WorldWideScience

Sample records for nocturnal driving performances

  1. In-car nocturnal blue light exposure improves motorway driving: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillard, Jacques; Capelli, Aurore; Sagaspe, Patricia; Anund, Anna; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Philip, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness greatly decreases nocturnal driving performance. The development of in-car countermeasures is a future challenge to prevent sleep-related accidents. The aim of this study is to determine whether continuous exposure to monochromatic light in the short wavelengths (blue light), placed on the dashboard, improves night-time driving performance. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 48 healthy male participants (aged 20-50 years) drove 400 km (250 miles) on motorway during night-time. They randomly and consecutively received either continuous blue light exposure (GOLite, Philips, 468 nm) during driving or 2*200 mg of caffeine or placebo of caffeine before and during the break. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. The outcomes were number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) and mean standard deviation of the lateral position (SDLP). Eight participants (17%) complained about dazzle during blue light exposure and were removed from the analysis. Results from the 40 remaining participants (mean age ± SD: 32.9±11.1) showed that countermeasures reduced the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) (F(2,91.11) = 6.64; pquality, quantity and timing of 3 subsequent nocturnal sleep episodes. Despite a lesser tolerance, a non-inferior efficacy of continuous nocturnal blue light exposure compared with caffeine suggests that this in-car countermeasure, used occasionally, could be used to fight nocturnal sleepiness at the wheel in blue light-tolerant drivers, whatever their age. More studies are needed to determine the reproducibility of data and to verify if it can be generalized to women. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01070004.

  2. In-car nocturnal blue light exposure improves motorway driving: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Taillard

    Full Text Available Prolonged wakefulness greatly decreases nocturnal driving performance. The development of in-car countermeasures is a future challenge to prevent sleep-related accidents. The aim of this study is to determine whether continuous exposure to monochromatic light in the short wavelengths (blue light, placed on the dashboard, improves night-time driving performance. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 48 healthy male participants (aged 20-50 years drove 400 km (250 miles on motorway during night-time. They randomly and consecutively received either continuous blue light exposure (GOLite, Philips, 468 nm during driving or 2*200 mg of caffeine or placebo of caffeine before and during the break. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. The outcomes were number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC and mean standard deviation of the lateral position (SDLP. Eight participants (17% complained about dazzle during blue light exposure and were removed from the analysis. Results from the 40 remaining participants (mean age ± SD: 32.9±11.1 showed that countermeasures reduced the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC (F(2,91.11 = 6.64; p<0.05. Indeed, ILC were lower with coffee (12.51 [95% CI, 5.86 to 19.66], p = 0.001 and blue light (14.58 [CI, 8.75 to 22.58], p = 0.003 than with placebo (26.42 [CI, 19.90 to 33.71]. Similar results were found for SDLP. Treatments did not modify the quality, quantity and timing of 3 subsequent nocturnal sleep episodes. Despite a lesser tolerance, a non-inferior efficacy of continuous nocturnal blue light exposure compared with caffeine suggests that this in-car countermeasure, used occasionally, could be used to fight nocturnal sleepiness at the wheel in blue light-tolerant drivers, whatever their age. More studies are needed to determine the reproducibility of data and to verify if it can be generalized to women.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01070004.

  3. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-15

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr(-1)). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  4. High performance AC drives

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive view of high performance ac drives. It may be considered as both a text book for graduate students and as an up-to-date monograph. It may also be used by R & D professionals involved in the improvement of performance of drives in the industries. The book will also be beneficial to the researchers pursuing work on multiphase drives as well as sensorless and direct torque control of electric drives since up-to date references in these topics are provided. It will also provide few examples of modeling, analysis and control of electric drives using MATLAB/SIMULIN

  5. Marijuana and actual driving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This report concerns the effects of marijuana smoking on actual driving performance. It presents the results of one pilot and three actual driving studies. The pilot study's major purpose was to establish the THC dose current marijuana users smoke to...

  6. Male broiler performance and nocturnal feeding under constant 8-h ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... however, they still consumed more feed in the 8-h dark period than birds that had always been given 16 h illumination. Cobb and Ross genotypes responded similarly to all lighting treatments. Keywords: Photoperiod, broiler growth, nocturnal feeding. South African Journal of Animal Science Vol. 38 (3) 2008: pp. 159-165 ...

  7. Treatment of nocturnal airway obstruction improves daytime cognitive performance in asthmatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weersink, EJM; vanZomeren, EH; Koeter, GH; Postma, DS

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that asthmatics have nocturnal symptoms associated with impaired cognitive performance. We explored more carefully different therapeutic approaches on this performance in relation to lung function in 46 atopics with mild to moderate asthma and with a circadian variation in peak

  8. Driving Performance Under Alcohol in Simulated Representative Driving Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenntner-Mabiala, Ramona; Kaussner, Yvonne; Jagiellowicz-Kaufmann, Monika; Hoffmann, Sonja; Krüger, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Comparing drug-induced driving impairments with the effects of benchmark blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) is an approved approach to determine the clinical relevance of findings for traffic safety. The present study aimed to collect alcohol calibration data to validate findings of clinical trials that were derived from a representative test course in a dynamic driving simulator. The driving performance of 24 healthy volunteers under placebo and with 0.05% and 0.08% BACs was measured in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Trained investigators assessed the subjects’ driving performance and registered their driving errors. Various driving parameters that were recorded during the simulation were also analyzed. Generally, the participants performed worse on the test course (P the investigators’ assessment) under the influence of alcohol. Consistent with the relevant literature, lane-keeping performance parameters were sensitive to the investigated BACs. There were significant differences between the alcohol and placebo conditions in most of the parameters analyzed. However, the total number of errors was the only parameter discriminating significantly between all three BAC conditions. In conclusion, data show that the present experimental setup is suitable for future psychopharmacological research. Thereby, for each drug to be investigated, we recommend to assess a profile of various parameters that address different levels of driving. On the basis of this performance profile, the total number of driving errors is recommended as the primary endpoint. However, this overall endpoint should be completed by a specifically sensitive parameter that is chosen depending on the effect known to be induced by the tested drug. PMID:25689289

  9. The Drive-Wise Project: Driving Simulator Training increases real driving performance in healthy older drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianclaudio eCasutt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age-related cognitive decline is often associated with unsafe driving behavior. We hypothesized that 10 active training sessions in a driving simulator increase cognitive and on-road driving performance. In addition, driving simulator training should outperform cognitive training.Methods: Ninety-one healthy active drivers (62 – 87 years were randomly assigned to either (1 a driving simulator training group, (2 an attention training group (vigilance and selective attention, or (3 a control group. The main outcome variables were on-road driving and cognitive performance. Seventy-seven participants (85% completed the training and were included in the analyses. Training gains were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis with planned comparisons.Results: The driving simulator training group showed an improvement in on-road driving performance compared to the attention training group. In addition, both training groups increased cognitive performance compared to the control group. Conclusion: Driving simulator training offers the potential to enhance driving skills in older drivers. Compared to the attention training, the simulator training seems to be a more powerful program for increasing older drivers’ safety on the road.

  10. Driving performance at lateral system limits during partially automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naujoks, Frederik; Purucker, Christian; Wiedemann, Katharina; Neukum, Alexandra; Wolter, Stefan; Steiger, Reid

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated driver performance during system limits of partially automated driving. Using a motion-based driving simulator, drivers encountered different situations in which a partially automated vehicle could no longer safely keep the lateral guidance. Drivers were distracted by a non-driving related task on a touch display or driving without an additional secondary task. While driving in partially automated mode drivers could either take their hands off the steering wheel for only a short period of time (10s, so-called 'Hands-on' variant) or for an extended period of time (120s, so-called 'Hands-off' variant). When the system limit was reached (e.g., when entering a work zone with temporary lines), the lateral vehicle control by the automation was suddenly discontinued and a take-over request was issued to the drivers. Regardless of the hands-off interval and the availability of a secondary task, all drivers managed the transition to manual driving safely. No lane exceedances were observed and the situations were rated as 'harmless' by the drivers. The lack of difference between the hands-off intervals can be partly attributed to the fact that most of the drivers kept contact to the steering wheel, even in the hands-off condition. Although all drivers were able to control the system limits, most of them could not explain why exactly the take-over request was issued. The average helpfulness of the take-over request was rated on an intermediate level. Consequently, providing drivers with information about the reason for a system limit can be recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Examining nocturnal railway noise and aircraft noise in the field: sleep, psychomotor performance, and annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Pennig, Sibylle; Rolny, Vinzent; Quehl, Julia; Mueller, Uwe; Maaß, Hartmut; Basner, Mathias

    2012-05-01

    Traffic noise is interfering during day- and nighttime causing distress and adverse physiological reactions in large parts of the population. Railway noise proved less annoying than aircraft noise in surveys which were the bases for a so called 5 dB railway bonus regarding noise protection in many European countries. The present field study investigated railway noise-induced awakenings during sleep, nighttime annoyance and the impact on performance the following day. Comparing these results with those from a field study on aircraft noise allowed for a ranking of traffic modes concerning physiological and psychological reactions. 33 participants (mean age 36.2 years ± 10.3 (SD); 22 females) living alongside railway tracks around Cologne/Bonn (Germany) were polysomnographically investigated. These data were pooled with data from a field study on aircraft noise (61 subjects) directly comparing the effects of railway and aircraft noise in one random subject effects logistic regression model. Annoyance was rated in the morning evaluating the previous night. Probability of sleep stage changes to wake/S1 from railway noise increased significantly from 6.5% at 35 dB(A) to 20.5% at 80 dB(A) LAFmax. Rise time of noise events had a significant impact on awakening probability. Nocturnal railway noise led to significantly higher awakening probabilities than aircraft noise, partly explained by the different rise times, whereas the order was inversed for annoyance. Freight train noise compared to passenger train noise proved to have the most impact on awakening probability. Nocturnal railway noise had no effect on psychomotor vigilance. Nocturnal freight train noise exposure in Germany was associated with increased awakening probabilities exceeding those for aircraft noise and contrasting the findings of many annoyance surveys and annoyance ratings of our study. During nighttime a bonus for railway noise seems not appropriate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Marijuana, alcohol and actual driving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically determine the separate and combined effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and alcohol on actual driving performance. This was the first study ever in which the drugs' combined effects were measured...

  13. Superior visual performance in nocturnal insects: neural principles and bio-inspired technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrant, Eric J.

    2016-04-01

    At night, our visual capacities are severely reduced, with a complete loss in our ability to see colour and a dramatic loss in our ability to see fine spatial and temporal details. This is not the case for many nocturnal animals, notably insects. Our recent work, particularly on fast-flying moths and bees and on ball-rolling dung beetles, has shown that nocturnal animals are able to distinguish colours, to detect faint movements, to learn visual landmarks, to orient to the faint pattern of polarised light produced by the moon and to navigate using the stars. These impressive visual abilities are the result of exquisitely adapted eyes and visual systems, the product of millions of years of evolution. Nocturnal animals typically have highly sensitive eye designs and visual neural circuitry that is optimised for extracting reliable information from dim and noisy visual images. Even though we are only at the threshold of understanding the neural mechanisms responsible for reliable nocturnal vision, growing evidence suggests that the neural summation of photons in space and time is critically important: even though vision in dim light becomes necessarily coarser and slower, it also becomes significantly more reliable. We explored the benefits of spatiotemporal summation by creating a computer algorithm that mimicked nocturnal visual processing strategies. This algorithm dramatically increased the reliability of video collected in dim light, including the preservation of colour, strengthening evidence that summation strategies are essential for nocturnal vision.

  14. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjin Gan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders.

  15. Effect of inducing nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations in daytime on sleep, mood, body temperature, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollins, A. B.; Zhdanova, I. V.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lynch, H. J.; Deng, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    We examined effects of very low doses of melatonin (0.1-10 mg, orally) or placebo, administered at 1145 h, on sleep latency and duration, mood, performance, oral temperature, and changes in serum melatonin levels in 20 healthy male volunteers. A repeated-measure double-blind Latin square design was used. Subjects completed a battery of tests designed to assess mood and performance between 0930 and 1730 h. The sedative-like effects of melatonin were assessed by a simple sleep test: at 1330 h subjects were asked to hold a positive pressure switch in each hand and to relax with eyes closed while reclining in a quiet darkened room. Latency and duration of switch release, indicators of sleep, were measured. Areas under the time-melatonin concentration curve varied in proportion to the different melatonin doses ingested, and the 0.1- and 0.3-mg doses generated peak serum melatonin levels that were within the normal range of nocturnal melatonin levels in untreated people. All melatonin doses tested significantly increased sleep duration, as well as self-reported sleepiness and fatigue, relative to placebo. Moreover, all of the doses significantly decreased sleep-onset latency, oral temperature, and the number of correct responses on the Wilkinson auditory vigilance task. These data indicate that orally administered melatonin can be a highly potent hypnotic agent; they also suggest that the physiological increase in serum melatonin levels, which occurs around 2100 h daily, may constitute a signal initiating normal sleep onset.

  16. Concerta cf Ritalin Effects on Driving Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different methylphenidate (MPH delivery profiles on driving performance of 6 male ADHD adolescents, aged 16 to 19 years, were evaluated by a randomized, crossover, single-blind study comparing controlled-release (OROS MPH (Concerta given q.d. to immediate-release MPH (Ritalin in equal doses t.i.d. in a study at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

  17. Resistance exercise performed with repetitions until failure affects nocturnal blood pressure decreases in hypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia de Almeida Correia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that resistance exercise reduces 24-hour blood pressure to levels below resting values, although this is not a universal finding. The number of repetitions has been shown to influence this response. Thus, the aim of the study was to analyze the effects of resistance exercise performed until failure (UF on 24-hour blood pressure in hypertensive women. Thirteen hypertensive women underwent three experimental sessions in random order: UF, resistance exercise with repetitions before concentric failure (BF and control (C. Prior to and up to 24 hours after the sessions, cardiovascular variables, as well as the nocturnal fall in blood pressure, the morning surge, and the presence or absence of a blood pressure dip pattern were established using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. In both wakefulness and sleep there was no significant difference among the three groups. However, after UF and C fewer patients presented a dip in blood pressure (46% and 38%, respectively compared BF (77%, p=0.047. In conclusion, the UF attenuated blood pressure dips at night in hypertensive patients.

  18. Driving and visuospatial performance in people with hemianopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tant, M.L.; Brouwer, W.H.; Cornelissen, F.W; Kooijman, A.C

    2002-01-01

    Practical fitness to drive was studied in 28 patients with homonymous hemianopia (HH). More specifically, visual performance during driving and neuropsychological visuospatial test performance were compared and related. Visuospatial tests were a priori classified in four visuospatial sets, and were

  19. Combined caffeine and carbohydrate ingestion: effects on nocturnal sleep and exercise performance in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ben; O'Connor, Helen; Orr, Rhonda; Ruell, Patricia; Cheng, Hoi Lun; Chow, Chin Moi

    2014-12-01

    In athletes, caffeine use is common although its effects on sleep have not been widely studied. This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial investigated the effects of late-afternoon caffeine and carbohydrate-electrolyte (CEB) co-ingestion on cycling performance and nocturnal sleep. Six male cyclists/triathletes (age 27.5 ± 6.9 years) completed an afternoon training session (TS; cycling 80 min; 65% VO₂max) followed by a 5 kJ kg(-1) cycling time trial (TT). Caffeine (split dose 2 × 3 mg kg(-1)) or placebo was administered 1 h prior and 40 min into the TS. A 7.4% CEB (3 ml kg(-1) every 15 min) was administered during the TS, followed 30 min after by a standardised evening meal. Participants retired at their usual bedtime and indices of sleep duration and quality were monitored via polysomnography. mean ± SD. All participants performed better in the caffeine TT (caffeine 19.7 ± 3.3; placebo 20.5 ± 3.5 min; p = 0.006), while ratings of perceived exertion (caffeine 12.0 ± 0.6; placebo 12.9 ± 0.7; p = 0.004) and heart rate (caffeine 175 ± 6; placebo 167 ± 11 bpm; p = 0.085) were lower in the caffeine TS. Caffeine intake induced significant disruptions to a number of sleep indices including increased sleep onset latency (caffeine 51.1 ± 34.7; placebo 10.2 ± 4.2 min; p = 0.028) and decreased sleep efficiency (caffeine 76.1 ± 19.6; placebo 91.5 ± 4.2%; p = 0.028), rapid eye movement sleep (caffeine 62.1 ± 19.6; placebo 85.8 ± 24.7 min; p = 0.028) and total sleep time (caffeine 391 ± 97; placebo 464 ± 49 min; p = 0.028). This study supports a performance-enhancing effect of caffeine, although athletes (especially those using caffeine for late-afternoon/evening training and competition) should consider its deleterious effects on sleep.

  20. Cryptic seedling herbivory by nocturnal introduced generalists impacts survival, performance of native and exotic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Sharon Y; Stanton, Maureen L; Emery, Nancy C; Bradley, Carrie A; Carleton, Alexandra; Dittrich-Reed, Dylan R; Ervin, Olivia A; Gray, Levi N; Hamilton, Andrew M; Rogge, Jennifer Harrington; Harper, Skye D; Law, Kimberley Cook; Pham, Vinh Q; Putnam, Matthew E; Roth, Tara M; Theil, Jacob H; Wells, Lara M; Yoshizuka, Eric M

    2009-02-01

    Although much of the theory on the success of invasive species has been geared at escape from specialist enemies, the impact of introduced generalist invertebrate herbivores on both native and introduced plant species has been underappreciated. The role of nocturnal invertebrate herbivores in structuring plant communities has been examined extensively in Europe, but less so in North America. Many nocturnal generalists (slugs, snails, and earwigs) have been introduced to North America, and 96% of herbivores found during a night census at our California Central Valley site were introduced generalists. We explored the role of these herbivores in the distribution, survivorship, and growth of 12 native and introduced plant species from six families. We predicted that introduced species sharing an evolutionary history with these generalists might be less vulnerable than native plant species. We quantified plant and herbivore abundances within our heterogeneous site and also established herbivore removal experiments in 160 plots spanning the gamut of microhabitats. As 18 collaborators, we checked 2000 seedling sites every day for three weeks to assess nocturnal seedling predation. Laboratory feeding trials allowed us to quantify the palatability of plant species to the two dominant nocturnal herbivores at the site (slugs and earwigs) and allowed us to account for herbivore microhabitat preferences when analyzing attack rates on seedlings. The relationship between local slug abundance and percent cover of five common plant taxa at the field site was significantly negatively associated with the mean palatability of these taxa to slugs in laboratory trials. Moreover, seedling mortality of 12 species in open-field plots was positively correlated with mean palatability of these taxa to both slugs and earwigs in laboratory trials. Counter to expectations, seedlings of native species were neither more vulnerable nor more palatable to nocturnal generalists than those of

  1. The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Ayça Berfu; Steg, Linda; Epstude, Kai

    2012-09-01

    The current research examined the influence of loud music on driving performance, and whether mental effort mediated this effect. Participants (N=69) drove in a driving simulator either with or without listening to music. In order to test whether music would have similar effects on driving performance in different situations, we manipulated the simulated traffic environment such that the driving context consisted of both complex and monotonous driving situations. In addition, we systematically kept track of drivers' mental load by making the participants verbally report their mental effort at certain moments while driving. We found that listening to music increased mental effort while driving, irrespective of the driving situation being complex or monotonous, providing support to the general assumption that music can be a distracting auditory stimulus while driving. However, drivers who listened to music performed as well as the drivers who did not listen to music, indicating that music did not impair their driving performance. Importantly, the increases in mental effort while listening to music pointed out that drivers try to regulate their mental effort as a cognitive compensatory strategy to deal with task demands. Interestingly, we observed significant improvements in driving performance in two of the driving situations. It seems like mental effort might mediate the effect of music on driving performance in situations requiring sustained attention. Other process variables, such as arousal and boredom, should also be incorporated to study designs in order to reveal more on the nature of how music affects driving. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünal, Ayca Berfu; Steg, Linda; Epstude, Kai

    The current research examined the influence of loud music on driving performance, and whether mental effort mediated this effect. Participants (N = 69) drove in a driving simulator either with or without listening to music. In order to test whether music would have similar effects on driving

  3. Do in-car devices affect experienced users' driving performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapper, A.S. Hagenzieker, M.P. & Brookhuis, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Distracted driving is considered to be an important factor in road safety. To investigate how experienced user's driving behaviour is affected by in-vehicle technology, a fixed-base driving simulator was used. 20 participants drove twice in a rich simulated traffic environment while performing

  4. Do in-car devices affect experienced users' driving performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapper, A.S.; Hagenzieker, M.P.; Brookhuis, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Distracted driving is considered to be an important factor in road safety. To investigate how experienced user's driving behaviour is affected by in-vehicle technology, a fixed-base driving simulator was used. 20 participants drove twice in a rich simulated traffic environment while performing

  5. Assessment of driving-related performance in chronic whiplash using an advanced driving simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Hiroshi; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Haines, Andrew; Jull, Gwendolen

    2013-11-01

    Driving is often nominated as problematic by individuals with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD), yet driving-related performance has not been evaluated objectively. The purpose of this study was to test driving-related performance in persons with chronic WAD against healthy controls of similar age, gender and driving experience to determine if driving-related performance in the WAD group was sufficiently impaired to recommend fitness to drive assessment. Driving-related performance was assessed using an advanced driving simulator during three driving scenarios; freeway, residential and a central business district (CBD). Total driving duration was approximately 15min. Five driving tasks which could cause a collision (critical events) were included in the scenarios. In addition, the effect of divided attention (identify red dots projected onto side or rear view mirrors) was assessed three times in each scenario. Driving performance was measured using the simulator performance index (SPI) which is calculated from 12 measures. z-Scores for all SPI measures were calculated for each WAD subject based on mean values of the control subjects. The z-scores were then averaged for the WAD group. A z-score of ≤-2 indicated a driving failing grade in the simulator. The number of collisions over the five critical events was compared between the WAD and control groups as was reaction time and missed response ratio in identifying the red dots. Seventeen WAD and 26 control subjects commenced the driving assessment. Demographic data were comparable between the groups. All subjects completed the freeway scenario but four withdrew during the residential and eight during the CBD scenario because of motion sickness. All scenarios were completed by 14 WAD and 17 control subjects. Mean z-scores for the SPI over the three scenarios was statistically lower in the WAD group (-0.3±0.3; P0.05). Assessment of driving in an advanced driving simulator for approximately 15min revealed

  6. The influence of music on mood and performance while driving

    OpenAIRE

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein D.; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Mulder, Ben L. J. M.; Westerink, Joyce H. D. M.; Brookhuis, Karel A.

    2012-01-01

    Mood can influence our everyday behaviour and people often seek to reinforce, or to alter their mood, for example by turning on music. Music listening while driving is a popular activity. However, little is known about the impact of music listening while driving on physiological state and driving performance. In the present experiment, it was investigated whether individually selected music can induce mood and maintain moods during a simulated drive. In addition, effects of positive, negative...

  7. Nocturnal Lagophthalmos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn H. Tsai

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal lagophthalmos is the inability to close the eyelids during sleep. It may be physiological but can cause significant symptoms in some patients. The spectrum of the disease ranges from minimal corneal epithelial changes, which may heal later in the daytime, to corneal ulcers after severe exposure. There are a variety of predisposing factors for lagophthalmos, which can be grouped as proptosis/eye exposure etiologies, palpebral insufficiency etiologies, and idiopathic etiology. The diagnosis is easily missed in subjects having nocturnal lagophthalmos with normal voluntary lid closure (idiopathic. A diagnosis of such cases can usually be made from a detailed history and careful slit lamp examination. A focused clinical evaluation for lagophthalmos in patients complaining of redness, dryness or eye irritation, especially after sleep, will identify most cases. The optimal treatment usually depends on the cause of lagophthalmos. It may include topical agents, lid taping at night or ocular surgery to correct lid malpositioning. This article reviews the incidence, clinical presentations, etiology, diagnosis, examination, and treatments of nocturnal lagophthalmos.

  8. The influence of music on mood and performance while driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein D; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Mulder, Ben L J M; Westerink, Joyce H D M; Brookhuis, Karel A

    2012-01-01

    Mood can influence our everyday behaviour and people often seek to reinforce, or to alter their mood, for example by turning on music. Music listening while driving is a popular activity. However, little is known about the impact of music listening while driving on physiological state and driving performance. In the present experiment, it was investigated whether individually selected music can induce mood and maintain moods during a simulated drive. In addition, effects of positive, negative, and no music on driving behaviour and physiological measures were assessed for normal and high cognitive demanding rides. Subjective mood ratings indicated that music successfully maintained mood while driving. Narrow lane width drives increased task demand as shown in effort ratings and increased swerving. Furthermore, respiration rate was lower during music listening compared to rides without music, while no effects of music were found on heart rate. Overall, the current study demonstrates that music listening in car influences the experienced mood while driving, which in turn can impact driving behaviour. PRACTITIONERS SUMMARY: Even though it is a popular activity, little is known about the impact of music while driving on physiological state and performance. We examined whether music can induce moods during high and low simulated drives. The current study demonstrates that in car music listening influences mood which in turn can impact driving behaviour. The current study shows that listening to music can positively impact mood while driving, which can be used to affect state and safe behaviour. Additionally, driving performance in high demand situations is not negatively affected by music.

  9. Car Driving Performance in Hemianopia : An On-Road Driving Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, Gera A.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; Bredewoud, Ruud A.; Tucha, Oliver; Heutink, Joost

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. To study driving performance in people with homonymous hemianopia (HH) assessed in the official on-road test of practical fitness to drive by the Dutch driver's licensing authority (CBR). METHODS. Data were collected from a cohort (January 2010-July 2012) of all people with HH following the

  10. Highly automated driving, secondary task performance, and driver state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merat, Natasha; Jamson, A Hamish; Lai, Frank C H; Carsten, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    A driving simulator study compared the effect of changes in workload on performance in manual and highly automated driving. Changes in driver state were also observed by examining variations in blink patterns. With the addition of a greater number of advanced driver assistance systems in vehicles, the driver's role is likely to alter in the future from an operator in manual driving to a supervisor of highly automated cars. Understanding the implications of such advancements on drivers and road safety is important. A total of 50 participants were recruited for this study and drove the simulator in both manual and highly automated mode. As well as comparing the effect of adjustments in driving-related workload on performance, the effect of a secondary Twenty Questions Task was also investigated. In the absence of the secondary task, drivers' response to critical incidents was similar in manual and highly automated driving conditions. The worst performance was observed when drivers were required to regain control of driving in the automated mode while distracted by the secondary task. Blink frequency patterns were more consistent for manual than automated driving but were generally suppressed during conditions of high workload. Highly automated driving did not have a deleterious effect on driver performance, when attention was not diverted to the distracting secondary task. As the number of systems implemented in cars increases, an understanding of the implications of such automation on drivers' situation awareness, workload, and ability to remain engaged with the driving task is important.

  11. Chinese carless young drivers' self-reported driving behavior and simulated driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Zuhua; Zheng, Dongpeng; Man, Dong; Xu, Xunnan

    2013-01-01

    Carless young drivers refers to those drivers aged between 18 and 25 years who have a driver's license but seldom have opportunities to practice their driving skills because they do not have their own cars. Due to China's lower private car ownership, many young drivers become carless young drivers after licensure, and the safety issue associated with them has raised great concern in China. This study aims to provide initial insight into the self-reported driving behaviors and simulated driving performance of Chinese carless young drivers. Thirty-three carless young drivers and 32 young drivers with their own cars (as a comparison group) participated in this study. A modified Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) with a 4-factor structure (errors, violations, attention lapses, and memory lapses) was used to study carless young drivers' self-reported driving behaviors. A simulated driving experiment using a low-cost, fixed-base driving simulator was conducted to measure their simulated driving performance (errors, violations, attention lapses, driving maintenance, reaction time, and accidents). Self-reported DBQ outcomes showed that carless young drivers reported similar errors, more attention lapses, fewer memory lapses, and significantly fewer violation behaviors relative to young drivers with their own cars, whereas simulated driving results revealed that they committed significantly more errors, attention lapses, and violation behaviors than the comparison group. Carless young drivers had a lower ability to maintain the stability of speed and lane position, drove more cautiously approaching and passing through red traffic lights, and committed more accidents during simulated driving. A tendency to speed was not found among carless young drivers; their average speed and speeding frequency were all much lower than that of the comparison group. Lifetime mileage was the only significant predictor of carless young drivers' self-reported violations, simulated violations

  12. Effects of two antihistamine drugs on actual driving performance.

    OpenAIRE

    Betts, T; Markman, D; Debenham, S; Mortiboy, D; McKevitt, T

    1984-01-01

    A double blind placebo controlled experiment was conducted measuring the effects of the centrally active antihistamine triprolidine and the peripherally acting antihistamine terfenadine on actual driving performance in a group of experienced women drivers. Triprolidine greatly impaired driving behaviour, whereas terfenadine did not. Triprolidine also impaired subjective and objective measures of mood and arousal, and despite an awareness that their driving was impaired while they were taking ...

  13. Driving with the wandering mind: the effect that mind-wandering has on driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanko, Matthew R; Spalek, Thomas M

    2014-03-01

    The principal objective of the present work was to examine the effects of mind state (mind-wandering vs. on-task) on driving performance in a high-fidelity driving simulator. Mind-wandering is thought to interfere with goal-directed thought. It is likely, then, that when driving, mind-wandering might lead to impairments in critical aspects of driving performance. In two experiments, we assess the extent to which mind-wandering interferes with responsiveness to sudden events, mean velocity, and headway distance. Using a car-following procedure in a high-fidelity driving simulator, participants were probed at random times to indicate whether they were on-task at that moment or mind-wandering. The dependent measures were analyzed based on the participant's response to the probe. Compared to when on-task, when mind-wandering participants showed longer response times to sudden events, drove at a higher velocity, and maintained a shorter headway distance. Collectively, these findings indicate that mind-wandering affects a broad range of driving responses and may therefore lead to higher crash risk. The results suggest that situations that are likely associated with mind-wandering (e.g., route familiarity) can impair driving performance.

  14. MEASURING DRIVING PERFORMANCE BY CAR-FOLLOWING IN TRAFFIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROOKHUIS, K; DEWAARD, D; MULDER, Lambertus J.M.

    The measurement of impairing effects on driving performance by such external factors as alcohol, medicinal drugs, or mobile telephoning, etc., is extended with a new test. Most existing methods of measuring impairing effects in the actual driving environment have the drawback that, irrespective of

  15. In Patients With Cirrhosis, Driving Simulator Performance Is Associated With Real-life Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Mette M; Thacker, Leroy R; White, Melanie B; Unser, Ariel; Sterling, Richard K; Stravitz, Richard T; Matherly, Scott; Puri, Puneet; Sanyal, Arun J; Gavis, Edith A; Luketic, Velimir; Siddiqui, Muhammad S; Heuman, Douglas M; Fuchs, Michael; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2016-05-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) has been linked to higher real-life rates of automobile crashes and poor performance in driving simulation studies, but the link between driving simulator performance and real-life automobile crashes has not been clearly established. Furthermore, not all patients with MHE are unsafe drivers, but it is unclear how to distinguish them from unsafe drivers. We investigated the link between performance on driving simulators and real-life automobile accidents and traffic violations. We also aimed to identify features of unsafe drivers with cirrhosis and evaluated changes in simulated driving skills and MHE status after 1 year. We performed a study of outpatients with cirrhosis (n = 205; median 55 years old; median model for end-stage liver disease score, 9.5; none with overt hepatic encephalopathy or alcohol or illicit drug use within previous 6 months) seen at the Virginia Commonwealth University and McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, from November 2008 through April 2014. All participants were given paper-pencil tests to diagnose MHE (98 had MHE; 48%), and 163 patients completed a standardized driving simulation. Data were collected on traffic violations and automobile accidents from the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles and from participants' self-assessments when they entered the study, and from 73 participants 1 year later. Participants also completed a questionnaire about alcohol use and cessation patterns. The driving simulator measured crashes, run-time, road center and edge excursions, and illegal turns during navigation; before and after each driving simulation session, patients were asked to rate their overall driving skills. Drivers were classified as safe or unsafe based on crashes and violations reported on official driving records; simulation results were compared with real-life driving records. Multivariable regression analyses of real-life crashes and violations was performed using data on

  16. Do in-car devices affect experienced users' driving performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allert S. Knapper

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Distracted driving is considered to be an important factor in road safety. To investigate how experienced user's driving behaviour is affected by in-vehicle technology, a fixed-base driving simulator was used. 20 participants drove twice in a rich simulated traffic environment while performing secondary, i.e. mobile phone and navigation system tasks. The results show that mean speed was lower in all experimental conditions, compared to baseline driving, while subjective effort increased. Lateral performance deteriorated only during visual–manual tasks, i.e. texting and destination entry, in which the participants glanced off the forward road for a substantial amount of time. Being experienced in manipulating in-car devices does not solve the problem of dual tasking when the primary task is a complex task like driving a moving vehicle. The results and discussion may shed some light on the current debate regarding phone use hazards.

  17. Class-D amplifier design and performance for driving a Piezo Actuator Drive servomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the behavior of piezoelectric stacks in a Piezoelectric Actuator Drive (PAD) motor, which shows non-linear equivalent impedance and has a dramatic impact on the overall system performance. Therefore, in this paper, the piezo stackt’s model is discussed and an improved large...... signal model is proposed and verified by measurement. Finally, a Class-D amplifier as a power driver and its associated closed-loop control are implemented and tested to control PAD drive effectively....

  18. Alcohol consumption for simulated driving performance: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeid Rezaee-Zavareh

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Alcohol consumption may decrease simulated driving performance in alcohol consumed people compared with non-alcohol consumed people via changes in SDSD, LPSD, speed, MLPD, LC and NA. More well-designed randomized controlled clinical trials are recommended.

  19. Driving-Related Neuropsychological Performance in Stable COPD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foteini Karakontaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cognitive deterioration may impair COPD patient’s ability to perform tasks like driving vehicles. We investigated: (a whether subclinical neuropsychological deficits occur in stable COPD patients with mild hypoxemia (PaO2 > 55 mmHg, and (b whether these deficits affect their driving performance. Methods. We recruited 35 stable COPD patients and 10 normal subjects matched for age, IQ, and level of education. All subjects underwent an attention/alertness battery of tests for assessing driving performance based on the Vienna Test System. Pulmonary function tests, arterial blood gases, and dyspnea severity were also recorded. Results. COPD patients performed significantly worse than normal subjects on tests suitable for evaluating driving ability. Therefore, many (22/35 COPD patients were classified as having inadequate driving ability (failure at least in one of the tests, whereas most (8/10 healthy individuals were classified as safe drivers (P=0.029. PaO2 and FEV1 were correlated with almost all neuropsychological tests. Conclusions. COPD patients should be warned of the potential danger and risk they face when they drive any kind of vehicle, even when they do not exhibit overt symptoms related to driving inability. This is due to the fact that stable COPD patients may manifest impaired information processing operations.

  20. Destination Characteristics that Drive Hotel Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A. George; Josiassen, Alexander; Woo, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The increased market saturation and competition in both domestic and international tourism destinations have renewed interest among hotel operators in identifying the key drivers of hotel performance. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the determinants of hotel performance and their ...

  1. The impact of visual field loss on driving performance: evidence from on-road driving assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Lyne; Casson, Evanne J

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between visual field loss and driving performance as determined by on-road driving assessments. We reviewed the files of 1350 patients enrolled in a rehabilitation program at the Bloorview MacMillan Rehabilitation Centre, Toronto, Canada. We identified 131 patients with visual field loss who had undergone an on-road driving assessment. These patients had a primary diagnosis of visual impairment or a primary diagnosis of cerebral vascular accident (CVA) with a secondary diagnosis of visual impairment. None of these patients had documentation of neglect, substantial motor or cognitive deficits. We report the data obtained from 13 hemianopics, 7 quadrantanopics, 25 patients with monocular vision, 10 patients with moderate peripheral losses (worse impact on driving performance than quadrantanopia with a marginally significant result (chi2 = 3.33, p = 0.068). Overall, the location of the visual loss was not significantly related to driving fitness (chi2 = 1.05, p = 0.30). However, localized defects in the left hemifield (chi2 = 9.561, p = 0.002) and diffuse visual loss in the right hemifield (chi2 = 10.395, p = 0.001) seemed to be associated with driving impairments. A large proportion of monocular drivers were safe drivers and the location of their deficit had no significant impact. Although the extent of visual field defects appears to be related to driving performance as determined by an on-road driving assessment, large individual differences were observed. This highlights the need for individualized on-road assessments for patients with visual field defects.

  2. What Drives Business Performance in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo; Wang, Cong

    level rather than focus on the narrow aspect of entrepreneurs’ own social network and religious beliefs. Using Principal Component Analysis to aggregate various trust, norm, network and religious belief-related variables to construct social capital and religion variables, this paper identifies......Motivated by the limited evidence on the positive link between social capital, religion and firm performance, this paper explores these potential drivers of firm performance at the firm rather than macro-level by employing a novel approach: we capture social capital and religion at a community...... an overall positive and significant effect of social capital and religion on firm performance in Denmark. These effects are robust to different levels of aggregation (sample structure), different sampling years and alternative measures of firm performance (return on asset, current ratio, solvency ratio...

  3. In Patients with Cirrhosis, Driving Simulator Performance is Associated With Real-life Driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Mette Enok Munk; Thacker, Leroy R; White, Melanie B

    2016-01-01

    , not all patients with MHE are unsafe drivers, but it is unclear how to distinguish them from unsafe drivers. We investigated the link between performance on driving simulators and real-life automobile accidents and traffic violations. We also aimed to identify features of unsafe drivers with cirrhosis...... collected on traffic violations and automobile accidents from the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles and from participants' self-assessments when they entered the study, and from 73 participants 1 year later. Participants also completed a questionnaire about alcohol use and cessation patterns....... The driving simulator measured crashes, run-time, road center and edge excursions, and illegal turns during navigation; before and after each driving simulation session, patients were asked to rate their overall driving skills. Drivers were classified as safe or unsafe based on crashes and violations reported...

  4. The effects of below-elbow immobilization on driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Evan M; Barrow, Aaron E; Skordas, Nic J; Green, David P; Cho, Mickey S

    2017-02-01

    There is limited research to guide physicians and patients in deciding whether it is safe to drive while wearing various forms of upper extremity immobilization. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of below-elbow removable splints and fiberglass casts on automobile driving performance. 20 healthy subjects completed 10 runs through a closed, cone-marked driving course while wearing a randomized sequence of four different types of immobilization on each extremity (short arm thumb spica fiberglass cast, short arm fiberglass cast, short arm thumb spica splint, and short arm wrist splint). The first and last driving runs were without immobilization and served as controls. Performance was measured based on evaluation by a certified driving instructor (pass/fail scoring), cones hit, run time, and subject-perceived driving difficulty (1-10 analogue scoring). The greatest number of instructor-scored failures occurred while immobilized in right arm spica casts (n=6; p=0.02) and left arm spica casts (n=5; p=0.049). The right arm spica cast had the highest subject-perceived difficulty (5.2±1.9; pimmobilization had significantly increased perceived difficulty compared to control, except for the left short arm splint (2.5±1.6; p>0.05). There was no significant difference in number of cones hit or driving time between control runs and runs with any type of immobilization. Drivers should use caution when wearing any of the forms of upper extremity immobilization tested in this study. All forms of immobilization, with exception of the left short arm splint significantly increased perceived driving difficulty. However, only the fiberglass spica casts (both left and right arm), significantly increased drive run failures due to loss of vehicle control. We recommend against driving when wearing a below-elbow fiberglass spica cast on either extremity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Internship at Bentley Motors; driving luxury performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minde, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bentleys are amongst the most sought after luxury cars of the world. They are known for their performance on the road, the luxury in the cabin, their reliability and the artisanship involved in making every single one of them. It was an honor to be part of the Quality Department of a company with

  6. Correlation between clinical manifestations of nocturnal enuresis and attentional performance in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng-Kai; Huang, Kuo-How; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Yang, Hung-Ju; Guo, Ya-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to be more vulnerable to various forms of voiding dysfunction and nocturnal enuresis (NE). We attempt to compare the clinical manifestations and attentional performance between ADHD children with NE and those without NE. We consecutively enrolled children diagnosed with ADHD in child and adolescent psychiatric clinics. The questionnaires for evaluation of ADHD symptoms and voiding dysfunction symptoms were administered to all study participants. All participants also received the Test Battery for Attention Performance (TAP) for assessment of attentional function. A total of 53 children were enrolled in this study, comprising 47 boys and six girls. The prevalence rate of NE was 28.3%. Children in the NE group had statistically significant higher dysfunctional voiding symptom score (5.40 ± 3.66 vs.3.16 ± 2.74; p = 0.018) and two subscales of "When I wet myself, my underwear is soaked" (p attention than the non-NE group. Children with ADHD have a high prevalence of NE. ADHD children with NE had a significantly higher dysfunctional voiding symptom score and shorter reaction time in most domains of the TAP test. Further study is needed to discern the impact of NE on the neuropsychological function of ADHD children. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Driving performance and EEG fluctuations during on-the-road driving following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, J; Jongen, S; Vuurman, E; Bocca, M L; Ramaekers, J G; Vermeeren, A

    2016-12-01

    The present study mainly aimed to assess whether and how sleepiness due to sleep deprivation interacts with Time on Task (ToT) effects both on electroencephalography (EEG) measures and driving performance in real driving conditions. Healthy participants performed a one hour on-the-road monotonous highway driving task while EEG was recorded continuously after one night of normal sleep and after one night of total sleep deprivation. The main outcome parameter in the highway driving test was the Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP). SDLP and EEG indices (i.e alpha and theta power spectra) increased after sleep deprivation and varied with ToT. The latter was more pronounced after sleep deprivation. Beta power spectra did not differ between conditions but increased with ToT. Changes in SDLP and EEG did not correlate significantly. We conclude that driving performance as well as fatigue and sleepiness fluctuations with ToT were more evident after sleep deprivation as compared to normal sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Non-Driving Related Task Modalities on Takeover Performance in Highly Automated Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandtner, Bernhard; Schömig, Nadja; Schmidt, Gerald

    2018-04-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of different non-driving related tasks (NDR tasks) on takeover performance in highly automated driving. During highly automated driving, it is allowed to engage in NDR tasks temporarily. However, drivers must be able to take over control when reaching a system limit. There is evidence that the type of NDR task has an impact on takeover performance, but little is known about the specific task characteristics that account for performance decrements. Thirty participants drove in a simulator using a highly automated driving system. Each participant faced five critical takeover situations. Based on assumptions of Wickens's multiple resource theory, stimulus and response modalities of a prototypical NDR task were systematically manipulated. Additionally, in one experimental group, the task was locked out simultaneously with the takeover request. Task modalities had significant effects on several measures of takeover performance. A visual-manual texting task degraded performance the most, particularly when performed handheld. In contrast, takeover performance with an auditory-vocal task was comparable to a baseline without any task. Task lockout was associated with faster hands-on-wheel times but not altered brake response times. Results showed that NDR task modalities are relevant factors for takeover performance. An NDR task lockout was highly accepted by the drivers and showed moderate benefits for the first takeover reaction. Knowledge about the impact of NDR task characteristics is an enabler for adaptive takeover concepts. In addition, it might help regulators to make decisions on allowed NDR tasks during automated driving.

  9. Effects of alcohol on automated and controlled driving performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelon, Catherine; Gineyt, Guy

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently detected substance in fatal automobile crashes, but its precise mode of action is not always clear. The present study was designed to establish the influence of blood alcohol concentration as a function of the complexity of the scenarios. Road scenarios implying automatic or controlled driving performances were manipulated in order to identify which behavioral parameters were deteriorated. A single blind counterbalanced experiment was conducted on a driving simulator. Sixteen experienced drivers (25.3 ± 2.9 years old, 8 men and 8 women) were tested with 0, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8 g/l of alcohol. Driving scenarios varied: road tracking, car following, and an urban scenario including events inspired by real accidents. Statistical analyses were performed on driving parameters as a function of alcohol level. Automated driving parameters such as standard deviation of lateral position measured with the road tracking and car following scenarios were impaired by alcohol, notably with the highest dose. More controlled parameters such as response time to braking and number of crashes when confronted with specific events (urban scenario) were less affected by the alcohol level. Performance decrement was greater with driving scenarios involving automated processes than with scenarios involving controlled processes.

  10. Driving performance in cold, warm, and thermoneutral environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Vliert, E. van de; Huang, X.

    2003-01-01

    Driving performance deteriorates at high ambient temperatures. Less is known about the effect of low ambient temperatures and the role of subjective aspects like thermal comfort and having control over the ambient temperature. Therefore, an experiment was constructed in which 50 subjects performed a

  11. Manual control analysis of drug effects on driving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, A.; Ziedman, K.; Moskowitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of secobarbital, diazepam, alcohol, and marihuana on car-driver transfer functions obtained using a driving simulator were studied. The first three substances, all CNS depressants, reduced gain, crossover frequency, and coherence which resulted in poorer tracking performance. Marihuana also impaired tracking performance but the only effect on the transfer function parameters was to reduce coherence.

  12. Factors That Drive RTO Performance: An Overview. Synthesis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, Josie

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent research on the factors that drive the performance of registered training organisations (RTOs), with a view to identifying areas for future research. Initially it explores the drivers of RTO performance; then discusses findings from available literature from Australia and from overseas, and discusses some…

  13. Gender differences in alcohol impairment of simulated driving performance and driving-related skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melissa A; Weafer, Jessica; Fillmore, Mark T

    2009-01-01

    Considerable laboratory research indicates that moderate doses of alcohol impair a broad range of skilled activities related to driving performance in young adults. Although laboratory studies show that the intensity of impairment is generally dependent on the blood alcohol concentration, some reviews of this literature suggest that women might be more sensitive to the impairing effects of alcohol than men. The present study tested this hypothesis. Drawing on data from previous experiments in our laboratory, we compared men and women in terms of the degree to which a challenge dose of alcohol (0.65 g/kg) impaired their simulated driving performance and measures of three separate behavioral and cognitive functions important to driving performance: motor coordination, speed of information processing and information-processing capacity. Alcohol significantly impaired all aspects of performance. Moreover, women displayed greater impairment than men on all behavioral tests and also reported higher levels of subjective intoxication compared with men. Both biological and social-cultural factors have been implicated in gender differences in the behavioral responses to alcohol. The current evidence of heightened sensitivity to alcohol in women highlights the need for better understanding the biological and environmental factors underlying this gender difference.

  14. Driving with music : Effects on arousal and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, Ayca Berfu; de Waard, Dick; Epstude, Kai; Steg, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we aimed at exploring the influence of music on driving performance, arousal and mental effort while carrying out a monotonous car-following task in a low-complexity traffic setting. Participants (N = 47) were randomly assigned to loud and moderate volume music groups, and

  15. Performance Evaluation of A Developed Variable Frequency Drive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the performance characteristics of a developed variable frequency drive (VFD) adaptable for operation of ac machines speed control. The VFD developed is robust, durable, cheap and have low maintenance cost compared to conventional VFDs. The controlled asynchronous ac motor was operated to ...

  16. Dynamics Performance and Abrasive Wear of the Automotive Drive Shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Mao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An automotive drive shaft is used in a front drive transmission vehicle for transmitting rotary movement from the gearbox output shaft to the wheels with a constant velocity. This paper presents the kinematic model of ball joint and tripod joint with consideration of clearance and proposes a simplified dynamics model of the drive shaft. The simulation of the dynamics model is given by the measured data. Also, the abrasive wear of the ball type joint is tested on the experimental setup with consideration of full loading. The results show that the dynamics of the motion will be affected by the clearance when the loading changes its direction. The motion will be stable due to the damping. It can be found that the abrasive wear of ball joint largely depends on the relative sliding velocity from the experiments. This will probably affectthe dynamics performance and the impact force, which will also cause the other type of failures.

  17. Driver Cognitive Distraction Detection Using Driving Performance Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Driver cognitive distraction is a hazard state, which can easily lead to traffic accidents. This study focuses on detecting the driver cognitive distraction state based on driving performance measures. Characteristic parameters could be directly extracted from Controller Area Network-(CAN-Bus data, without depending on other sensors, which improves real-time and robustness performance. Three cognitive distraction states (no cognitive distraction, low cognitive distraction, and high cognitive distraction were defined using different secondary tasks. NLModel, NHModel, LHModel, and NLHModel were developed using SVMs according to different states. The developed system shows promising results, which can correctly classify the driver’s states in approximately 74%. Although the sensitivity for these models is low, it is acceptable because in this situation the driver could control the car sufficiently. Thus, driving performance measures could be used alone to detect driver cognitive state.

  18. Excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep duration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    2011-12-04

    Dec 4, 2011 ... psychopathology – both impair social and occupational functions. Insomnia and short nocturnal sleep duration are regular accompaniments of psychopathology. The triad of EDS, short nocturnal sleep duration and psychopathology must necessarily impact adversely on the lives and academic performance ...

  19. What Drive the Damage to Post-Merger Operating Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soegiharto Soegiharto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether bidders’ post-merger operat-ing performance are affected by their CEO behavior, premiumspaid to the target firms, the period of mergers, the method ofpayment, the industry of merged firms, capital liquidity, andtheir pre-merger operating performance. Testing the U.S. suc-cessful merger and acquisition data for the period of 1990s, thisstudy finds that in-wave mergers, intra-industry mergers, thepayment of lower premiums, and better pre-merger operatingperformance drive the bidders to produce better post-mergeroperating performance. Three measures of CEO behavior—themain predictor scrutinezed in this study—are proposed andexamined, and the results demonstrate that the effects of thesemeasures on post-merger operating performance are mixed,suggesting that each of the behavioral measures designed in thisstudy may capture CEO behavior in different ways. Keywords: capital liquidity; CEO overconfidence; merger waves, method of pay-ment operating performance

  20. Predicting the Impacts of Intravehicular Displays on Driving Performance with Human Performance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane Kuhl; Wojciechowski, Josephine; Samms, Charneta

    2012-01-01

    A challenge facing the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), as well as international safety experts, is the need to educate car drivers about the dangers associated with performing distraction tasks while driving. Researchers working for the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a technique for predicting the increase in mental workload that results when distraction tasks are combined with driving. They implement this technique using human performance modeling. They have predicted workload associated with driving combined with cell phone use. In addition, they have predicted the workload associated with driving military vehicles combined with threat detection. Their technique can be used by safety personnel internationally to demonstrate the dangers of combining distracter tasks with driving and to mitigate the safety risks.

  1. Radiation dose, driving performance, and cognitive function in patients with head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Hon K.; Sharma, Anand K.; Logan, William C.; Gillespie, M. Boyd; Day, Terry A.; Brooks, Johnell O.

    2008-01-01

    Seven head and neck cancer patients participated in a driving evaluation in a driving simulator. Radiation dose on the temporal lobes was moderately associated with time to complete a cognitive test and with driving performance. Results indicated that incidental irradiation may contribute to a decrease in cognition and in unsafe driving performance, which seems to be time-dependent

  2. Turboelectric Aircraft Drive Key Performance Parameters and Functional Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ralph H.; Brown, Gerald V.; Felder, James L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose specific power and efficiency as the key performance parameters for a turboelectric aircraft power system and investigate their impact on the overall aircraft. Key functional requirements are identified that impact the power system design. Breguet range equations for a base aircraft and a turboelectric aircraft are found. The benefits and costs that may result from the turboelectric system are enumerated. A break-even analysis is conducted to find the minimum allowable electric drive specific power and efficiency that can preserve the range, initial weight, operating empty weight, and payload weight of the base aircraft.

  3. Driving Performance and User's Evaluation of Self-Balancing Personal Mobility Vehicle with a Pedal Driving Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghee Jeong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a self-balancing personal mobility vehicle with a hybrid driving mechanism, called as Wi-PMP, and discuss its features from the perspectives of its power-assist driving performance and a rider's evaluation. The mobility vehicle consists of a wheeled inverted pendulum type mobile platform, and a hybrid driving mechanism that can use human and motor power together for driving. By performing a bump driving, a slope driving, and a outdoor driving experiment, we confirm that the proposed hybrid mechanism is valid for the integration of human and motor power, and is effective to increase the driving power and reduce electrical load on motors and batteries. We conducted several experiments to investigate the rider's evaluation on a sit-riding method compared to a stand-riding one. The questionnaire results showed that a rider felt more comfortable in the case of the sit-riding method when getting on and off, and when driving the mobility vehicle. This implies that riding-type self-balancing vehicles such as Wi-PMP have the potential to become familiar personal mobility vehicles in daily life.

  4. Do night naps impact driving performance and daytime recovery sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centofanti, Stephanie A; Dorrian, Jillian; Hilditch, Cassie J; Banks, Siobhan

    2017-02-01

    Short, nighttime naps are used as a fatigue countermeasure in night shift work, and may offer protective benefits on the morning commute. However, there is a concern that nighttime napping may impact upon the quality of daytime sleep. The aim of the current project was to investigate the influence of short nighttime naps (sleep periods were recorded polysomnographically. Compared to control, the napping conditions did not significantly impact upon simulated driving lane variability, percentage of time in a safe zone, or time to first crash on morning or evening drives (p>0.05). Short nighttime naps did not significantly affect daytime recovery total sleep time (p>0.05). Slow wave sleep (SWS) obtained during the 30-min nighttime nap resulted in a significant reduction in SWS during subsequent daytime recovery sleep (p<0.05), such that the total amount of SWS in 24-h was preserved. Therefore, short naps did not protect against performance decrements during a simulated morning commute, but they also did not adversely affect daytime recovery sleep following a night shift. Further investigation is needed to examine the optimal timing, length or combination of naps for reducing performance decrements on the morning commute, whilst still preserving daytime sleep quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of music on mood and performance while driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Marjolein D.; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Mulder, Ben L. J. M.; Westerink, Joyce H. D. M.; Brookhuis, Karel A.

    2012-01-01

    Mood can influence our everyday behaviour and people often seek to reinforce, or to alter their mood, for example by turning on music. Music listening while driving is a popular activity. However, little is known about the impact of music listening while driving on physiological state and driving

  6. TeenDrivingPlan effectiveness: the effect of quantity and diversity of supervised practice on teens' driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirman, Jessica H; Albert, W Dustin; Curry, Allison E; Winston, Flaura K; Fisher Thiel, Megan C; Durbin, Dennis R

    2014-11-01

    The large contribution of inexperience to the high crash rate of newly licensed teens suggests that they enter licensure with insufficient skills. In a prior analysis, we found moderate support for a direct effect of a web-based intervention, the TeenDrivingPlan (TDP), on teens' driving performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the mechanisms by which TDP may be effective and to extend our understanding of how teens learn to drive. A randomized controlled trial conducted with teen permit holders and parent supervisors (N = 151 dyads) was used to determine if the effect of TDP on driver performance operated through five hypothesized mediators: (1) parent-perceived social support; (2) teen-perceived social support; (3) parent engagement; (4) practice quantity; and (5) practice diversity. Certified driving evaluators, blinded to teens' treatment allocation, assessed teens' driving performance 24 weeks after enrollment. Mediator variables were assessed on self-report surveys administered periodically over the study period. Exposure to TDP increased teen-perceived social support, parent engagement, and practice diversity. Both greater practice quantity and diversity were associated with better driving performance, but only practice diversity mediated the relationship between TDP and driver performance. Practice diversity is feasible to change and increases teens' likelihood of completing a rigorous on-road driving assessment just before licensure. Future research should continue to identify mechanisms that diversify practice driving, explore complementary ways to help families optimize the time they spend on practice driving, and evaluate the long-term effectiveness of TDP. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Scrolling and driving: how an MP3 player and its aftermarket controller affect driving performance and visual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John D; Roberts, Shannon C; Hoffman, Joshua D; Angell, Linda S

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how scrolling through playlists on an MP3 player or its aftermarket controller affects driving performance and to examine how drivers adapt device use to driving demands. Drivers use increasingly complex infotainment devices that can undermine driving performance. The goal activation hypothesis suggests that drivers might fail to compensate for these demands, particularly with long tasks and large search set sizes. A total of 50 participants searched for songs in playlists of varying lengths using either an MP3 player or an aftermarket controller while negotiating road segments with traffic and construction in a medium-fidelity driving simulator. Searching through long playlists (580 songs) resulted in poor driving performance and required more long glances (longer than 2 s) to the device compared with other playlist lengths. The aftermarket controller also led to more long glances compared with the MP3 player. Drivers did not adequately adapt their behavior to roadway demand, as evident in their degraded driving performance. No significant performance differences were found between short playlists, the radio-tuning task, and the no-task condition. Selecting songs from long playlists undermined driving performance, and drivers did not sufficiently adapt their use of the device to the roadway demands, consistent with the goal activation hypothesis. The aftermarket controller degraded rather than enhanced performance. Infotainment systems should support drivers in managing distraction. Aftermarket controllers can have the unintended effect of making devices carried into the car less compatible with driving.These results can motivate development of new interfaces as alternatives to scrolling lists.

