveness of sedation in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouri, A Sassan; Firoozabadi, Farshid; Carlin, Drew; Creighton, Paul; Raczka, Michelle; Joshi, Prashant; Heard, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric dentists perform moderate sedation frequently to facilitate dental treatment in uncooperative children. Assessing the depth and quality of sedation is an important factor in the clinical utilization of moderate sedation. We aimed to determine if the level of noise, created by the children who are undergoing moderate sedation during dental procedures, could be used as a nonsubjective measurement of the depth of sedation and compare it to the Ohio State Behavior Rating Score (OSBRS). Following Institutional Review Board approval and after receiving informed consent, we studied 51 children with a mean age of 4.2 years and average weight of 18.5 kg, who were undergoing restorative or extractive dental procedures, requiring moderate sedation. Sedation efficacy was assessed using OSBRS at several stages of the procedure. The noise level was measured by using a NoisePRO logging device to record the noise level at a rate of every second throughout the procedure. The depth of sedation assessed by OSBRS during the operative procedure was significantly correlated with noise level. The act of administering the local anesthesia and the operative procedure itself were two phases of the encounter that were significantly associated with higher OSBRS as well as noise levels. Measurement of noise level can be used as an effective guide to quantify the depth of sedation at different stages of the dental procedure. It is a nonsubjective and continuous measurement, which could be useful in clinical practice for the administration of moderate sedation during dental procedures. By using noise level analysis we are able to determine successful, poor, and failed sedation outcome. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Measurement of noise and impedance of dry and wet textile electrodes, and textile electrodes with hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puurtinen, Merja M; Komulainen, Satu M; Kauppinen, Pasi K; Malmivuo, Jaakko A V; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2006-01-01

    Textile sensors, when embedded into clothing, can provide new ways of monitoring physiological signals, and improve the usability and comfort of such monitoring systems in the areas of medical, occupational health and sports. However, good electrical and mechanical contact between the electrode and the skin is very important, as it often determines the quality of the signal. This paper introduces a study where the properties of dry textile electrodes, textile electrodes moistened with water, and textile electrodes covered with hydrogel were studied with five different electrode sizes. The aim was to study how the electrode size and preparation of the electrode (dry electrode/wet electrode/electrode covered with hydrogel membrane) affect the measurement noise, and the skin-electrode impedance. The measurement noise and skin-electrode impedance were determined from surface biopotential measurements. These preliminary results indicate that noise level increases as the electrode size decreases. The noise level is high in dry textile electrodes, as expected. Yet, the noise level of wet textile electrodes is quite low and similar to that of textile electrodes covered with hydrogel. Hydrogel does not seem to improve noise properties, however it may have effects on movement artifacts. Thus, it is feasible to use textile embedded sensors in physiological monitoring applications when moistening or hydrogel is applied.

  3. Donnan membrane technique (DMT) for anion measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Flora Alonso; Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2010-04-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl(-), 1-2 days for NO(3)(-), 1-4 days for SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and 1-14 days for H(2)PO(4)(-) in a background of 2-200 mM KCl or K(2)SO(4). The strongest effect of ionic strength on equilibrium time is found for H(2)PO(4)(-), followed by SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and then by Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). The negatively charged organic particles of fulvic and humic acids do not pass the membrane. Two approaches for the measurement of different anion species of the same element, such as SeO(4)(2-) and HSeO(3)(-), using DMT are proposed and tested. These two approaches are based on transport kinetics or response to ionic strength difference. A transport model that was developed previously for cation DMT is applied in this work to analyze the rate-limiting step in the anion DMT. In the absence of mobile/labile complexes, transport tends to be controlled by diffusion in solution at a low ionic strength, whereas at a higher ionic strength, diffusion in the membrane starts to control the transport.

  4. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  5. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  6. Large refinery and petrochemical plant furnaces and heaters : low frequency noise measurement and noise source order-ranking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Frank, HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp. Calgary AB

    2007-07-01

    Large furnaces and process heaters at refineries, gas plants, and petrochemical plants produce a low-frequency tonal noise from combustion roar. They can also produce mid-frequency broadband noise from induced draft fans. The common noise generating mechanisms are turbulence, flow instability, pressure drop, mechanical friction, and component vibration. Some of these energy facilities have multiple furnaces and heaters. As such, a noise source order-ranking assessment is typically performed to determine which plant equipment is responsible for the highest sound level contributions at nearby residence locations. The order-ranking is useful in determining which noise sources may require acoustical treatment to reduce the overall sound level at each residence. These results would form the basis for evaluating the effect of noise mitigating strategies for each source, and for estimating the associated costs for each noise control scenario. The noise model results can also be used to order-rank the equipment noise sources in terms of their frequency-dependant octave band. Experience has shown that large furnaces and heaters usually rank very high in terms of predominant contributors. The combustion roar noise generating mechanism is largely responsible for the predominant amount of acoustical energy. Although some degree of noise reduction can be achieved through burner design, it was shown that noise control engineering largely occurs at the furnace and heater manufacturing or plant retrofit level. This paper presented the results of one refinery with 19 older style furnaces and heaters. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  7. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    CERN Document Server

    Pooser, R C

    2014-01-01

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems(MEMs) cantilevers is used to measure a variety of phenomena in devices ranging from force microscopes for single spin detection[1] to biochemical sensors[2] to uncooled thermal imaging systems[3]. The displacement readout is often performed optically with segmented detectors or interference measurements. Until recently, various noise sources have limited the minimum detectable displacement in MEMs systems, but it is now possible to minimize all other sources[4] so that the noise level of the coherent light field, called the shot noise limit(SNL), becomes the dominant source. Light sources dis- playing quantum-enhanced statistics below this limit are available[5, 6], with applications in gravitational wave astronomy[7] and bioimaging[8], but direct displacement measurements of MEMS cantilevers below the SNL have been impossible until now. Here, we demonstrate the first direct measurement of a MEMs cantilever displacement with sub-SNL sensitivity, thus enabli...

  8. Extracting strong measurement noise from stochastic time series: applications to empirical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, P G; Haase, M; Böttcher, F; Peinke, J; Kleinhans, D; Friedrich, R

    2010-04-01

    It is a big challenge in the analysis of experimental data to disentangle the unavoidable measurement noise from the intrinsic dynamical noise. Here we present a general operational method to extract measurement noise from stochastic time series even in the case when the amplitudes of measurement noise and uncontaminated signal are of the same order of magnitude. Our approach is based on a recently developed method for a nonparametric reconstruction of Langevin processes. Minimizing a proper non-negative function, the procedure is able to correctly extract strong measurement noise and to estimate drift and diffusion coefficients in the Langevin equation describing the evolution of the original uncorrupted signal. As input, the algorithm uses only the two first conditional moments extracted directly from the stochastic series and is therefore suitable for a broad panoply of different signals. To demonstrate the power of the method, we apply the algorithm to synthetic as well as climatological measurement data, namely, the daily North Atlantic Oscillation index, shedding light on the discussion of the nature of its underlying physical processes.

  9. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range.

  10. Survey of techniques for reduction of wind turbine blade trailing edge noise.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin

    2011-08-01

    Aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors leads to constraints in both rotor design and turbine siting. The primary source of aerodynamic noise on wind turbine rotors is the interaction of turbulent boundary layers on the blades with the blade trailing edges. This report surveys concepts that have been proposed for trailing edge noise reduction, with emphasis on concepts that have been tested at either sub-scale or full-scale. These concepts include trailing edge serrations, low-noise airfoil designs, trailing edge brushes, and porous trailing edges. The demonstrated noise reductions of these concepts are cited, along with their impacts on aerodynamic performance. An assessment is made of future research opportunities in trailing edge noise reduction for wind turbine rotors.

  11. Basic phenomena utilised in aerosol particle measurement techniques; Hiukkasmittaustekniikoiden perusilmioet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, K. [Dekati Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    2006-10-15

    The project deals with development of basic phenomena and mechanism utilised in aerosol particle measurement techniques. The areas under development are: particle-charging techniques, photoelectric charging, particle concentrating using virtual-impactor technique, and optical characterising techniques of particles. Results will be applied on detection techniques of bioaerosol attract, particle emission sensors for diesel exhaust gases, and widening the application areas of existing measurement techniques. (orig.)