  8. Effect of the teen driving plan on the driving performance of teenagers before licensure: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirman, Jessica H; Curry, Allison E; Winston, Flaura K; Wang, Wenli; Elliott, Michael R; Schultheis, Maria T; Fisher Thiel, Megan C; Durbin, Dennis R

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have failed to show an effect of parent-supervised practice driving on the driving performance of teenagers; nevertheless, most Graduated Driver Licensing programs have provisions that require supervised practice. To determine whether a web-based intervention, the Teen Driving Plan (TDP), can improve the driving performance of teenagers before licensure as measured by the Teen On-road Driving Assessment (tODA). Randomized, single-blind, clinical trial among 217 dyads (1 parent: 1 teenaged learner's-permit holder) to test TDP effectiveness on increasing the quantity and diversity of supervised practice and improving the teenagers' prelicensed driving performance. The study was conducted from December 2011 through January 2013 in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Dyads were randomized (3:2) to receive the TDP or the Pennsylvania driver's manual (control group). The TDP is a psychoeducational intervention designed to increase the quantity and diversity of parent-supervised practice. Materials are grouped by the following driving environments: empty parking lots, suburban residential streets, intermediate (1- or 2-lane) roads, highways, rural roads with curves and elevation changes, and commercial districts. The main outcomes were self-reported practice driving across 6 environments and 2 conditions and driving performance as measured by the teenagers' completion of the standardized and validated tODA 24 weeks after enrollment. Certified professional driving evaluators blinded to randomization status terminated the tODA if they determined that the teenager could not safely complete it. We examined mean differences in the quantity of supervised practice, differences in the overall proportion of teenagers in each group that had assessments terminated for unsafe driving, and the point of termination during the assessment. The TDP dyads reported more practice in 5 of the 6 environments and at night and in bad weather compared with the control dyads. Overall, 5 of 86

  9. Familial nocturnal cramping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J H; Rosenberg, R S; Huttenlocher, P R; Spire, J P

    1986-01-01

    A familial syndrome of painful nocturnal cramping and jerking in members of three generations is described. All-night polysomnograms demonstrated both myoclonic jerks and sustained muscular activity in three family members, a 4-year-old girl, who presented with frequent episodes of painful awakenings; her 7-year-old brother, who had similar but less severe symptoms; and the 28-year-old mother, who had suffered nocturnal cramping and awakenings for much of her life. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of a familial disorder characterized by exclusively nocturnal intermittent cramping and myoclonus of brainstem or spinal origin.

  10. A pilot study of the effects of atomoxetine on driving performance in adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A; Anderson, Deborah L; Kruesi, Markus

    2007-02-01

    There is a high risk of vehicular crashes, traffic citations, and poorer driving performance in adults with ADHD. This pilot study examines the value of a new nonstimulant (atomoxetine) for improving the driving performance of adults with ADHD. Atomoxetine (1.2 mg/kg daily for 3 weeks) and a placebo are studied on 18 adults with ADHD (M age = 37 years) using ratings of ADHD symptoms, impairment, and safe driving behavior; a virtual reality driving simulator; and ratings of simulator performance. Atomoxetine improves self-ratings of ADHD symptoms, impairments, safe driving behavior, and simulator driving performance. No effects of atomoxetine are evident on others' ratings of driving behavior or on the simulator. Practice effects on the simulator may have obscured those drug effects. The authors find a mixed pattern of results such that atomoxetine warrants further study for its effects on driving in this high-risk population.

  11. Sexual dimorphism in bite performance drives morphological variation in chameleons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M da Silva

    Full Text Available Phenotypic performance in different environments is central to understanding the evolutionary and ecological processes that drive adaptive divergence and, ultimately, speciation. Because habitat structure can affect an animal's foraging behaviour, anti-predator defences, and communication behaviour, it can influence both natural and sexual selection pressures. These selective pressures, in turn, act upon morphological traits to maximize an animal's performance. For performance traits involved in both social and ecological activities, such as bite force, natural and sexual selection often interact in complex ways, providing an opportunity to understand the adaptive significance of morphological variation with respect to habitat. Dwarf chameleons within the Bradypodion melanocephalum-Bradypodion thamnobates species complex have multiple phenotypic forms, each with a specific head morphology that could reflect its use of either open- or closed-canopy habitats. To determine whether these morphological differences represent adaptations to their habitats, we tested for differences in both absolute and relative bite performance. Only absolute differences were found between forms, with the closed-canopy forms biting harder than their open-canopy counterparts. In contrast, sexual dimorphism was found for both absolute and relative bite force, but the relative differences were limited to the closed-canopy forms. These results indicate that both natural and sexual selection are acting within both habitat types, but to varying degrees. Sexual selection seems to be the predominant force within the closed-canopy habitats, which are more protected from aerial predators, enabling chameleons to invest more in ornamentation for communication. In contrast, natural selection is likely to be the predominant force in the open-canopy habitats, inhibiting the development of conspicuous secondary sexual characteristics and, ultimately, enforcing their overall diminutive

  12. Posture and nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, K F; Douglas, N J

    1989-01-01

    To investigate whether the supine posture caused sustained bronchoconstriction and could thus contribute to the development of nocturnal asthma, nine patients with nocturnal asthma were studied on two consecutive days, lying supine for four hours on one day and sitting upright for four hours on the other, the order of the two postures being randomised. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured immediately before an...

  13. Drowsiness in conditional automation : Proneness, diagnosis and driving performance effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncalves, J.; Happee, R.; Bengler, KJ; Rosetti, R.; Wolf, D.

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue and drowsiness can play an important role in Conditional Automation (CA), as drowsy drivers may fail to properly recover control. In order to provide better insight in the effects of drowsy driving in Take Over Request (TOR), we designed a driving experiment that extends related

  14. Improving Motor and Drive System Performance – A Sourcebook for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-02-01

    This sourcebook outlines opportunities to improve motor and drive systems performance. The sourcebook is divided into four main sections: (1) Motor and Drive System Basics: Summarizes important terms, relationships, and system design considerations relating to motor and drive systems. (2) Performance Opportunity Road Map: Details the key components of well-functioning motor and drive systems and opportunities for energy performance opportunities. (3) Motor System Economics: Offers recommendations on how to propose improvement projects based on corporate priorities, efficiency gains, and financial payback periods. (4) Where to Find Help: Provides a directory of organizations associated with motors and drives, as well as resources for additional information, tools, software, videos, and training opportunities.

  15. Study of the Effects of Alcohol on Drivers and Driving Performance on Straight Road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drinking driving is responsible for a high proportion of traffic accidents. To study the effects of alcohol on drivers and driving performance, 25 drivers’ subjective feelings and driving performance data in different blood-alcohol concentration (BAC levels were collected with simulated driving experiment. The investigation results revealed that alcohol affected drivers in many aspects, including attitude, judgment, vigilance, perception, reaction, and controlling. The analysis of accident rate showed that higher BAC level would lead to higher accident rate. The statistical analysis results of driving performance indicated that average speed, speed standard deviation, and lane position standard deviation were significantly higher under the influence of alcohol. They also had a statistically significant linear trend as the function of BAC level. The discrimination of drinking driving based on driving performance was performed with Fisher discrimination method. The results showed that drinking driving with higher BAC level was easier to discriminate from normal driving. Also, the results indicated that the three significant indicators on straight roadway could be used in the discrimination of drinking driving state. The conclusions can provide references for the study of drinking driving and the identification of driving state and then contribute to traffic safety.

  16. Neuropsychological performance, brain imaging, and driving violations in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehning, Meaghan; Kim, Jinsuh; Nguyen, Christopher M; Shivapour, Ezzatollah; Denburg, Natalie L

    2014-10-01

    To examine the relationship between third ventricular width, a measure of thalamic brain atrophy, and motor vehicle violation type and frequency in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care university hospital. Thirty-five individuals with clinically confirmed relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 35 age-, sex-, and education-matched community-dwelling healthy comparisons (N=70). Participants were aged between 25 and 65 years. Not applicable. Data on motor vehicle violations were obtained from an online database (Iowa Courts Online). The violations were categorized as follows: (1) speeding, (2) nonmoving safety, (3) administrative, (4) alcohol-related offense, (5) moving safety, and (6) total violations. Neuropsychological performance in all major cognitive domains was obtained. Thalamic atrophy for the patients with MS was determined via third ventricular width measurement. The MS group had a greater number of overall violations, administrative violations, and nonmoving safety violations. The groups differed on neuropsychological tasks measuring visuospatial skills, speeded language, learning, and executive functioning, after controlling for affective symptoms. Third ventricular width was associated with total violations as well as moving safety violations. Finally, third ventricular width accounted for a significant variance in driving violation frequency above and beyond demographic variables and neuropsychological factors. There is an increased frequency of motor vehicle violations among patients with multiple sclerosis, and the number of violations can be predicted by thalamic brain atrophy. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of sonic driving on maximal aerobic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilla, L.R.; Hatcher, Stefanie

    2000-07-01

    The study purpose was to evaluate antecedent binaural stimulation (ABS) on maximal aerobic physical performance. Twenty-two healthy, physically active subjects, 21-34 years, randomly received one of two preparations for each session: 15 min of quiet (BLANK) or percussive sonic driving at 200+ beats per minute (bpm) using a recorded compact disc (FSS, Mill Valley, CA) with headphones (ABS). Baseline HR, blood pressure (BP), and breathing frequency (f(br)) were obtained. During each condition, HR and f(br) were recorded at 3-min intervals. The graded maximal treadmill testing was administered immediately postpreparation session on separate days, with at least 48 h rest between sessions. There were significant differences in the antecedent period means between the two conditions, ABS (HR: 70.2 +/- 10.7 bpm; f(br): 18.5 +/- 3.3 br min(-1); BP: 134.5/87.9 +/- 13.6/9.2 mm Hg) and BLANK (HR: 64.6 +/- 7.9; f(br): 14.3 +/- 2.9; BP: 126.7/80.3 +/- 12.1/8.6). Differences were noted for each 3-min interval and pre- postantecedent period. The maximal graded exercise test (GXT) results showed that there was a small but significant (P 0.05). There may be a latency to ABS related to entrainment or imagery-enhanced warm-up. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:558-565, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Effects of MDMA (ecstasy), and multiple drugs use on (simulated) driving performance and traffic safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookhuis, KA; de Waard, D; Samyn, N

    Rationale. The effects of MDMA on driving behaviour are not clear, since the direct effects of MDMA on cognitive performance are reported as not generally negative. Objectives. To assess in an advanced driving simulator acute effects on simulated driving behaviour and heart rate of MDMA, and effects

  19. Methylphenidate significantly improves driving performance of adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a randomized crossover trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verster, J.C.; Bekker, E.M.; Roos, M.; Minova, A.; Eijken, E.J.; Kooij, J.J.S.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Kenemans, J.L.; Verbaten, M.N.; Olivier, B.; Volkerts, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    Although patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have reported improved driving performance on methylphenidate, limited evidence exists to support an effect of treatment on driving performance and some regions prohibit driving on methylphenidate. A randomized, crossover trial

  20. Driving performance while using cell phones: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Tova

    2006-01-01

    Through spontaneous driving observations, this study sought to examine the impact of using a hands-free cell phone while driving on speed and safe gap keeping behaviors. The study also examined the association between the measure of disturbance created by using a cell phone and the driver's awareness of the disturbance. Twenty-three male adults were observed while driving for an hour and a half each; drivers were unaware of being observed. During the session, each of the participants received a phone call, initiated by an associate of the observer. The experiment was divided into two periods during which the experimental parameters were monitored: 10 minutes during conversation on a cell phone and 10 minutes of non-conversation on a hands-free cell phone. After the experiment, the driver was questioned concerning the extent to which his/her driving was disturbed by the cell phone conversation. T-test for matched samples revealed that the gaps between the drivers' cars and those in front of them diminished when drivers were engaged in the cell phone conversations. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that drivers that had short conversations did not change their speed, while drivers who were engaged in long (over 16 minutes) conversations drove faster. No effect of drivers' awareness toward cell phone-related disturbance on actual driving behavior monitored in the present study was found.

  1. Pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    overactivity, or a defect intrinsic circadian control of bladder function. The role of sleep is currently under scrutiny as recent evidence point towards poor sleep with increased sleep fragmentation, arousal index, and periodic limb movements as important factors. One unifying pathophysiologic theory suggests...... vasopressin levels and renal factors such as increased GFR and solute excretion (e.g. sodium) as well as increased prostaglandin PGE2 excretion. Furthermore, nocturnal polyuria has been associated with poor sleep (e.g. sleep fragmentation) and increased nocturnal arterial blood pressure levels. Another...... important part of enuresis pathogenesis is reduced bladder capacity, either during night-time only or present during daytime also (i.e. reduced MVV on a FV chart). The background behind the reduced nocturnal reservoir function is not fully clarified but may involve CNS regulatory centers, detrusor...

  2. Nocturnal panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Fabiana L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sleep disorders and the search for specific treatment.

  3. THE EFFECTS OF MOBILE TELEPHONING ON DRIVING PERFORMANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROOKHUIS, KA; DEVRIES, G; DEWAARD, D

    The effects of telephoning while driving were studied in three different traffic conditions, i.e. in light traffic on a quiet motorway, in heavy traffic on a four-lane ring-road, and in city traffic. Twelve subjects, unfamiliar with mobile telephones, drove an instrumented vehicle for one hour each

  4. Post and during event effect of cell phone talking and texting on driving performance--a driving simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Raju; Codjoe, Julius; Ishak, Sherif; McCarter, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have been done in the field of driver distraction, specifically on the use of cell phone for either conversation or texting while driving. Researchers have focused on the driving performance of drivers when they were actually engaged in the task; that is, during the texting or phone conversation event. However, it is still unknown whether the impact of cell phone usages ceases immediately after the end of task. The primary objective of this article is to analyze the post-event effect of cell phone usage (texting and conversation) in order to verify whether the distracting effect lingers after the actual event has ceased. This study utilizes a driving simulator study of 36 participants to test whether a significant decrease in driver performance occurs during cell phone usage and after usage. Surrogate measures used to represent lateral and longitudinal control of the vehicle were standard deviation (SD) of lane position and mean velocity, respectively. RESULTS suggest that there was no significant decrease in driver performance (both lateral and longitudinal control) during and after the cell phone conversation. For the texting event, there were significant decreases in driver performance in both the longitudinal and lateral control of the vehicle during the actual texting task. The diminished longitudinal control ceased immediately after the texting event but the diminished lateral control lingered for an average of 3.38 s. The number of text messages exchanged did not affect the magnitude or duration of the diminished lateral control. The result indicates that the distraction and subsequent elevated crash risk of texting while driving linger even after the texting event has ceased. This finding has safety and policy implications in reducing distracted driving.

  5. Effects of vibration on occupant driving performance under simulated driving conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizan, Amzar; Fard, M; Azari, Michael F; Jazar, Reza

    2017-04-01

    Although much research has been devoted to the characterization of the effects of whole-body vibration on seated occupants' comfort, drowsiness induced by vibration has received less attention to date. There are also little validated measurement methods available to quantify whole body vibration-induced drowsiness. Here, the effects of vibration on drowsiness were investigated. Twenty male volunteers were recruited for this experiment. Drowsiness was measured in a driving simulator, before and after 30-min exposure to vibration. Gaussian random vibration, with 1-15 Hz frequency bandwidth was used for excitation. During the driving session, volunteers were required to obey the speed limit of 100 kph and maintain a steady position on the left-hand lane. A deviation in lane position, steering angle variability, and speed deviation were recorded and analysed. Alternatively, volunteers rated their subjective drowsiness by Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) scores every 5-min. Following 30-min of exposure to vibration, a significant increase of lane deviation, steering angle variability, and KSS scores were observed in all volunteers suggesting the adverse effects of vibration on human alertness level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Driving simulator performance of veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amick, Melissa M; Kraft, Melissa; McGlinchey, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Driving simulator performance was examined in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans to objectively evaluate driving abilities among this cohort who self-report poorer driving safety postdeployment. OIF/OEF Veterans (n = 25) and age- and education-matched civilian controls (n = 25) participated in a 30 min driving simulator assessment that measured the frequency of minor, moderate, and severe driving errors. Frequency of errors in specific content domains (speed regulation, positioning, and signaling) was also calculated. All participants answered questions about number of lifetime traffic "warnings," moving violation tickets, and accidents. Veterans completed the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist-Military Version. On the driving simulator assessment, Veterans committed more minor, moderate, severe, and speeding errors and reported poorer lifetime driving records than the civilian control group. Exploratory analyses revealed an association between increasing errors on the driving simulator with increasing symptoms of PTSD, although statistically this correlation did not reach significance. These findings suggest that Veterans perform more poorly on an objective evaluation of driving safety and that the presence of PTSD could be associated with worse performance on this standardized driving simulator assessment.

  7. Comparative Effects of an Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker (ARB)/Diuretic vs. ARB/Calcium-Channel Blocker Combination on Uncontrolled Nocturnal Hypertension Evaluated by Information and Communication Technology-Based Nocturnal Home Blood Pressure Monitoring - The NOCTURNE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Kanegae, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hajime; Uchiyama, Kazuaki; Yamagiwa, Kayo; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Kanda, Kiyomi; Hasegawa, Shinji; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2017-06-23

    Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular events. The NOCTURNE study, a multicenter, randomized controlled trial (RCT) using our recently developed information and communication technology (ICT) nocturnal home BP monitoring (HBPM) device, was performed to compare the nocturnal HBP-lowering effects of differential ARB-based combination therapies in 411 Japanese patients with nocturnal hypertension (HT).Methods and Results:Patients with nocturnal BP ≥120/70 mmHg at baseline even under ARB therapy (100 mg irbesartan daily) were enrolled. The ARB/CCB combination therapy (irbesartan 100 mg+amlodipine 5 mg) achieved a significantly greater reduction in nocturnal home systolic BP (primary endpoint) than the ARB/diuretic combination (daily irbesartan 100 mg+trichlormethiazide 1 mg) (-14.4 vs. -10.5 mmHg, P<0.0001), independently of urinary sodium excretion and/or nocturnal BP dipping status. However, the change in nocturnal home systolic BP was comparable among the post-hoc subgroups with higher salt sensitivity (diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and elderly patients). This is the first RCT demonstrating the feasibility of clinical assessment of nocturnal BP by ICT-nocturnal HBPM. The ARB/CCB combination was shown to be superior to ARB/diuretic in patients with uncontrolled nocturnal HT independently of sodium intake, despite the similar impact of the 2 combinations in patients with higher salt sensitivity.

  8. The Impact of Age Stereotypes on Older Adults' Hazard Perception Performance and Driving Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Lyn; Sargent-Cox, Kerry; Horswill, Mark S; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effect of age-stereotype threat on older adults' performance on a task measuring hazard perception performance in driving. The impact of age-stereotype threat in relation to the value participants placed on driving and pre- and post-task confidence in driving ability was also investigated. Eighty-six adults aged from 65 years of age completed a questionnaire measuring demographic information, driving experience, self-rated health, driving importance, and driving confidence. Prior to undertaking a timed hazard perception task, participants were exposed to either negative or positive age stereotypes. Results showed that age-stereotype threats, while not influencing hazard perception performance, significantly reduced post-driving confidence compared with pre-driving confidence for those in the negative prime condition. This finding builds on the literature that has found that stereotype-based influences cannot simply be understood in terms of performance outcomes alone and may be relevant to factors affected by confidence such as driving cessation decisions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Performance Improvement of Sensorless Vector Control for Matrix Converter Drives Using PQR Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to improve sensorless performance of matrix converter drives using PQR power transformation. The non-linearity of matrix converter drives such as commutation delay, turn-on and turn-off time of switching device, and on-state switching device voltage drop is modelled...... drives using a 3 kW matrix converter system without a speed sensor. Experimental results are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed strategy....

  10. Performance improvement of sensorless vector control for matrix converter drives using PQR power theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to improve sensorless performance of matrix converter drives using PQR power transformation. The non-linearity of matrix converter drives such as commutation delay, turn-on and turn-off time of switching device, and on-state switching device voltage drop is modelled...... drives using a 3 kW matrix converter system without a speed sensor. Experimental results are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed strategy....

  11. Saccadic eye movement performance as an indicator of driving ability in elderly drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Seeger, Rolf; Fischer, Hartmut; Lanz, Christian; Muser, Markus; Walz, Felix; Schwarz, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Regular checking of the fitness to drive of elderly car-license holders is required in some countries, and this will become increasingly important as more countries face aging populations. The present study investigated whether the analysis of saccadic eye movements could be used as a screening method for the assessment of driving ability. Three different paradigms (prosaccades, antisaccades, and visuovisual interactive (VVI) saccades) were used to test saccadic eye movements in 144 participants split into four groups: elderly drivers who came to the attention of road authorities for suspected lack of fitness to drive, a group of elderly drivers who served as a comparison group, a group of neurology patients with established brain lesion diagnoses, and a young comparison group. The group of elderly drivers with suspected deficits in driving skills also underwent a medical examination and a practical on-road driving test. The results of the saccadic eye tests of the different groups were compared. Antisaccade results indicated a strong link to driving behaviour: elderly drivers who were not fit to drive exhibited a poor performance on the antisaccade task and the performance in the VVI task was also clearly poorer in this group. Testing saccadic eye movements appears to be a promising and efficient method for screening large numbers of people such as elderly drivers. This study indicated a link between antisaccade performance and the ability to drive. Hence, measuring saccadic eye movements should be considered as a tool for screening the fitness to drive.

  12. The influence of cognitive impairment on driving performance in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheis, M T; Garay, E; DeLuca, J

    2001-04-24

    To examine the influence of impaired cognitive processing on measures of driving skills in persons with MS. Twenty-eight subjects with documented MS were divided into two groups-with [MS(+), n = 13] and without [MS(-), n = 15] cognitive impairment-based on neuropsychological performance. Healthy control (HC) subjects (n = 17) matched on age and driving experience were also studied. Driving-related skills were compared between the groups based on performance on two computerized driving tests: the Useful Field of Vision (UFOV) and the Neurocognitive Driving Test (NDT). The MS(+) group performed significantly worse than both the MS(-) and HC groups in the latency to perform several driving-specific functions on the NDT, but no overall group differences were observed in actual errors on the NDT. On the UFOV, when compared to MS(-) and HC subjects, the MS(+) group demonstrated poorer performance on two of the three subtests. Additionally, a significantly higher percentage of MS(+) individuals were rated within the high risk (probability of crash involvement) category, relative to the MS(-) and HC groups. Cognitive impairment can negatively affect driving-related skills in persons with MS and should be considered in the determination of driving ability.

  13. Effects of OROS-MPH Versus Dl-Amphetamine-XR on Driving Performance of ADHD Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Driving performance of 35 adolescent ADHD patients (19 boys/16 girls; mean age 17.8 years on a driving simulator was compared while taking OROS methylphenidate (Concerta, 72 mg, mixed dl-amphetamine salts (Adderall XR, 30 mg, or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study at University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

  14. Differences in driving performance due to headway distances and gender: the application of jerk cost function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Seung; Kim, Han-Soo; Shin, Yoon-Ho; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Min, Byung-Chan; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Driving is directly controlled by the driver's movement. This study tried to compare differences in gender and headway distances between the DRIVING phase and the SUDDEN STOP phase by using subjects' movement during driving in the simulator. To quantify subjects' movement, the jerk cost function (JC) was used, and conventional vehicle control parameters such as the coefficient of variation of the mediolateral trajectory (MLCV) for lane keeping and the brake time (BT) were also used. As the headway distance increased, MLCV and JC decreased significantly in the DRIVING phase. In the SUDDEN STOP phase, BT was increased and, MLCV and JC were decreased. Differences between genders were detected for both MLCV (males females). The results of this study demonstrate that JC may be used as a variable in evaluating driving performance as influenced by driving conditions and gender.

  15. Tooth modification and dynamic performance of the cycloidal drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong-Yi; Mao, Shi-Min; Guo, Wen-Chao; Guo, Zheng

    2017-02-01

    A new method of cycloid disc tooth modification is presented in this paper. Its main idea is to design the modification clearance curves to adapt to different modification targets. A detailed procedure of the new modification clearance curve, which can be defined by adjusting the position of 5 key points is developed. Numerical experiments are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the new method. A Multi-DOF nonlinear dynamic model of cycloidal speed reducer is established, then the cycloid disc rotational displacement and rotational velocity versus time of different modification clearance are solved by the Runge-kutta numerical method. The results show that this method can improve the carrying capability of cycloidal drive, eliminate noise and vibration and develop the transmission accuracy.

  16. RLS patients show better nocturnal performance in the Simon task due to diminished visuo-motor priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Schrempf, Wiebke; Brandt, Moritz D; Mückschel, Moritz; Beste, Christian; Stock, Ann-Kathrin

    2018-01-01

    The restless legs syndrome (RLS) is characterized by sensory-motor symptoms which usually occur predominantly at rest in the evening and at night. It is assumed that this circadian rhythm is caused by low dopamine levels in the evening. Yet, it has never been investigated whether RLS patients show diurnal variations in cognitive functions modulated by dopamine and what neurophysiological and functional neuroanatomical processes underlie such modulations. We used a Simon task combined with EEG and source localization to investigate whether top-down response selection and/or automatic visuo-motor priming are subject to diurnal changes in RLS patients, as compared to matched healthy controls. We found that RLS patients showed better task performance due to reduced visuo-motor priming in the evening, as reflected by smaller early lateralized readiness potential (e-LRP) amplitudes and decreased activation of the superior parietal cortex and premotor cortex. Top-down response selection and early attentional processing were unaffected by RLS. Counterintuitively, RLS patients show enhanced task performance in the evening, i.e. when experiencing dopaminergic deficiency. Yet, this may be explained by deficits in visuo-motor priming that lead to reduced false response tendencies. This study reveals a counterintuitive circadian variation of cognitive functions in RLS patients. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the NightCool Nocturnal Radiation Cooling Concept: Annual Performance Assessment in Scale Test Buildings Stage Gate 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Danny S. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Sherwin, John R. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2008-03-01

    In this report, data is presented on the long-term comparative with all of NightCool system fully operational, with circulating fans when attic conditions are favorable for nocturnal cooling and with conventional air conditioning at other times. Data is included for a full year of the cooling season in Central Florida, which stretches from April to November of 2007.

  18. A study of dynamics performance improvement by rear right and left independent drive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Takashi; Fukuba, Hitoshi; Suetomi, Takamasa

    2010-11-01

    In this study, methods of motion control on a rear right and left independent electric motor drive vehicle and the benefit for drivers when using this configuration were researched. The system offers direct yaw moment control (DYC) function and it is possible to compensate for the vehicle turning motion. On the other hand, a rear drive vehicle often becomes unstable at a situation of acceleration in a turn. Even if the DYC system controls the vehicle motion, there are performance limits. One of the cause considered is that the characteristics of rear tyres are changed by the driving force. Control methods that focused especially on this point were examined, and the performance of independent drive system was evaluated by a simulation. Moreover, the effects on driver were confirmed with a driving simulator. The effectiveness of the system was confirmed from these results.

  19. Performance of the high-altitude balloon experiment Roto-lok drive gimbal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulthess, Marcus R.; Ardaman, Andrew A.; Baugh, Steven; Carson, Donald G.

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents and discusses laboratory performance measurements of a Roto-Lok drive system for the HABE azimuth and elevation gimbals. The HABE system is a 7,000 lb acquisition tracking and pointing (ATP) balloon-launched vehicle. The primary azimuth and elevation drive systems are zero-backlash torque multipliers referred to by the trade name Roto-Lok rotary drive and designed by Sagebrush Technology, Inc. The Roto-Lok used in the azimuth gimbal has a limited 320 deg of angular travel; therefore, it is supplemented with a secondary drive element to provide unlimited travel. This secondary drive is used to counteract the gross angles resulting from the freely rotating nature of the untethered balloon system. The Roto-Lok drive is used for the fine tracking and pointing of the gimbals. Both the azimuth and elevation Rota-Lok drives are tandem drives with an end-to-end ratio of 72:1. Performance specifications developed from the mission requirements are compared against the actual system performance measurements. The entire gimbaled azimuth and elevation systems are required to point in inertial space to less than 250 (mu) rad RMS over the band DC to 100 Hz for each axis. Performance measurements better than the specification were measured. The primary gimbal base-motion disturbances, however, are due to the motor cogging torque or torque ripple. A brief discussion of the measurement methods and the control system used to drive the gimbals is presented. Several system anomalies, such as the structural compliance between the drive element and the inertial rate sensors and the coarse gear backlash, are discussed in terms of their impact on the gimbal control system.

  20. Driving performance after an extended period of travel in an automated highway system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this experiment -- part of a series exploring human factors issues related to the Automated Highway System (AHS)-was to determine whether driving performance would be affected by extended travel under automated control at a velocity ...

  1. A thermodynamic approach to compare the performance of rhombic-drive and crank-drive mechanisms for a beta-type Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksoy, F.; Solmaz, H.; Karabulut, H.; Cinar, C.; Ozgoren, Y.O.; Polat, Seyfi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Rhombic drive and crank drive mechanisms of a beta type engine were compared. • Nodal analysis method was used to compare engines having different drive mechanism. • Maximum specific power was 1410 W/L for rhombic-drive engine. • Heat transfer coefficient was determined as 475 W/m 2 K for rhombic-drive engine. • Rhombic drive provided higher efficiency because of its better kinematic behaviours. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of rhombic drive and crank drive mechanisms on the performance of a beta-type Stirling engine was investigated by nodal analysis. Kinematic and thermodynamic relations for both drive mechanisms were introduced and a Fortran code was written for the solution. Piston strokes, cylinder and displacer diameters, hot and cold end temperatures, regenerator volumes and heat transfer surface areas were taken equal for both engines with two different drive mechanisms. In the analysis, air was used as the working gas. Engine power and efficiency were compared for different charge pressure values, working gas mass values, heat transfer coefficients and hot end temperatures. Maximum specific engine power was 1410 W/L for the engine with rhombic drive mechanism and 1200 W/L for the engine with crank drive mechanism at 4 bars of charge pressure and 500 W/m 2 K heat transfer coefficient. Rhombic drive mechanism was relatively advantageous at low working gas mass values and high hot end temperatures. In comparison with the engine having rhombic drive mechanism, the relatively poor kinematic behaviour of the engine having crank drive mechanism caused lower engine efficiency and performance. Heat transfer coefficient was also predicted by using an experimental pressure trace.

  2. Driving While Interacting With Google Glass: Investigating the Combined Effect of Head-Up Display and Hands-Free Input on Driving Safety and Multitask Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippey, Kathryn G; Sivaraj, Elayaraj; Ferris, Thomas K

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the individual and combined effects of voice (vs. manual) input and head-up (vs. head-down) display in a driving and device interaction task. Advances in wearable technology offer new possibilities for in-vehicle interaction but also present new challenges for managing driver attention and regulating device usage in vehicles. This research investigated how driving performance is affected by interface characteristics of devices used for concurrent secondary tasks. A positive impact on driving performance was expected when devices included voice-to-text functionality (reducing demand for visual and manual resources) and a head-up display (HUD) (supporting greater visibility of the driving environment). Driver behavior and performance was compared in a texting-while-driving task set during a driving simulation. The texting task was completed with and without voice-to-text using a smartphone and with voice-to-text using Google Glass's HUD. Driving task performance degraded with the addition of the secondary texting task. However, voice-to-text input supported relatively better performance in both driving and texting tasks compared to using manual entry. HUD functionality further improved driving performance compared to conditions using a smartphone and often was not significantly worse than performance without the texting task. This study suggests that despite the performance costs of texting-while-driving, voice input methods improve performance over manual entry, and head-up displays may further extend those performance benefits. This study can inform designers and potential users of wearable technologies as well as policymakers tasked with regulating the use of these technologies while driving.

  3. The relationship between cognitive performance, perceptions of driving comfort and abilities, and self-reported driving restrictions among healthy older drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Mark J; Naglie, Gary; Weegar, Kelly; Myers, Anita; Cameron, Duncan; Crizzle, Alexander; Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Tuokko, Holly; Vrkljan, Brenda; Bédard, Michel; Porter, Michelle M; Mazer, Barbara; Gélinas, Isabelle; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Marshall, Shawn

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between cognitive performance, driver perceptions and self-reported driving restrictions. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on baseline data from Candrive II, a five-year prospective cohort study of 928 older drivers aged 70-94 years from seven cities. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) as well as the Trail Making Test, parts A and B. Driver perceptions were assessed using the Day and Night Driving Comfort Scales and the Perceived Driving Abilities scale, while driving practices were captured by the Situational Driving Frequency and Avoidance scales, as well as the Driving Habits and Intentions Questionnaire. The baseline data indicates this cohort is largely a cognitively intact group. Univariate regression analysis showed that longer Trails A and B completion times were significantly, but only modestly associated with reduced driving frequency and perceived driving abilities and comfort, as well as a significant tendency to avoid more difficult driving situations (all pcognition or changes in cognition are associated with changes in driver perceptions, actual driving restrictions and on-road driving outcomes (e.g., crashes, violations) over time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of daily sleep patterns of commercial truck drivers on driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang Xiang; Fang, Youjia; Guo, Feng; Hanowski, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Fatigued and drowsy driving has been found to be a major cause of truck crashes. Lack of sleep is the number one cause of fatigue and drowsiness. However, there are limited data on the sleep patterns (sleep duration, sleep percentage in the duration of non-work period, and the time when sleep occurred) of truck drivers in non-work periods and the impact on driving performance. This paper examined sleep patterns of 96 commercial truck drivers during non-work periods and evaluated the influence these sleep patterns had on truck driving performance. Data were from the Naturalistic Truck Driving Study. Each driver participated in the study for approximately four weeks. A shift was defined as a non-work period followed by a work period. A total of 1397 shifts were identified. Four distinct sleep patterns were identified based on sleep duration, sleep start/end point in a non-work period, and the percentage of sleep with reference to the duration of non-work period. Driving performance was measured by safety-critical events, which included crashes, near-crashes, crash-relevant conflicts, and unintentional lane deviations. Negative binomial regression was used to evaluate the association between the sleep patterns and driving performance, adjusted for driver demographic information. The results showed that the sleep pattern with the highest safety-critical event rate was associated with shorter sleep, sleep in the early stage of a non-work period, and less sleep between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. This study also found that male drivers, with fewer years of commercial vehicle driving experience and higher body mass index, were associated with deteriorated driving performance and increased driving risk. The results of this study could inform hours-of-service policy-making and benefit safety management in the trucking industry. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Performance comparison of a novel configuration of beta-type Stirling engines with rhombic drive engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solmaz, Hamit; Karabulut, Halit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper describes a novel arrangement of a beta-type Stirling engine. • Its performance was compared with rhombic drive engine. • The power output of the engine was found to be greater than rhombic drive. • Efficiency was found to be higher than rhombic drive at the same working fluid mass. • Efficiency was found to be lower than rhombic drive at the same charge pressure. - Abstract: This study presents a beta type Stirling engine mechanism and its performance analysis. The displacer motion of the engine is performed by a lever mechanism. The performance of the engine was investigated via comparing with a rhombic-drive engine possessing an equal sided rhombic. Comparison was made for kinematic behaviors, power and thermal efficiency. For comparison; the piston swept volume, the inner heat transfer area, the hot and cold end temperatures, the inner heat transfer coefficient, charge pressure and dead volumes were kept equal for both engines. As working fluid the helium was used. Thermodynamic treatments of engines were performed via the nodal analysis. The power of the lever driven engine was found to be greater than the power of the rhombic drive engine. Under the equal charge pressure, the thermal efficiency of the lever driven engine was found to be lower than the efficiency of the rhombic drive engine however, under the equal working fluid mass the thermal efficiency of the lever driven engine was found to be greater than that of the rhombic drive engine. The external volume and mass of the lever driven engine is lower than the rhombic drive engine

  6. Current management of nocturnal enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Wm Lane M

    2008-07-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is an especially common problem with the potential to have an appreciable negative impact on the emotional health of a child. Our understanding of the pathogenesis continues to improve. A disorder of sleep arousal, a low nocturnal bladder capacity, and nocturnal polyuria are the three factors that interrelate to cause nocturnal enuresis. Constipation is a very common and often unrecognized factor that appreciably affects bladder function. Successful treatment involves interventions that simultaneously improve these factors. Self-esteem improves with any form of therapy and dryness is possible for the majority of children.

  7. Performance analysis of WAVE communication under high-speed driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-young Kang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although WAVE (Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments is a technology designed for the high-speed mobile environments, WAVE communication performance in a real road environment is highly dependent on the surrounding environments such as moving vehicles, road shape, and topography. In particular, when a vehicle moves at high speed, the location of the vehicle and its proximity to the road-side device are rapidly changed and thus affect communication performance. Accordingly, we build a performance evaluation system based on the WAVE-LTE network cooperative operation. We also analyzed the performance differences based on external environmental factors, such as information volume and velocity, from the data acquired through actual vehicle tests.

  8. Association between unsafe driving performance and cognitive-perceptual dysfunction in older drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si-Woon; Choi, Eun Seok; Lim, Mun Hee; Kim, Eun Joo; Hwang, Sung Il; Choi, Kyung-In; Yoo, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Kuem Ju; Jung, Hi-Eun

    2011-03-01

    To find an association between cognitive-perceptual problems of older drivers and unsafe driving performance during simulated automobile driving in a virtual environment. Cross-sectional study. A driver evaluation clinic in a rehabilitation hospital. Fifty-five drivers aged 65 years or older and 48 drivers in their late twenties to early forties. All participants underwent evaluation of cognitive-perceptual function and driving performance, and the results were compared between older and younger drivers. The association between cognitive-perceptual function and driving performance was analyzed. Cognitive-perceptual function was evaluated with the Cognitive Perceptual Assessment for Driving (CPAD), a computer-based assessment tool consisting of depth perception, sustained attention, divided attention, the Stroop test, the digit span test, field dependency, and trail-making test A and B. Driving performance was evaluated with use of a virtual reality-based driving simulator. During simulated driving, car crashes were recorded, and an occupational therapist observed unsafe performances in controlling speed, braking, steering, vehicle positioning, making lane changes, and making turns. Thirty-five older drivers did not pass the CPAD test, whereas all of the younger drivers passed the test. When using the driving simulator, a significantly greater number of older drivers experienced car crashes and demonstrated unsafe performance in controlling speed, steering, and making lane changes. CPAD results were associated with car crashes, steering, vehicle positioning, and making lane changes. Older drivers who did not pass the CPAD test are 4 times more likely to experience a car crash, 3.5 times more likely to make errors in steering, 2.8 times more likely to make errors in vehicle positioning, and 6.5 times more likely to make errors in lane changes than are drivers who passed the CPAD test. Unsafe driving performance and car crashes during simulated driving were more

  9. Effects of Cognitive Load on Driving Performance: The Cognitive Control Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Johan; Markkula, Gustav; Victor, Trent; Merat, Natasha

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this paper was to outline an explanatory framework for understanding effects of cognitive load on driving performance and to review the existing experimental literature in the light of this framework. Although there is general consensus that taking the eyes off the forward roadway significantly impairs most aspects of driving, the effects of primarily cognitively loading tasks on driving performance are not well understood. Based on existing models of driver attention, an explanatory framework was outlined. This framework can be summarized in terms of the cognitive control hypothesis: Cognitive load selectively impairs driving subtasks that rely on cognitive control but leaves automatic performance unaffected. An extensive literature review was conducted wherein existing results were reinterpreted based on the proposed framework. It was demonstrated that the general pattern of experimental results reported in the literature aligns well with the cognitive control hypothesis and that several apparent discrepancies between studies can be reconciled based on the proposed framework. More specifically, performance on nonpracticed or inherently variable tasks, relying on cognitive control, is consistently impaired by cognitive load, whereas the performance on automatized (well-practiced and consistently mapped) tasks is unaffected and sometimes even improved. Effects of cognitive load on driving are strongly selective and task dependent. The present results have important implications for the generalization of results obtained from experimental studies to real-world driving. The proposed framework can also serve to guide future research on the potential causal role of cognitive load in real-world crashes.

  10. Quinine for Nocturnal Leg Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Wells, George; Lau, Anita

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE With respect to the use of quinine for the treatment of nocturnal leg cramps, to determine whether the findings of a previously performed meta-analysis of published data are altered with the addition of unpublished data, and whether publication bias is present in this area. DESIGN A meta-analysis of eight (four published and four unpublished) randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, seven of which had a crossover design. SETTING Randomized trials that were available as of July 1997. SUBJECTS Ambulatory patients (659) who suffered from regular nocturnal leg cramps. MAIN RESULTS When individual patient data from all crossover studies were pooled, persons had 3.60 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.15, 5.05) fewer cramps in a 4-week period when taking quinine compared with placebo. This compared with an estimate of 8.83 fewer cramps (95% CI 4.16, 13.49) from pooling published studies alone. The corresponding relative risk reductions were 21% (95% CI 12%, 30%) and 43% (95% CI 21%, 65%), respectively. Compared with placebo, the use of quinine was associated with an increased incidence of side effects, particularly tinnitus. Publication bias is present in the reporting of the efficacy of quinine for this indication, as almost all published studies reported larger estimates of its efficacy than did unpublished studies. CONCLUSIONS This study confirms that quinine is efficacious in the prevention of nocturnal leg cramps. However, its benefit may not be as large as reported from the pooling of published studies alone. Given the side effect profile of quinine, nonpharmacologic therapy (e.g., regular passive stretching of the affected muscle) is the best first-line treatment. For persons who find this ineffective and whose quality of life is significantly affected, a trial of quinine is warranted. Prescribing physicians must closely monitor the risks and benefits in individual patients. Publication bias is present in this area even though there is

  11. Engrossed in conversation: the impact of cell phones on simulated driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beede, Kristen E; Kass, Steven J

    2006-03-01

    The current study examined the effects of cognitively distracting tasks on various measures of driving performance. Thirty-six college students with a median of 6 years of driving experience completed a driving history questionnaire and four simulated driving scenarios. The distraction tasks consisted of responding to a signal detection task and engaging in a simulated cell phone conversation. Driving performance was measured in terms of four categories of behavior: traffic violations (e.g., speeding, running stop signs), driving maintenance (e.g., standard deviation of lane position), attention lapses (e.g., stops at green lights, failure to visually scan for intersection traffic), and response time (e.g., time to step on brake in response to a pop-up event). Performance was significantly impacted in all four categories when drivers were concurrently talking on a hands-free phone. Performance on the signal detection task was poor and not significantly impacted by the phone task, suggesting that considerably less attention was paid to detecting these peripheral signals. However, the signal detection task did interact with the phone task on measures of average speed, speed variability, attention lapses, and reaction time. The findings lend further empirical support of the dangers of drivers being distracted by cell phone conversations.

  12. Operating System Support for High-Performance Solid State Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørling, Matias

    of the operating system in reducing the gap, and enabling new forms of communication and even co-design between applications and high-performance SSDs. More specifically, we studied the storage layers within the Linux kernel. We explore the following issues: (i) what are the limitations of the legacy block...... a form of application-SSD co-design? What are the impacts on operating system design? (v) What would it take to provide quality of service for applications requiring millions of I/O per second? The dissertation consists of six publications covering these issues. Two of the main contributions...

  13. A Method For Determination And Standardization Of Performance Parameters For Aircrafts With Electric Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakielaszek Zbigniew

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study outlines the technique for flight tests carried out for a plane powered by an electric drive and the method for standardization of performance parameters applicable to evaluation of test results. Due to the relatively new type of drive, which is an electric motor, the literature references provide no descriptions of such issues. Therefore the solutions presented in the paper are the own contribution of the research team from Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL.

  14. Can Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder Use Virtual Reality Driving Simulation Training to Evaluate and Improve Driving Performance? An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel J.; Brown, Timothy; Ross, Veerle; Moncrief, Matthew; Schmitt, Rose; Gaffney, Gary; Reeve, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Investigate how novice drivers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) differ from experienced drivers and whether virtual reality driving simulation training (VRDST) improves ASD driving performance. 51 novice ASD drivers (mean age 17.96 years, 78% male) were randomized to routine training (RT) or one of three types of VRDST (8-12 sessions). All…

  15. Caffeine withdrawal, sleepiness, and driving performance: what does the research really tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatherley, Susan V

    2011-05-01

    As a psychostimulant, caffeine is thought to reduce road accidents by keeping drivers alert and wakeful. Studies have found that caffeine can improve performance on vigilance tasks and in driving simulators under normal sleeping conditions and after sleep restriction or deprivation. However, there is increasing evidence that these beneficial effects of caffeine are due to withdrawal reversal. Studies comparing the effects of caffeine versus placebo on driving performance have tested habitual caffeine consumers deprived of caffeine from the evening before the test day. The conclusion from this review is, therefore, that improvements in driving performance and alertness after caffeine are likely to represent withdrawal reversal rather than a net beneficial effect of caffeine. Further research using designs that control for caffeine withdrawal are necessary and, accordingly, advice given to the public on use of caffeine as an antidote to tiredness and impaired performance should be reviewed.

  16. The impact of Stereotype Threat on the simulated driving performance of older drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanisse, Mélanie; Gagnon, Sylvain; Voloaca, Mihnea

    2013-01-01

    Older drivers are perceived as being dangerous and overly cautious by other drivers. We tested the hypothesis that this negative stereotype has a direct influence on the performance of older drivers. Based on the Stereotype Threat literature, we predicted that older driving performance would be altered after exposure to a Stereotype Threat. Sixty-one older drivers aged 65 and above completed a simulated driving assessment course. Prior to testing, half of the participants were told that the objective of the study was to investigate why older adults aged 65 and above were more implicated in on-road accidents (Stereotype Threat condition) and half were showed a neutral statement. Results confirmed that exposure to the threat significantly altered driving performance. Older adults in the Stereotype Threat condition made more driving mistakes than those in the control group. Interestingly, under a Stereotype Threat condition, older adults tended to commit more speeding infractions. We also observed that domain identification (whether driving is deemed important or not) moderated the impact of the threat. Taken together, these results support recent older drivers' performance models suggesting that the interaction between individual and social factors need to be considered when examining older drivers' performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing treatment effects of oral THC on simulated and on-the-road driving performance: testing the validity of driving simulator drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldstra, J L; Bosker, W M; de Waard, D; Ramaekers, J G; Brookhuis, K A

    2015-08-01

    The driving simulator provides a safe and controlled environment for testing driving behaviour efficiently. The question is whether it is sensitive to detect drug-induced effects. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the sensitivity of the driving simulator for detecting drug effects. As a case in point, we investigated the dose-related effects of oral ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), i.e. dronabinol, on simulator and on-the-road driving performance in equally demanding driving tasks. Twenty-four experienced driver participants were treated with dronabinol (Marinol®; 10 and 20 mg) and placebo. Dose-related effects of the drug on the ability to keep a vehicle in lane (weaving) and to follow the speed changes of a lead car (car following) were compared within subjects for on-the-road versus in-simulator driving. Additionally, the outcomes of equivalence testing to alcohol-induced effects were investigated. Treatment effects found on weaving when driving in the simulator were comparable to treatment effects found when driving on the road. The effect after 10 mg dronabinol was however less strong in the simulator than on the road and inter-individual variance seemed higher in the simulator. There was, however, a differential treatment effect of dronabinol on reactions to speed changes of a lead car (car following) when driving on the road versus when driving in the simulator. The driving simulator was proven to be sensitive for demonstrating dronabinol-induced effects particularly at higher doses. Treatment effects of dronabinol on weaving were comparable with driving on the road but inter-individual variability seemed higher in the simulator than on the road which may have potential effects on the clinical inferences made from simulator driving. Car following on the road and in the simulator were, however, not comparable.

  18. How Does Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation Drive Performance Culture in Organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Arielle

    2017-01-01

    The performance culture of an organization is impacted by the motivation of an organization's employee. Determining whether or not an employee's motivation is intrinsic or extrinsic is helpful for organizations to see what is more of a drive in their performance. The following article reviews literature on the subject of employee motivation to…

  19. Examination of Cognitive and Instrumental Functional Performance as Indicators for Driving Cessation Risk across 3 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michelle L.; Edwards, Jerri D.; Ross, Lesley A.; Ball, Karlene K.; Lunsman, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively examine the role of cognitive and instrumental functional performance in driving cessation while simultaneously accounting for any contributions of demographics, vision, physical performance, and health among a sample of older adults without dementia. Design and Methods: Included in the…

  20. Performance Improvement of Sensorless Vector Control for Matrix Converter Drives Using PQR Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    using PQR transformation and compensated using a reference current control scheme. To eliminate the input current distortion due to the input voltage unbalance, a simple method using PQR transformation is also proposed. The proposed compensation method is applied for high performance induction motor......This paper presents a new method to improve sensorless performance of matrix converter drives using PQR power transformation. The non-linearity of matrix converter drives such as commutation delay, turn-on and turn-off time of switching device, and on-state switching device voltage drop is modelled...

  1. Development of the Floating Centrifugal Pump by Use of Non Contact Magnetic Drive and Its Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Uno

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the impeller construction, non contact driving method and performance of a newly developed shaftless floating pump with centrifugal impeller. The drive principle of the floating impeller pump used the magnet induction method similar to the levitation theory of the linear motor. In order to reduce the axial thrust by the pressure different between shroud and disk side, the balance hole and the aileron blade were installed in the floating impeller. Considering the above effect, floating of an impeller in a pump was realized. Moreover, the performance curves of a developed pump are in agreement with a general centrifugal pump, and the dimensionless characteristic curve also agrees under the different rotational speed due to no mechanical friction of the rotational part. Therefore, utility of a non contacting magnetic-drive style pump with the floating impeller was made clear.

  2. Modeling and controller performance assessment for a switched reluctance motor drive based on setpoint relay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, L L N; Coelho, A A R; Almeida, O M; Campos, J C T

    2009-04-01

    This paper considers the implementation of a current control method for switched reluctance motors (SRMs) and presents a novel approach to the accurate on-line modeling of an SRM drive. A simple autotuning technique for the SRM drives using a PWM controller is considered. Furthermore, conventional PI control and Internal Model Control (IMC) are considered to validate this method and present corresponding robust control analysis for the process. The control structures are comparatively analyzed using standard robustness measures for stability and performance. The proposed PWM controller is simulated and a hardware prototype is then implemented using digital signal processor control to evaluate the method using a 12/8, three-phase SRM. The experimental results of the SRM drive model validates the performance of the current loop.

  3. Performance improvement of rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motors using dual-frequency drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yang; Richardson, Robert C; Levesley, Martin C; Walker, Peter G; Watterson, Kevin

    2004-12-01

    To improve the performances of a rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motor for specific applications, a dual-frequency drive has been proposed and investigated. Through careful design of the rectangular piezoelectric ceramic plate, its first longitudinal resonant frequency coincides with its second lateral bending resonant frequency and is one-third of its higher lateral bending resonant frequency. When a square-wave voltage is used to drive the motor, its first longitudinal and second bending and the higher bending vibration modes are excited. Experimental results show that the maximum thrust force and maximum velocity of the motor are over 170% of those obtained from the single-frequency sine-wave drive when the voltage performance of the motor becomes saturated.

  4. Nocturnality constrains morphological and functional diversity in the eyes of reef fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Lars

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambient light levels are often considered to drive the evolution of eye form and function. Diel activity pattern is the main mechanism controlling the visual environment of teleost reef fish, with day-active (diurnal fish active in well-illuminated conditions, whereas night-active (nocturnal fish cope with dim light. Physiological optics predicts several specific evolutionary responses to dim-light vision that should be reflected in visual performance features of the eye. Results We analyzed a large comparative dataset on morphological traits of the eyes in 265 species of teleost reef fish in 43 different families. The eye morphology of nocturnal reef teleosts is characterized by a syndrome that indicates better light sensitivity, including large relative eye size, high optical ratio and large, rounded pupils. Improved dim-light image formation comes at the cost of reduced depth of focus and reduction of potential accommodative lens movement. Diurnal teleost reef fish, released from the stringent functional requirements of dim-light vision have much higher morphological and optical diversity than nocturnal species, with large ranges of optical ratio, depth of focus, and lens accommodation. Conclusions Physical characteristics of the environment are an important factor in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate eye. Both teleost reef fish and terrestrial amniotes meet the functional requirements of dim-light vision with a similar evolutionary response of morphological and optical modifications. The trade-off between improved dim-light vision and reduced optical diversity may be a key factor in explaining the lower trophic diversity of nocturnal reef teleosts.

  5. Effect of single-dose Ginkgo biloba and Panax ginseng on driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSala, Gregory S; McKeever, Rita G; Patel, Urvi; Okaneku, Jolene; Vearrier, David; Greenberg, Michael I

    2015-02-01

    Panax ginseng and Gingko biloba are commonly used herbal supplements in the United States that have been reported to increase alertness and cognitive function. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of these specific herbals on driving performance. 30 volunteers were tested using the STISIM3® Driving Simulator (Systems Technology Inc., Hawthorne, CA, USA) in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The subjects were randomized into 3 groups of 10 subjects per group. After 10-min of simulated driving, subjects received either ginseng (1200 mg), Gingko (240 mg), or placebo administered orally. The test herbals and placebo were randomized and administered by a research assistant outside of the study to maintain blinding. One hour following administration of the herbals or placebo, the subjects completed an additional 10-min of simulated driving. Standard driving parameters were studied including reaction time, standard deviation of lateral positioning, and divided attention. Data collected for the divided attention parameter included time to response and number of correct responses. The data was analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis test using SPSS 22 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). There was no difference in reaction time or standard deviation of lateral positioning for both the ginseng and Ginkgo arms. For the divided attention parameter, the response time in the Ginkgo arm decreased from 2.9 to 2.5 s. The ginseng arm also decreased from 3.2 to 2.4 s. None of these values were statistically significant when between group differences were analyzed. The data suggests there was no statistically significant difference between ginseng, Ginkgo or placebo on driving performance. We postulate this is due to the relatively small numbers in our study. Further study with a larger sample size may be needed in order to elucidate more fully the effects of Ginkgo and ginseng on driving ability.

  6. Impact of Methylphenidate Delivery Profiles on Driving Performance of Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel J.; Merkel, R. Lawrence; Penberthy, Jennifer Kim; Kovatchev, Boris; Hankin, Cheryl S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at high risk for driving accidents. One dose of methylphenidate (MPH) improves simulator driving performances of ADHD-diagnosed adolescents at 1.5 hours post-dose. However, little is known about the effects of different MPH delivery profiles on driving performance…

  7. Impaired Driving Performance as Evidence of a Magnocellular Deficit in Dyslexia and Visual Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carri; Chekaluk, Eugene; Irwin, Julia

    2015-11-01

    High comorbidity and an overlap in symptomology have been demonstrated between dyslexia and visual stress. Several researchers have hypothesized an underlying or causal influence that may account for this relationship. The magnocellular theory of dyslexia proposes that a deficit in visuo-temporal processing can explain symptomology for both disorders. If the magnocellular theory holds true, individuals who experience symptomology for these disorders should show impairment on a visuo-temporal task, such as driving. Eighteen male participants formed the sample for this study. Self-report measures assessed dyslexia and visual stress symptomology as well as participant IQ. Participants completed a drive simulation in which errors in response to road signs were measured. Bivariate correlations revealed significant associations between scores on measures of dyslexia and visual stress. Results also demonstrated that self-reported symptomology predicts magnocellular impairment as measured by performance on a driving task. Results from this study suggest that a magnocellular deficit offers a likely explanation for individuals who report high symptomology across both conditions. While conclusions about the impact of these disorders on driving performance should not be derived from this research alone, this study provides a platform for the development of future research, utilizing a clinical population and on-road driving assessment techniques. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. On Optimizing Steering Performance of Multi-axle Vehicle Based on Driving Force Control

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    Wu Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The steering performance of multi-axle vehicle with independent driving system is affected by the distribution of the wheel driving force. A nonlinear vehicle dynamics model including magic formula tire model for describing 11 DoF four-axle vehicle with dual-front-axle-steering (DFAS system was presented. The influence of different driving force distribution scheme on the steering performance of the vehicle was analyzed. A control strategy for improving the steady response and transient response of the vehicle steering is proposed. The results show: For the steady response, setting different drive force for internal and external wheels according to the actual steering characteristics of the vehicle can effectively improve its steering characteristics; For the transient response, adopting the zero sideslip angle control strategy and using the PID control algorithm to control the driving force of the outside wheel of tear-two-axle, under angle step input, the vehicle sideslip angle can quickly stabilize to 0 and yaw rate also significantly decreases.

  9. Myocardial infarction and nocturnal hypoxaemia

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    Penčić Biljana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with nocturnal intermittent hypoxaemia. Objecive. The aim of this study was to evalute the influence of nocturnal hypoxaemia on ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial ischaemia in patients with myocardial infarction (MI. Method. We studied 77 patients (55.8±7.9 years with MI free of complications, chronic pulmonary diseases, abnormal awake blood gases tension. All patients underwent overnight pulse oximetry and 24-hour electrocardiography. Patients were divided into two groups according to nocturnal hypoxaemia. Total number of ventricular premature complex (VPC; maximal VPC/h; incidence of VPC Lown class>2 and occurrence of ST-segment depression were analyzed for nocturnal (10 PM to 6 AM, daytime (6 AM to 22 PM periods and for the entire 24 hours. Results. Both groups were similar in age, gender, standard risk factors, myocardial infarction size and did not differ in VPC during the analyzed periods. The number of nocturnal maximal VPC/h was insignificantly greater in group 1 (with hypoxaemia compared to group 2 (without hypoxaemia, (p=0.084. Maximal VPC/h did not differ significantly either for daytime or for 24 hours among the groups. Nocturnal VPC Lown>2 were significantly more frequent in group 1 (25% vs 0%, p=0.002. The incidence of VPC Lown>2 was similar during the daytime, and during 24 hrs in both groups. Occurrence of ST-segment depression did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Conclusion. Nocturnal hypoxaemia was associated with complex nocturnal ventricular arrhythmias in patients with MI. .

  10. Driving and Low Vision: Validity of Assessments for Predicting Performance of Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, J. Graham; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Russell-Minda, Elizabeth; Evans, Mal

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to examine whether vision-related assessments can predict the driving performance of individuals who have low vision. The results indicate that measures of visual field, contrast sensitivity, cognitive and attention-based tests, and driver screening tools have variable utility for predicting real-world…

  11. Impact of distracting activities and drivers' cognitive failures on driving performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farah, H.; Zatmeh, S.; Toledo, T.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of smart phones and other infotainment devices, and their widespread use while driving, contributes significantly to car crash rates. This is since the human brain has limited capacity and cannot perform two tasks at the same time, but rather switches from one

  12. Motion perception and driving: predicting performance through testing and shortening braking reaction times through training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Luke; Gray, Rob; Gaska, James; Winterbottom, Marc

    2013-12-30

    A driving simulator was used to examine the relationship between motion perception and driving performance. Although motion perception test scores have been shown to be related to driving safety, it is not clear which combination of tests are the best predictors and whether motion perception training can improve driving performance. In experiment 1, 60 younger drivers (22.4 ± 2.5 years) completed three motion perception tests (2-dimensional [2D] motion-defined letter [MDL] identification, 3D motion in depth sensitivity [MID], and dynamic visual acuity [DVA]) followed by two driving tests (emergency braking [EB] and hazard perception [HP]). In experiment 2, 20 drivers (21.6 ± 2.1 years) completed 6 weeks of motion perception training (using the MDL, MID, and DVA tests), while 20 control drivers (22.0 ± 2.7 years) completed an online driving safety course. The EB performance was measured before and after training. In experiment 1, MDL (r = 0.34) and MID (r = 0.46) significantly correlated with EB score. The change in DVA score as a function of target speed (i.e., "velocity susceptibility") was correlated most strongly with HP score (r = -0.61). In experiment 2, the motion perception training group had a significant decrease in brake reaction time on the EB test from pre- to posttreatment, while there was no significant change for the control group: t(38) = 2.24, P = 0.03. Tests of 3D motion perception are the best predictor of EB, while DVA velocity susceptibility is the best predictor of hazard perception. Motion perception training appears to result in faster braking responses.

  13. Study on Driving Performance of the Axial-Flow Blood Pump under the Condition of Large Gap

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    Yan Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates an improvement of the simulation and computational methods for research on the system magnetic field and driving performance of the large gap magnetic drive system, which is used to drive the axial flow blood pump. The operational principle and structure of large gap magnetic drive system are narrated. Ansoft is adopted to simulate a three-dimensional driving torque to improve accuracy of computation. Experiments and theoretical study show that the use of Z10-T25 oriented silicon steel sheets as the electromagnetic core material can remarkably improve the system driving performance as well as optimize the volume and weight of the electromagnets. So the electromagnet made with oriented silicon steel sheets is conducive to improving the driving performance.

  14. Characteristics of a Tire Friction and Performances of a Braking in a High Speed Driving

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    Yumrak Oh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of pavement is to deliver the fine roughness and the safe road surface to traffic. It requires a secured and comfortable surface using the controlled speed of road. Through adjusting driving speed, skid resistance can be altered in one of the performances of the pavement surface. In high speed driving, there might be a certain level of risk, not in the same level as the proposed roads. Hence, this study first analyzes the speed equation under a consideration of a braking distance and then suggests the friction coefficient in high speed driving with the principle of conservation of energy. If we accept simply that the coefficient of friction is independent of speed, the difference between analysis and test value for braking distance is greatly generated. Therefore we have to analyze the coefficient of friction as an exponential function of braking speed of a vehicle.

  15. Rapid restoration of electric vehicle battery performance while driving at cold temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangsheng; Ge, Shanhai; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Leng, Yongjun; Marple, Dan; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2017-12-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) driven in cold weather experience two major drawbacks of Li-ion batteries: drastic power loss (up to 10-fold at -30 °C) and restriction of regenerative braking at temperatures below 5-10 °C. Both factors greatly reduce cruise range, exacerbating drivers' range anxiety in winter. While preheating the battery before driving is a practice widely adopted to maintain battery power and EV drivability, it is time-consuming (on the order of 40 min) and prohibits instantaneous mobility. Here we reveal a control strategy that can rapidly restore EV battery power and permit full regeneration while driving at temperatures as low as -40 °C. The strategy involves heating the battery internally during regenerative braking and rest periods of driving. We show that this technique fully restores room-temperature battery power and regeneration in 13, 33, 46, 56 and 112 s into uninterrupted driving in 0, -10, -20, -30 and -40 °C environments, respectively. Correspondingly, the strategy significantly increases cruise range of a vehicle operated at cold temperatures, e.g. 49% at -40 °C in simulated US06 driving cycle tests. The present work suggests that smart batteries with embedded sensing/actuation can leapfrog in performance.

  16. The Preliminary Research for Implementation of Improved DTC Scheme of High Performance PMSM Drives

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    Tole Sutikno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct torque control (DTC is one of control approache that is used commonly in PMSM control system. This method supports a very quick and precise torque response. However, the DTC method is not perfect and has some disadvantages. Many researchers have been proposed to modify the basic DTC scheme for PMSM drive. All this contributions allow performance to be improved, but at the same time they lead to more complex schemes. Furthermore, the PMSM drive control systems are usually based on microcontroller and DSP. Some researchers also have been used DSP and FPGA together to develop DTC for AC drives. These allow improving the performance, but they will increase cost. For the reason above, this paper proposed a new DTC scheme to apply only based on FPGA. The preliminary research showed that the proposed DTC sheme can reduce torque and flux ripples significantly. Therefore, this paper also recomend to realize proposed DTC scheme based on FPGA in order to support to execute very fast computation.The implementation is hoped that it will very potential to replace not only the induction motor but also the DC servo motor in a number of industrial process, commercial, domestic and modern military applications of high-performance drive.

  17. Driving performance changes of middle-aged experienced taxi drivers due to distraction tasks during unexpected situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Seung; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Sang-Pyo; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Tack, Gye-Rae; Kim, Boseong; Min, Ung-Chan; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of distraction taskssuch as sending a text message with a cellphone and searching navigation with car navigation system-on the driving performance of 29 highly experienced taxi drivers in their 50s. All participants were instructed to drive using a driving simulator for 2 min. while maintaining a constant distance from the vehicle in front and a constant speed. Participants drove without any distractions for the first minute. For an additional minute, they performed Driving Only or performed a task while driving (Driving + Sending Text Message or Driving + Searching Navigation). An unexpected situation, in which the participant had to stop abruptly due to a sudden stop of the preceding vehicle, occurred during this period. Driving performance during the unexpected situation was evaluated by car control variables, medial-lateral coefficient of variation and brake time, and by motion variables such as the jerk-cost function. Compared to Driving Only, jerk-cost function, medial-lateral coefficient of variation, and brake time increased during Driving + Sending Text Message or Driving + Searching Navigation.

  18. Occupational driver safety: conceptualising a leadership-based intervention to improve safe driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, Sharon; Lewis, Ioni; Watson, Barry

    2012-03-01

    Occupational driving crashes are the most common cause of death and injury in the workplace. The physical and psychological outcomes following injury are also very costly to organizations. Thus, safe driving poses a managerial challenge. Some research has attempted to address this issue through modifying discrete and often simple target behaviours (e.g., driver training programs). However, current intervention approaches in the occupational driving field generally consider the role of organizational factors in workplace safety. This study adopts the A-B-C framework to identify the contingencies associated with an effective exchange of safety information within the occupational driving context. Utilizing a sample of occupational drivers and their supervisors, this multi-level study examines the contingencies associated with the exchange of safety information within the supervisor-driver relationship. Safety values are identified as an antecedent of the safety information exchange, and the quality of the leader-member exchange relationship and safe driving performance is identified as the behavioural consequences. We also examine the function of role overload as a factor influencing the relationship between safety values and the safety information exchange. Hierarchical linear modelling found that role overload moderated the relationship between supervisors' perceptions of the value given to safety and the safety information exchange. A significant relationship was also found between the safety information exchange and the subsequent quality of the leader-member exchange relationship. Finally, the quality of the leader-member exchange relationship was found to be significantly associated with safe driving performance. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Safe driving in a green world: a review of driver performance benchmarks and technologies to support 'smart' driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark S; Birrell, Stewart A; Stanton, Neville A

    2011-05-01

    Road transport is a significant source of both safety and environmental concerns. With climate change and fuel prices increasingly prominent on social and political agendas, many drivers are turning their thoughts to fuel efficient or 'green' (i.e., environmentally friendly) driving practices. Many vehicle manufacturers are satisfying this demand by offering green driving feedback or advice tools. However, there is a legitimate concern regarding the effects of such devices on road safety--both from the point of view of change in driving styles, as well as potential distraction caused by the in-vehicle feedback. In this paper, we appraise the benchmarks for safe and green driving, concluding that whilst they largely overlap, there are some specific circumstances in which the goals are in conflict. We go on to review current and emerging in-vehicle information systems which purport to affect safe and/or green driving, and discuss some fundamental ergonomics principles for the design of such devices. The results of the review are being used in the Foot-LITE project, aimed at developing a system to encourage 'smart'--that is safe and green--driving. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Good distractions: Testing the effects of listening to an audiobook on driving performance in simple and complex road environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Robert J; Trick, Lana M; Toxopeus, Ryan

    2018-02-01

    Distracted driving (driving while performing a secondary task) causes many collisions. Most research on distracted driving has focused on operating a cell-phone, but distracted driving can include eating while driving, conversing with passengers or listening to music or audiobooks. Although the research has focused on the deleterious effects of distraction, there may be situations where distraction improves driving performance. Fatigue and boredom are also associated with collision risk and it is possible that secondary tasks can help alleviate the effects of fatigue and boredom. Furthermore, it has been found that individuals with high levels of executive functioning as measured by the OSPAN (Operation Span) task show better driving while multitasking. In this study, licensed drivers were tested in a driving simulator (a car body surrounded by screens) that simulated simple or complex roads. Road complexity was manipulated by increasing traffic, scenery, and the number of curves in the drive. Participants either drove, or drove while listening to an audiobook. Driving performance was measured in terms of braking response time to hazards (HRT): the time required to brake in response to pedestrians or vehicles that suddenly emerged from the periphery into the path of the vehicle, speed, standard deviation of speed, standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP). Overall, braking times to hazards were higher on the complex drive than the simple one, though the effects of secondary tasks such as audiobooks were especially deleterious on the complex drive. In contrast, on the simple drive, driving while listening to an audiobook lead to faster HRT. We found evidence that individuals with high OSPAN scores had faster HRTs when listening to an audiobook. These results suggest that there are environmental and individual factors behind difference in the allocation of attention while listening to audiobooks while driving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 'I didn't see that coming': simulated visual fields and driving hazard perception test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Fiona C; Smith, Nicholas D; Jones, Lee; Crabb, David P

    2016-09-01

    Evidence is limited regarding specific types of visual field loss associated with unsafe driving. We use novel gaze-contingent software to examine the effect of simulated visual field loss on computer-based driving hazard detection with the specific aim of testing the impact of scotomata located to the right and left of fixation. The 'hazard perception test' is a component of the UK driving licence examination, which measures speed of detecting 15 different hazards in a series of real-life driving films. We have developed a novel eye-tracking and computer set up capable of generating a realistic gaze-contingent scotoma simulation (GazeSS) overlaid on film content. Thirty drivers with healthy vision completed three versions of the hazard perception test in a repeated measures experiment. In two versions, GazeSS simulated a scotoma in the binocular field of view to the left or right of fixation. A third version was unmodified to establish baseline performance. Participants' mean baseline hazard perception test score was 51 ± 7 (out of 75). This reduced to 46 ± 9 and 46 ± 11 when completing the task with a binocular visual field defect located to the left and right of fixation, respectively. While the main effect of simulated visual field loss on performance was statistically significant (p = 0.007), there were no average differences in the experimental conditions where a scotoma was located in the binocular visual field to the right or left of fixation. Simulated visual field loss impairs driving hazard detection on a computer-based test. There was no statistically significant difference in average performance when the simulated scotoma was located to the right or left of fixation of the binocular visual field, but certain types of hazard caused more difficulties than others. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  2. Performance measurement of the upgraded Microcab-H4 with academic drive cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthfi Rais

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The original Microcab-H4, a hybrid fuel cell car, was tested with Academic drive cycle. After several years, the car was upgraded and tested with the ECE 15 drive cycle. The result showed the car has higher energy efficiency. However, the result could not be compared to the original car due to different drive cycle test. This research was done to measure the performance and energy efficiency of the Upgraded Microcab-H4 with Academic drive cycle. The measure of car energy efficiency was done through four tests: Run on battery, run on battery and Ballard fuel cell, and run on battery, Ballard, and Horizon fuel cell. The energy efficiency was calculated based on the hydrogen consumption after 5 cycles. The lowest energy efficiency was run on battery and Ballard fuel cell with (1.01 km/MJ. The highest energy efficiency was run on battery, Ballard, and Horizon fuel cells (1.10 km/MJ, which is higher than previous tests.

  3. Obstacle avoidance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior of glaucoma patients in a driving simulator : A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prado Vega, R.; Van Leeuwen, P.M.; Rendon Velez, E.; Lemij, H.G.; De Winter, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in driving performance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior between glaucoma patients and control participants without glaucoma. Glaucoma patients (n = 23) and control participants (n = 12) completed four 5-min driving

  4. Dynamic neural networks based on-line identification and control of high performance motor drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubaai, Ahmed; Kotaru, Raj

    1995-01-01

    In the automated and high-tech industries of the future, there wil be a need for high performance motor drives both in the low-power range and in the high-power range. To meet very straight demands of tracking and regulation in the two quadrants of operation, advanced control technologies are of a considerable interest and need to be developed. In response a dynamics learning control architecture is developed with simultaneous on-line identification and control. the feature of the proposed approach, to efficiently combine the dual task of system identification (learning) and adaptive control of nonlinear motor drives into a single operation is presented. This approach, therefore, not only adapts to uncertainties of the dynamic parameters of the motor drives but also learns about their inherent nonlinearities. In fact, most of the neural networks based adaptive control approaches in use have an identification phase entirely separate from the control phase. Because these approaches separate the identification and control modes, it is not possible to cope with dynamic changes in a controlled process. Extensive simulation studies have been conducted and good performance was observed. The robustness characteristics of neuro-controllers to perform efficiently in a noisy environment is also demonstrated. With this initial success, the principal investigator believes that the proposed approach with the suggested neural structure can be used successfully for the control of high performance motor drives. Two identification and control topologies based on the model reference adaptive control technique are used in this present analysis. No prior knowledge of load dynamics is assumed in either topology while the second topology also assumes no knowledge of the motor parameters.

  5. Highly loaded multi-stage fan drive turbine: Performance of final three configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, D. G.; Thomas, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    Results for a three-stage highly loaded fan drive turbine follow-on test program are presented. The effects of combinations of tandem and leaned bladerows on three-stage turbine performance were tested. The three-stage turbine with a tandem stator in stage two exhibited a total-to-total efficiency of approximately 0.887 as compared to 0.886 for the plain blade turbine base case.

  6. Effects of in-car support on mental workload and driving performance of older drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidse, Ragnhild J; Hagenzieker, Marjan P; van Wolffelaar, Peter C; Brouwer, Wiebo H

    2009-08-01

    This study examined the extent to which driving performance of 10 older (70-88 years old) and 30 younger participants (30-50 years old) improves as a result of support by a driver assistance system. Various studies have indicated that advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) may provide tailored assistance for older drivers and thereby improve their safe mobility. While drivers followed an urban route in a driving simulator, an ADAS provided them with prior knowledge on the next intersection. The system was evaluated in terms of effects on workload and safety performance. Messages informing drivers about the right-of-way regulation, obstructed view of an intersection, and safe gaps to join or cross traffic streams led to safer driving performance. A message regarding an unexpected one-way street led to fewer route errors. In general, effects were the same for all age groups. Workload was not reduced by the support system. The evaluated support system shows promising effects for all age groups. Longer evaluation periods are needed to determine long-term effects. The messages provided by the evaluated system are currently not provided by existing ADAS such as advanced cruise control and navigation systems, but they could possibly be added to them in the future.

  7. Effect of meal glycemic load and caffeine consumption on prolonged monotonous driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Christopher; Desbrow, Ben; Hall, Susan; Irwin, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    Monotonous driving involves low levels of stimulation and high levels of repetition and is essentially an exercise in sustained attention and vigilance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of consuming a high or low glycemic load meal on prolonged monotonous driving performance. The effect of consuming caffeine with a high glycemic load meal was also examined. Ten healthy, non-diabetic participants (7 males, age 51±7yrs, mean±SD) completed a repeated measures investigation involving 3 experimental trials. On separate occasions, participants were provided one of three treatments prior to undertaking a 90min computer-based simulated drive. The 3 treatment conditions involved consuming: (1) a low glycemic load meal+placebo capsules (LGL), (2) a high glycemic load meal+placebo capsules (HGL) and (3) a high glycemic load meal+caffeine capsules (3mgkg -1 body weight) (CAF). Measures of driving performance included lateral (standard deviation of lane position (SDLP), average lane position (AVLP), total number of lane crossings (LC)) and longitudinal (average speed (AVSP) and standard deviation of speed (SDSP)) vehicle control parameters. Blood glucose levels, plasma caffeine concentrations and subjective ratings of sleepiness, alertness, mood, hunger and simulator sickness were also collected throughout each trial. No difference in either lateral or longitudinal vehicle control parameters or subjective ratings were observed between HGL and LGL treatments. A significant reduction in SDLP (0.36±0.20m vs 0.41±0.19m, p=0.004) and LC (34.4±31.4 vs 56.7±31.5, p=0.018) was observed in the CAF trial compared to the HGL trial. However, no differences in AVLP, AVSP and SDSP or subjective ratings were detected between these two trials (p>0.05). Altering the glycemic load of a breakfast meal had no effect on measures of monotonous driving performance in non-diabetic adults. Individuals planning to undertake a prolonged monotonous drive following consumption of a

  8. Challenges and Opportunities of Very Light High-Performance Electric Drives for Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Henke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The demand for alternative fueling methods to reduce the need for fossil fuels is not limited to the electrification of ground vehicles. More-electric and all-electric aircraft pose challenges, with extensive requirements in terms of power density, efficiency, safety, and environmental sustainability. This paper focuses on electrical machines and their components, especially for high-power applications like the main propulsion. The electrical machine is evaluated from different aspects, followed by a closer look at the components and materials to determine the suitability of the current standard materials and advanced technologies. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal aspects are reviewed, including new and innovative concepts for the cooling of windings and for the use of additive manufacturing. Aircraft have special demands regarding weight and installation space. Following recent developments and looking ahead to the future, the need and the possibilities for light and efficient electrical machines are addressed. All of the approaches and developments presented lead to a better understanding of the challenges to be expected and highlight the upcoming opportunities in electrical machine design for the use of electric motors and generators in future aircraft. Several prototypes of electrical machines for smaller aircraft already exist, such as the electric drive of the Siemens powered Extra 330LE. The focus of this paper is to provide an overview of current technical possibilities and technical interrelations of high performance electric drives for aviation. A 1 MW drive is exemplified to present the possibilities for future drives for airplanes carrying a larger number of passengers. All presented techniques can also be applied to other drive power classes.

  9. Effects of Fat Grip Training on Muscular Strength and Driving Performance in Division I Male Golfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Patrick M; Waldman, Hunter S; Krings, Ben M; Smith, JohnEric W; McAllister, Matthew J

    2018-01-01

    Cummings, PM, Waldman, HS, Krings, BM, Smith, JW, and McAllister, MJ. Effects of fat grip training on muscular strength and driving performance in division I male golfers. J Strength Cond Res 32(1): 205-210, 2018-Fat grip (FG) training is implemented into strength and conditioning programs with the overall goal of increasing grip strength. Previous research assessing the effect of training with increased grip diameters compared with standard Olympic bar diameters has mainly been in acute settings. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine to effects FG training compared with normal diameter grip (CON) training during an 8-week periodized resistance training (RT) program in division I male golfers. Subjects (n = 10) were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the FG group (n = 5, scoring average: 75.4 ± 2.0) and CON group (n = 5, scoring average: 75.0 ± 0.5). Both groups participated in 8 weeks of RT (3 d·wk). The FG group completed every lift and repetition using FG, compared with the CON training group which used normal diameter bars. Pretraining and posttraining performance variables included swing speed, ball speed, driving distance, driving carry, maximum pull-ups to failure, right and left hand grip strength, and 1 repetition max trap-bar deadlift. The FG group demonstrated significant increases (p ≤ 0.05) in ball speed, carry, drive distance, and left hand grip strength after 8 weeks of RT. In a population, such as low-handicap division I male golfers, FG training may allow for athletes to increase golf-specific performance after 8 weeks of periodized RT. Strength and conditioning coaches may use FG training over the course of a training program with athletes who require adequate grip strength to further elicit training adaptations.

  10. Effects of different blood alcohol concentrations and post-alcohol impairment on driving behavior and task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Ching; Ho, Chin Heng

    2010-08-01

    A study using simulator methodology was conducted to investigate the effects of (1) different blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0, 0.05, 0.08, and 0.10 percent and (2) post-alcohol impairment (where BAC approximately 0%) on driving behavior and subsidiary cognitive task performance. Two driving sessions were investigated, that is, drunk driving and post-alcohol driving, with each requiring approximately 20 min of driving. In addition to driving safely, participants were instructed to perform the critical flicker fusion (CFF) test and completed the NASA-TLX mental workload questionnaire. Eight licensed drivers (6 males, 2 females) participated in this 2 (road complexities) x 2 (simulated driving sessions) x 4 (levels of BAC) within-subjects experiment. The study revealed that higher BAC levels were associated with lower performing driving behavior. The driver's mental workload reached the highest values in the post-alcohol session. In terms of tasks involving divided attention, the traffic sign distance estimation showed significant deterioration with increased BAC levels. The relationship between drunk-driving behavior and alcohol dosage was supported in this study. Noticeably, no significant difference was found between drunk driving and post-alcohol driving, indicating that even in the post-alcohol situation, the impairment still remained significant enough to jeopardize traffic safety as much as it does in the case of drunk driving. In real-life situations, adopting a rest-time strategy to avoid post-alcohol impairment effects may not be the most appropriate solution by drivers; rather, drivers should be given some tests to verify the probability of post-alcohol effects on driving.

  11. Development of a simple driving simulator and determination of the reference range of normative performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Noriaki; Saeki, Satoru; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Katsuya; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    To establish the reference range for assessment items of the 'Simple Driving Simulator' (SiDS) in a normative population and to compare performance of age-matched young adults with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) to this reference data. Normative ranges were calculated from the data of 445 participants in the control group. Three performance ranges were established: 'normal', 'borderline' and 'impaired' defined using standard deviation cutoff values in the control group. The performance of 28 patients with a TBI, aged 18-35 years, was evaluated. The performance score for the TBI group in the 'impaired range' was calculated for each test item and used to make a synthetic judgment regarding the clinical value of the SiDS. In the control group, only 0.6% of the participants exhibited a performance in the impaired range on >2 items, compared to 33.2% for the TBI group. We provide evidence that impaired performance on ≤2 items of the SiDS provides a sensitive criterion of 'driving fitness' in young adults after a TBI.

  12. The relationship between nocturnal polyuria and the distribution of body fluid: assessment by bioelectric impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torimoto, Kazumasa; Hirayama, Akihide; Samma, Shoji; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Increased nocturnal urinary volume is closely associated with nocturia. We investigated the relationship between nocturnal polyuria and the variation of body fluid distribution during the daytime using bioelectric impedance analysis. A total of 34 men older than 60 years were enrolled in this study. A frequency volume chart was recorded. Nocturnal polyuria was defined as a nocturnal urine volume per 24-hour production of greater than 0.35 (the nocturnal polyuria index). Bioelectric impedance analysis was performed 4 times daily at 8 and 11 a.m., and 5 and 9 p.m. using an InBody S20 body composition analyzer (BioSpace, Seoul, Korea). A significant difference was found in mean +/- SEM 24-hour urine production per fat-free mass between the groups with and without nocturnal polyuria (17.8 +/- 1.4 vs 7.7 +/- 0.9 ml/kg). The increase in fluid in the legs compared with the volume at 8 a.m. was significantly larger at 5 p.m., while there was no difference in the arms or trunk. Nocturnal urine volume significantly correlated with the difference in fluid volume in the legs (r = 0.527, p = 0.0019) and extracellular fluid volume (r = 0.3844, p = 0.0248) between the volumes at 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. Overproduction of urine per fat-free mass leads to nocturnal polyuria. Extracellular fluid accumulates as edema in the legs during the day in patients with nocturnal polyuria. The volume of accumulated extracellular fluid correlates with nocturnal urine volume. We suggest that leg edema is the source of nocturnal urine volume and decreasing edema may cure nocturnal polyuria.

  13. Combined vector control and direct torque control method for high performance induction motor drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaez-Zadeh, S.; Jalali, E.

    2007-01-01

    A new control method is proposed for three phase high performance induction motor drives. The control system enjoys the advantages of vector control and direct torque control and avoids some of the implementation difficulties of either of the two control methods. In particular, the proposed control system includes a current vector control in connection with a switching table. An extensive comparative performance evaluation of a motor under the proposed control method confirms the effectiveness of the method and its partial superiority over either vector control or direct torque control despite its relative structural simplicity

  14. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    The FED-A study aims to quantify the potential improvement in cost-effectiveness of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by assuming low safety factor q (less than 2 as opposed to about 3) at the plasma edge and noninductive current drive (as opposed to only inductive current drive). The FED-A performance objectives are set to be : (1) ignition assuming International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) plamsa confinement scaling, but still achieving a fusion power amplification Q greater than or equal to 5 when the confinement is degraded by a factor of 2; (2) neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 , with 0.5 MW/m 2 as a conservative lower bound; and (3) more clearly power-reactor-like operations, such as steady state

  15. Treatment of nocturnal eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael J; Schenck, Carlos H

    2009-09-01

    Identifying abnormal nocturnal eating is critically important for patient care and public health. Obesity is a global pandemic and a leading cause of preventable mortality in the United States, with more than 100,000 deaths annually. Normally, nighttime energy homeostasis is maintained, despite an absence of food intake, through appetite suppression and alterations in glucose metabolism that result in stable energy stores. Two conditions break this nighttime fast and are associated with weight gain as well as medical and neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) is characterized by isolated nocturnal eating, whereas the night-eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian delay in meal timing leading to evening hyperphagia, nocturnal eating, and morning anorexia. Recently, SRED has been associated with the benzodiazepine receptor agonist zolpidem. Both SRED and NES are treatable and represent potentially reversible forms of obesity. In SRED, the antiseizure medication topiramate and dopaminergics have both demonstrated promising results. Nocturnal eating associated with NES has responded well to sertraline.

  16. High-performance adaptive intelligent Direct Torque Control schemes for induction motor drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed comparison between viable adaptive intelligent torque control strategies of induction motor, emphasizing advantages and disadvantages. The scope of this paper is to choose an adaptive intelligent controller for induction motor drive proposed for high performance applications. Induction motors are characterized by complex, highly non-linear, time varying dynamics, inaccessibility of some states and output for measurements and hence can be considered as a challenging engineering problem. The advent of torque and flux control techniques have partially solved induction motor control problems, because they are sensitive to drive parameter variations and performance may deteriorate if conventional controllers are used. Intelligent controllers are considered as potential candidates for such an application. In this paper, the performance of the various sensor less intelligent Direct Torque Control (DTC techniques of Induction motor such as neural network, fuzzy and genetic algorithm based torque controllers are evaluated. Adaptive intelligent techniques are applied to achieve high performance decoupled flux and torque control. This paper contributes: i Development of Neural network algorithm for state selection in DTC; ii Development of new algorithm for state selection using Genetic algorithm principle; and iii Development of Fuzzy based DTC. Simulations have been performed using the trained state selector neural network instead of conventional DTC and Fuzzy controller instead of conventional DTC controller. The results show agreement with those of the conventional DTC.

  17. Effects of two doses of methylphenidate on simulator driving performance in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A; Murphy, Kevin R; O'Connell, Trisha; Connor, Daniel F

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented an increased frequency of vehicular crashes, traffic citations, driving performance deficits, and driving-related cognitive impairments in teens and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The present study evaluated the effects of two single, acute doses of methylphenidate (10 and 20 mg) and a placebo on the driving performance of 53 adults with ADHD (mean age=37 years, range=18-65) using a virtual reality driving simulator, examiner and self-ratings of simulator performance, and a continuous performance test (CPT) to evaluate attention and inhibition. A double-blind, drug-placebo, within-subjects crossover design was used in which all participants were tested at baseline and then experienced all three drug conditions. A significant beneficial effect for the high dose of medication was observed on impulsiveness on CPT, variability of steering in the standard driving course, and driving speed during the obstacle course. A beneficial effect of the low dose of medication also was evident on turn signal use during the standard driving course. An apparent practice effect was noted on some of the simulator measures between the baseline and subsequent testing sessions that may have interacted with and thereby obscured drug effects on those measures. The results, when placed in the context of prior studies of stimulants on driving performance, continue to recommend their clinical use as one means of reducing the driving risks in ADHD teens and adults. Given the significantly higher risk of adverse driving outcomes associated with ADHD, industry needs to better screen for ADHD among employees who drive as part of employment so as to improve safety and reduce costs. Use of stimulants to treat the adult ADHD driver may reduce safety risks.

  18. Modafinil improves real driving performance in patients with hypersomnia: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Pierre; Chaufton, Cyril; Taillard, Jacques; Capelli, Aurore; Coste, Olivier; Léger, Damien; Moore, Nicholas; Sagaspe, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Patients with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) are at high risk for driving accidents, and physicians are concerned by the effect of alerting drugs on driving skills of sleepy patients. No study has up to now investigated the effect of modafinil (a reference drug to treat EDS in patients with hypersomnia) on on-road driving performance of patients suffering from central hypersomnia. The objective is to evaluate in patients with central hypersomnia the effect of a wake-promoting drug on real driving performance and to assess the relationship between objective sleepiness and driving performance. Randomized, crossover, double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted among 13 patients with narcolepsy and 14 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia. Patients were randomly assigned to receive modafinil (400 mg) or placebo for 5 days prior to the driving test. Each condition was separated by at least 3 weeks of washout. Mean number of Inappropriate Line Crossings, Standard Deviation of Lateral Position of the vehicle and mean sleep latency in the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test were assessed. Modafinil reduced the mean number of Inappropriate Line Crossings and Standard Deviation of Lateral Position of the vehicle compared to placebo (F(1,25) = 4.88, P Modafinil improves driving performance in patients with narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia. The Maintenance of Wakefulness Test is a suitable clinical tool to assess fitness to drive in this population.

  19. Driving Performance After Self-Regulated Control Transitions in Highly Automated Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Alexander; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to explore whether driver-paced, noncritical transitions of control may counteract some of the aftereffects observed in the contemporary literature, resulting in higher levels of vehicle control. Research into control transitions in highly automated driving has focused on urgent scenarios where drivers are given a relatively short time span to respond to a request to resume manual control, resulting in seemingly scrambled control when manual control is resumed. Twenty-six drivers drove two scenarios with an automated driving feature activated. Drivers were asked to read a newspaper or monitor the system and relinquish or resume control from the automation when prompted by vehicle systems. Driving performance in terms of lane positioning and steering behavior was assessed for 20 seconds post resuming control to capture the resulting level of control. It was found that lane positioning was virtually unaffected for the duration of the 20-second time span in both automated conditions compared to the manual baseline when drivers resumed manual control; however, significant increases in the standard deviation of steering input were found for both automated conditions compared to baseline. No significant differences were found between the two automated conditions. The results indicate that when drivers self-paced the transfer back to manual control they exhibit less of the detrimental effects observed in system-paced conditions. It was shown that self-paced transitions could reduce the risk of accidents near the edge of the operational design domain. Vehicle manufacturers must consider these benefits when designing contemporary systems.

  20. How do ankle braces affect braking performance? An experimental driving simulation study with healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ulf Krister; Thumm, Stefan; Jordan, Maurice; Mittag, Falk; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Ipach, Ingmar

    2015-11-01

    Fitness to drive a car has been investigated increasingly over recent years. However, most research has focussed on perioperative driving performance, and few data are available on how orthoses influence the ability to perform an emergency stop. This study investigated the effect of 4 common ankle braces (Kallassy, CaligaLoc, Air-Stirrup, ASO) on reaction time, foot transfer time (together: brake response time) and brake force. The hypothesis was that wearing these braces on the right ankle impairs braking performance, specifically by increasing foot transfer time, but also by altering brake force. A car cabin was set up with measurement equipment to register reaction time, foot transfer time, brake response time and brake force under realistic spatial constraints. A crossover repeated measures design was used to test 30 healthy volunteers with and without each of the braces. All 4 braces resulted in statistically significantly increased foot transfer time (p Brake force was not statistically significantly impaired. This study demonstrates that ankle braces lead to impaired braking performance. Depending on the type of brace, a stopping distance increase of more than 1 m at 100 km/h can be expected.

  1. The efficiency and quality dilemma: What drives South African call centre management performance indicators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Banks

    2011-03-01

    Research purpose: This study explored the key performance indicators that drive management practices in the South African call centre industry in the context of the dilemma between efficiency and quality. Motivation for the study: The South African government has identified call centres as a method of creating jobs and foreign investment. Management practices affect centres’ performance. Understanding these practices will help to achieve these aims. Research design: The researchers used a web-based questionnaire in a survey with South African call centre managers in more than 44 different organisations that represented nine industry sectors. Main findings: This study indicated that the dilemma between efficiency and quality is prevalent in South African call centres and that efficiency key performance indicators drive management practices. Practical/managerial implications: The inconsistencies the study reported mean that South African organisations should assess the alignment between their organisational visions, the strategic intentions of their call centres and the performance measures they use to assess their call centre managers. Contribution/value-add: This study adds to the relatively small amount of empirical research available on the call centre industry in South Africa. It contributes to the industry’s attempt to position itself favourably for local and international outsourcing opportunities.

  2. Optimising homing endonuclease gene drive performance in a semi-refractory species: the Drosophila melanogaster experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk-Sang Chan

    Full Text Available Homing endonuclease gene (HEG drive is a promising insect population control technique that employs meganucleases to impair the fitness of pest populations. Our previous studies showed that HEG drive was more difficult to achieve in Drosophila melanogaster than Anopheles gambiae and we therefore investigated ways of improving homing performance in Drosophila. We show that homing in Drosophila responds to increased expression of HEGs specifically during the spermatogonia stage and this could be achieved through improved construct design. We found that 3'-UTR choice was important to maximise expression levels, with HEG activity increasing as we employed Hsp70, SV40, vasa and βTub56D derived UTRs. We also searched for spermatogonium-specific promoters and found that the Rcd-1r promoter was able to drive specific expression at this stage. Since Rcd-1 is a regulator of differentiation in other species, it suggests that Rcd-1r may serve a similar role during spermatogonial differentiation in Drosophila. Contrary to expectations, a fragment containing the entire region between the TBPH gene and the bgcn translational start drove strong HEG expression only during late spermatogenesis rather than in the germline stem cells and spermatogonia as expected. We also observed that the fraction of targets undergoing homing was temperature-sensitive, falling nearly four-fold when the temperature was lowered to 18°C. Taken together, this study demonstrates how a few simple measures can lead to substantial improvements in the HEG-based gene drive strategy and reinforce the idea that the HEG approach may be widely applicable to a variety of insect control programs.

  3. Static Analysis of High-Performance Fixed Fluid Power Drive with a Single Positive-Displacement Hydraulic Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Nikitin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the static calculations in designing a high-performance fixed fluid power drive with a single positive-displacement hydraulic motor. Designing is aimed at using a drive that is under development and yet unavailable to find and record the minimum of calculations and maximum of existing hydraulic units that enable clear and unambiguous performance, taking into consideration an available assortment of hydraulic units of hydraulic drives, to have the best efficiency.The specified power (power, moment and kinematics (linear velocity or angular velocity of rotation parameters of the output element of hydraulic motor determine the main output parameters of the hydraulic drive and the useful power of the hydraulic drive under development. The value of the overall efficiency of the hydraulic drive enables us to judge the efficiency of high-performance fixed fluid power drive.The energy analysis of a diagram of the high-performance fixed fluid power drive shows that its high efficiency is achieved when the flow rate of fluid flowing into each cylinder and the magnitude of the feed pump unit (pump are as nearly as possible.The paper considers the ways of determining the geometric parameters of working hydromotors (effective working area or working volume, which allow a selection of the pumping unit parameters. It discusses the ways to improve hydraulic drive efficiency. Using the principle of holding constant conductivity allows us to specify the values of the pressure losses in the hydraulic units used in noncatalog modes. In case of no exact matching between the parameters of existing hydraulic power modes and a proposed characteristics of the pump unit, the nearest to the expected characteristics is taken as a working version.All of the steps allow us to create the high-performance fixed fluid power drive capable of operating at the required power and kinematic parameters with high efficiency.

  4. Investigating the autonomic nervous system and cognitive functions as potential mediators of an association between cardiovascular disease and driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Jeffrey; Bélanger, Mathieu F; Corriveau, Hélène; Mekary, Said; Hay, Dean; Johnson, Michel J

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) impacts the autonomic nervous system and cognitive functions related to activities of daily living, including driving an automobile. Although CVD has been linked to unsafe driving, mechanisms underlying this relationship remain elusive. The aim of this study was to examine the role of cognitive functions and the autonomic nervous system as potential mediators of driving performance. Nineteen individuals having recently suffered a cardiac event and 16 individuals with no history of CVD completed a simulated drive using a STISIM simulator to assess driving performance. Heart rate was recorded throughout testing using a Polar RS800CX heart rate monitor, and measures of executive, orienting, and alerting functions were obtained through the Attention Network Test. We used the Baron and Kenny analysis method to assess potential mediating effects of the relationship between CVD and driving performance. Executive function was the only potential mediator investigated to be associated with driving (p driving and that further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying this relationship.

  5. Data-driven HR how to use analytics and metrics to drive performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marr, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Traditionally seen as a purely people function unconcerned with numbers, HR is now uniquely placed to use company data to drive performance, both of the people in the organization and the organization as a whole. Data-driven HR is a practical guide which enables HR practitioners to leverage the value of the vast amount of data available at their fingertips. Covering how to identify the most useful sources of data, how to collect information in a transparent way that is in line with data protection requirements and how to turn this data into tangible insights, this book marks a turning point for the HR profession. Covering all the key elements of HR including recruitment, employee engagement, performance management, wellbeing and training, Data-driven HR examines the ways data can contribute to organizational success by, among other things, optimizing processes, driving performance and improving HR decision making. Packed with case studies and real-life examples, this is essential reading for all HR profession...

  6. Effects of two doses of alcohol on simulator driving performance in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A; Murphy, Kevin R; O'Connell, Trisha; Anderson, Deborah; Connor, Daniel F

    2006-01-01

    Prior studies have documented greater impairments in driving performance and greater alcohol consumption among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study examined whether alcohol consumption produces a differentially greater impairment in driving among adults with ADHD in comparison to a community control group. The present study compared 50 adults with ADHD (mean age 33 years) and 40 control adults (mean age 29 years) on the effects of 2 single, acute doses of alcohol (0.04 and 0.08 blood alcohol concentration) and a placebo on their driving performance. The authors used a virtual reality driving simulator, examiner and self-ratings of simulator performance, and a continuous performance test (CPT) to evaluate attention and inhibition. Approximately half of the adults in each group were randomized to either the low or high dose alcohol treatment arms. Alcohol consumption produced a greater impact on the CPT inattention measures of the ADHD than the control group. Similar results were obtained for the behavioral observations taken during the operation of the driving simulator. Driving simulator scores, however, showed mainly a deleterious effect of alcohol on all participants but no differentially greater effect on the ADHD group. The present results demonstrated that alcohol may have a greater detrimental effect on some aspects of driving performance in ADHD than control adults.

  7. PERFORMANCE STUDIES OF INTEGRATED FUZZY LOGIC CONTROLLER FOR BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR DRIVES USING ADVANCED SIMULATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Subba Rami Reddy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an Integrated fuzzy logic controller (IFLC for brushless dc (BLDC motor drives using advanced simulation model and presents a comparative study of performances of PID controller and IFLC. The dynamic characteristics of speed and torque are effectively monitored and analyzed using the proposed model. The aim of IFLC is to obtain improved performance in terms of disturbance rejection or parameter variation than obtained using PID controller. The IFLC is constructed by using Fuzzy logic controller (FLC and PID controller. A performance comparison of the controllers is also given based on the integral of the absolute value of the error (IAE, the integral of the squared error (ISE, the integral of the time-weighted absolute error (ITAE and the integral of the time-weighted squared error (ITSE. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  8. Nocturnality in dinosaurs inferred from scleral ring and orbit morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke

    2011-05-06

    Variation in daily activity patterns facilitates temporal partitioning of habitat and resources among species. Knowledge of temporal niche partitioning in paleobiological systems has been limited by the difficulty of obtaining reliable information about activity patterns from fossils. On the basis of an analysis of scleral ring and orbit morphology in 33 archosaurs, including dinosaurs and pterosaurs, we show that the eyes of Mesozoic archosaurs were adapted to all major types of diel activity (that is, nocturnal, diurnal, and cathemeral) and provide concrete evidence of temporal niche partitioning in the Mesozoic. Similar to extant amniotes, flyers were predominantly diurnal; terrestrial predators, at least partially, nocturnal; and large herbivores, cathemeral. These similarities suggest that ecology drives the evolution of diel activity patterns.

  9. Drivers' smart advisory system improves driving performance at STOP sign intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available STOP signs are often physically blocked by obstacles at the corner, forming a safety threat. To enhance the safety at an un-signalized intersection like a STOP sign intersection, a radio frequency identification (RFID based drivers smart advisory system (DSAS was developed, which provides drivers with an earlier warning message when they are approaching an un-signalized intersection. In this research, a pilot field test was conducted with the DSAS alarm on an approach towards a STOP sign intersection in a residential area in Houston, Texas. The designed test route covers all turning movements, including left turn, through movement, and right turn. GPS units recorded test drivers' driving behaviors. A self-developed MATLAB program and statistically significant difference t-test were applied to analyze the impacts of the DSAS messages on drivers' driving performance, in terms of approaching speed profile, acceleration/deceleration rates, braking distance, and possible extra vehicle emissions induced by the introduction of the DSAS message. Drivers' preference on the DSAS was investigated by a designed survey questionnaire among test drivers. Results showed that the DSAS alarm was able to induce drivers to drive significantly slower to approach a STOP sign intersection, perform smaller fluctuation in acceleration/deceleration rates, and be more aware of a coming STOP sign indicated by decelerating earlier. All test drivers preferred to follow the DSAS alarm on roads for a safety concern. Further, the DSAS alarm caused the reduction in emission rates through movement. For a general observation, more road tests with more participants and different test routes were recommended.

  10. Electric drives

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    ENERGY CONVERSION IN ELECTRIC DRIVESElectric Drives: A DefinitionApplication Range of Electric DrivesEnergy Savings Pay Off RapidlyGlobal Energy Savings Through PEC DrivesMotor/Mechanical Load MatchMotion/Time Profile MatchLoad Dynamics and StabilityMultiquadrant OperationPerformance IndexesProblemsELECTRIC MOTORS FOR DRIVESElectric Drives: A Typical ConfigurationElectric Motors for DrivesDC Brush MotorsConventional AC MotorsPower Electronic Converter Dependent MotorsEnergy Conversion in Electric Motors/GeneratorsPOWER ELECTRONIC CONVERTERS (PECs) FOR DRIVESPower Electronic Switches (PESs)The

  11. The effect of the global positioning system on the driving performance of people with mild Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jewel; Lee, Hoe Chung-Yeung; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    The initial symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include attention deficits, memory loss and deficiencies in topographic and spatial orientation. People with AD may have way-finding difficulties in driving due to the deterioration of their navigation ability. Although the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been proven to be a useful aid for older people in driving, there is no evidence to suggest that the benefit could extend to drivers with AD. This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of the GPS in assisting drivers with mild AD in finding their destination safely. Twenty-eight drivers with mild to very mild AD, diagnosed by a general practitioner or a psychogeriatrician, completed all clinical and psychometric assessments including the Mini Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test B and Doors and People Test. During the driving assessment, 3 driving trials with different settings (normal, visual-only and audio-only) of the GPS were administered to all participants. The participants were required to follow instructions from the GPS and perform a variety of driving tasks on a driving simulator. The driving performances of participants were assessed by criteria specific to AD drivers. The driving assessment criteria were first combined to form the overall driving performance score: a higher score indicated a better overall driving performance. The other outcome of this study was the success of participants to navigate to a predetermined destination. The driving performance of participants was different among the 3 settings (F = 72.8, p driving performance score was highest in the audio-only setting (mean: 20.0, SD: 2.2), moderate in the normal setting (mean: 16.7, SD: 2.6) and lowest in the visual-only setting (mean: 14.3, SD: 3.3). When compared with the visual-only setting, drivers using the audio-only setting (OR: 37.2, 95% CI: 9.2-151.2) and normal setting (OR: 37.2, 95% CI: 4.8-286.9) were more likely to successfully find their

  12. The Effect of High and Low Antiepileptic Drug Dosage on Simulated Driving Performance in Person's with Seizures: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Crizzle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prior studies examining driving performance have not examined the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AED’s or their dosages in persons with epilepsy. AED’s are the primary form of treatment to control seizures, but they are shown to affect cognition, attention, and vision, all which may impair driving. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of high and low AED dosages on simulated driving performance in persons with seizures. Method: Patients (N = 11; mean age 42.1 ± 6.3; 55% female; 100% Caucasian were recruited from the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit and had their driving assessed on a simulator. Results: No differences emerged in total or specific types of driving errors between high and low AED dosages. However, high AED drug dosage was significantly associated with errors of lane maintenance (r = .67, p < .05 and gap acceptance (r = .66, p < .05. The findings suggest that higher AED dosages may adversely affect driving performance, irrespective of having a diagnosis of epilepsy, conversion disorder, or other medical conditions. Conclusion: Future studies with larger samples are required to examine whether AED dosage or seizure focus alone can impair driving performance in persons with and without seizures.

  13. Secondary Nocturnal Enuresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... self-esteem, and adverse effects on self-perception, interpersonal relationships, quality of life, and school performance. What ... in, can help with the wetting. Moisture alarm therapy and medications are available, and your healthcare provider ...

  14. Temperature-dependent shifts in herbivore performance and interactions drive nonlinear changes in crop damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangles, Olivier; Herrera, Mario; Mazoyer, Charlotte; Silvain, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    Understanding how and to what extent the influence of temperature on physiological performance scales up to interspecific interactions and process rate patterns remains a major scientific challenge faced by ecologists. Here, we combined approaches developed by two conceptual frameworks in ecology, the stress-gradient hypothesis (SGH), and the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship (B-EF), to test the hypothesis that interspecific difference in thermal performance modulates multiple species interactions along a thermal stress (SGH) and the subsequent richness effects on process rates (B-EF). We designed an experiment using three species of herbivorous agricultural pests with different thermal optima for which we determined how temperature influences the direction and the strength of interaction and subsequent richness effects on crop damage (7 species interaction treatments × 6 temperature treatments × 10 replicates). We showed that both biotic interactions and species richness effects drive variations in crop damages along a thermal stress gradient, and thus have the potential to drive agro-system responses to climate change. To help explain and generalize underlying mechanisms of richness effects on process rates, we further proposed a conceptual model that views interaction outcomes as shifting between positive and negative along a thermal stress depending on species thermal optima. Overall, our study demonstrates that nonlinear effects of temperature on process rates must be a major concern in terms of prediction and management of the consequences of global warming. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Sleepiness, long distance commuting and night work as predictors of driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Milia, Lee; Rogers, Naomi L; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of working night shift and long distance commuting. We examined the association between several sleep related and demographic variables, commuting distance, night work and use of mobile phones on driving performance. We used a prospective design to recruit participants and conducted a telephone survey (n = 649). The survey collected demographic and journey details, work and sleep history and driving performance concerning the day the participant was recruited. Participants also completed the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Night workers reported significantly more sleepiness, shorter sleep duration and commuting longer distances. Seven variables were significant predictors of lane crossing. The strongest predictor was acute sleepiness (OR = 5.25, CI, 1.42-19.49, psleep in the previous 48 hours (OR = 2.58, CI, 1.03-6.46, pmobile phones during the journey (OR = 1.90, CI, 1.10-3.27, pSleep related variables, long-distance commuting and night work have a major impact on lane crossing. Several interventions should be considered to reduce the level of sleepiness in night workers.

  16. Boost Converter Fed High Performance BLDC Drive for Solar PV Array Powered Air Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Rani Depuru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the utilization of a DC-DC boost converter as a mediator between a Solar Photovoltaic (SPV array and the Voltage Source Inverters (VSI in an SPV array powered air cooling system to attain maximum efficiency. The boost converter, over the various common DC-DC converters, offers many advantages in SPV based applications. Further, two Brushless DC (BLDC motors are employed in the proposed air cooling system: one to run the centrifugal water pump and the other to run a fan-blower. Employing a BLDC motor is found to be the best option because of its top efficiency, supreme reliability and better performance over a wide range of speeds. The air cooling system is developed and simulated using the MATLAB/Simulink environment considering the steady state variation in the solar irradiance. Further, the efficiency of BLDC drive system is compared with a conventional Permanent Magnet DC (PMDC motor drive system and from the simulated results it is found that the proposed system performs better.

  17. [NPT: nocturnal penile tumescence test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, F; Fenice, O; Austoni, E

    1994-09-01

    The recording of the variations of penile tumescence and rigidity during nocturnal unconscious erections that usually occur with the REM phases of sleep, has been considered the diagnostic tool of choice in the workup of erectile disturbances for a number of years. Such a success is partly due to its absence of invasiveness. Moreover this test was believed to allow to differentiate between the psychogenic and organic origin of impotence. As some authors have recently reported, anxiety state (common among patients who undergo invasive andrological procedure in the office) can at times influence the content of the dream state, thus negatively affecting the spontaneous nocturnal erections. Besides, sleep disturbances such as apnea and motor agitation can also induce erroneous interpretations of NPT graphs. Further, dysfunctions at the level of the cortex and the spine still allow the occurrence of nocturnal tumescence but determine an erectile deficit in the awake state. Clinically, all this poses new questions about the effectiveness of the NPT test in the study of the origin of impotence. The diagnostic methods, despite its world-wide diffusion, remains, under certain aspects, obscure: the operative details and, above all, its interpretative criteria. All this impedes the achievement of uniformity in the evaluation of the results obtained thanks to this test (e.g. the number and duration of erectile episodes, the interpretation of tumescence on its own, of the basal-apical dissociation, of the erectile episodes occurring immediately before waking, and of those of short duration).

  18. Evaluation of Rutting Performance of Asphalt Mixture with Driving Wheel Pavement Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rutting is common pavement distress, which leads to lower riding comfort for road users and high maintenance costs. One of the commonly used tests is the simulation test with wheel tracking devices. Here, a new rutting test system has been developed based on the “Driving Wheel Pavement Analyzer” (DWPA to evaluate the rutting performance of asphalt mixtures. This study conducted three types of rutting tests to validate feasibility, reliability, and accuracy of DWPA test. The results indicated that the DWPA test provided more information on ruts and enabled us to distinguish the performance of materials. The CDWPA index is better suited to reflect the rutting resistance of the material, which is highly correlated to the APA rutting index and the rutting test index of China according to the grey relational analysis results.

  19. The Roles and Performance of Professional Driving Instructors in Novice Driver Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulhaidi M. Jawi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article aimed to analyse existing literature regarding the roles and performance of professional driving instructors (PDIs in novice driver education (DE. A systematic classification scheme was adopted to analyse identified articles to determine the study context of PDIs in novice DE, the competency level of PDIs in relation to experienced and learner drivers and the contributions of PDIs to the novice driver learning process. A total of 14 original research articles were identified, with no systematic reviews or meta-analyses available. Overall, all of the articles were found to be inadequate in providing an in-depth understanding of the roles and performance of PDIs in novice DE. There is an urgent need to improve current understanding of the roles of PDIs in novice DE and to work towards an internationally recognised PDI management approach.

  20. The efficiency and quality dilemma: What drives South African call centre management performance indicators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Banks

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Call centres have become principal channels of communication with customers. Therefore, companies attempt to reduce costs and improve the quality of their interactions with customers simultaneously. These objectives are often conflicting and call centre managers struggle to balance the efficiency and quality priorities of the business.Research purpose: This study explored the key performance indicators that drive management practices in the South African call centre industry in the context of the dilemma between efficiency and quality.Motivation for the study: The South African government has identified call centres as a method of creating jobs and foreign investment. Management practices affect centres’ performance. Understanding these practices will help to achieve these aims.Research design: The researchers used a web-based questionnaire in a survey with South African call centre managers in more than 44 different organisations that represented nine industry sectors.Main findings: This study indicated that the dilemma between efficiency and quality is prevalent in South African call centres and that efficiency key performance indicators drive management practices.Practical/managerial implications: The inconsistencies the study reported mean that South African organisations should assess the alignment between their organisational visions, the strategic intentions of their call centres and the performance measures they use to assess their call centre managers.Contribution/value-add: This study adds to the relatively small amount of empirical research available on the call centre industry in South Africa. It contributes to the industry’s attempt to position itself favourably for local and international outsourcing opportunities.

  1. The effects of music on time perception and performance of a driving game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, G G; Macdonald, R A R

    2010-12-01

    There is an established and growing body of evidence highlighting that music can influence behavior across a range of diverse domains (Miell, MacDonald, & Hargreaves 2005). One area of interest is the monitoring of "internal timing mechanisms", with features such as tempo, liking, perceived affective nature and everyday listening contexts implicated as important (North & Hargreaves, 2008). The current study addresses these issues by comparing the effects of self-selected and experimenter-selected music (fast and slow) on actual and perceived performance of a driving game activity. Seventy participants completed three laps of a driving game in seven sound conditions: (1) silence; (2) car sounds; (3) car sounds with self-selected music, and car sounds with experimenter-selected music; (4) high-arousal (70 bpm); (5) high-arousal (130 bpm); (6) low-arousal (70 bpm); and (7) low-arousal (130 bpm) music. Six performance measures (time, accuracy, speed, and retrospective perception of these), and four experience measures (perceived distraction, liking, appropriateness and enjoyment) were taken. Exposure to self-selected music resulted in overestimation of elapsed time and inaccuracy, while benefiting accuracy and experience. In contrast, exposure to experimenter-selected music resulted in poorest performance and experience. Increasing the tempo of experimenter-selected music resulted in faster performance and increased inaccuracy for high-arousal music, but did not impact experience. It is suggested that personal meaning and subjective associations connected to self-selected music promoted increased engagement with the activity, overriding detrimental effects attributed to unfamiliar, less liked and less appropriate experimenter-selected music. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  2. Tuning and objective performance evaluation of a driving simulator to investigate tyre behaviour in on-centre handling manoeuvres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoni, F.; Galante, F.; Pernetti, M.; Russo, M.; Terzo, M.; Toscano, M.

    2011-09-01

    Driving simulation aims at reproducing, within a safe and controlled environment, sensorial stimuli as close to those perceived during the actual drive as possible, in order to induce driving behaviour similar to the real one. This paper illustrates an activity carried out on the driving simulator Virtual Environment for Road Safety, bound for system performance optimisation while dealing with subjective and objective tyres evaluation in the field of on-centre manoeuvres. Such activity can be divided into two main steps. The first one, described herewith, has been focusing on platform motion algorithms tuning and has led to driving simulator objective validation within the on-centre range. Device capability of reproducing dynamics, worked out by the vehicle model, has been thoroughly examined. Simulator sensitivity to a few tyre parameters influencing vehicle lateral dynamics has been analysed too. The second step - calling for the support of experienced drivers - will pursue subjective validation.

  3. Implications of driving patterns on well-to-wheel performance of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Leon; MacLean, Heather L; Roorda, Matthew J

    2012-06-05

    This study examines how driving patterns (distance and conditions) and the electricity generation supply interact to impact well-to-wheel (WTW) energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW performance of a PHEV is compared with that of a similar (nonplug-in) gasoline hybrid electric vehicle and internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV). Driving PHEVs for short distances between recharging generally results in lower WTW total and fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kilometer compared to driving long distances, but the extent of the reductions depends on the electricity supply. For example, the shortest driving pattern in this study with hydroelectricity uses 81% less fossil energy than the longest driving pattern. However, the shortest driving pattern with coal-based electricity uses only 28% less fossil energy. Similar trends are observed in reductions relative to the nonplug-in vehicles. Irrespective of the electricity supply, PHEVs result in greater reductions in WTW energy use and GHG emissions relative to ICEVs for city than highway driving conditions. PHEVs charging from coal facilities only reduce WTW energy use and GHG emissions relative to ICEVs for certain favorable driving conditions. The study results have implications for environmentally beneficial PHEV adoption and usage patterns.