  12. A state of the art on electrochemical noise technique. Assessment of corrosion characteristics and development of remedial technology in nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lim, Yun Soo; Yi, Yong Sun; Chung, Man Kyo

    2003-02-01

    The studies for the application of electrochemical noise technique were reviewed in terms of principle, analysing method and application examples of this technique. Because 4% of the economic damage of industry is caused by metallic corrosion, it is important to find and protect corrosive materials and location. By corrosion monitoring of industrial facilities such as nuclear power plant using Electrochemical Noise Measurement(ENM), corrosion attack can be detected and furthermore it can be indicated whether the attacked materials is replaced by new one or not. According to development of control and electronic technology, it was easy to apply ENM to the industry and the interest in ENM also increased. As corrosion is produced on a metal under corrosive environment, local anode(oxidation) and cathode(reduction) are formed. Hence, there is potential difference and current flow between the anode and cathode. ENM is monitoring the potential difference and the current flow with time by high impedance load voltmeter and Zero Resistance Ammeter(ZRA), respectively. The potential difference and current flow generated spontaneously without any application of current and potential between electrodes are monitored by electrochemical noise technique, Thereby ENM can be regarded as the most ideal corrosion monitoring method for the industrial facility and nuclear power plant having corrosion damage and difficulty in access of human body. Moreover, it is possible to obtain the spontaneous and reliable results from the metals damaged by ununiform and localized corrosion such as pitting and SCC using ENM while it is difficult to obtain the reliable result using traditional linear polarization and ac-impedance measurement. In many countries, there are extensive works concerned with application of electrochemical noise technique to corrosion monitoring of nuclear power plant and other industrial facilities, whereas there is little work on this field in Korea. Systematic study for

  13. Unravelling the noise: the discrimination of wave function collapse models under time-continuous measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Duarte, O. S.; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the notion that environmental noise is in principle observable, while fundamental noise due to spontaneous localization would not be, we study the estimation of the diffusion parameter induced by wave function collapse models under continuous monitoring of the environment. We take into account finite measurement efficiencies and, in order to quantify the advantage granted by monitoring, we analyse the quantum Fisher information associated with such a diffusion parameter, identify optimal measurements in limiting cases, and assess the performance of such measurements in more realistic conditions.

  14. Measurements and observations of noise from a 4.2 megawatt (WTS-4) wind turbine generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Noise measurements and calculations are being made for large wind turbine generators to develop a data base for use in designing and siting such systems for community acceptance. As part of this program, measurements were made on the WTS-4 wind turbine generator during its acceptance runs. This paper presents the results of these exploratory measurements for power output conditions in the range 1.0 to 4.2 MW. Data include noise levels, spectra, radiation patterns, effects of distance, and the associated perception thresholds for use in the further development of acceptance criteria for this type of machine.

  15. Residual stress measurements with barkhausen noise in power plant creep failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvonen, I. [CoMoTest Oy, Maentsaelae (Finland)] Suominen, L. [Stresstech Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Continuously developing power and process industry needs predictive maintenance inspection methods in order to prevent failures with correctly timed and properly specified measures. Materials` monitoring has traditionally been non-destructive inspection to detect growing cracks or other deficiencies. Recently, after the development of portable stress measurement systems, some advances has been reached. Based on stress anomalies due to creep, fatigue or corrosion, new applications have been found in the use of Barkhausen noise inspection. When the Barkhausen noise findings have been simultaneously confirmed with other stress measuring methods, a wider acceptance of the application of the method can be proposed. (orig.) 7 refs.

  16. Noise measurements for single and multiple operation of 50 kw wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    The noise characteristics of the U.S. Windpower Inc., 50 kw wind turbine generator were measured at various distances from 30 m to 1100 m and for a range of output power. The generated noise is affected by the aerodynamic wakes of the tower legs at frequencies below about 120 Hz and the blade trailing edge thickness at frequencies of about 2 kHz. Rope strakes and airfoil fairings on the legs did not result in substantial noise reductions. Sharpening the blade trailing edges near the tip was effective in reducing broad band noise near 2 kHz. For multiple machines the sound fields are superposed. A three-fold increase in number of machines (from 1 to 3) results in a predicted increase in he sound pressure level of about 5 dB. The detection threshold for 14 machines operating in a 13 - 20 mph wind is observed to be at approximately 1160 m in the downwind direction.

  17. Measuring Noise Temperatures of Phased-Array Antennas for Astronomy at CSIRO

    CERN Document Server

    Chippendale, Aaron; Hay, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    We describe the development of a noise-temperature testing capability for phased-array antennas operating in receive mode from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz. Sampled voltages from each array port were recorded digitally as the zenith-pointing array under test was presented with three scenes: (1) a large microwave absorber at ambient temperature, (2) the unobstructed radio sky, and (3) broadband noise transmitted from a reference antenna centred over and pointed at the array under test. The recorded voltages were processed in software to calculate the beam equivalent noise temperature for a maximum signal-to-noise ratio beam steered at the zenith. We introduced the reference-antenna measurement to make noise measurements with reproducible, well-defined beams directed at the zenith and thereby at the centre of the absorber target. We applied a detailed model of cosmic and atmospheric contributions to the radio sky emission that we used as a noise-temperature reference. We also present a comprehensive analysis of measureme...

  18. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  19. Invariant Measures for Monotone SPDEs with Multiplicative Noise Term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es-Sarhir, Abdelhadi, E-mail: a.es-sarhir@uiz.ac.ma [Universite Ibn Zohr, Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des Sciences (Morocco); Scheutzow, Michael, E-mail: ms@math.tu-berlin.de; Toelle, Jonas M., E-mail: jonasmtoelle@gmail.com [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Fakultaet II, Institut fuer Mathematik (Germany); Gaans, Onno van, E-mail: vangaans@math.leidenuniv.nl [Universiteit Leiden, Mathematisch Instituut (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    We study diffusion processes corresponding to infinite dimensional semilinear stochastic differential equations with local Lipschitz drift term and an arbitrary Lipschitz diffusion coefficient. We prove tightness and the Feller property of the solution to show existence of an invariant measure. As an application we discuss stochastic reaction diffusion equations.

  20. Active Noise Control for Narrow-band and Broad-band Signals Using Q-Learning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Raeisy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic noise pollution is one of the serious disasters in the current industrialized life. Though traditional solutions based on noise absorption have many different applications, but these methods have low performance for low frequency noises. Active Noise Control (ANC has been introduced to resolve this problem. In this paper, a new active method is introduced for suppressing acoustic noises based on the reinforcement learning. To achieve this, an algorithm to control periodic noises is suggested. Then, the method is developed further to deal with multi-tonal signals with a large number of harmonics. At the next step, the broad-band signals are considered. The problem is broken into some sub-problems in frequency domain and each is solved via a reinforcement learning approach. In all of the proposed techniques no model for the environment is needed. Combining the reinforcement learning and the traditional methods in ANC for broad-band signals is a new line research considered here. This combination could increase the speed of the response, but some information of the dynamics of the environment is needed. This will cause the system to become compatible with gradual changes of the environment. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. An Innovations-Based Noise Cancelling Technique on Inverse Kepstrum Whitening Filter and Adaptive FIR Filter in Beamforming Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsoo Jeong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an acoustic noise cancelling technique using an inverse kepstrum system as an innovations-based whitening application for an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR filter in beamforming structure. The inverse kepstrum method uses an innovations-whitened form from one acoustic path transfer function between a reference microphone sensor and a noise source so that the rear-end reference signal will then be a whitened sequence to a cascaded adaptive FIR filter in the beamforming structure. By using an inverse kepstrum filter as a whitening filter with the use of a delay filter, the cascaded adaptive FIR filter estimates only the numerator of the polynomial part from the ratio of overall combined transfer functions. The test results have shown that the adaptive FIR filter is more effective in beamforming structure than an adaptive noise cancelling (ANC structure in terms of signal distortion in the desired signal and noise reduction in noise with nonminimum phase components. In addition, the inverse kepstrum method shows almost the same convergence level in estimate of noise statistics with the use of a smaller amount of adaptive FIR filter weights than the kepstrum method, hence it could provide better computational simplicity in processing. Furthermore, the rear-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure has shown less signal distortion in the desired signal than the front-end kepstrum method and the front-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure.

  2. In-situ monitoring of nickel electrodeposit structure using electrochemical noise technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The nickel electroplating process was investigated by means of electrochemical noise(EN), cyclic voltammetry in conjunction with the scanning electron microscopy(SEM) technique. The results show that, in the experimental conditions and with the increase of current density, the growth mechanism of nickel crystallites changes from 2-D to 3-D with the potential turning point of about - 1.15 V,and the potential for the onset of diffusion control of the ensemble nickel electroplating process was about -1.4 V. In the case of activation-control, the two-dimensional (2-D) nucleation / growth process of nickel often results in the electrocrystallization EN features of only slowly small positive potential drift and the corresponding compact layer-by-layer deposit structure, and the maximum relative energy of the RP-EDP (re-plotted relative energy distribution plot), which is obtained from wavelet analysis, defined in the region with smaller scales. While under the diffusion-control, the three-dimensional (3-D) nucleation / growth process of nickel, often results in the electrocrystallization EN features of both the fast positive potential drift and subsequent remarkable negative potential drift and the corresponding dentritic/large conglomerate structure of nickel deposit, and the maximum relative energy of the RP-EDP defined in the region with larger scales. The electroplating time affects the nickel deposit structure mainly through its influence on the growth rate of crystallites and the Ni2+ ions diffusion process around each crystallite.