  4. Simulating Study on Drive System Performance for Hybrid Electric Bus Based on ADVISOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xingxing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid electric bus has a number of advantages when compared with ordinary passenger cars, but in the dynamic matching and the vehicle performance are difficult to detect, thus limits its development process. In this paper, combined with the actual models, the hybrid electric bus module parameters were modified in the software of ADVISOR (Advanced Vehicle Simulator, main including: module of the vehicle, the wheel module, motor module, a battery module and engine module, three kinds of bus models for A, B and C were established, and the related performance that need to be analyzed was set up, such as acceleration, gradability, emissions and energy utilization and so on, in order to ensure the vehicle running in the same environment and convenient for comparison, a fixed vehicle driving cycles was chose, then the simulation results was analyzed, and the various performance was compared with the dynamic indicators and economic indicators which determined by referencing of traditional city bus standard and each other, and finally, the performance optimal model of B was chose out which can meet the demand, its related performance parameters of the simulation results are as follows: the best gradability is 26%, maximum speed is 72.7km/h, maximum acceleration is 1.7m/s2, 0~50km/h acceleration time is 9.5s and fuel consumption is 25L/km.

  5. A pilot study to evaluate simulated driving performance and cognitive function in healthy subjects and patients with restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen D

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dan Chen,1 Paula Shaw,2 Daniel M Canafax,1,3 James Catesby Ware4 1XenoPort, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA; 2Charles River Northwest, Tacoma, WA, USA; 3Theravance Inc., South San Francisco, CA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Objective: Symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS usually occur during the evening and night time, resulting in disrupted sleep and subsequent daytime fatigue. This study compared simulated driving performance, alertness, and cognitive function between healthy subjects and patients with a diagnosis of RLS. Methods: Fifteen healthy subjects and 15 untreated RLS subjects were enrolled and completed two driving tests. The first test occurred at 4 PM followed by the second test at 8 AM the next morning. Outcome measures included lane position variability (LPV, speed variability, frequency of simulated crashes (off-road events or collision, and brake reaction time. Other assessments included visual analog scale (VAS of alertness and the Brief Assessment of Cognition (BAC. Results: Overall, RLS patients and healthy subjects performed similarly on driving assessments. Two subjects within each group experienced off-road events. RLS patients had less alertness on the VAS than healthy subjects before and after driving assessments. Both groups scored similarly on the cognitive function assessments. Conclusion: Despite reported diminished alertness, RLS patients did not demonstrate impairment in driving or cognitive performance. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, simulated driving performance, cognitive function

  6. Summary of the control-drive-mechanism design and performance for LWBR (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnall, F.

    1983-01-01

    Control Drive Mechanisms (CDM) are used in the Light Water Breeder reactor to position Movable Fuel Assemblies weighing in excess of one ton each for purposes of reactivity control. These mechanisms are the first of a kind designed for loads of that magnitude. This report presents a summary of the design and performance of the CDM and includes discussions of the principles of operation, unique design features, and fabrication methods of this large, high load capacity CDM. The extensive design acceptance test program and the Shippingport plant periodic testing are summrized as are lessons learned during assembly of the CDM's to the reactor. These CDM's operated successfully to control the light water breeder core at the Shippingport Station from initial criticality in August 1977 to the final shutdown in October 1982. All test and operative data were within expected bands

  7. Adaptive control schemes for improving dynamic performance of efficiency-optimized induction motor drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet; Raj Chelliah, Thanga; Srivastava, S P

    2015-07-01

    Model Based Control (MBC) is one of the energy optimal controllers used in vector-controlled Induction Motor (IM) for controlling the excitation of motor in accordance with torque and speed. MBC offers energy conservation especially at part-load operation, but it creates ripples in torque and speed during load transition, leading to poor dynamic performance of the drive. This study investigates the opportunity for improving dynamic performance of a three-phase IM operating with MBC and proposes three control schemes: (i) MBC with a low pass filter (ii) torque producing current (iqs) injection in the output of speed controller (iii) Variable Structure Speed Controller (VSSC). The pre and post operation of MBC during load transition is also analyzed. The dynamic performance of a 1-hp, three-phase squirrel-cage IM with mine-hoist load diagram is tested. Test results are provided for the conventional field-oriented (constant flux) control and MBC (adjustable excitation) with proposed schemes. The effectiveness of proposed schemes is also illustrated for parametric variations. The test results and subsequent analysis confer that the motor dynamics improves significantly with all three proposed schemes in terms of overshoot/undershoot peak amplitude of torque and DC link power in addition to energy saving during load transitions. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance of a direct drive hydro turbine for wave power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y-H; Kim, C-G [Division of Mechanical and Information Engineering, Korea Maritime University Dongsam-dong 1, Youngdo-ku, Busan, 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Y-D; Kim, I-S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mokpo National University Muan-ro 560, Chunggye-myun, Jeonnam, 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y-C, E-mail: lyh@hhu.ac.k [R and D Institute, Shinhan Precision Co. Ltd. Gomo-ri 313, Jinle-myun, Kimhae, 621-881 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Clean and renewable energy technologies using ocean energy give us non-polluting alternatives to fossil-fueled power plants as a countermeasure against the global warming and growing demand for electrical energy. Among the ocean energy resources, wave power takes a growing interest because of its enormous amount of potential energy in the world. Therefore, various types of wave power system to capture the energy of ocean waves have been developed. However, suitable turbine type is not normalized yet because of relatively low efficiency of the turbine systems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of a newly developed direct drive hydro turbine (DDT), which will be built in a caisson for wave power plant. Experiment and CFD analysis are conducted to clarify the turbine performance and internal flow characteristics. The results show that the DDT obtains fairly good turbine efficiency in both cases of with wave and no wave conditions. As the turbine performance is influenced considerably by the wave condition, designed point of the turbine should be determined according to the wave condition at an expected installation site. Most of the output power generates at the runner passage of the Stage 2.

  9. Coming back into the loop: Drivers' perceptual-motor performance in critical events after automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Tyron; Markkula, Gustav; Boer, Erwin; Madigan, Ruth; Carsten, Oliver; Merat, Natasha

    2017-11-01

    This driving simulator study, conducted as part of the EU AdaptIVe project, investigated drivers' performance in critical traffic events, during the resumption of control from an automated driving system. Prior to the critical events, using a between-participant design, 75 drivers were exposed to various screen manipulations that varied the amount of available visual information from the road environment and automation state, which aimed to take them progressively further 'out-of-the-loop' (OoTL). The current paper presents an analysis of the timing, type, and rate of drivers' collision avoidance response, also investigating how these were influenced by the criticality of the unfolding situation. Results showed that the amount of visual information available to drivers during automation impacted on how quickly they resumed manual control, with less information associated with slower take-over times, however, this did not influence the timing of when drivers began a collision avoidance manoeuvre. Instead, the observed behaviour is in line with recent accounts emphasising the role of scenario kinematics in the timing of driver avoidance response. When considering collision incidents in particular, avoidance manoeuvres were initiated when the situation criticality exceeded an Inverse Time To Collision value of ≈0.3s -1 . Our results suggest that take-over time and timing and quality of avoidance response appear to be largely independent, and while long take-over time did not predict collision outcome, kinematically late initiation of avoidance did. Hence, system design should focus on achieving kinematically early avoidance initiation, rather than short take-over times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of platooning on signal-detection performance, workload, and stress: A driving simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikoop, Daniël D; de Winter, Joost C F; van Arem, Bart; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-04-01

    Platooning, whereby automated vehicles travel closely together in a group, is attractive in terms of safety and efficiency. However, concerns exist about the psychological state of the platooning driver, who is exempted from direct control, yet remains responsible for monitoring the outside environment to detect potential threats. By means of a driving simulator experiment, we investigated the effects on recorded and self-reported measures of workload and stress for three task-instruction conditions: (1) No Task, in which participants had to monitor the road, (2) Voluntary Task, in which participants could do whatever they wanted, and (3) Detection Task, in which participants had to detect red cars. Twenty-two participants performed three 40-min runs in a constant-speed platoon, one condition per run in counterbalanced order. Contrary to some classic literature suggesting that humans are poor monitors, in the Detection Task condition participants attained a high mean detection rate (94.7%) and a low mean false alarm rate (0.8%). Results of the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire indicated that automated platooning was less distressing in the Voluntary Task than in the Detection Task and No Task conditions. In terms of heart rate variability, the Voluntary Task condition yielded a lower power in the low-frequency range relative to the high-frequency range (LF/HF ratio) than the Detection Task condition. Moreover, a strong time-on-task effect was found, whereby the mean heart rate dropped from the first to the third run. In conclusion, participants are able to remain attentive for a prolonged platooning drive, and the type of monitoring task has effects on the driver's psychological state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-rated confidence and on-road driving performance among older adults: Autoévaluation de la confiance et de la performance au volant chez les personnes âgées.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Julie A; Maxwell, Hillary; Patterson, Loretta; Weaver, Bruce; Bédard, Michel

    2016-05-13

    Driver confidence can be measured through concepts such as driving frequency, situational avoidance, and self-perceptions. However, it is not clear how well confidence aligns with actual driving performance. We examined the relationship between subjective measures of confidence in driving ability and on-road performance. We report findings from two studies. The first compared scores from the Older and Wiser Driver Questionnaire to an on-road driving evaluation. The second looked at the Day and Night Driving Comfort Scales and Driving Habits and Intentions Questionnaire in relation to an on-road driving evaluation. No measures of confidence in driving ability were related to on-road driving performance. Confidence in driving ability bears little relationship to on-road performance. Future research should examine approaches to foster a better match between self-assessments and actual abilities among drivers. © CAOT 2016.

  12. Nocturnal sleep problems among university students from 26 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of nocturnal sleeping problems and its associated factors among university students in mainly low- and middle-income countries. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 20,222 undergraduate university students (mean age, 20.8; SD = 2.8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Overall, 10.4% reported severe or extreme nocturnal sleeping problems (male, 10.2%; female, 10.5%) in the past month. Noctural sleeping problems differed by country, from 32.9% in Indonesia to 3.0 % in Thailand among Asian countries, from 13.7% in Mauritius to 7.5% in South Africa, and from 11.8% in Jamaica to 6.1% in Columbia in the Americas. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, coming from a poor family background, staying off campus (on their own or with parents or guardians), stress (history of child sexual abuse), poor mental health (depression and PTSD symptoms), health risk behaviour (tobacco use, heavy internet use, gambling, skipping breakfast and having sustained an injury), lack of social support and poor academic performance were associated with nocturnal sleeping problems. A significant prevalence of past-month nocturnal sleeping problems was found. Potential factors associated with the risk of reporting sleeping complaints were identified, which may assist in prevention strategies to promote a better quality of sleep.

  13. Running Club - Nocturne des Evaux

    CERN Multimedia

    Running club

    2017-01-01

    Les coureurs du CERN sont encore montés sur les plus hautes marches du podium lors de la course interentreprises. Cette course d’équipe qui se déroule de nuit et par équipe de 3 à 4 coureurs est unique dans la région de par son originalité : départ groupé toutes les 30 secondes, les 3 premiers coureurs doivent passer la ligne d’arrivée ensemble. Double victoire pour le running club a la nocturne !!!! 1ère place pour les filles et 22e au classement général; 1ère place pour l'équipe mixte et 4e au général, battant par la même occasion le record de l'épreuve en mixte d'environ 1 minute; 10e place pour l'équipe homme. Retrouvez tous les résultats sur http://www.chp-geneve.ch/web-cms/index.php/nocturne-des-evaux

  14. Quality initiatives: department scorecard: a tool to help drive imaging care delivery performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lane F; Gessner, Kevin E; Dickerson, Julie M; Koch, Bernadette L; Towbin, Alexander J; Lehkamp, Todd W; Moskovitz, Jay; Brody, Alan S; Dumoulin, Charles L; Jones, Blaise V

    2010-11-01

    The radiology department at a midwestern U.S. children's hospital has created a scorecard that is presented quarterly to the institutional leadership and is available to all radiology employees on the institutional intranet. The scorecard currently has 33 measures in six areas: clinical services (safety, quality, timeliness); education; research; professionalism, communication, and user satisfaction; finances and administration; and staffing. For each measure, the goal, current value of the measure, interval at which the measure is updated, date of last update, and previous value of the measure are listed. Each measure was reviewed over time to determine those measures for which target goals were met. Results indicate that a visible and transparent department scorecard is one of the more powerful tools available to the radiology leadership to call attention to and improve performance in specific areas. The use of such a scorecard can help develop a departmental culture of quality improvement, focus healthcare providers on specific quality improvement projects, and drive departmental performance. © RSNA, 2010.

  15. A performance study on a direct drive hydro turbine for wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Do [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Goo; Kim, You Taek; Lee, Young Ho [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jung Il [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Clean and renewable energy technologies using ocean energy give us non-polluting alternatives to fossil-fueled power plants as a countermeasure against global warming and growing demand for electrical energy. Among the ocean energy resources, wave power takes a growing interest because of its enormous amount of potential energy in the world. Therefore, various types of wave power systems to capture the energy of ocean waves have been developed. However, a suitable turbine type is not yet normalized because of relatively low efficiency of the turbine systems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of a newly developed direct drive hydro turbine (DDT), which will be built in a caisson for a wave power plant. Experiment and CFD analysis are conducted to clarify the turbine performance and internal flow characteristics. The results show that the DDT obtains fairly good turbine efficiency in cases with and without wave conditions. Most of the output power is generated at the runner passage of Stage 2. Relatively larger amount of the decreased tangential velocity at Stage 2 produces more angular momentum than that at Stage 1 and thus, the larger angular momentum at the Stage 2 makes a greater contribution to the generation of total output power in comparison with that at Stage 1. Large vortex existing in the upper-left region of the runner passage forms a large recirculation region in the runner passage, and the recirculating flow consumes the output power at Region 2

  16. The acute effects of caffeinated versus non-caffeinated alcoholic beverage on driving performance and attention/reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Jonathan; Rohsenow, Damaris J; Arnedt, J Todd; Bliss, Caleb A; Hunt, Sarah K; Calise, Tamara Vehige; Heeren, Timothy; Winter, Michael; Littlefield, Caroline; Gottlieb, Daniel J

    2011-02-01

    Marketing that promotes mixing caffeinated 'energy' drinks with alcoholic beverages (e.g. Red Bull with vodka) targets young drinkers and conveys the expectation that caffeine will offset the sedating effects of alcohol and enhance alertness. Such beliefs could result in unwarranted risk taking (e.g. driving while intoxicated). The aim of this study was to assess the acute effects of caffeinated versus non-caffeinated alcoholic beverages on a simulated driving task and attention/reaction time. We conducted a 2 × 2 between-groups randomized trial in which participants were randomized to one of four conditions: beer and non-alcoholic beer, with and without caffeine added. Caffeine was added in the same proportion as found in a commercially available caffeinated beer (69 mg/12 oz of beer at 4.8% alc. by vol). Participants were 127 non-dependent, heavy episodic, young adult drinkers (age 21-30) who were college students or recent graduates. The target breath alcohol level was 0.12 g%. Driving performance was assessed with a driving simulator; sustained attention/reaction with the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT). Across the driving and attention/reaction time we found main effects for alcohol, with alcohol significantly impairing driving and sustained attention/reaction time, with mainly large statistical effects; however, the addition of caffeine had no main or interaction effects on performance. The addition of caffeine to alcohol does not appear to enhance driving or sustained attention/reaction time performance relative to alcohol alone. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Sleep Apnea and Nocturnal Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Populational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Dumas Cintra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms associated with the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include abrupt changes in autonomic tone, which can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. The authors hypothesized that nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Objective: To analyze the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and abnormal heart rhythm during sleep in a population sample. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 1,101 volunteers, who form a representative sample of the city of São Paulo. The overnight polysomnography was performed using an EMBLA® S7000 digital system during the regular sleep schedule of the individual. The electrocardiogram channel was extracted, duplicated, and then analyzed using a Holter (Cardio Smart® system. Results: A total of 767 participants (461 men with a mean age of 42.00 ± 0.53 years, were included in the analysis. At least one type of nocturnal cardiac rhythm disturbance (atrial/ventricular arrhythmia or beat was observed in 62.7% of the sample. The occurrence of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias was more frequent with increased disease severity. Rhythm disturbance was observed in 53.3% of the sample without breathing sleep disorders, whereas 92.3% of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea showed cardiac arrhythmia. Isolated atrial and ventricular ectopy was more frequent in patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea when compared to controls (p < 0.001. After controlling for potential confounding factors, age, sex and apnea-hypopnea index were associated with nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusion: Nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia occurs more frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the prevalence increases with disease severity. Age, sex, and the Apnea-hypopnea index were predictors of arrhythmia in this sample.

  18. Drowsy Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least 8 hours. 8-9 Develop good sleeping habits such as sticking to a sleep schedule. If ... K, Howard ME. Cognitive components of simulated driving performance: sleep loss effects and predictors. Accid Anal Prev. 2012; ...

  19. Associations between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis and improvements with etanercept therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Mohammed; Zack, Debra J; Li, Wenzhi; Stewart, V Michelle; Koenig, Andrew S

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationships between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and the impact of 12 weeks' etanercept treatment versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Data were combined from four clinical trials for patients with AS who received at least one dose of etanercept, sulfasalazine or placebo and had at least one postbaseline assessment value. Linear regression was performed (controlling for site, protocol and demographics), to explore the relationship between inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP]), nocturnal back pain (visual analog scale [VAS] 0-100 mm) and fatigue (VAS 0-100 mm Bath AS Disease Activity Index fatigue item). Out of 1283 patients (etanercept, n = 867; sulfasalazine, n = 187; placebo, n = 229), improvement in nocturnal back pain was a significant predictor of improvement in fatigue. Significant correlations were found between nocturnal back pain and fatigue, but not CRP levels. Etanercept provided significantly greater pain/fatigue improvement than sulfasalazine or placebo. Improvements in nocturnal back pain and fatigue had weak relationships with improvement in inflammation (CRP level). AS patients treated with etanercept demonstrated superior improvement in nocturnal back pain and fatigue versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Decrease in nocturnal back pain can improve fatigue. Assessing treatment response using CRP levels alone may be misleading without also examining patient-reported outcomes such as back pain and fatigue.

  20. Heavy rainfall triggers increased nocturnal flight in desert populations of the Pacific black duck (Anas superciliosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, J F; Ribot, R F H; Wingfield, J C; Bennett, A T D

    2017-12-14

    Understanding of avian nocturnal flight comes mainly from northern hemisphere species in seasonal temperate ecosystems where nocturnal flight is often precisely timed and entrained by annual photoperiod. Here we investigate patterns of nocturnal flight in waterbirds of Australian desert ecosystems that fly considerable distances to find temporary water bodies formed from rainfall which is highly unpredictable seasonally and spatially, and when there is sufficient water, they then breed. How they perform these feats of navigation and physiology remain poorly known. Using GPS tracking of 38 satellite tagged Pacific black ducks (Anas superciliosa) in two contrasting ecosystems, before and after heavy rainfall we revealed a key role for facultative nocturnal flight in the movement ecology of this species. After large rainfall events, birds rapidly increased nocturnal flight activity in the arid aseasonal ecosystem, but not in the mesic seasonal one. Nocturnal flights occurred throughout the night in both ecosystems. Long range flights (>50 km in 2 hours) occurred almost exclusively at night; at night the distance flown was higher than during the day, birds visited more locations, and the locations were more widely dispersed. Our work reveals that heavy rainfall triggers increased nocturnal flight activity in desert populations of waterbirds.

  1. Driving performance on the descending limb of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in undergraduate students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mathieu; Gallant, François; Lavallière, Martin; Chiasson, Martine; Silvey, Dustin; Behm, David; Albert, Wayne J; Johnson, Michel J

    2015-01-01

    Young drivers are overrepresented in collisions resulting in fatalities. It is not uncommon for young drivers to socially binge drink and decide to drive a vehicle a few hours after consumption. To better understand the risks that may be associated with this behaviour, the present study has examined the effects of a social drinking bout followed by a simulated drive in undergraduate students on the descending limb of their BAC (blood alcohol concentration) curve. Two groups of eight undergraduate students (n = 16) took part in this study. Participants in the alcohol group were assessed before drinking, then at moderate and low BAC as well as 24 hours post-acute consumption. This group consumed an average of 5.3 ± 1.4 (mean ± SD) drinks in an hour in a social context and were then submitted to a driving and a predicted crash risk assessment. The control group was assessed at the same time points without alcohol intake or social context.; at 8 a.m., noon, 3 p.m. and 8 a.m. the next morning. These multiple time points were used to measure any potential learning effects from the assessment tools (i.e. driving simulator and useful field of view test (UFOV)). Diminished driving performance at moderate BAC was observed with no increases in predicted crash risk. Moderate correlations between driving variables were observed. No association exists between driving variables and UFOV variables. The control group improved measures of selective attention after the third assessment. No learning effect was observed from multiple sessions with the driving simulator. Our results show that a moderate BAC, although legal, increases the risky behaviour. Effects of alcohol expectancy could have been displayed by the experimental group. UFOV measures and predicted crash risk categories were not sensitive enough to predict crash risk for young drivers, even when intoxicated.

  2. Driving performance on the descending limb of blood alcohol concentration (BAC in undergraduate students: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Tremblay

    Full Text Available Young drivers are overrepresented in collisions resulting in fatalities. It is not uncommon for young drivers to socially binge drink and decide to drive a vehicle a few hours after consumption. To better understand the risks that may be associated with this behaviour, the present study has examined the effects of a social drinking bout followed by a simulated drive in undergraduate students on the descending limb of their BAC (blood alcohol concentration curve. Two groups of eight undergraduate students (n = 16 took part in this study. Participants in the alcohol group were assessed before drinking, then at moderate and low BAC as well as 24 hours post-acute consumption. This group consumed an average of 5.3 ± 1.4 (mean ± SD drinks in an hour in a social context and were then submitted to a driving and a predicted crash risk assessment. The control group was assessed at the same time points without alcohol intake or social context.; at 8 a.m., noon, 3 p.m. and 8 a.m. the next morning. These multiple time points were used to measure any potential learning effects from the assessment tools (i.e. driving simulator and useful field of view test (UFOV. Diminished driving performance at moderate BAC was observed with no increases in predicted crash risk. Moderate correlations between driving variables were observed. No association exists between driving variables and UFOV variables. The control group improved measures of selective attention after the third assessment. No learning effect was observed from multiple sessions with the driving simulator. Our results show that a moderate BAC, although legal, increases the risky behaviour. Effects of alcohol expectancy could have been displayed by the experimental group. UFOV measures and predicted crash risk categories were not sensitive enough to predict crash risk for young drivers, even when intoxicated.

  3. Treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Lisukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, life‑threatening clonal hematological disorder caused by an acquired mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glucan (PIG-A gene. PNH is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, thrombophilia and other severe clinical syndromes. Until recently, the treatment of PNH has been symptomatic with blood transfusions, anticoagulation and supplementation with folic acid or iron. The only potentially curative treatment is allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but this has severe complications with high mortality rates. A new targeted treatment strategy is the inhibition of the terminal complement cascade with anti‑C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab. Eculizumab has shown significant efficacy in controlling of intravascular hemolysis resulting in improving quality of life and survival.

  4. Treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Lisukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, life‑threatening clonal hematological disorder caused by an acquired mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glucan (PIG-A gene. PNH is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, thrombophilia and other severe clinical syndromes. Until recently, the treatment of PNH has been symptomatic with blood transfusions, anticoagulation and supplementation with folic acid or iron. The only potentially curative treatment is allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but this has severe complications with high mortality rates. A new targeted treatment strategy is the inhibition of the terminal complement cascade with anti‑C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab. Eculizumab has shown significant efficacy in controlling of intravascular hemolysis resulting in improving quality of life and survival.

  5. Improved linear ultrasonic motor performance with square-wave based driving-tip trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Adam Y; Mills, James K; Benhabib, Beno

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of a non-sinusoidal periodic excitation voltage to induce a near-square-wave driving tip trajectory in linear ultrasonic motors (LUSMs). A square-wave-based trajectory can deliver superior frictional force to the moving stage in the forward stroke of the driving tip motion and reduced frictional force during the return stroke. This would reduce lost power in the periodic driving tip motion, thereby, increasing the output force and power of the LUSM. An implementation procedure is suggested to achieve the near-square-wave driving tip trajectory. The proposed approach is illustrated through realistic finite-element-based simulations using a bimodal LUSM configuration. (technical note)

  6. Effect of different alcohol levels on take-over performance in conditionally automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Katharina; Naujoks, Frederik; Wörle, Johanna; Kenntner-Mabiala, Ramona; Kaussner, Yvonne; Neukum, Alexandra

    2018-06-01

    Automated driving systems are getting pushed into the consumer market, with varying degrees of automation. Most often the driver's task will consist of being available as a fall-back level when the automation reaches its limits. These so-called take-over situations have attracted a great body of research, focusing on various human factors aspects (e.g., sleepiness) that could undermine the safety of control transitions between automated and manual driving. However, a major source of accidents in manual driving, alcohol consumption, has been a non-issue so far, although a false understanding of the driver's responsibility (i.e., being available as a fallback level) might promote driving under its influence. In this experiment, N = 36 drivers were exposed to different levels of blood alcohol concentrations (BACs: placebo vs. 0.05% vs. 0.08%) in a high fidelity driving simulator, and the effect on take-over time and quality was assessed. The results point out that a 0.08% BAC increases the time needed to re-engage in the driving task and impairs several aspects of longitudinal and lateral vehicle control, whereas 0.05% BAC did only go along with descriptive impairments in fewer parameters. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Driving with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia: Cognitive Test Performance and Proxy Report of Daily Life Function in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Leslie; Hogan, Patricia E; Rapp, Stephen R; Dugan, Elizabeth; Marottoli, Richard A; Snively, Beverly M; Shumaker, Sally A; Sink, Kaycee M

    2015-09-01

    To investigate associations between proxy report of cognitive and functional limitations and cognitive performance and current or former driving status in older women with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and all-cause dementia. Cross-sectional data analysis of retrospectively identified older women with adjudicated MCI and all-cause dementia in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study-Epidemiology of Cognitive Health Outcomes (WHIMS-ECHO). Academic medical center. Women (mean age ± standard deviation 83.7 ± 3.5) adjudicated with MCI or dementia during Year 1, 2, 3, or 4 of the WHIMS-ECHO follow-up period (N = 385). The telephone-administered cognitive battery included tests of attention, verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, executive function, working memory, and global cognitive function plus self-report measures of depressive symptomatology. The Dementia Questionnaire (DQ) was administered to a knowledgeable proxy (family member, friend). Sixty percent of women with MCI and 40% of those with dementia are current drivers. Proxy reports of functional limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are associated with current driving status in women with MCI, whereas performance-based cognitive tests are not. In women with dementia, proxy reports of functional limitations in IADLs and performance-based cognitive tests are associated with current driving status, as expected. These findings have clinical implications for the importance of evaluating driving concurrently with other instrumental functional abilities in MCI and dementia. Additional work is needed to determine whether proxy report of cognitive and functional impairments should help guide referrals for driving assessment and rehabilitation or counseling for driving transition. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. A meta-analysis of in-vehicle and nomadic voice-recognition system interaction and driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sarah M; Caird, Jeff K; Steel, Piers

    2017-09-01

    Driver distraction is a growing and pervasive issue that requires multiple solutions. Voice-recognition (V-R) systems may decrease the visual-manual (V-M) demands of a wide range of in-vehicle system and smartphone interactions. However, the degree that V-R systems integrated into vehicles or available in mobile phone applications affect driver distraction is incompletely understood. A comprehensive meta-analysis of experimental studies was conducted to address this knowledge gap. To meet study inclusion criteria, drivers had to interact with a V-R system while driving and doing everyday V-R tasks such as dialing, initiating a call, texting, emailing, destination entry or music selection. Coded dependent variables included detection, reaction time, lateral position, speed and headway. Comparisons of V-R systems with baseline driving and/or a V-M condition were also coded. Of 817 identified citations, 43 studies involving 2000 drivers and 183 effect sizes (r) were analyzed in the meta-analysis. Compared to baseline, driving while interacting with a V-R system is associated with increases in reaction time and lane positioning, and decreases in detection. When V-M systems were compared to V-R systems, drivers had slightly better performance with the latter system on reaction time, lane positioning and headway. Although V-R systems have some driving performance advantages over V-M systems, they have a distraction cost relative to driving without any system at all. The pattern of results indicates that V-R systems impose moderate distraction costs on driving. In addition, drivers minimally engage in compensatory performance adjustments such as reducing speed and increasing headway while using V-R systems. Implications of the results for theory, design guidelines and future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A longitudinal investigation of the Drive for Muscularity Scale: predicting use of performance enhancing substances and weightlifting among males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Dana; Dodge, Tonya

    2008-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the predictive validity of the Drive for Muscularity Scale (DMS; McCreary & Sasse, 2000). The drive for muscularity scale (DMS) is comprised of two subscales: a muscularity-oriented body image (MBI) subscale and a muscularity behavior (MB) subscale. The present study tested whether these subscales predicted two behavioral outcomes in the context of a longitudinal design: use of performance enhancing substances (PES) and weightlifting behavior. One hundred and sixty-one male undergraduates completed a questionnaire that assessed the drive for muscularity, PES use and weightlifting behavior at Time 1 and again 6 weeks later. Results indicated that the MB subscale at Time 1 significantly predicted both changes in PES use and weightlifting behavior controlling for past substance use and past weightlifting behavior. The MBI subscale failed to predict either changes in PES use or weightlifting behavior. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  10. ISOLATED REDUCED NOCTURNAL BLADDER RESERVOIR FUNCTION - A NEW TYPE OF NOCTURNAL ENURESIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Britt; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Rittig, Søren

    PURPOSE Bladder reservoir function in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MNE) is assessed by maximal voided volumes (MVV) registered on frequency-volume charts during daytime. Although a degree of association is evident, MVV does not necessarily reflect the nocturnal bladder...... below their MVV and MVVAge, the latter could be viewed as isolated reduced nocturnal bladder reservoir function. This indicates bladder reservoir function abnormalities during sleep that is not assessed by day recordings. Physicians treating children with MNE should consider anticholinergic...

  11. The effects of using a portable music player on simulated driving performance and task-sharing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kristie L; Mitsopoulos-Rubens, Eve; Rudin-Brown, Christina M; Lenné, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the effects of performing scrollable music selection tasks using a portable music player (iPod Touch™) on simulated driving performance and task-sharing strategies, as evidenced through eye glance behaviour and secondary task performance. A total of 37 drivers (18-48 yrs) completed the PC-based MUARC Driver Distraction Test (DDT) while performing music selection tasks on an iPod Touch. Drivers' eye glance behaviour was examined using faceLAB eye tracking equipment. Results revealed that performing music search tasks while driving increased the amount of time that drivers spent with their eyes off the roadway and decreased their ability to maintain a constant lane position and time headway from a lead vehicle. There was also evidence, however, that drivers attempted to regulate their behaviour when distracted by decreasing their speed and taking a large number of short glances towards the device. Overall, results suggest that performing music search tasks while driving is problematic and steps to prohibit this activity should be taken. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Nocturnal Sleep Disturbances: Risk Factors for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... among the elderly (Bernert, 2007) and, mediated by depression, are associated with suicide ideation among the elderly (Nadorff et al., 2013). ... suicidal behavior in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent ... (2013) 5 Nocturnal Sleep Disturbances: Risk Factors for ...

  13. Effect of Nocturnal Haemodialysis on Body Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ipema, K.J.R.; Westerhuis, R.; van der Schans, C.P.; de Jong, P.E.; Gaillard, C.A. J. M.; Krijnen, W.P.; Slart, R.H.J.A.; Franssen, C.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Haemodialysis patients have a high risk of malnutrition which is associated with increased mortality. Nocturnal haemodialysis (NHD) is associated with a significant increase in protein intake compared with conventional haemodialysis (CHD). It is unclear whether this leads to improved

  14. Effect of nocturnal haemodialysis on body composition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H. Slart; C.A. Gaillard; R. Westerhuis; C.F. Franssen; W.P. Krijnen; Dr. C.P. van der Schans; K.J. Ipema; P.E. de Jong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Haemodialysis patients have a high risk of malnutrition which is associated with increased mortality. Nocturnal haemodialysis (NHD) is associated with a significant increase in protein intake compared with conventional haemodialysis (CHD). It is unclear whether this leads to improved

  15. Use of a driving simulator to assess performance under adverse weather conditions in adults with albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Gwen M; Summers, C Gail; Ward, Nicholas; Bhargava, Esha; Rakauskas, Michael E; Holleschau, Ann M

    2012-04-01

    Participants with albinism have reduced vision and nystagmus with reduced foveation times. This prospective study evaluated driving in 12 participants with albinism and 12 matched controls. Participants drove a vehicle simulator through a virtual rural course in sunny and foggy conditions. Under sunny conditions, participants with albinism showed a narrower preferred minimum safety boundary during car-following tasks than did controls, but there was no difference under foggy conditions. Their driving did not differ significantly from that of controls when approaching a stop sign or when choosing gap size between oncoming vehicles when crossing an intersection. However, when compared to control drivers, participants with albinism had a decreased minimum safety boundary for car-following that should be included in counseling regarding driving safety.

  16. Effects of slow-release caffeine and a nap on driving simulator performance after partial sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Valck, Elke; De Groot, Esther; Cluydts, Raymond

    2003-02-01

    A driving simulator was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a 30-min. nap and 300-mg slow-release caffeine as countermeasures to drivers' sleepiness induced by partial sleep deprivation. 12 participants were allowed 45 hr. time in bed at the laboratory. Driving performance then was measured twice--at 9 a.m. and at 1 p.m.--by a 45-min. driving task on a simulator. Subjective sleepiness/alertness and mood were assessed four times on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Profile of Mood States. Driving performance was assessed as Lane Drifting, Speed Deviation, and Accident Liability. A 30-min. nap opportunity and 300 mg of slow-release caffeine both were successful in counteracting drivers' sleepiness. The remedial effect of slow-release caffeine lasted longer than that of the nap, that is, it was also effective in the afternoon session. This suggests that slow-release caffeine represents a valuable countermeasure that, in the case of partial sleep deprivation, is preferred to a nap when sleepiness has to be counteracted for a longer time.

  17. Performance Availability Assessment of Combined Multi Power Source Traction Drive Considering Real Operational Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Frenkel Ilia; Bolvashenkov Igor; Herzog Hans-Georg; Khvatskin Lev

    2016-01-01

    The present paper deals with the vehicle’s traction electric drive, consisting of several various electric power sources. One of the main requirements for such systems are the safety and sustainable operations, achieved largely the implementation of an uninterrupted supply of the vehicle’s propulsion system with an electric power.

  18. Performance of Magnetic-Superconductor Non-Contact Harmonic Drive for Cryogenic Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Perez-Diaz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Harmonic drives are profusely used in aerospace mainly because of their compactness and large reduction ratio. However, their use in cryogenic environments is still a challenge. Lubrication and fatigue are non-trivial issues under these conditions. The objective of the Magnetic-Superconductor Cryogenic Non-contact Harmonic Drive (MAGDRIVE project, funded by the EU Space FP7, is to design, build, and test a new concept of MAGDRIVE. Non-contact interactions among magnets, soft magnetic materials, and superconductors are efficiently used to provide a high reduction ratio gear that smoothly and naturally operates at cryogenic environments. The limiting elements of conventional harmonic drives (teeth, flexspline, and ball bearings are substituted by contactless mechanical components (magnetic gear and superconducting magnetic bearings. The absence of contact between moving parts prevents wear, lubricants are no longer required, and the operational lifetime is greatly increased. This is the first mechanical reducer in mechanical engineering history without any contact between moving parts. In this paper, the test results of a −1:20 inverse reduction ratio MAGDRIVE prototype are reported. In these tests, successful operation at 40 K and 10−3 Pa was demonstrated for more than 1.5 million input cycles. A maximum torque of 3 N·m and an efficiency of 80% were demonstrated. The maximum tested input speed was 3000 rpm, six times the previous existing record for harmonic drives at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Influence of stimulant and non-stimulant drug treatment on driving performance in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbo, Maria Angela; Louzã, Mario R

    2014-09-01

    Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), especially teenagers and young adults, show important car driving impairments, including risky driving, accidents, fines and suspension of driver׳s license. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of stimulant and non-stimulant drugs on driving performance of ADHD patients. We searched several databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published through March, 2013. Fifteen RCTs (the majority with crossover design) evaluated methylphenidate (MPH) immediate-release (MPH-IR), MPH osmotic-controlled oral system (MPH-OROS), MPH transdermal system (MTS), extended-release mixed amphetamine salts (MAS-XR); atomoxetine (ATX) and lisdexamfetamine (LDX). Methods varied widely; including simulators and/or cars and different courses and scenarios. Various outcomes of driving performance, including a 'composite' or 'overall' driving score were considered. In general, stimulants improved driving performance in ADHD patients (either in RCTs conducted in simulators and/or cars). MPH-OROS improved driving performance compared with MAS-XR, placebo, or no-drug conditions. Although MPH-OROS and MPH-IR produced similar improvements during the day, MPH-IR lost its efficacy in the evening. MAS-XR also improved driving performance, but worsened driving performance in the evening. MTS (one study) showed a positive effect, but drug compliance varied widely across patients. LDX had positive effect on driving (two studies with the same sample). Studies with ATX report conflicting results. Improvement was more consistent in teenagers and young adults. In general, treatment with psychostimulants or ATX in therapeutic dosages had no negative impact on driving performance of ADHD patients. To conclude, treatment with stimulants in therapeutic doses improves driving performance in ADHD patients, especially teenagers and young adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P. A.

    2011-10-20

    This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the

  1. Sensor-based evaluation and treatment of nocturnal hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease: An evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Sringean, Jirada; Thanawattano, Chusak

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of nocturnal movements in Parkinson's disease (PD) are protean, with major disabilities related to nocturnal hypokinesia. While it can be assessed by clinical interviews and screening instruments, these are often inaccurate and prone to recall bias. In light of advances in sensor technology, we explored the use of sensors in the study of nocturnal hypokinesia, by performing a systematic review of the professional literature on this topic. Evidence suggests that nocturnal hypokinesia exists even in patients in the early stages, and PD patients turned significantly less and with much slower speed and acceleration than controls, partly related to low nocturnal dopamine level. We conducted another systematic review to evaluate the evidence of the efficacy of dopaminergic agents in the treatment of nocturnal hypokinesia. Several lines of evidence support the use of long-acting drugs or by continuous administration of short-acting agents to control symptoms. Sensor parameters could be considered as one of the important objective outcomes in future clinical trials investigating potential drugs to treat nocturnal hypokinesia. Physicians should be aware of this technology as it can aid the clinical assessment of nocturnal hypokinesia and enhance the quality of patient care. In addition, the use of sensors currently is being considered for various aspects of research on early diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of PD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nocturnal Polyuria : Excess of Nocturnal Urine Production, Excess of Definitions-Influence on Renal Function Profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessaert, An-Sofie; Walle, Johan Vande; Bosch, JLHR; Hoebeke, Piet; Everaert, Karel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify important differences in renal function profile, and potential water and sodium diuresis cutoffs among participants with nocturnal polyuria according to nocturnal polyuria definitions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This post hoc analysis was based on a prospective

  3. Brake response time is significantly impaired after total knee arthroplasty: investigation of performing an emergency stop while driving a car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Maurice; Hofmann, Ulf-Krister; Rondak, Ina; Götze, Marco; Kluba, Torsten; Ipach, Ingmar

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether total knee arthroplasty (TKA) impairs the ability to perform an emergency stop. An automatic transmission brake simulator was developed to evaluate total brake response time. A prospective repeated-measures design was used. Forty patients (20 left/20 right) were measured 8 days and 6, 12, and 52 wks after surgery. Eight days postoperative total brake response time increased significantly by 30% in right TKA and insignificantly by 2% in left TKA. Brake force significantly decreased by 35% in right TKA and by 25% in left TKA during this period. Baseline values were reached at week 12 in right TKA; the impairment of outcome measures, however, was no longer significant at week 6 compared with preoperative values. Total brake response time and brake force in left TKA fell below baseline values at weeks 6 and 12. Brake force in left TKA was the only outcome measure significantly impaired 8 days postoperatively. This study highlights that categorical statements cannot be provided. This study's findings on automatic transmission driving suggest that right TKA patients may resume driving 6 wks postoperatively. Fitness to drive in left TKA is not fully recovered 8 days postoperatively. If testing is not available, patients should refrain from driving until they return from rehabilitation.

  4. ACUTE AND SUBCHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE H-1-HISTAMINE RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST EBASTINE IN 10, 20 AND 30 MG DOSE, AND TRIPROLIDINE 10 MG ON CAR DRIVING PERFORMANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROOKHUIS, KA; DEVRIES, G; DEWAARD, D

    1 The effects of a new antihistamine, ebastine (10, 20 and 30 mg), on several parameters of driving performance in actual traffic were studied in 15 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were treated for 5 days, and their driving performance tested on day 1 and day 5. The study was double-blind, placebo

  5. Codes Don't Always Get Enforced, But Contracts Do: Changing the Procurement Paradigm to Drive Building Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scheib, Jennifer G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McMillen, Adam [Seventhwave

    2016-08-26

    New construction could account for more than 25% of the U.S. energy consumption by 2030. Millions of square feet are built every year that will not perform as expected - despite advancing codes, rating systems, super-efficient technologies, and advanced utility programs. With retrofits of these under-performers decades away, savings potential will be lost for years to come. Only the building owner is in the driver's seat to demand - and verify - higher-performing buildings. Yet our current policy and market interventions really target the design team, not the owner. Accelerate Performance, a U.S. Department of Energy funded initiative, is changing the building procurement approach to drive deeper, verified savings in three pilot states: Illinois, Minnesota, and Connecticut. Performance-based procurement ties energy performance to design and contractor team compensation while freeing them to meet energy targets with strategies most familiar to them. The process teases out the creativity of the design and contracting teams to deliver energy performance - without driving up the construction cost. The paper will share early results and lessons learned from new procurement and contract approaches in government, public, and private sector building projects. The paper provides practical guidance for building owners, facilities managers, design, and contractor teams who wish to incorporate effective performance-based procurement for deeper energy savings in their buildings.

  6. Alcohol and driving-related performance - A comprehensive meta-analysis focusing the significance of the non-significant

    OpenAIRE

    Schnabel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The present work reviews the experimental literature on the acute effects of alcohol on human behaviour related to driving performance. A meta-analysis was conducted which includes studies published between 1954 and 2007 in order to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the substance alcohol. 450 studies reporting 5,300 findings were selected from over 12,000 references after applying certain in- and exclusion criteria. Thus, the present meta-analysis comprises far more studies than reviews on...

  7. Low levels of alcohol impair driving simulator performance and reduce perception of crash risk in partially sleep deprived subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Siobhan; Catcheside, Peter; Lack, Leon; Grunstein, Ron R; McEvoy, R Doug

    2004-09-15

    Partial sleep deprivation and alcohol consumption are a common combination, particularly among young drivers. We hypothesized that while low blood alcohol concentration (sleep deprivation and low blood alcohol concentration would cause significant performance impairment. Experimental Sleep Disorders Unit Laboratory 20 healthy volunteers (mean age 22.8 years; 9 men). Subjects underwent driving simulator testing at 1 am on 2 nights a week apart. On the night preceding simulator testing, subjects were partially sleep deprived (5 hours in bed). Alcohol consumption (2-3 standard alcohol drinks over 2 hours) was randomized to 1 of the 2 test nights, and blood alcohol concentrations were estimated using a calibrated Breathalyzer. During the driving task subjects were monitored continuously with electroencephalography for sleep episodes and were prompted every 4.5 minutes for answers to 2 perception scales-performance and crash risk. Mean blood alcohol concentration on the alcohol night was 0.035 +/- 0.015 g/dL. Compared with conditions during partial sleep deprivation alone, subjects had more microsleeps, impaired driving simulator performance, and poorer ability to predict crash risk in the combined partial sleep deprivation and alcohol condition. Women predicted crash risk more accurately than did men in the partial sleep deprivation condition, but neither men nor women predicted the risk accurately in the sleep deprivation plus alcohol condition. Alcohol at legal blood alcohol concentrations appears to increase sleepiness and impair performance and the detection of crash risk following partial sleep deprivation. When partially sleep deprived, women appear to be either more perceptive of increased crash risk or more willing to admit to their driving limitations than are men. Alcohol eliminated this behavioral difference.

  8. Spatial and temporal EEG dynamics of dual-task driving performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shi-An

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driver distraction is a significant cause of traffic accidents. The aim of this study is to investigate Electroencephalography (EEG dynamics in relation to distraction during driving. To study human cognition under a specific driving task, simulated real driving using virtual reality (VR-based simulation and designed dual-task events are built, which include unexpected car deviations and mathematics questions. Methods We designed five cases with different stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA to investigate the distraction effects between the deviations and equations. The EEG channel signals are first converted into separated brain sources by independent component analysis (ICA. Then, event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP changes of the EEG power spectrum are used to evaluate brain dynamics in time-frequency domains. Results Power increases in the theta and beta bands are observed in relation with distraction effects in the frontal cortex. In the motor area, alpha and beta power suppressions are also observed. All of the above results are consistently observed across 15 subjects. Additionally, further analysis demonstrates that response time and multiple cortical EEG power both changed significantly with different SOA. Conclusions This study suggests that theta power increases in the frontal area is related to driver distraction and represents the strength of distraction in real-life situations.

  9. Lack of interaction between two antihistamines, mizolastine and cetirizine, and ethanol in psychomotor and driving performance in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patat, A; Stubbs, D; Dunmore, C; Ulliac, N; Sexton, B; Zieleniuk, I; Irving, A; Jones, W

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic interaction between mizolastine, a new H1 antihistamine, and ethanol was assessed in a randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover, placebo-controlled study. Eighteen healthy young male volunteers received mizolastine 10 mg, or cetirizine 10 mg or placebo once daily for 7 days with a 1-week wash-out interval. An oral dose of ethanol or ethanol placebo, given 2 h after dosing on days 5 or 7 of each treatment period, was administered to achieve a peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.7 g/l then maintained for 1 h by two further doses of ethanol. Driving ability and psychomotor performance were evaluated using actual and simulated driving tests, critical flicker fusion threshold (CFF), adaptive tracking and divided attention (DAT) tasks. Ethanol produced a significant decrement in all tasks up to 5.5 h after administration: an increase in steering movements of 4.6, in lateral deviation of 0.45 m, in braking reaction time of 80 ms, in driving test and DAT performance of + 3.2; and a decrease in CFF and in tracking speed of 2.6 m.s-1. Neither mizolastine nor cetirizine significantly impaired driving ability or arousal (CFF) compared with the placebo. However, both drugs significantly impaired DAT performance 6:00 h post-dose (increase of + 2.1 for mizolastine and + 2.4 for cetirizine). The tracking speed was significantly decreased 7:50 h after mizolastine administration (-1.3 m.s-1) and more consistently from 1:30 to 7:50 h after cetirizine administration (-1.4 m.s-1). No significant adverse interaction, i.e. potentiation, occurred between ethanol and either antihistamine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Harmonic Distortion Performance of Multi Three-Phase SCR-Fed Drive Systems with Controlled DC-Link Current under Unbalanced Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Hamid; Davari, Pooya; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    effective factors on the drives harmonic performance are discussed. Moreover, the analysis is performed by considering an Equally-Pulse-Space (EPS) firing approach on the SCRs. Obtained simulation and experimental results verify the proposed theoretical analysis and mathematical modeling....

  11. Nocturnal enuresis: basic facts and new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjälmås, K

    1998-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis in children is quite seldom due to psychological factors. Instead, it is caused by a hereditary delay in maturation of the somatic mechanisms (reduction of nocturnal urine production, relaxation of the bladder during sleeping hours, and a normal arousal to a full bladder) which prevent the child from wetting the bed. Doctors treating bedwetting children have often used an expectant attitude because nocturnal enuresis has been looked upon as self-limiting and innocent. According to recent research, this is not true. In children aged 7 years, more than 5% and in the adult population 0.5% report nocturnal enuresis. Thus, many enuretic children will remain bedwetters for life if left untreated. Furthermore, the child is ashamed and feels guilt because of his nocturnal enuresis which threatens to give a significant impairment of self-esteem at an age when an intact self-image is extremely important for an optimal development of the child's personality. Treatment should be given when the enuretic child wants to sleep dry.

  12. Simulation of enhanced tokamak performance on DIII-D using fast wave current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassie, J.S. de; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chan, V.S.; Prater, R.; John, H. St.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    The fast magnetosonic wave is now recognized to be a leading candidate for noninductive current drive for the tokamak reactor due to the ability of the wave to penetrate to the hot dense core region. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments on DIII-D have realized up to 120 kA of rf current drive, with up to 40% of the plasma current driven noninductively. The success of these experiments at 60 MHz with a 2 MW transmitter source capability has led to a major upgrade of the FWCD system. Two additional transmitters, 30 to 120 MHz, with a 2 MW source capability each, will be added together with two new four-strap antennas in early 1994. Another major thrust of the DIII-D program is to develop advanced tokamak modes of operation, simultaneously demonstrating improvements in confinement and stability in quasi-steady-state operation. In some of the initial advanced tokamak experiments on DIII-D with neutral beam heated (NBI) discharges it has been demonstrated that energy confinement time can be improved by rapidly elongating the plasma to force the current density profile to be more centrally peaked. However, this high-l i phase of the discharge with the commensurate improvement in confinement is transient as the current density profile relaxes. By applying FWCD to the core of such a κ-ramped discharge it may be possible to sustain the high internal inductance and elevated confinement. Using computational tools validated on the initial DIII-D FWCD experiments we find that such a high-l i advanced tokamak discharge should be capable of sustainment at the 1 MA level with the upgraded capability of the FWCD system. (author) 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Analysis of the performance of the drive system and diffuser of the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasel, L. E.; Stallings, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A broad program was initiated at the Langley Research Center in 1973 to reduce the energy consumption of the laboratory. As a part of this program, the performance characteristics of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel were reexamined to determine if potential methods for incresing the operating efficiencies of the tunnel could be formulated. The results of that study are summarized. The performance characteristics of the drive system components and the variable-geometry diffuser system of the tunnel are documented and analyzed. Several potential methods for reducing the energy requirements of the facility are discussed.

  14. Development of 4.6 GHz lower hybrid current drive system for steady state and high performance plasma in EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, F.K.; Li, J.G.; Shan, J.F.; Wang, M.; Liu, L.; Zhao, L.M.; Hu, H.C.; Feng, J.Q.; Yang, Y.; Jia, H.; Wang, X.J.; Wu, Z.G.; Ma, W.D.; Huang, Y.Y.; Xu, H.D.; Zhang, J.; Cheng, M.; Xu, L.; Li, M.H.; Li, Y.C.; and others

    2016-12-15

    In order to achieve steady state and high performance plasma in EAST, a new lower hybrid current drive system at a frequency of 4.6 GHz has been built. The system is composed of 24 continuous wave (CW) klystron amplifiers to generate 6MW/CW microwave, 24 standard rectangle waveguide transmission lines with water-cooling plate, a multi-junction grill composed of 576 active (in groups of 8) and 84 passive sub-waveguides arranged in 12 rows and 6 columns, and four sets of high voltage power supplies. The power value and the spectrum of the launched microwave from the antenna can be controlled by the low-power microwave circuits in front of the klystrons. The new LHCD system has been applied to the experiments on EAST tokmak since 2014, and the obtained results suggest that it is effective to couple the wave into plasma and drive plasma current.

  15. Influence of Control Structures and Load Parameters on Performance of a Pseudo Direct Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Bouheraoua

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an in-depth and systematic analysis of a pseudo direct drive permanent magnet machine in closed loop control. Due to the torque being transmitted from the high-speed rotor (HSR to the low-speed rotor (LSR, through a relatively low stiffness magnetic gear with non-linear characteristics, speed oscillations appear in the drive output with a conventional proportional integral (PI controller. Therefore two candidate controllers have been proposed as an alternative to the PI control and all controllers have been optimally tuned with a genetic algorithm against a defined criterion. Furthermore, closed loop models are established in the complex frequency domain to determine the system damping and the cause of the oscillations. Consequently, the best controller structure that improves the dynamic behaviour of the system in terms of speed tracking and disturbance rejection could be identified, based on the frequency domain analysis. Experimental results are presented to validate the analysis and the proposed control technique.

  16. Nocturnal leg cramps in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J; Mulkerrin, E; O'Keeffe, S

    2002-01-01

    Nocturnal leg cramps are common in older people. Such cramps are associated with many common diseases and medications. Physiological methods may be useful for preventing cramps in some people, but there have been no controlled trials of these approaches. Quinine is moderately effective in preventing nocturnal leg cramps. However, there are concerns about the risk/benefit ratio with this drug. In patients with severe symptoms, a trial of 4–6 weeks' treatment with quinine is probably still justified, but the efficacy of treatment should be monitored, for example using a sleep and cramp diary. PMID:12415081

  17. Night terrors and sudden unexplained nocturnal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melles, R B; Katz, B

    1988-06-01

    A high incidence of sudden unexplained nocturnal deaths has been reported among young Asian males. These deaths are known as Pokkuri in Japan, Bangungut in the Philippines and Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death in the United States. Post mortem analysis has demonstrated cardiac conduction defects in many of the victims. Careful review of the terminal events surrounding these deaths suggests that the victims suffered from night terrors. Night terrors are a sleep disorder characterized by vocalization, motor activity, a nonarousable state, and severe autonomic discharge. The proposed recognition of both night terrors and cardiac anomalies in these patients offers a pathophysiologic mechanism for their sudden death.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions ADNFLE Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy ( ADNFLE ) is an uncommon form of epilepsy that ...

  19. Critical review and analysis of the impact of the physical infrastructure on the driving ability, performance, and safety of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Paula Christine

    2008-01-01

    Literature on the impact of physical infrastructure on older adult safe driving performance was reviewed in 2005 as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Literature Review Project. Existing guidelines for driving environments, related to changes in visual, cognitive, and psychomotor abilities associated with the aging process (as published in the Highway Design Handbook for Older Drivers and Pedestrians, Federal Highway Administration, 2001), are exhaustive, but the authors made no attempt to critically assess the strength of the study design or level of evidence. In laboratory studies since 1999, the interventions lacked applicability to real-life driving environments. Further investigation of the effectiveness of best practice interventions and how the driving environment can better accommodate the needs of older drivers is needed. Occupational therapy interventions that focus on the occupation of driving and compensation and education strategies that allow older adults to drive safely as long as possible are included.

  20. Iatrogenic nocturnal eneuresis- an overlooked side effect of anti histamines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Italiano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal enuresis is a common disorder in childhood, but its pathophysiological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Iatrogenic nocturnal enuresis has been described following treatment with several psychotropic medications. Herein, we describe a 6-year-old child who experienced nocturnal enuresis during treatment with the antihistamine cetirizine. Drug rechallenge was positive. Several neurotransmitters are implicated in the pathogenesis of nocturnal enuresis, including noradrenaline, serotonin and dopamine. Antihistamine treatment may provoke functional imbalance of these pathways resulting in incontinence.

  1. Pattern of Primary Nocturnal Enuresis in Primary School Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of Primary Nocturnal Enuresis in Primary School Children (First Grade) in Assiut City. ... Statistically significant risk factors were deep sleep and a high educational level of the parents. Primary nocturnal enuresis was insignificantly associated with a positive family history, family size or birth rank. In primary nocturnal ...

  2. What drives university research performance? An analysis using the CWTS Leiden Ranking data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenken, Koen; Heimeriks, Gaston J.; Hoekman, Jarno

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the factors underlying university research performance as indicated by the number of highly-cited publications, international co-publications, and university-industry co-publications. The three performance indicators evaluate three possible university missions, respectively:

  3. Obstacle avoidance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior of glaucoma patients in a driving simulator: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Prado Vega

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in driving performance, visual detection performance, and eye-scanning behavior between glaucoma patients and control participants without glaucoma. Glaucoma patients (n = 23 and control participants (n = 12 completed four 5-min driving sessions in a simulator. The participants were instructed to maintain the car in the right lane of a two-lane highway while their speed was automatically maintained at 100 km/h. Additional tasks per session were: Session 1: none, Session 2: verbalization of projected letters, Session 3: avoidance of static obstacles, and Session 4: combined letter verbalization and avoidance of static obstacles. Eye-scanning behavior was recorded with an eye-tracker. Results showed no statistically significant differences between patients and control participants for lane keeping, obstacle avoidance, and eye-scanning behavior. Steering activity, number of missed letters, and letter reaction time were significantly higher for glaucoma patients than for control participants. In conclusion, glaucoma patients were able to avoid objects and maintain a nominal lane keeping performance, but applied more steering input than control participants, and were more likely than control participants to miss peripherally projected stimuli. The eye-tracking results suggest that glaucoma patients did not use extra visual search to compensate for their visual field loss. Limitations of the study, such as small sample size, are discussed.