  3. High Resolution Flicker-Noise-Free Frequency Measurements of Weak Microwave Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Creedon, Daniel L; Ivanov, Eugene N; Hartnett, John G

    2011-01-01

    Amplification is usually necessary when measuring the frequency instability of microwave signals. In this work, we develop a flicker noise free frequency measurement system based on a common or shared amplifier. First, we show that correlated flicker phase noise can be cancelled in such a system. Then we compare the new system with the conventional by simultaneously measuring the beat frequency from two cryogenic sapphire oscillators with parts in 10^15 fractional frequency instability. We determine for low power, below -80 dBm, the measurements were not limited by correlated noise processes but by thermal noise of the readout amplifier. In this regime, we show that the new readout system performs as expected and at the same level as the standard system but with only half the number of amplifiers. We also show that, using a standard readout system, the next generation of cryogenic sapphire oscillators could be flicker phase noise limited when instability reaches parts in 10^16 or better

  4. Single-Ended Quality Measurement of Noise Suppressed Speech Based on Kullback-Leibler Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago H. Falk

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a single-ended quality measurement algorithm for noise suppressed speech is described.The proposed algorithm computes fast approximations of Kullback-Leibler distances between Gaussian mixture (GM reference models of clean, noise corrupted, and noise suppressed speech and a GM model trained online on the test speech signal. The distances, together with a spectral flatness measure, are mapped to an estimated quality score via a support vector regressor. Experimental results show that substantial improvement in performance and complexity can be attained, relative to the current state-of-art single-ended ITU-T P.563 algorithm. Due to its modular architecture, the proposed algorithm can be easily configured to also perform signal distortion and background intrusiveness measurement, a functionality not available with current standard algorithms.

  5. Noise thermometry applied to thermoelectric measurements in InAs nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, E. S.; Shovkun, D. V.; Ercolani, D.; Rossella, F.; Rocci, M.; Sorba, L.; Roddaro, S.; Khrapai, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    We apply noise thermometry to characterize charge and thermoelectric transport in single InAs nanowires (NWs) at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. Shot noise measurements identify elastic diffusive transport in our NWs with negligible electron-phonon interaction. This enables us to set up a measurement of the diffusion thermopower. Unlike previous approaches, we make use of a primary electronic noise thermometry to calibrate a thermal bias across the NW. In particular, this enables us to apply a contact heating scheme, which is much more efficient in creating the thermal bias as compared to conventional substrate heating. The measured thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient exhibits strong mesoscopic fluctuations in dependence on the back-gate voltage that is used to tune the NW carrier density. We analyze the transport and thermoelectric data in terms of an approximate Mott's thermopower relation and evaluate a gate-voltage to the Fermi energy conversion factor.

  6. Measurements of the communication noise level on the internal roads of the manufacturing metallurgical enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This publication shows the results of measurements of the noise level emitted by the motor trucks on the internal roads of the steelworks. The distribution of the metallurgical products with the use of trucks is, next to the rail transport, one of the main logistic forms of products delivery to the customer. The research was conducted on one of the busiest internal roads of metallurgical enterprise ArcelorMittal Poland in Dąbrowa Górnicza. The enterprise conducts the whole production cycle and is the biggest steel producer in Poland. On the premises of the steelworks there were five points of measurements marked where the noise level is measured and the results were compared with the acceptable noise levels defined in the norms.

  7. Measurement and prediction of broadband noise from large horizontal axis wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, F. W.; Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the broadband noise spectra of large wind turbine generators. It includes contributions from such noise sources as the inflow turbulence to the rotor, the interactions between the turbulent boundary layers on the blade surfaces with their trailing edges and the wake due to a blunt trailing edge. The method is partly empirical and is based on acoustic measurements of large wind turbines and airfoil models. Spectra are predicted for several large machines including the proposed MOD-5B. Measured data are presented for the MOD-2, the WTS-4, the MOD-OA, and the U.S. Windpower Inc. machines. Good agreement is shown between the predicted and measured far field noise spectra.

  8. Common mode noise cancellation for electrically non-contact ECG measurement system on a chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keun Kim, Ko; Kyu Lim, Yong; Suk Park, Kwang

    2005-01-01

    Electrically non-contact ECG measurement system on a chair can be applied to a number of various fields for continuous health monitoring in daily life. However, the body is floated electrically for this system due to the capacitive electrodes and the floated body is very sensitive to the external noises or motion artifacts which affect the measurement system as the common mode noise. In this paper, the Driven-Seat-Ground circuit similar to the Driven-Right-Leg circuit is proposed to reduce the common mode noise. The analysis of this equivalent circuit is performed and the output signal waveforms are compared between with Driven-Seat-Ground and with capacitive ground. As the results, the Driven-Seat-Ground circuit improves significantly the properties of the fully capacitive ECG measurement system as the negative feedback.

  9. Real-time full bandwidth measurement of spectral noise in supercontinuum generation

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, B; Larger, L; Lacourt, P A; Merolla, J M; Sylvestre, T; Kudlinski, A; Mussot, A; Genty, G; Dias, F; Dudley, J M; 10.1038/srep00882

    2012-01-01

    The ability to measure real-time fluctuations of ultrashort pulses propagating in optical fiber has provided significant insights into fundamental dynamical effects such as modulation instability and the formation of frequency-shifting rogue wave solitons. We report here a detailed study of real-time fluctuations across the full bandwidth of a fiber supercontinuum which directly reveals the significant variation in measured noise statistics across the spectrum, and which allows us to study correlations between widely separated spectral components. For two different propagation distances corresponding to the onset phase of spectral broadening and the fully-developed supercontinuum, we measure real time noise across the supercontinuum bandwidth, and we quantify the supercontinuum noise using statistical higher-order moments and a frequency-dependent intensity correlation map. We identify correlated spectral regions within the supercontinuum associated with simultaneous sideband generation, as well as signatures...

  10. Optical metrology techniques for dimensional stability measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Jonathan David

    2010-01-01

    This thesis work is optical metrology techniques to determine material stability. In addition to displacement interferometry, topics such as periodic nonlinearity, Fabry-Perot interferometry, refractometry, and laser stabilization are covered.

  11. Optical metrology techniques for dimensional stability measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Jonathan David

    2010-01-01

    This thesis work is optical metrology techniques to determine material stability. In addition to displacement interferometry, topics such as periodic nonlinearity, Fabry-Perot interferometry, refractometry, and laser stabilization are covered.

  12. Measuring Electrolyte Impedance and Noise Simultaneously by Triangular Waveform Voltage and Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanzhi; Wang, Peng; Dong, Yonggui

    2016-04-22

    In order to measure the impedance variation process in electrolyte solutions, a method of triangular waveform voltage excitation is investigated together with principal component analysis (PCA). Using triangular waveform voltage as the excitation signal, the response current during one duty cycle is sampled to construct a measurement vector. The measurement matrix is then constructed by the measurement vectors obtained from different measurements. After being processed by PCA, the changing information of solution impedance is contained in the loading vectors while the response current and noise information is contained in the score vectors. The measurement results of impedance variation by the proposed signal processing method are independent of the equivalent impedance model. The noise-induced problems encountered during equivalent impedance calculation are therefore avoided, and the real-time variation information of noise in the electrode-electrolyte interface can be extracted at the same time. Planar-interdigitated electrodes are experimentally tested for monitoring the KCl concentration variation process. Experimental results indicate that the measured impedance variation curve reflects the changing process of solution conductivity, and the amplitude distribution of the noise during one duty cycle can be utilized to analyze the contact conditions of the electrode and electrolyte interface.

  13. Measuring Electrolyte Impedance and Noise Simultaneously by Triangular Waveform Voltage and Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanzhi Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to measure the impedance variation process in electrolyte solutions, a method of triangular waveform voltage excitation is investigated together with principal component analysis (PCA. Using triangular waveform voltage as the excitation signal, the response current during one duty cycle is sampled to construct a measurement vector. The measurement matrix is then constructed by the measurement vectors obtained from different measurements. After being processed by PCA, the changing information of solution impedance is contained in the loading vectors while the response current and noise information is contained in the score vectors. The measurement results of impedance variation by the proposed signal processing method are independent of the equivalent impedance model. The noise-induced problems encountered during equivalent impedance calculation are therefore avoided, and the real-time variation information of noise in the electrode-electrolyte interface can be extracted at the same time. Planar-interdigitated electrodes are experimentally tested for monitoring the KCl concentration variation process. Experimental results indicate that the measured impedance variation curve reflects the changing process of solution conductivity, and the amplitude distribution of the noise during one duty cycle can be utilized to analyze the contact conditions of the electrode and electrolyte interface.

  14. A novel method for the evaluation of polarization and hemisphere coverage of HF radio noise measurement antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, Ben A.; van Maanen, Erik; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Slump, Cornelis H.; Schiphorst, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    In HF (3-30 MHz) communications the ambient electromagnetic background noise or 'radio noise' generally is the limiting factor in reception. Radio noise measurements are needed for spectrum pollution control and to provide reference levels for radio system design. This article discusses the influenc

  15. A novel method for the evaluation of polarization and hemisphere coverage of HF radio noise measurement antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, Ben A.; van Maanen, Erik; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Slump, Cornelis H.; Schiphorst, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    In HF (3-30 MHz) communications the ambient electromagnetic background noise or 'radio noise' generally is the limiting factor in reception. Radio noise measurements are needed for spectrum pollution control and to provide reference levels for radio system design. This article discusses the

  16. Measured and calculated noise reduction of rail dampers and absorption plates on a high speed slab track

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.; Graafland, F.; Eisses, A.R.; Nijhof, M.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Rail dampers and sound absorbing plates have been tested on a high speed railway slab track in a walled cutting at a noise sensitive location. Their noise reduction has been determined from pass-by measurements during service and predicted using BEM calculations. The cutting depth, noise barrier hei

  17. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  18. Aeroacoustic Calculations of Wind Turbine Noise with the Actuator Line/ Navier-Stokes Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debertshäuser, Harald; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2016-01-01

    to the local conditions and airfoil data. In the acoustic solver, the aeroacoustics is simulated by: (1) calculating the noise source using the improved engineering model (IBPM) based on the model developed by Brook, Pope and Marcolini (BPM); (2) introducing the noise source with an expected range...

  19. Numerical Investigation of Jet Noise Prediction in Exhaust Nozzle by Passive Control Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagu sundaram.A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The project mainly focuses on the reduction of jet noise emission in the exhaust nozzle of TURBOFAN ENGINES. Reduction of noise in the exhaust system is done by attaching chevrons with particular parameters in the nozzle exit. Numerical investigations have been carried out on chevron nozzles to assess the importance of chevron parameters such as the number of chevrons like (chevron count, chevron penetration and the mixing characteristics of co flow jet. Chevron count is the pertinent parameter for noise reduction at low nozzle pressure ratios, whereas at high nozzle pressure ratios, chevron penetration is crucial. The results illustrate that by careful selection of chevron parameters substantial noise reduction can be achieved. The sound pressure level (SPL can be calculated from that we determined the noise level at nozzle exit section. After assessing the chevron parameters we are going to modify the chevron shapes in order to get maximum noise reduction along with very negligible thrust loss. Modification of chevron is based on aspect of increasing the mixing of cold jet and the hot jet in order to decrease the noise emission. ANSYS-Fluent is a commercial CFD code which will be used for performing the simulation and the simulation configuration contains three different velocities (100,150,200 with two different nozzle model(plain & chevron nozzle. The simulation results are evaluated to find out nozzle noise level in the engine exhaust system.

  20. A Cepstrum-Based Technique for Determining a Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio in Speech Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Krom, Guus

    1993-01-01

    A new method to calculate a spectral harmonics-to-noise (HNR) ratio is presented. The method discriminates between harmonic and noise energy in the magnitude spectrum by means of a comb-filtering operation in the cepstrum domain. HNR is seen to be a useful parameter in the analysis of voice quality. (Author/DB)

  1. Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1998-01-01

    Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

  2. Understanding data noise in gravity field recovery on the basis of inter-satellite ranging measurements acquired by the satellite gravimetry mission GRACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditmar, P.; Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Hashemi Farahani, H.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral analysis of data noise is performed in the context of gravity field recovery from inter-satellite ranging measurements acquired by the satellite gravimetry mission GRACE. The motivation of the study is two-fold: (i) to promote a further improvement of GRACE data processing techniques and

  3. Improvement of vibration and noise by applying analysis technology. Development of active control technique of engine noise in a car cabin. Kaiseki gijutsu wo oyoshita shindo-soon no kaizen. Shashitsunai engine soon akutibu seigyo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, H.; Nakao, N.; Butsuen, T. (Matsuda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan). Technology Research Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    It is difficult to reduce engine noise which is principal noise in a car cabin without producing an adverse effect on low cost production. Active noise control technique (ANC) has been developed to reduce engine noise compatible with low cost production. This paper discusses its control algorithm and the system configuration and presents experimental results. The filtered-x least mean square method is a well-known ANC algorithm, however, it often requires large amount of calculation exceeding the present capacity of a digital signal processor. An effective ANC algorithm is developed by the use of the repetitiveness of the engine noise. This paper describes the basic theory of the control algorithm, the extension to a multiple input and output system, the system configuration and experimental results. A noise control system with three microphones is designed with consideration of the spatial distribution of the noise and reduces noise in the whole cabin by 8dB(A) in the largest case. Active noise control technique is applicable to many areas and can be used for the reduction of noise and vibration other than engine noise. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Improved electronic measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise Thermometry

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Jifeng; Pollarolo, Alessio; Rogalla, Horst; Tew, Weston L; White, Rod; Zhou, Kunli

    2015-01-01

    The unit of thermodynamic temperature, the kelvin, will be redefined in 2018 by fixing the value of the Boltzmann constant, k. The present CODATA recommended value of k is determined predominantly by acoustic gas-thermometry results. To provide a value of k based on different physical principles, purely electronic measurements of k were performed by using a Johnson noise thermometer to compare the thermal noise power of a 200 Ohm sensing resistor immersed in a triple-point-of-water cell to the noise power of a quantum-accurate pseudo-random noise waveform of nominally equal noise power. Measurements integrated over a bandwidth of 550 kHz and a total integration time of 33 days gave a measured value of k = 1.3806514(48)x10^-23 J/K, for which the relative standard uncertainty is 3.5x10^-6 and the relative offset from the CODATA 2010 value is +1.9x10^-6.

  5. Boundary Layer Measurements of the NACA0015 and Implications for Noise Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    A NACA0015 airfoil section instrumented with an array of high frequency microphones flush-mounted beneath its surface was measured in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov. Various inflow speeds and angles of attack were investigated. In addition, a hot-wire device system was used...... of surface pressure fluctuations spectra are used to analyze and improve trailing edge noise modeling by the so-called TNO model. Finally, a pair of hot-wires were placed on each side of the trailing edge in order to measure the radiated trailing edge noise. However, there is no strong evidence...

  6. Comparison of Transmission Error Predictions with Noise Measurements for Several Spur and Helical Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Donald R.; Oswald, Fred B.; Valco, Mark J.; Drago, Raymond J.; Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Measured sound power data from eight different spur, single and double helical gear designs are compared with predictions of transmission error by the Load Distribution Program. The sound power data was taken from the recent Army-funded Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission project. Tests were conducted in the NASA gear noise rig. Results of both test data and transmission error predictions are made for each harmonic of mesh frequency at several operating conditions. In general, the transmission error predictions compare favorably with the measured noise levels.

  7. Comparison of transmission error predictions with noise measurements for several spur and helical gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Donald R.; Oswald, Fred B.; Valco, Mark J.; Drago, Raymond J.; Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Measured sound power data from eight different spur, single and double helical gear designs are compared with predictions of transmission error by the Load Distribution Program. The sound power data was taken from the recent Army-funded Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission project. Tests were conducted in the NASA gear noise rig. Results of both test data and transmission error predictions are made for each harmonic of mesh frequency at several operating conditions. In general, the transmission error predictions compare favorably with the measured noise levels.

  8. Rényi entropy measure of noise-aided information transmission in a binary channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Delahaies, Agnès

    2010-05-01

    This paper analyzes a binary channel by means of information measures based on the Rényi entropy. The analysis extends, and contains as a special case, the classic reference model of binary information transmission based on the Shannon entropy measure. The extended model is used to investigate further possibilities and properties of stochastic resonance or noise-aided information transmission. The results demonstrate that stochastic resonance occurs in the information channel and is registered by the Rényi entropy measures at any finite order, including the Shannon order. Furthermore, in definite conditions, when seeking the Rényi information measures that best exploit stochastic resonance, then nontrivial orders differing from the Shannon case usually emerge. In this way, through binary information transmission, stochastic resonance identifies optimal Rényi measures of information differing from the classic Shannon measure. A confrontation of the quantitative information measures with visual perception is also proposed in an experiment of noise-aided binary image transmission.