  4. Configuration Driving NPD Performance Fit with Market Demands and time constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.; Visscher, Klaasjan; Song, Michael; Parry, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this paper is aimed at developing knowledge on organizing NPD systems to optimize their contribution to performance. To this end, a systems approach to fit is used to explain the context-structure-performance relationships for NPD performance, specifically in terms of fit

  5. Configurations driving NPD performance fit with market demands and time constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.; Visscher, Klaasjan; Song, Michael; Parry, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this paper is aimed at developing knowledge on organizing NPD systems to optimize their contribution to performance. To this end, a systems approach to fit is used to explain the context-structure-performance relationships for NPD performance, specifically in terms of fit

  6. Effects on driving performance of interacting with an in-vehicle music player: a comparison of three interface layout concepts for information presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsopoulos-Rubens, Eve; Trotter, Margaret J; Lenné, Michael G

    2011-05-01

    Interface design is an important factor in assessing the potential effects on safety of interacting with an in-vehicle information system while driving. In the current study, the layout of information on a visual display was manipulated to explore its effect on driving performance in the context of music selection. The comparative effects of an auditory-verbal (cognitive) task were also explored. The driving performance of 30 participants was assessed under both baseline and dual task conditions using the Lane Change Test. Concurrent completion of the music selection task with driving resulted in significant impairment to lateral driving performance (mean lane deviation and percentage of correct lane changes) relative to the baseline, and significantly greater mean lane deviation relative to the combined driving and the cognitive task condition. The magnitude of these effects on driving performance was independent of layout concept, although significant differences in subjective workload estimates and performance on the music selection task across layout concepts highlights that potential uncertainty regarding design use as conveyed through layout concept could be disadvantageous. The implications of these results for interface design and safety are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors influencing phototaxis in nocturnal migrating birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuebing; Chen, Mingyan; Wu, Zhaolu; Wang, Zijiang

    2014-12-01

    Many migratory bird species fly during the night (nocturnal migrants) and have been shown to display some phototaxis to artificial light. During 2006 to 2009, we investigated phototaxis in nocturnal migrants at Jinshan Yakou in Xinping County (N23°56', E101°30'; 2400 m above sea-level), and at the Niaowang Mountain in Funing County (N23°30', E105°35'; 1400 m above sea-level), both in the Yunnan Province of Southwest China. A total of 5069 birds, representing 129 species, were captured by mist-netting and artificial light. The extent of phototaxis effect on bird migration was examined during all four seasons, three phases of the moon, and under two weather conditions (mist and wind). Data were statistically analyzed to determine the extent to which these factors may impact phototaxis of nocturnal migrants. The results point to phototaxis in birds migrating in the spring and autumn, especially in the autumn. Furthermore, migrating birds were more readily attracted to artificial lights during nights with little moonlight, mist, and a headwind. Regardless of the initial orientation in which birds flew, either following the wind or against the wind, birds would always fly against the wind when flying towards the light. This study broadens our understanding of the nocturnal bird migration, potentially resulting in improved bird ringing practices, increased awareness, and better policies regarding bird protection.

  8. Excessive daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep duration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. Short nocturnal sleep duration resulting in sleep debt may be a cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Severity of depression (psychopathology) has been found to be directly related to EDS. There is an association between sleep duration and mental health, so there may therefore be an ...

  9. Phytotherapy for children's nocturnal enuresis | Ahmadipour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results have shown that Zingiber officinale, Valeriana officinalis, Alcea rosea, Elettaria cardamomum, Cinnamomum verum, Ribes uva-crispa, Cornus mas, Juglans regia, Vitis vinifera, Sinapis spp., Olea europaea, and Prunus cerasus are a number of important plants that are effective on nocturnal enuresis in traditional ...

  10. The cause of ischaemic nocturnal rest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1988-01-01

    of symptomatology. In two limbs, with a normal peripheral circulation, blood flow decreased by 8 +/- 7%. In five limbs with arterial insufficiency, but no rest pain, blood flow decreased by 16 +/- 8% and in eight limbs with ischaemic nocturnal rest pain blood flow was reduced by 32 +/- 12% during sleep...

  11. Radiative cooling in the nocturnal boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjemkes, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the transfer of infrared radiation (electromagnetic waves with a wavelength between 3.6 and 100 μm) through a cloudfree nocturnal boundary layer is studied. To simulate the transfer of infrared radiation an accurate narrow band model which simulates the absorption and

  12. Renal manifestations in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is an acquired chronic disorder characterized by a triad of clinical features - hemolytic anemia, pancytopenia, and thrombosis. Not many reports of renal involvement in PNH are available in literature. We present a case series of PNH with renal involvement. We present the data of PNH patients who attended to Departments of General Medicine and Nephrology at a government-run tertiary care institute in South India. The diagnosis of PNH in these patients during initial phase, between 1998 and 2004 was based on sucrose lysis and Ham's test. After 2004, the diagnosis was based on flow cytometry to detect CD59 (membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis, a glycoprotein, and CD55 (decay accelerating factor in regulation of complement action. The patient data were collected from 1998 to 2014. There were 14 patients of PNH in this period. The mean age was 37 years and the range was 16–68 years. There were eight females. Acute kidney injury (AKI was noted in six patients. Dialysis was performed in four of them. The mean serum creatinine and urea at the initiation of dialysis were 5.4 ± 0.6 and 64.1 ± 6.1 mg/dl, respectively. The median number of hemodialysis sessions done was four. Renal biopsy was done in four patients. In three patients, the urinalysis and serum chemistry were suggestive of Fanconi syndrome. In our patients, three renal manifestations of PNH were identified. They were AKI, renal vessel thrombosis, and Fanconi syndrome. Chronic renal failure was not identified.

  13. A Fuzzy Model to Interpret Data of Drive Performances from Patients with Sleep Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Sena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for safe vehicles is increasing with both diffusion of high traffic density over the world and availability of new technologies providing sophisticated tools previously impossible to realize. Design and development of the necessary devices may be based on simulation tests that reduce cost allowing trials in many directions. A proper choice of the arrangement of the drive simulators, as much as of the parameters to be monitored, is of basic importance as they can address the design of devices somehow responsible for the drivers safety or, even their lives. This system setup, consisting of a free car simulator equipped with a monitoring system, collects in a nonintrusive way data of the car lateral position within the road lane and of its first derivative. Based on these measured parameters, the system is able to detect symptoms of drowsiness and sleepiness. The analysis is realized by a fuzzy inferential process that provides an immediate warning signal as soon as drowsiness is detected with a high level of certainty. Enhancement of reliability and minimisation of the false alarm rate are obtained by operating continuous comparison between learned driver typical modalities of operation on the control command of the vehicle the pattern recorded.

  14. A fuzzy model to interpret data of drive performances from patients with sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Pasquale; Attianese, Paolo; Carbone, Francesca; Pellegrino, Arcangelo; Pinto, Aldo; Villecco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The search for safe vehicles is increasing with both diffusion of high traffic density over the world and availability of new technologies providing sophisticated tools previously impossible to realize. Design and development of the necessary devices may be based on simulation tests that reduce cost allowing trials in many directions. A proper choice of the arrangement of the drive simulators, as much as of the parameters to be monitored, is of basic importance as they can address the design of devices somehow responsible for the drivers safety or, even their lives. This system setup, consisting of a free car simulator equipped with a monitoring system, collects in a nonintrusive way data of the car lateral position within the road lane and of its first derivative. Based on these measured parameters, the system is able to detect symptoms of drowsiness and sleepiness. The analysis is realized by a fuzzy inferential process that provides an immediate warning signal as soon as drowsiness is detected with a high level of certainty. Enhancement of reliability and minimisation of the false alarm rate are obtained by operating continuous comparison between learned driver typical modalities of operation on the control command of the vehicle the pattern recorded.

  15. Driving mechanism of SOL plasma flow an effects on the divertor performance in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Nobuyuki; Takenaga, H.; Sakurai, S.

    2003-01-01

    The measurements of the scrape-off layer(SOL) flow and plasma profiles both at the high-field-side (HFS) and low-field-side (LFS), for the first time, identified the SOL flow pattern and its driving mechanism. 'Flow reversal' was found near the HFS and LFS separatrix of the main plasma for the ion ∇B drift direction towards the divertor, Radial profiles of the SOL flow were similar to those calculated numerically using the UEDGE code with the plasma drifts included although Mach numbers in measurements were greater than those obtained numerically. Particle fluxes towards the HFS and LFS divertors produced by the parallel SOL flow and E r xB drift flow were evaluated. The particle flux for the case of intense gas puff and divertor pump (puff and pump) was investigated, and it was found that both the Mach number and collisionality were enhanced, in particular, at HFS. Drift flux in the private flux region was also evaluated, and important physics issues for the divertor design and operation, such as in-out asymmetries of the heat and particle fluxes, and control of impurity ions were investigated. (author)

  16. Driving mechanism of SOL plasma flow and effects on the divertor performance in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, N.; Takenaga, H.; Sakurai, S.

    2003-01-01

    The measurements of the SOL flow and plasma profiles both at the high-field-side (HFS) and low field- side (LFS), for the first time, identified the SOL flow pattern and its driving mechanism. 'Flow reversal' was found near the HFS and LFS separatrix of the main plasma for the ion ∇β drift direction towards the divertor. Radial profiles of the SOL flow were similar to those calculated numerically using the UEDGE code with the plasma drifts included although Mach numbers in measurements were greater than those obtained numerically. Particle fluxes towards the HFS and LFS divertors produced by the parallel SOL flow and E r xB drift flow were evaluated. The particle flux for the case of intense gas puff and divertor pump (puff and pump) was investigated, and it was found that both the Mach number and collisionality were enhanced, in particular, at HFS. Drift flux in the private flux region was also evaluated, and important physics issues for the divertor design and operation, such as in-out asymmetries of the heat and particle fluxes, and control of impurity ions were investigated. (author)

  17. A Medium-Voltage Motor Drive with a Modular Multilevel PWM Inverter Part II. Startup Method and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazutoshi; Hagiwara, Makoto; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents a medium-voltage motor drive with a modular multilevel PWM inverter, and focuses on a startup method and its performance. It is formed by six modular arms, each of which consists of a cascaded stack of multiple bidirectional chopper-cells. The frequency of the dominant ac-voltage fluctuation is equal to the motor (inverter) frequency. These fluctuations occur in the dc capacitor of each chopper-cell, and the magnitude of the fluctuation is inversely proportional to the motor frequency. Because of the increased voltage fluctuation in low-frequency regions, the so-called “volt-per-hertz control” cannot be applied in motor starting. The startup method proposed in this paper is suitable for a motor drive with the modular multilevel PWM inverter. It enables the motor to produce a startup torque loaded on the motor at an initial amplitude and a fixed frequency of the inverter while taking into account constraints on the motor current and the ac-voltage fluctuation. The validity of the startup method as well as the startup performance is confirmed by experiment and simulation.

  18. Fear of darkness, the full moon and the nocturnal ecology of African lions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Packer

    Full Text Available Nocturnal carnivores are widely believed to have played an important role in human evolution, driving the need for night-time shelter, the control of fire and our innate fear of darkness. However, no empirical data are available on the effects of darkness on the risks of predation in humans. We performed an extensive analysis of predatory behavior across the lunar cycle on the largest dataset of lion attacks ever assembled and found that African lions are as sensitive to moonlight when hunting humans as when hunting herbivores and that lions are most dangerous to humans when the moon is faint or below the horizon. At night, people are most active between dusk and 10:00 pm, thus most lion attacks occur in the first weeks following the full moon (when the moon rises at least an hour after sunset. Consequently, the full moon is a reliable indicator of impending danger, perhaps helping to explain why the full moon has been the subject of so many myths and misconceptions.

  19. Fear of darkness, the full moon and the nocturnal ecology of African lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Craig; Swanson, Alexandra; Ikanda, Dennis; Kushnir, Hadas

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal carnivores are widely believed to have played an important role in human evolution, driving the need for night-time shelter, the control of fire and our innate fear of darkness. However, no empirical data are available on the effects of darkness on the risks of predation in humans. We performed an extensive analysis of predatory behavior across the lunar cycle on the largest dataset of lion attacks ever assembled and found that African lions are as sensitive to moonlight when hunting humans as when hunting herbivores and that lions are most dangerous to humans when the moon is faint or below the horizon. At night, people are most active between dusk and 10:00 pm, thus most lion attacks occur in the first weeks following the full moon (when the moon rises at least an hour after sunset). Consequently, the full moon is a reliable indicator of impending danger, perhaps helping to explain why the full moon has been the subject of so many myths and misconceptions.

  20. Effects of exercise intensity and duration on nocturnal heart rate variability and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllymäki, Tero; Rusko, Heikki; Syväoja, Heidi; Juuti, Tanja; Kinnunen, Marja-Liisa; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2012-03-01

    Acute physical exercise may affect cardiac autonomic modulation hours or even days during the recovery phase. Although sleep is an essential recovery period, the information on nocturnal autonomic modulation indicated by heart rate variability (HRV) after different exercises is mostly lacking. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of exercise intensity and duration on nocturnal HR, HRV, HR, and HRV-based relaxation, as well as on actigraphic and subjective sleep quality. Fourteen healthy male subjects (age 36 ± 4 years, maximal oxygen uptake 49 ± 4 ml/kg/min) performed five different running exercises on separate occasions starting at 6 p.m. with HR guidance at home. The effect of intensity was studied with 30 min of exercises at intensities corresponding to HR level at 45% (easy), 60% (moderate) and 75% (vigorous) of their maximal oxygen uptake. The effect of duration was studied with 30, 60, and 90 min of moderate exercises. Increased exercise intensity elevated nocturnal HR compared to control day (p exercises (p exercise day compared to control day (p exercise intensity nor duration had any impact on actigraphic or subjective sleep quality. The results suggest that increased exercise intensity and/or duration cause delayed recovery of nocturnal cardiac autonomic modulation, although long exercise duration was needed to induce changes in nocturnal HRV. Increased exercise intensity or duration does not seem to disrupt sleep quality.

  1. Driving forces and barriers to improved energy performance of buildings: an analysis of energy performance of Swedish buildings, 2000-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglseth, Bente Beckstroem

    2008-06-15

    The building sector is responsible for a substantial part of energy use and green house gas emissions in Europe. This report explores driving forces and barriers to improved energy performance of buildings, using the Swedish building sector as a case. The development of energy performance of buildings in Sweden from 2000 until 2006 is explored by applying a threefold understanding of energy performance of buildings: substitution from fossil fuels to renewable energy, conversion from electrical heating to thermal energy and reduction in energy demand. Three explanatory approaches are used to analyse driving forces and barriers to improved energy performance: the techno-economic approach stresses the physical aspects of infrastructure and technologies, the institutional approach emphasizes the role of institutional factors, while the regulative approach focuses on formal rules and laws. The study concludes that all factors have promoted substitution of fossil fuels with renewable energy, while they have prevented conversion from electrical heating to thermal energy and reduction in energy demand. (author). 95 refs

  2. Cooling Performance Characteristics of the Stack Thermal Management System for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles under Actual Driving Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Seong Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The cooling performance of the stack radiator of a fuel cell electric vehicle was evaluated under various actual road driving conditions, such as highway and uphill travel. The thermal stability was then optimized, thereby ensuring stable operation of the stack thermal management system. The coolant inlet temperature of the radiator in the highway mode was lower than that associated with the uphill mode because the corresponding frontal air velocity was higher than obtained in the uphill mode. In both the highway and uphill modes, the coolant temperatures of the radiator, operated under actual road driving conditions, were lower than the allowable limit (80 °C; this is the maximum temperature at which stable operation of the stack thermal management system of the fuel cell electric vehicle could be maintained. Furthermore, under actual road driving conditions in uphill mode, the initial temperature difference (ITD between the coolant temperature and air temperature of the system was higher than that associated with the highway mode; this higher ITD occurred even though the thermal load of the system in uphill mode was greater than that corresponding to the highway mode. Since the coolant inlet temperature is expected to exceed the allowable limit (80 °C in uphill mode under higher ambient temperature with air conditioning system operation, the FEM design layout should be modified to improve the heat capacity. In addition, the overall volume of the stack cooling radiator is 52.2% higher than that of the present model and the coolant inlet temperature of the improved radiator is 22.7% lower than that of the present model.

  3. Understanding the dynamic interactions driving Zambian health centre performance: a case-based health systems analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Stephanie M; Chipukuma, Julien M; Hanefeld, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite being central to achieving improved population health outcomes, primary health centres in low- and middle-income settings continue to underperform. Little research exists to adequately explain how and why this is the case. This study aimed to test the relevance and usefulness of an adapted conceptual framework for improving our understanding of the mechanisms and causal pathways influencing primary health centre performance. Methods A theory-driven, case-study approach was adopted. Four Zambian health centres were purposefully selected with case data including health-care worker interviews (n = 60); patient interviews (n = 180); direct observation of facility operations (2 weeks/centre) and key informant interviews (n = 14). Data were analysed to understand how the performance of each site was influenced by the dynamic interactions between system ‘hardware’ and ‘software’ acting on mechanisms of accountability. Findings Structural constraints including limited resources created challenging service environments in which work overload and stockouts were common. Health workers’ frustration with such conditions interacted with dissatisfaction with salary levels eroding service values and acting as a catalyst for different forms of absenteeism. Such behaviours exacerbated patient–provider ratios and increased the frequency of clinical and administrative shortcuts. Weak health information systems and lack of performance data undermined providers’ answerability to their employer and clients, and a lack of effective sanctions undermined supervisors’ ability to hold providers accountable for these transgressions. Weak answerability and enforceability contributed to a culture of impunity that masked and condoned weak service performance in all four sites. Conclusions Health centre performance is influenced by mechanisms of accountability, which are in turn shaped by dynamic interactions between system hardware and system software. Our

  4. Performance analysis of active damped small DC-link capacitor based drive for unbalanced input voltage supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    A small DC-link capacitor based drive is presented in this paper. The drive shows negative impedance instability at operating points with high power load. A phase portrait is presented for input filter states which exhibit a limit cycle. When the drive is operated with unbalanced input supply...

  5. A High-Performance Control Method of Constant V/f-Controlled Induction Motor Drives for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-phase induction motor used as a propulsion system for the electric vehicle (EV is a nonlinear, multi-input multi-output, and strong coupling system. For such a complicated model system with unmeasured and unavoidable disturbances, as well as parameter variations, the conventional vector control method cannot meet the demands of high-performance control. Therefore, a novel control strategy named least squares support vector machines (LSSVM inverse control is presented in the paper. Invertibility of the induction motor in the constant V/f control mode is proved to confirm its feasibility. The LSSVM inverse is composed of an LSSVM approximating the nonlinear mapping of the induction motor and two integrators. The inverse model of the constant V/f-controlled induction motor drive is obtained by using LSSVM, and then the optimal parameters of LSSVM are determined automatically by applying a modified particle swarm optimization (MPSO. Cascading the LSSVM inverse with the induction motor drive system, the pseudolinear system can be obtained. Thus, it is easy to design the closed-loop linear regulator. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Mathematical modelling of performance of safety rod and its drive mechanism in sodium cooled fast reactor during scram action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan Babu, V.; Thanigaiyarasu, G.; Chellapandi, P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mathematical modelling of dynamic behaviour of safety rod during scram action in fast reactor. • Effects of hydraulics, structural interaction and geometry on drop time of safety rod are understood. • Using simplified model, drop time can be assessed replacing detailed CFD analysis. • Sensitivities of the related parameters on drop time are understood. • Experimental validation qualifies the modelling and computer software developed. - Abstract: Performance of safety rod and its drive mechanism which are parts of shutdown systems in sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plays a major role in ensuring safe operation of the plant during all the design basis events. The safety rods are to be inserted into the core within a stipulated time during off-normal conditions of the reactor. Mathematical modelling of dynamic behaviour of a safety rod and its drive mechanism in a typical 500 MWe SFR during scram action is considered in the present study. A full-scale prototype system has undergone qualification tests in air, water and in sodium simulating the operating conditions in the reactor. In this paper, the salient features of the safety rod and its mechanism, details related to mathematical modelling and sensitivity of the parameters having influence on drop time are presented. The outcomes of the numerical analysis are compared with the experimental results. In this process, the mathematical model and the computer software developed are validated

  7. Performance Evaluation of Electronic Inductor-Based Adjustable Speed Drives with Respect to Line Current Interharmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Hamid; Davari, Pooya; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    attractive due to its improved harmonic performance compared to a conventional ASD. In this digest, the input currents of the EI-based ASD are investigated and compared with the conventional ASDs with respect to interharmonics, which is an emerging power quality topic. First, the main causes...

  8. Thermal Performance of the Texas Instruments 1-W Linear Drive Cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency, of the electronics plays a large part in determining the overall spacecraft power requirements to operate the cooler as well as determining the thermal dissipation characteristics of the various electrical components. The results of all the performance measurements are presented in the paper.

  9. Business health reporting process at Bruce Power helps drive successful plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing and implementing consistent and comprehensive measures of performance on a large multi-reactor unit nuclear power plant site is a significant challenge. Linking these performance measures back to licence compliance standards and all aspects of the operations, engineering, maintenance and support activities is needed to ensure cohesive site-wide safe operations and satisfy regulatory needs. At Bruce Power, Canada's largest independently-owned nuclear power producer, a Business Health reporting process has been developed to provide a standardized performance rating scheme. The reporting process ties all self assessment activities to common management principles and process structure areas that comprise the Bruce Power Management System. The principles used for performance ratings link directly back to the operating licenses and the primary referenced management system standard. The Business Health reporting process provides a natural business and regulatory oversight framework report that is easily understood and consistently measured over time. The rating data is derived from easily understood quantitative and qualitative descriptions that can be trended over time. The results derived from semi-annual Business Health reports provide an ongoing overall measure of Bruce Power's management system effectiveness for enabling and sustaining required business results and high standards of safety. (author)

  10. Effects of time of day and sleep deprivation on motorcycle-driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougard, Clément; Espié, Stéphane; Larnaudie, Bruno; Moussay, Sébastien; Davenne, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether motorcycle handling capabilities--measured by means of the efficiency of emergency manoeuvres--were dependent on prior sleep deprivation and time of day. Twelve male participants voluntarily took part in four test sessions, starting at 6 a.m., 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 6 p.m., following a night either with or without sleep. Each test session comprised temperature and sleepiness measurements, before three different types of motorcycling tests were initiated: (1) stability in straight ahead riding at low speed (in "slow motion" mode and in "brakes and clutch" mode), (2) emergency braking and (3) crash avoidance tasks performed at 20 kph and 40 kph. The results indicate that motorcycle control at low speed depends on time of day, with an improvement in performance throughout the day. Emergency braking performance is affected at both speeds by time of day, with poorer performance (longer total stopping distance, reaction time and braking distance) in the morning, and also by sleep deprivation, from measurements obtained at 40 kph (incorrect initial speed). Except for a tendency observed after the sleepless night to deviate from the initial speed, it seems that crash avoidance capabilities are quite unaffected by the two disturbance factors. Consequently, some motorcycle handling capabilities (stability at low speed and emergency braking) change in the same way as the diurnal fluctuation observed in body temperature and sleepiness, whereas for others (crash avoidance) the participants were able to maintain their initial performance level despite the high levels of sleepiness recorded after a sleepless night. Motorcycle riders have to be aware that their handling capabilities are limited in the early morning and/or after sleep deprivation. Both these situations can increase the risk of falls and of being involved in a road accident.

  11. Effects of time of day and sleep deprivation on motorcycle-driving performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Bougard

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether motorcycle handling capabilities--measured by means of the efficiency of emergency manoeuvres--were dependent on prior sleep deprivation and time of day. Twelve male participants voluntarily took part in four test sessions, starting at 6 a.m., 10 a.m., 2 p.m., and 6 p.m., following a night either with or without sleep. Each test session comprised temperature and sleepiness measurements, before three different types of motorcycling tests were initiated: (1 stability in straight ahead riding at low speed (in "slow motion" mode and in "brakes and clutch" mode, (2 emergency braking and (3 crash avoidance tasks performed at 20 kph and 40 kph. The results indicate that motorcycle control at low speed depends on time of day, with an improvement in performance throughout the day. Emergency braking performance is affected at both speeds by time of day, with poorer performance (longer total stopping distance, reaction time and braking distance in the morning, and also by sleep deprivation, from measurements obtained at 40 kph (incorrect initial speed. Except for a tendency observed after the sleepless night to deviate from the initial speed, it seems that crash avoidance capabilities are quite unaffected by the two disturbance factors. Consequently, some motorcycle handling capabilities (stability at low speed and emergency braking change in the same way as the diurnal fluctuation observed in body temperature and sleepiness, whereas for others (crash avoidance the participants were able to maintain their initial performance level despite the high levels of sleepiness recorded after a sleepless night. Motorcycle riders have to be aware that their handling capabilities are limited in the early morning and/or after sleep deprivation. Both these situations can increase the risk of falls and of being involved in a road accident.

  12. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance.

  13. Magnetic hyperthermia performance of magnetite nanoparticle assemblies under different driving fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2017-05-01

    The heating performance of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) is dependent on several factors. Optimizing these factors improves the heating efficiency for cancer therapy and meanwhile lowers the MNP treatment dosage. AMF is one of the most easily controllable variables to enhance the efficiency of heat generation. This paper investigated the optimal magnetic field strength and frequency for an assembly of magnetite nanoparticles. For hyperthermia treatment in clinical applications, monodispersed NPs are forming nanoclusters in target regions where a strong magnetically interactive environment is anticipated, which leads to a completely different situation than MNPs in ferrofluids. Herein, the energy barrier model is revisited and Néel relaxation time is tailored for high MNP packing densities. AMF strength and frequency are customized for different magnetite NPs to achieve the highest power generation and the best hyperthermia performance.

  14. Performance and Stability Analysis of Negative Capacitor in OLED Driving Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Chang-Hoon; Hattori, Reiji

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated in the previous work that the negative capacitor can effectively prevent the signal delay due to the parasitic capacitance in the current programmed OLED display. However, there were some problems in the real panel application. Therefore, we discussed the difference between the simulation and measurement results and proposed the methods to improve the negative capacitor performance. We also analyzed the stability of negative capacitor considering the parasitic resistance ...

  15. Electrothermal Microactuators With Peg Drive Improve Performance for Brain Implant Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sindhu; Sutanto, Jemmy; Baker, Michael S; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2012-07-13

    This paper presents a new actuation scheme for in-plane bidirectional translation of polysilicon microelectrodes. The new Chevron-peg actuation scheme uses microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based electrothermal microactuators to move microelectrodes for brain implant applications. The design changes were motivated by specific needs identified by the in vivo testing of an earlier generation of MEMS microelectrodes that were actuated by the Chevron-latch type of mechanism. The microelectrodes actuated by the Chevron-peg mechanism discussed here show improved performance in the following key areas: higher force generation capability (111 μ N per heat strip compared to 50 μ N), reduced power consumption (91 mW compared to 360 mW), and reliable performance with consistent forward and backward movements of microelectrodes. Failure analysis of the Chevron-latch and the Chevron-peg type of actuation schemes showed that the latter is more robust to wear over four million cycles of operation. The parameters for the activation waveforms for Chevron-peg actuators were optimized using statistical analysis. Waveforms with a 1-ms time period and a 1-Hz frequency of operation showed minimal error between the expected and the actual movement of the microelectrodes. The new generation of Chevron-peg actuators and microelectrodes are therefore expected to enhance the longevity and performance of implanted microelectrodes in the brain.  [2011-0341].

  16. Body position and late postoperative nocturnal hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Stausholm, K; Edvardsen, L

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients were monitored for nocturnal body position (supine vs. side) and arterial oxygen saturation pre-operatively and on the second postoperative night after major abdominal surgery. The number of positional changes were significantly decreased after operation (p ... position than on the side (p movements....... towards more time spent in the supine position (p = 0.1). Individual mean arterial oxygen saturation decreased postoperatively (p positions (p = 0.9). Pre-operatively, episodic desaturations were significantly more frequent in the supine...

  17. E-GOVERNMENT: A DRIVING FACTOR FOR STIMULATING INNOVATION PERFORMANCE IN ROMANIA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coculescu Cristina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of public services is one of the priorities on the agendas of all policies, both national and European. One of the most recent concerns of the European Commission, as shown in the 2010 Innobarometer, is to find ways and develop strategies to support the innovation in the public administration sector, in the context of the continuously changing economic background. In this paper, we'll investigate the relationship between e-Government, and the overall innovation performance at national level, for some European Union countries. e-Government is already a known concept, widespread in the world, promoting the implementation of information and communication technologies in the public administration, in order to provide better public services to citizens and businesses. A main component of the e-Government concept is the 'counter reform', aimed to streamlining administrative act quickly in order to respond to the demands of citizens, businesses and government structures. Innovation in e-Government will be measured with two Eurostat indicators e-Government on-line availability and e-Government usage by individuals while for the overall innovation performance we'll use a composite indicator the Summary Innovation Index (SII - from the Innovation Union Scoreboard (IUS. In Romania, even if the values of these indicators are not at the level of other EU countries, we can say that the situation has improved and electronic public services are being used increasingly often. The study also includes a comparison between two modest innovators: Romania and Bulgaria. Regarding the overall innovation performance, according to the 2010 Innovation Union Scoreboard ranking, Romania is the leader of the modest innovators countries, overcoming Latvia, Bulgaria and Lithuania. However, in the field of e-Government our country has major shortcomings. Romania has registered a significant progress in the years after the EU integration, followed by a setback in

  18. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  19. RF high voltage performance of RF transmission line components on the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, S.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Phelps, D.A.; Ponce, D.; Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.

    1995-12-01

    The performance of the high voltage rf components of the DIII-D Fast Wave Current Drive System (FWCD) have been evaluated under various conditions of insulator configuration, insulator material, insulating gas and gas pressure. The insulator materials that have been investigated are alumina, steatite, pyrex, quartz, and teflon. The results of this evaluation are discussed in this paper. Additionally a rf high potter was developed to aid in the evaluation of rf high voltage components. The high potter consists of a 50 Ω, 1/4 wavelength cavity with a variable position short and a 50 ohm matched tap at one end of the cavity. With this configuration rf voltages were generated in excess of 100 kVp in the frequency range 30 to 60 MHz

  20. Dementia & Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find the loss of driving privileges and the inherent loss of independence upsetting. Encourage the individual with ... to modify their driving. This can reduce the risk of an accident if the individual’s driving skills ...

  1. Drive Stands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Systems Laboratory (ESL)houses numerous electrically driven drive stands. A drive stand consists of an electric motor driving a gearbox and a mounting...

  2. Thermodynamic characterisation of urban nocturnal cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hua Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal cooling of urban areas governs the evolution of thermal state and many thermal-driven environmental issues in cities, especially those suffer strong urban heat island (UHI effect. Advances in the fundamental understanding of the underlying physics of nighttime UHI involve disentangling complex contributing effects and remains an open challenge. In this study, we develop new numerical algorithms to characterize the thermodynamics of urban nocturnal cooling based on solving the energy balance equations for both the landscape surface and the overlying atmosphere. Further, a scaling law is proposed to relate the UHI intensity to a range of governing mechanisms, including the vertical and horizontal transport of heat in the surface layer, the urban-rural breeze, and the possible urban expansion. The accuracy of proposed methods is evaluated against in-situ urban measurements collected in cities with different geographic and climatic conditions. It is found that the vertical and horizontal contributors modulate the nocturnal UHI at distinct elevation in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  3. Enhancing Diversity in Undergraduate Science: Self-Efficacy Drives Performance Gains with Active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballen, Cissy J; Wieman, Carl; Salehi, Shima; Searle, Jeremy B; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2017-01-01

    Efforts to retain underrepresented minority (URM) students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have shown only limited success in higher education, due in part to a persistent achievement gap between students from historically underrepresented and well-represented backgrounds. To test the hypothesis that active learning disproportionately benefits URM students, we quantified the effects of traditional versus active learning on student academic performance, science self-efficacy, and sense of social belonging in a large (more than 250 students) introductory STEM course. A transition to active learning closed the gap in learning gains between non-URM and URM students and led to an increase in science self-efficacy for all students. Sense of social belonging also increased significantly with active learning, but only for non-URM students. Through structural equation modeling, we demonstrate that, for URM students, the increase in self-efficacy mediated the positive effect of active-learning pedagogy on two metrics of student performance. Our results add to a growing body of research that supports varied and inclusive teaching as one pathway to a diversified STEM workforce. © 2017 C. J. Ballen et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Impaired driving performance in shiftworkers: the role of the circadian system in a multifactorial model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G. S.; Miner, J. D.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A substantial and growing percentage of the U.S. work force now works on a rotating shift schedule. The repeated changes in sleep-wake, meal and work times inherent in such schedules conflict with the dictates of the internal biological clock and have adverse consequences for the health of the shiftworker population. An important consequence of this conflict is impaired performance, both on and off the job, as indexed by the increased incidence of motor vehicle accidents in shift workers. In this paper we report the results of a survey administered to rotating shift and straight day workers at a manufacturing plant in the eastern U.S. This survey documents an increased incidence of motor vehicle accidents or "near misses" in which sleepiness was implicated as a cause by the respondent. Complaints of poor sleep and increased sleepiness were also significantly more common in shiftworkers than day workers. Last, shiftworkers reported higher caffeine and alcohol consumption, and were more likely to use alcohol as a sleep aid. Although causal links cannot be established using these associative observations alone, previously reported experience with alteration of shift schedules, improvement of levels of alertness, and reduction in adverse performance outcomes corroborate the possibility of a causal link and suggest potential interventions.

  5. Identifying Method of Drunk Driving Based on Driving Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Drunk driving is one of the leading causes contributing to traffic crashes. There are numerous issues that need to be resolved with the current method of identifying drunk driving. Driving behavior, with the characteristic of real-time, was extensively researched to identify impaired driving behaviors. In this paper, the drives with BACs above 0.05% were defined as drunk driving state. A detailed comparison was made between normal driving and drunk driving. The experiment in driving simulator was designed to collect the driving performance data of the groups. According to the characteristics analysis for the effect of alcohol on driving performance, seven significant indicators were extracted and the drunk driving was identified by the Fisher Discriminant Method. The discriminant function demonstrated a high accuracy of classification. The optimal critical score to differentiate normal from drinking state was found to be 0. The evaluation result verifies the accuracy of classification method.

  6. Sleep-related breathing disorders in small children with nocturnal acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, J; Kaczmarski, M

    2004-01-01

    Coincidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome has been discussed in recent years. Treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) reduces gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Moreover, treatment of gastroesophageal reflux with omeprazole can reduce the severity of obstructive sleep in selected individuals. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that gastroesophageal reflux does not influence sleep quality and breathing pattern during sleep in children. 24 children (14 boys, 10 girls, aged 2 months-3 years) with sleep disturbances indicating GER were studied. Standard polysomnography with parallel recording of 24-h oesophageal monitoring was performed. Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) in active/REM sleep and quiet/NREM sleep was compared between nocturnal acid GER children (13 children; 7 boys, 6 girls; aged 1.28 +/- 0.95y; FRT-18.63 +/- 11.83%) and nocturnal acid GER-free controls (11 children; 7 boys, 4 girls; aged 1.64 +/- 0.97y; FRT-2.93 +/- 2.08%). Exclusion criteria were: 1. laboratory signs of infection (increasing OB, increasing CRP, increasing alpha2-globulin); 2. clinical symptoms of infection in the respiratory tract, the alimentary tract or in the urinary tract. In children with nocturnal GER higher incidence of obstructive apnea/hypopnea during REM sleep was found: AHI = 23.35/h +/- 19.1; (CI 95%11.81-34.89) vs AHI = 4.99/h +/- 3.12 in children without nocturnal GER. We found no differences between the groups in saturation < 90% time during sleep. The study confirms coincidence of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux and sleep-related breathing disorders in children. Higher number of apnea/hypopnea during REM sleep was found in children with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux.

  7. Nocturnal offshore convection near the island of Corsica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, Christian; Adler, Bianca; Kalthoff, Norbert; Handwerker, Jan; Kohler, Martin; Wieser, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In the region of Corsica, located in the western Mediterranean Sea, the mean daily lightning activity for late summer and autumn as an indicator for deep convection shows a distinct maximum in mid-afternoon and a secondary maximum in the night. During the night, most of the lightning activity is located offshore and near the island's coastline. Currently there are no observational data which could be used to explain this nocturnal offshore convection but understanding its formation mechanism is crucial for accurately forecasting the regional weather. In this work, we explore two possible mechanisms initiating nocturnal offshore convection: (i) convergence with subsequent lifting due to the interaction between drainage winds and the synoptic flow over the sea and (ii) dynamically induced lee-side convergence due to the island barrier effect. To this end, we perform numerical simulations with the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO) model at a convection-resolving horizontal grid spacing of 2.8 km. The analysis of two cases with different low-level wind directions reveals that the role of the island's drainage flow can either favour or hinder the development of deep convection. Furthermore, convective initiation is very sensitive to terrain elevation and model initialisation time and small changes of these features can decide whether deep convection occurs or not.

  8. High-intensity endurance training increases nocturnal heart rate variability in sedentary participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nummela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of endurance training on endurance performance characteristics and cardiac autonomic modulation during night sleep were investigated during two 4-week training periods. After the first 4-week training period (3 x 40 min per week, at 75% of HRR the subjects were divided into HIGH group (n = 7, who performed three high-intensity endurance training sessions per week; and CONTROL group (n = 8 who did not change their training. An incremental treadmill test was performed before and after the two 4-weektraining periods. Furthermore, nocturnal RR-intervals were recorded after each training day. In the second 4-weektraining period HIGH group increased their V0Zmax (P = 0.005 more than CONTROL group. At the same time, nocturnal HR decreased (P = 0.039 and high-frequency power (HFP increased (P = 0.003 in HIGH group while no changes were observed in CONTROL group. Furthermore, a correlation was observed between the changes in nocturnal HFP and changes in V0Zmax during the second 4-week training period (r = 0.90, P < 0.001. The present study showed that the increased HFP is related to improved VO2max in sedentary subjects suggesting that nocturnal HFP can provide a useful method in monitoring individual responses to endurance training.

  9. Pollination of Campomanesia phaea (Myrtaceae) by night-active bees: a new nocturnal pollination system mediated by floral scent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, G D; Pinheiro, M; Dötterl, S; Alves-Dos-Santos, I

    2017-03-01

    Bees are the most important diurnal pollinators of angiosperms. In several groups of bees a nocturnal/crepuscular habit developed, yet little is known about their role in pollination and whether some plants are adapted specifically to these bees. We used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the reproductive biology and to understand the role of nocturnal/crepuscular bees in pollination of Campomanesia phaea (Myrtaceae), popularly named cambuci. We studied the floral biology and breeding system of C. phaea. We collected the floral visitors and tested the pollinators' effectiveness. We also determined the floral scents released at night and during daytime, and studied behavioural responses of crepuscular/nocturnal bees towards these scents. The flowers of cambuci were self-incompatible and had pollen as the only resource for flower visitors. Anthesis lasted around 14 h, beginning at 04:30 h at night. The flowers released 14 volatile compounds, mainly aliphatic and aromatic compounds. We collected 52 species of floral visitors, mainly bees. Nocturnal and crepuscular bees (four species) were among the most frequent species and the only effective pollinators. In field bioassays performed at night, nocturnal/crepuscular bees were attracted by a synthetic scent blend consisting of the six most abundant compounds. This study describes the first scent-mediated pollination system between a plant and its nocturnal bee pollinators. Further, C. phaea has several floral traits that do not allow classification into other nocturnal pollination syndromes (e.g. pollinator attraction already before sunrise, with pollen as the only reward), instead it is a plant specifically adapted to nocturnal bees. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  10. Analysis of nocturnal air temperature in districts using mobile measurements and a cooling indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, François; Bouyer, Julien; Claverie, Rémy; Pétrissans, Mathieu

    2017-10-01

    The urban heat island phenomenon is generally defined as an air temperature difference between a city center and the non-urbanized rural areas nearby. However, this description does not encompass the intra-urban temperature differences that exist between neighborhoods in a city. This study investigates the air temperature dynamics of neighborhoods for meteorological conditions that lead to important urban heat island amplitude. Local climate zones (LCZs) have been determined in Nancy, France, and mobile screen-height air temperature measurements are performed using an instrumented vehicle. Initially, hourly measurements are performed within four different LCZs. These results show that air temperature within LCZ demonstrates a nocturnal cooling in two phases, i.e., a first phase between 1 to 3 h before sunset and 3 to 5 h after sunset, and a second phase from 3 to 5 h after sunset to sunrise. During phase 1, neighborhoods exhibit different cooling rate values and air temperature gaps develop between districts, while during phase 2, cooling rates tend to be analogous. Then, a larger meteorological data set is used to investigate these two phases for a selection of 13 LCZs. Normalized cooling rates are calculated between daytime measures and nighttime measures in order to quantify the air temperature dynamics of the studied areas during phase 1. Considering this indicator, three groups are emerging: LCZ compact midrise and open midrise with mean normalized cooling rate values of 0.09 h -1 LCZ large lowrise and open lowrise/sparsely built with mean normalized cooling rate values of 0.011 h -1 LCZ low plants with mean normalized cooling rate values of 0.014 h -1 Results indicate that the relative position of LCZ within the conurbation does not drive air temperature dynamics during phase 1. In addition, measures performed during phase 2 tend to illustrate that cooling rates are similar to all LCZ during this period.

  11. Vision in the nocturnal wandering spider Leucorchestris arenicola (Araneae: Sparassidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Thomas; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Henschel, Joh R

    2008-01-01

    At night the Namib Desert spider Leucorchestris arenicola performs long-distance homing across its sand dune habitat. By disabling all or pairs of the spiders' eight eyes we found that homing ability was severely reduced when vision was fully abolished. Vision, therefore, seems to play a key role...... in the nocturnal navigational performances of L. arenicola. After excluding two or three pairs of eyes, the spiders were found to be able to navigate successfully using only their lateral eyes or only their anterior median eyes. Measurement of the eyes' visual fields showed that the secondary eyes combined have...... a near full (panoramic) view of the surroundings. The visual fields of the principal eyes overlap almost completely with those of the anterior lateral eyes. Electroretinogram recordings indicate that each eye type contains a single photopigment with sensitivity peaking at approximately 525 nm...

  12. Impact of sleep deprivation and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on daytime vigilance and driving performance: a laboratory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, F; Contardi, S; Mondini, S; Cirignotta, F

    2012-01-01

    To study the impact of sleepiness, a well-established cause of car accidents, on driving ability, we designed a 30-min monotonous simulated driving task. Our simulated driving task encompasses both primary vehicle control (standard deviation of lane position, crash occurrence) and secondary tasks (type and reaction times to divided attention tasks). Driving simulator data were correlated to subjective (state/trait) and objective (MSLT/MWT) sleepiness measures in healthy subjects undergoing sleep deprivation (SD) and in obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) patients. SD induced severe sleepiness during nighttime, when state sleepiness increased while primary vehicle control ability worsened. After SD, driving ability decreased and was inversely correlated to subjective and objective sleepiness at MSLT. OSAS patients driving ability was well correlated to objective sleepiness, with inverse correlation to sleep propensity at the MSLT and even more strict relation with the ability to maintain wakefulness at the MWT. Sleepiness worsens driving ability in healthy subjects after SD and in OSAS patients. Driving ability correlates with subjective and objective sleepiness measures, in particular to the ability to maintain wakefulness.

  13. Quantitative demonstration of the efficacy of night-time apomorphine infusion to treat nocturnal hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Sringean, Jirada; Anan, Chanawat; Boonpang, Kamolwan; Thanawattano, Chusak; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2016-12-01

    Nocturnal hypokinesia/akinesia is one of the common night-time symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), negatively affecting quality of life of patients and caregivers. The recognition of this problem and treatment options are limited in clinical practice. To evaluate the efficacy of nocturnal apomorphine infusion, using a wearable sensor, in patients who are already on daytime continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion and still suffer from nocturnal hypokinesia. Nocturnal parameters in 10 PD patients before and during nocturnal infusion were assessed over two nights at their homes, using a wearable sensor (trunk). Nocturnal parameters included number, velocity, acceleration, degree, and duration of rolling over, and number of times they got out of bed. Correlations with validated clinical rating scales were performed. Following nocturnal apomorphine infusion (34.8 ± 6.5 mg per night), there were significant improvements in the number of turns in bed (p = 0.027), turning velocity (p = 0.046), and the degree of turning (p = 0.028) in PD patients. Significant improvements of Modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (p = 0.005), the axial score of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (p = 0.013), and Nocturnal Akinesia Dystonia and Cramp Scale (p = 0.014) were also observed. Our study was able to demonstrate quantitatively the efficacy of nocturnal apomorphine infusion in PD patients with nocturnal hypokinesia and demonstrated the feasibility of using wearable sensors to yield objective and quantifiable outcomes in a clinical trial setting. More studies are needed to determine the long-term efficacy of this treatment in a large prospective cohort of PD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Six Downie Nocturnes - for viola and piano

    OpenAIRE

    Lancaster, David

    2013-01-01

    This music comprises three pairs of highly contrasted miniatures; I have separated each movement from its ‘companion’ in order to explore possible relationships between the different pairs (in spite of the stark contrasts between them) and to fracture the natural continuity of the music.\\ud \\ud The outer pieces are a sustained chorale, plaintive and largely undecorated. The second and fourth Nocturnes are a small tribute to Elliott Carter who had died while I was at work on this commission. W...

  15. Does Talking on a Cell Phone, With a Passenger, or Dialing Affect Driving Performance? An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Experimental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caird, Jeff K; Simmons, Sarah M; Wiley, Katelyn; Johnston, Kate A; Horrey, William J

    2018-02-01

    Objective An up-to-date meta-analysis of experimental research on talking and driving is needed to provide a comprehensive, empirical, and credible basis for policy, legislation, countermeasures, and future research. Background The effects of cell, mobile, and smart phone use on driving safety continues to be a contentious societal issue. Method All available studies that measured the effects of cell phone use on driving were identified through a variety of search methods and databases. A total of 93 studies containing 106 experiments met the inclusion criteria. Coded independent variables included conversation target (handheld, hands-free, and passenger), setting (laboratory, simulation, or on road), and conversation type (natural, cognitive task, and dialing). Coded dependent variables included reaction time, stimulus detection, lane positioning, speed, headway, eye movements, and collisions. Results The overall sample had 4,382 participants, with driver ages ranging from 14 to 84 years ( M = 25.5, SD = 5.2). Conversation on a handheld or hands-free phone resulted in performance costs when compared with baseline driving for reaction time, stimulus detection, and collisions. Passenger conversation had a similar pattern of effect sizes. Dialing while driving had large performance costs for many variables. Conclusion This meta-analysis found that cell phone and passenger conversation produced moderate performance costs. Drivers minimally compensated while conversing on a cell phone by increasing headway or reducing speed. A number of additional meta-analytic questions are discussed. Application The results can be used to guide legislation, policy, countermeasures, and future research.

  16. Driver Drowsiness Warning System Using Visual Information for Both Diurnal and Nocturnal Illumination Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Javier Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, traffic accidents due to human errors cause increasing amounts of deaths and injuries globally. To help reduce the amount of fatalities, in the paper presented here, a new module for Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS which deals with automatic driver drowsiness detection based on visual information and Artificial Intelligence is presented. The aim of this system is to locate, track, and analyze both the drivers face and eyes to compute a drowsiness index, where this real-time system works under varying light conditions (diurnal and nocturnal driving. Examples of different images of drivers taken in a real vehicle are shown to validate the algorithms used.

  17. The effects of adenotonsillotomy on nocturnal enuresis in snoring children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kostrzewa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nocturnal enuresis is a common problem in the paediatric population. A number of reports indicate that there is a relationship between sleep-disordered breathing in children with tonsillar hypertrophy and nocturnal enuresis. Restoration of nasopharyngeal patency may eliminate nocturnal enuresis. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of nocturnal enuresis in children snoring due to nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue hypertrophy as well as to assess the effects of restored upper respiratory patency by means of adenectomy and tonsillectomy on the resolution of nocturnal enuresis in children. Material and methods: The study included 50 children with sleep-disordered breathing qualified for adenectomy, tonsillotomy or adenotonsillotomy (median age 7 years. The control group consisted of 20 healthy children (median age 8 years. Children in the study group were assessed prior to surgical procedure as well as 3 and 6 months after surgery. The presence of sleep-disordered breathing and nocturnal enuresis was determined based on author’s questionnaire completed by parents. Results: The incidence of nocturnal enuresis in children with nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue hypertrophy was 18% (M:F 17%:19%; p > 0.05. Nocturnal enuresis was still reported in 6% of children 3 months after tonsillotomy. The disorder resolved in all girls and 97% of boys 6 months after procedure. Conclusions: Sleep-disordered breathing in children with nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue hypertrophy is associated with nocturnal enuresis. Restoration of nasopharyngeal patency in these patients eliminates nocturnal enuresis. Tonsillar hypertrophy causing obstructive breathing should be included in the differential diagnosis of nocturnal enuresis.

  18. The Effect of Rotor Cruise Tip Speed, Engine Technology and Engine/Drive System RPM on the NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR2) Size and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robuck, Mark; Wilkerson, Joseph; Maciolek, Robert; Vonderwell, Dan

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year study was conducted under NASA NNA06BC41C Task Order 10 and NASA NNA09DA56C task orders 2, 4, and 5 to identify the most promising propulsion system concepts that enable rotor cruise tip speeds down to 54% of the hover tip speed for a civil tiltrotor aircraft. Combinations of engine RPM reduction and 2-speed drive systems were evaluated. Three levels of engine and the drive system advanced technology were assessed; 2015, 2025 and 2035. Propulsion and drive system configurations that resulted in minimum vehicle gross weight were identified. Design variables included engine speed reduction, drive system speed reduction, technology, and rotor cruise propulsion efficiency. The NASA Large Civil Tiltrotor, LCTR, aircraft served as the base vehicle concept for this study and was resized for over thirty combinations of operating cruise RPM and technology level, quantifying LCTR2 Gross Weight, size, and mission fuel. Additional studies show design sensitivity to other mission ranges and design airspeeds, with corresponding relative estimated operational cost. The lightest vehicle gross weight solution consistently came from rotor cruise tip speeds between 422 fps and 500 fps. Nearly equivalent results were achieved with operating at reduced engine RPM with a single-speed drive system or with a two-speed drive system and 100% engine RPM. Projected performance for a 2025 engine technology provided improved fuel flow over a wide range of operating speeds relative to the 2015 technology, but increased engine weight nullified the improved fuel flow resulting in increased aircraft gross weights. The 2035 engine technology provided further fuel flow reduction and 25% lower engine weight, and the 2035 drive system technology provided a 12% reduction in drive system weight. In combination, the 2035 technologies reduced aircraft takeoff gross weight by 14% relative to the 2015 technologies.

  19. Nocturnal Cramps in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis Treated Conservatively: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Kapoor, Kulwant Singh

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study with questionnaire. Purpose To compare the treatment outcome of nocturnal leg cramps in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) patients on conservative treatment with historical surgical cohorts and to determine the sensitivity and specificity as well as positive predictive value and negative predictive value of knee flexion test suggested for LSCS patient. Overview of Literature True prevalence of nocturnal leg cramps in LSCS patients as well as the clinical outcome of its surgical treatment have been reported. Methods A questionnaire suggested from previous study with minor modifications was used in this study. Clinical data was collected. Knee flexion test was performed in two groups. Results The prevalence of nocturnal leg cramp was higher in the LSCS group compared to the control group (second group). In LSCS patients, 38 (88%) had improved leg cramps after the conservative treatment, 3 (6.97%) remained unchanged, and 2 (4.6%) had worsened leg cramps. Of the 43 patients, 21 (48.8%) had no disturbance to their activities of daily living. In the LSCS group, the sensitivity and specificity of the knee flexion test was 53.5% and 33.3%, respectively. The knee flexion test in the LSCS group had a positive predictive value and a negative predictive value of 65.71% and 23.1%, respectively. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that nocturnal leg cramps were significantly more frequent in LSCS patients than in the control group. PMID:25346815

  20. Prognostic value of nocturnal pulse oximetry in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-López, Ricardo; Jordán-Martínez, Laura; López-Fernández, Silvia; Rivera-Fernandez, Ricardo; Tercedor, Luis; Sáez-Roca, Germán

    2017-12-22

    To analyze the prognostic value of nocturnal hypoxemia measured with portable nocturnal pulse-oximetry in patients hospitalized due to heart failure and its relation to mortality and hospital readmission. We included 38 patients who were admitted consecutively to our unit with the diagnosis of decompensated heart failure. Pulse-oximetry was considered positive for hypoxemia when more than 10 desaturations per hour were recorded during sleep. Follow-up was performed for 30.3 (standard deviation [SD] 14.2) months, the main objective being a combined endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital readmission due to heart failure. The average age was 70.7 (SD 10.7) years, 63.3% were males. Pulse-oximetry was considered positive for hypoxemia in 27 (71%) patients. Patients with positive pulse-oximetry had the most frequent endpoint (9.1% [1] vs. 61.5% [16], P = 0.003). After multivariate analysis, continuous nocturnal hypoxemia was related to the combined endpoint (HR = 8.37, 1.19-68.4, P = 0.03). Patients hospitalized for heart failure and nocturnal hypoxemia measured with portable pulse-oximeter have an increased risk of hospital readmission and death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure in prehypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Kimberly; Cartner, Ben; Alley, Jessica R; Curry, Chelsea D; Dickinson, David L; Morris, David M; Collier, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    During nocturnal sleep, blood pressure (BP) "dips" compared to diurnal BP, reducing stress on the cardiovascular system. Both the hypotensive response elicited by acute aerobic exercise and sleep quality can impact this dipping response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise timing on circadian BP changes and sleep architecture. Twenty prehypertensive subjects completed the study. During four test sessions, participants first completed a graded exercise test to exhaustion and then performed 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 7 am (7A), 1 pm (1P), and 7 pm (7P) in a random, counterbalanced order at 65% of the heart rate obtained at peak oxygen uptake. An ambulatory cuff was used to monitor BP responses during 24 hours following exercise, and an ambulatory sleep-monitoring headband was worn during sleep following each session. Aerobic exercise at 7A invoked a greater dip in nocturnal systolic BP than exercise at 1P or 7P, although the greatest dip in nocturnal diastolic BP occurred following 7P. Compared to 1P, 7A also invoked greater time spent in deep sleep. These data indicate that early morning may be the most beneficial time to engage in aerobic exercise to enhance nocturnal BP changes and quality of sleep.

  2. Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth K. Perkin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month’s exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m × 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift.

  3. Criteria in diagnosing nocturnal leg cramps : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallegraeff, Joannes; de Greef, Mathieu; Krijnen, Wim; van der Schans, Cees

    2017-01-01

    Background: Up to 33% of the general population over 50 years of age are affected by nocturnal leg cramps. Currently there are no generally accepted clinical characteristics, which identify nocturnal leg cramps. This study aims to identify these clinical characteristics and to differentiate between

  4. Treatment Options for Primary Nocturnal Enuresis by Parents in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    however, some studies reveal that majority of sufferers are not taken for medical consultation as a ... their children. Amongst these children, majority had severe nocturnal enuresis and a positive family history of enuresis. Conclusion: Treatment of primary nocturnal ... Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care.

  5. Road sign recognition during computer testing versus driving simulator performance for stroke and stroke+aphasia groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Driving is essential to maintaining independence. For most Americans preserving personal mobility is a : key element to retaining jobs, friends, activities and the basic necessities to maintain a household. This : is particularly true for older peopl...

  6. Simulated Fuel Economy and Emissions Performance during City and Interstate Driving for a Heavy-Duty Hybrid Truck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C. Stuart; Gao, Zhiming; Smith, David E.; Laclair, Tim J.; Pihl, Josh A.; Edwards, K. Dean

    2013-04-08

    We compare simulated fuel economy and emissions for both conventional and hybrid class 8 heavy-duty diesel trucks operating over multiple urban and highway driving cycles. Both light and heavy freight loads were considered, and all simulations included full aftertreatment for NOx and particulate emissions controls. The aftertreatment components included a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), urea-selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR), and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Our simulated hybrid powertrain was configured with a pre-transmission parallel drive, with a single electric motor between the clutch and gearbox. A conventional HD truck with equivalent diesel engine and aftertreatment was also simulated for comparison. Our results indicate that hybridization can significantly increase HD fuel economy and improve emissions control in city driving. However, there is less potential hybridization benefit for HD highway driving. A major factor behind the reduced hybridization benefit for highway driving is that there are fewer opportunities to utilize regenerative breaking. Our aftertreatment simulations indicate that opportunities for passive DPF regeneration are much greater for both hybrid and conventional trucks during highway driving due to higher sustained exhaust temperatures. When passive DPF regeneration is extensively utilized, the fuel penalty for particulate control is virtually eliminated, except for the 0.4%-0.9% fuel penalty associated with the slightly higher exhaust backpressure.

  7. It's not just what you eat but when: The impact of eating a meal during simulated shift work on driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Charlotte C; Dorrian, Jill; Grant, Crystal L; Pajcin, Maja; Coates, Alison M; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Della Vedova, Chris B; Banks, Siobhan

    2017-01-01

    Shiftworkers have impaired performance when driving at night and they also alter their eating patterns during nightshifts. However, it is unknown whether driving at night is influenced by the timing of eating. This study aims to explore the effects of timing of eating on simulated driving performance across four simulated nightshifts. Healthy, non-shiftworking males aged 18-35 years (n = 10) were allocated to either an eating at night (n = 5) or no eating at night (n = 5) condition. During the simulated nightshifts at 1730, 2030 and 0300 h, participants performed a 40-min driving simulation, 3-min Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT-B), and recorded their ratings of sleepiness on a subjective scale. Participants had a 6-h sleep opportunity during the day (1000-1600 h). Total 24-h food intake was consistent across groups; however, those in the eating at night condition ate a large meal (30% of 24-h intake) during the nightshift at 0130 h. It was found that participants in both conditions experienced increased sleepiness and PVT-B impairments at 0300 h compared to 1730 and 2030 h (p eating condition displayed a significant decrease in time spent in the safe zone (p eating condition. Results suggest that, for optimal performance, shiftworkers should consider restricting food intake during the night.

  8. How Reverse R&D Knowledge Transfer from Foreign Invested R&D in Emerging Markets Can Drive Global Innovation Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng; Harryson, Sigvald

    2010-01-01

    Although R&D globalization has happened in China, India and other rapid growth regions for many years, it has to our knowledge not yet been studied how it affects reverse knowledge transfer, reverse innovation, and the innovation performance of the MNCs that are driving the R&D globalization...

  9. Effects of alcohol (BAC 0.5 parts per thousand) and ecstasy (MDMA 100 mg) on simulated driving performance and traffic safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldstra, J.L.; Brookhuis, K.A.; De Waard, D.; Molmans, B.H.W.; Verstraete, A.G.; Skopp, G.; Jantos, R.

    An increasing number of fatal road-accidents have been reported in which ecstasy was found in the blood of drivers. Although, ecstasy is frequently found to have been used in combination with alcohol, studies on the acute effects of ecstasy co-administered with alcohol on driving performance are

  10. Nocturnal departure timing in songbirds facing distinct migratory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Florian; Eikenaar, Cas; Crysler, Zoe J; Taylor, Philip D; Schmaljohann, Heiko

    2018-03-05

    Most migratory songbirds travel between their breeding areas and wintering grounds through a series of nocturnal flights. The timing of their departures defines the potential flight duration and thus the distance covered during a migratory night. Yet, migratory songbirds show substantial variation in their nocturnal departure timing. With this study, we aim to assess whether the respective challenges of the migration route, namely its distance and nature, help to explain this variation. At a stopover site, we caught Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) of two subspecies that differ in distance and nature of their onward migration route in spring, but not in autumn. We determined the start of their nocturnal migratory restlessness during short-term captivity, and radiotracked their nocturnal departure timing after release in both migration seasons. Northern Wheatears started their nocturnal migratory restlessness earlier when facing a long remaining migration distance and an extended sea barrier in spring. Individual departure directions generally affected the nocturnal departure timing with early departures being directed towards the respective migratory destination. In spring, this pattern was predominantly found in birds carrying relatively large fuel stores, but was absent in lean birds. At the same time, birds facing a short remaining migration distance and no extended sea barrier strongly reacted to relatively large fuel stores by an early start of nocturnal migratory behaviour (migratory restlessness and departure timing), whereas this reaction was not found in birds facing a long remaining migration distance and sea barrier. These results suggest that the basic diel schedule of birds' migratory activity is adapted to the onward migration route. Further, they suggest that birds adjust their behavioural response, that is start of nocturnal migratory behaviour, to fuel stores in relation to their impending migratory challenges. This is a substantial step in

  11. Effects of exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure in prehypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairbrother K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly Fairbrother,1 Ben Cartner,1 Jessica R Alley,1 Chelsea D Curry,1, David L Dickinson,2 David M Morris,1 Scott R Collier1 1Vascular Biology and Autonomic Studies Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, 2Department of Economics, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA Background: During nocturnal sleep, blood pressure (BP “dips” compared to diurnal BP, reducing stress on the cardiovascular system. Both the hypotensive response elicited by acute aerobic exercise and sleep quality can impact this dipping response. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise timing on circadian BP changes and sleep architecture. Materials and methods: Twenty prehypertensive subjects completed the study. During four test sessions, participants first completed a graded exercise test to exhaustion and then performed 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 7 am (7A, 1 pm (1P, and 7 pm (7P in a random, counterbalanced order at 65% of the heart rate obtained at peak oxygen uptake. An ambulatory cuff was used to monitor BP responses during 24 hours following exercise, and an ambulatory sleep-monitoring headband was worn during sleep following each session. Results: Aerobic exercise at 7A invoked a greater dip in nocturnal systolic BP than exercise at 1P or 7P, although the greatest dip in nocturnal diastolic BP occurred following 7P. Compared to 1P, 7A also invoked greater time spent in deep sleep. Conclusion: These data indicate that early morning may be the most beneficial time to engage in aerobic exercise to enhance nocturnal BP changes and quality of sleep. Keywords: nocturnal dipping, prehypertension, aerobic exercise

  12. Modeling the Performance and Cost of Lithium-Ion Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles - SECOND EDITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Paul A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gallagher, Kevin G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bloom, Ira D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dees, Dennis W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publicly available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publicly peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on

  13. Raconter Accident nocturne de Patrick Modiano Raconter Accident nocturne de Patrick Modiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurate Kaminskas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Modiano affirme que chaque roman marque un pas en avant dans la réalisation de son oeuvre. « J’ai l’impression qu’à chaque livre je me suis débarrassé d’un truc pour essayer d’accéder à d'autres choses », explique-t-il dans un entretien avec Laurence Liban. Qu’en est-il donc pour Accident nocturne ?Modiano affirme que chaque roman marque un pas en avant dans la réalisation de son oeuvre. « J’ai l’impression qu’à chaque livre je me suis débarrassé d’un truc pour essayer d’accéder à autre chose », explique-t-il dans un entretien avec Laurence Liban. Qu’en est-il donc pour Accident nocturne ?

  14. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in mucopolysaccharidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Paolo; Volzone, Anna; Randazzo, Giovanna; Antoniazzi, Lisa; Rampazzo, Angelica; Scarpa, Maurizio; Nobili, Lino

    2014-10-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is an epileptic syndrome that is primarily characterized by seizures with motor signs occurring almost exclusively during sleep. We describe 2 children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) who were referred for significant sleep disturbance. Long term video-EEG monitoring (LT-VEEGM) demonstrated sleep-related hypermotor seizures consistent with NFLE. No case of sleep-related hypermotor seizures has ever been reported to date in MPS. However, differential diagnosis with parasomnias has been previously discussed. The high frequency of frontal lobe seizures causes sleep fragmentation, which may result in sleep disturbances observed in at least a small percentage of MPS patients. We suggest monitoring individuals with MPS using periodic LT-VEEGM, particularly when sleep disorder is present. Moreover, our cases confirm that NFLE in lysosomal storage diseases may occur, and this finding extends the etiologic spectrum of NFLE. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Green Light for Nocturnally Migrating Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke Poot

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown the magnetic compass to be wavelength dependent: migratory birds require light from the blue-green part of the spectrum for magnetic compass orientation, whereas red light (visible long-wavelength disrupts magnetic orientation. We designed a field study to test if and how changing light color influenced migrating birds under field conditions. We found that nocturnally migrating birds were disoriented and attracted by red and white light (containing visible long-wavelength radiation, whereas they were clearly less disoriented by blue and green light (containing less or no visible long-wavelength radiation. This was especially the case on overcast nights. Our results clearly open perspective for the development of bird-friendly artificial lighting by manipulating wavelength characteristics. Preliminary results with an experimentally developed bird-friendly light source on an offshore platform are promising. What needs to be investigated is the impact of bird-friendly light on other organisms than birds.

  16. Clinical correlation between hypercalciuria and nocturnal enuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Valavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercalciuria may present with dysuria, urinary incontinence and nocturnal enuresis (NE. To determine the frequency of hypercalciuria in NE patients and normally continent children, we studied 122 consecutive pre- school children with NE referred to our nephrology clinic during two years, from September 2007 to August 2009. We measured the 24- hour urinary calcium. Furthermore, we compared the response to nasal desmopressin in hypercalciuric and normocalciuric patients. Hypercalciuria was found in 26 (21.3 % of the NE patients as compared with five (4.5% of 110 continent children [(P 0.05. The response to desmopressin above 90% occurred within one month of therapy without a significant change in the levels of hypercalciuria. We conclude that these results suggest that hypercalciuria has a significant association with NE and does not interfere with the desmopressin therapy.

  17. Performance analysis of active damped small DC-link capacitor based drive for unbalanced input voltage supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    A small DC-link capacitor based drive is presented in this paper. The drive shows negative impedance instability at operating points with high power load. A phase portrait is presented for input filter states which exhibit a limit cycle. When the drive is operated with unbalanced input supply...... voltages, the rectified voltage contains all even harmonics frequencies. However, it is shown that the dominant harmonic component of the DC-link voltage is decided by the limit cycle instead of the input filter resonance frequency. An active damping technique is used to stabilize the operating point....... The responses of the DC-link voltage with and without active damping are presented. The low order harmonics components are reduced with the increase in the gain of the active damping term. The experimental results for the DC-link voltage, input phase currents, and machine phase current are presented....

  18. EVALUATION OF NOCTURNAL OXYGEN DESATURATION IN COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaddadi Sailendra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Patients of COPD become hypoxic during sleep to a significant extent. Florid hypoxic episodes occur during REM sleep secondary to central diminution in respiratory output, accentuated by hypotonia of postural muscles, intercostals and accessory muscles of respiration. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a cross-sectional study carried out prospectively in Gayathri Vidya Parishad Institute of Healthcare and Medical Technology, Visakhapatnam, AP, India, to evaluate breathing disorders during sleep in COPD patients and to correlate them with the stage of the disease. SAMPLE SIZE A total of 36 COPD patients were enrolled into the study. They are classified into Mild, Moderate and Severe COPD categories in accordance to the Indian guidelines. The study was conducted between April 2014 and May 2016. POLYSOMNOGRAPHY Overnight sleep study was conducted using Compumedics Profusion Polysomnographic Machine. A total of 20 leads were utilised for the study. The sleep data recorded by the computer was manually scored for analysing Sleep stages, Apnoeas and Hypopnoeas. Sleep scoring was done according to R and K classification. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation is defined as >30% of total recording time with a SaO2 <90% (or nocturnal SaO2 <85% for at least 5 minutes. RESULTS Out of the 36 patients enrolled into the study, 6 were having mild COPD, 22 had moderate COPD and 8 had severe COPD. Total number of patients who had significant oxygen desaturation during sleep were 5 (13.9%. Out of these, 1 patient (16.67% belonged to Mild COPD, 1 (4.54% belonged to Moderate COPD and 3 (37.5% belonged to Severe COPD. CONCLUSION We conclude that in patients with COPD, daytime SpO2 is the single most useful determinant that contributes to NOD; daytime hypercapnia being the other important factor. In Severe COPD group, daytime PaO2 contributes to NOD whereas in Mild COPD, a raised AHI might explain the occurrence of NOD.

  19. Medications and impaired driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Amanda; Carr, David B

    2014-04-01

    To describe the association of specific medication classes with driving outcomes and provide clinical recommendations. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published from January 1973 to June 2013 on classes of medications associated with driving impairment. The search included outcome terms such as automobile driving, motor vehicle crash, driving simulator, and road tests. Only English-language articles that contained findings from observational or interventional designs with ≥ 10 participants were included in this review. Cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. Driving is an important task and activity for the majority of adults. Some commonly prescribed medications have been associated with driving impairment measured by road performance, driving simulation, and/or motor vehicle crashes. This review of 30 studies identified findings with barbiturates, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, antidepressants, opioid and nonsteroidal analgesics, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, antiparkinsonian agents, skeletal muscle relaxants, antihistamines, anticholinergic medications, and hypoglycemic agents. Additional studies of medication impact on sedation, sleep latency, and psychomotor function, as well as the role of alcohol, are also discussed. Psychotropic agents and those with central nervous system side effects were associated with measures of impaired driving performance. It is difficult to determine if such associations are actually a result of medication use or the medical diagnosis itself. Regardless, clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of impaired driving with specific classes of medications, educate their patients, and/or consider safer alternatives.

  20. Comparing Expert and Novice Driving Behavior in a Driving Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiran B. Ekanayake

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study focused on comparing driving behavior of expert and novice drivers in a mid-range driving simulator with the intention of evaluating the validity of driving simulators for driver training. For the investigation, measurements of performance, psychophysiological measurements, and self-reported user experience under different conditions of driving tracks and driving sessions were analyzed. We calculated correlations between quantitative and qualitative measures to enhance the reliability of the findings. The experiment was conducted involving 14 experienced drivers and 17 novice drivers. The results indicate that driving behaviors of expert and novice drivers differ from each other in several ways but it heavily depends on the characteristics of the task. Moreover, our belief is that the analytical framework proposed in this paper can be used as a tool for selecting appropriate driving tasks as well as for evaluating driving performance in driving simulators.

  1. Discrepancy analysis of driving performance of taxi drivers and non-professional drivers for red-light running violation and crash avoidance at intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiawei; Yan, Xuedong; Radwan, Essam

    2016-06-01

    Due to comfort, convenience, and flexibility, taxis have become increasingly more prevalent in China, especially in large cities. However, many violations and road crashes that occurred frequently were related to taxi drivers. This study aimed to investigate differences in driving performance between taxi drivers and non-professional drivers from the perspectives of red-light running violation and potential crash involvement based on a driving simulation experiment. Two typical scenarios were established in a driving simulator, which includes the red-light running violation scenario and the crash avoidance scenario. There were 49 participants, including 23 taxi drivers (14 males and 9 females) and 26 non-professional drivers (13 males and 13 females) recruited for this experiment. The driving simulation experiment results indicated that non-professional drivers paid more attention to red-light running violations in comparison to taxi drivers who had a higher probability of red-light running violation. Furthermore, it was found that taxi drivers were more inclined to turn the steering wheel in an attempt to avoid a potential collision and non-professional drivers had more abrupt deceleration behaviors when facing a potential crash. Moreover, the experiment results showed that taxi drivers had a smaller crash rate compared to non-professional drivers and had a better performance in terms of crash avoidance at the intersection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathophysiology of nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms in older patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Marie-Astrid; Decalf, Veerle; Kumps, Candy; Petrovic, Mirko; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-01

    To explore the mismatch between functional bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production, and to study the pathophysiology of an increased nocturnal urine production in older patients with urinary incontinence. The present prospective observational study included adults aged ≥65 years with urinary incontinence. Participants completed questionnaires, frequency volume charts and renal function profiles. The nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index was defined as nocturnal urine output/maximum voided volume; the nocturnal polyuria index as nocturnal/24 h urine output. The median age (n = 95) was 74 years (69-79), 87% were women and 73% had nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms (nocturnal urinary incontinence or nocturia ≥2). Participants with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms had a significantly higher nocturnal urine output (809 mL vs 650 mL; P = 0.001) and no significant difference in maximum voided volume (350 mL vs 437 mL; P = 0.079) compared with participants without nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. Participants (nocturnal polyuria index >33% [n = 56], nocturnal polyuria index >40% [n = 42], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index >1.87 [n = 51]) showed higher night-time diuresis rates, free water and sodium clearance compared with during the daytime. Controls (nocturnal polyuria index ≤33% [n = 26], nocturnal polyuria index ≤40% [n = 40], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index ≤1.87 [n = 44]) had no circadian rhythm in their diuresis rate or sodium clearance, but more nocturnal free water clearance compared with during the daytime. The majority of older adults with urinary incontinence present nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. An increased nocturnal sodium diuresis seems to be the only mechanism differentiating patients with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms from controls. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Performance of Magnetic-Superconductor Non-Contact Harmonic Drive for Cryogenic Space Applications: Speed, Torque and Efficiency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Jose Luis; Diez-Jimenez, Efren; Valiente-Blanco, Ignacio; Cristache, Cristian; Alvarez-Valenzuela, Marco-Antonio; Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic Drives are widely used in space mainly because of their compactness, large reduction ratio ad zero backlash. However, their use in extreme environments like in cryogenic temperatures is still a challenge. Lubrication, lifetime and fatigue are still issues under these conditions.The MAGDRIVE project, funded by the EU Space FP7 was devoted to test a new concept of harmonic drive reducer. By using the magnetic distance force interactions of magnets and ferromagnetic materials, all the conventional mechanical elements of a Harmonic Drives (teeth, flexspline and ball bearings) are substituted by contactless mechanical components (magnetic gear and superconducting magnetic bearings). The absence of contact between any moving parts prevents wear, lubricants are no longer required and the operational life time is greatly increased. As the magnetic transmission is continuous there is no backlash in the reduction. MAG SOAR Company is already providing contactless mechanical components for space applications able to operate in a wide range of temperatures.In this paper the tests results of a -1:20 ratio MAGDRIVE prototype are reported. In these tests successful operation at 40 K and 10-3 Pa was demonstrated for more than 1.5 million input cycles. A maximum torque of 3 Nm and efficiency higher than 75% at 3000 rpm were demonstrated. The maximum tested input speed was 3000 rpm -six times the previous existing record for harmonic drives at cryogenic temperature.

  4. A Class of Speed-Sensorless Sliding-Mode Observers for High-Performance Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Christian; Boldea, Ion; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    A new family of speed-sensorless sliding-mode observers for induction motor drives has been developed. Three topologies are investigated in order to determine their feasibility, parameter sensitivity, and practical applicability. The most significant feature of all schemes is that they do...

  5. Effects of alcohol (BAC 0.5‰) and ecstasy (MDMA 100 mg) on simulated driving performance and traffic safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldstra, J.L.; Brookhuis, K.A.; De Waard, D.; Molmans, B.H.W.; Verstraete, A.G.; Skopp, G.; Janstos, R.

    2012-01-01

    Rational An increasing number of fatal road-accidents have been reported in which ecstasy was found in the blood of drivers. Although, ecstasy is frequently found to have been used in combination with alcohol, studies on the acute effects of ecstasy co-administered with alcohol on driving

  6. Monitoring driver fatigue using a single-channel electroencephalographic device: A validation study by gaze-based, driving performance, and subjective data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, José M; Díaz-Piedra, Carolina; Rieiro, Héctor; Roca-González, Joaquín; Romero, Samuel; Catena, Andrés; Fuentes, Luis J; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2017-12-01

    Driver fatigue can impair performance as much as alcohol does. It is the most important road safety concern, causing thousands of accidents and fatalities every year. Thanks to technological developments, wearable, single-channel EEG devices are now getting considerable attention as fatigue monitors, as they could help drivers to assess their own levels of fatigue and, therefore, prevent the deterioration of performance. However, the few studies that have used single-channel EEG devices to investigate the physiological effects of driver fatigue have had inconsistent results, and the question of whether we can monitor driver fatigue reliably with these EEG devices remains open. Here, we assessed the validity of a single-channel EEG device (TGAM-based chip) to monitor changes in mental state (from alertness to fatigue). Fifteen drivers performed a 2-h simulated driving task while we recorded, simultaneously, their prefrontal brain activity and saccadic velocity. We used saccadic velocity as the reference index of fatigue. We also collected subjective ratings of alertness and fatigue, as well as driving performance. We found that the power spectra of the delta EEG band showed an inverted U-shaped quadratic trend (EEG power spectra increased for the first hour and half, and decreased during the last thirty minutes), while the power spectra of the beta band linearly increased as the driving session progressed. Coherently, saccadic velocity linearly decreased and speeding time increased, suggesting a clear effect of fatigue. Subjective data corroborated these conclusions. Overall, our results suggest that the TGAM-based chip EEG device is able to detect changes in mental state while performing a complex and dynamic everyday task as driving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance Evaluation and Slip Regulation Control of an Asymmetrical Parameter Type Two-Phase Induction Motor Drive Using a Three-Leg Voltage Source Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyarat, Wekin; Kinnares, Vijit

    This paper presents a performance evaluation and a simple speed control method of an asymmetrical parameter type two-phase induction motor drive using a three-leg VSI (Voltage Source Inverter). The two-phase induction motor is adapted from an existing single-phase induction motor resulting in impedance unbalance between main and auxiliary windings. The unbalanced two-phase inverter outputs with orthogonal displacement based on a SPWM (Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation) method are controlled with appropriate amplitudes for improving the motor performance. Dynamic simulation of the proposed drive system is given. A simple speed controller based on a slip regulation method is designed. The overall system is implemented on a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) board. The validity of the proposed system is verified by simulation and experimental results.

  8. Manipulation of skin temperature improves nocturnal sleep in narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Raymann, R.J.; Overeem, S.; Romeijn, N.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Lammers, G.J.; Someren, E.J.W. van

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Besides excessive daytime sleepiness, disturbed nocturnal sleep is a major complaint of patients with narcolepsy. Previously, alterations in skin temperature regulation in narcoleptic patients have been shown to be related to increased sleepiness. This study tests the hypothesis that

  9. Manipulation of skin temperature improves nocturnal sleep in narcolepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Overeem, S.; Romeijn, N.; van Dijk, J. G.; Lammers, G.J.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Besides excessive daytime sleepiness, disturbed nocturnal sleep is a major complaint of patients with narcolepsy. Previously, alterations in skin temperature regulation in narcoleptic patients have been shown to be related to increased sleepiness. This study tests the hypothesis that

  10. Sibelius: Luonnotar. Chevauchee nocturne et lever du soleil / Pierre Gervasoni

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gervasoni, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Sibelius: Luonnotar. Chevauchee nocturne et lever du soleil. 4 Legendes. Orchestre Philharmonique Royal de Stockholm, Paavo Järvi. Virgin Classics 545 213-2 (CD:167F). 1996. TT: 1h 13'22"

  11. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy presenting as excessive daytime sleepiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Y Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS is common in the general population. Etiologies include insufficient sleep and primary sleep disorders. Due to its high prevalence, physicians often overlook EDS as a significant problem. However, EDS may also be the presenting symptom of seizures, in particular Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy (NFLE. Due to the clinical similarity between the nocturnal behaviors of NFLE and parasomnias, and poor patient-related history, NFLE remains a challenging diagnosis. We report the case of a patient with NFLE who presented with a primary complaint of EDS, and discuss the differential diagnosis and evaluation of patients with EDS associated with nocturnal behaviors. In the context of a patient presenting with EDS and stereotyped nocturnal events, clinical suspicion should be high for NFLE.

  12. Influence of Frequent Nocturnal Home Hemodialysis on Food Preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ipema, Karin; Franssen, Casper; van der Schans, Cees; Smit, Lianne; Noordman, Sabine; Haisma, Hinke

    Objective: Dialysis patients frequently report a change of taste that is reversible after renal transplantation, suggesting that uremic toxins may negatively influence taste. Currently, frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) is the most effective method of hemodialysis, and is associated with

  13. Concord grape juice, cognitive function, and driving performance: a 12-wk, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover trial in mothers of preteen children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamport, Daniel J; Lawton, Clare L; Merat, Natasha; Jamson, Hamish; Myrissa, Kyriaki; Hofman, Denise; Chadwick, Helen K; Quadt, Frits; Wightman, JoLynne D; Dye, Louise

    2016-03-01

    Daily consumption of Concord grape juice (CGJ) over 3-4 mo has been shown to improve memory function in adults with mild cognitive impairment and reduce blood pressure in hypertensive adults. These benefits likely result from the high concentration of polyphenols in CGJ. Increased stress can impair cognitive function and elevate blood pressure. Thus, we examined the potential beneficial effect of CGJ in individuals with somewhat stressful and demanding lifestyles. We sought to examine the effects of the daily consumption of CGJ for 12 wk on cognitive function, driving performance, and blood pressure in healthy, middle-aged working mothers. Twenty-five healthy mothers (aged 40-50 y) of preteen children who were employed for ≥30 h/wk consumed 12 ounces (355 mL) of either CGJ (containing 777 mg total polyphenols) or an energy-, taste-, and appearance-matched placebo daily for 12 wk according to a randomized crossover design with a 4-wk washout. Verbal and spatial memory, executive function, attention, blood pressure, and mood were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 wk. Immediately after the cognitive battery, a subsample of 17 women completed a driving performance assessment at the University of Leeds Driving Simulator. The 25-min driving task required participants to match the speed and direction of a lead vehicle. Significant improvements in immediate spatial memory and driving performance were observed after CGJ relative to placebo. There was evidence of an enduring effect of CGJ such that participants who received CGJ in arm 1 maintained better performance in the placebo arm. Cognitive benefits associated with the long-term consumption of flavonoid-rich grape juice are not exclusive to adults with mild cognitive impairment. Moreover, these cognitive benefits are apparent in complex everyday tasks such as driving. Effects may persist beyond the cessation of flavonoid consumption, and future studies should carefully consider the length of washout within

  14. The Relationship Between Enterobius Vermicularis Infection And Nocturnal Enuresis

    OpenAIRE

    Çulha, Gülnaz; Duran, Nizami

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The possible association between certain childhood infections and the propensity to develop nocturnal enuresis may include intestinal helminth infections. Objective: To explore the association between Enterobius vermicularis and nocturnal enuresis among children 4 to 7 years of age in a Turkish orphanage. Methods: Eighty children (45 boy, 35 girl, age range 4-7 years) participated in this study. The association between Enterobius vermicularis and enuressis was investigated after mebendaz...

  15. Working for Food Shifts Nocturnal Mouse Activity into the Day

    OpenAIRE

    Hut, Roelof A.; Pilorz, Violetta; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Daan, Serge; Yamazaki, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal rodents show diurnal food anticipatory activity when food access is restricted to a few hours in daytime. Timed food access also results in reduced food intake, but the role of food intake in circadian organization per se has not been described. By simulating natural food shortage in mice that work for food we show that reduced food intake alone shifts the activity phase from the night into the day and eventually causes nocturnal torpor (natural hypothermia). Release into continuous...

  16. Nocturnal enuresis among primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Mohamed Aljefri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence and personal and family risk factors for nocturnal enuresis (NE among primary school children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered, three-part structured questionnaire involving 832 school children aged 6 - 15 years between 2007 and 2008. We assessed participants′ socio-demographic factors, family characteristics and factors related to the presence of NE. The mean age of the children was 11.5 (±2.7 years. The overall prevalence of NE was 28.6%, with a predominance of girls, and the prevalence decreased with increasing age (P 0.002 and a higher number of siblings (P = 0.01. Our findings reveal a high prevalence of NE among children in Al-Mukalla City, Yemen, with a higher prevalence in girls than in boys compared with the other studies. Sleep pattern, stressful life events, family history of NE, large family size and more children in the household may act as a risk factor for NE.

  17. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  18. Distracted Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Communities Toolkit Best Practices Guide Publications Motorcycle Safety Bicycle Safety Publications Global Road Safety Get Email Updates ... study. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety keeps track of distracted driving laws. 7 As of June ...

  19. Is nocturnal panic a distinct disease category? Comparison of clinical characteristics among patients with primary nocturnal panic, daytime panic, and coexistence of nocturnal and daytime panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masaki; Sugiura, Tatsuki; Nishida, Shingo; Komada, Yoko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-05-15

    Many patients with panic disorder (PD) experience nocturnal panic attacks. We investigated the differences in demographic variables and symptom characteristics as well as response to treatment among patients with primary day panic (DP), primary nocturnal panic (NP), and the coexistence of DP and NP (DP/NP), and discuss whether NP is a distinct disease category. One hundred one consecutive untreated patients with PD were enrolled and subsequently divided into the NP, DP, and DP/NP groups. The presence of 13 panic attack symptom items as well as scores on the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were compared among the groups. After 3 months of regular treatment, PDSS scores were assessed again to evaluate treatment response. Nocturnal panic attacks of the participants were mostly reported to occur in the first tertile of nocturnal sleep. The number of males, onset age, and presence of choking sensation were significantly higher, and the PDSS score was significantly lower in the NP group compared with the other groups. The DP/NP group showed the highest PDSS score, and participants in this group were prescribed the highest doses of medication among all groups. Only diagnostic sub-category was significantly associated with treatment response. The total score for PDSS and PSQI correlated significantly only in the NP group. DP/NP could be a severe form of PD, while primary NP could be a relatively mild subcategory that may partially share common pathophysiology with adult type night terror.

  20. Nocturnal asthma in school children of south punjab, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, G.; Khan, P.A.; Iqbal, I.

    2008-01-01

    At the present time, the epidemiology of the childhood asthma is of considerable interest. There is an understandable concern that changes in the geographical area, lifestyle, and environment. This study was conducted to find the prevalence of nocturnal asthma, in school children of south Punjab, Pakistan. It was a cross sectional, questionnaire based, descriptive survey of the children aged 3-18 years, in randomly selected primary and secondary schools, from October 2002 to March 2003. The data was analysed with Statistical Analysis System (SAS). Of 6120 questionnaire sent to the parents/guardians, we received 3180 back (52%). Of the 3180 respondents, 1767 (56%) were for boys and 1413 (44%) were for girls. The median age was 8.25 years. Around 71% of children were between 4 to 11 years of age. The parents reported nocturnal asthma in 177 (6%) of their children with an equal prevalence in boys and girls, i.e., (3% each, rounded off to nearest whole number). Of these 177 children with nocturnal asthma, 99 (56%) were boys and 78 (44%) were girls. Of the 1767 boys and 1413 girls, the nocturnal asthma reported by parents was 6% each (99 and 78 respectively). The nocturnal asthma was not reported in 14-18 years age group of females. The asthma is taken as a stigma in our society and as such is not reported or disclosed rather denied. An extensive educational media campaign is required for awareness of the masses. (author)

  1. Nocturnalism induced by scheduled feeding in diurnal Octodon degus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, Pablo; López-Espinoza, Antonio; Madariaga, Ana Maria; Rol, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Octodon degus, a mainly diurnal rodent, characterized by its ability to shift to a nocturnal locomotor pattern under laboratory conditions, was studied to determine whether restricted food access during the scotophase could induce nocturnalism. To address this question, wheel running activity, feeding, and body temperature rhythms were analyzed for diurnal degus housed with a wheel and subjected to either long (12 h) or short (2 h) food availability periods, in the latter case with random or scheduled food access times. The results show that allowing nocturnal feeding for 2 h, but not 12 h, can shift a previous diurnal phase preference for wheel running activity and body temperature to the scotophase, with random feeding being more effective than scheduled food availability. However, this behavioral inversion proved to be unstable, as the degus returned to the diurnal phase within only a few days after the restricted feeding was discontinued. In addition, the negative masking effect induced by light, which is characteristic of the degus' nocturnal chronotype, was not observed when the animals were forced to feed at night. Thus, neither long, short, random, nor scheduled food-availability during the scotophase was able to induce all the characteristics of the nocturnal chronotype in Octodon degus.

  2. Criteria in diagnosing nocturnal leg cramps: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallegraeff, Joannes; de Greef, Mathieu; Krijnen, Wim; van der Schans, Cees

    2017-02-28

    Up to 33% of the general population over 50 years of age are affected by nocturnal leg cramps. Currently there are no generally accepted clinical characteristics, which identify nocturnal leg cramps. This study aims to identify these clinical characteristics and to differentiate between them and the characteristics of restless leg syndrome and periodic limb disorder. A systematic literature study was executed from December 2015 to May 2016. This study comprised of a systematic literature review of randomized clinical trials, observational studies on nocturnal and rest cramps of legs and other muscles, and other systematic and narrative reviews. Two researchers independently extracted literature data and analyzed this using a standardized reviewing protocol. Modified versions of the Cochrane Collaboration tools assessed the risk of bias. A Delphi study was conducted to assess agreement on the characteristics of nocturnal leg cramps. After systematic and manual searches, eight randomized trials and ten observational studies were included. On the basis of these we identified seven diagnostic characteristics of nocturnal leg cramps: intense pain, period of duration from seconds to maximum 10 minutes, location in calf or foot, location seldom in thigh or hamstrings, persistent subsequent pain, sleep disruption and distress. The seven above characteristics will enhance recognition of the condition, and help clinicians make a clear distinction between NLC and other sleep-related musculoskeletal disorder among older adults.

  3. Global effects of moon phase on nocturnal acoustic scattering layers

    KAUST Repository

    Prihartato, PK

    2016-01-18

    © Inter-Research 2016. The impact of moon phase on the global nocturnal vertical distribution of acoustic scattering layers (SLs) in the upper 200 m was studied during the Malaspina expedition that circumnavigated the world. We assessed the nocturnal weighted mean depths and the vertical extension of the SL (the range between the upper 25th percentile and lower 75th percentile of the backscatter) and used a generalized additive model to reveal the relationship between the nocturnal vertical distribution of the SL and moon phase, as well as other environmental factors. Moon phase significantly affected the SL distribution on a global scale, in contrast to other factors such as dissolved oxygen, temperature and fluorescence, which each correlated with nocturnal SL distribution during the large geographic coverage. Full moon caused a deepening effect on the nocturnal SL. Contrary to expectations, the shallowest distribution was not observed during the darkest nights (new moon) and there was no difference in vertical distribution between new moon and intermediate moon phases. We conclude that the trend of deepening SL during approximately full moon (bright nights) is a global phenomenon related to anti-predator behavior.

  4. Screening and managing obstructive sleep apnoea in nocturnal heart block patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Liu, Zilong; Chang, Su Chi; Fu, Cuiping; Li, Wenjing; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Liyan; Li, Shanqun

    2016-02-16

    Nocturnal heart block often occurs in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). It is more likely to be undiagnosed in heart block patients who are ignorant of the symptoms of sleep disorder. Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) is a highly reliable way to discover the risk factors of OSA, whereas the validity in sleep-related heart block patients is uncertain. We performed an observational study to address these issues and confirmed the potential protective effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Patients who were previously diagnosed with nocturnal heart block with R-R pauses exceeding 2 seconds were retrospective screened from the ECG centre of Zhongshan hospital. These recruited participants completed Berlin Questionnaire and underwent polysomnography synchronously with 24-hour Holter monitoring. A cross-sectional analysis was performed to confirm the association between nocturnal arrhythmia and OSA, as well as to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the BQ. Subsequently, subjects diagnosed with OSA (apnoea-hypopnoea index > 5) underwent 3 consecutive days of CPAP therapy. On the third day, patients repeated 24-hour Holter monitoring within the institution of CPAP. The symptoms of disruptive snoring and hypersomnolence in 72 enrolled patients were more related to the occurrence of nocturnal heart block (r = 0.306, 0.226, respectively, p = 0.015, 0.019) than syncope (r = 0.134, p = 0.282) and palpitations (r = 0.106, p = 0.119), which were prominent trait of our study population. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the BQ at a cut-off point of 5 of AHI for detecting OSA in heart block patients was 81.0 %, 44.4 %, 91.07 % and 25 %. Nocturnal heart block does not appear to occur exclusively in severe sleep apnoea. The frequent occurrence of arrhythmias in prominent oxygen desaturation supports the correlation between them. CPAP therapy resulted in significant decrease in the average number of

  5. Driving things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    . pp.155 ((http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/publications/2010/pdf/rsgr_2010001.pdf)) Nevile, M., Haddington, P., Heinemann, T., Rauniomaa, M. (Eds.) Interacting with objects: Language, materiality, and social activity. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Redshaw, S. (2008....... Interaction with objects reflects the car’s role beyond mere transport as a site of personal, social, and work life (Featherstone et al. 2005; Redshaw 2008). Studies of interaction examine this role as it is actually enacted, understood, and accomplished, in situ through participants’ practices (e.g. Laurier...... of in-car distractions, and how they impact driving activities (Nevile & Haddington 2010). Data are video recordings of ordinary journeys, capturing drivers and passengers in real-world real-time driving situations (27 hours, 90 journeys). For driving and road safety, research and experience has...

  6. Community Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2018-01-01

    opportunity to break boundaries between research institutions and surrounding communities through the involvement of new types of actors, knowledge forms and institutions (OECD, 2011). This paper presents the project Community Drive a three year cross disciplinary community-driven game– and data-based project....... In the paper we present how the project Community Drive initiated in May 2018 is based on results from pilot projects conducted from 2014 – 2017. Overall these studies showed that it is a strong motivational factor for students to be given the task to change their living conditions through redesign...... of living in the area. The paper discusses potentials and pitfalls of designing community-driven science gaming environments and how results from previous studies can form the project Community Drive....

  7. Nocturnal Hypertension: Neglected Issue in Comprehensive Hypertension Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Kristanto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The body circardian rhythm affects blood pressure variability at day and night, therefore blood pressure at day and night might be different. Nocturnal hypertension is defined as increase of blood pressure >120/70mmHg at night, which is caused by disturbed circadian rhythm, and associated with higher cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events also mortality in hypertensive patients. Nocturnal hypertension and declining blood pressure pattern, can only be detected by continuous examination for 24 hours, also known as ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM. Chronotherapy, has become a strategy for managing the hypertensive nocturnal patients, by taking hypertensive medication at night to obtain normal blood pressure decrease in accordance with the normal circadian rhythm and, improving blood pressure control.

  8. Working for food shifts nocturnal mouse activity into the day.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelof A Hut

    Full Text Available Nocturnal rodents show diurnal food anticipatory activity when food access is restricted to a few hours in daytime. Timed food access also results in reduced food intake, but the role of food intake in circadian organization per se has not been described. By simulating natural food shortage in mice that work for food we show that reduced food intake alone shifts the activity phase from the night into the day and eventually causes nocturnal torpor (natural hypothermia. Release into continuous darkness with ad libitum food, elicits immediate reversal of activity to the previous nocturnal phase, indicating that the classical circadian pacemaker maintained its phase to the light-dark cycle. This flexibility in behavioral timing would allow mice to exploit the diurnal temporal niche while minimizing energy expenditure under poor feeding conditions in nature. This study reveals an intimate link between metabolism and mammalian circadian organization.

  9. The evolution of color vision in nocturnal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huabin; Rossiter, Stephen J; Teeling, Emma C; Li, Chanjuan; Cotton, James A; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-06-02

    Nonfunctional visual genes are usually associated with species that inhabit poor light environments (aquatic/subterranean/nocturnal), and these genes are believed to have lost function through relaxed selection acting on the visual system. Indeed, the visual system is so adaptive that the reconstruction of intact ancestral opsin genes has been used to reject nocturnality in ancestral primates. To test these assertions, we examined the functionality of the short and medium- to long-wavelength opsin genes in a group of mammals that are supremely adapted to a nocturnal niche: the bats. We sequenced the visual cone opsin genes in 33 species of bat with diverse sensory ecologies and reconstructed their evolutionary history spanning 65 million years. We found that, whereas the long-wave opsin gene was conserved in all species, the short-wave opsin gene has undergone dramatic divergence among lineages. The occurrence of gene defects in the short-wave opsin gene leading to loss of function was found to directly coincide with the origin of high-duty-cycle echolocation and changes in roosting ecology in some lineages. Our findings indicate that both opsin genes have been under purifying selection in the majority bats despite a long history of nocturnality. However, when spectacular losses do occur, these result from an evolutionary sensory modality tradeoff, most likely driven by subtle shifts in ecological specialization rather than a nocturnal lifestyle. Our results suggest that UV color vision plays a considerably more important role in nocturnal mammalian sensory ecology than previously appreciated and highlight the caveat of inferring light environments from visual opsins and vice versa.

  10. Circadian rhythm of temperature selection in a nocturnal lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refinetti, R; Susalka, S J

    1997-08-01

    We recorded body temperature and locomotor activity of Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) with free access to a heat source under a 14:10 light-dark cycle and in constant darkness. Under the light-dark cycle, the lizards selected higher temperatures during the light phase, when locomotor activity was less intense. Rhythmicity in temperature selection was transiently disrupted but later resumed when the animals were placed in constant darkness. These results demonstrate the existence of a circadian rhythm of temperature selection in nocturnal ectotherms and extend previous findings of a temporal mismatch between the rhythms of locomotor activity and temperature selection in nocturnal rodents.

  11. Male broiler performance and nocturnal feeding under constant 8-h ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 38, No 3 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Performance and Analysis of an Asynchronous Motor Drive with a New Modified Type-2 Neuro Fuzzy Based MPPT Controller Under Variable Irradiance and Variable Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakkiraiah B.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, we have developed a new modified Type 2 neuro fuzzy (T2NF based MPPT controller, which combines the advantages of fractional open circuit voltage (FCV, variable step and optimized P&O algorithm. It leads to a faster and better tracking and lower oscillations around the MPP to contribute higher efficiency. The simulation result shows an efficiency of 96.41 %, an improvement of 2 ms is observed in the starting characteristics. The above concept has been extended to single phase AC photovoltaic system with improvement of 15 % in its performance. It has benefits of high efficiency and low harmonic distortion at output voltage waveform. Here DC-DC boost converter and space vector modulation based inverter are used to provide the required supply to the load. The proposed T2NF based MPPT improves the system efficiency even at abnormal weather conditions. Here a lot of reduction in torque and current ripple contents is obtained with the help of T2NF based MPPT for an asynchronous motor drive. Also the better performance of an asynchronous motor drive is analyzed with the comparison of conventional and proposed MPPT controller using Matlab-simulation results. Practical validations are also carried out and tabulated.

  13. Sensorless FOC Performance Improved with On-Line Speed and Rotor Resistance Estimator Based on an Artificial Neural Network for an Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose. M. Gutierrez-Villalobos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-phase induction motor drive requires high accuracy in high performance processes in industrial applications. Field oriented control, which is one of the most employed control schemes for induction motors, bases its function on the electrical parameter estimation coming from the motor. These parameters make an electrical machine driver work improperly, since these electrical parameter values change at low speeds, temperature changes, and especially with load and duty changes. The focus of this paper is the real-time and on-line electrical parameters with a CMAC-ADALINE block added in the standard FOC scheme to improve the IM driver performance and endure the driver and the induction motor lifetime. Two kinds of neural network structures are used; one to estimate rotor speed and the other one to estimate rotor resistance of an induction motor.

  14. Sensorless FOC Performance Improved with On-Line Speed and Rotor Resistance Estimator Based on an Artificial Neural Network for an Induction Motor Drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Villalobos, Jose M; Rodriguez-Resendiz, Juvenal; Rivas-Araiza, Edgar A; Martínez-Hernández, Moisés A

    2015-06-29

    Three-phase induction motor drive requires high accuracy in high performance processes in industrial applications. Field oriented control, which is one of the most employed control schemes for induction motors, bases its function on the electrical parameter estimation coming from the motor. These parameters make an electrical machine driver work improperly, since these electrical parameter values change at low speeds, temperature changes, and especially with load and duty changes. The focus of this paper is the real-time and on-line electrical parameters with a CMAC-ADALINE block added in the standard FOC scheme to improve the IM driver performance and endure the driver and the induction motor lifetime. Two kinds of neural network structures are used; one to estimate rotor speed and the other one to estimate rotor resistance of an induction motor.

  15. Removal of nutrient limitations by long-term fertilization decreases nocturnal water loss in savanna trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.G. Scholz; S.J. Bucci; G. Goldstein; F.C. Meinzer; A.C. Franco; F. Miralles-Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, nocturnal transpiration can be relatively high in temperate and tropical woody species. In nutrient-poor systems such as the Brazilian Cerrado, nocturnal transpiration may enhance delivery of nutrients to roots. We compared nocturnal transpiration of three dominant Cerrado tree species growing in unfertilized plots and plots to...

  16. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: Footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m −1 and 111 kV m −1 in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. - Highlights: • Electric field vectors have been calculated in EME systems. • A new driving force has been proposed in EME systems. • EME can be theoretically applied to nonionic polarizable analytes.

  17. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: Footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moazami, Hamid Reza [School of Physics and Accelerators, NSTRI, P. O. Box, 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed, E-mail: ss-hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abrari, Masoud [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-03

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m{sup −1} and 111 kV m{sup −1} in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. - Highlights: • Electric field vectors have been calculated in EME systems. • A new driving force has been proposed in EME systems. • EME can be theoretically applied to nonionic polarizable analytes.

  18. The influence of the sea surface temperature on the nocturnal offshore line of precipitation near Mediterranean coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, Jordi; Pino, David

    2013-04-01

    Drainage winds lead offshore the cold inland air, which might form a coastal front when interacting with the warm and wet air over the Mediterranean. This air may lift over this cold drained air mass, and convective clouds may appear if the air reaches the Level of Free Convection (LFC). Nocturnal offshore lines and cells of precipitation near the coastline caused by the convergence between drainage winds and a synoptic flow have been well studied in the tropical areas (e.g. Yu et al., 2004; Frye, 2001; Oshawa et al., 2001; Mapes et al., 2003). In the Mediterranean basin, despite some works studied this phenomenon (Newman, 1951; Greich et al., 2004; Callado et al., 2002; Mazón and Pino, 2009 and 2012a, b) there is still some lack of understanding about the main mechanisms driving the formation of the coastal fronts. By using observations and the version 3.3 of the WRF mesoscale model we analyze the role of the sea surface temperature in these lines and cells of precipitation. Several numerical experiments varying SST according the simulation obtained in Somot et al. (2008) have been performed, accordingly the Mediterranean region and season. Three events have been selected in the west, middle and east of the Mediterranean basin at different seasons: late winter (minimum SST) and early autumn (maximum SST). The numerical experiment done in early autumn shows that the increasing the SST enhances the drainage wind. However, this relative cold wind warm fast over the Mediterranean Sea. The numerical experiment shows an increase of the intensity, the accumulated precipitation and the number of the precipitation cells. However, this precipitation areas use to be located more offshore the coastline.

  19. Self-driving carsickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectral sensitivity of the nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus,as a vector of West Nile virus is the target of many surveillance and control efforts. Surveillance of this species primarily consists of light traps baited with a variety of chemical lures. While much research has focused on optimization of the olfa...

  1. Oscillating Nocturnal Slope Flow in a Coastal Valley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Mahrt, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Observations of slope flows in a coastal valley are analyzed. The diurnal variation of upslope and downslope flows depends on season in a systematic way which appears to be related to the high latitude of the observational site and the presence of a nearby layer of marine air. Summer nocturnal flow...

  2. Working for Food Shifts Nocturnal Mouse Activity into the Day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, Roelof A.; Pilorz, Violetta; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Daan, Serge; Yamazaki, Shin

    2011-01-01

    Nocturnal rodents show diurnal food anticipatory activity when food access is restricted to a few hours in daytime. Timed food access also results in reduced food intake, but the role of food intake in circadian organization per se has not been described. By simulating natural food shortage in mice

  3. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Farnsworth, A.; Aelterman, B.; Alves, J.A.; Azijn, K.; Bernstein, G.; Branco, S.; Desmet, P.; Dokter, A.M.; Horton, K.; Kelling, S.; Kelly, J.F.; Leijnse, H.; Rong, J.; Sheldon, D.; Van den Broeck, W.; Van Den Meersche, J.K.; Van Doren, B.M.; van Gasteren, H.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’

  4. Does petroleum development affect burrowing owl nocturnal space-use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scobie, Corey; Wellicome, Troy; Bayne, Erin [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta (Canada)], email: cscobie@ualberta.ca, email: tiw@ualberta.ca, email: bayne@ualberta.ca

    2011-07-01

    Decline all over Canada in the population of burrowing owls, a federally listed endangered species, has raised concerns about the possible influence of petroleum infrastructure development on owl nocturnal space-use while foraging. Roads, wells, pipelines and sound-producing facilities related to petroleum development change the landscape and can influence the owls' mortality risk. For 3 years, 27 breeding adult male burrowing owls with nests close to different petroleum infrastructures were captured and fitted with a miniature GPS datalogger in order to track their nocturnal foraging. Data from these GPS devices were fed into a geographical information system and showed that pipelines and wells did not alter the foraging habits of the owls. Dirt and gravel roads, with little traffic, were preferentially selected by the owls, conceivably because of higher owl mortality risk along paved roads. Sound-producing facilities did not change owls' foraging behaviour, implying that sound may not affect their nocturnal space-use. Traffic data and sound power measurements will be used in further studies in an effort to better understand burrowing owls' nocturnal foraging habits.

  5. daily, sustained-release theophylline on sleep in nocturnal asthmatics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the quality and efficiency of sleep as well as changes in lung function in nocturnal asthmatics in a double- blind, randomised, cross-over, placebo-controlled study. Once-daily, sustained-release, evening-administered theophylline was compared with placebo while concurrent anti-asthma medication (inhaled ...

  6. Frequency analysis of snoring sounds during simulated and nocturnal snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Michael; Schieb, Eva; Bremert, Thomas; Herzog, Beatrice; Hosemann, Werner; Kaftan, Holger; Kühnel, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Despite several ways of investigation, such as clinical examination, drug-induced sleep endoscopy and pressure measurement of the upper airway, it is still difficult to locate the site of snoring exactly. Frequency analysis of snoring sounds is described as a promising diagnostic tool. The aim of the study was to examine simulated snoring under conditions awake, record the produced snoring sounds and compare those sounds with nocturnal snoring. A total of 50 snoring male patients were examined clinically by flexible nasal endoscopy and simulated snoring under conditions awake, and the simulated snoring sounds were recorded. Additionally, nocturnal snoring sounds were recorded during nighttime polysomnography. Snoring events were analyzed by fast-fourier-transformation and the intensity peaks 1-5 were evaluated. Rhythmic and non-rhythmic snoring events were distinguished depending on present obstructive apneas. Clinical and polysomnographical data were correlated with the results of the frequency analysis of the snoring sounds. Simulated snoring sounds revealed a low frequency of 200 Hz in intensity peaks 1 and 2 with an increase up to 3,000 Hz in peaks 3-5. Similar frequency patterns were detected in rhythmic nocturnal snoring. Non-rhythmic snoring events revealed frequency patterns between 2,000 and 3,000 Hz in all five intensity peaks. Simulated snoring resembles rhythmic nocturnal snoring with low-frequency intensity peaks, whereas non-rhythmic snoring revealed high frequencies. The examination during simulated snoring and frequency analysis of snoring sounds might contribute in locating the pathogenesis of snoring.

  7. Impact of nocturnal bruxism on mercury uptake from dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacsson, G; Barregård, L; Seldén, A; Bodin, L

    1997-06-01

    The mercury (Hg) release from dental amalgam fillings increases by mechanical stimulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible impact of nocturnal bruxism on Hg exposure from dental amalgams and to evaluate the effect of an occlusal appliance. 88 female patients from an orofacial pain clinic with a complete maxillary and mandibular dentition, a normal frontal vertical overbite with cuspid guidance, and at least 4 occlusal amalgam fillings in contact with antagonists in intercuspidal position, were examined with the Bruxcore bruxism monitoring device to measure the level of on-going nocturnal bruxism. Based on the degree of abrasion recorded, the subjects were divided into a group defined as bruxists, (n = 29), another group defined as non-bruxists, (n = 32), serving as controls, the intermediate group being discarded. The Hg exposure was assessed from the Hg concentration in plasma and urine, corrected for the creatinine content. In a regression model with bruxism as the only explanatory variable, no significant effect of bruxism was found, but when the number of amalgam fillings, chewing gum use, and other background variables were taken into account, there was a limited impact of bruxism on Hg in plasma. The nocturnal use of an occlusal appliance did not, however, significantly change the Hg levels. This study indicates that mechanical wear on amalgams from nocturnal bruxism may increase the Hg uptake, but the magnitude of this effect seems to be less than from the use of chewing gum.

  8. Seed predation by nocturnal rodents in an African savanna ecosystem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The small mammal community in Acacia savanna consists of three omnivorous nocturnal rodent species, Mastomys natalensis, Saccostomus campestris and Aethomys chrysophilus, which eat varying proportions of seed in their diet. From a seed removal experiment, it was found that rodents preferentially selected Acacia ...

  9. Exploring Forensic Implications of the Fusion Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the forensic implications of Apple's Fusion Drive. The Fusion Drive is an example of auto-tiered storage. It uses a combination of a flash drive and a magnetic drive. Data is moved between the drives automatically to maximize system performance. This is different from traditional caches because data is moved and not simply copied. The research included understanding the drive structure, populating the drive, and then accessing data in a controlled setting to observe data migration strategies. It was observed that all the data is first written to the flash drive with 4 GB of free space always maintained. If data on the magnetic drive is frequently accessed, it is promoted to the flash drive while demoting other information. Data is moved at a block-level and not a file-level. The Fusion Drive didn't alter the timestamps of files with data migration.

  10. Investigation of turbines for driving supersonic compressors II : performance of first configuration with 2.2 percent reduction in nozzle flow area / Warner L. Stewart, Harold J. Schum, Robert Y. Wong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Warner L; Schum, Harold J; Wong, Robert Y

    1952-01-01

    The experimental performance of a modified turbine for driving a supersonic compressor is presented and compared with the performance of the original configuration to illustrate the effect of small changes in the ratio of nozzle-throat area to rotor-throat area. Performance is based on the performance of turbines designed to operate with both blade rows close to choking. On the basis of the results of this investigation, the ratio of areas is concluded to become especially critical in the design of turbines such as those designed to drive high-speed, high-specific weight-flow compressors where the turbine nozzles and rotor are both very close to choking.

  11. A novel design and driving strategy for a hybrid electric machine with torque performance enhancement both taking reluctance and electromagnetic attraction effects into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.-N.; Chen, W.-P.; Teng, C.-C.; Chen, M.-P.

    2006-01-01

    A novel design, the hybrid electric machine, that owns improved competence for the output torque regulation as well as enlarged power density comparing to the conventional brushless machines by making use of the simultaneous performance overlapping concept based on magnetism is proposed in this paper. The developed design concept is focused on electric machine structure and its counterpart drive for applying two main magnetic-power transmitting paths by combination of both features of magnetic tendencies of flux generation that may flow in the path with minimum reluctance and direction owning the electromagnetic motive attraction. The verifications demonstrate that the outputted torque owns effective improvement by the presented concept of the electric machine based on the equivalent 3-hp frame than the conventional brushless motors

  12. Performance analysis of three-dimensional-triple-level cell and two-dimensional-multi-level cell NAND flash hybrid solid-state drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Yukiya; Yamada, Tomoaki; Matsui, Chihiro; Yamaga, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Ken

    2018-04-01

    In order to improve performance of solid-state drives (SSDs), hybrid SSDs have been proposed. Hybrid SSDs consist of more than two types of NAND flash memories or NAND flash memories and storage-class memories (SCMs). However, the cost of hybrid SSDs adopting SCMs is more expensive than that of NAND flash only SSDs because of the high bit cost of SCMs. This paper proposes unique hybrid SSDs with two-dimensional (2D) horizontal multi-level cell (MLC)/three-dimensional (3D) vertical triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash memories to achieve higher cost-performance. The 2D-MLC/3D-TLC hybrid SSD achieves up to 31% higher performance than the conventional 2D-MLC/2D-TLC hybrid SSD. The factors of different performance between the proposed hybrid SSD and the conventional hybrid SSD are analyzed by changing its block size, read/write/erase latencies, and write unit of 3D-TLC NAND flash memory, by means of a transaction-level modeling simulator.

  13. Amantadine can Ameliorate Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction and Nocturnal Polyuria in Patients with Parkinson Disease and Vascular Parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Hiromi, Tateno; Tomoyuki, Uchiyama; Tatsuya, Yamamoto; Yuka, Watanabe; Kenichi, Hashimoto; Chiharu, Shibata-yamaguchi; Miki, Fuse; Takao, Kamai; Tomonori, Yamanishi; Ryuji, Sakakibara; Satoshi, Kuwabara; Koichi, Hirata; Department Of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University; Department Of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University:Neurourology And Continence Center, Dokkyo Medical University:Department Of Neurology, Chiba University Graduate School Of Medicine; Department Of Neurology, Chiba University Graduate School Of Medicine:Neurourology And Continence Center, Dokkyo Medical University:Department Of Neurology, Chiba University Graduate School Of Medicine

    2015-01-01

    Background:Amantadine is a drug used for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular parkinsonism (VP). These patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and nocturnal polyuria (NP). Thus, we investigated the effect of amantadine on these in parkinsonian patients.Methods:Twenty-two patients with LUTS, including 13 with PD and nine with VP, were recruited. We performed a urinary questionnaire, frequency-volume chart, and residual urine (RU) measurement before and after dail...

  14. Evaluation of depression and self-esteem in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis: A controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Koca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nocturnal enuresis (NE is very common and is one of the most common causes for patients to be admitted to urology, pediatrics, child psychiatry and child surgery departments. We aimed to investigate the effect on depression and self-esteem of this disorder that can cause problems on person's social development and human relations. Material and methods: 90 patients who were admitted to our clinic with complaints of nocturnal enuresis were enrolled. Investigations to rule out organic causes were performed in this group of patients. Out of them 38 children and adolescents (age range 8-18 years with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE agreed to participate in the study In the same period 46 healthy children and adolescents with a similar age range without bed wetting complaint were included in the study as a control group. The age of the family, educational and socioeconomic level were questioned and Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (PHCSCS and Children's Depression Inventory (CDI forms were filled out. Results: Mean age of the cases (18 females or 47.4% and 20 males or 52.6% was 10.76 ± 3.82 years whereas mean age of controls (26 females or 56.5% and 20 males or 43.5% was 10.89 ± 3.11 years. Depression scale was significantly higher (p = 0.001 in the case group than in the control group (10.42 ± 4.31 vs 7.09 ± 4.35. In both groups there was no statistically significant difference by age and sex in terms of depression scale (p > 0.05. Conclusion: NE is widely seen as in the community and is a source of stresses either for children and for their families. When patients were admitted to physicians for treatment, a multidisciplinary approach should be offered and the necessary psychological support should be provided jointly by child psychiatrists and psychologists.

  15. Vertical Distribution of Daily Migrating Mesopelagic Fish in Respect to Nocturnal Lights

    KAUST Repository

    Prihartato, Perdana

    2014-12-01

    The nighttime distribution of vertically migrating mesopelagic fish in relation to nocturnal light was studied during a circumglobal survey, in the Red Sea, and in a fjord at high latitude. The study was based on data derived from ship borne echo sounders (circumglobal and the Red Sea) as well as using upward looking echo sounders mounted on the bottom (Masfjorden, Norway). We also applied a numerical model for analyzing diel vertical migration patterns. The effect of the lunar cycle was the focus in studies at low latitudes, while seasonal changes in nocturnal light climate was in focus at high latitude. Lunar phase significantly affected the distribution of mesopelagic fish at the global scale and in the Red Sea. During nights near full moon, scattering layers of mesopelagic fish distributed deeper than during darker phases of the moon. At high latitude, mesopelagic fish switched its behavior along with seasonal changes in nocturnal lights. In autumn, the population of the studied fish (Maurolicus mueleri) formed separated layers. Juveniles performed normal diel vertical migration followed by midnight sinking, with midnight sinking mainly related to temperature minima and also for avoiding predators. Meanwhile the adults did not migrate vertically, reducing foraging but increasing the adult survival. From late winter to mid-Spring, interrupted ascents behavior was noted in the afternoon. Predator avoidance, satiation, and finding temperature optimum might be the reason behind interrupted ascents. At lighter nights in mid-summer, M. muelleri took on schooling behavior, likely as an anti-predator behavior permitting access to the upper waters in the absence of darkness.

  16. Adaptive strategies in nocturnally migrating insects and songbirds: contrasting responses to wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jason W; Nilsson, Cecilia; Lim, Ka S; Bäckman, Johan; Reynolds, Don R; Alerstam, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Animals that use flight as their mode of transportation must cope with the fact that their migration and orientation performance is strongly affected by the flow of the medium they are moving in, that is by the winds. Different strategies can be used to mitigate the negative effects and benefit from the positive effects of a moving flow. The strategies an animal can use will be constrained by the relationship between the speed of the flow and the speed of the animal's own propulsion in relation to the surrounding air. Here we analyse entomological and ornithological radar data from north-western Europe to investigate how two different nocturnal migrant taxa, the noctuid moth Autographa gamma and songbirds, deal with wind by analysing variation in resulting flight directions in relation to the wind-dependent angle between the animal's heading and track direction. Our results, from fixed locations along the migratory journey, reveal different global strategies used by moths and songbirds during their migratory journeys. As expected, nocturnally migrating moths experienced a greater degree of wind drift than nocturnally migrating songbirds, but both groups were more affected by wind in autumn than in spring. The songbirds' strategies involve elements of both drift and compensation, providing some benefits from wind in combination with destination and time control. In contrast, moths expose themselves to a significantly higher degree of drift in order to obtain strong wind assistance, surpassing the songbirds in mean ground speed, at the cost of a comparatively lower spatiotemporal migratory precision. Moths and songbirds show contrasting but adaptive responses to migrating through a moving flow, which are fine-tuned to the respective flight capabilities of each group in relation to the wind currents they travel within. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  17. How much North African dust emission is associated with breakdowns of nocturnal low-level jets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, S.; Schepanski, K.; Heinold, B.; Knippertz, P.; Tegen, I.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol has important impacts on atmospheric radiation transfer, optical properties and precipitability of clouds, as well as human health and eco-systems. Time, location and amount of dust emission are key factors for simulating the atmospheric life cycle of dust and its effects accurately. Dust emission is a non-linear function of surface properties, and the momentum transfer from the atmosphere to the Earth's surface. A phenomenon capable of mobilizing dust is the Nocturnal Low-Level Jet (NLLJ), a wind speed maximum at night caused by air accelerating due to reduced dynamical friction in the nocturnal boundary layer. Momentum from the NLLJ is transferred downwards by turbulence, predominantly during the following morning when surface heating erodes the nocturnal temperature inversion. While this breakdown of NLLJs has been suggested to be a main driver for dust storms in North Africa, a quantitative investigation based on analysis data is lacking. As part of the European Research Council funded 'Desert Storms' project, this work presents the first statistical analysis of the importance of NLLJs for the mineral dust amount emitted in North Africa. A new automated detection algorithm for NLLJs has been developed for analyzing the spatio-temporal characteristics and associated mineral dust emission amounts. The algorithm is applied to the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim re-analysis for 1979-2010. Near-surface wind speed and soil moisture from ERA-interim drive an off-line dust model for calculating associated dust emission fluxes. Annually and spatially averaged, NLLJs form in 29 % of the nights in North Africa. The areal distribution of NLLJs highlights their frequent occurrence along the margins of the Saharan heat-low in summer, and in regions affected by mountain channeling like the Bodélé Depression, Chad, predominantly in winter. In these seasonally varying hotspots NLLJs are identified in 40-80 % of the nights

  18. Glaucoma and Driving: On-Road Driving Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A; Mallon, Kerry; Thomas, Ravi; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    To comprehensively investigate the types of driving errors and locations that are most problematic for older drivers with glaucoma compared to those without glaucoma using a standardized on-road assessment. Participants included 75 drivers with glaucoma (mean = 73.2±6.0 years) with mild to moderate field loss (better-eye MD = -1.21 dB; worse-eye MD = -7.75 dB) and 70 age-matched controls without glaucoma (mean = 72.6 ± 5.0 years). On-road driving performance was assessed in a dual-brake vehicle by an occupational therapist using a standardized scoring system which assessed the types of driving errors and the locations where they were made and the number of critical errors that required an instructor intervention. Driving safety was rated on a 10-point scale. Self-reported driving ability and difficulties were recorded using the Driving Habits Questionnaire. Drivers with glaucoma were rated as significantly less safe, made more driving errors, and had almost double the rate of critical errors than those without glaucoma. Driving errors involved lane positioning and planning/approach, and were significantly more likely to occur at traffic lights and yield/give-way intersections. There were few between group differences in self-reported driving ability. Older drivers with glaucoma with even mild to moderate field loss exhibit impairments in driving ability, particularly during complex driving situations that involve tactical problems with lane-position, planning ahead and observation. These results, together with the fact that these drivers self-report their driving to be relatively good, reinforce the need for evidence-based on-road assessments for evaluating driving fitness.

  19. How high-performance work systems drive health care value: an examination of leading process improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Julie; Garman, Andrew N; Song, Paula H; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    As hospitals focus on increasing health care value, process improvement strategies have proliferated, seemingly faster than the evidence base supporting them. Yet, most process improvement strategies are associated with work practices for which solid evidence does exist. Evaluating improvement strategies in the context of evidence-based work practices can provide guidance about which strategies would work best for a given health care organization. We combined a literature review with analysis of key informant interview data collected from 5 case studies of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) in health care organizations. We explored the link between an evidence-based framework for HPWP use and 3 process improvement strategies: Hardwiring Excellence, Lean/Six Sigma, and Baldrige. We found that each of these process improvement strategies has not only strengths but also important gaps with respect to incorporating HPWPs involving engaging staff, aligning leaders, acquiring and developing talent, and empowering the front line. Given differences among these strategies, our analyses suggest that some may work better than others for individual health care organizations, depending on the organizations' current management systems. In practice, most organizations implementing improvement strategies would benefit from including evidence-based HPWPs to maximize the potential for process improvement strategies to increase value in health care.

  20. Motor Integrated Variable Speed Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Yash Veer

    A new trend in the variable speed drives (VSDs) is to develop fully integrated systems, which lead to low-cost products with shorter design cycles. Motor Integrated design of VSDs will reduce cable length to connect drive with machine windings and installation time for end user. The electric drives...... so it can fit inside the motor housing. Weight and volume of a filter inductor has to come down drastically to make it a suitable power converter for motor integrated variable speed drives. Introduction of active power electronic switches can ensure very high performance and small size...

  1. Nocturnal sustained attention during sleep deprivation can be predicted by specific periods of subjective daytime alertness in normal young humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillard, Jacques; Moore, Nicholas; Claustrat, Bruno; Coste, Olivier; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    In our 24-h society, nocturnal sleep-related accidents are common. Because all individuals are not equal in their responses to sleep loss, it is very important to identify predictors of vulnerability to sleep deprivation in normal subjects. We investigated the performance of a cognitive test of sustained attention, electroencephalogram theta/alpha power, subjective sleepiness, and two circadian markers (core temperature and melatonin) in 18 healthy men (nine morning types and nine evening types, 21.4 +/- 1.9 years) during a 36-h sleep deprivation in a constant routine protocol. Sleep need (self-reported) and baseline sleep structure were also investigated. Nighttime performance impairment was defined as the difference between the mean nocturnal number of lapses (00:00-07:30 [corrected] hours) and the mean diurnal number of lapses (07:30-20:30 hours) expressed as a percentage. Feeling fully alert in the morning just after awakening and/or sleepy in early afternoon were the only two factors (Multiple R > 0.80, > 60% of explained variance) which better predicted the decrease in performances of nocturnal operational tasks requiring sustained attention.

  2. Bacteria-foraging based-control of high-performance railway level-crossing safety drives fed from photovoltaic array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essamudin A. Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years, railway level-crossing accidents have noticeably escalated in an indisputably preposterous manner, this devastating snag opened the floodgates for the frustrating death of a numerous number of the third world’s citizens, especially in Egypt. To tackle with this problem, a fully intelligent control system is required, which must be automated without human intervention. So, in this research, a new proposed level-crossing tracking system is designed and introduced. The system comprises a high-performance induction motor (IM fed from photovoltaic (PV array, the boom barrier (gate with its mechanism – as a load – buck–boost converter, inverter, and two smart PI-controllers. The first one is designed to regulate the duty cycle of the converter to its optimum value required to balance between maximum power point tracking (MPPT and keeping dc-link voltage of the inverter at a minimum level needed to maintain the motor internal torque at rated value. The second PI-controller is designed for speed control of indirect field-oriented vector-control (IFO-VC IM. The proposed design problems of MPPT, dc-link voltage and speed controllers are solved as optimization problems by bacteria-foraging optimization (BFO algorithm to search for the optimal PI-parameters. The simulation test results are acquired when using the battery-less PV-array with and without the proposed controllers. Also, results are obtained when applying several prescribed speed trajectories to test the robustness against PV-irradiance fluctuations and motor-dynamic disturbances. From these results, the proposed intelligent controllers are robust compared to classical Ziegler–Nichols (ZN PI-controllers and also when the motor is directly fed from PV generator without converter.

  3. Short and longer duration effects of protective gloves on hand performance capabilities and subjective assessments in a screw-driving task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianat, Iman; Haslegrave, Christine M; Stedmon, Alex W

    2010-12-01

    The study investigated short and longer duration effects of gloves on hand performance capabilities (muscle activity, dexterity, touch sensitivity, finger pinch and forearm torque strength) and subjective assessments of discomfort and ease of manipulation when performing a light assembly task. The independent variables were hand condition with four levels (wearing cotton, nylon or nitrile gloves as well as barehanded) and point of time within the 2 h duration of the task (with measurements taken at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min). Participants worked with a screwdriver to fit two components together using screws. Wearing gloves significantly increased the muscle activity, pinch strength and discomfort but reduced the dexterity and touch sensitivity. There was also a significant effect of task time on the muscle activity, dexterity, forearm torque strength and touch sensitivity, which indicates that the duration of the task should be an important consideration in glove evaluation studies and in the selection of work gloves. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: It is important to evaluate the effects of gloves on hand performance capabilities in a working context so that job demands can be taken into account and the most appropriate type of glove be chosen for each task. This study gives recommendations regarding the evaluation and use of gloves for screw-driving tasks.

  4. Evaluating noise performance of the IUCAA sidecar drive electronics controller (ISDEC) based system for TMT on-instrument wavefront sensing (OIWFS) application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burse, Mahesh; Chattopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Sinha, Sakya; Prabhudesai, Swapnil; Punnadi, Sujit; Chordia, Pravin; Kohok, Abhay

    2016-07-01

    As a part of a design study for the On-Instrument Low Order Wave-front Sensor (OIWFS) for the TMT Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we recently evaluated the noise performance of a detector control system consisting of IUCAA SIDECAR DRIVE ELECRONICS CONTROLLER (ISDEC), SIDECAR ASIC and HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) MUX. To understand and improve the performance of this system to serve as a near infrared wavefront sensor, we implemented new read out modes like multiple regions of interest with differential multi-accumulate readout schemes for the HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) detector. In this system, the firmware running in SIDECAR ASIC programs the detector for ROI readout, reads the detector, processes the detector output and writes the digitized data into its internal memory. ISDEC reads the digitized data from ASIC, performs the differential multi-accumulate operations and then sends the processed data to a PC over a USB interface. A special loopback board was designed and used to measure and reduce the noise from SIDECAR ASIC DC biases2. We were able to reduce the mean r.m.s read noise of this system down to 1-2 e. for any arbitrary window frame of 4x4 size at frame rates below about 200 Hz.

  5. The effect of sleep on nocturnal urine output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Hagstrøm, Søren; Rittig, Søren

    2005-01-01

      Hypothesis / aims of studyAim of this study was to elucidate the impact of sleep on the quantity and quality of the nocturnal urine production in healthy individuals.Our hypothesis was that sleep deprivation is related to excess nocturnal urine production.Study design, materials and methods...... sleep and the sequence was randomized. During these nights with sleep deprivation, participants were in lying position in a dimly lit room and physical activities, food and fluid intake were not allowed. Smoking was not allowed throughout the entire experimental protocol. Determinations of electrolytes...... deprivation. The circadian rhythm of AVP, PGE2 and MEL was evaluated at baseline and during sleep deprivation.ResultsNo significant differences were found in the urinary production at daytime between the two experimental 24-h periods. Males excreted significantly higher amounts of urine on a 24-h basis...

  6. Nocturnal raptors (owls: contributions to study of its popularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lindelia Rincón Hernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research characterizes the nocturnal birds of prey on the campus of Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (UPTC; in English, Pedagogical and Technological University of Colombia, in addition to the contribution to the study of its popularity, with students in fifth grade from two educational institutions, one, of the urban context, and other, of the rural context. The study involved the implementation of the didactic component to promote recognition of their biological significance in elementary school students. Among the findings two species of nocturnal birds of prey were identified: common currucutú owl (Tropical Screech Owl, Megascops choliba and the barn owl (Tyto alba, with a relative abundance of 12 individuals and 10 individuals, respectively. It also includes changes in perception from students regarding beliefs and superstitions about such species, which favors the recognition of the biological role in the ecosystem and the need for its conservation.

  7. On the mechanisms of blunted nocturnal decline in arterial blood pressure in NIDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Flemming Steen; Rossing, P; Bang, L E

    1995-01-01

    Nondiabetic hypertensive patients lacking the normal nocturnal decline in arterial blood pressure have enhanced cardiovascular complications. Since cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are increased in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we performed a prospective cross......-sectional case-controlled study comparing the diurnal variation in arterial blood pressure, prevalence of dippers, cardiac autonomic nervous function (beat-to-beat variation during deep breathing), and extracellular fluid volume (51Cr-labeled EDTA) in 55 NIDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (group 1), 55...... NIDDM patients with normoalbuminuria (group 2), and 22 nondiabetic control subjects (group 3). All antihypertensive treatments were withdrawn at least 2 weeks before the study. The nocturnal blood pressure reduction (daytime-to-nighttime)/daytime (mean +/- SE) was impaired in group 1 (6.6 +/- 1...

  8. Sleep disturbances in IDDM patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtson, I; Gade, J; Thomsen, C E

    1992-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied to evaluate sleep patterns during normoglycemia and spontaneous and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two channels of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram and actooculogram were recorded. The signals were analyzed off-line, using...... a polygraphic sleep analysis system. The scoring was mainly based on the color density spectral array of the EEG. Blood glucose and growth hormone were measured serially. Asymptomatic, spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred in 38% of the nights. Conventional sleep analysis showed a tendency toward...

  9. Stable nocturnal spectral characteristics over a vineyard (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueger, John H.; Alfieri, joesph G.; Hipps, Lawrence E.; Kustas, William P.; Neale, Christopher M.

    2016-10-01

    Vineyards are agricultural surfaces that present a unique structural perturbation to the mean wind flow. As part of the Grape Remote Sensing Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experiment (GRAPEX) a 10-m profile tower of three sonic anemometers at 2, 3.75 and 8 m above ground level in in a mature vineyard having was deployed to measure high frequency diurnal variations of 3-dimensional velocity components (u, v, w) and temperature (T) throughout the growing season. Previous work has been published involving eddy covariance measurements in vineyards but these mostly represented convective daytime unstable conditions. Significantly less has been published about turbulence in vineyards during stable nocturnal periods. Hence, in this study we focused on the nocturnal stable periods under clear skies and relatively light winds typical of the northern portion of California's Central Valley. Our objective was to characterize and evaluate turbulent exchange processes in the layer near the top of a vine canopy during nocturnal periods which are often characterized by weak and intermittent turbulence. Spectra, cospectra and coherence plots were evaluated for nocturnal periods. The spectra suggest there are periods of intermittent turbulence with features indicative of local and regional scale processes. Additionally the impact of the vine structure and spacing on slow meandering flows enhance the decomposition of organized turbulent eddies resulting in intricate mechanical turbulence generated by intermittent eddies that are rapidly decomposed as eddies interact with the vine structure and spacing. Preliminary results will be discussed that provide insight into turbulence characteristics at several heights above a canopy vineyard as affected by vine structure and spacing, wind speed, direction and stable conditions.

  10. Nocturnal leg cramps in children: incidence and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, A. K.; Wong, B. E.; Chan, P. Y.; Cho, H. Y.

    1999-01-01

    The records of 2527 healthy children seen in an ambulatory care clinic were evaluated for nocturnal leg cramps in the preceding 12 months, frequency and duration of the cramps, whether the cramps affected one leg or both legs at a time, whether there was associated muscle cramps in feet, whether the cramps occurred when the child was awake or asleep, and whether there was residual tenderness in the affected muscles. Nocturnal leg cramps were present in 185 children for an overall incidence of 7.3%. Leg cramps were noted only in children aged > or = 8 years. The incidence increased at 12 years and peaked at 16 to 18 years of age. A majority (81.6%) of the affected children had nocturnal leg cramps 1 to 4 times per year. The mean duration of episodes was 1.7 minutes. Leg cramps were unilateral in 98.9% of cases and the ipsilateral foot also was involved in 18.9% of cases. One hundred thirty-five (73%) children had leg cramps while asleep, and the remaining 23 (12.4%) children had leg cramps in either state. Fifty-seven (30.8%) children had residual tenderness in the affected muscles. The mean duration of residual tenderness was 33.2 minutes (range: 2 minutes-1 day). We conclude that nocturnal leg cramps are common in children aged > 12 years. A majority of the affected children have leg cramps 1 to 4 times per year. The cramps are usually unilateral and occur when the children are asleep. Normal duration of the leg cramp is < 2 minutes. Residual tenderness is present in approximately 30% of the affected children. Residual tenderness, if present, usually lasts for half an hour. PMID:10388258

  11. Nocturnal Oxygen Variability in Home Dwelling Heart Failure Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-16

    must be submitted for review and approval.) The Electronic Collection & Presentation of Nocturnal Heart Failure Information 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO...heart failure experience extreme night-to-night variability in blood oxygen saturation and heart rate over several nights. Materials & Methods: This... Failure Patients presented at/published to SURF 2017 UTSA Main Campus, San Antonio, TX, 16 Jun 2017 in accordance with MDWI 41 - 108, has been

  12. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Shamoun-Baranes

    Full Text Available Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals' life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human-wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological

  13. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Andrew; Aelterman, Bart; Alves, Jose A.; Azijn, Kevin; Bernstein, Garrett; Branco, Sérgio; Desmet, Peter; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Horton, Kyle; Kelling, Steve; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Leijnse, Hidde; Rong, Jingjing; Sheldon, Daniel; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Van Den Meersche, Jan Klaas; Van Doren, Benjamin Mark; van Gasteren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human–wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public

  14. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens

    OpenAIRE

    Yorzinski, Jessica L.; Chisholm, Sarah; Byerley, Sydney D; Coy, Jeanee R.; Aziz, Aisyah; Wolf, Jamie A.; Gnerlich, Amanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching acce...

  15. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Latour, Régis Peffault; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Blaise, Didier; de Souza, Carmino A.; Vigouroux, Stephane; Willemze, Roelf; Terriou, Louis; Tichelli, Andre; Mohty, Mohamad; de Guibert, Sophie; Marsh, Judith C.; Passweg, Jakob; Yves Mary, Jean; Socié, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background In the era of eculizumab, identifying patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria who may benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplantation is challenging. Design and Methods We describe the characteristics and overall survival of 211 patients transplanted for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in 83 EBMT centers from 1978 to 2007. Next, we conducted a comparison with a cohort of 402 non-transplanted patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria diagnosed between 1950 and 2005 in 92 French centers. We compared the occurrence of complications (i.e. thromboembolism and aplastic anemia) using either an individual or a stratum-matching procedure. Results After a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year overall survival rate ± standard error (%) was 68±3 in the transplanted group (54±7 in the case of thromboembolism, 69±5 in the case of aplastic anemia without thromboembolism and 86±6 in the case of recurrent hemolytic anemia without thromboembolism or aplastic anemia). Only thromboembolism as the indication for transplantation was associated with worse outcome (P=0.03). We identified 24 pairs of transplanted and non-transplanted patients with thromboembolism for the matched comparison, with worse overall survival for the transplanted patients (hazard ratio=10.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-78.1; P=0.007). This was confirmed by the global matching procedure (P=0.03). As regards aplastic anemia without thromboembolism, 30 pairs were identified for the matched comparison. It was not observed that transplanted patients had a significantly worse overall survival (hazard ratio=4.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.9-18.9; P=0.06). A global matching procedure was not feasible. Conclusions Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is probably not a suitable treatment option for life-threatening thromboembolism in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. PMID:22689687

  16. Usefulness of transcutaneous PCO2 to assess nocturnal hypoventilation in restrictive lung disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Marjolaine; Nguyen-Baranoff, Danièle; Griffon, Lucie; Foignot, Clement; Bonniaud, Philippe; Camus, Philippe; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Rabec, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    Nocturnal hypoventilation is now an accepted indication for the initiation of non-invasive ventilation. Nocturnal hypoventilation may be an under diagnosed condition in chronic respiratory failure. The most appropriate strategy to identify sleep hypoventilation is not yet clearly defined. In clinical practice, it is indirectly assessed using nocturnal pulse oximetry (NPO) and morning arterial blood gases (mABG). Even though continuous transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (TcPCO2 ) monitoring is theoretically superior to NPO plus mABG, it is not routinely used. We aimed to prospectively compare NPO plus mABG with nocturnal TcPCO2 for the detection of alveolar hypoventilation in a cohort of patients with chronic restrictive respiratory dysfunction. We assessed 80 recordings of mABG, nocturnal TcPCO2 and NPO in 72 consecutive patients with neuromuscular disease or thoracic cage disorders. Nocturnal hypoventilation was defined as a mean nightime TcPCO2 ≥50 mm Hg, and nocturnal hypoxaemia as ≥30% of the night with transcutaneous pulse oxygen saturation ≤90% and/or >5 consecutive minutes with transcutaneous pulse oxygen saturation ≤88%. Amongst the 80 recordings, 25 of 76 (32.9%) without nocturnal hypoxaemia and 16 of 59 (27.1%) without hypercapnia on mABG showed nocturnal hypoventilation on TcPCO2 . Amongst recordings showing both normal NPO and mABG, 16 of 52 (30.8%) had a mean TcPCO2 ≥50 mm Hg. Nocturnal hypoxaemia was associated with nocturnal hypoventilation in all recordings. However, 5 of 21 (23.8%) recordings that showed an absence of nocturnal hypoventilation at the chosen threshold showed hypercapnia on mABG. Morning arterial blood gases and NPO alone or in combination underestimate nocturnal hypoventilation in patients with chronic restrictive respiratory dysfunction of extrapulmonary origin. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. Nocturnal sleep pattern in native Brazilian Terena adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REIMÃO RUBENS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Social-economic factors influence sleep habits. This research analyzes characteristics of nocturnal sleep in Brazilian Native Terena adults. Sixty-four adults (31 M; 33 F from 18 to 75 years, with a mean age of 37.0, from the Indian Reservation village of Córrego do Meio, in the central region of Mato Grosso do Sul, an agriculturally oriented group were evaluated. Nocturnal sleep characteristics were evaluated by means of a standard questionnaire applied to each individual. It was observed that reported nocturnal sleep was longer, sleep onset was earlier and wake up time was also earlier than usually described in urban populations. The mean total time in bed was 8.5 h or more, in every age bracket. The seven-day prevalence rate of insomnia was 4.6%, while the seven-day prevalence rate of hypnotic use was 1.5%, both remarkably less than described in urban populations. These findings stress the need to consider ethnic influences on sleep patterns and disorders.

  18. Sound imaging of nocturnal animal calls in their natural habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Takeshi; Aihara, Ikkyu; Otsuka, Takuma; Takeda, Ryu; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Hiroshi G

    2011-09-01

    We present a novel method for imaging acoustic communication between nocturnal animals. Investigating the spatio-temporal calling behavior of nocturnal animals, e.g., frogs and crickets, has been difficult because of the need to distinguish many animals' calls in noisy environments without being able to see them. Our method visualizes the spatial and temporal dynamics using dozens of sound-to-light conversion devices (called "Firefly") and an off-the-shelf video camera. The Firefly, which consists of a microphone and a light emitting diode, emits light when it captures nearby sound. Deploying dozens of Fireflies in a target area, we record calls of multiple individuals through the video camera. We conduct two experiments, one indoors and the other in the field, using Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). The indoor experiment demonstrates that our method correctly visualizes Japanese tree frogs' calling behavior. It has confirmed the known behavior; two frogs call synchronously or in anti-phase synchronization. The field experiment (in a rice paddy where Japanese tree frogs live) also visualizes the same calling behavior to confirm anti-phase synchronization in the field. Experimental results confirm that our method can visualize the calling behavior of nocturnal animals in their natural habitat.

  19. Social support and nocturnal blood pressure dipping: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann, Addie L; Gallo, Linda C

    2013-03-01

    Attenuated nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality than resting BP measurements. Studies have reported associations between social support, variously defined, and BP dipping. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to investigate associations of functional and structural social support with nocturnal BP dipping assessed over a minimum of 24 hours. A total of 297 articles were identified. Of these, 11 met criteria for inclusion; all studies were cross-sectional in design and included adult participants only (mean age = 19 to 72 years). Evidence was most consistent for an association between functional support and BP dipping, such that 5 of 7 studies reported statistically (or marginally) significant positive associations with BP dipping. Statistically significant functional support-BP dipping associations were moderate (standardized effect size (d) = 0.41) to large (d = 2.01) in magnitude. Studies examining structural support were fewer and relatively less consistent; however, preliminary evidence was observed for associations of marital status and social contact frequency with BP dipping. Statistically significant structural support findings were medium (d = 0.53) to large (d = 1.13) in magnitude. Overall, findings suggest a link between higher levels of functional support and greater nocturnal BP dipping; preliminary evidence was also observed for the protective effects of marriage and social contact frequency. Nonetheless, the relatively small number of studies conducted to date and the heterogeneity of findings across meaningful subgroups suggest that additional research is needed to substantiate these conclusions.

  20. Experimental temperature manipulations alter songbird autumnal nocturnal migratory restlessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berchtold Adrienne

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Migrating birds may respond to a variety of environmental cues in order to time migration. During the migration season nocturnally migrating songbirds may migrate or stop-over at their current location, and when migrating they may vary the rate or distance of migration on any given night. It has long been known that a variety of weather-related factors including wind speed and direction, and temperature, are correlated with migration in free-living birds, however these variables are often correlated with each other. In this study we experimentally manipulated temperature to determine if it would directly modulate nocturnal migratory restlessness in songbirds. We experimentally manipulated temperature between 4, 14, and 24°C and monitored nocturnal migratory restlessness during autumn in white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis. White-throated sparrows are relatively shortdistance migrants with a prolonged autumnal migration, and we thus predicted they might be sensitive to weatherrelated cues when deciding whether to migrate or stopover. At warm temperatures (24°C none of the birds exhibited migratory restlessness. The probability of exhibiting migratory restlessness, and the intensity of this restlessness (number of infra-red beam breaks increased at cooler (14°C, 4°C temperatures. These data support the hypothesis that one of the many factors that birds use when making behavioural decisions during migration is temperature, and that birds can respond to temperature directly independently of other weather-related cues.

  1. Nocturnal surface ozone enhancement over Portugal during winter: Influence of different atmospheric conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.

    2016-09-24

    Four distinct nocturnal surface ozone (NSO) enhancement events were observed, with NSO concentration exceeding 80μg/m3, at multiple ozone (O3) monitoring stations (32 sites) in January, November and December between year 2000–2010, in Portugal. The reasonable explanation for the observed bimodal pattern of surface ozone with enhanced NSO concentration during nighttime has to be transport processes, as the surface ozone production ceases at nighttime. Simultaneous measurements of O3 at multiple stations during the study period in Portugal suggest that horizontal advection alone cannot explain the observed NSO enhancement. Thus, detailed analysis of the atmospheric conditions, simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, were performed to evaluate the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for NSO enhancement in the region. Simulations revealed that each event occurred as a result of one or the combination of different atmospheric processes such as, passage of a cold front followed by a subsidence zone; passage of a moving surface trough, with associated strong horizontal wind speed and vertical shear; combination of vertical and horizontal transport at the synoptic scale; formation of a low level jet with associated vertical mixing below the jet stream. The study confirmed that large-scale flow pattern resulting in enhanced vertical mixing in the nocturnal boundary layer, plays a key role in the NSO enhancement events, which frequently occur over Portugal during winter months. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Nocturnal behavior in captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis)--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Graham; Burn, Charlotte C; Clauss, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) are known to perform oral and locomotor stereotypies. However, many studies do not consider the behavioral repertoire of these animals during the time when animals are confined to night quarters. At two zoological institutions, a total of six captive giraffes were observed via camera trap technology throughout six diurnal and nocturnal periods to record feeding, ruminating, and stereotypic behaviors. The effect of browse enrichment was assessed on alternate nights to determine how behaviors may be altered in the presence of natural forage. Results need to be interpreted with caution due to a high proportion of time when animals were out of camera range. For the observed time, stereotypical licking behavior was significantly higher at night compared to daytime at both facilities, while tongue play increased at the same time, but not significantly. The provision of browse enrichment during the night decreased the rate of tongue playing, but not significantly; however, browse did significantly reduce pacing behavior. Across treatments and institutions, observed oral stereotypies tended to correlate negatively with increased feeding behavior. Apart from a short-term effect of enrichment, this study indicates relevant differences in the frequencies of behaviors observed during the day and night, suggesting that assessing nocturnal behavior specifically may be important in many species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of aerobic exercise in early evening on the following nocturnal sleep and its haemodynamic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akira; Myouken, Shizuka; Yamada, Masako; Fujihara, Chizuko; Miura, Kouhei; Kashima, Hideaki; Eguchi, Kouhei; Endo, Masako Y; Koga, Shunsaku; Fukuba, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We determined effect of aerobic exercise in early evening on the quality, quantity, and haemodynamic response of subsequent nocturnal sleep in the home. Ten healthy young participants performed two protocols, with/without cycle ergometer exercise (60 min at 50% heart rate reserve) in early evening. Blood pressure (BP) (Holter) and physical activity (accelerometer) were measured from late afternoon of day 1 until noon of next day (day 2). Additionally, at bedtime participants were equipped with a small device worn on the wrist that identified sleep stage. There were no substantial differences in objective indices of sleep between two protocols (total sleep time: 438 ± 76 vs. 457 ± 64 min; P > 0.10). BP during nocturnal sleep tended to be lowered by prior exercise (MAP: 71 ± 5 vs. 68 ± 6 mmHg; P = 0.08). Aerobic exercise in early evening apparently has no acute effect on sleep per se, but seems to have a residual effect on haemodynamics, i.e. prolongation of post-exercise hypotension.

  4. Reduced Input Throw and High-speed Driving

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDowell, Kaleb; Paul, Victor; Alban, Jillyn

    2007-01-01

    .... In particular, drive-by-wire technology coupled with non-standard driving control devices have the potential to lead to improved driving performance, reduced Soldier training time, crash prevention...

  5. Efficacy of Acupuncture in Children with Nocturnal Enuresis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-tao Lv

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nocturnal enuresis (NE is recognized as a widespread health problem in young children and adolescents. Clinical researches about acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for nocturnal enuresis. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive literature search of 8 databases was performed up to June 2014; randomized controlled trials which compared acupuncture therapy and placebo treatment or pharmacological therapy were identified. A meta-analysis was conducted. Results. This review included 21 RCTs and a total of 1590 subjects. The overall methodological qualities were low. The results of meta-analysis showed that acupuncture therapy was more effective for clinical efficacy when compared with placebo or pharmacological treatment. Adverse events associated with acupuncture therapy were not documented. Conclusion. Based on the findings of this study, we cautiously suggest that acupuncture therapy could improve the clinical efficacy. However, the beneficial effect of acupuncture might be overstated due to low methodological qualities. Rigorous high quality RCTs are urgently needed.

  6. Effect of nocturnal sound reduction on the incidence of delirium in intensive care unit patients: An interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Ineke; van Iterson, Mat; Maaskant, Jolanda

    2017-08-01

    Delirium in critically-ill patients is a common multifactorial disorder that is associated with various negative outcomes. It is assumed that sleep disturbances can result in an increased risk of delirium. This study hypothesized that implementing a protocol that reduces overall nocturnal sound levels improves quality of sleep and reduces the incidence of delirium in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. This interrupted time series study was performed in an adult mixed medical and surgical 24-bed ICU. A pre-intervention group of 211 patients was compared with a post-intervention group of 210 patients after implementation of a nocturnal sound-reduction protocol. Primary outcome measures were incidence of delirium, measured by the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) and quality of sleep, measured by the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ). Secondary outcome measures were use of sleep-inducing medication, delirium treatment medication, and patient-perceived nocturnal noise. A significant difference in slope in the percentage of delirium was observed between the pre- and post-intervention periods (-3.7% per time period, p=0.02). Quality of sleep was unaffected (0.3 per time period, p=0.85). The post-intervention group used significantly less sleep-inducing medication (psound-reduction protocol. However, reported sleep quality did not improve. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Nocturnal Pruritus: The Battle for a Peaceful Night’s Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Joseph Lavery

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pruritus is a debilitating condition with numerous etiologies. Many patients suffer from nocturnal pruritus, which can decrease quality of life and affect mortality in hemodialysis patients. Nocturnal pruritus may occur in all sleep stages but is most prevalent in stages N1 and N2. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of nocturnal itch, which will aid in the development of tailored management strategies.

  8. Impaired nocturnal melatonin in acute phase of ischaemic stroke: cross-sectional matched case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, P A; Terzieva, D D; Dimitrov, B D

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative data on melatonin in stroke patients are scarce. A gender- and age-matched cross-sectional case-control study in 33 patients with ischaemic stroke was performed and associations between nocturnal melatonin and other factors (e.g. cortisol) were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory (e.g. melatonin and cortisol) measurements (03.00 h and 08.00 h) with statistical techniques [e.g. multifactorial regressions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and curvilinear estimations] were used. We identified mean value and 95% confidence interval (CI) (69.70 pg/ml; 95% CI = 53.86-85.54) for control levels of nocturnal melatonin in healthy subjects. The patients with stroke had lower melatonin (48.1 +/- 35.9 pg/ml) and higher cortisol (297.3 +/- 157.8 nmol/l) at 03.00 h (P 0.05). Stroke was the strongest factor of disturbed nocturnal cortisol (P melatonin depended on stroke (P = 0.010) and gender (P = 0.018). At the same time, vice versa, only nocturnal measures were associated with an increased probability of the presence of stroke (accuracy > 75%, Pmodel melatonin with 1.0 pg/ml might be associated with > 2% increase in the probability of the presence of stroke [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.020; 95% CI = 1.002-1.037] was also suggested. The ROC curve (0.67, P = 0.0119) and optimisation techniques indicated that a novel best cut-off melatonin in the view of the presence of stroke (OR = 3.12, P = 0.0463) might exist. The classification performance of such a cut-off might be confirmed by existing nocturnal melatonin and cortisol differences between the sub-groups; potential differences in diurnal melatonin were also suggested. In conclusion, a novel melatonin cut-off of 51.5 pg/ml may be associated with the presence of ischaemic stroke. As a single marker (84% sensitivity, 74% specificity), it is hypothesised that modelling performance was independent of age, gender and cortisol. These new results, including the suggested hypothesis, might be further tested in

  9. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based

  10. CAAD: Computer Architecture for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shaoshan; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Zhe; Gaudiot, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We describe the computing tasks involved in autonomous driving, examine existing autonomous driving computing platform implementations. To enable autonomous driving, the computing stack needs to simultaneously provide high performance, low power consumption, and low thermal dissipation, at low cost. We discuss possible approaches to design computing platforms that will meet these needs.

  11. Modeling human learning involved in car driving

    OpenAIRE

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, car driving is considered at the level of human tracking and maneuvering in the context of other traffic. A model analysis revealed the most salient features determining driving performance and safety. Learning car driving is modelled based on a system theoretical approach and based on a neural network approach. The aim of this research is to assess the relative merit of both approaches to describe human learning behavior in car driving specifically and in operating dynamic sys...

  12. Neuroethology of ultrasonic hearing in nocturnal butterflies (Hedyloidea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yack, Jayne E.; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2007-01-01

    Nocturnal Hedyloidea butterflies possess ultrasound-sensitive ears that mediate evasive flight maneuvers. Tympanal ear morphology, auditory physiology and behavioural responses to ultrasound are described for Macrosoma heliconiaria, and evidence for hearing is described for eight other hedylid....... Extracellular recordings from IIN1c reveal sensory responses to ultrasonic (>20 kHz), but not low frequency(butterflies exposed to ultrasound exhibit a variety of evasive maneuvers...... of evolutionary divergence, since we demonstrate that the ears are homologous to low frequency ears in some diurnal Nymphalidae butterflies....

  13. The effect of sleep on nocturnal urine output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Hagstrøm, Søren; Rittig, Søren

    2005-01-01

    sleep and the sequence was randomized. During these nights with sleep deprivation, participants were in lying position in a dimly lit room and physical activities, food and fluid intake were not allowed. Smoking was not allowed throughout the entire experimental protocol. Determinations of electrolytes...... sleep related physiological mechanisms into consideration. In the present study we report that acute sleep deprivation has a dramatic effect on the volume of nocturnal urine production in both genders although the effect is more pronounced in males. Natriuresis and kaliuresis were observed on nights...

  14. The Nocturnal Avian Migration Experiment Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanian, P. M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Horton, K. G. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Remote sensing techniques are playing a greater role in ornithology, and radar has proven a valuable tool for high resolution, long-term observations of airborne animals. The major disadvantage in radar remote sensing is the current inability to gain taxonomic information from these measurements. One solution is the incorporation of collocated acoustic monitoring that can provide recordings of species-specific nocturnal flight calls of migrating birds in flight. In addition, by taking multichannel recordings of these calls, the position of the calling bird can be calculated and linked to collocated radar measurements.

  15. Safe driving for teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... MAKE A COMMITTMENT TO SAFETY Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order to improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving ...

  16. Fesoterodine for the Treatment of Nocturnal Urgency in Patients with Overactive Bladder Syndrome: An Analysis of Responders and Nonresponders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusid, Johnathan A; Weiss, Jeffrey P; Carlsson, Martin O; Mangan, Erin K

    2017-11-01

    A recent study demonstrated improvement in nocturnal urgency in patients with overactive bladder when treated with fesoterodine. In the current study we aimed to determine which bladder diary parameters predict the response to fesoterodine in these patients. Patients with nocturnal urgency completed a 2-week, single-blind placebo run-in followed by 1:1 double-blind randomization to 12 weeks of fesoterodine or placebo. We analyzed bladder diary parameter changes from baseline to week 12, including the actual number of night voids (total number of nocturia episodes), maximum voided volume, nocturnal bladder capacity, Nocturnal Bladder Capacity Index (NBCi) (actual number of night voids - nocturnal urine volume/maximum voided volume - 1), nocturnal urine volume, the nocturia index (nocturnal urine volume/maximum voided volume) and the nocturnal polyuria index (nocturnal urine volume/24-hour volume). Additionally, we analyzed OAB-q (Overactive Bladder Questionnaire) changes. There was a linear relationship between the likelihood of being a responder for NBCi and the nocturia index. Responders had a significant decrease in nocturnal urine volume relative to baseline (-181.7 ml, p overactive bladder syndrome and low nocturnal bladder capacity with a mismatch between nocturnal urine production and bladder capacity may benefit from fesoterodine. Symptom improvement appears to be mediated by increases in typical rather than maximum nocturnal voided volumes. Symptom improvement was associated with improved quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vertical evolution of wind meandering in a nocturnal boundary layer during low-wind speed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanello, Michel; Acevedo, Otávio; Mortarini, Luca; Cava, Daniela; Giostra, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio; Anfossi, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    In the nocturnal boundary layer episodes of horizontal wind meandering are frequent. These episodes are characterised by low-wind regimes (wind speed less than 1.5 m s-1) in which submeso motions drive the wind dynamics and turbulence is weak and often intermittent. The inception of the meandering phenomenon as well as the interaction between turbulence and the submeso oscillations are still poorly understood. In this work we study the vertical evolution of the wind meandering by analysingnight-time anemometric data. The observations were carried on at a coastal site in Espirito Santo state, south-eastern Brazil from august to November 2016. The turbulent data, divided in hourly series, were collected in a 140-m tower designed to provide micrometeorological observations with high vertical resolution and deep coverage of the lower portion of the atmospheric boundary layer. Particularly, turbulence observations of the wind components and temperature are carried at 11 vertical levels. The tower has been deployed next to a natural gas power plant, at 3 km from the ocean. The terrain is generally flat for an area of 30 km from the tower, where moderate hills exist. The meandering timescale at each level is evaluated through the Eulerian Autocorrelation Functions of the horizontal wind velocity components and temperature, while the interactions between the different scales of motions is studied using the multi-correlation analysis. Thus the vertical evolution of meandering and time scales structure can be studied.

  18. Diurnal and Nocturnal Flight Activity of Blow Flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Rainforest Fragment in Brazil: Implications for the Colonization of Homicide Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Thiago F; Vasconcelos, Simao D

    2016-11-01

    Nocturnal flight of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a controversial issue in forensic entomology. We performed two field experiments to investigate the diurnal and nocturnal activity of six blow fly species in a rainforest fragment in Brazil. Initially, nocturnal (17:30-05:30) versus diurnal (05:30-17:30) flight activity was investigated. Only 3.9% of adults were collected at night, mostly the native species Mesembrinella bicolor, and nocturnal oviposition did not occur. In the second experiment, collection of adults took place at the following intervals: 05:30-08:30, 08:30-11:30, 11:30-14:30, and 14:30-17:30. The proportions of adults did not differ significantly among the four diurnal intervals, except for Hemilucilia segmentaria, which was captured more frequently in the early morning. Calliphoridae has predominantly diurnal behavior, not laying eggs in darkness. The association of the native species M. bicolor, Hemilucilia semidiaphana, and H. segmentaria to forested areas reinforces the forensic relevance of data on their flight pattern. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. EMI performance comparison of two-level and three-level inverters in small dc-link capacitors based motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Busquets-Monge, S.

    2012-01-01

    The size of passive components in an adjustable speed drive can be reduced by using small dc-link capacitors. The EMI filter in the drive also consists of passive components. The size of the filter can be reduced by using a three-level inverter, which can have low output voltage distortion. Howev....... Results show that the conducted emission from the three-level inverter is lower than that of the two-level inverter. Thus, a three-level inverter requires a smaller EMI filter in motor drives with small dc-link capacitors.......The size of passive components in an adjustable speed drive can be reduced by using small dc-link capacitors. The EMI filter in the drive also consists of passive components. The size of the filter can be reduced by using a three-level inverter, which can have low output voltage distortion. However......, the three-level inverter based on small dc-link capacitors requires a PWM strategy to maintain neutral-point voltage balance. In this paper, the common mode voltage, which is the determining factor for the EMI filter size, is analyzed for a virtual-vector-based PWM strategy. The common mode voltage...

  20. Increased prevalence of nocturnal smoking in restless legs syndrome (RLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provini, F; Antelmi, E; Vignatelli, L; Zaniboni, A; Naldi, G; Calandra-Buonaura, G; Vetrugno, R; Plazzi, G; Pizza, F; Montagna, P

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence of nocturnal smoking (NS) in patients with RLS. One hundred RLS patients living in Emilia-Romagna (Northern Italy) and 100 matched controls, randomly selected from the general population, underwent interviews for the presence of nocturnal smoking and for obsessive-compulsive traits, depression, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and subjective sleep quality. NS was more prevalent in RLS patients than controls (lifetime prevalence: 12% vs. 2%, P=0.012). Patients with NS had more frequently Sleep-Related Eating Disorders (SRED) than patients without NS (83.3% vs. 26.1%, P=0.0002). Pathological and borderline Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI) values as well as pathological values at the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) increased from controls to RLS patients without NS to RLS patients with NS (P=0.005 and P=0.01, respectively). We demonstrate an increased prevalence of NS in patients with RLS, in many cases associated with increased SRED. NS may be associated with psychopathological traits in RLS and may be relevant in the management of RLS patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Sarah; Byerley, Sydney D; Coy, Jeanee R.; Aziz, Aisyah; Wolf, Jamie A.; Gnerlich, Amanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences. PMID:26339552

  2. [Therapy of Cheyne-Stokes respiration with nocturnal oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, S; von Breska, B; Clemens, C; Schulz, R; Kreuzer, H

    1995-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is common in patients with severe congestive heart failure and is associated with significant nocturnal oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. The pathogenesis of Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with congestive heart failure has been well described and is related to prolonged circulation time between the lung and the carotid body mainly due to increased cardiac dimensions, reduced body stores of oxygen and carbon dioxide, disturbance of ventilation and respiratory control due to arousals and a relatively high hypercapnic ventilatory response. Oxygen is likely to reduce Cheyne-Stokes respiration by increasing oxygen and carbon dioxide stores and reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response. In the following paper we describe a study designed to determine the impact of nasal nocturnal oxygen on Cheyne-Stokes respiration, sleep, peak oxygen consumption during bicycle exercise, cognitive function evaluated by the trailmaking test and daytime symptoms in patients with severe congestive heart failure. The study is designed as a randomized, cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol on about 20 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 35%.

  3. Quetiapine reduces nocturnal urinary cortisol excretion in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Stefan; Pohlmann, Kathrin; Guan, Zhenghua; Jordan, Wolfgang; Meier, Andreas; Huether, Gerald; Rüther, Eckart; Rodenbeck, Andrea

    2004-07-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction is a frequent finding in psychiatric disorders, including psychotic depression and schizophrenia. Conflicting results exist concerning the influence of antipsychotics on the HPA-axis. Therefore, this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study investigated the effect of quetiapine on nocturnal urinary cortisol and melatonin excretion in 13 healthy male subjects under conditions of undisturbed and experimentally disturbed sleep. Volunteers were studied 3 times for 3 consecutive nights (N0, adaptation; N1, standard sleep conditions; N2, acoustic stress) 4 days apart. Placebo, quetiapine 25 mg or quetiapine 100 mg was administered orally 1 h before bedtime on nights 1 and 2. Urine produced during the 8-h bedtime period was collected for later determination of cortisol and melatonin concentrations by standard radioimmunoassays. MANOVA showed a significant effect for N1 vs. N2 with elevated total amount of cortisol ( pmelatonin ( pcortisol excretion in comparison to placebo. No interaction effect of stress condition was observed. There was no effect of quetiapine on melatonin levels. The significant reduction of nocturnal cortisol excretion following quetiapine reflects a decreased activity of the HPA-axis in healthy subjects. This finding may be an important aspect in quetiapine's mode of action in different patient populations.

  4. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Yorzinski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus. Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences.

  5. Artificial light pollution increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorzinski, Jessica L; Chisholm, Sarah; Byerley, Sydney D; Coy, Jeanee R; Aziz, Aisyah; Wolf, Jamie A; Gnerlich, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    Artificial light pollution is drastically changing the sensory environments of animals. Even though many animals are now living in these changed environments, the effect light pollution has on animal behavior is poorly understood. We investigated the effect of light pollution on nocturnal vigilance in peahens (Pavo cristatus). Captive peahens were exposed to either artificial lighting or natural lighting at night. We employed a novel method to record their vigilance behavior by attaching accelerometers to their heads and continuously monitoring their large head movements. We found that light pollution significantly increases nocturnal vigilance in peahens. Furthermore, the birds faced a trade-off between vigilance and sleep at night: peahens that were more vigilant spent less time sleeping. Given the choice, peahens preferred to roost away from high levels of artificial lighting but showed no preference for roosting without artificial lighting or with low levels of artificial lighting. Our study demonstrates that light pollution can have a substantial impact on animal behavior that can potentially result in fitness consequences.

  6. Effects of artificial illumination on the nocturnal foraging of waders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Carlos D.; Miranda, Ana C.; Granadeiro, José P.; Lourenço, Pedro M.; Saraiva, Sara; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2010-03-01

    Large areas of natural and semi-natural habitats are exposed to artificial illumination from adjacent urban areas and roads. Estuarine and coastal wetlands are particularly exposed to such illumination because shorelines often are heavily utilized by man. However, the impact of artificial illumination on the waders that forage in these highly productive habitats is virtually unknown. We evaluated the effects of artificial illumination on the nocturnal habitat selection and foraging behaviour of six wader species with different feeding strategies: three visual foragers, two species that alternate visual and tactile strategies (mixed foragers), and one tactile forager. We quantified the number of birds and their foraging behaviour at sites affected and not affected by streetlights, and also before and after illuminating experimental sites. Areas illuminated by streetlights were used more during the night by visual foragers, and to a lesser extent by mixed foragers, than non-illuminated areas. Visual foragers increased their foraging effort in illuminated areas, and mixed foragers changed to more efficient visual foraging strategies. These behavioural shifts improved prey intake rate by an average of 83% in visual and mixed foragers. We have showed that artificial illumination has a positive effect on the nocturnal foraging of waders, but on the other hand may draw them to degraded areas close to urban centres, and potentially raises their exposure to predators. Our findings suggest that artificial illumination is worth investigation as a tool in the management of intertidal habitats for waders.

  7. Nocturnal hypoxia in ALS is related to cognitive dysfunction and can occur as clusters of desaturations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Yeon Park

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to progressive weakness of the respiratory and limb muscles. Consequently, most patients with ALS exhibit progressive hypoventilation, which worsens during sleep. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between nocturnal hypoxia and cognitive dysfunction and to assess the pattern of nocturnal hypoxia in patients with ALS.Twenty-five patients with definite or probable ALS underwent neuropsychologic testing, nocturnal pulse oximetry, and capnography. Patients were grouped according to the presence of nocturnal hypoxia (SpO2<95% for ≥10% of the night and their clinical characteristics and cognitive function were compared.Compared to patients without nocturnal hypoxia, those with nocturnal hypoxia (n = 10, 40% had poor memory retention (p = 0.039 and retrieval efficiency (p = 0.045. A cluster-of-desaturation pattern was identified in 7 patients (70% in the Hypoxia Group.These results suggest that nocturnal hypoxia can be related to cognitive dysfunction in ALS. In addition, a considerable number of patients with ALS may be exposed to repeated episodes of deoxygenation-reoxygenation (a cluster-of-desaturation pattern during sleep, which could be associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species. Further studies are required to define the exact causal relationships between these phenomena, the exact manifestations of nocturnal cluster-of-desaturation patterns, and the effect of clusters of desaturation on ALS progression.

  8. Association of Nocturnal Melatonin Secretion With Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Young Women

    OpenAIRE

    McMullan, Ciaran J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Forman, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin ameliorates insulin resistance in animals, while among humans, polymorphisms in the melatonin receptor gene are associated with insulin resistance. We aimed to investigate the association of endogenous nocturnal melatonin secretion with insulin resistance in humans. We analyzed the association between endogenous nocturnal melatonin secretion, estimated by measuring the main melatonin metabolite, 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, from the first morning urinary void, and the prevalence ...

  9. Nocturnal variations in lower-leg subcutaneous blood flow in paraplegic men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Wroblewski, H; Kastrup, J

    1992-01-01

    with the concept of a central nervous or humoral elicitation of nocturnal hyperaemia, although local metabolic and other factors might participate as well. Paraplegic men have an intact regulation of the postural and nocturnal changes in peripheral blood flow whether of central sympathetic or humoral origin....

  10. Nocturnal enuresis in school‑aged children with sickle‑cell anemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-09

    May 9, 2016 ... Background: Reports show that children with sickle‑cell anemia (SCA) have a tendency for nocturnal enuresis when compared with their counterparts with normal hemoglobin. Although nocturnal enuresis in SCA has been attributed to several factors including tubular and even bladder dysfunction, ...

  11. Nocturnal enuresis in school‑aged children with sickle‑cell anemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reports show that children with sickle‑cell anemia (SCA) have a tendency for nocturnal enuresis when compared with their counterparts with normal hemoglobin. Although nocturnal enuresis in SCA has been attributed to several factors including tubular and even bladder dysfunction, its relationship with ...

  12. Comparing the effects of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping on declarative memory consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June C Lo

    Full Text Available Nocturnal sleep and daytime napping facilitate memory consolidation for semantically related and unrelated word pairs. We contrasted forgetting of both kinds of materials across a 12-hour interval involving either nocturnal sleep or daytime wakefulness (experiment 1 and a 2-hour interval involving either daytime napping or wakefulness (experiment 2. Beneficial effects of post-learning nocturnal sleep and daytime napping were greater for unrelated word pairs (Cohen's d=0.71 and 0.68 than for related ones (Cohen's d=0.58 and 0.15. While the size of nocturnal sleep and daytime napping effects was similar for unrelated word pairs, for related pairs, the effect of nocturnal sleep was more prominent. Together, these findings suggest that sleep preferentially facilitates offline memory processing of materials that are more susceptible to forgetting.

  13. Automated driving safer and more efficient future driving

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The main topics of this book include advanced control, cognitive data processing, high performance computing, functional safety, and comprehensive validation. These topics are seen as technological bricks to drive forward automated driving. The current state of the art of automated vehicle research, development and innovation is given. The book also addresses industry-driven roadmaps for major new technology advances as well as collaborative European initiatives supporting the evolvement of automated driving. Various examples highlight the state of development of automated driving as well as the way forward. The book will be of interest to academics and researchers within engineering, graduate students, automotive engineers at OEMs and suppliers, ICT and software engineers, managers, and other decision-makers.

  14. Drowsy drivers' under-performance in lateral control : How much is too much? Using an integrated measure of lateral control to quantify safe lateral driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, R.J. van; Brouwer, R.F.T.; Martens, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Internationally, drowsy driving is associated with around 20% of all crashes. Despite the development of different detection methods, driver drowsiness remains a disconcerting public health issue. Detection methods can estimate drowsiness by directly measuring the physiology of the driver, or they

  15. Driving Performance among Bioptic Telescope Users with Low Vision Two Years after Obtaining Their Driver's License: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claude; Lachance, Jean-Paul; Deaudelin, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to compare road safety of new drivers with low vision who have followed a specific pilot bioptic training program with other groups of drivers all matched for age and driving experience. A quasi-experimental design was used two years after drivers obtained their license. Drivers were classified in the experimental group (n = 10,…

  16. Drowsy drivers’ under-performance in lateral control: How much is too much? Using an integrated measure of lateral control to quantify safe lateral driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, R.J.; Brouwer, R.F.T.; Martens, Marieke Hendrikje

    2015-01-01

    Internationally, drowsy driving is associated with around 20% of all crashes. Despite the development of different detection methods, driver drowsiness remains a disconcerting public health issue. Detection methods can estimate drowsiness by directly measuring the physiology of the driver, or they

  17. Nitrogen Oxides in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemistry of Nitrous Acid (HONO) and the Nitrate Radical (N03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochen Stutz

    2005-05-24

    Summary Chemical processes occurring at night in the lowest part of the urban atmosphere, the so called nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), can influence the composition of the atmosphere during the night as well as the following day. They may impact the budgets of some of the most important pollutants, such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, as well as influence size and composition of particular matter. Few studies have thus far concentrated on the nocturnal chemistry of the urban NBL, most likely due to the strong influence of vertical transport and mixing, which requires the measurement of trace gas profiles instead of simple point observations. Motivated by our lack of observations and understanding of nocturnal chemistry, the focus of this project was the study of the vertical distribution of trace gases and the altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry under polluted conditions through field observations and modeling studies. The analysis of three field experiments (TEXAQS, Houston, 2000; Phoenix Sunrise Ozone Experiment, 2001; NAPOX, Boston, 2002), two of which were performed in this project, showed that ozone concentrations typically increase with height in the lowest 150m, while NO2 typically decreases. NO3, the dominant nocturnal radical species, showed much higher concentrations in the upper part of the NBL, and was often not present at the ground. With the help of a one-dimensional chemical transport model, developed in this project, we found that the interaction of ground emissions of NOx and hydrocarbons, together with their vertical transport, is responsible for the vertical profiles. The dominant chemical reactions influencing ozone, NO2 and NO3 are the reaction of ozone and NO3 with freshly emitted NO. Sensitivity studies with our model showed that the magnitude of the trace gas gradients depend both on the emission rates and the vertical stability of the NBL. Observations and model analysis clearly show that nocturnal chemistry in urban areas is altitude

  18. A mutation in a functional Sp1 binding site of the telomerase RNA gene (hTERC promoter in a patient with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Haemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Philip J

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the gene coding for the RNA component of telomerase, hTERC, have been found in autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita (DC and aplastic anemia. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a clonal blood disorder associated with aplastic anemia and characterized by the presence of one or more clones of blood cells lacking glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins due to a somatic mutation in the PIGA gene. Methods We searched for mutations in DNA extracted from PNH patients by amplification of the hTERC gene and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC. After a mutation was found in a potential transcription factor binding site in one patient electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to detect binding of transcription factors to that site. The effect of the mutation on the function of the promoter was tested by transient transfection constructs in which the promoter is used to drive a reporter gene. Results Here we report the finding of a novel promoter mutation (-99C->G in the hTERC gene in a patient with PNH. The mutation disrupts an Sp1 binding site and destroys its ability to bind Sp1. Transient transfection assays show that mutations in this hTERC site including C-99G cause either up- or down-regulation of promoter activity and suggest that the site regulates core promoter activity in a context dependent manner in cancer cells. Conclusions These data are the first report of an hTERC promoter mutation from a patient sample which can modulate core promoter activity in vitro, raising the possibility that the mutation may affect the transcription of the gene in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo, and that dysregulation of telomerase may play a role in the development of bone marrow failure and the evolution of PNH clones.

  19. Measurement of Driving Terms

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, F; Faus-Golfe, A

    2001-01-01

    In 2000 a series of MDs has been performed at the SPS to measure resonance driving terms. Theory predicts that these terms can be determined by harmonic analysis of BPM data recorded after applying single kicks at various amplitudes. Strong sextupoles were introduced to create a sizeable amount of nonlinearities. Experiments at injection energy (26 GeV) with single bunch as well as one experiment at 120 GeV with 84 bunches were carried out. The expected nonlinear content is compared to the experimenteal observation.

  20. Promising Electric Aircraft Drive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of electric aircraft propulsion technology performance thresholds for key power system components is presented. A weight comparison of electric drive systems with equivalent total delivered energy is made to help identify component performance requirements, and promising research and development opportunities.

  1. Nocturnal Blood Pressure Variability in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynowicz, H; Porębska, I; Poręba, R; Mazur, G; Brzecka, A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common respiratory disorder associated with hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Blood pressure variability may be a sign of risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that severe OSA syndrome is associated with increased blood pressure variability. Based on respiratory polygraphy, 58 patients were categorized into two groups: severe OSA with apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 29 episodes per hour (mean 52.2 ± 19.0/h) and mild-to-moderate OSA with AHI between 5 and 30 episodes per hour (mean 20.2 ± 7.8/h). A 24-h noninvasive blood pressure monitoring was performed. The standard deviation of mean blood pressure was used as the indicator of blood pressure variability. In patients with severe, compared with mild-to-moderate OSA, a higher mean nocturnal systolic blood pressure (133.2 ± 17.4 mmHg vs. 117.7 ± 31.2 mmHg, p variability (12.1 ± 6.0 vs. 7.6 ± 4.3, p variability (10.5 ± 6.1 vs. 7.3 ± 4.0 p variability (9.1 ± 4.9 mmHg vs. 6.8 ± 3.5 mmHg) were detected. The findings of the study point to increased nocturnal systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure and blood pressure variability as risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with severe OSA.

  2. Morning and evening physical exercise differentially regulate the autonomic nervous system during nocturnal sleep in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yujiro; Hashimoto, Satoko; Takasu, Nana N; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Nishide, Shin-Ya; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2015-11-01

    Effects of daily physical exercise in the morning or in the evening were examined on circadian rhythms in plasma melatonin and core body temperature of healthy young males who stayed in an experimental facility for 7 days under dim light conditions (Sleep polysomnogram (PSG) and heart rate variability (HRV) were also measured. Subjects performed 2-h intermittent physical exercise with a bicycle ergometer at ZT3 or at ZT10 for four consecutive days, where zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0) was the time of wake-up. The rising phase of plasma melatonin rhythm was delayed by 1.1 h without exercise. Phase-delay shifts of a similar extent were detected by morning and evening exercise. But the falling phase shifted only after evening exercise by 1.0 h. The sleep PSG did not change after morning exercise, while Stage 1+2 sleep significantly decreased by 13.0% without exercise, and RE sleep decreased by 10.5% after evening exercise. The nocturnal decline of rectal temperature was attenuated by evening exercise, but not by morning exercise. HRV during sleep changed differentially. Very low frequency (VLF) waves increased without exercise. VLF, low frequency (LF), and high frequency (HF) waves increased after morning exercise, whereas HR increased after evening exercise. Morning exercise eventually enhanced the parasympathetic activity, as indicated by HRV, while evening exercise activated the sympathetic activity, as indicated by increase in heart rate in the following nocturnal sleep. These findings indicated differential effects of morning and evening exercise on the circadian melatonin rhythm, PSG, and HRV. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Nocturnal bladder emptying: a simple technique for reversing urinary tract deterioration in children with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Stephen A; Gigax, Michael R; Jayanthi, Venkata R

    2005-10-01

    In this preliminary study we sought to determine the effect of instituting nocturnal bladder emptying (NBE) in children with neurogenic (NGB) or nonneurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNGNGB) in whom urinary tract deterioration developed despite optimal daytime clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and urotropic medications. We hypothesize that a syndrome of nocturnal overdistention of the bladder (SNOB) can cause urinary tract deterioration through increased nighttime storage pressures manifested by recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), worsening incontinence, hydronephrosis and/or decreasing bladder compliance and capacity, and may be reversed by NBE. A total of 19 children with NGB (17) or NNGNGB (2) who displayed urinary tract deterioration while on CIC and urotropic medications were started on NBE. Of the patients 15 used a continuously draining nighttime catheter while 4 had scheduled awakenings during the night to perform CIC. The primary indications for NBE were recurrent symptomatic UTI in 5, new or progressive hydronephrosis in 7, and decreasing bladder capacity and compliance in 7. At a mean followup of 23 months 15 (79%) patients showed improvement or complete resolution of 1 or more signs or symptoms of hydronephrosis (7), increase in bladder capacity (5), recurrent UTI (6) and worsening incontinence (3). The remaining 4 patients had no response to NBE. No adverse effects were observed with 10 hours or less of nightly indwelling catheter time. Patients with NGB or NNGNGB on idealized daytime programs of CIC and urotropic drugs may have high intravesical pressures and experience urological deterioration because of an unrecognized SNOB. NBE is a simple technique for treating this condition and reversing the pathophysiological changes. The observation that NBE alone may increase bladder compliance and capacity sufficient to avoid bladder augmentation suggests that development of decreased bladder compliance and capacity in children with NGB may not

  4. Effects of resistance exercise timing on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Jessica R; Mazzochi, John W; Smith, Caroline J; Morris, David M; Collier, Scott R

    2015-05-01

    Short sleep duration and poor quality of sleep have been associated with health risks including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Prior research has suggested that regular aerobic exercise improves the quality of sleep; however, less is known regarding resistance exercise (RE) and how RE may affect sleep architecture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of timing of RE on sleep architecture and nocturnal blood pressure. College-aged subjects engaged in 5 laboratory visits. Visits 1 (C) and 2 provided a non-RE control day and established the 10-repetition maximum on each of 9 RE machines, respectively. During visits 3-5, the subjects reported at 0700 hours (7A), 1300 hours (1P), and 1900 hours (7P) in a randomized order to perform 30 minutes of RE. Ambulatory blood pressure and sleep-monitoring devices were worn during sleep after C, 7A, 1P, and 7P. Time to fall asleep was significantly different between RE conditions 7A and 1P and between 7A and 7P. All exercise conditions exhibited significantly fewer times woken than the non-RE control day, with 7P resulting in significantly less time awake after initially falling asleep as compared with C. Although timing of RE does not seem to statistically impact sleep stages or nocturnal blood pressure, these data indicate that engaging in RE at any time of the day may improve quality of sleep as compared with no RE. Resistance exercise may offer additional benefits regarding the ability to fall asleep and stay asleep to populations with osteoporosis, sarcopenia, anxiety, or depression.

  5. Desmopressin acetate and nocturnal enuresis: how much do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, M E; Harlos, S; Kirshen, A J; Burd, L

    1993-09-01

    Desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) is promoted to treat nocturnal enuresis but indications for its use are unclear. We reviewed all randomized controlled trials to determine (1) short- and long-term efficacy, (2) responders, (3) dose-response curve, (4) side effects, and (5) comparative efficacy with other treatments. A Medline search of the English language literature from January 1966 to August 1992, supplemented by contact with the drug companies, yielded 18 articles which were true randomized controlled trials (11 cross-over and 7 parallel studies). The 18 randomized controlled trials included 689 subjects for most of whom some other type of treatment had failed. All studies found decreased mean frequency of wetting ranging from 10% to 91%, but only 24.5% of subjects achieved short-term dryness. One study of DDAVP responders directly tested long-term dryness and 21% stayed dry. In three studies that incidentally reported on long-term effects 5.7% stayed dry after stopping DDAVP: There was wide variation in the type of patient included. Seven studies addressed prognostic factors. Children more than 9 years old and with fewer initial wet nights do better. Four studies seem to include almost exclusively monosymptomatic children with nocturnal enuresis (ie, primary nocturnal enuresis, positive family history, and no urinary symptoms). Results were no better than those which included mixed symptoms. Five studies attempted to address the dose-response issue. Despite some methodological issues, there is probably some dose-response effect. Side effects were infrequent in the 589 subjects who received DDAVP as opposed to placebo. No cases of water intoxication and no significant shifts in electrolytes were reported in the four studies which measured them. Nasal stuffiness, headache, epistaxis, and mild abdominal pain seem to be the only side effects noted, and these were uncommon. Only one study compared DDAVP with conditioning alarms. Alarm patients had 10% fewer wet nights

  6. Psychological predictors of college students' cell phone use while driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehofer, Michèle M; Thompson, Suzanne C; Ting, Sarah; Ostermann, Sharon; Nierman, Angela; Skenderian, Jessica

    2010-07-01

    Despite the known risk, many people talk on a phone while driving. This study explored psychological predictors of cell phone use while driving. College students (final N=69) completed a survey and predicted their driving performance both with and without a simultaneous phone conversation. Their actual performance on a driving simulator was then assessed. Cell phone use reduced performance on the simulation task. Further, perceiving oneself as good at compensating for driving distractions, overestimating one's performance on the driving simulator, and high illusory control predicted more frequent cell phone use while driving in everyday life. Finally, those who talked more frequently on a phone while driving had poorer real-world driving records. These findings suggest illusory control and positive illusions partly explain driver's decisions of whether to use cell phones while driving. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phoning while driving II: a review of driving conditions influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, C; Guillot, A; Petit, C

    2010-05-01

    The first paper examined how the variables related to driving performance were impacted by the management of holding a phone conversation. However, the conditions under which this dual task is carried out are dependent upon a set of factors that may particularly influence the risk of crash. These conditions are defined by several independent variables, classified into five main categories: i) legislation; ii) phone type (hands-free or hand-held); iii) drivers' features regarding age, gender, personal individual profile and driving experience; iv) conversation content (casual or professional) and its context (held with passengers or with a cell (mobile) phone); v) driving conditions (actual or simulated driving, road type, traffic density and weather). These independent variables determine the general conditions. The way in which these factors are combined and interact one with another thus determines the risk that drivers undergo when a cell phone is used while driving. Finally, this review defined the general conditions of driving for which managing a phone conversation is likely to elicit a high risk of car crash or, conversely, may provide a situation of lower risk, with sufficient acceptance to ensure safety.

  8. Differentiating nocturnal leg cramps and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Khan, Fatima; Mosabbir, Abdullah; Ondo, William

    2014-07-01

    Leg pain and discomfort are common complaints in any primary physician's clinic. Two common causes of pain or discomfort in legs are nocturnal leg cramps (NLC) and restless leg syndrome (RLS). NLC present as painful and sudden contractions mostly in part of the calf. Diagnosis of NLC is mainly clinical and sometimes involves investigations to rule out other mimics. RLS is a condition characterized by the discomfort or urge to move the lower limbs, which occurs at rest or in the evening/night. The similarity of RLS and leg cramps poses the issue of errors in diagnosing and differentiating the two. In this paper we review the pathopysiology of each entity and their diagnosis as well as treatment. The two conditions are then compared to appreciate the differences and similarities. Finally, suggestions are recommended for complete assessment.

  9. [Sensory integration function in children with primary nocturnal enuresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu-Hong; Cheng, Huan

    2008-10-01

    To assess the sensory integration function of children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) and explore the role of sensory integration dysfunction in the pathogenesis of PNE. Sensory integration function was assessed by the Childhood Sensory Integration Ability Development Checklist in 46 children with PNE and 46 normal children (control). The incidence of sensory integration dysfunction in the PNE group (82.6%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (43.5%)(Psensory integration dysfunction in the PNE group but only 1 (2.1%) in the control group (Psensory integration indexes revealed by sensory integration function testing in the PNE group were significantly lower than those in the control group (Psensory integration dysfunction. Sensory integration dysfunction may be associated with the pathogenesis of PNE.

  10. Sleep disturbances in IDDM patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtson, I; Gade, J; Thomsen, C E

    1992-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied to evaluate sleep patterns during normoglycemia and spontaneous and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two channels of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram and actooculogram were recorded. The signals were analyzed off-line, using a polygrap......Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied to evaluate sleep patterns during normoglycemia and spontaneous and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two channels of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram and actooculogram were recorded. The signals were analyzed off-line, using...... a polygraphic sleep analysis system. The scoring was mainly based on the color density spectral array of the EEG. Blood glucose and growth hormone were measured serially. Asymptomatic, spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred in 38% of the nights. Conventional sleep analysis showed a tendency toward...

  11. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a case report of MR, CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik; Chung, Soo Young; Park, Hai Jung; Lee Yul; Chun, Rho Won; Noh, Jung Woo [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired disease involving multiple hematopoietic cell lines. Characteristics of PNH are intrinsic hemolytic anemia, iron deficiency anemia and venous thrombosis. We report a case of PNH with characterostoc MR and CT findings. The signal intensity of renal cortex was lower than that of medulla on both T1-and T2-weighted MR imaging. On T2 weighted MR images, the liver showed very low signal intensity but the signal intensity of the spleen was normal. On precontrast CT the attenuation of renal cortex was higher than that of renal medulla and the attenuation of liver was higher than that of the spleen. These findings of MR imaging and CT were the result from the deposition of hemosiderin in the cells of proximal convoluted tubules and transfusional hemosiderosis of liver.

  12. Late postoperative nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia and associated sleep pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Wildschiødtz, G; Pedersen, M H

    1994-01-01

    pattern is disturbed severely with early depression of REM and slow wave sleep and with rebound of REM sleep on the second and third nights. Postoperative rebound of REM sleep may contribute to the development of sleep disordered breathing and nocturnal episodic hypoxaemia....... significantly after surgery (P sleep decreased significantly on the first night after operation (P sleep (rebound) on the second, third or both nights after operation compared with the preoperative night. Slow wave sleep...... was depressed significantly on the first two nights after operation (P sleep-associated hypoxaemic episodes for individual patients increased about three-fold on the second and third nights after operation compared with the night before operation (P sleep...

  13. Nocturnal activity positively correlated with auditory sensitivity in noctuoid moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Ratcliffe, John M; Fullard, James H

    2008-06-23

    We investigated the relationship between predator detection threshold and antipredator behaviour in noctuoid moths. Moths with ears sensitive to the echolocation calls of insectivorous bats use avoidance manoeuvres in flight to evade these predators. Earless moths generally fly less than eared species as a primary defence against predation by bats. For eared moths, however, there is interspecific variation in auditory sensitivity. At the species level, and when controlling for shared evolutionary history, nocturnal flight time and auditory sensitivity were positively correlated in moths, a relationship that most likely reflects selection pressure from aerial-hawking bats. We suggest that species-specific differences in the detection of predator cues are important but often overlooked factors in the evolution and maintenance of antipredator behaviour.

  14. A short-range objective nocturnal temperature forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A relatively simple, objective, nocturnal temperature forecasting model suitable for freezing and near-freezing conditions has been designed so that a user, presumably a weather forecaster, can put in standard meteorological data at a particular location and receive an hour-by-hour prediction of surface and air temperatures for that location for an entire night. The user has the option of putting in his own estimates of wind speeds and background sky radiation which are treated as independent variables. An analysis of 141 test runs show that 57.4% of the time the model predicts to within 1 C for the best cases and to within 3 C for 98.0% of all cases.

  15. Acute tubular necrosis in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eranga S Wijewickrama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a well-recognized complication of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH. The predominant mechanism is intravascular hemolysis resulting in massive hemoglobinuria ARF. We report a case of acute tubular necrosis (ATN developed in the absence of overwhelming evidence of intravascular hemolysis in a 21-year-old man with anemia, who was eventually diagnosed to have PNH. The patient presented with rapidly deteriorating renal functions in the background of iron deficiency anemia, which was attributed to reflux esophagitis. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of intravascular hemolysis. Renal biopsy revealed ATN with deposition of hemosiderin in the proximal tubular epithelial cells. Diagnosis of PNH was confirmed with a positive Ham′s test and flow cytometry. Our case emphasizes the need to consider ATN as a possible cause for ARF in patients suspected to have PNH even in the absence of overwhelming evidence of intravascular hemolysis.

  16. The Endoscopic Morphological Features of Congenital Posterior Urethral Obstructions in Boys with Refractory Daytime Urinary Incontinence and Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Hyuga, Taiju; Kawai, Shina; Kubo, Taro; Nakai, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study aims to evaluate the endoscopic morphological features of congenital posterior urethral obstructions in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. Patients and Methods A total of 54 consecutive patients underwent endoscopy and were diagnosed with a posterior urethral valve (PUV) (types 1-4). PUV type 1 was classified as severe, moderate, or mild. A transurethral incision (TUI) was mainly performed for anterior wall lesions of the PUV. Voiding cystourethrography and pressure flow studies (PFS) were performed before and 3 to 4 months after TUI. Clinical symptoms were evaluated 6 months after TUI, and outcomes were assessed according to PFS waveform pattern groups (synergic pattern [SP] and dyssynergic pattern [DP]). Results All patients had PUV type 1 and/or 3 (i.e., n = 34 type 1, 7 type 3, and 13 types 1 and 3). There were severe (n = 1), moderate (n = 21), and mild (n = 25) cases of PUV type 1. According to PFS, SP and DP were present in 43 and 11 patients, respectively. TUI was effective in the SP group and symptoms improved in 77.4 and 69.3% of patients with daytime incontinence and nocturnal enuresis, respectively. Almost no effect was observed in the DP group. A significant decrease in the detrusor pressure was observed at maximum flow rate using PFS in the SP group. Conclusions PUV type 1 encompassed lesions with a spectrum of obstructions ranging from severe to mild, with mild types whose main obstructive lesion existed at the anterior wall of urethra occurring most frequently in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Simvastatin-induced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojaković Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. Case Outline. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the ‘desirable’ range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day. The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day. At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. Conclusion. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways. It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  18. Nocturnal hypoxia in ALS is related to cognitive dysfunction and can occur as clusters of desaturations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Yeon; Kim, Sung-Min; Sung, Jung-Joon; Lee, Kyung-Min; Park, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Sang-Yun; Nam, Hyun-woo; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to progressive weakness of the respiratory and limb muscles. Consequently, most patients with ALS exhibit progressive hypoventilation, which worsens during sleep. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between nocturnal hypoxia and cognitive dysfunction and to assess the pattern of nocturnal hypoxia in patients with ALS. Twenty-five patients with definite or probable ALS underwent neuropsychologic testing, nocturnal pulse oximetry, and capnography. Patients were grouped according to the presence of nocturnal hypoxia (SpO2hypoxia, those with nocturnal hypoxia (n = 10, 40%) had poor memory retention (p = 0.039) and retrieval efficiency (p = 0.045). A cluster-of-desaturation pattern was identified in 7 patients (70%) in the Hypoxia Group. These results suggest that nocturnal hypoxia can be related to cognitive dysfunction in ALS. In addition, a considerable number of patients with ALS may be exposed to repeated episodes of deoxygenation-reoxygenation (a cluster-of-desaturation pattern) during sleep, which could be associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species. Further studies are required to define the exact causal relationships between these phenomena, the exact manifestations of nocturnal cluster-of-desaturation patterns, and the effect of clusters of desaturation on ALS progression.

  19. Light pollution modifies the expression of daily rhythms and behavior patterns in a nocturnal primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14(th) night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.

  20. Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8) were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes. PMID:24236115

  1. Getting a good night sleep? The importance of recognizing and treating nocturnal hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2018-01-05

    When Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are asked about the quality of their sleep, their answers are dominated by difficulties associated with impaired mobility in bed, medically referred to as nocturnal hypokinesia. Nocturnal hypokinesia is symptomatic from the mid-stage of the disease, affecting up to 70% of PD patients, and contributes to poor sleep quality, and increased carer burden. Here we explore four areas of nocturnal hypokinesia that are relevant to clinical practice, namely: manifestations and definition; clinical assessment and objective monitoring; etiologies and contributing factors; and evidence-based therapeutic approaches. In addition, we provide an operational definition of what constitutes nocturnal hypokinesia and outline different methods of assessment, ranging from clinical interviews and rating scales to objective night-time monitoring with inertial sensors. Optimal management of nocturnal hypokinesia in PD begins with recognizing its manifestation by inquiring about cardinal symptoms and contributing factors from, not only patients, but also carers, followed by formal assessment, and the application of individualized evidence-based treatment. Night-time dopaminergic treatment is the primary therapy; however, careful clinical judgment is required to balance the benefits with the potential adverse events related to nocturnal dopaminergic stimulation. Future studies are needed to explore the practicality of home-based objective assessment of nocturnal hypokinesia, new therapeutic options not limited to dopaminergic medications, and non-pharmacologic approaches, including training on compensatory strategies and bedroom adaptations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Light pollution modifies the expression of daily rhythms and behavior patterns in a nocturnal primate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Le Tallec

    Full Text Available Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal mammals an experimental study was conducted on a nocturnal primate, the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. Male mouse lemurs (N = 8 were exposed 14 nights to moonlight treatment and then exposed 14 nights to light pollution treatment. For both treatments, chronobiological parameters related to locomotor activity and core temperature were recorded using telemetric transmitters. In addition, at the end of each treatment, the 14(th night, nocturnal and feeding behaviors were explored using an infrared camera. Finally, throughout the study, body mass and daily caloric food intake were recorded. For the first time in a nocturnal primate, light pollution was demonstrated to modify daily rhythms of locomotor activity and core temperature especially through phase delays and increases in core temperature. Moreover, nocturnal activity and feeding behaviors patterns were modified negatively. This study suggests that light pollution induces daily desynchronization of biological rhythms and could lead to seasonal desynchronization with potential deleterious consequences for animals in terms of adaptation and anticipation of environmental changes.

  3. Studies on the Effects of High Renewable Penetrations on Driving Point Impedance and Voltage Regulator Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Sacramento Municipal Utility District Load Tap Changer Driving Point Impedance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarajan, Adarsh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Coddington, Michael H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brown, David [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States); Hassan, Sheikh [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States); Franciosa, Leonardo [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States); Sison-Lebrilla, Elaine [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

    2018-01-09

    Voltage regulators perform as desired when regulating from the source to the load and when regulating from a strong source (utility) to a weak source (distributed generation). (See the glossary for definitions of a strong source and weak source.) Even when the control is provisioned for reverse operation, it has been observed that tap-changing voltage regulators do not perform as desired in reverse when attempting regulation from the weak source to the strong source. The region of performance that is not as well understood is the regulation between sources that are approaching equal strength. As part of this study, we explored all three scenarios: regulator control from a strong source to a weak source (classic case), control from a weak source to a strong source (during reverse power flow), and control between equivalent sources.

  4. Relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and total antioxidants in peripheral blood with insomnia after stroke: study protocol for a prospective non-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been shown to regulate sleep. The nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants may relate to insomnia in stroke patients. In this prospective single-center non-randomized controlled clinical trial performed in the China Rehabilitation Research Center, we analyzed the relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants with insomnia after stroke. Patients during rehabilitation of stroke were recruited and assigned to the insomnia group or non-insomnia group. Simultaneously, persons without stroke or insomnia served as normal controls. Each group contained 25 cases. The primary outcome was nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants in peripheral blood. The secondary outcomes were Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (Chinese version, and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. The relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants with insomnia after stroke was analyzed and showed that they were lower in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group. The severity of stroke was higher in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the nocturnal concentrations of melatonin and GABA were associated with insomnia after stroke. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT03202121.

  5. [Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg pain : Differential diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, M; Stiasny-Kolster, K; Evers, S; Happe, S

    2011-09-01

    Pain in the legs belongs to the five most frequent regional pain symptoms. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) presents a particular differential diagnosis for pain in the legs, which is characterized by a nocturnal urge to move the legs often associated with painful sensations in the legs. It is one of the most common neurological disorders and probably the leading cause of nocturnal pain in the legs. In this overview, the diagnosis and therapy of RLS as well as aspects of pain therapy of the disorder are presented. In addition, the differential diagnoses for exclusion of other specific causes of nocturnal pain in the legs are discussed.

  6. Inside Solid State Drives (SSDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Micheloni, Rino; Eshghi, Kam

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Drives (SSDs) are gaining momentum in enterprise and client applications, replacing Hard Disk Drives (HDDs) by offering higher performance and lower power. In the enterprise, developers of data center server and storage systems have seen CPU performance growing exponentially for the past two decades, while HDD performance has improved linearly for the same period. Additionally, multi-core CPU designs and virtualization have increased randomness of storage I/Os. These trends have shifted performance bottlenecks to enterprise storage systems. Business critical applications such as online transaction processing, financial data processing and database mining are increasingly limited by storage performance. In client applications, small mobile platforms are leaving little room for batteries while demanding long life out of them. Therefore, reducing both idle and active power consumption has become critical. Additionally, client storage systems are in need of significant performance improvement as well ...

  7. Association of Sleep Disordered Breathing with Mono-Symptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis: A Study among School Children of Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharat; Patil, Rajesh; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Pakhare, Abhijit P; Goyal, Abhishek; P, Aswin; Dhingra, Bhavna; Tamaria, K C

    2016-01-01

    To study the prevalence of primary monosymptopomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) in children aged 5-10 year and to find its association with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) by using a 22 item pediatric sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) scale. This was a school based cross sectional epidemiological study from July 2015 to November 2015. A questionnaire seeking information on socio-demographic variables, nocturnal enuresis (NE) frequency, school performance and a validated 22 item pediatric sleep related breathing disorder scale (SRBDs) was distributed to 1820 pupils in three primary schools. A total of 1528(83.95%) questionnaires were retrieved. Out of 1528 forms, 182(11.9%) forms were incomplete for requested information and hence 1346 (73.9%) questionnaires were finally analyzed. The prevalence of NE was found to be 12.7% (95% CI; 11-14.6), whereas prevalence of primary nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) was 8.2% (95% CI; 7.1-10.1). SRBD scale score >0.33 (adjusted OR: 2.87; 95%CI: 1.67-4.92), paternal history of enuresis in childhood (adjusted OR:4.96; 95% CI: 2.36-10.45), and inappropriate toilet training (adjusted OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01-2.66) were independently associated with PMNE. Sleep disordered breathing, inappropriate toilet training and a history of childhood NE in father were found to be significant risk factors for PMNE in the present study. Thus, these findings suggest that it is imperative to rule out SDB in PMNE patients as they may require different therapeutic interventions.

  8. The short-term benefits of brief and long naps following nocturnal sleep restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietzel, A J; Lack, L C

    2001-05-01

    The purpose was to remedy the lack of experimental studies directly comparing the effects of brief and long daytime naps following nocturnal sleep restriction. Twelve young adult healthy sleepers participated in a repeated measures design comparing the effects of no nap, a 10-minute nap, and a 30-minute afternoon nap in each case following a night of 4.7 hours of total sleep time. Objective and subjective alertness measures and cognitive performance measures were taken before, then 5, 35, and 60 minutes after the termination of the nap. N/A. N/A. N/A. In the no nap condition measures showed either no change or a decreases of alertness and performance across the testing period. Following the 10-minute nap there was an immediate improvement in subjective alertness and cognitive performance which was sustained for the hour of post nap testing. Immediately following the 30 minute nap most measures of alertness and performance declined but showed some recovery by the end of testing. Because the delayed benefits following the 30-minute nap may be due to sleep inertia, longer post-nap testing periods should be investigated. However, we conclude that the detrimental effects of sleep restriction were more rapidly and significantly ameliorated, at least within the hour following the nap, by a 10-minute afternoon nap.

  9. Dementia and driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. If your loved one has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may ...

  10. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimano, Kunio; Nakamura, Akira; Mizuguchi, Koji; Sakai, Kazuhito; Mitsui, Hisayasu.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns upper-built-in type control rod drives of a BWR type reactor. Namely, high temperature linear motor driving type control rod drives are disposed in an upper space of the reactor pressure vessel, which generates electromagnetic power. In usual driving of control rods, driving shafts connected with control rods by a high temperature linear motor driving system comprising a driving shaft having an iron core inserted therein and electromagnetic coils is vertically moved to insert/withdraw the control rods to and from the reactor core. Upon occurrence of reactor scram, electric power source is interrupted, and the control rods are rapidly inserted to the reactor core. According to the present invention, since the control rod drives are disposed in the space above the reactor pressure vessel, pipelines or equipments passing through the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel can be saved. As a result, operation for maintenance and inspection is facilitated. (I.S.)

  11. Perceived confidence relates to driving habits post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Annabel; Walker, Ruth; Ratcliffe, Julie; George, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Returning to driving post-stroke is a step towards independence. On return to driving following stroke, confidence is related to performance in on-road assessment and self-regulation of driving behaviours occurs. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between driver's confidence and driving habits post-stroke. Structured telephone surveys were completed with 40 stroke survivors (62% men), of mean age 65 years SD 12.17 who returned to driving post-stroke within the previous 3 years. The survey included: (1) socio-demographics, (2) Adelaide Driving Self Efficacy Scale (ADSES) and (3) Driving Habits Questionnaire (DHQ). Male stroke survivors were more likely to return to driving, drive further and more often. Stroke survivors under 65 years were likely to drive further. Driving confidence was significantly associated with kilometres driven (p = 0.006), distance driven (p = 0.027) and self-limiting driving (p = 0.00). Findings indicate a relationship between confidence and driving behaviours post-stroke. Early recognition of driving confidence will help professionals target specific strategies, encouraging stroke survivors to return to full driving potential, access activities and positively influence quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Findings indicate a relationship between confidence and driving behaviours post-stroke. Early recognition of driving confidence will help professionals target specific strategies, encouraging stroke survivors to return to full driving potential, access activities and positively influence quality of life.

  12. Visuomotor competencies and primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis in prepubertal aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Giovanni Mazzotta,5 Giuseppina Patriciello,1 Francesco Precenzano,1 Marco Carotenuto1 1Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Italy; 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 5Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria 2, Terni, Italy Background: Primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE is a common problem in the developmental ages; it is the involuntary loss of urine during the night in children older than 5 years of age. Several clinical observations have suggested an association between bedwetting and developmental delays in motricity, language development, learning disability, physical growth, and skeletal maturation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of fine motor coordination and visuomotor integration abnormalities in prepubertal children with PMNE. Methods: The study population included 31 children (16 males, 15 females; mean age 8.14 years ± 1.36 years, and the control group comprised 61 typical developing children (32 males, 29 females; mean age 8.03 years ± 1.44 years. The whole population underwent a clinical evaluation to assess total intelligence quotient level, visuomotor integration (VMI skills, and motor coordination performance (using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, or M-ABC. Results: No significant differences between the two study groups were found for age (P = 0.725, gender (P = 0.886, z-body mass index (P = 0.149, or intellectual abilities (total intelligence quotient (P = 0.163. The PMNE group showed a higher prevalence of borderline performance on M

  13. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  14. Simple Driving Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    2002-01-01

    -like language. Our aim is to extract a simple notion of driving and show that even in this tamed form it has much of the power of more general notions of driving. Our driving technique may be used to simplify functional programs which use function composition and will often be able to remove intermediate data...

  15. Control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonuki, Koji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the driving speed of control rods at rapid insertion with an elongate control rod and an extension pipe while ensuring sufficient buffering performance in a short buffering distance, by providing a plurality of buffers to an extension pipe between a control rod drive source and a control rod in LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: First, second and third buffers are respectively provided to an acceleration piston, an extension pipe and a control rod respectively and the insertion positions for each of the buffers are displaced orderly from above to below. Upon disconnection of energizing current for an electromagnet, the acceleration piston, the extension pipe and the control rod are rapidly inserted in one body. The first, second and third buffers are respectively actuated at each of their falling strokes upon rapid insertion respectively, and the acceleration piston, the extension pipe and the control rod receive the deceleration effect in the order correspondingly. Although the compression force is applied to the control rod only near the stroke end, it does not cause deformation. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Numerical sensitivity study of the nocturnal low-level jet over a forest canopy and implications for nocturnal surface exchange of carbon dioxide and other trace gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, M.Y.; Duarte, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    and are typically intertwined with other contributing factors, they constitute an important cause of jet formation. This mechanism is the only one that can be simulated by one-dimensional atmospheric boundary-layer model. This mechanism is a strong function of the distribution of surface energy properties which...... in the nocturnal boundary layer, several studies demonstrated the role of nocturnal jets in transporting moisture, ozone, and other trace gases between the biosphere and the lower atmosphere (Mathieu et al., 2005; Karipot et al., 2006; 2007; 2008; 2009). This study suggests that SCADIS, because of its simplicity...... and low computational demand, has potential as a research tool regarding surface–atmosphere gaseous exchange in the nocturnal boundary layer, especially if carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone and other gases are released or deposited inside the forest canopy....

  17. Nocturnal eating predicts tooth loss among adults: results from the Danish MONICA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jennifer D; Williams, Karen B; Heitmann, Berit L

    2010-01-01

    /88) predicts number of missing teeth at time two (1993/94), when controlling for age, education, smoking status, body mass, carbohydrate intake, binge eating behavior, and diabetes diagnosis. A negative binomial model predicting number of missing teeth from nocturnal eating while controlling for covariates......The relationship between nocturnal eating, such as that associated with night eating syndrome (NES), and oral health is unknown. This study sought to determine if nocturnal eating is related to tooth loss in a large, epidemiologic sample. Danes (N=2217; age range 30-60 years, M BMI [kg/m(2......)]=25.9, % Male=50.1) enrolled in the Danish MONICA (MONItoring trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease) were assessed on oral health, eating behavior, anthropometrics, general health, and demographic characteristics in both 1987/88 and 1993/94. We hypothesized that nocturnal eating at time one (1987...

  18. Effect of Nocturnal Low-level Jet on Nighttime CO2 Concentrations and Fluxes: a Numerical Sensitive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogachev, A.; Jørgensen, H.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Duarte, H. F.; Durden, D.; Pingintha, N.; Zhang, G.

    2009-12-01

    profiles derived by SCADIS are in qualitative agreement with those observed by authors above agricultural land and Karipot et al. (2008) above a slash pine plantation. Numerical experiments performed with the model revealed that vertical CO2 fluxes in the nocturnal boundary layer often do not reflect real ecosystem respiration. This study suggests that SCADIS, especially in its 3D mode, has potential as a research tool regarding surface-atmosphere gaseous exchange over complex terrain.

  19. Light Pollution Modifies the Expression of Daily Rhythms and Behavior Patterns in a Nocturnal Primate

    OpenAIRE

    Le Tallec, Thomas; Perret, Martine; Th?ry, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Among anthropogenic pressures, light pollution altering light/dark cycles and changing the nocturnal component of the environment constitutes a threat for biodiversity. Light pollution is widely spread across the world and continuously growing. However, despite the efforts realized to describe and understand the effects of artificial lighting on fauna, few studies have documented its consequences on biological rhythms, behavioral and physiological functions in nocturnal mammals. To determine ...

  20. The effect of first nocturnal ejaculation timing on risk and sexual behaviors of Korean male adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Ji Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThis study evaluated the effect of first nocturnal ejaculation timing on risk and sexual behaviors of Korean male adolescents.MethodsWe analyzed data from the 10th edition of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based survey that was conducted with male high school adolescents in grades 10–12. The survey included 17,907 adolescents, and 10,326 responded their experience of first nocturnal ejaculation. Of these, 595 had their first nocturnal ejaculation in ≤grade 4 (“early puberty” and 9,731 had their first nocturnal ejaculation in ≥grade 5 (“normal puberty”. We analyzed differences between these 2 groups in risk and sexual behaviors.ResultsEarly first nocturnal ejaculation showed a positive association with sexual intercourse (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.56–4.17, sexual debut at elementary school age (OR, 7.45; 95% CI, 5.00–11.10, and having had a sexually transmitted disease (OR, 6.60; 95% CI, 3.94–11.08. After a multiple logistic regression to adjust for socio-demographic variables, early first nocturnal ejaculation was still positively associated with sexual intercourse (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 2.03–3.69, sexual debut at elementary school age (OR, 5.96; 95% CI, 3.47–10.22, and having had a sexually transmitted disease (OR, 5.17; 95% CI, 2.52–10.20. Early first nocturnal ejaculation was positively associated with alcohol consumption, smoking, and substance use. However, this was not statistically significant after adjusting for several socio-demographic variables.ConclusionThere is a positive association between early nocturnal ejaculation and sexual behaviors in male adolescents. Proactive education about sexual behaviors is required for adolescents who reach sexual maturity early.

  1. Spina bifida occulta: not to be overlooked in children with nocturnal enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Hee; Im, Young Jae; Lee, Mi-Jung; Lee, Yong Seung; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Han, Sang Won

    2013-08-01

    Previous reports have suggested that the incidence of spina bifida occulta in patients with nocturnal enuresis is higher than in the general population. However, the effect of spina bifida occulta on the response to nocturnal enuresis treatment is controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between spina bifida occulta and response to treatment of nocturnal enuresis. Between 2006 and 2009, the records of 160 children with nocturnal enuresis were reviewed. Children with other organic urological disease or symptoms suggestive of spinal dysraphism were excluded. Plain radiography for the kidney-ureter-bladder was carried out before the start of the nocturnal enuresis treatment. Response to treatment of children with and without spina bifida occulta was compared. Of 160 children, 53 were girls; the mean age was 7.8 ± 2.06 years. The mean duration of treatment was 8.7 ± 9.29 months. Spina bifida occulta was detected in 43 children (26.9%). Spina bifida occulta affected L4 in four children, L5 in 12 children, S1 in 26 children and S2 in one child. There was a significant difference between the spina bifida occulta and non-spina bifida occulta groups in terms of outcome (P=0.002), with a complete response more likely in children without spina bifida occulta (P=0.005). None of the children with primary non-mono symptomatic nocturnal enuresis and spina bifida occulta showed a complete response. The presence of spina bifida occulta significantly affects the response to treatment in patients with nocturnal enuresis. Thus, verifying spina bifida occulta in this patient population can facilitate the prediction of the response to nocturnal enuresis treatment. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Epidemiology of nocturnal enuresis in basic schoolchildren in Aden Governorate, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalida Anwer Yousef

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal enuresis is a common problem among children and adolescents. Data regarding this problem in schoolchildren in Yemen are scarce. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of nocturnal incontinence in Aden school going children, describe its severity and identify the relation between nocturnal enuresis with personal and family characteristics. The study was a cross-sectional survey conducted on the public basic schoolchildren in Aden, Yemen, in the period November 2007-April 2009. A random, multistage sample of 890 students was taken from four districts in eight schools and divided into two strata: males and females. Data were obtained by using pre-recoded questionnaire, which was completed by parents. The response rate was 73.7% (656 students; 113 (17.2% cases of nocturnal enuresis were encountered. Nocturnal enuresis de-creased by age from 31.5% at 6-8 years to 8.7% at 15+ years (P < 0.05. Primary nocturnal enuresis affected 76.1%, of which the majority of children were bedwetting every night. Positive family history of nocturnal enuresis, deeper sleep, daytime enuresis, tea drinking, being non working father or with less education showed significant association with the occurrence of enuresis in the students. Stressful events in the previous 6 months of the study were twice more frequently noted. The study concluded that the prevalence of nocturnal enuresis in Aden public school children and its associated factors are almost comparable with that reported in epidemiological studies from various countries. Health education will encourage the parents to be aware, cope with this problem and seek appropriate medical advice.

  3. Is nocturnal epilepsy cause of disturbed quality of sleep and elevated daytime sleepiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobucníková, Katariná; Carnická, Zuzana; Wagnerová, Helená; Siarnik, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Authors evaluated quality of sleep and daytime vigilance in patients with nocturnal epilepsy and compared it to those with daytime epilepsy. Nocturnal seizures are an important type of epilepsy. They can result in morbidity due to disruption of sleep architecture. Daytime sleepiness, as a serious consequence of nocturnal seizures, has negative influence on quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Authors examined 100 patients with epilepsy. The occurrence of epileptic seizures in circadian rhythm, type of epilepsy and epileptic seizures, as well as aetiology of epilepsy were evaluated. Patients were divided in two groups, 17 patients with nocturnal epilepsy and 83 patients with epileptic seizures not related to sleep. All of them underwent overnight video-EEG-polysomnography and they filled in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale questionnaire (ESS) as well as The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaire (PSQI). Overnight video-EEG-polysomnography detected significant changes in the sleep architecture in patients with nocturnal epilepsy. Significant decrease of N3 stage of NREM sleep (14.31%±8.07 in the group of nocturnal epilepsy vs. 20.12%±9.24 in the group of daytime epilepsy, p=0.01). Concurrently, significantly poorer sleep quality according to PSQI (18.52±7.51 in the group of nocturnal epilepsy vs. 6.21±3.62 in the group of daytime epilepsy, p=0.01) and tendency to increased daytime sleepiness according to ESS was revealed in these patients. Remarkable changes in sleep architecture associated with poor quality of sleep and increased daytime sleepiness were detected in patients with nocturnal epilepsy. In conclusion, we emphasize the importance of sleep history taking in patients with epilepsy and their further evaluation in sleep laboratory.

  4. Nocturnal antihypertensive treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes with autonomic neuropathy and non-dipping of blood pressure during night time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkær, Henrik; Jensen, Tonny; Kofoed, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    demonstrated. The present protocol describes a trial to test the efficacy of bedtime dosing of the ACE inhibitor enalapril on night time blood pressure and left ventricular mass in patients with type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomised, double-blind, two-way cross-over study, 24 normoalbuminuric...... patients with type 1 diabetes with CAN will be treated for 12 weeks with either morning or bedtime dosing of 20 mg enalapril, followed by 12 weeks of switched treatment regimen. During each treatment period, two 24 h ambulatory blood pressure measurements will be performed and after each treatment period......INTRODUCTION: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and elevated nocturnal blood pressure are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Previously, associations between CAN, non-dipping of nocturnal blood pressure and coronary artery calcification have been...

  5. Features of electric drive sucker rod pumps for oil production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizatullin, F. A.; Khakimyanov, M. I.; Khusainov, F. F.

    2018-01-01

    This article is about modes of operation of electric drives of downhole sucker rod pumps. Downhole oil production processes are very energy intensive. Oil fields contain many oil wells; many of them operate in inefficient modes with significant additional losses. Authors propose technical solutions to improve energy performance of a pump unit drives: counterweight balancing, reducing of electric motor power, replacing induction motors with permanent magnet motors, replacing balancer drives with chain drives, using of variable frequency drives.

  6. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Children with Monosymptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Cecilie Siggaard; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Borch, Luise; Borg, Britt; Rittig, Søren

    2017-09-01

    In a third of all children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis their condition is refractory to first line treatments. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation has been documented to be efficacious in children with daytime incontinence. We investigated the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (3 or more wet nights per week) and no nocturnal polyuria were randomized to treatment with active or sham transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation involving 1-hour sessions twice daily for 10 weeks in a double-blind design. Of the 52 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis included in the study 47 completed treatment (mean age 9.5 ± 2.1 years, 38 males). None of the children experienced a full response with complete remission of enuresis. Treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation did not lead to significant changes in number of wet nights, nocturnal urine production on wet or dry nights, maximum voided volume with and without first morning voided volume, or voiding frequency when comparing parameters before and after treatment. The present study demonstrates no anti-enuretic effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Nocturnal urine production and bladder capacity remained unchanged during and after treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nocturnal activity of a "diurnal" species, the northern chamois, in a predator-free Alpine area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevali, Lucilla; Lovari, Sandro; Monaco, Andrea; Mori, Emiliano

    2016-05-01

    The reduction of predation risk is widely considered a major factor affecting the nocturnal activity of mammals. Furthermore, on precipitous mountain terrain, moving in very poor light conditions should be avoided by animals with no special eyesight adaptation to darkness. The Northern chamois Rupicapra rupicapra has been for long considered as a diurnal species, with occasional nocturnal movements. For the first time, we have quantified the nocturnal activity of 21 radiotagged female chamois from the Italian Eastern Alps (Paneveggio-Pale di San Martino Natural Park), continuously monitored for two years from sunset to sunrise, with 24h tracking sessions carried out for six months. Large predators were not present in the study site. Despite their mainly diurnal activity pattern, peaks of nocturnal movements were detected throughout the year. The least proportion of active night fixes occurred in January and in July, while the most were in April and in October. The greater nocturnal activity in the warm months compared to cold periods, was probably due to frozen snow cover reducing nocturnal movements. Movements were mainly concentrated in bright moonlight nights, possibly because of the absence of large predators, but more likely because of increased visibility. Changes in activity levels throughout the year may also reflect changes in energy requirements of Northern chamois. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Contribution of diurnal and nocturnal insects to the pollination of Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae) in southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chang W; Huang, Zachary Y; Chen, Xiao M; Li, Kun; Chen, You; Sun, Yong Y

    2011-02-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) is being increasingly planted worldwide, but questions remain regarding its pollination biology. This study examined the contribution of diurnal and nocturnal insects to the pollination of monoecious J. curcas, through its floral biology, pollination ecology, and foraging behavior of potential pollinators. Nectar production of both male and female flowers peaked in the morning, declined in the afternoon, and rapidly bottomed during the night in all of their anthesis days. The diurnal visitors to the flowers of J. curcas are bees and flies, and the nocturnal visitors are moths. Flowers received significantly more visits by diurnal insects than by nocturnal insects. Through bagging flowers during night or day or both or exclusion, we compared fruit and seed production caused by diurnal and nocturnal pollinators. Both nocturnal and diurnal visitors were successful pollinators. However, flowers exposed only to nocturnal visitors produced less fruits than those exposed only to diurnal visitors. Thus, diurnal pollinators contribute more to seed production by J. curcas at the study site.

  9. Cerebral stroke in a teenage girl with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gervasi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH in a 14 year-old girl presenting a cerebral arterial thrombosis. The initial diagnosis was carential anemia due to menarche following identification of slight macrocytic anemia, leucopenia and mild thrombocytopenia at routine blood analysis. The child was eventually referred to a children’s hospital after the onset of progressive fatigue, anorexia and paleness. Severe anemia (hemoglobin 6 g/dL with negative Coombs test, mild leucopenia (white blood cells 4.9×109/L and thrombocytopenia (platelets 97×109/L and high values of lactate dehydrogenase (2855 U/L were identified; a packed red cells transfusion was administered. Her condition worsened and she subsequently presented complete right hemiplegia, aphasia and coma; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a massive ischemic lesion. A diagnosis of PNH was eventually made following high sensitivity flow cytometry, which identified a PNH clone (CD66b negative equal to 93.7% of granulocytes. Fast recovery from neurologic and hematological problems occurred in response to anticoagulant therapy and intravenous therapy with eculizumab. We are convinced that PNH should be included in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with cytopenia.

  10. Sensory system plasticity in a visually specialized, nocturnal spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Jay A; Michalik, Peter; Hebets, Eileen A

    2017-04-21

    The interplay between an animal's environmental niche and its behavior can influence the evolutionary form and function of its sensory systems. While intraspecific variation in sensory systems has been documented across distant taxa, fewer studies have investigated how changes in behavior might relate to plasticity in sensory systems across developmental time. To investigate the relationships among behavior, peripheral sensory structures, and central processing regions in the brain, we take advantage of a dramatic within-species shift of behavior in a nocturnal, net-casting spider (Deinopis spinosa), where males cease visually-mediated foraging upon maturation. We compared eye diameters and brain region volumes across sex and life stage, the latter through micro-computed X-ray tomography. We show that mature males possess altered peripheral visual morphology when compared to their juvenile counterparts, as well as juvenile and mature females. Matching peripheral sensory structure modifications, we uncovered differences in relative investment in both lower-order and higher-order processing regions in the brain responsible for visual processing. Our study provides evidence for sensory system plasticity when individuals dramatically change behavior across life stages, uncovering new avenues of inquiry focusing on altered reliance of specific sensory information when entering a new behavioral niche.

  11. Nocturnal blood pressure nondipping in obese African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napan, Sirikarn; Kwagyan, John; Randall, Otelio S; Xu, Shichen; Ketete, Muluemebet; Maqbool, Abid R

    2011-06-01

    Nondipping pattern of circadian blood pressure (BP) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; however, limited data are available among obese African-Americans. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate the pattern of circadian BP variation and to identify clinical conditions associated with nondipping in this population. A total of 211 obese African-Americans enrolled in a weight-reduction program underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring. Nondipping was defined as a nocturnal BP reduction of less than 10%. Systolic BP (SBP) nondipping was present in 158 participants (74.9%) and diastolic BP (DBP) nondipping was present in 93 participants (44.1%). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, diabetes was associated with SBP nondipping (adjusted OR, 2.53; CI: 1.16-5.76; P=0.02), and increasing BMI (5 kg/m) was associated with DBP nondipping (adjusted OR, 1.46; CI: 1.17-1.83; P=0.001). In linear regression analyses, BMI was positively correlated to office, 24-h, daytime, and night-time SBP (P=0.03, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.005, respectively) and office, 24-h, daytime, and night-time PP (P=0.01, P<0.001, 0.001, and P=0.003, respectively). This study demonstrated an excessively high prevalence of nondippers and independent associations between diabetes and SBP nondipping and between BMI and DBP nondipping in an obese African-American population.

  12. Phenytoin-induced isolated chronic, nocturnal dry cough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio A. Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 72-year-old man with a four-year history of dyscognitive seizures (with occasional secondary generalization who developed isolated, nocturnal dry cough immediately after being started on PO phenytoin. The cough was not accompanied by any other symptom or sign as his physical exam was completely normal. Further investigation with chest CT and spirometry was unremarkable. This symptom persisted for six months and did not resolve until we weaned him off of phenytoin. According to the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, his cough was classified as being probably (score +6 related to the use of this antiepileptic drug. To our knowledge, there has been only one study that reported phenytoin-triggered cough. It described a postoperative patient who developed cough and bronchospasm after receiving IV phenytoin. By reporting our case and discussing the literature on this specific topic, we have essentially two goals. First, we intend to remind clinicians that isolated persistent cough can be an adverse reaction to phenytoin. Second, we hope to encourage further studies that will be able to elucidate the association presented herein.

  13. A Moessbauer study of hemoglobin in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamorano-Ulloa, R.; Yee-Madeira, H.; Flores-Llamas, H.; Perez-Ramirez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra of concentrated hemoglobin (Hb) of normal subjects and six patients with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) were studied at 300deg K and 77 K. PNH is a very rate autoimmune hematological disease. The possibility of structural alterations of Hb induced by, or as part of the altered PNH-red cell membrane was the objective of this study. The Moessbauer parameters of the Hb of the normal subjects, both at 300 K and at 77 K, are identical to values previously reported. The PNH-Hb spectra show clear differences. They are wider and more asymmetric. At 77 K, an extra doublet grows in with an isomer shift of 0.425 mm/sec. and a quadrupolar splitting of 1.951 mm/sec. The other two doublets have δ's and ΔQ's slightly, but significantly, different from the corresponding values for normal Hb. These results are rationalized in terms of a population of Hb molecules with structures varying very slightly in a narrow range. The spread in structures manifests itself in a wider and more asymmetric Moessbauer spectrum. (orig.)

  14. [Useful assessment for identifying unsafe driving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Régis; Fabrigoule, Colette; Domont, Alain

    2005-03-01

    Ability to drive safely is the resultant of interactions between the individual (the driver), the vector (the car) and the environment (the state of the road). For some aged drivers, an important decline of visual, musculosquelettic and cognitive performances, may affect the ability to drive and increase the rate of crashes per vehicle-kilometer-driven, and the morbidity and mortality related to crash. Therefore, each holder of a driving licence should be medically suited to control his driving ability. In case of transitory or lasting driving incapacity, drivers must, of their own initiative, stop driving according to the Highway code and the contractual obligations appearing in their vehicle insurance contract. A medical examination for aptitude to driving requires a standardized, reliable, reproducible procedure based on consensual assessment tools to avoid arbitrary decisions for driving cessation. We propose a multidisciplinary approach to detect important decline of visuospatial and motor skills, paroxystic drops of attention and vigilance, and decreased cognitive capacity to anticipate and adapt driving at every moment. This assessment is based on a semi-directed interview and simple diagnostic tests. According to the present French law, only twelve medical conditions or functional deficits are inconsistent with the retain of the driving licence for a light vehicle.

  15. Driving with head-slaved camera system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oving, A.B.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    In a field experiment, we tested the effectiveness of a head-slaved camera system for driving an armoured vehicle under armour. This system consists of a helmet-mounted display (HMD), a headtracker, and a motion platform with two cameras. Subjects performed several driving tasks on paved and in

  16. Motion feedback in advanced driving manoeuvres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia Grácio, B.; Wentink, M.; Feenstra, P.J; Mulder, M.; Paassen M.M. van; Bles, W.

    2009-01-01

    During advanced driving manoeuvres, drivers can be hypothesized to use all the available cues to optimize their performance. Fixed-base simulators are commonly used for training of these advanced driving manoeuvres, despite the fact that motion cues are not present. In this experiment we hypothesize

  17. Simulation of linear Switched Reluctance Motor drives

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Amoros, Jordi; Blanqué Molina, Balduino; Andrada Gascón, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation model of linear switched reluctance motor drives. A Matlab-Simulink environment coupled with finite element analysis is used to perform the simulations. Experimental and simulation results for a double sided linear switched motor drive prototype are reported and compared to verify the simulation model.

  18. Measurement of carbon dioxide flux from tropical peatland in Indonesia using the nocturnal temperature-inversion trap method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriana, Windy; Tonokura, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Inoue, Gen; Kusin, Kitso; Limin, Suwido H.

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of CO2 flux from peatland soil respiration is important to understand the effect of land use change on the global carbon cycle and climate change and particularly to support carbon emission reduction policies. However, quantitative estimation of emitted CO2 fluxes in Indonesia is constrained by existing field data. Current methods for CO2 measurement are limited by high initial cost, manpower, and the difficulties associated with construction issues. Measurement campaigns were performed using a newly developed nocturnal temperature-inversion trap method, which measures the amount of CO2 trapped beneath the nocturnal inversion layer, in the dry season of 2013 at a drained tropical peatland near Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. This method is cost-effective and data processing is easier than other flux estimation methods. We compared CO2 fluxes measured using this method with the published data from the existing eddy covariance and closed chamber methods. The maximum value of our measurement results was 10% lower than maximum value of eddy covariance method and average value was 6% higher than average of chamber method in drained tropical peatlands. In addition, the measurement results shows good correlation with groundwater table. The results of this comparison suggest that this methodology for the CO2 flux measurement is useful for field research in tropical peatlands.

  19. A brief afternoon nap following nocturnal sleep restriction: which nap duration is most recuperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Amber; Lack, Leon

    2006-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the benefits of different length naps relative to no nap and to analyze the electroencephalographic elements that may account for the benefits. A repeated-measures design included 5 experimental conditions: a no-nap control and naps of precisely 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes of sleep. Nocturnal sleep restricted to about 5 hours in participants' homes was followed by afternoon naps at 3:00 PM and 3 hours of postnap testing conducted in a controlled laboratory environment. Twenty-four healthy, young adults who were good sleepers and not regular nappers. The 5-minute nap produced few benefits in comparison with the no-nap control. The 10-minute nap produced immediate improvements in all outcome measures (including sleep latency, subjective sleepiness, fatigue, vigor, and cognitive performance), with some of these benefits maintained for as long as 155 minutes. The 20-minute nap was associated with improvements emerging 35 minutes after napping and lasting up to 125 minutes after napping. The 30-minute nap produced a period of impaired alertness and performance immediately after napping, indicative of sleep inertia, followed by improvements lasting up to 155 minutes after the nap. These findings suggest that the 10-minute nap was overall the most effective afternoon nap duration of the nap lengths examined in this study. The implications from these results also suggest a need to consider a process occurring in the first 10 minutes of sleep that may account for the benefits associated with brief naps.

  20. Labor analgesia in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocche, R M; Garcia, L V; Klamt, J G

    2001-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a form of acquired hemolytic anemia in which a defect of glycophosphatidylinositol anchor proteins in the cell membrane of bone marrow stem cells leads to activation of the complement system and consequent destruction of defective cells. The characteristics of this disease are an increased frequency of thrombotic events, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. We report a case of a pregnant patient with PNH with thrombocytopenia who delivered vaginally after receiving epidural labor analgesia. Prophylaxis of thromboembolism was performed with heparin 1 hour after the removal of the epidural catheter, and repeated at 12-hour intervals. Sensory changes or motor changes and pain were monitored every 10 minutes for 8 hours after delivery. During analgesia, the patient reported complete pain relief. Delivery and the immediate postpartum period were without any untoward events. Four major factors influenced the anesthetic conduct used for the present patient: (1) the risk of an acute hemolytic crisis, (2) the need to perform prophylaxis for thromboembolism, (3) the need to reduce labor stress, and (4) minimizing the risk of missing an epidural hematoma. We also present a survey of the literature about PNH and discuss the anesthetic conduct in this patient.