  9. Boundary layer measurements of the NACA0015 and implications for noise modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2011-01-15

    A NACA0015 airfoil section instrumented with an array of high frequency microphones flush-mounted beneath its surface was measured in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov. Various inflow speeds and angles of attack were investigated. In addition, a hot-wire device system was used to measure the velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics in the boundary layer near the trailing edge of the airfoil. The measured boundary layer data are presented in this report and compared with CFD results. A relative good agreement is observed, though a few discrepancies also appear. Comparisons of surface pressure fluctuations spectra are used to analyze and improve trailing edge noise modeling by the so-called TNO model. Finally, a pair of hot-wires were placed on each side of the trailing edge in order to measure the radiated trailing edge noise. However, there is no strong evidence that such noise could be measured in the higher frequency range. Nevertheless, low-frequency noise could be measured and related to the presence of the airfoil but its origin is unclear. (Author)

  10. Wheatstone bridge technique for magnetostriction measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M

    1980-03-01

    A basic Wheatstone bridge, with additional electronic instrumentation, has been used in the measurement of magnetostriction. This method allows a resolution of approximately 10% on measurements of magnetostrictions less than 0.75 parts per million.

  11. Blood Glucose Measurement Using Bioimpedance Technique

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Bioimpedance measurement is gaining importance in wide field of bioresearch and biomedical systems due to its noninvasive nature. Noninvasive measurement method is very important to decrease infection and physical injuries which result due to invasive measurement. This paper presents basic principle of bioimpedance along with its application for blood glucose analysis and effect of frequency on impedance measurement. Input from bioimpedance sensor is given to amplifier and signal conditioner ...

  12. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  13. Measurement of Underwater Operational Noise Emitted by Wave and Tidal Stream Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Paul A; Robinson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    The increasing international growth in the development of marine and freshwater wave and tidal energy harvesting systems has been followed by a growing requirement to understand any associated underwater impact. Radiated noise generated during operation is dependent on the device's physical properties, the sound-propagation environment, and the device's operational state. Physical properties may include size, distribution in the water column, and mechanics/hydrodynamics. The sound-propagation environment may be influenced by water depth, bathymetry, sediment type, and water column acoustic properties, and operational state may be influenced by tidal cycle and wave height among others This paper discusses some of the challenges for measurement of noise characteristics from these devices as well as a case study of the measurement of radiated noise from a full-scale wave energy converter.

  14. Instrumentation for Gate Current Noise Measurements on sub-100 nm MOS Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Gaioni, L; Ratti, L; Re, V; Speziali, V; Traversi, G

    2008-01-01

    This work describes a measuring system that was developed to characterize the gate current noise performances of CMOS devices with minimum feature size in the 100 nm span. These devices play an essential role in the design of present daymixedsignal integrated circuits, because of the advantages associated with the scaling process. The reduction in the gate oxide thickness brought about by CMOS technology downscaling leads to a non-negligible gate current due to direct tunneling phenomena; this current represents a noise source which requires an accurate characterization for optimum analog design. In this paper, two instruments able to perform measurements in two different ranges of gate current values will be discussed. Some of the results of gate current noise characterization will also be presented.

  15. Analysis of Noise Exposure Measurements Acquired Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique workplace environment for U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts to conduct research and live for a period of six months or more. Noise has been an enduring environmental physical hazard that has been a challenge for the U.S. space program since before the Apollo era. Noise exposure in ISS poses significant risks to the crewmembers, such as; hearing loss (temporary or permanent), possible disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and communication, possible interference with crew task performance, and possible reduction in alarm audibility. Acoustic measurements were made onboard ISS and compared to requirements in order to assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the noise exposure monitoring program as well as an assessment of the acoustic dosimeter data collected to date. The hardware currently being used for monitoring the noise exposure onboard ISS will be discussed. Acoustic data onboard ISS has been collected since the beginning of ISS (Increment 1, November 2001). Noise exposure data analysis will include acoustic dosimetry logged data from crew-worn dosimeters during work and sleep periods and also fixed-location measurements from Increment 1 to present day. Noise exposure levels (8-, 16- and 24-hr), LEQ, will also be provided and discussed in this paper. Future directions and recommendations for the noise exposure monitoring program will be highlighted. This acoustic data is used to ensure a safe and healthy working and living environment for the crewmembers onboard the ISS.

  16. On the theory of SODAR measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, I.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Bradley, S.

    2003-01-01

    The need for alternative means to measure the wind speed for wind energy purposes has increased with the increase of the size of wind turbines. The cost and the technical difficulties for performing wind speed measurements has also increased with the sizeof the wind turbines, since it is demanded...... of measuring both the wind speed distribution with height and the wind direction. At the same time the SODAR presents a number of serious drawbacks such asthe low number of measurements per time period, the dependence of the ability to measure on the atmospheric conditions and the difficulty of measuring...... that the wind speed has to be measured at the rotor centre of the turbine and the size of both the rotor and the hub height have grown following the increase in the size of the wind turbines. The SODAR (SOundDetection And Ranging) is an alternative to the use of cup anemometers and offers the possibility...

  17. Perspective of remote optical measurement techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorio, Eduard; Rocadenbosch Burillo, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an intercomparison between four different ROMTs: differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The main focus is on the TDLAS technique, where the main laser-diode typologies and modulation schemes, namely, wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS), are reviewed. At present, new pr...

  18. Donnan Membrane Technique (DMT) for Anion Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso Vega, M.F.; Weng, L.P.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl-, 1-2 days for NO3-, 1-4 days for SO42-

  19. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  20. Noise Reduction Technique for Images using Radial Basis Function Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Ali Khowaja

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a NN (Neural Network based model for reducing the noise from images. This is a RBF (Radial Basis Function network which is used to reduce the effect of noise and blurring from the captured images. The proposed network calculates the mean MSE (Mean Square Error and PSNR (Peak Signal to Noise Ratio of the noisy images. The proposed network has also been successfully applied to medical images. The performance of the trained RBF network has been compared with the MLP (Multilayer Perceptron Network and it has been demonstrated that the performance of the RBF network is better than the MLP network.

  1. Environmental impact of electric motorcycles: Evidence from traffic noise assessment by a building-based data mining technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, N; Zhou, X; Zhou, Y

    2016-06-01

    This study provided new evidence on the potential adoption of electric motorcycle (EM) as a cleaner alternative to gasoline-powered motorcycle. The effects of EM on human exposure to traffic noise were assessed in different urban areas with different traffic scenarios. The assessment was carried out by a developed building-based model system that took into account the contribution of motorcycle traffic. The results indicated that the EM could be an appealing solution to reduce the risk of human exposure to excessive high traffic noise in a motorcycle city. Particularly, in a historical urban area in which the total traffic volume was lower and motorcycle traffic was dominant, the proportion of noise levels meeting the standard of 70 dB(A) increased significantly from 12.2% to 41.9% when 100% of gasoline motorcycles in the real traffic scenario were replaced by EMs. On the other hand, in a modern urban area in which the total traffic volume was higher and traffic noise levels at majority of sites were higher than 75 dB(A), the proportion of noise levels above 75 dB(A) decreased significantly from 82.6% to 59.9%. Nevertheless, the effect of EM on improving the traffic noise compliance rate in the modern urban area was not significant and other policies or measures need to be sought.

  2. An Improved Technique for Speech Signal De-noising Based on Wavelet Threshold and Invasive Weed Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shaban

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Speech signals play a significant role in the area of digital signal processing. When these signals pass through air as a channel of propagation, it interacts with noise. Therefore, it needs removing noise from corrupted signal without altering it. De-noising is a compromise between the removal of the largest possible amount of noise and the preservation of signal integrity. To improve the performance of the speech which displays high power fluctuations, a new speech de-noising method based on Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO is proposed. In addition, a theoretical model is modified to estimate the value of threshold without any priority of knowledge. This is done by implementing the IWO algorithm for kurtosis measuring of the residual noise signal to find an optimum threshold value at which the kurtosis function is maximum. It has been observed that the proposed method appeared better performance than other methods at the same condition. Moreover, the results show that the proposed IWO algorithm offered a better mean square error(MSE than Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm (PSO for both one and multilevel decomposition. For instance, IWO brought an improvement in MSE in the range of 0.01 compared with PSO for multilevel decomposition.

  3. Note: A temperature-stable low-noise transimpedance amplifier for microcurrent measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Shi, Xueyou; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature stability and noise characteristics often run contradictory in microcurrent (e.g., pA-scale) measurement instruments because low-noise performance requires high-value resistors with relatively poor temperature coefficients. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier with high-temperature stability, which involves an active compensation mechanism to overcome the temperature drift mainly caused by high-value resistors, is presented. The implementation uses a specially designed R-2R compensating network to provide programmable current gain with extra-fine trimming resolution. The temperature drifts of all components (e.g., feedback resistors, operational amplifiers, and the R-2R network itself) are compensated simultaneously. Therefore, both low-temperature drift and ultra-low-noise performance can be achieved. With a current gain of 1011 V/A, the internal current noise density was about 0.4 fA/√Hz, and the average temperature coefficient was 4.3 ppm/K at 0-50 °C. The amplifier module maintains accuracy across a wide temperature range without additional thermal stabilization, and its compact size makes it especially suitable for high-precision, low-current measurement in outdoor environments for applications such as electrochemical emission supervision, air pollution particles analysis, radiation monitoring, and bioelectricity.

  4. Borehole cylindrical noise during hole-surface and hole-hole resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiensky, James L.; Nimmer, Robin; Binley, Andrew M.

    2004-04-01

    Drilled boreholes generally are the only feasible means to access the subsurface for the emplacement of downhole electrodes for most hole-hole and hole-surface resistivity experiments. However, the very existence of the borehole itself creates the potential for significant noise due to the inevitable conductivity contrast that develops between the borehole walls and the formation. Borehole cylindrical noise develops whenever a current source is placed in a drilled borehole. Borehole geometries may range from nearly perfect cylinders to highly, irregular, rugose holes in consolidated rock, to relatively minor, collapsed, disturbed zones in caving sediments. Boreholes in non-caving formations generally are filled with artificial, conductive materials to afford crucial, electrical continuity between downhole electrodes and the borehole walls. Filled boreholes form cylindrically shaped heterogeneities that create significant noise due to preferential current flow up and down the conductive columns. Selected conditions are simulated with a finite difference model to illustrate the significance of borehole cylindrical noise on hole-hole and hole-surface mise-à-la-masse electrical potentials near a current electrode. Mise-à-la-masse electrical potentials measured during a field tracer experiment also are presented. These measurements are used to illustrate significant errors may develop in the interpretation of apparent resistivity estimates out to a distance of several meters from the current source if borehole cylindrical noise is not recognized and accounted for in the analysis of electrical potential data.

  5. Note: A temperature-stable low-noise transimpedance amplifier for microcurrent measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Shi, Xueyou; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature stability and noise characteristics often run contradictory in microcurrent (e.g., pA-scale) measurement instruments because low-noise performance requires high-value resistors with relatively poor temperature coefficients. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier with high-temperature stability, which involves an active compensation mechanism to overcome the temperature drift mainly caused by high-value resistors, is presented. The implementation uses a specially designed R-2R compensating network to provide programmable current gain with extra-fine trimming resolution. The temperature drifts of all components (e.g., feedback resistors, operational amplifiers, and the R-2R network itself) are compensated simultaneously. Therefore, both low-temperature drift and ultra-low-noise performance can be achieved. With a current gain of 10(11) V/A, the internal current noise density was about 0.4 fA/√Hz, and the average temperature coefficient was 4.3 ppm/K at 0-50 °C. The amplifier module maintains accuracy across a wide temperature range without additional thermal stabilization, and its compact size makes it especially suitable for high-precision, low-current measurement in outdoor environments for applications such as electrochemical emission supervision, air pollution particles analysis, radiation monitoring, and bioelectricity.

  6. Simultaneous Measurement and Analysis of Noise Levels in Flexible and Rigid Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yıldırım

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although concrete roads have been used worldwide for years, the same improvement could not exist in Turkey and therefore, bituminous (hot mix asphalt roads were preferred instead.In this paper, the vastly built HMA (Hot Mix Asphalt roads and rarely preferred concrete roads were compared based on their level of noise. For this purpose, the concrete road at the length of 2 kilometers between Afyonkarahisar and Emirdag; also the transition point to the HMA road (which continues after the concrete road was observed.Both concrete and HMA road ends of this transition point was equipped with a noise measurement device and a camera was installed separately for providing minimum level of noise interference. Consequently, change in the noise levels depending on the building material of roads was recorded simultaneously. These factors was analysed and various models related to the sort of coating was provided. At this stage, the distance between set up points was kept as short as possible in order to prevent different results in the density of traffic and also in the flow rate.Result of various measurements and analysis provided the noise levels of concrete roads being 4 dB(A less than HMA roads in the comparison based on the same level of vehicle composition and traffic flow. Encouraging the construction of concrete roads in our country is emphasized accordingly.

  7. 3D filtering technique in presence of additive noise in color videos implemented on DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Montenegro-Monroy, Hector; Palacios, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    A filtering method for color videos contaminated by additive noise is presented. The proposed framework employs three filtering stages: spatial similarity filtering, neighboring frame denoising, and spatial post-processing smoothing. The difference with other state-of- the-art filtering methods, is that this approach, based on fuzzy logic, analyses basic and related gradient values between neighboring pixels into a 7 fi 7 sliding window in the vicinity of a central pixel in each of the RGB channels. Following, the similarity measures between the analogous pixels in the color bands are taken into account during the denoising. Next, two neighboring video frames are analyzed together estimating local motions between the frames using block matching procedure. In the final stage, the edges and smoothed areas are processed differently in a current frame during the post-processing filtering. Numerous simulations results confirm that this 3D fuzzy filter perform better than other state-of-the- art methods, such as: 3D-LLMMSE, WMVCE, RFMDAF, FDARTF G, VBM3D and NLM, in terms of objective criteria (PSNR, MAE, NCD and SSIM) as well as subjective perception via human vision system in the different color videos. An efficiency analysis of the designed and other mentioned filters have been performed on the DSPs TMS320 DM642 and TMS320DM648 by Texas Instruments through MATLAB and Simulink module showing that the novel 3D fuzzy filter can be used in real-time processing applications.

  8. The Optimum Design Methodology of Low-Phase-Noise LC-VCO Using Multiple-Divide Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Shoichi; Murakami, Rui; Okada, Kenichi; Matsuzawa, Akira

    The multiple-divide technique, using the multi-ratio frequency divider, has a possibility to improve FoM of VCO. This paper proposes a design optimization of LC-VCO using the multiple-divide technique. In the simulated results using 90-nm CMOS model parameters, the optimum frequency range, achieving better than -187.0dBc/Hz of FoM, can be extended from 6.5-12.5GHz to 1.5-12.5GHz. The proposed multiple-divide technique can provide a lower phase-noise, lower power consumption, smaller layout area of LC-VCO.

  9. Blood Glucose Measurement Using Bioimpedance Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Kamat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioimpedance measurement is gaining importance in wide field of bioresearch and biomedical systems due to its noninvasive nature. Noninvasive measurement method is very important to decrease infection and physical injuries which result due to invasive measurement. This paper presents basic principle of bioimpedance along with its application for blood glucose analysis and effect of frequency on impedance measurement. Input from bioimpedance sensor is given to amplifier and signal conditioner AD5933. AD5933 is then interfaced with microcontroller LPC1768 using I2C bus for displaying reading on LCD. Results can also be stored in database using UART interface of LPC1768.

  10. Application of acoustic noise and self-potential localization techniques to a buried hydrothermal vent (Waimangu Old Geyser site, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Roux, P.; Gouédard, P.; Legaz, A.; Revil, A.; Hurst, A. W.; Bolève, A.; Jardani, A.

    2010-02-01

    A seismo-acoustic and self-potential survey has been performed in the hydrothermal area of the old Waimangu Geyser (New Zealand), which was violently erupting a century ago. Nowadays, no surface activity is visible there. We set-up an array of 16 geophones and recorded a high and steady acoustic ambient noise. We applied the matched field processing (MFP) approach to the acoustic data to locate the sources responsible for the ambient noise. The white noise constraint processor reveals the presence of a unique and well-focused acoustic source at a depth of 1.5 m below the seismic array. For this very shallow source, the application of MFP enabled the determination of both the source location and the dispersion curve of seismic velocity. The study was completed by self-potential (SP) measurements on several profiles around the acoustic noise source, which displayed a large positive anomaly above it. The results of the SP inversion gave an electric streaming current density source very close to the acoustic one. Both sources likely belong to a shallow hydrothermal structure interpreted as a small convective cell of boiling water beneath an impermeable layer. The joint application of these methods is a promising technique to recognize hydrothermal structures and to study their dynamics.

  11. A Tracking Filter in Spherical Coordinates Enhanced by De-noising of Converted Doppler Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Gongjian; YU Changjun; CUI Naigang; QUAN Taifan

    2012-01-01

    Tracking problem in spherical coordinates with range rate (Doppler) measurements,which would have errors correlated to the range measurement errors,is investigated in this paper.The converted Doppler measurements,constructed by the product of the Doppler measurements and range measurements,are used to replace the original Doppler measurements.A de-noising method based on an unbiased Kalman filter (KF) is proposed to reduce the converted Doppler measurement errors before updating the target states for the constant velocity (CV) model.The states from the de-noising filter are then combined with the Cartesian states from the converted measurement Kalman filter (CMKF) to produce final state estimates.The nonlinearity of the de-noising filter states are handled by expanding them around the Cartesian states from the CMKF in a Taylor series up to the second order term.In the mean time,the correlation between the two filters caused by the common range measurements is handled by a minimum mean squared error (MMSE) estimation-based method.These result in a new tracking filter,CMDN-EKF2.Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the proposed tracking filter can provide efficient and robust performance with a modest computational cost.

  12. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block

  13. Measuring the levels of noise at the İstanbul Atatürk Airport and comparisons with model simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Deniz; Ozkurt, Nesimi; Akdag, Ali; Kutukoglu, Murat; Gurarslan, Aliye

    2014-06-01

    Airport noise and its impact on the surrounding areas are major issues in the aviation industry. The İstanbul Atatürk Airport is a major global airport with passenger numbers increasing rapidly per annum. The noise levels for day, evening and night times were modeled around the İstanbul Atatürk Airport according to the European Noise Directive using the actual data records for the year 2011. The "ECAC Doc. 29-Interim" method was used for the computation of the aircraft traffic noise. In the setting the noise model for the local airport topography was taken into consideration together with the noise source data, the airport loadings, features of aircraft and actual air traffic data. Model results were compared with long-term noise measurement values for calibration. According to calibration results, classifications of the aircraft type and flight tracks were revised. For noise model validation, the daily noise measurements at four additional locations were used during the verification period. The input data was re-edited only for these periods and the model was validated. A successful model performance was obtained in several zones around the airport. The validated noise model of the İstanbul Atatürk Airport can be now utilized both for determining the noise levels in the future and for producing new strategies which are about the land use planning, operational considerations for the air traffic management and the noise abatement procedures.

  14. Periodic Noise Suppression from ECG Signal using Novel Adaptive Filtering Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Sharma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiogram signal most commonly known recognized and used biomedical signal for medical examination of heart. The ECG signal is very sensitive in nature, and even if small noise mixed with original signal, the various characteristics of the signal changes, Data corrupted with noise must either filtered or discarded, filtering is important issue for design consideration of real time heart monitoring systems. Various filters used for removing the noise from ECG signals, most commonly used filters are Notch Filters, FIR filters, IIR filters, Wiener filter, Adaptive filters etc. Performance analysis shows that the best result is obtained by using Adaptive filter to remove various noises from ECG signal and get significant SNR andMSE results. In this paper a novel adaptive approach by using LMS algorithm and delay has shown whichcan be used for pre-processing of ECG signal and give appreciable result.

  15. A Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently developed wireless measurement acquisition system to fluid-level measurement. This type of fluid-level measurement system alleviates many shortcomings of fluid-level measurement methods currently being used, including limited applicability of any one fluid-level sensor design. Measurement acquisition shortcomings include the necessity for power to be supplied to each sensor and for the measurement to be extracted from each sensor via a physical connection to the sensor. Another shortcoming is existing measurement systems require that a data channel and signal conditioning electronics be dedicated to each sensor. Use of wires results in other shortcomings such as logistics needed to add or replace sensors, weight, potential for electrical arcing and wire degradations. The fluid level sensor design is a simple passive inductor-capacitor circuit that is not subject to mechanical failure that is possible when float and lever-arm systems are used. Methods are presented for using the sensor in caustic, acidic or cryogenic fluids. Oscillating magnetic fields are used to power the sensor. Once electrically excited, the sensor produces a magnetic field response. The response frequency corresponds to the amount to fluid within the capacitor s electric field. The sensor design can be modified for measuring the level of any fluid or fluent substance that can be stored in a non-conductive reservoir. The interrogation method for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency is also presented.

  16. A Simple Technique for High Resistance Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguia; Landin, Ramon Ochoa

    2012-01-01

    A simple electronic system for the measurement of high values of resistance is shown. This system allows the measurement of resistance in the range of a few megohm up to 10[superscript 9] [omega]. We have used this system for the evaluation of CdS thin film resistance, but other practical uses in the basic physics laboratory are presented.…

  17. A Simple Technique for High Resistance Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguia; Landin, Ramon Ochoa

    2012-01-01

    A simple electronic system for the measurement of high values of resistance is shown. This system allows the measurement of resistance in the range of a few megohm up to 10[superscript 9] [omega]. We have used this system for the evaluation of CdS thin film resistance, but other practical uses in the basic physics laboratory are presented.…

  18. SPEED ROLLER STAND MEASUREMENT SYSTEM CHECKING TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Zybtsev, Y.; I. Marmut

    2011-01-01

    The study has shown that the accuracy of brakes checking by inertial stands depends upon the applied methods of measurement of braking parameters (stand slowing down, braking distance, brakes triggering time, current speed) as well as the methods of metrological checking of measuring system canals.

  19. A simple technique for individual picosecond laser pulse duration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    We describe here a simple nonlinear optic technique for the measurement of the duration of individual picosecond pulses. The accuracy and relative simplicity of the technique increase with the number of pulses measured. An experimental test of the basis of the technique is described.

  20. Vibration transfers to measure the performance of vibration isolated platforms on site using background noise excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segerink, F.B.; Korterik, J.P.; Offerhaus, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    This article demonstrates a quick and easy way of quantifying the performance of a vibration-isolated platform. We measure the vibration transfer from floor to table using background noise excitation from the floor. As no excitation device is needed, our setup only requires two identical sensors (in

  1. Sub-bottom profiling with ambient noise measured on a drifting vertical array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.H.; Schippers, P.; Snellen, M.; Weterings, A.

    2005-01-01

    The angle and frequency dependent reflective properties of the seabed can be determined from beam-steered ambient noise measurements on a vertical array of hydrophones. From the up-to-down ratio the beam-smeared modulus square of the plane wave reflection coefficient is obtained. Geo-acoustic parame

  2. Field Studies of the Air Force Procedures (NOISECHECK) for Measuring Community Noise Exposure from Aircraft Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    who assisted in the field measurements and Mrs. Norma Peachey who typed this report. 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I INTRODUCTION...1812 ft 702 ft 2025 ft 3620 ft 2323 ft Slant Distance ’" J I’ 4 • l iSI ! o, APPENDIX B HOMESTEAD AFB DATA 17 TABLE B-I HOURLY NOISE LEVELS (dB) AT

  3. Effects of bladdered fish on ambient noise measurements close to the port of Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Jong C.A.F. de; Dreschler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient noise in the frequency range 25 Hz to 80 kHz was measured at a site close to the Port of Rotterdam in September 2008, before construction began of a port extension known as ‘Maasvlakte 2’ [http://www.maasvlakte2.com/en/index/], and in September-October 2009 (during construction). Day-night

  4. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are ana...

  5. Sinusoidal echo-planar imaging with parallel acquisition technique for reduced acoustic noise in auditory fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Jascha; Schmitter, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-09-01

    To extend the parameter restrictions of a silent echo-planar imaging (sEPI) sequence using sinusoidal readout (RO) gradients, in particular with increased spatial resolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) of the most feasible configurations is compared to conventional EPI having trapezoidal RO gradients. We enhanced the sEPI sequence by integrating a parallel acquisition technique (PAT) on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The SPL was measured for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, without and with PAT (R = 2). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was examined for both sinusoidal and trapezoidal RO gradients. Compared to EPI PAT, the SPL could be reduced by up to 11.1 dB and 5.1 dB for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, respectively. The SNR of sinusoidal RO gradients is lower by a factor of 0.96 on average compared to trapezoidal RO gradients. The sEPI PAT sequence allows for 1) increased resolution, 2) expanded RO frequency range toward lower frequencies, which is in general beneficial for SPL, or 3) shortened TE, TR, and RO train length. At the same time, it generates lower SPL compared to conventional EPI for a wide range of RO frequencies while having the same imaging parameters. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Apparatus and techniques for measuring bedload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, David Wellington

    1964-01-01

    The need for accurate determinations of the total sediment discharge of particles of bedload size has prompted this investigation of available and possible measuring apparatus and procedures. The accuracy of measurements of sediment discharge made with trap-type samplers is affected by the variability of sampler efficiency, by the oscillatory variation of bedload discharge, and by sampler placement. Equations that were developed for determining total discharge from measured bedioad discharge and measured suspended-sediment discharge are simplest if the bedload apparatus measures only the true bedload. Early bedload samplers are generally unsatisfactory. Recently developed or suggested apparatus include various improved samplers of the pressure-difference type, a pumping sampler, a magnetic sampler, acoustical instruments that measure the magnitude of the sound of particle collisions, an ultrasonic bedload sampler designed to measure and integrate electronically the concentration and velocity, and a tiltmeter designed to measure the total sediment discharge from the ground tilt that results from the passage of flow. All the pressure-difference samplers are improvements over early samplers, but none are void of the inherent shortcomings of trap-type apparatus; probably the Sphinx (Dutch) and VUV (Hungarian) samplers are the most satisfactory. The acoustical instruments are capable of measuring only the relative discharge. The ultrasonic sampler and the tiltmeter are not adequate without further development. Some new possible apparatus and means for measuring or aiding in measuring bedload discharge are small pit samplers, ultrasonic sounders, pressure transducers, and photography. A small pit sampler for measuring bedload discharge was designed to provide self-placement and portability ; however, its practicability and efficiency are undetermined. Exploratory films show that by using slowmotion photography the discharge of particles larger than about pea size can be

  7. Wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on 40-GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We have performed wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on semiconductor 40-GHz mode-locked lasers by employing electrical waveguide components for the radio-frequency circuit. The intrinsic timing jitters of lasers with one, two, and three quantum wells (QW) are compared and our design...... prediction, concerning noise versus number of QWs, for the first time corroborated by experiments. A minimum jitter of 44 fs is found, by extrapolating to the Nyquist frequency, for the one-QW device having nearly transform-limited pulses of 1.2 ps. This jitter is nearly three times lower than for a three...

  8. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  9. Chemonucleolysis technique. New oblique approach requires no measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romy, M

    1986-01-01

    The author describes a new technique for intradiscal therapy that eliminates the need for measurements. The new technique for entering the lumbar disk for discolysis from the oblique approach is described as simple, accurate and safe.

  10. Analysis of normal shock noise measurements on nose-cylinder bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, J. P.; Guenther, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise measurements have been obtained on three nose-cylinder configurations (15 deg cone-cylinder, biconic nose-cylinder and biconic nose-corrogated cylinder) in transonic flow. The noise environment at the foot of the terminal normal shock and its associated separated flow bubble were examined in detail. A peak in the frequency spectra of the separated flow region was observed which compares well with the predicted resonance frequency of the separated pocket using Trilling's incident shock model. As a consequence of the observed sound spectra and noise level, a flow model is postulated which consist of a cellular separated flow region. In the central portion of the cell the flow resembles the classical two-dimensional recirculating bubble, but each cell is vented by a pair of counter rotating vortices, which start at the surface and steam downstream.

  11. Measure of 1/f noise using the sound card of a PC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlà, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup is described to measure 1/f noise (pink noise) in conductors using a PC equipped with a sound card functioning as a spectrum analyzer. A simple auxiliary analog electronic circuit with three operational amplifiers has been assembled to yield the required amplification, to match the sound card signal levels, and to implement a bridge configuration to improve dynamical range. Test experiments and data analysis have been conducted using commonly available software, together with some custom scripts and C code. The whole setup is technically accessible and economical for both the high school and undergraduate levels. Results are reported for pink noise of vintage carbon resistors spanning seven frequency decades, from 1 mHz to 10 kHz.

  12. Measurement of high-power microwave pulse under intense electromagnetic noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Roy; S K Singh; R Menon; D Senthil Kumar; R Venkateswaran; M R Kulkarni; P C Saroj; K V Nagesh; K C Mittal; D P Chakravarthy

    2010-01-01

    KALI-1000 pulse power system has been used to generate single pulse nanosecond duration high-power microwaves (HPM) from a virtual cathode oscillator (VIRCATOR) device. HPM power measurements were carried out using a transmitting–receiving system in the presence of intense high frequency (a few MHz) electromagnetic noise. Initially, the diode detector output signal could not be recorded due to the high noise level persisting in the ambiance. It was found that the HPM pulse can be successfully detected using wide band antenna, RF cable and diode detector set-up in the presence of significant electromagnetic noise. Estimated microwave peak power was ∼ 59.8 dBm (∼ 1 kW) at 7 m distance from the VIRCATOR window. Peak amplitude of the HPM signal varies on shot-to-shot basis. Duration of the HPM pulse (FWHM) also varies from 52 ns to 94 ns for different shots.

  13. Active self-testing noise measurement sensors for large-scale environmental sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-12-13

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  14. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Domínguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone’s frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor’s hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50 effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  15. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements Made on a Williams International FJ44 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Horvath, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire noise source localization data on a full-scale Williams International FJ44 turbofan engine. Data were acquired with the array at three different locations relative to the engine, two on the side and one in front of the engine. At the two side locations the planar microphone array was parallel to the engine centerline; at the front location the array was perpendicular to the engine centerline. At each of the three locations, data were acquired at eleven different engine operating conditions ranging from engine idle to maximum (take off) speed. Data obtained with the array off to the side of the engine were spatially filtered to separate the inlet and nozzle noise. Tones occurring in the inlet and nozzle spectra were traced to the low and high speed spools within the engine. The phased array data indicate that the Inflow Control Device (ICD) used during this test was not acoustically transparent; instead, some of the noise emanating from the inlet reflected off of the inlet lip of the ICD. This reflection is a source of error for far field noise measurements made during the test. The data also indicate that a total temperature rake in the inlet of the engine is a source of fan noise.

  16. Altertative trophy measuring techniques for African buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Gandy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The African buffalo is considered the classic African trophy. It is the choice of many hunters who will never go on to hunt any of the other dangerous game animals on the continent. A good trophy is perceived as that of a mature bull with a hardened boss and horn tips that lengthen into sharply pointed hooks. However, indications are that these are the bulls in their breeding prime and there is concern that the continued targeting of these individuals will negatively impact on the population dynamics of the herds, ultimately affecting the sustainability of buffalo hunting. As they age and become postreproductive, the horns broom down, reducing the trophy score under the current measurement systems. A new measuring system is needed that encourages hunters to target the older post-reproductive bulls, instead of those that are still breeding. A random sample of trophies was divided into broomed and non-broomed sub-samples. All key parameters that can be measured in the trophy were measured with a view to identifying the parameters that would allow broomed-down individuals to compete favourably with the non-broomed “classic trophy” in the primary measurement systems, those of Safari Club International and Rowland Ward. An index, created through dividing tip space by the mean of the two individual horn lengths proved to serve the purpose. This factor was then applied to the mean of the SCI and Rowland Ward measurements in the samples. These methods allowed broomed horns to score more points in the record books than non-broomed horns. Boss width and boss space are other possible measurement inclusions that could be considered.

  17. Improved Kalman Filter Method for Measurement Noise Reduction in Multi Sensor RFID Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chul Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the range of available Radio Frequency Identification (RFID tags has been widened to include smart RFID tags which can monitor their varying surroundings. One of the most important factors for better performance of smart RFID system is accurate measurement from various sensors. In the multi-sensing environment, some noisy signals are obtained because of the changing surroundings. We propose in this paper an improved Kalman filter method to reduce noise and obtain correct data. Performance of Kalman filter is determined by a measurement and system noise covariance which are usually called the R and Q variables in the Kalman filter algorithm. Choosing a correct R and Q variable is one of the most important design factors for better performance of the Kalman filter. For this reason, we proposed an improved Kalman filter to advance an ability of noise reduction of the Kalman filter. The measurement noise covariance was only considered because the system architecture is simple and can be adjusted by the neural network. With this method, more accurate data can be obtained with smart RFID tags. In a simulation the proposed improved Kalman filter has 40.1%, 60.4% and 87.5% less Mean Squared Error (MSE than the conventional Kalman filter method for a temperature sensor, humidity sensor and oxygen sensor, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was also verified with some experiments.

  18. Improved Kalman filter method for measurement noise reduction in multi sensor RFID systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Ki Hwan; Lee, Seung Joon; Kyung, Yeo Sun; Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Min Chul; Jung, Kyung Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the range of available radio frequency identification (RFID) tags has been widened to include smart RFID tags which can monitor their varying surroundings. One of the most important factors for better performance of smart RFID system is accurate measurement from various sensors. In the multi-sensing environment, some noisy signals are obtained because of the changing surroundings. We propose in this paper an improved Kalman filter method to reduce noise and obtain correct data. Performance of Kalman filter is determined by a measurement and system noise covariance which are usually called the R and Q variables in the Kalman filter algorithm. Choosing a correct R and Q variable is one of the most important design factors for better performance of the Kalman filter. For this reason, we proposed an improved Kalman filter to advance an ability of noise reduction of the Kalman filter. The measurement noise covariance was only considered because the system architecture is simple and can be adjusted by the neural network. With this method, more accurate data can be obtained with smart RFID tags. In a simulation the proposed improved Kalman filter has 40.1%, 60.4% and 87.5% less mean squared error (MSE) than the conventional Kalman filter method for a temperature sensor, humidity sensor and oxygen sensor, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was also verified with some experiments.

  19. Evaluating strong measurement noise in data series with simulated annealing method

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, J; Haase, M; Lind, P G

    2013-01-01

    Many stochastic time series can be described by a Langevin equation composed of a deterministic and a stochastic dynamical part. Such a stochastic process can be reconstructed by means of a recently introduced nonparametric method, thus increasing the predictability, i.e. knowledge of the macroscopic drift and the microscopic diffusion functions. If the measurement of a stochastic process is affected by additional strong measurement noise, the reconstruction process cannot be applied. Here, we present a method for the reconstruction of stochastic processes in the presence of strong measurement noise, based on a suitably parametrized ansatz. At the core of the process is the minimization of the functional distance between terms containing the conditional moments taken from measurement data, and the corresponding ansatz functions. It is shown that a minimization of the distance by means of a simulated annealing procedure yields better results than a previously used Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, which permits a...

  20. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Zhenyu; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations. In addition, the notion of a valid measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct ...