WorldWideScience

Sample records for nitrogen gas sources

  1. Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbova, M.; Zakharov, S. V.; Zakharov, V. S.

    2014-07-01

    Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88 nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s2 → 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72 mm thickness, 1 bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7 ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

  2. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer sources and tillage practices on greenhouse gas emissions in paddy fields of central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. S.; Chen, J.; Liu, T. Q.; Cao, C. G.; Li, C. F.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) fertilizer sources and tillage practices on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission have been well elucidated separately. However, it is still remained unclear regarding the combined effects of N fertilization and tillage practices on the global warming potential (GWP) and net ecosystem economic budget (NEEB) in paddy fields. In this paper, a 2-year field experiment was performed to investigate the effects of N fertilizer sources (N0, no N; IF, 100% N from chemical fertilizer; SRIF, 50% N from slow-release fertilizer and 50% N from chemical fertilizer; OF, 100% N from organic fertilizer; OFIF, 50% N from organic fertilizer and 50% N from chemical fertilizer) and tillage practices (CT, conventional intensive tillage; NT, no-tillage) on the emissions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), GWP, greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), and NEEB in paddy fields of central China. Compared with N0 treatment, IF, SRIF, OF and OFIF treatments greatly enhanced the cumulative seasonal CH4 emissions (by 54.7%, 41.7%, 51.1% and 66.0%, respectively) and N2O emissions (by 164.5%, 93.4%, 130.2% and 251.3%, respectively). NT treatment significantly decreased the GWP and GHGI compared with CT treatment. On the other hand, NT treatment significantly decreased CH4 emissions by 8.5-13.7%, but did not affect N2O emissions relative to CT treatment. Application of N fertilizers significantly increased GWP and GHGI. It was worth noting that the combined treatment of OFIF and NT resulted in the second-highest GWP and GHGI and the largest NEEB among all treatments. Therefore, our results suggest that OFIF combined with NT is an eco-friendly strategy to optimize the economic and environmental benefits of paddy fields in central China. Although the treatment of SRIF plus NT showed the lowest GWP and GHGI and the highest grain yield among all treatments, it led to the lowest NEEB due to its highest fertilizer cost. These results indicate that the government should provide

  3. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  4. NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

    1999-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest

  5. Growth of cubic III-nitrides by gas source MBE using atomic nitrogen plasma: GaN, AlGaN and AlN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, H.; Hamaguchi, H.; Koizumi, T.; Balakrishnan, K.; Ishida, Y.; Arita, M.; Chichibu, S.; Nakanishi, H.; Nagatomo, T.; Yoshida, S.

    1998-06-01

    Cubic GaN, AlGaN and AlN epilayers were grown on 3C-SiC(0 0 1) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using radio-frequency N 2 plasma containing atomic nitrogen species. Due to the enhancement of growth rate by this plasma source, cubic GaN epilayers with the thickness of several micrometers were obtained, and the quality of epilayers was so much improved that they showed an X-ray diffraction peak width as small as 9 min. Cubic Al xGa 1- xN and cubic AlN epilayers were also grown, and the variations of X-ray diffraction peak position and emission energy were observed according to the Al content.

  6. Variable leak gas source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  7. Deep source gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-02-01

    Three separate emplacement concepts could explain the occurrence of gas at extreme depths: abiogenesis (a primordial, nonbiologic origin source); subducted, organic-origin gas (involving the deep, tectonic subduction emplacement of hydrocarbon-generating ocean sediments); and deep sedimentary basin gas (the more conventional emplacement of sedimentary rocks by deep downwarping of the Earth's crust). Of these concepts, Deep Source Gas research focuses on the subducted, organic-origin concept. The purpose of Deep Source Gas research is to verify natural gas arising from depths in excess of 30,000 feet, to relate these occurrences to conceptual models, to define the limits of target areas, to quantify the resource, and to determine the significance of the gas to the nation's reserves. The research emphasizes an Earth science study (geology, geochemistry, and geophysics) of the Cordilleran Geologic Province of western North America. This area is considered a prospective source largely because of known and suspected plate tectonic structures and their youthful emplacement, which increase the likelihood of a timely entrapment of deep-source generated hydrocarbons. Detailed geochemical studies indicate that the deep-source-gas generating capacity of the Aleutian Trench area of southern Alaska is high. Furthermore, geophysical studies show that an apparent fossil subduction zone exists in western Washington. This zone appears to have very thick sedimentary rock units, the existence of which will be evaluated through a more detailed seismic study and possibly through drilling activities. Structural observations made in the northern Brooks Range and central Alaskan Range indicate that overthrusting and compressional features may serve as large-scale target areas for deep source gas generation and occurrence. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Method for removal of nitrogen oxides from stationary combustion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles D. (Inventor); Clausen, III, Christian A. (Inventor); Collins, Michelle M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for removing NO.sub.X from gas streams emanating from stationary combustion sources and manufacturing plants utilizes the injection of hydrogen peroxide into the gas stream for rapid gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO.sub.2 and water-soluble nitrogen acids HNO.sub.2 and HNO.sub.3. The nitrogen acids may be removed from the oxidized gas stream by wet scrubbing or by contact with a particulate alkaline material to form a nitrite/nitrate salt.

  9. Solubility characteristics of nitrogen gas in SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, J. W.; Sung, K. W.; Chio, M. S.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, W. C.; Chio, B. S.; Lee, D. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen gas is used in a pressurizer to regulate the pressure of the primary system of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Some of the nitrogen gas in the upper part of the pressurizer is dissolved into the coolant water in the pressurizer and then diffused to primary coolant in reactor core. The solubility of nitrogen in the primary coolant at high temperature and pressure, is important to the reliable operation and the management of water chemistry of SMART. Nitrogen solubility was calculated as the function of temperature and pressure by Himmelblau equation based on Henry's law. As a result, nitrogen solubility in water showed a minimum value at about 85 .deg. C and a maximum value at about 280 .deg. C with total system pressure (150 atm). At the operation condition of SMART, the equilibrium concentration of dissolved nitrogen in the core and the concentration change and the bubble formation of nitrogen gas in water with a temperature change were analyzed.

  10. Indigenous nitrogen in the Moon: Constraints from coupled nitrogen-noble gas analyses of mare basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Barry, Peter H.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Marty, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by step-wise CO2 laser-extraction, static-mass spectrometry analysis, are reported for bulk fragments and mineral separates of ten lunar mare basalts (10020, 10057, 12008, 14053, 15555, 70255, 71557, 71576, 74255, 74275), one highland breccia (14321), and one ferroan anorthosite (15414). The mare basalt sub-samples 10057,183 and 71576,12 contain a large amount of solar noble gases, whereas neon and argon in all other samples are purely cosmogenic, as shown by their 21Ne/22Ne ratios of ≈0.85 and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of ≈0.65. The solar-gas-free basalts contain a two-component mixture of cosmogenic 15N and indigenous nitrogen (Earth's primordial mantle or an enstatite chondrite-like impactor. While the lowest δ15 N values allow for nitrogen trapped in the Moon's interior to be inherited from the proto-Earth and/or the impactor, the more 15N-enriched compositions require that carbonaceous chondrites provided nitrogen to the lunar magma ocean prior to the solidification of the crust. Since nitrogen can efficiently be incorporated into mafic minerals (olivine, pyroxene) under oxygen fugacities close to or below the iron-wustite buffer (Li et al., 2013), the mare basalt source region is likely characterized by a high nitrogen storage capacity. In contrast, anorthosite 15414 shows no traces of indigenous nitrogen, suggesting that nitrogen was not efficiently incorporated into the lunar crust during magma ocean differentiation.

  11. Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwilling, Daniel Patrick; Golden, Timothy Christoph; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Ludwig, Keith Alan

    2003-06-10

    A method for the separation of a gas mixture comprises (a) obtaining a feed gas mixture comprising nitrogen and at least one hydrocarbon having two to six carbon atoms; (b) introducing the feed gas mixture at a temperature of about 60.degree. F. to about 105.degree. F. into an adsorbent bed containing adsorbent material which selectively adsorbs the hydrocarbon, and withdrawing from the adsorbent bed an effluent gas enriched in nitrogen; (c) discontinuing the flow of the feed gas mixture into the adsorbent bed and depressurizing the adsorbent bed by withdrawing depressurization gas therefrom; (d) purging the adsorbent bed by introducing a purge gas into the bed and withdrawing therefrom an effluent gas comprising the hydrocarbon, wherein the purge gas contains nitrogen at a concentration higher than that of the nitrogen in the feed gas mixture; (e) pressurizing the adsorbent bed by introducing pressurization gas into the bed; and (f) repeating (b) through (e) in a cyclic manner.

  12. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  13. The Answer to Rising Gas Prices...Nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank; Batelaan, Herman

    2010-01-01

    It is claimed by the company NitroFill and the GetNitrogen Institute that filling car tires with nitrogen improves gas mileage considerably. The reason given is that oxygen leaks out of tires so that the increased rolling friction causes a reduced gas mileage. Because it is hard to do an actual road test, we report on a simple visual test of…

  14. Helium extraction and nitrogen removal from LNG boil-off gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L.; Peng, N.; Liu, L.; Gong, L.

    2017-02-01

    The helium bearing boil off gas (BOG) from liquid natural gas (LNG) storage tank in LNG plant, which has a helium concentration of about 1%, has attracted the attention in China as a new helium source. As the BOG is usually reused by re-condensing to recover methane, it is likely to cause continuous accumulation of nitrogen in the unit, thus a nitrogen removal process must be integrated. This paper describes a conceptional cryogenic separation system aiming at recovering methane, helium and nitrogen from BOG based on cryogenic distillation and condensation process.

  15. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels Manufactured by Nitrogen Gas Alloying and Adding Nitrided Ferroalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-bing; JIANG Zhou-hua; SHEN Ming-hui; YOU Xiang-mi

    2007-01-01

    A simple and feasible method for the production of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels involves nitrogen gas alloying and adding nitrided ferroalloys under normal atmospheric conditions. Alloying by nitrogen gas bubbling in Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo series alloys was carried out in MoSi2 resistance furnace and air induction furnace under normal atmospheric conditions. The results showed that nitrogen alloying could be accelerated by increasing nitrogen gas flow rate, prolonging residence time of bubbles, increasing gas/molten steel interfaces, and decreasing the sulphur and oxygen contents in molten steel. Nitrogen content of 0.69% in 18Cr18Mn was obtained using air induction furnace by bubbling of nitrogen gas from porous plug. In addition, the nickel-free, high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels with sound and compact macrostructure had been produced in the laboratory using vacuum induction furnace and electroslag remelting furnace under nitrogen atmosphere by the addition of nitrided alloy with the maximum nitrogen content of 0.81 %. Pores were observed in the ingots obtained by melting and casting in vacuum induction furnace with the addition of nitrided ferroalloys and under nitrogen atmosphere. After electroslag remelting of the cast ingots, they were all sound and were free of pores. The yield of nitrogen increased with the decrease of melting rate in the ESR process. Due to electroslag remelting under nitrogen atmosphere and the consequential addition of aluminum as deoxidizer to the slag, the loss of manganese decreased obviously. There existed mainly irregular Al2O3 inclusions and MnS inclusions in ESR ingots, and the size of most of the inclusions was less than 5 μm. After homogenization of the hot rolled plate at 1 150 ℃× 1 h followed by water quenching, the microstructure consisted of homogeneous austenite.

  16. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-07-31

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  17. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Bidochka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  18. ENUMERATION OF MICROBES AND GAS PRODUCTION DURING DENITRIFICATION AND NITROGEN FIXATION PROCESSES IN SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Ghaly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry plant material contains 2-4% nitrogen, making it an essential nutrient for all plants. The nitrogen cycle regulates the pathways which transform nitrogen from a relatively inert dinitrogen gas to forms of organic nitrogen such as proteins and nucleic acids. Denitrification and nitrogen fixation are the two most important processes that remove and add nitrogen to the soil, respectively. The aim of the study was to gain information on the denitrification and nitrogen fixing activities in soil and sediment employing the acetylene technique and assuring the gas chromatography analysis by total plate count and most probably number. The results indicated that acetylene (0.1 atm inhibited N2O reduction and caused stoichiometric accumulation of N2O during the conversion of NO3- to N2. N2O was an obligatory intermediate in the sequence of steps between N2O- and N2. The appearance of CO2 and accumulation of N2O would be suitable criteria for the presence of denitrifiers in appropriately enriched media and the acetylene reduction test is a suitable assay for nitrogen fixing activity. There was an obligatory requirement for organic carbon as a carbon and energy source for denitrification and nitrogen fixation to take place. The results showed that acetylglucosamine can be used as a carbon and energy source for denitrification but not as a nitrogen source (C:N ratio of 5:1. NH4+ has no effect on denitrification activity but it inhibited the nitrogenase activity. The presence of air in the gas phase affects both the denitrification and nitrogen fixing activity while adding H2O encouraged anaerobic conditions.

  19. Exhaust gas provides alternative gas source for cyclic EOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeppelwerth, G.P.

    1993-04-26

    Injected exhaust gas from a natural gas or propane engine enhanced oil recovery from several Nebraska and Kansas wells. The gas, containing nitrogen and carbon dioxide, is processed through a catalytic converted and neutralized as necessary before being injected in a cyclic (huff and puff) operation. The process equipment is skid or trailer mounted. The engine in these units drives the gas-injection compressor. The gas after passing through the converter and neutralizers is approximately 13% CO[sub 2] and 87% N[sub 2]. The pH is above 6.0 and dew point is near 0 F at atmospheric pressure. Water content is 0.0078 gal/Mscf. This composition is less corrosive than pure CO[sub 2] and reduces oil viscosity by 30% at 1,500 psi. The nitrogen supplies reservoir energy and occupies pore space. The paper describes gas permeability, applications, and field examples.

  20. Nitrogen deposition to the United States: distribution, sources, and processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulate nitrogen deposition over the US in 2006–2008 by using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution over North America and adjacent oceans. US emissions of NOx and NH3 in the model are 6.7 and 2.9 Tg N a−1 respectively, including a 20% natural contribution for each. Ammonia emissions are a factor of 3 lower in winter than summer, providing a good match to US network observations of NHx (≡NH3 gas + ammonium aerosol and ammonium wet deposition fluxes. Model comparisons to observed deposition fluxes and surface air concentrations of oxidized nitrogen species (NOy show overall good agreement but excessive wintertime HNO3 production over the US Midwest and Northeast. This suggests a model overestimate N2O5 hydrolysis in aerosols, and a possible factor is inhibition by aerosol nitrate. Model results indicate a total nitrogen deposition flux of 6.5 Tg N a−1 over the contiguous US, including 4.2 as NOy and 2.3 as NHx. Domestic anthropogenic, foreign anthropogenic, and natural sources contribute respectively 78%, 6%, and 16% of total nitrogen deposition over the contiguous US in the model. The domestic anthropogenic contribution generally exceeds 70% in the east and in populated areas of the west, and is typically 50–70% in remote areas of the west. Total nitrogen deposition in the model exceeds 10 kg N ha−1 a−1 over 35% of the contiguous US.

  1. Nitrogen deposition to the United States: distribution, sources, and processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We simulate nitrogen deposition over the US in 2006–2008 by using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model at 1/2°×2/3° horizontal resolution over North America and adjacent oceans. US emissions of NOx and NH3 in the model are 6.7 and 2.9 Tg N a−1 respectively, including a 20% natural contribution for each. Ammonia emissions are a factor of 3 lower in winter than summer, providing a good match to US network observations of NHx (≡NH3 gas + ammonium aerosol and ammonium wet deposition fluxes. Model comparisons to observed deposition fluxes and surface air concentrations of oxidized nitrogen species (NOy show overall good agreement but excessive wintertime HNO3 production over the US Midwest and Northeast. This suggests a model overestimate N2O5 hydrolysis in aerosols, and a possible factor is inhibition by aerosol nitrate. Model results indicate a total nitrogen deposition flux of 6.5 Tg N a−1 over the contiguous US, including 4.2 as NOy and 2.3 as NHx. Domestic anthropogenic, foreign anthropogenic, and natural sources contribute respectively 78%, 6%, and 16% of total nitrogen deposition over the contiguous US in the model. The domestic anthropogenic contribution generally exceeds 70% in the east and in populated areas of the west, and is typically 50–70% in remote areas of the west. Total nitrogen deposition in the model exceeds 10 kg N ha−1 a−1 over 35% of the contiguous US.

  2. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynicka, Justin D; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world.

  3. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynicka, Justin D.; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world.

  4. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  5. Production of Nitrogen-Bearing Stainless Steel by Injecting Nitrogen Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-yuan; LI Jing-she; ZHANG Li-feng; YANG Shu-feng

    2011-01-01

    To replace nickel-based stainless steel, a nitrogen-bearing stainless steel was produced to lower the production cost stemming from the shortage of nickel recourses. Thermodynamic model to calculate the saturated nitrogen content in the stainless steel was developed and the model was validated by experimental measurements performed with a high temperature induction furnace. Nitrogen gas under constant pressure was injected into the molten steel with a top lance. Thus, the nitrogen was transferred to the molten stainless steel. The effects of chemical composition, temperature, superficial active elements and nitrogen flow rate on the transfer of nitrogen to the steel were investigated and discussed. The results showed that the dissolution rate of nitrogen in the molten steel increases with a higher temperature and larger nitrogen flow rate but decreases significantly with an increase in the content of surface- active elements. Alloying elements such as chromium and manganese having a negative interaction coefficient can increase the dissolution of nitrogen in the molten steel. It was also proposed that the primary factor affecting the final saturated nitrogen content is temperature rather than the dissolved oxygen content.

  6. [Raman spectroscopic investigation of hydrogen storage in nitrogen gas hydrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-guo; Liu, Chang-ling; Ye, Yu-guang; Li, Cheng-feng

    2012-08-01

    Recently, hydrogen storage using clathrate hydrate as a medium has become a hotspot of hydrogen storage research In the present paper, the laser Raman spectroscopy was used to study the hydrogen storage in nitrogen hydrate. The synthetic nitrogen hydrate was reacted with hydrogen gas under relatively mild conditions (e.g., 15 MPa, -18 degrees C). The Raman spectra of the reaction products show that the hydrogen molecules have enclathrated the cavities of the nitrogen hydrate, with multiple hydrogen cage occupancies in the clathrate cavities. The reaction time is an important factor affecting the hydrogen storage in nitrogen hydrate. The experimental results suggest that nitrogen hydrates are expected to be an effective media for hydrogen storage.

  7. Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Various Fossil-fuel Combustion Nitrogen Oxide Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, W.; Michalski, G. M.; Fang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are important trace gases that impact atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climate. In order to help constrain NOx source contributions, the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of NOx (δ15N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning. However, despite anthropogenic emissions being the most prevalent source of NOx, there is still large uncertainty in the δ15N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources. To this end, this study provides a detailed analysis of several fossil-fuel combustion NOx sources and their δ15N-NOx values. To accomplish this, exhaust or flue samples from several fossil-fuel combustion sources were sampled and analyzed for their δ15N-NOx that included airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a catalytic converter, gasoline-powered lawn tools and utility vehicles, diesel-electric buses, diesel semi-trucks, and natural gas-burning home furnace and power plant. A relatively large range of δ15N-NOx values were measured from -28.1 to 0.3‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples with cold started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the lowest δ15N-NOx values at -20.9‰, and warm-started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the highest values of -1.7‰. The NOx sources analyzed in this study primarily originated from the "thermal production" of NOx and generally emitted negative δ15N-NOx values, likely due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with its production. It was found that there is a negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ15N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with catalytic NOx reduction technology, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx may have an influence on δ15N-NOx values. Based on the δ15N-NOx values reported in this study and in previous studies, a δ15N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous United States. The constructed isoscape demonstrates the seasonal importance of various

  8. Cephamycin C biosynthesis in Streptomyces cattleya: nitrogen source regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaoua, S; Lebrihi, A; Germain, P; Lefebvre, G

    1991-05-01

    The production of cephamycin C by Streptomyces cattleya varies with the use of asparagine, glutamine or ammonium as nitrogen sources. Hydroxylase and expandase activities were demonstrated for the first time with this species. A study of the biosynthetic regulation of these enzymes by two different nitrogen sources, glutamine and asparagine, was carried out. Asparagine proved to be a better nitrogen source, both for enzymatic biosynthesis and production of cephamycin C. Moreover, an excess of asparagine in the culture environment provokes, simultaneously, a reduction in cephamycin C production and a decrease in the biosynthesis of expandase and hydroxylase.

  9. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  10. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  11. PERILAKU RAMBAT API PREMIXED PENYALAAN BAWAH CAMPURAN GAS METANA-UDARA INHIBITOR NITROGEN (N2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Wahyudi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Komposisi gas metana dalam kandungan biogas salah satu dengan menurunkan gas nitrogennya. Nitrogen dalam campuran bahan bakar gas merupakan inhibitor yang efektif. Misalkan pengaruh nitrogen pada kecepatan pembakaran dari gas metana-udara mengalami penurunan. Seberapa besar pengaruh kadar nitrogen jika ditinjau dari perilaku rambat api, maka perlu adanya suatu pengamatan atau penelitian. Dalam penelitian ini variabel bebasnya adalah prosentase campuran Nitrogen 10%-50% dan titik penyalaan dari bawah. Prosentase nitrogen diambil dari prosentase gas metana, misal 10% nitrogen maka 90% gas metana. Campuran udara dan CH4 tetap stoikiometri (9.5:1. Untuk mendapatkan nitrogen pada campuran stoikiometri dengan menghitung jumlah volume dari helle shaw cell, kemudian menentukan prosentase nitrogen yang masuk ke ruang bakar, sesuai variasi prosentase nitrogen. Pola rambat api yang dibentuk dari campuran gas metana-udara dan nitrogen menunjukkan perubahan yang beda-beda dan berbentuk parabola yang mendatar dan akhirnya pecah menjadi beberapa parabola yang kecil-kecil.

  12. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  13. Watershed delineation and nitrogen source analysis for Bayou ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient pollution in stormwater runoff from urbanized areas contributes to water quality degradation in streams and receiving waterbodies. Agriculture, population growth, and industrial activities are significant sources of nitrogen inputs for surface waters. Increased nitrogen loading stimulates eutrophication through algal blooms, which leads to an overall decrease in drinking water and aquatic habitat quality. Bayou Chico, a highly urbanized watershed in the Pensacola Bay system in northwest Florida, is a nutrient-impaired waterbody under management to reduce bacteria and nutrient loadings, in accordance with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s (FDEP) Basin Management Action Plan. Best management practices and green infrastructure (GI) throughout Bayou Chico help reduce nitrogen inputs by retaining and filtering water. GI can function as a nitrogen sink by sorption or infiltration into soils, sequestration into plant material, and denitrification through microbial processes. However, a better understanding of the efficiency of these systems is needed to better inform management practices on future nitrogen reduction. This project will address two issues relating to the presence of nitrogen in the Bayou Chico watershed: 1) the identification of specific nitrogen sources within urbanized areas, and 2) the potential rates of nitrogen removal and sequestration from GI and nitrogen transport throughout the bayou. To accomplish these goals, nitr

  14. Source and Control of Nitrogen for X70 Pipeline Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min WANG; Yan-ping BAO

    2016-01-01

    The effects of some key factors on nitrogen absorption during the smelting process of X70 pipeline steel were studied,and the source of nitrogen pick-up was analyzed to find the bottleneck for nitrogen control.A series of measures were put forward to decrease the nitrogen pick-up.The results indicated that an exponential relationship existed between the nitrogen absorption index and the free oxygen in molten steel.Nitrogen absorption index could decrease below 0·3 when free oxygen in molten steel was above 100×10-6 after tapping.For low sulfur killed steel, the nitrogen absorption ratio and sulfur content satisfied a linear relationship with a slope of -0·007.Low free-oxy-gen and sulfur were beneficial to the deep desulfurization during vacuum treatment.The contradiction of high desul-furization ratio and low nitrogen pick-up during LF process could be resolved by skimming oxidizing slag after tap-ping and making new high basicity top slag.After optimization,the average content of nitrogen in final product de-creased from 46×10-6 to 35×10-6 .

  15. Optimising carbon and nitrogen sources for Azotobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... inorganic (nitrates and ammonium) and organic sources. (amino acids .... organic carbon compounds via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well ..... Growth of. Azotobacter chroococcum in chemically defined media containing p-.

  16. Gas and metal ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oaks, E. [High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)]|[State Academy of Control System and Radioelectronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G. [High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    The positive ion sources are now of interest owing to both their conventional use, e.g., as injectors in charged-particle accelerators and the promising capabilities of intense ion beams in the processes related to the action of ions on various solid surfaces. For industrial use, the sources of intense ion beams and their power supplies should meet the specific requirements as follows: They should be simple, technologically effective, reliable, and relatively low-cost. Since the scanning of an intense ion beam is a complicated problem, broad ion beams hold the greatest promise. For the best use of such beams it is desirable that the ion current density be uniformly distributed over the beam cross section. The ion beam current density should be high enough for the treatment process be accomplished for an acceptable time. Thus, the ion sources used for high-current, high-dose metallurgical implantation should provide for gaining an exposure dose of {approximately} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} in some tens of minutes. So the average ion current density at the surface under treatment should be over 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the current density depends on the admissible heating of the surface under treatment. The accelerating voltage of an ion source is dictated by its specific use; it seems to lie in the range from {approximately}1 kV (for the ion source used for surface sputtering) to {approximately}100 kV and over (for the ion sources used for high-current, high-dose metallurgical implantation).

  17. Influence of carbohydrate addition on nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions of intensive aquaculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Sharma, Keshab; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Aquaculture is one of the fastest-growing segments of the food economy in modern times. It is also being considered as an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, limited studies have been conducted on GHG emissions from aquaculture system. In this study, daily addition of fish feed and soluble starch at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 16:1 (w/w) was used to examine the effects of carbohydrate addition on nitrogen transformations and GHG emissions in a zero-water exchange intensive aquaculture system. The addition of soluble starch stimulated heterotrophic bacterial growth and denitrification, which led to lower total ammonia nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate concentrations in aqueous phase. About 76.2% of the nitrogen output was emitted in the form of gaseous nitrogen (i.e., N2 and N2O) in the treatment tank (i.e., aquaculture tank with soluble starch addition), while gaseous nitrogen accounted for 33.3% of the nitrogen output in the control tank (i.e., aquaculture tank without soluble starch addition). Although soluble starch addition reduced daily N2O emissions by 83.4%, it resulted in an increase of daily carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 91.1%. Overall, starch addition did not contribute to controlling the GHG emissions from the aquaculture system.

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Source and Carbon to Nitrogen Ratio on Hydrogen Production using C. acetobutylicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sahaid Kalil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the main factors influenced the bacterial productivity and total yield of hydrogen is the nitrogen source and its concentration. Approach: Using different nitrogen source with different concentration on bacterial productivity of hydrogen showed to affect on both bacterial productivity of hydrogen and biomass concentration. Results: Yeast extract as nitrogen source at concentration of 13 g L-1 was the best organic nitrogen source and resulted in hydrogen yield YP/S of 308 mL g-1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.1 g L-1, hydrogen yield per biomass YP/X of 280 mL g-1 L-1, biomass per substrate utilized YX/S of 0.22 and produced hydrogen in gram per gram of glucose utilized YH2/S of 0.0275. C/N of 70 enhanced the YP/S from 308-350 mL g?1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.22 gL-1, YP/X of 287 mL g-1 L-1, YX/S of 0.244 and YH2/S of 0.03125. Conclusion: Nitrogen source with proper C:N ratio enhanced the hydrogen production.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Enhanced Nitrogen Dissolution During Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A

    2001-08-17

    Nitrogen concentrations far in excess of Sieverts' Law calculations and as high as 0.2 wt.% have been obtained in steel welds during arc welding. Such high concentrations of nitrogen in the weld metal can originate from a variety of sources, depending on the welding operation in question. One such mechanism involves the interaction between the surrounding atmosphere, which is about 80% nitrogen, and the plasma phase above the weld pool. Impingement of the surrounding atmosphere into the arc column, which is primarily composed of an inert shielding gas, can be due, in part, to insufficient shielding of the weld metal. In other cases, nitrogen can be purposefully added to the shielding gas to enhance the microstructural evolution of the weld metal. The mechanisms responsible for enhanced nitrogen concentrations are of significant interest. In both arc melting and welding operations, a plasma phase exists above the liquid metal. This plasma phase, which is composed of a number of different species not normally observed in gas-metal systems, significantly alters the nitrogen absorption reaction in liquid iron and steel. Monatomic nitrogen (N) is considered to be the species responsible for the observed enhancements in the nitrogen concentration. This role for monatomic nitrogen is based on its significantly higher solubility in iron with partial pressures many orders of magnitude less than that for diatomic nitrogen. It has also been proposed that the total amount of nitrogen present in the liquid metal is the balance of two independent processes. Monatomic nitrogen is absorbed through the interface between the arc and the liquid metal. Once a saturation level is reached at any location on the metal surface, nitrogen is then expelled from the surface of the liquid metal. This expulsion of nitrogen from the weld pool surface occurs via a desorption reaction, in which bubbles form at the surface and other heterogeneous nucleation sites in the liquid melt. These

  20. Gas source molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Duncan W.

    1992-11-01

    Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) has long been recognized as a promising radiation hard optoelectronic material. AlGaN has a wide direct band gap and therefore has potential applications in the fabrication of short wave-length devices, e.g., detectors and light-emitting diodes in the visible to ultraviolet region. Additionally, its piezoelectric properties and high acoustic velocities make it attractive for acoustic devices. The technical objective in Phase 1 was to determine if low temperature sources based on covalently bonded Group 3-nitrogen compounds could be used to prepare AlGaN films by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The program required to investigate low temperature AlGaN source materials was separated into two parts: (1) the synthesis, purification, and pyrolysis of gallium-nitrogen adducts and aluminum-nitrogen adducts; and (2) the growth of GaN by chemical beam epitaxy. We clearly demonstrated under CBE conditions GaN(x)C(y) films could be grown using compounds with pre-existing Ga-N bonds whereas no films were formed using trimethylgallium. Dimethylgallium amide was shown to produce dramatically lower carbon content films in the presence of ammonia than did trimethylgallium in the presence of ammonia.

  1. Automatic TIG welding of austenitic stainless steels in nitrogen and nitrogen-based gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorc, B.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper treats studies of TIG gas-shielded arc welding using pure nitrogen, N2+ 5-20 % Ar gas mixtures and N2 + 2-10 % H2 gas mixtures. A weld root shielding was provided by nitrogen gas. Welding in N2 requires by 40 % lower welding current than welding in argon. The study showed that porosity was an issue due to overalloying of N2 in the weld pool; it can, however, be avoided with adequate welding parameters, particularly sufficiently high welding speed and controlled low heat input. The microstructure of all-weld metal is fully austenitic (γ. Hydrogen reduces nitrogen solubility in the weld pool and produces an austenitic-ferritic (γ+δ microstructure. Titanium increases nitrogen solubility in the weld pool and strongly reacts with nitrogen. Consequently, there is a high fraction of TiN inclusions in the weld metal.

    Hemos efectuado las investigaciones de la soldadura TIG en nitrógeno puro, las mezclas de gas N2 + 5 hasta un 20 % Ar, así como también N2 + 2 hasta un 10 % H2. Para la protección se utilizó nitrógeno. Para la soldadura se necesitan aproximadamente un 40 % menos de corriente de soldadura, comparado con la soldadura de argón. La investigación ha mostrado que la porosidad es un problema de absorción excesiva de la fundición con nitrógeno y que es posible suprimir la porosidad mediante parámetros adecuados de soldadura, sobre todo con una suficiente velocidad de soldadura y, con ella, una pequeña emisión controlada de calor. El hidrógeno reduce la solubilidad del nitrógeno en la fundición y acciona la segregación de ferrita. El titanio aumenta la solubilidad del nitrógeno en la fundición y reacciona fuertemente con el nitrógeno, de tal modo que en la soldadura hay una gran parte de inclusiones TiN.

  2. [Interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil labile carbon and nitrogen and greenhouse gas emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng-Hao; Wang, Nan; Liu, Man-Qiang; Li, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Kang-Li; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A 3 x 2 factorial design of microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and nitrogen (N(mic)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), mineral nitrogen (NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N), and greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O and CH4) emissions. Results showed that straw amendment remarkably increased the numbers of bacterivorous nematodes and the contents of Cmic and Nmic, but Cmic and Nmic decreased with the increasing dose of nitrogen fertilization. The effects of bacterivorous nematodes strongly depended on either straw or nitrogen fertilization. The interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilization and bacterivorous nematodes on soil DOC, DON and mineral nitrogen were strong. Straw and nitrogen fertilization increased DOC and mineral nitrogen contents, but their influences on DON depended on the bacterivorous nematodes. The DOC and mineral nitrogen were negatively and positively influenced by the bacterivorous nematodes, re- spectively. Straw significantly promoted CO2 and N2O emissions but inhibited CH4 emission, while interactions between nematodes and nitrogen fertilization on emissions of greenhouse gases were obvious. In the presence of straw, nematodes increased cumulative CO2 emissions with low nitrogen fertilization, but decreased CO2 and N2O emissions with high nitrogen fertilization on the 56th day after incubation. In summary, mechanical understanding the soil ecological process would inevitably needs to consider the roles of soil microfauna.

  3. Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Thermally Produced NOx from Various Fossil-Fuel Combustion Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Wendell W; Tharp, Bruce D; Fang, Huan; Kozak, Brian J; Michalski, Greg

    2015-10-06

    The nitrogen stable isotope composition of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning, which would help constrain NOx source contributions in nitrogen deposition studies. However, there is large uncertainty in the δ(15)N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources other than on-road vehicles and coal-fired energy generating units. To this end, this study presents a broad analysis of δ(15)N-NOx from several fossil-fuel combustion sources that includes: airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a three-way catalytic converter, lawn equipment, utility vehicles, urban buses, semitrucks, residential gas furnaces, and natural-gas-fired power plants. A relatively large range of δ(15)N-NOx values was measured from -28.1‰ to 8.5‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples that generally tended to be negative due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with thermal NOx production. A negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ(15)N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with selective catalytic reducers was observed, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx increases δ(15)N-NOx values relative to the NOx produced through fossil-fuel combustion processes. Combining the δ(15)N-NOx measured in this study with previous published values, a δ(15)N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous U.S., which demonstrates seasonal and regional importance of various NOx sources.

  4. A study on the geochemical characteristics of natural gas and gas sources in the Bozhong sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Natural gas is composed largely of hydrocarbon gas, especially wet gas in the Bozhong sag. The carbon isotopic composition shows that the gas is of organic origin. The carbon isotopic values of ethane indicate that the natural gas is dominated by mixed gas with minor coal-generated gas and oil-type gas. A gas-source correlation study showed that the source rocks of natural gas are those of the Lower Dongying Formation, the Shahejie Formation and the pre-Tertiary. The natural gas is characterized by multi-source and continuous generation in the study area, indicating that gas exploration potential is good in the Bozhong sag.

  5. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  6. Measurement of nitrogen content in a gas mixture by transforming the nitrogen into a substance detectable with nondispersive infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Thomas E.; Miller, Michael A.

    2007-03-13

    A method of determining the amount of nitrogen in a gas mixture. The constituent gases of the mixture are dissociated and transformed to create a substance that may measured using nondispersive infrared adsorption techniques.

  7. Nitrogen Sources Screening for Ethanol Production Using Carob Industrial Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, S; Constantino, A; Rodrigues, F; Rodrigues, B; Lima-Costa, M E

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, bioethanol production is one of the most important technologies by the necessity to identify alternative energy resources, principally when based on inexpensive renewable resources. However, the costs of 2nd-generation bioethanol production using current biotechnologies are still high compared to fossil fuels. The feasibility of bioethanol production, by obtaining high yields and concentrations of ethanol, using low-cost medium, is the primary goal, leading the research done today. Batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of high-density sugar from carob residues with different organic (yeast extract, peptone, urea) and inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate) was performed for evaluating a cost-effective ethanol production, with high ethanol yield and productivity. In STR batch fermentation, urea has proved to be a very promising nitrogen source in large-scale production of bioethanol, reaching an ethanol yield of 44 % (w/w), close to theoretical maximum yield value and an ethanol production of 115 g/l. Urea at 3 g/l as nitrogen source could be an economical alternative with a great advantage in the sustainability of ethanol production from carbohydrates extracted from carob. Simulation studies, with experimental data using SuperPro Design software, have shown that the bioethanol production biorefinery from carob wastes could be a very promising way to the valorization of an endogenous resource, with a competitive cost.

  8. Nitrogen transformation in alpine soils of the Northern Caucasus: effect of nitrogen source and low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Mikhail; Ermak, Anton; Malysheva, Tatiana; Mulyukova, Olga

    2010-05-01

    The alpine landscape supports a variety of plant communities whose distribution corresponds to their topographic position. Topography controls snow accumulation and hence soil winter temperature, length of growing season and soil water availability. The research was conducted at the Teberda Biosphere Reserve (Northern Caucasus, Russia). The study sites were located at Mt. Malaya Khatipara (43°27'N, 41°42'E) between 2700 and 2750 m a.s.l. The investigated toposequence was representative of the soil and plant community associations in the alpine zone of the Teberda Reserve: the wind-exposed ridges and upper slopes are covered by low-productive alpine lichen heaths; intermediate topographic positions are occupied by the most productive grasslands and meadows; the slope bottom is occupied by low-productive snowbed community. Under intensive snow cover accumulation typical for many alpine ecosystems, the temperature of soil within winter makes nearby 0 °C, while in case of absence or thin snow cover, characteristic for a lichen heath, the temperature can fall to -10 °C. The influence of nitrogen source, low temperatures and soil drying on processes of nitrogen mineralization, nitrification and plant/microbial immobilization was studied in the field and laboratory incubation experiments. 15N labeled ammonium, nitrate, glycine and aspartic acid were injected in situ before growth of aboveground biomass into the soil of lichen heath to investigate how the different nitrogen sources was subsequently utilized and cycled in the ecosystem. We analyzed the distribution of 15N between plants, soil microorganisms and different soil nitrogen compounds during all growing season in order to reveal differences for separate nitrogen sources. We concluded that the soil microorganisms were more efficient than plants in nitrogen uptake (especially amino acids) under natural conditions. In the laboratory, fresh and dry-rewetted soils of different alpine ecosystems were incubated at

  9. Cyanate - An overlooked energy and nitrogen source in soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooshammer, Maria; Palatinszky, Márton; Herbold, Craig; Han, Ping; Daims, Holger; Richter, Andreas; Wagner, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cyanate (NCO-) is a reduced nitrogen compound that is toxic to organisms due to its reactivity with nucleophilic groups in proteins. To lower cyanate concentrations within cells, a wide range of microorganisms possess a cyanase, which catalyzes the conversion of cyanate to ammonium and carbon dioxide. However, cyanate can also be useful for microbes by serving as a nitrogen source for cyanase-encoding microorganism, such as marine cyanobacteria (Kamennaya et al., 2008). Unexpectedly, we could recently demonstrate that at least one ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeote as well as nitrite-oxidizers thriving in consortia with ammonia-oxidizers can grow aerobically on cyanate as only energy and nitrogen source (Palatinszky et al., 2015). Furthermore, published metagenomes revealed that cyanase-encoding genes closely related to those of nitrifiers (ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers) are widespread in the environment and encompass also cyanases affiliated with anammox organisms. Therefore, cyanate presumably presents an alternative nitrogen and also energy source for many microorganisms in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Surprisingly, cyanate concentrations and fluxes in natural environments are largely unknown, and environmental cyanate concentrations have only been studied in seawater so far, where it occurs in the nanomolar-range (Widner et al. 2013). No information about the importance of cyanate in soils is available, although urea that spontaneously decomposes to cyanate is the most used agricultural fertilizer on a global scale. Cyanate can have many fates in soils - it can be (1) used as nitrogen and/or energy source by cyanase-encoding microorganisms, (2) abiotically hydrolysed to ammonium and carbon dioxide, (3) adsorbed to soil particles, or (4) complexed with other compounds. Here we present the first measurements of cyanate concentrations in natural soils and results of experiments designed to differentiate between biotic and abiotic degradation of cyanate in

  10. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  11. Evaluation of nitrogen gas accumulated inside MCP during natural circulation operation of SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B. S.; Kim, Y. I.; Seo, J. K.; Park, C. T.; Lee, D. J.; Jang, M. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    With nitrogen used in pressurizer, primary coolant of SMART will contain dissolved nitrogen. The solubility of nitrogen gas in water is calculated as a function of temperature and pressure by Himmelblau equation based on Henry's law. It is found that the nitrogen concentration of primary coolant is highly dependent upon thermal-hydraulic parameters of the primary system, temperature, pressure and heatup rate. The accumulated nitrogen gas within MCP is evaluated based on the assumed natural convective flows established between SMART core and MCP. It is concluded that the natural circulation time is varied from 100 {approx} 1000 hrs according to the natural convection flows.

  12. 40 CFR 52.277 - Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. 52.277 Section 52.277 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. (a) The following rules are being retained...

  13. Nitrogen biogeochemistry in the Caribbean sponge, Xestospongia muta: a source or sink of dissolved inorganic nitrogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Fiore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sponges have long been known to be ecologically important members of the benthic fauna on coral reefs. Recently, it has been shown that sponges are also important contributors to the nitrogen biogeochemistry of coral reefs. The studies that have been done show that most sponges are net sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN; NH4 (+ and NO3 (- and that nitrification, mediated by their symbiotic prokaryotes, is the primary process involved in supplying DIN to adjacent reefs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A natural experiment was conducted with the Caribbean sponge Xestospongia muta from three different locations (Florida Keys, USA; Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas and Little Cayman, Cayman Islands. The DIN fluxes of sponges were studied using nutrient analysis, stable isotope ratios, and isotope tracer experiments. Results showed that the fluxes of DIN were variable between locations and that X. muta can be either a source or sink of DIN. Stable isotope values of sponge and symbiotic bacterial fractions indicate that the prokaryotic community is capable of taking up both NH4 (+ and NO3 (- while the differences in δ (15N between the sponge and bacterial fractions from the NH4 (+ tracer experiment suggest that there is translocation of labeled N from the symbiotic bacteria to the host. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nitrogen cycling in X. muta appears to be more complex than previous studies have shown and our results suggest that anaerobic processes such as denitrification or anammox occur in these sponges in addition to aerobic nitrification. Furthermore, the metabolism of this sponge and its prokaryotic symbionts may have a significant impact on the nitrogen biogeochemistry on Caribbean coral reefs by releasing large amounts of DIN, including higher NH4 (+ concentrations that previously reported.

  14. In vivo determination of nitrogen using Pu-Be sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernagh, J R; Harrison, J E; McNeill, K G

    1977-09-01

    A mehtod of measuring body nitrogen by neutron capture gamma analysis is described. The neutron flux is provided by four collimated 5 Ci Pu-Be sources, placed to give a bilateral irradiation of the subject. The 10-83 MeV thermal neutron capture gamma rays from 14N are detected by two heavily shielded 5 in X 4 in NaI(Tl) detectors. Results indicate a reproducibility +/-3% (1 SD) for a 10 min irradiation of the chest area, while giving a radiation dose equivalent of 50 mREM.

  15. Use of nitrogen gas in high-speed milling of Ti-6Al-4V

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Ying-lin; DONG Hui-yue; LIU Gang; ZHANG Ming

    2009-01-01

    To inhibit chips burning in the high-speed cutting of Ti-6Al-4V, nitrogen gas with 0.7 MPa pressure was ejected at the milling zone. The high speed flowing of nitrogen gas speeds up the chips leaving, and prevents the chips from burning at the same time. By this method the cutting force is reduced. Especially, the temperature increment of the finished surface is smaller than 5 ℃. This prevents the increase of hardness, improves the roughness of the finished surface, and reduces the tools wear. Comparing and analyzing the morphology and color of chips, which are obtained from the high-speed machining of Ti-6Al-4V with and without nitrogen gas ejection, show the action mechanism of nitrogen gas during the high-speed machining of titanium alloy, and it is concluded that nitrogen gas can be used to realize the proper high-speed milling of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy.

  16. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Rebecca L.; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy B.; Riha, Krystin M.; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-06-03

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3–) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3– (δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3– during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover—retention basins, pipes, and grass cover—dictated the sourcing of NO3– in runoff. Urban watersheds can be strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on the proportion of rainfall that leaves the watershed as runoff, but we found no evidence that denitrification occurred during storms. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the timescale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.

  17. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Rebecca L; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy; Riha, Krystin; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen A; Childers, Daniel

    2014-06-03

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3-) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3- (δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3- during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover--retention basins, pipes, and grass cover--dictated the sourcing of NO3- in runoff. Urban watersheds were strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on runoff, which in turn was inversely related to retention basin density and positively related to imperviousness and precipitation. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the time scale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.

  18. Nitrate and Nitrogen Oxides: Sources, Health Effects and Their Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Khalid Rehman; Sabir, Muhammad; Ozturk, Munir; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Ibrahim, Faridah Hanum; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Sajid Aqeel

    Increased use of nitrogenous (N) fertilizers in agriculture has significantly altered the global N-cycle because they release nitrogenous gases of environmental concerns. The emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes to the global greenhouse gas accumulation and the stratospheric ozone depletion. In addition, it causes nitrate leaching problem deteriorating ground water quality. The nitrate toxicity has been reported in a number of studies showing the health hazards like methemoglobinemia in infants and is a potent cause of cancer. Despite these evident negative environmental as well as health impacts, consumption of N fertilizer cannot be reduced in view of the food security for the teeming growing world population. Various agronomic and genetic modifications have been practiced to tackle this problem. Some agronomic techniques adopted include split application of N, use of slow-release fertilizers, nitrification inhibitors and encouraging the use of organic manure over chemical fertilizers. As a matter of fact, the use of chemical means to remediate nitrate from the environment is very difficult and costly. Particularly, removal of nitrate from water is difficult task because it is chemically non-reactive in dilute aqueous solutions. Hence, the use of biological means for nitrate remediation offers a promising strategy to minimize the ill effects of nitrates and nitrites. One of the important goals to reduce N-fertilizer application can be effectively achieved by choosing N-efficient genotypes. This will ensure the optimum uptake of applied N in a balanced manner and exploring the molecular mechanisms for their uptake as well as metabolism in assimilatory pathways. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the interrelations which exist in the terrestrial ecosystems between the plant type and characteristics of nutrient uptake and analyze the global consumption and demand for fertilizer nitrogen in relation to cereal production, evaluate the various methods

  19. Nitrogen sources, transport and processing in peri-urban floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooddy, D C; Macdonald, D M J; Lapworth, D J; Bennett, S A; Griffiths, K J

    2014-10-01

    Peri-urban floodplains are an important interface between developed land and the aquatic environment and may act as a source or sink for contaminants moving from urban areas towards surface water courses. With increasing pressure from urban development the functioning of floodplains is coming under greater scrutiny. A number of peri-urban sites have been found to be populated with legacy landfills which could potentially cause pollution of adjacent river bodies. Here, a peri-urban floodplain adjoining the city of Oxford, UK, with the River Thames has been investigated over a period of three years through repeated sampling of groundwaters from existing and specially constructed piezometers. A nearby landfill has been found to have imprinted a strong signal on the groundwater with particularly high concentrations of ammonium and generally low concentrations of nitrate and dissolved oxygen. An intensive study of nitrogen dynamics through the use of N-species chemistry, nitrogen isotopes and dissolved nitrous oxide reveals that there is little or no denitrification in the majority of the main landfill plume, and neither is the ammonium significantly retarded by sorption to the aquifer sediments. A simple model has determined the flux of total nitrogen and ammonium from the landfill, through the floodplain and into the river. Over an 8 km reach of the river, which has a number of other legacy landfills, it is estimated that 27.5 tonnes of ammonium may be delivered to the river annually. Although this is a relatively small contribution to the total river nitrogen, it may represent up to 15% of the ammonium loading at the study site and over the length of the reach could increase in-stream concentrations by nearly 40%. Catchment management plans that encompass floodplains in the peri-urban environment need to take into account the likely risk to groundwater and surface water quality that these environments pose.

  20. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Alexandre A. [Institute for Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories, all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per unit electrode length. These results are important to establish the validity of this simulation tool for the future study and development of this effect for practical purposes.

  1. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Alexandre A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per u...

  2. The influence of casein and urea as nitrogen sources on in vitro equine caecal fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, A.S.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Martin-Rosset, W.; Cotovio, M.; Silva, F.; Bennett, R.N.; Cone, J.W.; Bessa, R.J.B.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    To access the fermentative response of equine caecal microbial population to nitrogen availability, an in vitro study was conducted using caecal contents provided with adequate energy sources and nitrogen as limiting nutrient. Two nitrogen (N) sources were provided, protein (casein) and non-protein

  3. Nitrogen biogeochemistry in tropical peatlands: nitrogen gas emissions and metagenomic insights into related microbial groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasak, Kuno; Espenberg, Mikk; Oopkaup, Kristjan; Ligi, Teele; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Maddison, Martin; Järveoja, Järvi; Teemusk, Alar; Mander, Ülo

    2017-04-01

    Tropical peatlands constitute considerable amount of global peatland areas and are one of the most important and vulnerable terrestrial ecosystems in terms of impact on the atmospheric greenhouse gas composition. Anthropogenic actions, especially drainage and agriculture, are transforming biochemical cycles in tropical peatlands substantially. It is well known that drainage of tropical peatlands will result in huge amount of carbon loss, however a comprehensive study of the nitrogen cycling genetic potential in tropical areas is still less known. In the current study, nitrogen gas (N2, N2O) emissions from tropical peatlands (French Guiana, South America) were measured and their relationships with the soil chemical parameters, water regime, and abundances and diversity of genes in nitrogen cycle was assessed. The measurements and soil sampling were carried out in October 2013 in two sites (undisturbed and drainage influenced) of the northern part of French Guiana. At both sampling sites, N2O emissions were measured in six sessions during three days using static closed chambers. N2 and N2O emission from the top soil samples were measured in the laboratory applying He-O (N2) method. Soil pHKCl, NO3-N, NH4-N, soluble P, K, Ca and Mg, totN and soil organic matter content were determined from the collected samples. The bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and functional genes involved in nitrogen cycle (nirS, nirK, nosZI, nosZII, bacterial and archaeal amoA, nifH, nrfA, ANAMMOX bacteria specific 16S rRNA genes) in soil were quantified by using quantitative PCR method. DNA extracted from soil samples was sequenced on Illumina NextSeq system. Metagenomes were used for microbial profiling, identifying functional genes and relating them to biogeochemical cycles and biological processes. N2O emissions were significantly lower and N2 emissions higher (p<0.05 in both cases) in natural site (mean values -0.3 and 9.9 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O, and 1477.3 and 637.2 μg m-2 h-1 for N2

  4. Real-gas effects 1: Simulation of ideal gas flow by cryogenic nitrogen and other selected gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas do not thermodynamically approximate an ideal, diatomic gas at cryogenic temperatures. Choice of a suitable equation of state to model its behavior is discussed and the equation of Beattie and Bridgeman is selected as best meeting the needs for cryogenic wind tunnel use. The real gas behavior of nitrogen gas is compared to an ideal, diatomic gas for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion; normal shocks; boundary layers; and shock wave boundary layer interactions. The only differences in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas that may limit the minimum operating temperatures of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels seem to occur at total pressures approaching 9atmospheres and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature, where the differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Several alternative cryogenic test gases - air, helium, and hydrogen - are also analyzed. Differences in air from an ideal, diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those of nitrogen. Differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. Helium and hydrogen do not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal, diatomic gas.

  5. Real-gas effects 1: Simulation of ideal gas flow by cryogenic nitrogen and other selected gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas do not thermodynamically approximate an ideal, diatomic gas at cryogenic temperatures. Choice of a suitable equation of state to model its behavior is discussed and the equation of Beattie and Bridgeman is selected as best meeting the needs for cryogenic wind tunnel use. The real gas behavior of nitrogen gas is compared to an ideal, diatomic gas for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion; normal shocks; boundary layers; and shock wave boundary layer interactions. The only differences in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas that may limit the minimum operating temperatures of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels seem to occur at total pressures approaching 9atmospheres and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature, where the differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Several alternative cryogenic test gases - air, helium, and hydrogen - are also analyzed. Differences in air from an ideal, diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those of nitrogen. Differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. Helium and hydrogen do not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal, diatomic gas.

  6. The effect of emission from coal combustion in nonindustrial sources on deposition of sulfur and oxidized nitrogen in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, Maciej; Werner, Małgorzata; Błaś, Marek; Dore, Anthony J; Sobik, Mieczysław

    2010-07-01

    Poland has one of the largest sulfur and nitrogen emissions in Europe. This is mainly because coal is a main fuel in industrial and nonindustrial combustion. The aim of this paper is to assess the amount of sulfur and nitrogen deposited from SNAP sector 02 (nonindustrial sources) coal combustion. To assess this issue, the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multipollutant Exchange (FRAME) model was used. The results suggest that industrial combustion has the largest impact on deposition of oxidized sulfur, whereas the oxidized nitrogen national deposition budget is dominated by transboundary transport. The total mass of pollutants deposited in Poland, originating from nonindustrial coal combustion, is 45 Gg of sulfur and 2.5 Gg of nitrogen, which is over 18% of oxidized sulfur and nearly 2% of oxidized nitrogen deposited. SNAP 02 is responsible for up to 80% of dry-deposited sulfur and 11% of nitrogen. The contribution to wet deposition is largest in central Poland in the case of sulfur and in some areas can exceed 11%. For oxidized nitrogen, nonindustrial emissions contribute less than 1% over the whole area of Poland. The switch from coal to gas fuel in this sector will result in benefits in sulfur and nitrogen deposition reduction.

  7. The effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on the fatty acids profile of Mortierella vinacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Mohammadi Nasr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microbial lipids attract attention of many researchers due to their therapeutic effects. The goal of this study is the production and optimization of lipids and fatty acids in Mortierella vinaceaby applying different media to achieve invaluable fatty acids in pharmaceutical and food industry. Materials and methods: Mortierella vinacea was cultured on potato dextrose agar. Then the spores were inoculated to the production medium. After 72 hours, the lipids were extracted and they were analyzedby gas chromatography. To optimize lipid and important fatty acids production in medium, various carbon and nitrogen sources were substituted with glucose and yeast extract respectively. Results: The effect of some carbon and nitrogen sources on biomass, lipid and fatty acids production were assayed. The highest level of lipid production was in a medium which contains lactose and yeast extract (26.66%. Linoleic acid was only produced in presence of lactose and yeast extract (25.7%. While, M. vinacea yielded the highest level of linoleic acid (52.76% in a medium containing peptone, linolenic acid was achieved only in presence of lactose and triptone. Discussion and conclusion: In this study, lactose as a carbon source was the most effective one in the production of lipids. In addition, linoleic acid was produced in presence of lactose, so lactose was selected as the best carbon source. Peptone and triptone as a nitrogen source were chosen for the production of linoleic acid and linolenic acid in M. vinacea respectively. All of these findings reveal that Mortierella strain is a potential candidate for enhancement of linoleic acid and linolenic acid production. Furthermore, this simple media can be used in production of linoleic acid and linolenic acid for industrial goals in large scales.

  8. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  9. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  10. Sources of Nitrogen for Winter Wheat in Organic Cropping Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Schjønning, Per; Olesen, Jørgen E;

    2013-01-01

    In organic cropping systems, legumes, cover crops (CC), residue incorporation, and manure application are used to maintain soil fertility, but the contributions of these management practices to soil nitrogen (N) supply remain obscure. We examined potential sources of N for winter wheat (Triticum...... explained 76 and 82% of the variation in grain N yields in organic cropping systems in 2007 and 2008, showing significant effects of, respectively, topsoil N, depth of A horizon, cumulated inputs of N, and N applied to winter wheat in manure. Thus, soil properties and past and current management all...... aestivum L.) in four experimental cropping systems established in 1997 on three soil types. Three of the four systems were under organic management. Topsoil N, depth of the A horizon, and cumulated inputs of N since 1997 were determined at plot level. Labile soil N pools [mineral N, potentially...

  11. Canola response to nitrogen sources and split application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João E. Kaefer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this study was to evaluate the response of the canola crop to nitrogen (N sources and split application. The experiment was carried out in two agricultural years (2009 and 2010, at the experimental unit of the Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná - PUCPR, Campus of Toledo. A completely randomized design in 5 x 2 factorial scheme was adopted in the experiment. The treatments consisted of five split applications of N at sowing and/or as top dressing (0 and 0, 120 and 0, 0 and 120, 40 and 80, 80 and 40 kg of N ha-1 and two N sources (ammonium sulfate and urea, with four replicates. The canola genotype Hyola 61 was used in the experiment, which was evaluated for plant height, number of plants m-2, shoot dry matter, leaf area, mass of seedpods plant-1, thousand-grain weight, yield and the contents of protein and oil in the grains. The results show that the variables were not influenced by the evaluated sources of N fertilization, but were significantly influenced by the split application of N, with the highest results obtained for the application of 1/3 at sowing and 2/3 as top-dressing (40 and 80 kg ha-1 of N.

  12. The European nitrogen assessment: sources, effects, and policy perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sutton, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    .... The five key societal threats posed by reactive nitrogen are assessed, providing a framework for joined-up management of the nitrogen cycle in Europe, including the first cost-benefit analysis...

  13. Nitrogen and carbon interactions in controlling terrestrial greenhouse gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Phil; Toet, Sylvia; Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    The increased input of N to terrestrial systems may have profound impacts on net greenhouse gas (GHGs) fluxes and, consequently, our future climate; however, fully capturing and quantifying these interactions under field conditions urgently requires new, more efficient, measurement approaches. We have recently developed and deployed a novel system for the automation of terrestrial GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scales, using the approach of 'flying' a single measurement chamber to multiple points in an experimental field arena. As an example of the value of this approach, we shall describe the results from a field experiment investigating the interactions between increasing inorganic nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) additions on net ecosystem exchanges of N2O, CH4 and CO2, enabling the simultaneous application of 25 treatments, replicated five times in a fully replicated block field design. We will describe how the ability to deliver automated GHG flux measurements, highly replicated in space and time, has revealed hitherto unreported findings on N and C interactions in field soil. In our experiments we found insignificant N2O fluxes from bare field soil, even at very high inorganic N addition rates, but the interactive addition of even small amounts of available C resulted in very large and rapid N2O fluxes. The SkyGas experimental system enabled investigation of the underlying interacting response surfaces on the fluxes of the major soil-derived GHGs (CO2, CH4 and N2O) to increasing N and C inputs, and revealed unexpected interactions. In addition to these results we will also discuss some of the technical problems which have been overcome in developing these 'flying' systems and the potential of the systems for automatically screening the impacts of large numbers of treatments on GHG fluxes, and other ecosystem responses, under field conditions. We describe here technological advances that can facilitate the development of more robust GHG mitigation

  14. NITROGEN UTILIZATION BY DAIRY GOATS OFFERED DIFFERENT NITROGEN SOURCES AS SUPPLEMENTS IN HIGH ISOCALORIC ENERGY CONCENTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R.S. Asih

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Twelve growing female goats (Anglo-Nubian were assigned to a multiple latin square designexperiment to evaluate the effectiveness of additions of nitrogen (N supplements to a high isocaloricenergy ration on N utilization. In this experiment, microbial synthesis and N balance were assessed. Thedaily rations were either unsupplemented barley meal (BM, or BM supplemented with one of threenitrogen sources. All rations were isocaloric (3.0 Mcal ME/kg DM and the N supplements weresoybean meal (BSBM, cottonseed meal (BCSM or urea (BU to provide 2.9% N in the concentratecomponent. The unsupplemented BM contained 1.7% N. The addition of N supplements to the rationenhanced N utilization in dairy goats. The organic matter (OM intake, N intake, N balance, andmicrobial N synthesis for BM, BSBM, BCSM and BU were 660.5 g, 721.9 g, 728.1g and 703.5 g; 13.5g, 21.5 g, 20.9 g and 20.7 g; 2.7 g; 7.1 g, 5.4 g, and 5.7 g; and 14.1 g 19.1 g, 19.1 g, and 20.0 g,respectively. It can be concluded that when sufficient dietary energy was available for ruminal microbialactivities, the source of N did not affect N balance, and microbial N synthesis.

  15. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.)seedlings from four seed sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alireza Moshki; Norbert P. Lamersdoff

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a greenhouse experiment to investigate the role of seed source in growth and symbiotic nitrogen fixation of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L).Seeds from different sources were planted in the same environmental conditions and inoculated with a suspension of mixed Rhizobium.We used the modified 15N isotope dilution method to estimate biological nitrogen fixation of Robinia trees.Different Robinia seed sources differed significantly in terms of tissue dry weight (50.6-80.1 g),total N (1.31-2.16 g) and proportion of nitrogen derived from the atmosphere ( 0-51%).A higher nitrogen fixation rate of Robinia trees was associated with higher dry weight.Moreover,the leaves of Robinia proved to adequately represent the nitrogen fixation capacity of entire plants.Our results confirmed that assessment of seed sources is a useful way to improve the nitrogen fixation capacity and therefore the growth rate of Robinia.

  16. Nitrogen alloying of steel powder using ammonia gas in the fluidised bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virta, J.; Hannula, S.-P. [VTT Manuf. Technol. (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    Powder nitriding method utilising ammonia gas and fluidised bed technique was developed. The expected advantages of this method are the short processing time, low processing temperature and homogeneous nitrogen content of the powder charge. The nitrogen content of 0.4 wt.-% was achieved in 10 minutes at the temperature of 570 C for AISI 316 L powder. The nitrogen content increased linearly with the nitriding time being 6.8 wt.-% after two hours. For the control of the nitrogen content the heating-up and cooling of the powder must occur in an inert atmosphere. Because of the low processing temperatures nitrogen gas could be used. The short processing times, low processing temperatures and the use of inexpensive processing gases makes the method economically very attractive. (orig.)

  17. A Comparison of the Nitrogen Gas Excess Versus the Fixed Nitrogen Deficit in Two Major Oxygen Deficient Zones of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devol, A. H.; Chang, B. X.

    2006-12-01

    This study compares the nitrogen gas excesses in the oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and the Arabian Sea. These are two of the three largest ODZs in the world. In the near absence of oxygen, heterotrophic denitrification is the dominant form of respiration in these regions which, coupled to the sheer vastness of the ODZs, makes them a globally significant sink of marine fixed nitrogen. Thus, understanding how nitrogen is cycled in the ODZs is important to understanding the global nitrogen cycle. We measured profiles of nitrogen gas and argon concentrations through the ODZs of the ETSP and the Arabian Sea in the fall of 2005 and 2004, respectively. Nitrogen gas concentrations were normalized to argon concentrations to eliminate variations due to physical changes in the water mass. Any nitrogen gas in excess of the background nitrogen gas concentration was interpreted to be from denitrification. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, we found the nitrogen gas excess up to 18 uM N. Using stoichiometric relationships of nitrate and phosphate specific to the Arabian Sea, previous workers have estimated the nitrate deficit in the Arabian Sea ODZ to be no more than 12 uM N, which is only two-thirds of the nitrogen gas excess. In the ODZ of the ETSP, we found the nitrogen gas excess to be 15 uM N and the estimated nitrate deficit to be comparable, which suggests that in the ETSP, the nitrogen gas excess may be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, however, there is 50% more nitrogen in the excess than can be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. Several explanations are possible for this discrepancy, but probably the most significant is the likely greater contribution of nitrogen fixation to the overall productivity of the Arabian Sea compared to the ETSP. Nitrogen fixing bacteria are known to have an elevated N:P relative to the assumed near-Redfieldian organic matter falling into the ODZ. Nitrogen fixation has been

  18. Effect of different nitrogen sources on growth, yield and quality of fodder maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El-Murtada Hassan Amin

    2011-01-01

    The present data revealed that, the crude protein and crude fiber were significantly affected by nitrogen sources in both seasons. The urea gave the lowest crude protein compared with the other nitrogen sources. On the other hand, the lowest crude fiber content was recorded when plant was treated with (ASN fertilizer, while the highest crude fiber content was recorded only under the control.

  19. The European nitrogen assessment: sources, effects, and policy perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sutton, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    "Presenting the first continental-scale assessment of reactive nitrogen in the environment, this book sets the related environmental problems in context by providing a multidisciplinary introduction...

  20. Nitrogen in the Environment: Sources, Problems, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Follett

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is applied worldwide to produce food. It is in the atmosphere, soil, and water and is essential to all life. N for agriculture includes fertilizer, biologically fixed, manure, recycled crop residue, and soil-mineralized N. Presently, fertilizer N is a major source of N, and animal manure N is inefficiently used. Potential environmental impacts of N excreted by humans are increasing rapidly with increasing world populations. Where needed, N must be efficiently used because N can be transported immense distances and transformed into soluble and/or gaseous forms that pollute water resources and cause greenhouse effects. Unfortunately, increased amounts of gaseous N enter the environment as N2O to cause greenhouse warming and as NH3 to shift ecological balances of natural ecosystems. Large amounts of N are displaced with eroding sediments in surface waters. Soluble N in runoff or leachate water enters streams, rivers, and groundwater. High-nitrate drinking water can cause methemoglobinemia, while nitrosamines are associated with various human cancers. We describe the benefits, but also how N in the wrong form or place results in harmful effects on humans and animals, as well as to ecological and environmental systems.

  1. Optimization of Carbon Nanotubes for Nitrogen Gas Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoun Ashrafi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nano-tubes are one of the most significant achievements of nano-technology with important applications in the design of electronic nano-devices. The study of their properties is therefore important. Here the density functional theory (DFT of electron and the Hartree-Fock (HF method are utilized to study the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the surface of (4, 4 and (5, 0 carbon nano-tubes. The electronic structure, single point and dipole moment of both nitrogen and carbon nuclei are thoroughly studied. The computational results, which includes, indicate that rich adsorption patterns may result from the interaction of nitrogen with the carbon nano tubes sometimes C-N bounds are formed via breaking C-C bounds and sometimes a carbon atom in the nano-tube is replaced with a nitrogen atom. Sometimes nitrogen atoms are attracted to a C-C bound. In summary, the optimized adsorption rates are calculated. Gaussian 98 software has been used to carry out quantum chemistry calculations. Keywords: Density functional theory, Hartree-Fock, carbon nano tube, Gaussian 98 software. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are one of the most significant achievements of nano-technology because of his important applications in the design of electronic nano-devices. The study of their properties is therefore important. In this investigation the Density Functional Theory (DFT of electron and the Hartree-Fock (HF method are utilized to study the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the surface of (4, 4 and (5, 0 carbon nanotubes. The electronic structure, single point and dipole moment of both nitrogen and carbon nuclei are thoroughly studied. The computational results, which includes, indicate that rich adsorption patterns m ay result from the interaction of nitrogen with the carbon nanotubes. Sometimes C-N bounds are formed via breaking C-C bounds and sometimes a carbon atom in the nanotube is replaced by a nitrogen atom. Sometimes nitrogen atoms are attracted to a C-C bound

  2. Influence of carbon and nitrogen source on production of volatile fragrance and flavour metabolites by the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gethins, Loughlin; Guneser, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Yuceer, Yonca; Morrissey, John P

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus produces a range of volatile molecules with applications as fragrances or flavours. The purpose of this study was to establish how nutritional conditions influence the production of these metabolites. Four strains were grown on synthetic media, using a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources and volatile metabolites analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The nitrogen source had pronounced effects on metabolite production: levels of the fusel alcohols 2-phenylethanol and isoamyl alcohol were highest when yeast extract was the nitrogen source, and ammonium had a strong repressing effect on production of 2-phenylethyl acetate. In contrast, the nitrogen source did not affect production of isoamyl acetate or ethyl acetate, indicating that more than one alcohol acetyl transferase activity is present in K. marxianus. Production of all acetate esters was low when cells were growing on lactose (as opposed to glucose or fructose), with a lower intracellular pool of acetyl CoA being one explanation for this observation. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis of the known yeast alcohol acetyl transferases ATF1 and ATF2 suggests that the ancestral protein Atf2p may not be involved in synthesis of volatile acetate esters in K. marxianus, and raises interesting questions as to what other genes encode this activity in non-Saccharomyces yeasts. Identification of all the genes involved in ester synthesis will be important for development of the K. marxianus platform for flavour and fragrance production.

  3. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Nitrogen oxides emissions from the MILD combustion with the conditions of recirculation gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min; Shim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Sang Hyun; Oh, Kwang-Joong; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2017-04-01

    The nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction technology by combustion modification which has economic benefits as a method of controlling NOx emitted in the combustion process, has recently been receiving a lot of attention. Especially, the moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion which applied high temperature flue gas recirculation has been confirmed for its effectiveness with regard to solid fuel as well. MILD combustion is affected by the flue gas recirculation ratio and the composition of recirculation gas, so its NOx reduction efficiency is determined by them. In order to investigate the influence of factors which determine the reduction efficiency of NOx in MILD coal combustion, this study changed the flow rate and concentration of nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and steam (H2O) which simulate the recirculation gas during the MILD coal combustion using our lab-scale drop tube furnace and performed the combustion experiment. As a result, its influence by the composition of recirculation gas was insignificant and it was shown that flue gas recirculation ratio influences the change of NOx concentration greatly. We investigated the influence of factors determining the nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction efficiency in MILD coal combustion, which applied high-temperature flue gas recirculation. Using a lab-scale drop tube furnace and simulated recirculation gas, we conducted combustion testing changing the recirculation gas conditions. We found that the flue gas recirculation ratio influences the reduction of NOx emissions the most.

  5. Nitrosation Reaction Without Nitrogen Oxide Waste Gas Emission and Its Engineering Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunguang; FENG Yaqing; NIU Weiwei; CHEN Xuexi

    2013-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase equilibrium is used in controlling the nitrosation reaction process.Decomposition of nitrous acid and oxidation side reaction are suppressed in a closed reaction system.The system pressure is used as the criterion of the end of reaction,avoiding excessive feeding and reducing the decomposition of nitrous acid.The head space of the reactor is used as the gas buffer,stabilizing the feeding fluctuations and inhibiting the side reaction,decomposition of nitrous acid.Nitrogen oxide concentration is controlled at the minimum level.Thus the zero release of nitrogen oxide waste gas can be achieved without using any absorption process.

  6. Effect of Nitrogen Sources on the Growth and Docosahexaenoic Acid Accumulation in Crypthecodinium cohnii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jufang; Wu Haizhen; Liang Shizhong; Chen Feng

    2002-01-01

    The effect of various nitrogen sources on the growth and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) yield is determined in Crypthecodinium cohnii ATCC30556. Single nitrogen tryptone and peptone are suitable to growth, the dry weight biomass is up to 2.78 g/L and 2.70g/L respectively on medium containing 0.34 g/L nitrogen. Peptone is a favorable nitrogen source for DHA accumulation, DHA yield increases up to 338.56 mg/L. Using peptone and KNO3 as a multiple nitrogen source, the highest biomass and DHA yield are obtained from media containing 0.34 g/L nitrogen in which the ratio of peptone-N:NO3--N is 1:2,and the biomass and DHA yield are 2.98 g/L(DW) and 527.97mg/L respectively.

  7. Gas Production Strategy of Underground Coal Gasification Based on Multiple Gas Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Tianhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To lower stability requirement of gas production in UCG (underground coal gasification, create better space and opportunities of development for UCG, an emerging sunrise industry, in its initial stage, and reduce the emission of blast furnace gas, converter gas, and coke oven gas, this paper, for the first time, puts forward a new mode of utilization of multiple gas sources mainly including ground gasifier gas, UCG gas, blast furnace gas, converter gas, and coke oven gas and the new mode was demonstrated by field tests. According to the field tests, the existing power generation technology can fully adapt to situation of high hydrogen, low calorific value, and gas output fluctuation in the gas production in UCG in multiple-gas-sources power generation; there are large fluctuations and air can serve as a gasifying agent; the gas production of UCG in the mode of both power and methanol based on multiple gas sources has a strict requirement for stability. It was demonstrated by the field tests that the fluctuations in gas production in UCG can be well monitored through a quality control chart method.

  8. Gas production strategy of underground coal gasification based on multiple gas sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianhong, Duan; Zuotang, Wang; Limin, Zhou; Dongdong, Li

    2014-01-01

    To lower stability requirement of gas production in UCG (underground coal gasification), create better space and opportunities of development for UCG, an emerging sunrise industry, in its initial stage, and reduce the emission of blast furnace gas, converter gas, and coke oven gas, this paper, for the first time, puts forward a new mode of utilization of multiple gas sources mainly including ground gasifier gas, UCG gas, blast furnace gas, converter gas, and coke oven gas and the new mode was demonstrated by field tests. According to the field tests, the existing power generation technology can fully adapt to situation of high hydrogen, low calorific value, and gas output fluctuation in the gas production in UCG in multiple-gas-sources power generation; there are large fluctuations and air can serve as a gasifying agent; the gas production of UCG in the mode of both power and methanol based on multiple gas sources has a strict requirement for stability. It was demonstrated by the field tests that the fluctuations in gas production in UCG can be well monitored through a quality control chart method.

  9. Gas Production Strategy of Underground Coal Gasification Based on Multiple Gas Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianhong, Duan; Zuotang, Wang; Limin, Zhou; Dongdong, Li

    2014-01-01

    To lower stability requirement of gas production in UCG (underground coal gasification), create better space and opportunities of development for UCG, an emerging sunrise industry, in its initial stage, and reduce the emission of blast furnace gas, converter gas, and coke oven gas, this paper, for the first time, puts forward a new mode of utilization of multiple gas sources mainly including ground gasifier gas, UCG gas, blast furnace gas, converter gas, and coke oven gas and the new mode was demonstrated by field tests. According to the field tests, the existing power generation technology can fully adapt to situation of high hydrogen, low calorific value, and gas output fluctuation in the gas production in UCG in multiple-gas-sources power generation; there are large fluctuations and air can serve as a gasifying agent; the gas production of UCG in the mode of both power and methanol based on multiple gas sources has a strict requirement for stability. It was demonstrated by the field tests that the fluctuations in gas production in UCG can be well monitored through a quality control chart method. PMID:25114953

  10. Preparation of SiN x film by pulsed laser ablation in nitrogen gas ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, I.; Yamaguchi, T.; Kohno, K.; Inada, M.; Sugimura, A.

    2002-09-01

    Silicon nitride films were synthesized by reactive pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a Si target in N 2 gas atmosphere. At different laser fluences and N 2 gas pressures the infrared absorption peak attributed to Si-N bond was evaluated. The nitrogen concentration in the film increased with the increasing fluence. Nitrogen concentration depended also on N 2 gas pressure; it increased as N 2 pressure increase up to 10 Pa and then it decreased with further increasing N 2 gas pressure. These results indicate that decomposition of N 2 molecules and collisions of SiN x clusters with N 2 molecules are essential to prepare silicon nitride films by PLA method. The PLA is a promising method to fabricate nitrogen rich silicon nitride films without using poisonous gases such as silane and ammonia.

  11. Effects of nitrogen loading on greenhouse gas emissions in salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Kroeger, K. D.; Morkeski, K.; Mora, J.; Chen, X.; Carey, J.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes play an important role in global and regional carbon and nitrogen cycling. We tested the hypothesis that anthropogenic nitrogen loading alters greenhouse gas (GHG, including CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions and carbon sequestration in salt marshes. We measured GHG emissions biweekly for two growing seasons across a nitrogen-loading gradient of four Spartina salt marshes in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. In addition, we conducted nitrogen addition experiments in a pristine marsh by adding low and high nitrate to triplicate plots bi-weekly during the summer. The GHG flux measurements were made in situ with a state-of-the-art mobile gas measurement system using the cavity ring down technology that consists of a CO2/CH4 analyzer (Picarro) and an N2O/CO analyzer (Los Gatos). We observed strong seasonal variations in greenhouse gas emissions. The differences in gas emissions across the nitrogen gradient were not significant, but strong pulse emissions of N2O were observed after nitrogen was artificially added to the marsh. Our results will facilitate model development to simulate GHG emissions in coastal wetlands and support methodology development to assess carbon credits in preserving and restoring coastal wetlands.

  12. Denitrification and inference of nitrogen sources in the karstic Floridan Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, J.B.; Albertin, A.R.; Fork, M.L.; Katz, B.G.; Cohen, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquifer denitrification is among the most poorly constrained fluxes in global and regional nitrogen budgets. The few direct measurements of denitrification in groundwaters provide limited information about its spatial and temporal variability, particularly at the scale of whole aquifers. Uncertainty in estimates of denitrification may also lead to underestimates of its effect on isotopic signatures of inorganic N, and thereby confound the inference of N source from these data. In this study, our objectives are to quantify the magnitude and variability of denitrification in the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA) and evaluate its effect on N isotopic signatures at the regional scale. Using dual noble gas tracers (Ne, Ar) to generate physical predictions of N2 gas concentrations for 112 observations from 61 UFA springs, we show that excess (i.e. denitrification-derived) N2 is highly variable in space and inversely correlated with dissolved oxygen (O2). Negative relationship between O2 and ??15NNO 3 across a larger dataset of 113 springs, well-constrained isotopic fractionation coefficients, and strong 15N: 18O covariation further support inferences of denitrification in this uniquely organic-matter-poor system. Despite relatively low average rates, denitrification accounted for 32% of estimated aquifer N inputs across all sampled UFA springs. Back-calculations of source ??15NNO 3 based on denitrification progression suggest that isotopically-enriched nitrate (NO3-) in many springs of the UFA reflects groundwater denitrification rather than urban- or animal-derived inputs. ?? Author(s) 2011.

  13. Biomass production and alcoholic fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a function of nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Ruben; Morales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Ramon; Mas, Albert; Beltran, Gemma

    2012-06-01

    Nitrogen limitation is one of the most common causes for stuck or sluggish fermentation. A broad range of values have been reported as the minimum nitrogen concentration necessary for the completion of alcoholic fermentation. We have analyzed the minimum nitrogen concentration required to yield the maximum biomass (nitrogen reference value) using a microwell plate reader to monitor fermentation with different nitrogen sources and sugar concentrations. The biomass yield was dependent on the amount of available nitrogen, the nature of nitrogen source, and the sugar concentration in the medium. Nevertheless, achieving the maximum biomass was not sufficient to ensure the completion of the alcoholic fermentation, because the fermentation of 280 g sugar L(-1) stuck, regardless of the nature and concentration of nitrogen source. However, a mixture of five amino acids (Leu, Ile, Val, Phe and Thr) as the nitrogen source allowed for maximum sugar consumption. Analysis of cell vitality by impedance showed a significant improvement in the vitality for cells fermenting using this amino acid combination.

  14. Chitin: 'Forgotten' Source of Nitrogen: From Modern Chitin to Thermally Mature Kerogen: Lessons from Nitrogen Isotope Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Wintsch, R.P.; Lewan, M.D.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Chitinous biomass represents a major pool of organic nitrogen in living biota and is likely to have contributed some of the fossil organic nitrogen in kerogen. We review the nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry of chitin and present preliminary results suggesting interaction between kerogen and ammonium during thermal maturation. Modern arthropod chitin may shift its nitrogen isotope ratio by a few per mil depending on the chemical method of chitin preparation, mostly because N-containing non-amino-sugar components in chemically complex chitin cannot be removed quantitatively. Acid hydrolysis of chemically complex chitin and subsequent ion-chromatographic purification of the "deacetylated chitin-monomer" D-glucosamine (in hydrochloride form) provides a chemically well-defined, pure amino-sugar substrate for reproducible, high-precision determination of ??15N values in chitin. ??15N values of chitin exhibited a variability of about one per mil within an individual's exoskeleton. The nitrogen isotope ratio differed between old and new exoskeletons by up to 4 per mil. A strong dietary influence on the ??15N value of chitin is indicated by the observation of increasing ??15N values of chitin from marine crustaceans with increasing trophic level. Partial biodegradation of exoskeletons does not significantly influence ??15N values of remaining, chemically preserved amino sugar in chitin. Diagenesis and increasing thermal maturity of sedimentary organic matter, including chitin-derived nitrogen-rich moieties, result in humic compounds much different from chitin and may significantly change bulk ??15N values. Hydrous pyrolysis of immature source rocks at 330??C in contact with 15N-enriched NH4Cl, under conditions of artificial oil generation, demonstrates the abiogenic incorporation of inorganic nitrogen into carbon-bound nitrogen in kerogen. Not all organic nitrogen in natural, thermally mature kerogen is therefore necessarily derived from original organic matter, but may

  15. Effects of Source and Concentrations of Nitrogen and Carbohydrate on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss microbial protein synthesis and the effects of sources and concentrations of nitrogen and carbohydrate on microbial protein synthesis. Even though ammonia-N is a satisfactory source of nitrogen for the growth of the majority of rumen microbes, substitution of intact protein for urea usually stimulates ruminal microbial protein synthesis. While protein sources high in degradable intake protein (DIP), such as soybean meal, appear to have properties ...

  16. EFFECT OF NITROGEN SOURCES ON THE PRODUCTION OF INVERTASE BY YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE 3090

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh P. Kamble; Jyotsna C. Borate

    2012-01-01

    Invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is high cost enzyme and primarily used in the confectionary industry. For large scale production of the enzyme, feasible synthetic medium with appropriate supplemented nutrients are required. The effect of carbon source on invertase production is well known, but little is known about the effect of different nitrogen source. The aim of the present study is to see the effect of different nitrogen sources on the production of invertase in submerged ferment...

  17. Nitrogen trace gas fluxes from a semiarid subtropical savanna under woody legume encroachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Fiona M.; Boutton, Thomas W.; Groffman, Peter M.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2016-05-01

    Savanna ecosystems are a major source of nitrogen (N) trace gases that influence air quality and climate. These systems are experiencing widespread encroachment by woody plants, frequently associated with large increases in soil N, with no consensus on implications for trace gas emissions. We investigated the impact of encroachment by N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa on total reactive N gas flux (Nt = NO + N2O + NOy + NH3) from south Texas savanna soils over 2 years. Contrary to expectations, upland Prosopis groves did not have greater Nt fluxes than adjacent unencroached grasslands. However, abiotic conditions (temperature, rainfall, and topography) were strong drivers. Emissions from moist, low-lying Prosopis playas were up to 3 times higher than from Prosopis uplands. Though NO dominated emissions, NH3 and NOy (non-NO oxidized N) comprised 12-16% of the total summer N flux (up to 7.9 µg N m-2 h-1). Flux responses to soil wetting were temperature dependent for NO, NH3, and NOy: a 15 mm rainfall event increased flux 3-fold to 22-fold after 24 h in summer but had no effect in winter. Repeated soil wetting reduced N flux responses, indicating substrate depletion as a likely control. Rapid (soils suggested that abiotic chemodenitrification contributes to pulse emissions. We conclude that temperature and wetting dynamics, rather than encroachment, are primary drivers of N flux from these upland savannas, with implications for future emission patterns under altered precipitation regimes.

  18. Neurochemistry of Pressure-Induced Nitrogen and Metabolically Inert Gas Narcosis in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-06-13

    Gases that are not metabolized by the organism are thus chemically inactive under normal conditions. Such gases include the "noble gases" of the Periodic Table as well as hydrogen and nitrogen. At increasing pressure, nitrogen induces narcosis at 4 absolute atmospheres (ATAs) and more in humans and at 11 ATA and more in rats. Electrophysiological and neuropharmacological studies suggest that the striatum is a target of nitrogen narcosis. Glutamate and dopamine release from the striatum in rats are decreased by exposure to nitrogen at a pressure of 31 ATA (75% of the anesthetic threshold). Striatal dopamine levels decrease during exposure to compressed argon, an inert gas more narcotic than nitrogen, or to nitrous oxide, an anesthetic gas. Inversely, striatal dopamine levels increase during exposure to compressed helium, an inert gas with a very low narcotic potency. Exposure to nitrogen at high pressure does not change N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta and striatum but enhances gama amino butyric acidA (GABAA) receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta. The decrease in striatal dopamine levels in response to hyperbaric nitrogen exposure is suppressed by recurrent exposure to nitrogen narcosis, and dopamine levels increase after four or five exposures. This change, the lack of improvement of motor disturbances, the desensitization of GABAA receptors on dopamine cells during recurrent exposures and the long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled with the higher sensitivity of NMDA receptors, suggest a nitrogen toxicity induced by repetitive exposures to narcosis. These differential changes in different neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1579-1590, 2016.

  19. Detecting changes of a distant gas source with an array of MOX gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashami, Sepideh; Lilienthal, Achim J; Trincavelli, Marco

    2012-11-27

    We address the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system. The main challenge is the turbulent nature of gas dispersion and the response dynamics of the sensors. We propose a change point detection approach and evaluate it on individual gas sensors in an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. We also introduce an efficient sensor selection algorithm and evaluate the change point detection approach with the selected sensor array subsets.

  20. Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) δ15N as a bioindicator of nitrogen sources: Observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, B.; Carruthers, T.J.B.; Dennison, W.C.; Fertig, E.J.; Altabet, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) in bioindicators are increasingly employed to identify nitrogen sources in many ecosystems and biological characteristics of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) make it an appropriate species for this purpose. To assess nitrogen isotopic fractionation associated with assimilation and baseline variations in oyster mantle, gill, and muscle tissue δ15N, manipulative fieldwork in Chesapeake Bay and corresponding modeling exercises were conducted. This study (1) determined that five individuals represented an optimal sample size; (2) verified that δ15N in oysters from two locations converged after shared deployment to a new location reflecting a change in nitrogen sources; (3) identified required exposure time and temporal integration (four months for muscle, two to three months for gill and mantle); and (4) demonstrated seasonal δ15N increases in seston (summer) and oysters (winter). As bioindicators, oysters can be deployed for spatial interpolation of nitrogen sources, even in areas lacking extant populations. PMID:20381097

  1. Determination of free nitrogen in carbon steels by inert gas fusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakov, Ya. I.; Grigorovich, K. V.; Mansurova, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility to use hot extraction (thermal extraction in a carrier-gas flow) for fractional analysis of nitrogen in carbon steels is shown for cord and reinforcing-bar steels. A rapid procedure is developed for an analysis of free nitrogen in carbon steels. The validity of the analytical procedure is confirmed by high-temperature hydrogen extraction. The data obtained by the two methods correlate well with each other. A sample preparation procedure is developed for the determination of the content of dissolved nitrogen.

  2. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  3. The influence of nitrogen sources on the alpha-amylase productivity of Aspergillus oryzae in continuous cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    was shown to be inferior to ammonia as a nitrogen source. A mixture of ammonia and complex nitrogen sources, such as yeast extract or casein hydrolysate, was better than with ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Even a low concentration of casein hydrolysate (0.05 g l(-1)) resulted in a 35% increase......The influence of the nitrogen source on the cc-amylase productivity of Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in continuous cultivations. Both inorganic and complex nitrogen sources were investigated and glucose was used as the carbon and energy sources. For production of alpha-amylase, nitrate...

  4. Analysis of nanowire transistor based nitrogen dioxide gas sensor – A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Saxena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sensors sensitivity, selectivity and stability has always been a prime design concern for gas sensors designers. Modeling and simulation of gas sensors aids the designers in improving their performance. In this paper, different routes for the modeling and simulation of a semiconducting gas sensor is presented. Subsequently, by employing one of the route, the response of Zinc Oxide nanowire transistor towards nitrogen dioxide ambient is simulated. In addition to the sensing mechanism, simulation study of gas species desorption by applying a recovery voltage is also presented.

  5. Investigation of Solar and Solar-Gas Thermal Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zupa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the investigation of solar thermal sources of electrical and heat energy as well as the investigation of hybrid solar-gas thermal sources of electrical and heat energy (so called photothermal sources. Photothermal sources presented here utilize computer-controlled injection of the conversion fluid into special capillary porous substance that is adjusted to direct temperature treatment by the concentrated thermal radiation absorption.

  6. Linking Watershed Nitrogen Sources with Nitrogen Dynamics in Rivers of Western Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, D. J.; Compton, J.; Goodwin, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    We constructed contemporary nitrogen (N) budgets for 25 river basins in the Willamette River Basin (WRB) of western Oregon, USA, to improve the understanding of how recent trends in human-driven N loading have influenced riverine N dynamics in the region. Nearly 20% of WRB stream length is currently in fair or poor condition because of high N concentrations. Additionally, nitrate contamination of drinking water affects at least 8,000 people in the WRB. We hypothesized that 1) the majority of N inputs in the WRB would originate from agricultural activities in lowland portions of watersheds, 2) annual riverine N yield (kg/ha/yr) would correspond to annual per area watershed N inputs, and 3) riverine N yields would be seasonal and highest during winter due to the region's Mediterranean climate. We calculated average annual N inputs for each study basin by summing newly available datasets describing spatially explicit N inputs of synthetic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition, crop biological N2 fixation, biological N2 fixation by red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.), livestock manure, and point sources for the period 1996 - 2007. Annual and seasonal riverine N exports were estimated with the USGS model LOADEST calibrated to N concentration data collected during the study period. We estimated that two-thirds of total N input to the WRB study basins in the 2000s came from synthetic fertilizer application. Nearly all fertilizer application occurred on the lowlands near watershed mouths. We found a wide range of riverine N yields from the study basins, ranging from one to 70 kg N/ha/yr. Across the study basins, N export was more strongly correlated to fertilizer application rates than to percent of agricultural area in the watershed. Low watershed N yields reflected a high proportion of watershed area in the forested Cascade Mountain Range, which received low N inputs mainly from atmospheric deposition. N yields from study basins were strongly seasonal, with at least 50%, and

  7. Nitrogen Source Stabilization of Quorum Sensing in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bioaugmentation Strain SD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Zhen; Lai, Bai-Min; Dandekar, Ajai A; Yang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Na; Yin, Jun; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2017-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa SD-1 is efficient at degrading aromatic compounds and can therefore contribute to the bioremediation of wastewater. P. aeruginosa uses quorum sensing (QS) to regulate the production of numerous secreted "public goods." In wastewater bioaugmentation applications, there are myriad nitrogen sources, and we queried whether various nitrogen sources impact the stabilities of both QS and the bacterial populations. In a laboratory strain of P. aeruginosa, PAO1, the absence of a nitrogen source has been shown to destabilize these populations through the emergence of QS mutant "cheaters." We tested the ability of SD-1 to grow in casein broth, a condition that requires QS for growth, when the nitrogen source with either NH4Cl, NaNO3, or NaNO2 or with no added nitrogen source. There was great variability in susceptibility to invasion by QS mutant cheaters and, by extension, the stability of the SD-1 population. When grown with NH4Cl as an extra nitrogen source, no population collapse was observed; by contrast, two-thirds of cultures grown in the presence of NaNO2 collapsed. In the populations that collapsed, the frequency of social cheaters exceeded 40%. NaNO3 and NaNO2 directly favor QS mutants of P. aeruginosa SD-1. Although the mechanism by which these nitrogen sources act is not clear, these data indicate that the metabolism of nitrogen can affect the stability of bacterial populations, an important observation for continuing industrial applications with this species.IMPORTANCE Bioaugmentation as a method to help remediate wastewater pollutant streams holds significant potential to enhance traditional methods of treatment. Addition of microbes that can catabolize organic pollutants can be an effective method to remove several toxic compounds. Such bioaugmented strains of bacteria have been shown to be susceptible to competition from the microbiota that are present in wastewater streams, limiting their potential effectiveness. Here, we show that

  8. Appropriate conditions or maximizing catalytic reduction efficiency of nitrate into nitrogen gas in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Xue; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2003-05-01

    This study focused on the appropriate catalyst preparation and operating conditions for maximizing catalytic reduction efficiency of nitrate into nitrogen gas from groundwater. Batch experiments were conducted with prepared Pd and/or Cu catalysts with hydrogen gas supplied under specific operating conditions. It has been found that Pd-Cu combined catalysts prepared at a mass ratio of 4:1 can maximize the nitrate reduction into nitrogen gas. With an increase in the quantity of the catalysts, both nitrite intermediates and ammonia can be kept at a low level. It has also been found that the catalytic activity is mainly affected by the mass ratio of hydrogen gas to nitrate nitrogen, and hydrogen gas gauge pressure. Appropriate operating values of H(2)/NO(3)-N ratio, hydrogen gas gauge pressure, pH, and initial nitrate concentration have been determined to be 44.6g H(2)/g N, 0.15 atm, 5.2 (-), 100 mg x L(-1) for maximizing the catalytic reduction of nitrate from groundwater.

  9. Anthropogenic point-source and non-point-source nitrogen inputs into Huai River basin and their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. S.; Swaney, D. P.; Li, X. Y.; Hong, B.; Howarth, R. W.; Ding, S. H.

    2015-07-01

    This study provides a new approach to estimate both anthropogenic non-point-source and point-source nitrogen (N) inputs to the landscape, and determines their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen (AN) flux, providing a foundation for further exploration of anthropogenic effects on N pollution. Our study site is Huai River basin of China, a water-shed with one of the highest levels of N input in the world. Multi-year average (2003-2010) inputs of N to the watershed are 27 200 ± 1100 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources comprised about 98 % of total N input, and only 2 % of inputs are directly added to the aquatic ecosystem as point sources. Fertilizer application was the largest non-point source of new N to the Huai River basin (69 % of net anthropogenic N inputs), followed by atmospheric deposition (20 %), N fixation in croplands (7 %), and N content of imported food and feed (2 %). High N inputs showed impacts on riverine AN flux: fertilizer application, point-source N input, and atmospheric N deposition were proved as more direct sources to riverine AN flux. Modes of N delivery and losses associated with biological denitrification in rivers, water consumption, interception by dams may influence the extent of export of riverine AN flux from N sources. Our findings highlight the importance of anthropogenic N inputs from both point sources and non-point sources in heavily polluted watersheds, and provide some implications for AN prediction and management.

  10. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  11. Physiological and transcriptional response of Bacillus cereus treated with low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims - This study was conducted to investigate the inactivation kinetics of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells upon exposure to low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma and to reveal the mode of inactivation by transcriptome profiling. Methods and Results - Exponentially growing B. cereus cells were

  12. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  13. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  14. Large scale fabrication of nitrogen vacancy-embedded diamond nanostructures for single-photon source applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianqing; Li, Wuxia; Tang, Chengchun; Chang, Yanchun; Hao, Tingting; Pan, Xinyu; Ye, Haitao; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2016-11-01

    Some color centers in diamond can serve as quantum bits which can be manipulated with microwave pulses and read out with laser, even at room temperature. However, the photon collection efficiency of bulk diamond is greatly reduced by refraction at the diamond/air interface. To address this issue, we fabricated arrays of diamond nanostructures, differing in both diameter and top end shape, with HSQ and Cr as the etching mask materials, aiming toward large scale fabrication of single-photon sources with enhanced collection efficiency made of nitrogen vacancy (NV) embedded diamond. With a mixture of O2 and CHF3 gas plasma, diamond pillars with diameters down to 45 nm were obtained. The top end shape evolution has been represented with a simple model. The tests of size dependent single-photon properties confirmed an improved single-photon collection efficiency enhancement, larger than tenfold, and a mild decrease of decoherence time with decreasing pillar diameter was observed as expected. These results provide useful information for future applications of nanostructured diamond as a single-photon source. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Plan of China (Grant No. 2016YFA0200402), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11574369, 11574368, 91323304, 11174362, and 51272278), and the FP7 Marie Curie Action (project No. 295208) sponsored by the European Commission.

  15. Suitability of different growth substrates as source of nitrogen for sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Subhabrata; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2015-11-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) mediated treatment of acid mine drainage is considered as a globally accepted technology. However, inadequate information on the role of nitrogen source in the augmentation of SRB significantly affects the overall treatment process. Sustenance of SRB depends on suitable nitrogen source which is considered as an important nutrient. This review focuses on the different nitrogen rich growth substrates for their effectiveness to support SRB growth and sulfate reduction in passive bioreactors. Compounds like NH4Cl, NH4HCO3, NO3 (-), aniline, tri-nitrotoluene, cornsteep liquor, peptone, urea, and chitin are reported to have served as nitrogen source for SRB. In association with fermentative bacteria, SRB can metabolize these complex compounds to NH4 (+), amines, and amino acids. After incorporation into cells, these compounds take part in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids and enzyme co-factor. This work describes the status of current and the probable directions of the future research.

  16. Denitrification and inference of nitrogen sources in the karstic Floridan Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Heffernan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aquifer denitrification is among the most poorly constrained fluxes in global and regional nitrogen budgets. The few direct measurements of denitrification in groundwaters provide limited information about its spatial and temporal variability, particularly at the scale of whole aquifers. Uncertainty in estimates of denitrification may also lead to underestimates of its effect on isotopic signatures of inorganic N, and thereby confound the inference of N source from these data. In this study, our objectives are to quantify the magnitude and variability of denitrification in the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA and evaluate its effect on N isotopic signatures at the regional scale. Using dual noble gas tracers (Ne, Ar to generate physical predictions of N2 gas concentrations for 112 observations from 61 UFA springs, we show that excess (i.e. denitrification-derived N2 is highly variable in space and inversely correlated with dissolved oxygen (O2. Negative relationships between O2 and δ15NNO3 across a larger dataset of 113 springs, well-constrained isotopic fractionation coefficients, and strong 15N:18O covariation further support inferences of denitrification in this uniquely organic-matter-poor system. Despite relatively low average rates, denitrification accounted for 32 % of estimated aquifer N inputs across all sampled UFA springs. Back-calculations of source δ15NNO3 based on denitrification progression suggest that isotopically-enriched nitrate (NO3 in many springs of the UFA reflects groundwater denitrification rather than urban- or animal-derived inputs.

  17. Understanding the source: The nitrogen isotope composition of Type II mantle diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Sami; Howell, Dan; Jones, Adrian; Milledge, Judith; Verchovsky, Sasha

    2010-05-01

    Diamonds can be broadly subdivided into 2 groups based on their nitrogen content; type I with > 10ppm nitrogen and type II with growth nitrogen can be incorporated into diamond as a compatible element in a closed system and therefore the N/C ratio in the source can be depleted by Rayleigh fractionation as the first diamonds to crystallise will partition nitrogen atoms into their lattice as a 1:1 substitution for carbon atoms (type I diamonds). However nitrogen may behave as an incompatible element in diamond (and be a compatible element in the metasomatic fluid), this coupled with an open system would lead to the removal of nitrogen by the metasomatic fluids, thus causing the source to progressively become depleted in nitrogen. Continued diamond crystallization in either system will produce diamonds with ever decreasing nitrogen concentrations with time, possibly to the point of them being almost nitrogen free. 2- It is conceivable that type I & II diamonds found in the same deposit and sharing a common paragenesis (eclogitic or peridotitic) may have formed from different metasomatic fluids in separate diamond forming events. The latter has been proposed for samples from the Cullinan mine (South Africa) based on their carbon isotope compositions (3). Both models can be tested using the stable isotope compositions of carbon and nitrogen with the N/C ratio of the diamonds in a given population with varying nitrogen content (from type I to type II). 1.D. G. Pearson, D. Canil, S. B. Shirey, D. H. Heinrich, K. T. Karl, in Treatise on Geochemistry. (Pergamon, Oxford, 2003), pp. 171-275. 2.C. McCammon, Science 293, 813 (August 3, 2001, 2001). 3.A. E. Moore, South African Journal of Geology 112, 23 (March 1, 2009, 2009).

  18. Isotopic constraints on the source of Pluto's nitrogen and the history of atmospheric escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, Kathleen E.; Mousis, Olivier; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn

    2016-10-01

    The origin and evolution of nitrogen in solar system bodies is an important question for understanding processes that took place during the formation of the planets and solar system bodies. Pluto has an atmosphere that is 99% molecular nitrogen, but it is unclear if this nitrogen is primordial or derived from ammonia in the protosolar nebula. The nitrogen isotope ratio is an important tracer of the origin of nitrogen on solar system bodies, and can be used at Pluto to determine the origin of its nitrogen. After evaluating the potential impact of escape and photochemistry on Pluto's nitrogen isotope ratio (14N/15N), we find that if Pluto's nitrogen originated as N2 the current ratio in Pluto's atmosphere would be greater than 324 while it would be less than 157 if the source of Pluto's nitrogen were NH3. The New Horizons spacecraft successfully visited the Pluto system in July 2015 providing a potential opportunity to measure 14N/15N in N2.

  19. Spatial variations of nitrogen trace gas emissions from tropical mountain forests in Nyungwe, Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gharahi Ghehi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Globally, tropical forest soils represent the second largest source of N2O and NO. However, there is still considerable uncertainty on the spatial variability and soil properties controlling N trace gas emission. Therefore, we carried out an incubation experiment with soils from 31 locations in the Nyungwe tropical mountain forest in southwestern Rwanda. All soils were incubated at three different moisture levels (50, 70 and 90 % water filled pore space (WFPS at 17 °C. Nitrous oxide emission varied between 4.5 and 400 μg N m−2 h−1, while NO emission varied from 6.6 to 265 μg N m−2 h−1. Mean N2O emission at different moisture levels was 46.5 ± 11.1 (50 %WFPS, 71.7 ± 11.5 (70 %WFPS and 98.8 ± 16.4 (90 %WFPS μg N m−2 h−1, while mean NO emission was 69.3 ± 9.3 (50 %WFPS, 47.1 ± 5.8 (70 %WFPS and 36.1 ± 4.2 (90 %WFPS μg N m−2 h−1. The latter suggests that climate (i.e. dry vs. wet season controls N2O and NO emissions. Positive correlations with soil carbon and nitrogen indicate a biological control over N2O and NO production. But interestingly N2O and NO emissions also showed a positive correlation with free iron and a negative correlation with soil pH (only N2O. The latter suggest that chemo-denitrification might, at least for N2O, be an important production pathway. In conclusion improved understanding and process based modeling of N trace gas emission from tropical forests will benefit from spatially explicit trace gas emission estimates linked to basic soil property data and differentiating between biological and chemical pathways for N trace gas formation.

  20. Spatial variations of nitrogen trace gas emissions from tropical mountain forests in Nyungwe, Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gharahi Ghehi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, tropical forest soils represent the second largest source of N2O and NO. However, there is still considerable uncertainty on the spatial variability and soil properties controlling N trace gas emission. To investigate how soil properties affect N2O and NO emission, we carried out an incubation experiment with soils from 31 locations in the Nyungwe tropical mountain forest in southwestern Rwanda. All soils were incubated at three different moisture levels (50, 70 and 90% water filled pore space (WFPS at 17 °C. Nitrous oxide emission varied between 4.5 and 400 μg N m−2 h−1, while NO emission varied from 6.6 to 265 μg N m−2 h−1. Mean N2O emission at different moisture levels was 46.5 ± 11.1 (50% WFPS, 71.7 ± 11.5 (70% WFPS and 98.8 ± 16.4 (90% WFPS μg N m−2 h−1, while mean NO emission was 69.3 ± 9.3 (50% WFPS, 47.1 ± 5.8 (70% WFPS and 36.1 ± 4.2 (90% WFPS μg N m−2 h−1. The latter suggests that climate (i.e. dry vs. wet season controls N2O and NO emissions. Positive correlations with soil carbon and nitrogen indicate a biological control over N2O and NO production. But interestingly N2O and NO emissions also showed a negative correlation (only N2O with soil pH and a positive correlation with free iron. The latter suggest that chemo-denitrification might, at least for N2O, be an important production pathway. In conclusion improved understanding and process based modeling of N trace gas emission from tropical forests will not only benefit from better spatial explicit trace gas emission and basic soil property monitoring, but also by differentiating between biological and chemical pathways for N trace gas formation.

  1. Wind tunnel studies of gas dispersion from ground level source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michálek Petr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of gas dispersion from ground source were performed in a boundary layer wind tunnel in VZLU Prague. The measurements include non-buoyant gas dispersion behind a ground level source on a flat plane, on a simple rectangular building model and behind a model hill and rectangular barrier. These measurements will serve for verification of a new gas dispersion software being developed in VZLU. The dispersion model is intended for use by firemen and ambulance services in the case of an accident for immediate estimation of the area with dangerous gas concentration. The dispersion model will use precalculated results for chosen areas in the Czech Republic with industrial plants and residential building in the neighborhood. The size of contaminated area will be estimated using actual meteorological situation, i.e. wind speed and direction etc. and precalculated data of flow and dispersion in the chosen location.

  2. Wind tunnel studies of gas dispersion from ground level source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michálek, Petr; Zacho, David

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of gas dispersion from ground source were performed in a boundary layer wind tunnel in VZLU Prague. The measurements include non-buoyant gas dispersion behind a ground level source on a flat plane, on a simple rectangular building model and behind a model hill and rectangular barrier. These measurements will serve for verification of a new gas dispersion software being developed in VZLU. The dispersion model is intended for use by firemen and ambulance services in the case of an accident for immediate estimation of the area with dangerous gas concentration. The dispersion model will use precalculated results for chosen areas in the Czech Republic with industrial plants and residential building in the neighborhood. The size of contaminated area will be estimated using actual meteorological situation, i.e. wind speed and direction etc. and precalculated data of flow and dispersion in the chosen location.

  3. Speciation analysis by gas chromatography with plasma source spectrometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łobiński, Ryszard; Adams, Freddy C.

    State-of-the-art species-selective analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with plasma source spectrometric detection is discussed for organometal and organometalloid compounds. Various plasmas, inductively coupled plasma, microwave induced plasma, capacitatively coupled plasma, direct current plasma and alternating current plasma, are characterized and critically compared as sources of radiation for atomic emission spectrometry and sources of ions for mass spectrometry. Interfaces between gas chromatography (packed, wide-bore, capillary and multicapillary) and plasma source spectrometry are characterized. Particular emphasis is given to applications of GC with plasma source detection to real-world analytical problems, which are comprehensively reviewed. The use of plasmas for the acquisition of auxiliary molecular information such as empirical formulae and structural information is discussed. Recent developments relating to sample preparation and presentation to the hyphenated system are addressed. The most significant trends in speciation analysis are highlighted.

  4. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-31

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

  5. Studies on optimization of nitrogen sources for astaxanthin production by Phaffia rhodozyma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Hui; CHEN Qi-he; RUAN Hui; YANG Yuan-fan; LI Li-jun; WU Guang-bin; HU Yang; HE Guo-qing

    2007-01-01

    Fermentation of Phaffia rhodozyma is a major method for producing astaxanthin, an important pigment with industrial and pharmaceutical application. To improve astaxanthin productivity, single factor and mixture design experiments were used to investigate the effects of nitrogen source on Phaffia rhodozyma cultivation and astaxanthin production. Results of single factor experiments showed nitrogen source could significantly affect P. rhodozyma cultivation with respect to carbon source utilization,yeast growth and astaxanthin accumulation. Further studies of mixture design experiments using (NH4)2SO4, KNO3 and beef extract as nitrogen sources indicated that the proportion of three nitrogen sources was very important to astaxanthin production.Validation experiments showed that the optimal nitrogen source was composed of 0.28 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 0.49 g/L KNO3 and 1.19g/L beef extract. The kinetic characteristics of batch cultivation were investigated in a 5-L pH-stat fermentor. The maximum amount of biomass and highest astaxanthin yield in terms of volume and in terms of biomass were 7.71 mg/L and 1.00 mg/g,respectively.

  6. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  7. Endohedral nitrogen storage in carbon fullerene structures: Physisorption to chemisorption transition with increasing gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Barraza, R. E.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2009-06-01

    We present extensive pseudopotential density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to analyze the structural properties and chemical reactivity of nitrogen molecules confined in spheroidal (C82) and tubelike (C110) carbon fullerene structures. For a small number of encapsulated nitrogens, the N2 species exist in a nonbonded state within the cavities and form well defined molecular conformations such as linear chains, zigzag arrays, as well as both spheroidal and tubular configurations. However, with increasing the number of stored molecules, the interaction among the confined nitrogens as well as between the N2 species and the fullerene wall is not always mainly repulsive. Actually, at high densities of the encapsulated gas, we found both adsorption of N2 to the inner carbon surface together with the formation of (N2)m molecular clusters. Total energy DFT calculations reveal that the shape of the interaction potential of a test molecule moving within the carbon cavities strongly varies with the number and proximity of the coadsorbed N2 from being purely repulsive to having short-range attractive contributions close to the inner wall. In particular, the latter are always found when a group of closely spaced nitrogens is located near the carbon cage (a fact that will naturally occur at high densities of the encapsulated gas), inducing the formation of covalent bonds between the N2 and the fullerene network. Interestingly, in some cases, the previous nitrogen adsorption to the inner surface is reversible by reducing the gas pressure. The calculated average density of states of our considered carbon compounds reveals the appearance of well defined features that clearly reflect the occurring structural changes and modifications in the adsorption properties in the systems. Our results clearly underline the crucial role played by confinement effects on the reactivity of our endohedral compounds, define this kind of materials as nonideal nanocontainers for high

  8. Polyol synthesis in Aspergillus niger : influence of oxygen availability, carbon and nitrogen sources on the metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Bekker-Jensen, S; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    Polyol production has been studied in Aspergillus niger under different conditions. Fermentations have been run using high concentration of glucose or xylose as carbon source and ammonium or nitrate as nitrogen source. The growth of biomass, as freely dispersed hyphae, led to an increase of medium...

  9. Sources, cycling and export of nitrogen on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, Jemma Louise; Hawkings, Jonathan; Telling, Jon; Chandler, Dave; Alcock, Jon; O'Donnell, Emily; Kaur, Preeti; Bagshaw, Elizabeth; Tranter, Martyn; Tedstone, Andre; Nienow, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Fjord and continental shelf environments in the polar regions are host to some of the planet's most productive ecosystems and support economically important fisheries. Their productivity, however, is often critically dependent upon nutrient supply from upstream terrestrial environments delivered via river systems. In glacially fed coastal ecosystems, riverine nutrients are largely sourced from melting snow and ice. The largest and most extensive glacially fed coastal ecosystem in the Arctic is that bordering the Greenland Ice Sheet. The future primary productivity of this ecosystem, however, is uncertain. A potential increase in primary productivity driven by reduced sea ice extent and associated increased light levels may be curtailed by insufficient nutrient supply, and specifically nitrogen. Research on small valley glaciers indicates that glaciers are important sources of nitrogen to downstream environments. However, no data exist from ice sheet systems such as Greenland. Time series of nitrogen concentrations in runoff are documented from a large Greenland glacier, demonstrating seasonally elevated fluxes to the ocean. Fluxes are highest in mid-summer, when nitrogen limitation is commonly reported in coastal waters. It is estimated that approximately half of the glacially exported nitrogen is sourced from microbial activity within glacial sediments at the surface and bed of the ice sheet, doubling nitrogen fluxes in runoff. Summer dissolved inorganic nitrogen fluxes from the Greenland Ice Sheet (30-40 Gg) are a similar order of magnitude to those from a large Arctic river (Holmes et al., 2012). Nitrogen yields from the ice sheet (236 kg TDN km-2 a-1), however, are approximately double those from Arctic riverine catchments. We assert that this ice sheet nitrogen subsidy to Arctic coastal ecosystems may be important for understanding coastal biodiversity, productivity and fisheries and should be considered in future biogeochemical modelling studies of coastal

  10. Depressurization and two-phase flow of water containing high levels of dissolved nitrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Depressurization of water containing various concentrations of dissolved nitrogen gas was studied. In a nonflow depressurization experiment, water with very high nitrogen content was depressurized at rates from 0.09 to 0.50 MPa per second and a metastable behavior which was a strong function of the depressurization rate was observed. Flow experiments were performed in an axisymmetric, converging diverging nozzle, a two dimensional, converging nozzle with glass sidewalls, and a sharp edge orifice. The converging diverging nozzle exhibited choked flow behavior even at nitrogen concentration levels as low as 4 percent of the saturation level. The flow rates were independent of concentration level. Flow in the two dimensional, converging, visual nozzle appeared to have a sufficient pressure drop at the throat to cause nitrogen to come out of solution, but choking occurred further downstream. The orifice flow motion pictures showed considerable oscillation downstream of the orifice and parallel to the flow. Nitrogen bubbles appeared in the flow at back pressures as high as 3.28 MPa, and the level at which bubbles were no longer visible was a function of nitrogen concentration.

  11. Is an organic nitrogen source needed for cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gomez, Divanery; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-11-01

    The effect of organic and inorganic nitrogen sources on Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 cellulase production was investigated in submerged cultivations. Stirred tank bioreactors and shake flasks, with and without pH control, respectively, were employed. The experimental design involved the addition of individual organic nitrogen sources (soy peptone, glutamate, glycine and alanine) within a basal medium containing Avicel (i.e. micro crystalline cellulose) and ammonium sulphate. It was found that in the shake flask experiments, the highest cellulase activities (~0.1 ± 0.02 FPU ml(-1)) were obtained with media containing soy peptone (3-6 g l(-1)) and glutamate (3.6 g l(-1)). However, these improvements in the cellulase titers in the presence of the organic nitrogen sources appeared to be related to smaller changes in the pH of the medium. This was confirmed using stirred tank bioreactors with pH control. No significant differences were observed in the highest cellulase titers and the protein pattern (according to the SDS-PAGE) of supernatants from pH controlled stirred tank bioreactor cultivations, when different nitrogen sources were used in the medium. Here the cellulase activities (~1.0 ± 0.2 FPU ml(-1)) were also much greater (8-150 times) than in shake flask cultivation. Consequently, the addition of ammonium sulphate as sole nitrogen source to Avicel basal medium is recommended when performing cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors with strict pH controlled conditions.

  12. Influence of different fibre sources on digestibility and nitrogen and energy balances in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Jørgen; Chwalibog, André; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate how three different fibre sources, sugar beet pulp, soya bean hulls and pectin residue, constituting 15% of diets for growing pigs, influenced daily body gain, feed conversion, apparent faecal digestibility and nitrogen and energy balances. Eight......, soya bean hulls and pectin residue in diets for growing pigs decreased the apparent faecal digestibility and in the diets with sugar beet pulp and pectin residue higher utilization of digested nitrogen for retention compensated for the lower amount of digested nitrogen....

  13. Influence of different fibre sources on digestibility and nitrogen and energy balances in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Jørgen; Chwalibog, André; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate how three different fibre sources, sugar beet pulp, soya bean hulls and pectin residue, constituting 15% of diets for growing pigs, influenced daily body gain, feed conversion, apparent faecal digestibility and nitrogen and energy balances. Eight......, soya bean hulls and pectin residue in diets for growing pigs decreased the apparent faecal digestibility and in the diets with sugar beet pulp and pectin residue higher utilization of digested nitrogen for retention compensated for the lower amount of digested nitrogen....

  14. The magnitude of the snow-sourced reactive nitrogen flux to the boundary layer in the Uintah Basin, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatko, Maria; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Geng, Lei; Easley, Lauren; Schauer, Andrew; Bates, Timothy; Quinn, Patricia K.; Light, Bonnie; Morison, David; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lyman, Seth; Neff, William; Yuan, Bin; Alexander, Becky

    2016-11-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr = NO, NO2, HONO) and volatile organic carbon emissions from oil and gas extraction activities play a major role in wintertime ground-level ozone exceedance events of up to 140 ppb in the Uintah Basin in eastern Utah. Such events occur only when the ground is snow covered, due to the impacts of snow on the stability and depth of the boundary layer and ultraviolet actinic flux at the surface. Recycling of reactive nitrogen from the photolysis of snow nitrate has been observed in polar and mid-latitude snow, but snow-sourced reactive nitrogen fluxes in mid-latitude regions have not yet been quantified in the field. Here we present vertical profiles of snow nitrate concentration and nitrogen isotopes (δ15N) collected during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study 2014 (UBWOS 2014), along with observations of insoluble light-absorbing impurities, radiation equivalent mean ice grain radii, and snow density that determine snow optical properties. We use the snow optical properties and nitrate concentrations to calculate ultraviolet actinic flux in snow and the production of Nr from the photolysis of snow nitrate. The observed δ15N(NO3-) is used to constrain modeled fractional loss of snow nitrate in a snow chemistry column model, and thus the source of Nr to the overlying boundary layer. Snow-surface δ15N(NO3-) measurements range from -5 to 10 ‰ and suggest that the local nitrate burden in the Uintah Basin is dominated by primary emissions from anthropogenic sources, except during fresh snowfall events, where remote NOx sources from beyond the basin are dominant. Modeled daily averaged snow-sourced Nr fluxes range from 5.6 to 71 × 107 molec cm-2 s-1 over the course of the field campaign, with a maximum noontime value of 3.1 × 109 molec cm-2 s-1. The top-down emission estimate of primary, anthropogenic NOx in Uintah and Duchesne counties is at least 300 times higher than the estimated snow NOx emissions presented in this study. Our results suggest

  15. VOC signatures from North American oil and gas sources (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Marrero, J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Hartt, G.; Meinardi, S.; Schroeder, J.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008 and 2013 UC Irvine has used its whole air sampling (WAS) technique to investigate VOC source signatures from a range of oil and gas sources in North America, including five separate field campaigns at the Alberta oil sands (1 airborne, 4 ground-based); the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill (airborne and ship-based); the 2012 airborne Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) mission over oil and gas wells in Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma; and the 2013 ground-based Barnett Shale Campaign in Texas. Each campaign has characterized more than 80 individual C1-C10 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes and aromatics. For example, oil sands are an extra-heavy, unconventional crude oil that is blended with diluent in order to flow, and upgraded into synthetic crude oil. The VOC signature at the oil sands mining and upgrading facilities is alkane-rich, and the fuel gas associated with these operations has an i-butane/n-butane ratio similar to that of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). In addition to light alkanes, enhanced levels of benzene were observed over US oil and natural gas wells during DC3, likely because of its use in hydrofracking fluid. A series of VOC emission ratios from North American petrochemical sources will be presented and compared, including oil sands, conventional oil and hydrofracking operations.

  16. Enhanced microalgal lipid production with media engineering of potassium nitrate as a nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Rakesh Singh; Bairagi, Madhusudan; Garlapati, Vijay Kumar; Kant, Anil

    2017-05-04

    Algal biofuels are far from a commercial reality due to the technical challenges associated with their growth and lipid extraction procedures. In this study, we investigated the effect of 4 different media and 5 different nitrogen sources at 5 levels on the growth, biomass and lipid productivity of Scenedesmus sp and Chlorella sp The hypothesis was that a nitrogen source can be identified that provides enough stress to accumulate lipids without compromising significantly on biomass and lipid productivity. A maximum specific growth rate and doubling per day have been observed with algal species using modified BG-11 medium. Among the tested nitrogen sources, 2.5 mM potassium nitrate as a nitrogen constituent of modified BG-11 medium resulted in higher lipid content and productivity in the case of S. dimorphus (29.15%, 15.449 mg L(-1)day(-1)). Another noteworthy outcome of the present study lies in the usage of a smaller amount of the nitrogen source, i.e., 2.5 mM, which is found to be 7 times less than the standard BG11 media (17.60 mM sodium nitrate).

  17. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.;

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... they have large scatter. The data sets that have been measured at low pressures extrapolate well towards the ideal equilibrium values. The two models show similar results, but differ at high pressure and/or temperature. CPA is shown to extrapolate well for methane-water to 1000 bar and 573 K, and our...

  18. Signature of superradiance from a nitrogen gas plasma channel produced by strong field ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guihua; Zeng, Bin; Xie, Hongqiang; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Yao et al. demonstrated the creation of coherent emissions in nitrogen gas with two-color (800 nm + 400 nm) ultrafast laser pulses [New J. Phys. 15, 023046 (2013)]. Based on this two-color scheme, here we report on systematic investigation of temporal characteristics of the coherent emission at 391 nm by experimentally examining its evolution with the increase of the plasma channel induced by the intense 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses at a nitrogen gas pressure of ~25 mbar. We reveal unexpected temporal profiles of the coherent emissions, which show significant superradiance signatures owing to the quantum coherence via cooperation of an ensemble of excited N2+ molecules. Our findings shed more light on the mechanisms behind the laser-like emissions induced by strong-field ionization of molecules.

  19. Dual arc penning ion source gas flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.D.; Lord, R.S.; Mallory, M.L.; Antaya, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Support gas, when added directly to an arc or admitted to an auxiliary chamber of a two-arc chamber ion source, increases the beam intensity for multicharged ions such as /sup 16/O/sup 5 +/. To clarify the mechanism of this intensity increase, gas flow rates from the auxiliary chamber to the main chamber have been measured by using the ORIC cyclotron as a mass spectrometer. The results show that only about three percent of the gas admitted to the auxiliary chamber reaches the main chamber. One can then infer that the improved operation probably results from the stabilizing effect of heating the common cathodes with the auxiliary arc and/or the more favorable distribution of the support gas to the part of the main arc close to the cathodes.

  20. Enhanced Basicity of Push-Pull Nitrogen Bases in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczyńska, Ewa D; Gal, Jean-François; Maria, Pierre-Charles

    2016-11-23

    Nitrogen bases containing one or more pushing amino-group(s) directly linked to a pulling cyano, imino, or phosphoimino group, as well as those in which the pushing and pulling moieties are separated by a conjugated spacer (C═X)n, where X is CH or N, display an exceptionally strong basicity. The n-π conjugation between the pushing and pulling groups in such systems lowers the basicity of the pushing amino-group(s) and increases the basicity of the pulling cyano, imino, or phosphoimino group. In the gas phase, most of the so-called push-pull nitrogen bases exhibit a very high basicity. This paper presents an analysis of the exceptional gas-phase basicity, mostly in terms of experimental data, in relation with structure and conjugation of various subfamilies of push-pull nitrogen bases: nitriles, azoles, azines, amidines, guanidines, vinamidines, biguanides, and phosphazenes. The strong basicity of biomolecules containing a push-pull nitrogen substructure, such as bioamines, amino acids, and peptides containing push-pull side chains, nucleobases, and their nucleosides and nucleotides, is also analyzed. Progress and perspectives of experimental determinations of GBs and PAs of highly basic compounds, termed as "superbases", are presented and benchmarked on the basis of theoretical calculations on existing or hypothetical molecules.

  1. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific: seasonal variation and source attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Yuepeng; Wang, Yuesi; Paulot, Fabien; Henze, Daven

    2016-04-01

    Rapid Asian industrialization has lead to increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition downwind threatening the marine environment. We present an analysis of the sources and processes controlling atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific, using the GEOS-Chem global chemistry model and its adjoint model at 1/2°× 2/3° horizontal resolution over the East Asia and its adjacent oceans. We focus our analyses on the marginal seas: the Yellow Sea and the South China Sea. Asian nitrogen emissions in the model are 28.6 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 15.7 Tg N a-1 as NOx. China has the largest sources with 12.8 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 7.9 Tg N a-1 as NOx; the much higher NH3 emissions reflect its intensive agricultural activities. We improve the seasonality of Asian NH3 emissions; emissions are a factor of 3 higher in summer than winter. The model simulation for 2008-2010 is evaluated with NH3 and NO2 column observations from satellite instruments, and wet deposition flux measurements from surface monitoring sites. Simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific ranges 0.8-20 kg N ha-1 a-1, decreasing rapidly downwind the Asian continent. Deposition fluxes average 11.9 kg N ha-1 a-1 (5.0 as reduced nitrogen NHx and 6.9 as oxidized nitrogen NOy) to the Yellow Sea, and 5.6 kg N ha-1 a-1 (2.5 as NHx and 3.1 as NOy) to the South China Sea. Nitrogen sources over the ocean (ship NOx and oceanic NH3) have little contribution to deposition over the Yellow Sea, about 7% over the South China Sea, and become important (greater than 30%) further downwind. We find that the seasonality of nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific is determined by variations in meteorology largely controlled by the East Asian Monsoon and in nitrogen emissions. The model adjoint further points out that nitrogen deposition to the Yellow Sea originates from sources over China (92% contribution) and the Korean peninsula (7%), and by sectors from fertilizer use (24%), power plants

  2. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar.

  3. Nitrogen hydrides in interstellar gas: Herschel/HIFI observations towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C)

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, C M; Cernicharo, J; Goicoechea, J R; Hassel, G E; Herbst, E; Gerin, M; De Luca, M; Bell, T A; Coutens, A; Falgarone, E; Goldsmith, P F; Gupta, H; Kazmierczak, M; Lis, D C; Mookerjea, B; Neufeld, D A; Pearson, J; Phillips, T G; Sonnentrucker, P; Stutzki, J; Vastel, C; Yu, S; Boulanger, F; Dartois, E; Encrenaz, P; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Gry, C; Hennebelle, P; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Kolos, R; Krelowski, J; Martin-Pintado, J; Menten, K; Monje, R; Perault, M; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Teyssier, D; Peron, I; Cais, P; Gaufre, P; Cros, A; Ravera, L; Morris, P; Lord, S; Planesas, P

    2010-01-01

    The HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory has been used to observe interstellar nitrogen hydrides along the sight-line towards G10.6-0.4 in order to improve our understanding of the interstellar chemistry of nitrogen. We report observations of absorption in NH N=1-0, J=2-1 and ortho-NH2 1_1,1-0_0,0. We also observed ortho-NH3 1_0-0_0, and 2_0-1_0, para-NH3 2_1-1_1, and searched unsuccessfully for NH+. All detections show emission and absorption associated directly with the hot-core source itself as well as absorption by foreground material over a wide range of velocities. All spectra show similar, non-saturated, absorption features, which we attribute to diffuse molecular gas. Total column densities over the velocity range 11-54 km/s are estimated. The similar profiles suggest fairly uniform abundances relative to hydrogen, approximately 6*10^-9, 3*10^-9, and 3*10^-9 for NH, NH2, and NH3, respectively. These abundances are discussed with reference to models of gas-phase and surface chemistry...

  4. Effects of Nitrogen and Carbon Sources on Transcription of Soluble Methyltransferases in Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1†

    OpenAIRE

    Veit, Katharina; Ehlers, Claudia; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2005-01-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 uses versatile carbon sources and is able to fix molecular nitrogen with methanol as carbon and energy sources. Here, we demonstrate that when growing on trimethylamine (TMA), nitrogen fixation does not occur, indicating that ammonium released during TMA degradation is sufficient to serve as a nitrogen source and represses nif gene induction. We further report on the transcriptional regulation of soluble methyltransferases, which catal...

  5. Laser Gas-Analyser for Monitoring a Source of Gas Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gorodnichev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the problem of growing air pollution of the Earth is of relevance. Many countries have taken measures to protect the environment in order to limit the negative anthropogenic impacts.In such a situation an objective information on the actual content of pollutants in the atmosphere is of importance. For operational inspection of the pollutant concentrations and for monitoring pollution sources, it is necessary to create high-speed high-sensitivity gas analysers.Laser meters are the most effective to provide operational remote and local inspection of gas pollution of the Earth atmosphere.Laser meter for routine gas analysis should conduct operational analysis of the gas mixture (air. For this a development of appropriate information support is required.Such information support should include a database with absorption coefficients of pollutants (specific to potential sources of pollution at possible measuring wavelengths (holding data for a particular emitter of the laser meter and an efficient algorithms to search the measuring wavelengths and conduct a quantitative analysis of gas mixtures.Currently, the issues, important for practice and related to the development of information support for the laser gas analyzer to conduct important for practice routine measurements remain unclear.In this paper we develop an algorithm to provide an operational search of the measuring wavelengths of laser gas analyser and an algorithm to recover quantitively the gaseous component concentrations of controlled gas mixture from the laser multi-spectral measurements that take into account a priori information about the source-controlled gas pollution and do not require a large amount of computation. The method of mathematical simulation shows the effectiveness of the algorithms described both for seach of measuring wavelengths and for quantitative analysis of gas releases.

  6. Evaluation of bactericidal effects of low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma towards application to short-time sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Kumiko; Sakuma, Ayaka; Nakamura, Yuka; Oguri, Tomoko; Sato, Natsumi; Kido, Nobuo

    2012-07-01

    To develop a novel low-temperature plasma sterilizer using pure N(2) gas as a plasma source, we evaluated bactericidal ability of a prototype apparatus provided by NGK Insulators. After determination of the sterilizing conditions without the cold spots, the D value of the BI of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores on the filter paper was determined as 1.9 min. However, the inactivation efficiency of BI carrying the same endospores on SUS varied to some extent, suggesting that the bactericidal effect might vary by materials of sterilized instruments. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were also exposed to the N(2) gas plasma and confirmed to be inactivated within 30 min. Through the evaluation of bactericidal efficiency in a sterilization bag, we concluded that the UV photons in the plasma and the high-voltage pulse to generate the gas plasma were not concerned with the bactericidal effect of the N(2) gas plasma. Bactericidal effect might be exhibited by activated nitrogen atoms or molecular radicals.

  7. Efficient Total Nitrogen Removal in an Ammonia Gas Biofilter through High-Rate OLAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Clippeleir, Haydée; Courtens, Emilie; Mosquera, Mariela

    2012-01-01

    .86 ± 0.04 kg N m–3 biofilter d–1 and an empty bed residence time of 14 s. After 45 days of operation a stable nitrogen removal rate of 0.67 ± 0.06 kg N m–3 biofilter d–1, an ammonia removal efficiency of 99%, a removal of 75–80% of the total nitrogen, and negligible NO/N2O productions were obtained......Ammonia gas is conventionally treated in nitrifying biofilters; however, addition of organic carbon to perform post-denitrification is required to obtain total nitrogen removal. Oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND), applied in full-scale for wastewater treatment, can...... offer a cost-effective alternative for gas treatment. In this study, the OLAND application thus was broadened toward ammonia loaded gaseous streams. A down flow, oxygen-saturated biofilter (height of 1.5 m; diameter of 0.11 m) was fed with an ammonia gas stream (248 ± 10 ppmv) at a loading rate of 0...

  8. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrailov, Simeon; Ivanova, Viara

    2016-03-01

    The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein) leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4) 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4) 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  9. Gas source localization and gas distribution mapping with a micro-drone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Patrick P.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this Ph.D. thesis is the development and validation of a VTOL-based (Vertical Take Off and Landing) micro-drone for the measurement of gas concentrations, to locate gas emission sources, and to build gas distribution maps. Gas distribution mapping and localization of a static gas source are complex tasks due to the turbulent nature of gas transport under natural conditions and becomes even more challenging when airborne. This is especially so, when using a VTOL-based micro-drone that induces disturbances through its rotors, which heavily affects gas distribution. Besides the adaptation of a micro-drone for gas concentration measurements, a novel method for the determination of the wind vector in real-time is presented. The on-board sensors for the flight control of the micro-drone provide a basis for the wind vector calculation. Furthermore, robot operating software for controlling the micro-drone autonomously is developed and used to validate the algorithms developed within this Ph.D. thesis in simulations and real-world experiments. Three biologically inspired algorithms for locating gas sources are adapted and developed for use with the micro-drone: the surge-cast algorithm (a variant of the silkworm moth algorithm), the zigzag / dung beetle algorithm, and a newly developed algorithm called ''pseudo gradient algorithm''. The latter extracts from two spatially separated measuring positions the information necessary (concentration gradient and mean wind direction) to follow a gas plume to its emission source. The performance of the algorithms is evaluated in simulations and real-world experiments. The distance overhead and the gas source localization success rate are used as main performance criteria for comparing the algorithms. Next, a new method for gas source localization (GSL) based on a particle filter (PF) is presented. Each particle represents a weighted hypothesis of the gas source position. As a first step, the PF

  10. Gas source localization and gas distribution mapping with a micro-drone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Patrick P.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this Ph.D. thesis is the development and validation of a VTOL-based (Vertical Take Off and Landing) micro-drone for the measurement of gas concentrations, to locate gas emission sources, and to build gas distribution maps. Gas distribution mapping and localization of a static gas source are complex tasks due to the turbulent nature of gas transport under natural conditions and becomes even more challenging when airborne. This is especially so, when using a VTOL-based micro-drone that induces disturbances through its rotors, which heavily affects gas distribution. Besides the adaptation of a micro-drone for gas concentration measurements, a novel method for the determination of the wind vector in real-time is presented. The on-board sensors for the flight control of the micro-drone provide a basis for the wind vector calculation. Furthermore, robot operating software for controlling the micro-drone autonomously is developed and used to validate the algorithms developed within this Ph.D. thesis in simulations and real-world experiments. Three biologically inspired algorithms for locating gas sources are adapted and developed for use with the micro-drone: the surge-cast algorithm (a variant of the silkworm moth algorithm), the zigzag / dung beetle algorithm, and a newly developed algorithm called ''pseudo gradient algorithm''. The latter extracts from two spatially separated measuring positions the information necessary (concentration gradient and mean wind direction) to follow a gas plume to its emission source. The performance of the algorithms is evaluated in simulations and real-world experiments. The distance overhead and the gas source localization success rate are used as main performance criteria for comparing the algorithms. Next, a new method for gas source localization (GSL) based on a particle filter (PF) is presented. Each particle represents a weighted hypothesis of the gas source position. As a first step, the PF

  11. A series of inorganic solid nitrogen sources for the synthesis of metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the dependence of production yield on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fupin; Guan, Jian; Wei, Tao; Wang, Song; Jiao, Mingzhi; Yang, Shangfeng

    2013-04-01

    A series of nitrogen-containing inorganic solid compounds with variable oxidation states of nitrogen and counter ions have been successfully applied as new inorganic solid nitrogen sources toward the synthesis of Sc-based metal nitride clusterfullerenes (Sc-NCFs), including ammonium salts [(NH4)xH(3-x)PO4 (x = 0-2), (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)2CO3, NH4X (X = F, Cl), NH4SCN], thiocyanate (KSCN), nitrates (Cu(NO3)2, NaNO3), and nitrite (NaNO2). Among them, ammonium phosphates ((NH4)xH(3-x)PO4, x = 1-3) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) are revealed to behave as better nitrogen sources than others, and the highest yield of Sc-NCFs is achieved when NH4SCN was used as a nitrogen source. The optimum molar ratio of Sc2O3:(NH4)3PO4·3H2O:C and Sc2O3:NH4SCN:C has been determined to be 1:2:15 and 1:3:15, respectively. The thermal decomposition products of these 12 inorganic compounds have been discussed in order to understand their different performances toward the synthesis of Sc-NCFs, and accordingly the dependence of the production yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion is interpreted. The yield of Sc3N@C80 (I(h) + D(5h)) per gram Sc2O3 by using the N2-based group of nitrogen sources (thiocyanate, nitrates, and nitrite) is overall much lower than those by using gaseous N2 and NH4SCN, indicating the strong dependence of the yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen, which is attributed to the "in-situ" redox reaction taking place for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources during discharging. For NH3-based group of nitrogen sources (ammonium salts) which exhibits a (-3) oxidation states of nitrogen, their performance as nitrogen sources is found to be sensitively dependent on the anion, and this is understood by considering their difference on the thermal stability and/or decomposition rate. Contrarily, for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources, the formation of Sc-NCFs is independent to both the oxidation state of nitrogen (+3 or +5) and the

  12. Genetic basis of variations in nitrogen source utilization in four wine commercial yeast strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available The capacity of wine yeast to utilize the nitrogen available in grape must directly correlates with the fermentation and growth rates of all wine yeast fermentation stages and is, thus, of critical importance for wine production. Here we precisely quantified the ability of low complexity nitrogen compounds to support fast, efficient and rapidly initiated growth of four commercially important wine strains. Nitrogen substrate abundance in grape must failed to correlate with the rate or the efficiency of nitrogen source utilization, but well predicted lag phase length. Thus, human domestication of yeast for grape must growth has had, at the most, a marginal impact on wine yeast growth rates and efficiencies, but may have left a surprising imprint on the time required to adjust metabolism from non growth to growth. Wine yeast nitrogen source utilization deviated from that of the lab strain experimentation, but also varied between wine strains. Each wine yeast lineage harbored nitrogen source utilization defects that were private to that strain. By a massive hemizygote analysis, we traced the genetic basis of the most glaring of these defects, near inability of the PDM wine strain to utilize methionine, as consequence of mutations in its ARO8, ADE5,7 and VBA3 alleles. We also identified candidate causative mutations in these genes. The methionine defect of PDM is potentially very interesting as the strain can, in some circumstances, overproduce foul tasting H2S, a trait which likely stems from insufficient methionine catabolization. The poor adaptation of wine yeast to the grape must nitrogen environment, and the presence of defects in each lineage, open up wine strain optimization through biotechnological endeavors.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Dispersion from Urban Greenhouse Gas Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottrott, Anders; Tan, Sze; He, Yonggang; Winkler, Renato

    2017-04-01

    Cities are characterized by complex topography, inhomogeneous turbulence, and variable pollutant source distributions. These features create a scale separation between local sources and urban scale emissions estimates known as the Grey-Zone. Modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques provide a quasi-deterministic, physically based toolset to bridge the scale separation gap between source level dynamics, local measurements, and urban scale emissions inventories. CFD has the capability to represent complex building topography and capture detailed 3D turbulence fields in the urban boundary layer. This presentation discusses the application of OpenFOAM to urban CFD simulations of natural gas leaks in cities. OpenFOAM is an open source software for advanced numerical simulation of engineering and environmental fluid flows. When combined with free or low cost computer aided drawing and GIS, OpenFOAM generates a detailed, 3D representation of urban wind fields. OpenFOAM was applied to model scalar emissions from various components of the natural gas distribution system, to study the impact of urban meteorology on mobile greenhouse gas measurements. The numerical experiments demonstrate that CH4 concentration profiles are highly sensitive to the relative location of emission sources and buildings. Sources separated by distances of 5-10 meters showed significant differences in vertical dispersion of plumes, due to building wake effects. The OpenFOAM flow fields were combined with an inverse, stochastic dispersion model to quantify and visualize the sensitivity of point sensors to upwind sources in various built environments. The Boussinesq approximation was applied to investigate the effects of canopy layer temperature gradients and convection on sensor footprints.

  14. Analytical and experimental investigations on nitrogen properties as geochemical indicator for gas and condensate deposits inundation prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Василівна Сіра

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nitrogen content in natural gas through the section, areally, and in the process of developing gas and condensate deposits has been studied. Based on conducted analysis and experimental investigations the pilot method of grapho-analytical prognosis of inundation, using nitrogen as a geochemical indicator, has been developed. This method comes instrumental in prolonging operational life of a well. 

  15. [Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on 5-keto-gluconic acid production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhilei; Wang, Hongcui; Wei, Yuqiao; Li, Yanyan; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2014-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans is known to oxidize glucose to gluconic acid (GA), and subsequently, to 2-keto-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-gluconic acid (5KGA), while 5KGA can be converted to L-(+)-tartaric acid. In order to increase the production of 5KGA, Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 that converts GA to 5KGA exclusively was chosen in this study, and effects of carbon sources (lactose, maltose, sucrose, amylum and glucose) and nitrogen sources (yeast extract, fish meal, corn steep liquor, soybean meal and cotton-seed meal) on 5KGA production were investigated. Results of experiment in 500 mL shake-flask show that the highest yield of 5KGA (98.20 g/L) was obtained using 100 g/L glucose as carbon source. 5KGA reached 100.20 g/L, 109.10 g/L, 99.83 g/L with yeast extract, fish meal and corn steep liquor as nitrogen source respectively, among which the optimal nitrogen source was fish meal. The yield of 5KGA by corn steep liquor is slightly lower than that by yeast extract. For the economic reason, corn steep liquor was selected as nitrogen source and scaled up to 5 L stirred-tank fermentor, and the final concentration of 5KGA reached 93.80 g/L, with its maximum volumetric productivity of 3.48 g/(L x h) and average volumetric productivity of 1.56 g/(L x h). The result obtained in this study showed that carbon and nitrogen sourses for large-scale production of 5KGA by Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 were glucose and corn steep liquor, respectively, and the available glucose almost completely (85.93%) into 5KGA.

  16. The effect of organic nitrogen sources on recombinant glucoamylase production by Aspergillus niger in chemostat culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swift, R.J.; Karandikar, A.; Griffen, A.M.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Robson, G.D.; Trinci, A.P.J.; Wiebe, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspergillus niger B1, a recombinant strain carrying 20 extra copies of the native glucoamylase gene, was grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures supplemented with various organic nitrogen sources (dilution rate 0.12 ± 0.01 h-1, pH 5.4). In cultures supplemented with L-alanine, L-methionine, casa

  17. Is an organic nitrogen source needed for cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez Gómez, Divanery; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-01-01

    The effect of organic and inorganic nitrogen sources on Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 cellulase production was investigated in submerged cultivations. Stirred tank bioreactors and shake flasks, with and without pH control, respectively, were employed. The experimental design involved the addition...

  18. Source receptor relations for the calculation of atmospheric deposition to the North Sea: Nitrogen and Cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld JA; de Leeuw FAAM

    1993-01-01

    In this report a simplified atmospheric transport model for estimating the deposition of nitrogen (both NOx and NHx) and cadmium to the North Sea is presented. In this so-called meta-model a linear relationship between the emissions from a source area and the resulting deposition at receptor points

  19. Nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources for deep subsurface microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutvonen, Heini; Rajala, Pauliina; Carpén, Leena; Bomberg, Malin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the N-utilizing bacterial community in anoxic brackish groundwater of the low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository cave in Olkiluoto, Finland, at 100 m depth using 15N-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and enrichment with 14∕15N-ammonium or 14∕15N-nitrate complemented with methane. Twenty-eight days of incubation at 12°C increased the concentration of bacterial 16S rRNA and nitrate reductase (narG) gene copies in the substrate amended microcosms simultaneously with a radical drop in the overall bacterial diversity and OTU richness. Hydrogenophaga/Malikia were enriched in all substrate amended microcosms and Methylobacter in the ammonium and ammonium+methane supplemented microcosms. Sulfuricurvum was especially abundant in the nitrate+methane treatment and the unamended incubation control. Membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes (narG) from Polarimonas sp. were detected in the original groundwater, while Burkholderia, Methylibium, and Pseudomonas narG genes were enriched due to substrate supplements. Identified amoA genes belonged to Nitrosomonas sp. 15N-SIP revealed that Burkholderiales and Rhizobiales clades belonging to the minority groups in the original groundwater used 15N from ammonium and nitrate as N source indicating an important ecological function of these bacteria, despite their low number, in the groundwater N cycle in Olkiluoto bedrock system. PMID:26528251

  20. Nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources for deep subsurface microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heini eKutvonen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the N-utilizing bacterial community in anoxic brackish groundwater of the low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository cave in Olkiluoto, Finland, at 100 m depth using 15N-based stable isotope probing (SIP and enrichment with 14/15N-ammonium or 14/15N-nitrate complemented with methane. 28 days of incubation at 12°C increased the concentration of bacterial 16S rRNA and nitrate reductase (narG gene copies in the substrate amended microcosms simultaneously with a radical drop in the overall bacterial diversity and OTU richness. Hydrogenophaga/Malikia were enriched in all substrate amended microcosms and Methylobacter in the ammonium and ammonium+methane supplemented microcosms. Sulfuricurvum was especially abundant in the nitrate+methane treatment and the unamended incubation control. Membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes (narG from Polarimonas sp. were detected in the original groundwater, while Burkholderia, Methylibium and Pseudomonas narG genes were enriched due to substrate supplements. Identified amoA genes belonged to Nitrosomonas sp. 15N-SIP revealed that Burkholderiales and Rhizobiales clades belonging to the minority groups in the original groundwater used 15N from ammonium and nitrate as N source indicating an important ecological function of these bacteria, despite their low number, in the groundwater N cycle in Olkiluoto bedrock system.

  1. Regioselective aminohalogenation of β-nitrostyrenes using NCS and NBS as nitrogen/halogen sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Aminohalogenation reaction of β-nitrostyrenes with N-halosuccinimides(N-chloro and N-bromosuccinimides) has been successfully conducted by using nickel acetate as a catalyst in the presence of potassium carbonate and succinimide as co-additives.The reaction was easily performed at room temperature under nitrogen gas protection to give dihalorinaed haloamino products in good to excellent yields(60%-98%).The structure has been confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis.

  2. COS-B gamma-ray sources and interstellar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, A. M. T.; Bennett, K.; Bignami, G. F.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Buccheri, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hermsen, W.; Kanbach, G.; Lebrun, F.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Of the gamma-radiation observed above 100 MeV only a few percent is due to the catalogued sources which are viewed against intense background mission from the Galactic plane. There has been considerable recent success in modelling the Galactic plane emission as the interactions of cosmic rays with atomic and molecular interstellar gas; Bloemen, et al., demonstrate that large angular scale features of the observations are well reproduced in this way. By extending the analysis to small angular scales, which of the eCG sources might be due to conventional levels of cosmic rays within clumps of gas are shown and which cannot be so explained. With the use of a more sophisticated model the results presented improve and extend those of an earlier report. So far only the data above 300 MeV is used where the instrument's angular resolution is at its best.

  3. Symbiotic bacteria enable olive flies (Bactrocera oleae) to exploit intractable sources of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yosef, M; Pasternak, Z; Jurkevitch, E; Yuval, B

    2014-12-01

    Insects are often associated with symbiotic micro-organisms, which allow them to utilize nutritionally marginal diets. Adult fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) associate with extracellular bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae) that inhabit their digestive tract. These flies obtain nutrients by foraging for plant exudates, honeydew and bird droppings scattered on leaves and fruit—a nutritional niche which offers ample amounts of carbohydrates, but low quantities of available nitrogen. We identified the bacteria resident in the gut of the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae)—a worldwide pest of olives and examined their contribution to nitrogen metabolism in the adult insect. By suppressing bacteria in the gut and monitoring female fecundity, we demonstrate that bacteria contribute essential amino acids and metabolize urea into an available nitrogen source for the fly, thus significantly elevating egg production. In an ecological context, bacteria were found to be beneficial to females subsisting on bird droppings, but not on honeydew—two natural food sources. We suggest that a main gut bacterium (Candidatus Erwinia dacicola) forms an inseparable, essential part of this fly's nutritional ecology. The evolution of this symbiosis has allowed adult flies to utilize food substrates which are low or imbalanced in assimilable nitrogen and thereby to overcome the nitrogen limitations of their natural diet. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. Source partitioning of anthropogenic groundwater nitrogen in a mixed-use landscape, Tutuila, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Christopher K.; El-Kadi, Aly I.; Dulai, Henrietta; Glenn, Craig R.; Fackrell, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    This study presents a modeling framework for quantifying human impacts and for partitioning the sources of contamination related to water quality in the mixed-use landscape of a small tropical volcanic island. On Tutuila, the main island of American Samoa, production wells in the most populated region (the Tafuna-Leone Plain) produce most of the island's drinking water. However, much of this water has been deemed unsafe to drink since 2009. Tutuila has three predominant anthropogenic non-point-groundwater-pollution sources of concern: on-site disposal systems (OSDS), agricultural chemicals, and pig manure. These sources are broadly distributed throughout the landscape and are located near many drinking-water wells. Water quality analyses show a link between elevated levels of total dissolved groundwater nitrogen (TN) and areas with high non-point-source pollution density, suggesting that TN can be used as a tracer of groundwater contamination from these sources. The modeling framework used in this study integrates land-use information, hydrological data, and water quality analyses with nitrogen loading and transport models. The approach utilizes a numerical groundwater flow model, a nitrogen-loading model, and a multi-species contaminant transport model. Nitrogen from each source is modeled as an independent component in order to trace the impact from individual land-use activities. Model results are calibrated and validated with dissolved groundwater TN concentrations and inorganic δ15N values, respectively. Results indicate that OSDS contribute significantly more TN to Tutuila's aquifers than other sources, and thus should be prioritized in future water-quality management efforts.

  5. Natural gas seeps in the French Alps: Sources and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Blessing, Michaela; Proust, Eric; Gal, Frédéric; Bentivegna, Gaetan; Henry, Benoit; Defossez, Pierrick; Catherine, Lerouge; Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Millot, Romain; Gaucher, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas emanations are part of the geochemical baseline to take into account when assessing global greenhouse gas emissions and potential impacts of conventional and unconventional gas exploration and exploitation on groundwater. Examples of such natural gas macro-seeps are known in several parts of the world (Etiope et al., 2009). Only a limited number of them have been characterized for their gas and isotopic compositions. Such analyses can provide essential information for baseline studies, providing insight in the sources (biogenic vs. thermogenic or modified thermogenic) and pathways of such seeps and may allow for distinction of natural seeps from stray gas leakage associated with human activities. Here, we report gas concentrations and multi-isotope data (δ13C and δ2H of methane and ethane, δ13C and δ18O of CO2, 3He/4He ratio) of two gas seeps in the French subalpine chains, both in a similar geological and structural position within Middle Jurassic claystones along the eastern border of the large synclinal structures of the Vercors and the Chartreuse massifs (Moss, 1992). The "ardent fountain" (fontaine ardente) of Le Gua, 30 km south of Grenoble has most likely the longest continuous written record of existence of any individual natural gas seep, mentioned explicitly as early as the first quarter of the 5th century (Augustin of Hippo (St. Augustin), approx. 426) This natural seep was described in the past as a "wet seep" associated with a spring, whereas the second investigated seep, Rochasson near Meylan north of Grenoble, is a dry seep. Both seeps contain methane and ethane with thermogenic C and H isotope signatures, comparable with a seep in the Northern Swiss Alps at Giswil (Etiope et al., 2010) but with a higher dryness (C1/(C2+C3)>1000) for the Le Gua seep, possibly due to molecular fractionation upon advective fluid+gas migration (Etiope et al., 2009). Maturity (R0) of the reservoir rocks deduced from δ13C(CH4), δ13C(C2H6) is similar to

  6. The effect of nitrogen source on photosynthesis of carob at high CO[sub 2] concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, C.; Martins-Loucao, M.A. (Depto. de Biologia Vegetal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)); Lips, S.H. (Desert Agrobiology Center, J. Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research, Gen-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer (Israel))

    1993-01-01

    Carob seedlings (Ceratonia siliqua L. cv. Mulata), fed with nitrate or ammonium, were grown in growth chambers containing two levels of CO[sub 2] (360 or 800 [mu]l l[sup -1]), three root temperatures (15, 20 or 25 deg. C), and the same shoot temperature (20/24 deg. C, night/day temperature). The response of the plants to CO[sub 2] enrichment was affected by environmental factors such as the type of inorganic nitrogen in the medium and root temperature. Increasing root temperature enhanced photosynthesis rate more in the presence of nitrate than in the presence of ammonium. Differences in photosynthetic products were also observed between nitrate- and ammonium-fed carob seedlings. Nitrate-grown plants showed an enhanced content of sucrose, while ammonium led to enhanced storage of starch. Increase in root temperature caused an increase in dry mass of the plants of similar proportions in both nitrogen sources. The enhancement of the rates of photosynthesis by CO[sub 2] enrichment was proportionally much larger than the resulting increases in dry mass production when nitrate was the nitrogen source. Ammonium was the preferred nitrogen source for carob at both ambient and high CO[sub 2] concentrations. The level of photosynthesis of a plant is limited not only by atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration but also by the nutritional and environmental conditions of the root. (au) (17 refs.)

  7. Carbon and Nitrogen Sources Influence Tricalcium Phosphate Solubilization and Extracellular Phosphatase Activity by Talaromyces flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoni Rubio, P J; Godoy, M S; Della Mónica, I F; Pettinari, M J; Godeas, A M; Scervino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study phosphate (P) solubilization (and the processes involved in this event) by Talaromyces flavus (BAFC 3125) as a function of carbon and/or nitrogen sources. P solubilization was evaluated in NBRIP media supplemented with different carbon (glucose, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose) and nitrogen (L-asparagine, urea, ammonium sulfate (AS), and ammonium nitrate (AN) combinations. The highest P solubilization was related to the highest organic acid production (especially gluconic acid) and pH drop for those treatments where glucose was present. Also P solubilization was higher when an inorganic nitrogen source was supplemented to the media when compared to an organic one. Although not being present an organic P source, phosphatase activity was observed. This shows that P mineralization and P solubilization can occur simultaneously, and that P mineralization is not induced by the enzyme substrate. The combination that showed highest P solubilization was for AN-glucose. The highest acid phosphatase activity was for AS-fructose, while for alkaline phosphatase were for AS-fructose and AN-fructose. Acid phosphatase activity was higher than alkaline. P solubilization and phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline) were influenced by the different carbon-nitrogen combinations. A better understanding of phosphate-solubilizing fungi could bring a better use of soil P.

  8. Ambient nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations over a region of natural gas production, Northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S. M. Nazrul; Jackson, Peter L.; Aherne, Julian

    2016-10-01

    The Peace River district of Northeastern British Columbia, Canada is a region of natural gas production that has undergone rapid expansion since 2005. In order to assess air quality implications, Willems badge passive diffusive samplers were deployed for six two-week exposure periods between August and November 2013, at 24 sites across the region to assess the ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The highest concentrations of both species (NO2: 9.1 ppb, SO2: 1.91 ppb) during the whole study period (except the 1st exposure period), were observed in Taylor (Site 14), which is consistent with its location near major industrial sources. Emissions from industrial activities, and their interaction with meteorology and topography, result in variations in atmospheric dispersion that can increase air pollution concentrations in Taylor. However, relatively high concentrations of NO2 were also observed near the center of Chetwynd (site F20), indicating the importance of urban emissions sources in the region as well. Observations of both species from the other study sites document the spatial variability and show relatively high concentrations near Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, where unconventional oil and gas development activities are quite high. Although a few sites in Northeastern British Columbia recorded elevated concentrations of NO2 and SO2 during this investigation, the concentrations over the three-month period were well below provincial annual ambient air quality objectives. Nonetheless, given the limited observations in the region, and the accelerated importance of unconventional oil and gas extraction in meeting energy demands, it is imperative that monitoring networks are established to further assess the potential for elevated ambient concentrations associated with industrial emissions sources in the Peace River region.

  9. Optimization of nitrogen source for Bifidobacterium bifidum using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the viable counts of Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 in the liquid medium, the Central Composite Design (CCD was used to optimize the nitrogen source in the medium of B. bifidum BB01. The results showed that the nitrogen source composition of B. bifidum BB01 was: peptone 0.9%, yeast extracts 0.3%, beef paste 0.7%. Under the optimal conditions, the viable counts of B. bifidum BB01 reached (2.49±0.06×109CFU/mL after cultured at 18h, which was 42.97% higher than MRS (lactose, and 12.85% higher than the optimized MRS medium (carbon source and prebiotics were optimized. Therefore, the CCD used in this study is workable for promoting the growth of B. bifidum BB01.

  10. Single-stage EHD thruster response to several simulation conditions in nitrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Victor H.; Pinheiro, Mario J.; Sá, Paulo A.

    2017-09-01

    We use a numerical model to investigate the influence of pressure from 0.5 Torr (66.7 Pa) to 100 Torr (13.3 kPa) and temperature (190-400 K) on the performance (thrust, fluid velocity, and thrust-to-power-ratio) of a single stage electrohydrodynamic thruster made of a rod anode and funnel-like cathode geometry, using nitrogen as the working gas. The model includes the following nitrogen species: N, N+, N2, N2+ , and N4+ . Additional factors are investigated: (i) the ballast resistance, (ii) the secondary electron emission from the cathode (in the range of 10-5 -10°), and (iii) the influence of the gap between electrodes on the discharge. As expected, higher pressures increase the net thrust, thrust efficiency, and peak gas velocity; however, with increasing temperatures, the trend reverses. We notice that gas flow velocity diminishes for the increasing values of the secondary emission coefficient, and it is possible to identify two working regimes presenting different behaviors: in the first region, for values of the secondary electron emission coefficient between 10-5 and 10-2 , thrust was not affected, and in the second region, between 10-2 and 1, a clear decrease in thrust is observed, accompanied by an increase in the discharge current, an undesired effect for the purpose of thrust production.

  11. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on diesel engine nitrogen oxide reduction operating with jojoba methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.E. [Mechanical Power Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mattaria, Helwan University, 9 k Eltaaweniat, Nasr Road, P.O. Box 11718, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-10-15

    Jojoba methyl ester (JME) has been used as a renewable fuel in numerous studies evaluating its potential use in diesel engines. These studies showed that this fuel is good gas oil substitute but an increase in the nitrogenous oxides emissions was observed at all operating conditions. The aim of this study mainly was to quantify the efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) when using JME fuel in a fully instrumented, two-cylinder, naturally aspirated, four-stroke direct injection diesel engine. The tests were carried out in three sections. Firstly, the measured performance and exhaust emissions of the diesel engine operating with diesel fuel and JME at various speeds under full load are determined and compared. Secondly, tests were performed at constant speed with two loads to investigate the EGR effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions including nitrogenous oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and exhaust gas temperatures. Thirdly, the effect of cooled EGR with high ratio at full load on engine performance and emissions was examined. The results showed that EGR is an effective technique for reducing NO{sub x} emissions with JME fuel especially in light-duty diesel engines. With the application of the EGR method, the CO and HC concentration in the engine-out emissions increased. For all operating conditions, a better trade-off between HC, CO and NO{sub x} emissions can be attained within a limited EGR rate of 5-15% with very little economy penalty. (author)

  12. Nitrogen as a carrier gas for regime control in focused electron beam induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachter Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID using a custom built gas injection system (GIS equipped with nitrogen as a gas carrier. We have deposited cobalt from Co2(CO8, which is usually achieved by a heated GIS. In contrast to a heated GIS, our strategy allows avoiding problems caused by eventual temperature gradients along the GIS. Moreover, the use of the gas carrier enables a high control over process conditions and consequently the properties of the synthesized nanostructures. Chemical composition and growth rate are investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and atomic force microscopy (AFM, respectively. We demonstrate that the N2 flux is strongly affecting the deposit growth rate without the need of heating the precursor in order to increase its vapour pressure. Particularly, AFM volume estimation of the deposited structures showed that increasing the nitrogen resulted in an enhanced deposition rate. The wide range of achievable precursor fluxes allowed to clearly distinguish between precursor- and electron-limited regime. With the carrier-based GIS an optimized deposition procedure with regards to the desired deposition regime has been enabled

  13. Effect of Nitrogen Shielding Gas on Laser Weldability of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Yoshida, Daisuke; Matsunawa, Akira

    YAG and CO2 laser weldability of Type 304 steel in nitrogen (N2) shielding gas was evaluated by investigating melting characteristics, porosity formation tendency, N content, microstructural characteristics and cracking sensitivity. Melting characteristics of weld beads produced below 4 kW were not so much different between YAG and CO2 laser. Porosity was remarkably reduced in any welds produced with nitrogen gas in comparison with normal welds made with Ar or He gas. This was attributed to the decrease in N content in a keyhole due to the reaction with evaporated Cr vapor as well as the absorption in the keyhole molten surface. The N contents absorbed in Type 304 weld fusion zones were larger under any welding conditions with CO2 laser than with YAG laser. On the other hand, in the case of several CO2 laser weld metals, solidification cracks occurred along the grain boundaries of a fully austenitic phase. Primary solidification of delta-ferrite phase normally took place in Type 304 weld metals, but a primary austenite phase was formed owing to the N enrichment, and micro-segregation of P and S increased along the grain boundaries. Consequently, cracking was induced by enhancement of cracking sensitivity due to a wider BTR. It was concluded that a great effect of nitrogen on the weldability of stainless steel was noted more remarkably in CO2 laser weld fusion zones than in YAG laser ones. It must be attributed to the N plasma formation leading to higher temperatures and consequent generation of more active N during CO2 laser welding.

  14. Abiotic nitrate loss and nitrogenous trace gas emission from Chinese acidic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajing; Cao, Wenchao; Zhang, Xinmu; Guo, Jingheng

    2017-08-16

    There are an increasing number of studies, which have shown the potential importance of abiotic denitrification in nitrogen biogeochemistry through pure chemical coupling between nitrate/nitrite reduction and Fe(II) oxidation. However, there is little direct evidence showing the environmental significance of abiotic nitrate (NO3(-)) reduction in acidic soils. We assessed the magnitude and gaseous product stoichiometry of abiotic nitrate reduction in acidic forest soils based on sterilized anoxic soil incubations at different soil pHs and nitrate loadings. The results showed that 24.9, 53.4, and 88.7% of added nitrate (70 mg N kg(-1)) were lost during 15 days incubation at pHs 3.9, 4.8, and 5.6, respectively. Nitrous oxide (N2O) was found as the dominant gaseous product of abiotic nitrate reduction, accounting for 5.0, 28.9, and 47.9% of nitrate losses at three pH levels, respectively. Minor but clear NO accumulations were observed for all nitrate-amended treatments, with the maxima at intermediate pH 4.8. The percentage of NO increased significantly with soil pH decline, leading to a negative correlation between NO/N2O ratio and soil pH. Though saturations were found under excessive nitrogen loading (i.e., 140 mg N kg(-1)), we still pose that abiotic nitrate reduction may represent a potentially important pathway for nitrate loss from acidic forest soils receiving nitrogen deposition. Our results here highlight the importance of abiotic nitrate reduction in the soil nitrogen cycle, with special relevance to nitrate removal and nitrogenous trace gas (NO and N2O) emissions from acidic soils.

  15. Direct analysis of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in plasma by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanille, P; Jourdil, N; Villier, C; Bessard, G

    1997-05-09

    A quantitative method for the simultaneous GC resolution and detection of fluoxetine and his metabolite norfluoxetine in human plasma was developed. The procedure required 1.0 ml of plasma, extraction with a mixed organic solvent and injection into a capillary gas chromatograph with an OV-1 fused-silica column coupled to a nitrogen-phosphorus detector. The calibration curves were linear over the range 5-3000 ng/ml. The detection limits were 0.3 and 2 ng/ml for fluoxetine and norfluoxetine, respectively. The assay is suitable for routine analysis.

  16. Degradation of o-chloronitrobenzene as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources by Pseudomonas putida OCNB-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Haizhen; WEI Chaohai; WAMG Yaqin; HE Qincong; LIANG Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    A bacterial strain that utilized o-chloronitrobenzene (o-CNB) as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy sources was isolated from an activated sludge collected from an industrial waste treatment plant. It was identified as Pseudomonas putida based on its morphology, physiological, and biochemical characteristics with an automatic biometrical system and the 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Microcosm study showed that the biodegradation of o-CNB was optimized at culture medium pH 8.0 and temperature of 32℃. At these conditions, the strain degraded 85% of o-CNB at a starting concentration of 1.1 mmol/L in 42 h. o-Chloroaniline was identified as the major metabolite with both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study showed that o-chloronitrobenzene degradation by Pseudomonas putida OCNB-1 was initiated by aniline dioxyenase, nitrobenzene reductase and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase.

  17. Black Nitrogen as a source for the built-up of microbial biomass in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, María; Milter, Anja; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    In areas with frequent wildfires, soil organic nitrogen (SON) is sequestered in pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) due to heat-induced transformation of proteinaceous compounds into N-heterocycles, i.e. pyrrole, imidazole and indole compounds. These newly formed structures, known as Black Nitrogen (BN), have been assumed to be hardly degradable by microorganisms, thus being efficiently sequestered from the N cycle. On the other hand, a previous study showed that nitrogen of BN can be used by plants for the built-up of their biomass (de la Rosa and Knicker 2011). Thus, BN may play an important role as an N source during the recovery of the forest after a fire event. In order to obtain a more profound understanding of the role of BN within the N cycle in soils, we studied the bioavailability and incorporation of N derived from PyOM into microbial amino acids. For that, pots with soil from a burnt and an unburnt Cambisol located under a Mediterranean forest were covered with different amendments. The toppings were mixtures of unlabeled KNO3 with 15N labeled grass or 15N-labeled PyOM from burned grass and K15NO3 mixed with unlabeled grass material or PyOM. The pots were kept in the greenhouse under controlled conditions for 16 months and were sampled after 0.5, 1, 5, 8 and 16 months. From all samples the amino acids were extracted after hydrolysis (6 M HCl, 22 h, 110 °C) and quantified via gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The fate of 15N was followed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The results show that the contribution of extractable amino acids to total soil organic matter was always higher in the unburnt than in the burnt soil. However, with ongoing incubation their amount decreased. Already after 0.5 months, some PyOM-derived 15N was incorporated into the extractable amino acids and the amount increased with experiment time. Since this can only occur after prior microbial degradation of PyOM our results clearly support a lower biochemical

  18. Tracking Nonpoint Source Nitrogen and Carbon in Watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Pennino, M. J.; Duan, S.; Blomquist, J.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have altered nitrogen and carbon cycles in rivers regionally with important impacts on coastal ecosystems. Nonpoint source nitrogen pollution is a leading contributor to coastal eutrophication and hypoxia. Shifts in sources of carbon impact downstream ecosystem metabolism and fate and transport of contaminants in coastal zones. We used a combination of stable isotopes and optical tracers to investigate fate and transport of nitrogen and carbon sources in tributaries of the largest estuary in the U.S., the Chesapeake Bay. We analyzed isotopic composition of water samples from major tributaries including the Potomac River, Susquehanna River, Patuxent River, and Choptank River during routine and storm event sampling over multiple years. A positive correlation between δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- in the Potomac River above Washington D.C. suggested denitrification or biological uptake in the watershed was removing agriculturally-derived N during summer months. In contrast, the Patuxent River in Maryland showed elevated δ15N-NO3- (5 - 12 per mil) with no relationship to δ18O-NO3- suggesting the importance of wastewater sources. From the perspective of carbon sources, there were distinct isotopic values of the δ13C-POM of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMS) for rivers influenced by their dominant watershed land use. EEMS showed that there were increases in the humic and fulvic fractions of dissolved organic matter during spring floods, particularly in the Potomac River. Stable isotopic values of δ13C-POM also showed rapid depletion suggesting terrestrial carbon "pulses" in the Potomac River each spring. The δ15N-POM peaked to 10 - 15 per mil each spring suggested a potential manure source or result of biological processing within the watershed. Overall, there were considerable changes in sources and transformations of nitrogen and carbon that varied across rivers and that contribute to nitrogen and carbon loads

  19. 'Water window' compact, table-top laser plasma soft X-ray sources based on a gas puff target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.co [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Rudawski, P.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    We have developed compact, high repetition, table-top soft-X-ray sources, based on a gas puff target, emitting in 'water window' spectral range at lambda = 2.88 nm from nitrogen gas target or, in 2-4 nm range of wavelengths, from argon gas target. Double stream gas puff target was pumped optically by commercial Nd:YAG laser, energy 0.74 J, pulse time duration 4 ns. Spatial distribution of laser-produced plasma was imaged using a pinhole camera. Using transmission grating spectrometer, argon and nitrogen emission spectra were obtained, showing strong emission in the 'water window' spectral range. Using AXUV100 detector the flux measurements of the soft-X-ray pulses were carried out and are presented. These debris free sources are table-top alternative for free electron lasers and synchrotron installations. They can be successfully employed in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology experiments among others.

  20. The potential of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Olley, Jon

    2013-04-01

    Moreton Bay, in South East Queensland, Australia, is a Ramsar wetland of international significance. A decline of the bay's ecosystem health has been primarily attributed to sediments and nutrients from catchment sources. Sediment budgets for three catchments indicated gully erosion dominates the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas erosion from cultivated soils is the primary sediment source in Blackfellow Creek. Sediment tracing with fallout-radionuclides confirmed subsoil erosion processes dominate the supply of sediment in Knapp Creek and the Upper Bremer River whereas in Blackfellow Creek cultivated and subsoil sources contribute >90% of sediments. Other sediment properties are required to determine the relative sediment contributions of channel bank, gully and cultivated sources in these catchments. The potential of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to conservatively discriminate between subsoil sediment sources is presented. The conservativeness of these sediment properties was examined through evaluating particle size variations in depth core soil samples and investigating whether they remain constant in source soils over two sampling occasions. Varying conservative behavior and source discrimination was observed. TN in the

  1. Winter Annual Weed Response to Nitrogen Sources and Application Timings prior to a Burndown Corn Herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autumn and early preplant N applications, sources, and placement may affect winter annual weed growth. Field research evaluated (1 the effect of different nitrogen sources in autumn and early preplant on total winter annual weed growth (2006–2010, and (2 strip-till and broadcast no-till N applied in autumn and early preplant on henbit (Lamium amplexicaule L. growth (2008–2010 prior to a burndown herbicide application. Total winter annual weed biomass was greater than the nontreated control when applying certain N sources in autumn or early preplant for no-till corn. Anhydrous ammonia had the lowest average weed density (95 weeds m−2, though results were inconsistent over the years. Winter annual weed biomass was lowest (43 g m−2 when applying 32% urea ammonium nitrate in autumn and was similar to applying anhydrous ammonia in autumn or early preplant and the nontreated control. Henbit biomass was 28% greater when applying N in the autumn compared to an early preplant application timing. Nitrogen placement along with associated tillage with strip-till placement was important in reducing henbit biomass. Nitrogen source selection, application timing, and placement affected the impact of N on winter annual weed growth and should be considered when recommending a burndown herbicide application timing.

  2. Influence of the nitrogen source on Saccharomyces cerevisiae anaerobic growth and product formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, E; Larsson, C; Lidén, G; Niklasson, C; Gustafsson, L

    1996-09-01

    To prevent the loss of raw material in ethanol production by anaerobic yeast cultures, glycerol formation has to be reduced. In theory, this may be done by providing the yeast with amino acids, since the de novo cell synthesis of amino acids from glucose and ammonia gives rise to a surplus of NADH, which has to be reoxidized by the formation of glycerol. An industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated in batch cultures with different nitrogen sources, i.e., ammonium salt, glutamic acid, and a mixture of amino acids, with 20 g of glucose per liter as the carbon and energy source. The effects of the nitrogen source on metabolite formation, growth, and cell composition were measured. The glycerol yields obtained with glutamic acid (0.17 mol/mol of glucose) or with the mixture of amino acids (0.10 mol/mol) as a nitrogen source were clearly lower than those for ammonium-grown cultures (0.21 mol/mol). In addition, the ethanol yield increased for growth on both glutamic acid (by 9%) and the mixture of amino acids (by 14%). Glutamic acid has a large influence on the formation of products; the production of, for example, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and acetic acid, increased compared with their production with the other nitrogen sources. Cultures grown on amino acids have a higher specific growth rate (0.52 h-1) than cultures of both ammonium-grown (0.45 h-1) and glutamic acid-grown (0.33 h-1) cells. Although the product yields differed, similar compositions of the cells were attained. The NADH produced in the amino acid, RNA, and extracellular metabolite syntheses was calculated together with the corresponding glycerol formation. The lower-range values of the theoretically calculated yields of glycerol were in good agreement with the experimental yields, which may indicate that the regulation of metabolism succeeds in the most efficient balancing of the redox potential.

  3. Urea as a Nitrogen Source in a Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon Closed Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supannee SUWANPAKDEE

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Urea [(NH22CO] is an organic compound that serves an important role in the metabolism of nitrogen-containing compound by animals. Urea is widely used in aquaculture systems. This study investigated the effects of urea on growth of Penaeus monodon. Shrimp were reared in 500 l fiber tanks. There was no exchange of water throughout the experiment. Shrimp with an average body weight of 10.99 ± 0.19 g were stocked at a density of 32 shrimp/m2 in 20 ppt diluted seawater and fed with 38 % protein diet for 9 weeks. Urea was added into the culture tanks at a concentration of 1.25 ppm once a week. The results show that urea slightly affects growth and survival of shrimp. Shrimp reared in the culture pond with added urea had a marginal better growth rate (p > 0.05 while the survival rate was significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.05. The urea in the closed culture tanks was shown to reduce the toxicity of ammonia in soil and promoted growth of plankton communities. Adding urea has no effect on water quality. This study concluded that urea is a potential nitrogen source in closed culture systems when the nitrogen input through the feeding regime is limited. It suggests that urea should be added at a concentration of 1.25 ppm once a week into culture systems with limiting nitrogen sources.

  4. Effects of Nitrogen source, empty bed residence time and inlet concentration on biofilter removal of chlorobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Can; Xi, Jin-Ying; Hu, Hong-Ying [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2009-04-15

    A new biofilter with bamboo carriers was used to remove gaseous chlorobenzene. Operating parameters such as the nitrogen source, the empty bed residence time (EBRT) and the inlet concentration of chlorobenzene were varied. The ability of the biofilter to remove chlorobenzene was evaluated under each set of conditions. The experimental results indicated that better biofilter performance was achieved using ammonium instead of nitrate nitrogen as the nitrogen source. However, an addition of excess ammonium did not further increase the removal efficiency. The optimal ratio of carbon to nitrogen supply (C/N) was 7:1-14:1. Increasing EBRT increased the biofilter efficiency from 0-20% (EBRT=24 s) to 30-50% (EBRT=41 s) and to 50-70% (EBRT=122 s). The relationship between removal efficiency and EBRT indicated that the removal of chlorobenzene is a pseudo first order kinetic process below the concentration of 400 mg/m{sup 3}. A substrate inhibition model, the Haldane equation, successfully described the removal rate of the biofilter at various inlet concentrations. With increasing inlet concentration, the removal rate initially rose and then declined. The highest removal rate of 18 g/m{sup 3} x h was achieved at an inlet concentration of 1440 mg/m{sup 3}. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases from rice production with simultaneous incorporation of wheat straw and nitrogen fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Longlong; Xia, Yongqiu; Ma, Shutan; Wang, Jinyang; Wang, Shuwei; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-01

    Impacts of simultaneous inputs of crop straw and nitrogen (N) fertilizer on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and N losses from rice production are not well understood. A 2-year field experiment was established in a rice-wheat cropping system in the Taihu Lake region (TLR) of China to evaluate the GHG intensity (GHGI) as well as reactive N intensity (NrI) of rice production with inputs of wheat straw and N fertilizer. The field experiment included five treatments of different N fertilization rates for rice production: 0 (RN0), 120 (RN120), 180 (RN180), 240 (RN240), and 300 kg N ha-1 (RN300, traditional N application rate in the TLR). Wheat straws were fully incorporated into soil before rice transplantation. The meta-analytic technique was employed to evaluate various Nr losses. Results showed that the response of rice yield to N rate successfully fitted a quadratic model, while N fertilization promoted Nr discharges exponentially (nitrous oxide emission, N leaching, and runoff) or linearly (ammonia volatilization). The GHGI of rice production ranged from 1.20 (RN240) to 1.61 kg CO2 equivalent (CO2 eq) kg-1 (RN0), while NrI varied from 2.14 (RN0) to 10.92 g N kg-1 (RN300). Methane (CH4) emission dominated the GHGI with a proportion of 70.2-88.6 % due to direct straw incorporation, while ammonia (NH3) volatilization dominated the NrI with proportion of 53.5-57.4 %. Damage costs to environment incurred by GHG and Nr releases from current rice production (RN300) accounted for 8.8 and 4.9 % of farmers' incomes, respectively. Cutting N application rate from 300 (traditional N rate) to 240 kg N ha-1 could improve rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency by 2.14 and 10.30 %, respectively, while simultaneously reducing GHGI by 13 %, NrI by 23 %, and total environmental costs by 16 %. Moreover, the reduction of 60 kg N ha-1 improved farmers' income by CNY 639 ha-1, which would provide them with an incentive to change the current N application rate. Our study suggests that GHG

  6. Plasma characterization of the gas-puff target source dedicated for soft X-ray microscopy using SiC detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Alfio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An Nd:YAG pulsed laser was employed to irradiate a nitrogen gas-puff target. The interaction gives rise to the emission of soft X-ray (SXR radiation in the ‘water window’ spectral range (λ= 2.3÷4.4 nm. This source was already successfully employed to perform the SXR microscopy. In this work, a Silicon Carbide (SiC detector was used to characterize the nitrogen plasma emission in terms of gas-puff target parameters. The measurements show applicability of SiC detectors for SXR plasma characterization.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly nitrogen-doped few-layer graphene via solid–gas reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xianqing, E-mail: lxq@gxu.edu.cn [College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhong, Jun [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Material and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Shi, Yalin; Guo, Jin; Huang, Guolong [College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Hong, Caihao; Zhao, Yidong [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A novel approach to synthesis of N-doped few-layer graphene has been developed. • The high doping levels of N in products are achieved. • XPS and XANES results reveal a thermal transformation of N bonding configurations. • The developed method is cost-effective and eco-friendly. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene sheets with high doping concentration were facilely synthesized through solid–gas reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with ammonia vapor in a self-designed hydrothermal system. The morphology, surface chemistry and electronic structure of N-doped graphene sheets were investigated by TEM, AFM, XRD, XPS, XANES and Raman characterizations. Upon hydrothermal treatment, up to 13.22 at% of nitrogen could be introduced into the crumpled few-layer graphene sheets. Both XPS and XANES analysis reveal that the reaction between oxygen functional groups in GO and ammonia vapor produces amide and amine species in hydrothermally treated GO (HTGO). Subsequent thermal annealing of the resultant HTGO introduces a gradual transformation of nitrogen bonding configurations in graphene sheets from amine N to pyridinic and graphitic N with the increase of annealing temperature. This study provides a simple but cost-effective and eco-friendly method to prepare N-doped graphene materials in large-scale for potential applications.

  8. Determination of Prometryn in Vetiver Grass and Water Using Gas Chromatography-Nitrogen Chemiluminescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shixian; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Ping; Punamiya, Pravin; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Dan, Youming; Ma, Junrong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD) is a nitrogen-specific detector that responds to ammonia, hydrazine, hydrogen cyanide and nitrogen oxide. A method to analyze the herbicide prometryn in plant and water samples was developed using gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with NCD. Extracts from plant (vetiver grass) and water matrices were analyzed for prometryn using an Agilent 7890A GC coupled with an Agilent 255 NCD in a split injection mode with a ratio of 2 : 1. Separation was carried out at 200°C and combustion at 1,018°C with H2 and O2 following optimized method development conditions. The percent recovery of prometryn in the two different matrices tested ranged from 81 to 107%, with relative standard deviations varying from 0.10 to 3.30% for spiked samples. Detection limit of the proposed method was 0.02 µg mL(-1) and the limit of quantification was 0.06 µg mL(-1). The proposed GC-NCD method was successfully applied to determine prometryn extracted from plant and water samples without potential interference of S-triazine, a pesticide from the same group. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Isotopic evidence on multiple sources of nitrogen in the northern Jiulong River, Southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenzhi; Huang, Zheng; Zhai, Weidong; Li, Ying; Hong, Huasheng

    2015-09-01

    Riverine export accounts for a large portion of estuarine and coastal nutrients and could lead to severe eutrophication. However, nitrogen (N) sources at the catchment scale remain unclear because of spatial and temporal variations. The stable isotope of 15N, which has been proven to be effective in deducing sources and testing biogeochemical behaviours, is applied in this study to explore multiple sources of riverine N and their nutrient concentrations in the northern section of Jiulong River catchment seasonally. Results show that drastic seasonal variation in external nitrate sources occurs in the river; manure and sewage dominate during base flows, whereas organic N in soil and atmospheric deposition dominate during storm flows. The external sources change throughout the year depending on the environmental conditions. Furthermore, riverine nitrate import in the northern Jiulong River is dominated by an external process because of the increasing NO3- - δ15N value accompanied by an increasing NO3- -N concentration (p management and eutrophication reversal.

  10. The impact of nitrogen source and crop rotation on nitrogen mass balances in the Mississippi River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesh, J; Drinkwater, L E

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) leaching to surface waters from grain farms in the Mississippi River Basin (MRB), USA, is the primary cause of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Regional-scale N mass balances indicate that a small, intensively cropped area of the upper MRB contributes disproportionately to nitrate loading. These aggregate balances miss small-scale variability, especially that caused by differences in farm management. We constructed N mass balances for a gradient of farm types, from corn-soybean monocultures to diversified grain farms that rely on biological N fixation (BNF) as a primary N source, to compare the relative efficiency of diverse farming systems in the MRB. Five-year N balances were calculated for a most and least productive field on each farm using data collected from interviews with 95 grain farmers in Iowa, Ohio, Minnesota, and Wisconsin; from legume biomass and corn grain samples collected from a subset of farms; and published values from the literature. Nitrogen balances ranged from high average annual surpluses (149 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) to large deficits (80 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), and differed based on N source and crop rotation. Fields with > 50% of total N additions from legume N sources and fields with complex crop rotations that included both annual and perennial species were approximately in balance (3.7 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1) and 5.7 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1), respectively) compared to fertilizer-based practices in corn-soybean rotations with average annual surpluses near 35 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1). Surplus N was also inversely related to the proportion of total N inputs from BNF for medium (80-160 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) to high (> 160 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) N rates. Diversified farmers were more likely to adjust their management practices in response to environmental variability compared to fertilizer-based farmers. Taken together, results from this study suggest that significantly reducing surplus N in agroecosystems will require reducing N

  11. 46 CFR 112.20-10 - Diesel or gas turbine driven emergency power source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diesel or gas turbine driven emergency power source. 112... Power Source § 112.20-10 Diesel or gas turbine driven emergency power source. Simultaneously with the operation of the transfer means under § 112.20-5, the diesel engine or gas turbine driving the...

  12. Biotransformation of Meloxicam by Cunninghamella blakesleeana: Significance of Carbon and Nitrogen Source

    OpenAIRE

    Shyam Prasad, Gurram; Narasimha Rao, Kollu; Preethi, Rama; Girisham, Sivasri; S. M. Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Influence of carbon and nitrogen source, on biotransformation of meloxicam was studied by employing Cunninghamella blakesleeana NCIM 687 with an aim to achieve maximum transformation of meloxicam and in search of new metabolites. The transformation was confirmed by HPLC and based on LC–MS–MS data and previous reports the metabolites were predicted as 5-hydroxymethyl meloxicam, 5-carboxy meloxicam and a novel metabolite. The quantification of metabolites was performed using HPLC peak areas. Th...

  13. Petroleum Pollution Bioremediation Using Water-Insoluble Uric Acid as the Nitrogen Source

    OpenAIRE

    Koren, Omry; Knezevic, Vishnia; Ron, Eliora Z.; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    The biodegradation of hydrocarbon pollutants in open systems is limited by the availability of a utilizable nitrogen source. This limitation can be overcome by using uric acid. Enrichment cultures grown on crude oil-uric acid media yielded mixed and pure cultures that degraded petroleum. In a simulated open system, uric acid bound to crude oil and was available for bacterial growth and petroleum biodegradation.

  14. Continental and marine sources of organic matter and nitrogen for rías of northern Galicia (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Bode, Antonio; Varela, Manuel; Prego, R.

    2011-01-01

    Sources of organic matter and nitrogen to the rías of Ortigueira, O Barqueiro and Viveiro (Galicia, N Spain) were traced using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Samples of water, seston, benthic organisms and sediments were collected in summer 2007 and 2008. Instantaneous sources were inferred from the concentrations and isotopic composition of seston, while averaged sources over longer time scales (months) were inferred from stable isotopes in macrophytes (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus...

  15. Transition Metal-Participated Synthesis and Utilization of N-containing Heterocycles: Exploring for Nitrogen Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingchun; Xu, Bin

    2016-06-01

    This account aims to describe our recent efforts on the synthesis and utilization of N-containing heterocycles, where transition metals participate in the synthesis. A variety of nitrogen sources, including amines, amides, hydrazones, pyrimidines, isocyanides, and copper nitrate, have been disclosed for the synthesis of diverse bioactive and pharmacologically interesting N-containing heterocycles under the participation of transition metals. The well-known nitrogen sources, such as amines and amides, were used for the construction of indoles, isatins, and quinolones. Dihydrophthalazines, isoquinolines, indazoles, and pyrazoles were obtained from hydrazones, while various pyrimidine-containing heterocycles were afforded through regioselective C-H functionalizations using pyrimidine as the directing group. Recent research has focused on the chemistry of isocyanides to achieve several kinds of heterocyclic compounds with high efficiency under the catalysis of transition metals (Pd, Rh, Mn, Cu), through oxidative cyanation reactions, sequential isocyanide insertions into C-H, N-H, or O-H bonds, and tandem radical annulation. More recently, an efficient route to isoxazolines has been reported using copper nitrate as a novel nitrogen source.

  16. Combined Gas-Liquid Plasma Source for Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, V. S.; Kiris, V. V.; Nevar, A. A.; Nedelko, M. I.; Tarasenko, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    A gas-liquid plasma source for the synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles by spark erosion of the electrode material was developed and allowed the particle synthesis regime to be varied over a wide range. The source parameters were analyzed in detail for the electrical discharge conditions in water. The temperature, particle concentration, and pressure in the discharge plasma were estimated based on spectroscopic analysis of the plasma. It was found that the plasma parameters did not change signifi cantly if the condenser capacitance was increased from 5 to 20 nF. Purging the electrode gap with argon reduced substantially the pressure and particle concentration. Signifi cant amounts of water decomposition products in addition to electrode elements were found in the plasma in all discharge regimes. This favored the synthesis of oxide nanoparticles.

  17. Design and operation results of nitrogen gas baking system for KSTAR plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Tae [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Jin, E-mail: k43689@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Nam-Yong; Im, Dong-Seok; Kim, Kang-Pyo; Kim, Kyung-Min; Bang, Eun-Nam; Kim, Yaung-Soo [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seong-Yeon [Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Vacuum pressure in a vacuum vessel arrived at 7.24 × 10{sup −8} mbar. • PFC temperature was reached maximum 250 °C by gas temperature at 300 °C. • PFC inlet gas temperature was changed 5 °C per hour during rising and falling. • PFC gas balancing was made temperature difference among them below 8.3 °C. • System has a pre-cooler and a three-way valve to save operation energy. -- Abstract: A baking system for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma facing components (PFCs) is designed and operated to achieve vacuum pressure below 5 × 10{sup −7} mbar in vacuum vessel with removing impurities. The purpose of this research is to prevent the fracture of PFC because of thermal stress during baking the PFC, and to accomplish stable operation of the baking system with the minimum life cycle cost. The uniformity of PFC temperature in each sector was investigated, when the supply gas temperature was varied by 5 °C per hour using a heater and the three-way valve at the outlet of a compressor. The alternative of the pipe expansion owing to hot gas and the cage configuration of the three-way valve were also studied. During the fourth campaign of the KSTAR in 2011, nitrogen gas temperature rose up to 300 °C, PFC temperature reached at 250 °C, the temperature difference among PFCs was maintained at below 8.3 °C, and vacuum pressure of up to 7.24 × 10{sup −8} mbar was achieved inside the vacuum vessel.

  18. Analyzing the contribution of climate change to long-term variations in sediment nitrogen sources for reservoirs/lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinghui; Wu, Qiong; Zhu, Baotong; Zhao, Pujun; Zhang, Shangwei; Yang, Lingyan

    2015-08-01

    We applied a mixing model based on stable isotopic δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and C:N ratios to estimate the contributions of multiple sources to sediment nitrogen. We also developed a conceptual model describing and analyzing the impacts of climate change on nitrogen enrichment. These two models were conducted in Miyun Reservoir to analyze the contribution of climate change to the variations in sediment nitrogen sources based on two (210)Pb and (137)Cs dated sediment cores. The results showed that during the past 50years, average contributions of soil and fertilizer, submerged macrophytes, N2-fixing phytoplankton, and non-N2-fixing phytoplankton were 40.7%, 40.3%, 11.8%, and 7.2%, respectively. In addition, total nitrogen (TN) contents in sediment showed significant increasing trends from 1960 to 2010, and sediment nitrogen of both submerged macrophytes and phytoplankton sources exhibited significant increasing trends during the past 50years. In contrast, soil and fertilizer sources showed a significant decreasing trend from 1990 to 2010. According to the changing trend of N2-fixing phytoplankton, changes of temperature and sunshine duration accounted for at least 43% of the trend in the sediment nitrogen enrichment over the past 50years. Regression analysis of the climatic factors on nitrogen sources showed that the contributions of precipitation, temperature, and sunshine duration to the variations in sediment nitrogen sources ranged from 18.5% to 60.3%. The study demonstrates that the mixing model provides a robust method for calculating the contribution of multiple nitrogen sources in sediment, and this study also suggests that N2-fixing phytoplankton could be regarded as an important response factor for assessing the impacts of climate change on nitrogen enrichment.

  19. Short term responses of nitrogen trace gas emissions to nitrogen fertilization in tropical sugar cane: Variations due to soils and management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, P. A.; Billow, C.; Hall, S.; Zachariassen, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization of agricultural systems is thought to be a major source of the increase in atmospheric N2O; NO emissions from soils have also been shown to increase due to N fertilization. While N fertilizer use is increasing rapidly in the developing world and in the tropics, nearly all of our information on gas emissions is derived from studies of temperate zone agriculture. Using chambers, we measured fluxes of N2O and NO following urea fertilization in tropical sugar cane systems growing on a variety of soil types in the Hawaiian Islands, USA. On the island of Maui, where urea is applied in irrigation lines and soils are mollisols and inceptisols, N2O fluxes were elevated for a week or less following fertilization; maximum average fluxes were typically less than 30 ng cm(exp -2)/ h. NO fluxes were often an order of magnitude less than N2O. Together, N2O and NO represented from 0.01 - 0.5% of the applied N. In fields on the island of Hawaii, where urea is broadcast on the surface and soils are andisols, N2O fluxes were similar in magnitude to Maui but remained elevated for much longer periods after fertilization. NO emissions were 2-5 times higher than N2O through most of the sampling periods. Together the gases loss represented approximately 1. 1 - 3% of the applied N. Laboratory studies indicate that denitrification is a critical source of N2O in Maui, but that nitrification is more important in Hawaii. Experimental studies suggest that differences in the pattern of N2O/NO and the processes producing them are a result of both carbon availability and placement of fertilizer, and that the more information-intensive fertilizer management practice results in lower emissions.

  20. How phosphorus limitation can control climatic gas sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gypens, Nathalie; Borges, Alberto V.; Ghyoot, Caroline

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1950's, anthropogenic activities severely increased river nutrient loads in European coastal areas. Subsequent implementation of nutrient reduction policies have considerably reduced phosphorus (P) loads from mid-1980's, while nitrogen (N) loads were maintained, inducing a P limitation of phytoplankton growth in many eutrophied coastal areas such as the Southern Bight of the North Sea (SBNS). When dissolved inorganic phosphorous (DIP) is limiting, most phytoplankton organisms are able to indirectly acquire P from dissolved organic P (DOP). We investigate the impact of DOP use on the importance of phytoplankton production and atmospheric fluxes of CO2 and dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the SBNS from 1951 to 2007 using an extended version of the R-MIRO-BIOGAS model. This model includes a description of the ability of phytoplankton organisms to use DOP as a source of P. Results show that primary production can increase up to 70% due to DOP uptake in limiting DIP conditions. Consequently, simulated DMS emissions double while CO2 emissions to the atmosphere decrease, relative to the reference simulation without DOP uptake. At the end of the simulated period (late 2000's), the net direction of air-sea CO2 annual flux, changed from a source to a sink for atmospheric CO2 in response to use of DOP and increase of primary production.

  1. Mapping Fugitive Gas Emission Sources and Severity Across Southeastern Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, J.; Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Williams, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada contains a 10,000 km2 region heavily developed by oil and gas activity that has been struggling with air quality issues, arising from hundreds or thousands of oil and gas leak points. The region is also very diverse in terms of oilfield operators, who use extraction techniques including conventional, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and fracking. As regulators and operators need more knowledge about emission patterns locally, we undertook comprehensive mapping and characterization of leak sources at the regional scale using vehicle-based data collection, together with computational techniques. We measured the presence and source of fugitive emissions from infrastructure and oilfield activities in eight 100 km2 survey domains. These included two controls with no oil and gas activity, and otherwise the domains were selected to capture the diversity of development; targeting primarily conventional and EOR activities in the Weyburn-Midale beds, and unconventional activities in the Bakken play. A total of 25 unique operators fell within the survey domains. Each domain was surveyed multiple times for CO2, CH4, and H2S, allowing us to identify persistent leaks and to screen out one-time events. The multiple gas targets also provided opportunities for discriminating one type of fugitive emission from another (i.e. flares from storage tanks) using ratios of excess (above ambient) concentrations, after correcting for natural background variability with a signal-processing routine. Fugitive emissions were commonly observed in all study domains. Most emissions were associated with oil and gas infrastructure, as opposed to drilling and other short-term activities. There were obvious emissions at many well pads, storage tanks, and flares. We also observed high geochemical variability around flares, with some being very effective in combusting toxic gases, and others less so. Almost all observed concentrations fell below regulatory limits, but have a

  2. CO₂ from alcoholic fermentation for continuous cultivation of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis in tubular photobioreactor using urea as nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudo, Marcelo C; Bezerra, Raquel P; Converti, Attilio; Sato, Sunao; Carvalho, João Carlos M

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide released from alcoholic fermentation accounts for 33% of the whole CO(2) involved in the use of ethanol as fuel derived from glucose. As Arthrospira platensis can uptake this greenhouse gas, this study evaluates the use of the CO(2) released from alcoholic fermentation for the production of Arthrospira platensis. For this purpose, this cyanobacterium was cultivated in continuous process using urea as nitrogen source, either using CO(2) from alcoholic fermentation, without any treatment, or using pure CO(2) from cylinder. The experiments were carried out at 120 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) in tubular photobioreactor at different dilution rates (0.2 ≤ D ≤ 0.8 d(-1) ). Using CO(2) from alcoholic fermentation, maximum steady-state cell concentration (2661 ± 71 mg L(-1) ) was achieved at D = 0.2 d(-1) , whereas higher dilution rate (0.6 d(-1) ) was needed to maximize cell productivity (839 mg L(-1) d(-1) ). This value was 10% lower than the one obtained with pure CO(2) , and there was no significant difference in the biomass protein content. With D = 0.8 d(-1) , it was possible to obtain 56% ± 1.5% and 50% ± 1.2% of protein in the dry biomass, using pure CO(2) and CO(2) from alcoholic fermentation, respectively. These results demonstrate that the use of such cost free CO(2) from alcoholic fermentation as carbon source, associated with low cost nitrogen source, may be a promising way to reduce costs of continuous cultivation of photosynthetic microorganisms, contributing at the same time to mitigate the greenhouse effect.

  3. Selection of Suitable Carbon, Nitrogen and Sulphate Source for the Production of Alkaline Protease by Bacillus licheniformis NCIM-2042

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath BHUNIA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, selection of suitable carbon, nitrogen and sulphate sources were carried out by one-variable-at-time approach for the production of alkaline protease enzyme by Bacillus licheniformis NCIM-2042. Maximum levels of alkaline protease were found in culture media supplemented with magnesium sulphate, starch and soybean meal as a good sulphate, carbon and nitrogen sources which influenced the maximum yield of this enzyme (137.694.57, 135.231.73 and 134.741.77, respectively in comparison with the other sulphate, carbon and nitrogen sources.

  4. Selection of Suitable Carbon, Nitrogen and Sulphate Source for the Production of Alkaline Protease by Bacillus licheniformis NCIM-2042

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath BHUNIA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, selection of suitable carbon, nitrogen and sulphate sources were carried out by one-variable-at-time approach for the production of alkaline protease enzyme by Bacillus licheniformis NCIM-2042. Maximum levels of alkaline protease were found in culture media supplemented with magnesium sulphate, starch and soybean meal as a good sulphate, carbon and nitrogen sources which influenced the maximum yield of this enzyme (137.69�4.57, 135.23�1.73 and 134.74�1.77, respectively in comparison with the other sulphate, carbon and nitrogen sources.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a bacterium which utilizes polyester polyurethane as a sole carbon and nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima-Kambe, T; Onuma, F; Kimpara, N; Nakahara, T

    1995-06-01

    Various soil samples were screened for the presence of microorganisms which have the ability to degrade polyurethane compounds. Two strains with good polyurethane degrading activity were isolated. The more active strain was tentatively identified as Comamonas acidovorans. This strain could utilize polyester-type polyurethanes but not the polyether-type polyurethanes as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Adipic acid and diethylene glycol were probably the main degradation products when polyurethane was supplied as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. When ammonium nitrate was used as nitrogen source, only diethylene glycol was detected after growth on polyurethane.

  6. β-Glucan production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in medium with different nitrogen sources in air-lift fermentor

    OpenAIRE

    AHMAD THONTOWI; KUSMIATI; SUKMA NUSWANTARA

    2007-01-01

    β-Glucan is one of the most abundant polysaccharides in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall. The aim of this research is to explore an alternative nitrogen sources for β-glucan production. S. cerevisiae were grown in fermentation medium with different nitrogen sources. Peptone 2%, glutamic acid 0,5%, urea 0,2%, and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAHP) 0,02% were used for nitrogen source in the medium. A two liter air-lift fermentor was used in the fermentation process for 84 hours (T = 3...

  7. The nitrogen source impacts major volatile compounds released by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Catarina; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2012-11-15

    Sulphur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine, are generally found in very low concentrations in grape-juice. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of methionine on aroma compounds formation. Nitrogen source effects on growth, fermentative behaviour and aroma compounds formation were evaluated in three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in batch under moderate nitrogen concentration, 267mg YAN/L, supplied as di-ammonium phosphate (DAP), a mixture of amino acids with (AA) or without methionine (AA(wMet)), and a mixture of AA plus DAP. Fermentative vigour and final biomass yields were dependent on the nitrogen source, for each of the strains tested, in particular for EC1118. Additionally, despite the strain-dependent behaviour with respect to the basal level of H(2)S produced, the comparison of treatments AA and AA(wMet) showed that presence of methionine suppressed H(2)S production in all strains tested, and altered aroma compound formation, particularly some of those associated with fruity and floral characters which were consistently more produced in AA(wMet). Moreover, DAP supplementation resulted in a remarkable increase in H(2)S formation, but no correlation between sulphide produced and yeast fermentative vigour was observed. Results suggest that the use of different nitrogen sources results in the production of wines with divergent aroma profiles, most notably when EC1118 strain is used. Methionine determination and its management prior to fermentation are crucial for suppressing H(2)S and to endowing beverages with diverse sensory traits.

  8. Diversification of Nitrogen Sources in Various Tundra Vegetation Types in the High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Wojtuń, Bronisław; Richter, Dorota; Jakubas, Dariusz; Wojczulanis-Jakubas, Katarzyna; Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Low nitrogen availability in the high Arctic represents a major constraint for plant growth, which limits the tundra capacity for carbon retention and determines tundra vegetation types. The limited terrestrial nitrogen (N) pool in the tundra is augmented significantly by nesting seabirds, such as the planktivorous Little Auk (Alle alle). Therefore, N delivered by these birds may significantly influence the N cycling in the tundra locally and the carbon budget more globally. Moreover, should these birds experience substantial negative environmental pressure associated with climate change, this will adversely influence the tundra N-budget. Hence, assessment of bird-originated N-input to the tundra is important for understanding biological cycles in polar regions. This study analyzed the stable nitrogen composition of the three main N-sources in the High Arctic and in numerous plants that access different N-pools in ten tundra vegetation types in an experimental catchment in Hornsund (Svalbard). The percentage of the total tundra N-pool provided by birds, ranged from 0-21% in Patterned-ground tundra to 100% in Ornithocoprophilous tundra. The total N-pool utilized by tundra plants in the studied catchment was built in 36% by birds, 38% by atmospheric deposition, and 26% by atmospheric N2-fixation. The stable nitrogen isotope mixing mass balance, in contrast to direct methods that measure actual deposition, indicates the ratio between the actual N-loads acquired by plants from different N-sources. Our results enhance our understanding of the importance of different N-sources in the Arctic tundra and the used methodological approach can be applied elsewhere.

  9. Effect of nitrogen sources on some morphological characteristics of in vitro stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, F; Arminian, A; Kahrizi, D; Fazeli, A

    2017-02-28

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni belongs to Asteraceae family that leaves 200-300 times sweeter than sugar. Low seed fertility is one of the most important problems in Stevia production. So, Plant tissue culture is an efficient method for mass propagation of Stevia. In this research, we studied the effect of various concentrations of nitrogen on some morphological traits of stevia under in vitro conditions. We used axillary nodes as explants and they were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing inorganic nitrogen sources i.e. NH4NO3(0, 825 and 1650 mg/l), KNO3(0, 950 and 1900 mg/l) were observed. The cultures were kept for 4 weeks at a temperature of 25±2°C with a photoperiod of 16/8 hour low light/dark each day. Maximum shoot length (89.33 mm), dry weight of plants (0.10 mg) and leaf fresh weight (0.42 mg) was observed on MS medium with 1650 mg/l NH4NO3 and 950 mg/l KNO3. Minimum shoot length (6.13 mm), root length (6.60 mm), leaf number (4.26), leaf dry weight (0.01 mg), leaf fresh weight (0.05 mg), total dry and fresh weight (0.02 and 0.15 mg) and growth rate was observed on a MS medium without nitrogen sources. Moreover, presence of nitrogen sources increases both shooting and rooting in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

  10. Assessment of Eutrophication in Estuaries: Pressure-State-Response and Nitrogen Source Apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitall, David; Bricker, Suzanne; Ferreira, Joao; Nobre, Ana M.; Simas, Teresa; Silva, Margarida

    2007-10-01

    A eutrophication assessment method was developed as part of the National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment (NEEA) Program. The program is designed to improve monitoring and assessment of eutrophication in the estuaries and coastal bays of the United States with the intent to guide management plans and develop analytical and research models and tools for managers. These tools will help guide and improve management success for estuaries and coastal resources. The assessment method, a Pressure-State-Response approach, uses a simple model to determine Pressure and statistical criteria for indicator variables (where applicable) to determine State. The Response determination is mostly heuristic, although research models are being developed to improve that component. The three components are determined individually and then combined into a single rating. Application to several systems in the European Union (E.U.), specifically in Portugal, shows that the method is transferable, and thus is useful for development of management measures in both the Unites States and E.U. This approach identifies and quantifies the key anthropogenic nutrient input sources to estuaries so that management measures can target inputs for maximum effect. Because nitrogen is often the limiting nutrient in estuarine systems, examples of source identification and quantification for nitrogen have been developed for 11 coastal watersheds on the U.S. east coast using the WATERSN model. In general, estuaries in the Northeastern United States receive most of their nitrogen from human sewage, followed by atmospheric deposition. This is in contrast to some watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic (Chesapeake Bay) and South Atlantic (Pamlico Sound), which receive most of their nitrogen from agricultural runoff. Source identification is important for implementing effective management measures that should be monitored for success using assessment methods, as described herein. For instance, these results suggest that

  11. Effect of nitrogen sources on the activities of lipogenic enzymes in oleaginous fungus Cunninghamella echinulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certik, Milan; Megova, Jana; Horenitzky, Robert

    1999-12-01

    Various inorganic and organic nitrogen sources were used to compare their effects on the lipogenesis and the activities of lipogenic enzymes (providing acetyl-CoA and donating NADPH) in gamma-linolenic acid-producing fungus Cunninghamella echinulata. Lipid accumulation was enhanced by organic nitrogen, among them the presence of corn-steep led to almost 40% oil in the biomass. While organic nitrogen increased activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and malic enzyme (ME), ATP:citrate lyase (ACL) was rapidly enhanced by ammonium ion. The use of NaNO(3) resulted in high activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD). NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICD) was more active when the fungus utilized all inorganic N-compounds. The rise of nitrogen concentration in medium was accompanied with reduced lipid accumulation and a fall of ACL, ACC, and ME. In contrast, N-sufficient conditions favored biomass growth and elevated activities of GPD and PGD. Kinetic experiments also suggest that a significant portion of the required acetyl-CoA was being provided via ACL and ACC, and ME (probably coupled with GPD) channeled the NADPH into the fatty acid biosynthesis. The contribution of the lipogenic enzymes to metabolic pathways other than lipogenesis is also discussed.

  12. Potential sources of nitrogen in an ant-garden tank-bromeliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Céline; Corbara, Bruno; Dejean, Alain; Céréghino, Régis

    2009-09-01

    Epiphytic plants in general and bromeliads in particular live in a water and nutrient-stressed environment often limited in nitrogen. Thus, these plants have developed different ways to survive in such an environment. We focused on Aechmea mertensii (Bromeliaceae), which is both a tank-bromeliad and an ant-garden (AG) epiphyte initiated by either the ants Camponotus femoratus or Pachycondyla goeldii. By combining a study of plant morphology and physiology associated with aquatic insect biology, we demonstrate that the ant species influences the leaf structure of the bromeliad, the structure of the aquatic community in its tank, and nutrient assimilation by the leaves. Based on nitrogen and nitrogen stable isotope measurements of the A. mertensii leaves, the leaf litter inside of the tank and the root-embedded carton nest, we discuss the potential sources of available nitrogen for the plant based on the ant partner. We demonstrate the existence of a complex ant-plant interaction that subsequently affects the biodiversity of a broader range of organisms that are themselves likely to influence nutrient assimilation by the A. mertensii leaves in a kind of plant-invertebrate-plant feedback loop.

  13. Nitrogen fertilization in corn with urea coated with different sources of polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Valderrama

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of theoretic increase in efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers for controlled release, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of nitrogen, using conventional urea and ureas coated by different polymers, in the leaf N content, leaf chlorophyll index, components production and grain yield of irrigated corn in growing season and second crop in the savannah region. The experiments were conducted at experimental area belonging to UNESP – Ilha Solteira, located in Selvíria – MS in a dystrophic Red Latosol (Haplustox, clayey texture. The statistical design was randomized blocks, with four repetitions, in a 4 x 4 factorial arrangement, being four nitrogen doses (0, 40, 80 and 120 kg ha-1 applied at sidedressing and four urea sources (a conventional urea and three coated with polymers in different compositions and concentrations. The coated ureas are not efficient under the soil and climate conditions studied of the savanna, because they provided results similar to the conventional urea for the production components and grain yield of corn in the first and second crop. The increment of nitrogen doses increase linearly the leaf N content and grain yield of corn in the first and second crop.

  14. Within-city contrasts in PM composition and sources and their relationship with nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, M C; Rivas, I; Aguilera, I; Alastuey, A; Moreno, T; Amato, F; Sunyer, J; Querol, X

    2012-10-26

    The present work is part of the INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente -'Environment and Childhood') project, which aims at assessing the adverse effects of exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and early in life. The present study was performed in the city of Sabadell (Northeast Spain) at three sampling sites covering different traffic characteristics, during two times of the year. It assesses time and spatial variations of PM(2.5) concentrations, chemical components and source contributions, as well as gaseous pollutants. Furthermore, a cross-correlation analysis of PM components and source contributions with gaseous pollutants used as a proxy for exposure assessment is carried out. Our data show the influence of traffic emissions in the Sabadell area. The main PM sources identified by Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) were similar between the two seasons: mineral source (traffic-induced resuspension, demolition/construction and natural background), secondary sulphate (higher in summer), secondary nitrate (only during winter), industrial, and road traffic, which was the main contributor to PM(2.5) at two of the sites. The correlation of concentrations of nitrogen oxides was especially strong with those of elemental carbon (EC). The relatively weaker correlations with organic carbon (OC) in summer are attributed to the variable formation of secondary OC. Strong correlations between concentration of nitrogen oxides and PM(2.5) road traffic contributions obtained from source apportionment analysis were seen at all sites. Therefore, under the studied urban environment, nitrogen oxides can be used as a proxy for the exposure to road traffic contribution to PM(2.5); the use of NO(x) concentrations being preferred, with NO and NO(2) as second and third options, respectively.

  15. Influence of the nitrogen gas addition in the Ar shielding gas on the erosion-corrosion of tube-to-tube sheet welds of hyper duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Park, Yong-Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Duplex stainless steels with nearly equal fraction of the ferrite(α) phase and austenite(γ) phase have been increasingly used for various applications such as power plants, desalination facilities due to their high resistance to corrosion, good weldability, and excellent mechanical properties. Hyper duplex stainless steel (HDSS) is defined as the future duplex stainless steel with a pitting resistance equivalent (PRE= wt.%Cr+3.3(wt.%Mo+0.5wt.%W)+30wt.%N) of above 50. However, when HDSS is welded with gas tungsten arc (GTA), incorporation of nitrogen in the Ar shielding gas are very important because the volume fraction of α-phase and γ-phase is changed and harmful secondary phases can be formed in the welded zone. In other words, the balance of corrosion resistance between two phases and reduction of Cr{sub 2}N are the key points of this study. The primary results of this study are as follows. The addition of N{sub 2} to the Ar shielding gas provides phase balance under weld-cooling conditions and increases the transformation temperature of the α-phase to γ-phase, increasing the fraction of γ-phase as well as decreasing the precipitation of Cr2N. In the anodic polarization test, the addition of nitrogen gas in the Ar shielding gas improved values of the electrochemical parameters, compared to the Pure Ar. Also, in the erosion-corrosion test, the HDSS welded with shielding gas containing N{sub 2} decreased the weight loss, compared to HDSS welded with the Ar pure gas. This result showed the resistance of erosion-corrosion was increased due to increasing the fraction of γ-phase and the stability of passive film according to the addition N{sub 2} gas to the Ar shielding gas. As a result, the addition of nitrogen gas to the shielding gas improved the resistance of erosion-corrosion.

  16. Source-Contacting Gas:Accumulation Mechanism and Distribution in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jinchuan; Jin Zhijun; Liu Lifang; Wang Zhixin; Xue Hui; Pu Jun

    2004-01-01

    Source-contacting gas, which is also called basin-center gas, deep basin gas, is the tight-sand gas accumulation contacting closely to its source rocks. Having different accumulation mechanisms from conventional gas reservoirs that are formed by replacement way, the typical source-contacting gas reservoirs are formed by piston-typed migration forward way. Source-contacting gas accumulations exhibit a series of distinctly mechanic characteristics. According to the valid combination of these characteristics, the estimation for the type of discovered gas reservoirs or distributions of source-contacting gas reservoirs can be forecasted. The source-contacting gas is special for having no edge water or bottom water for gas and complicated gas-water relationships, which emphasizes the intimate association of reservoir rocks with source rocks, which is called the root of the gas reservoir. There are many basins having the mechanic conditions for source-contacting gas accumulations in China, which can be divided into three regions. Most of the basins with favorable accumulation conditions are located mainly in the central and western China. According to the present data, basins having source-contacting gas accumulations in China can be divided into three types, accumulation conditions and configuration relationships are the best in type A basins and they are the larger basins in central China. Type B basins with plain accumulation conditions exist primarily in eastern China and also the basins in western China. Accumulation conditions and exploration futures are worse in type C basins, which refer mainly to the small basins in southern China and China Sea basins. Main source-contacting gas basins in China are thoroughly discussed in this paper and the distribution patterns of source-contacting gas in five huge basins are discussed and forecasted.

  17. Loss coefficient of nitrogenous non-point source pollution under various precipitation conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study,calibrations of non-point source (NPS) pollution models are performed based on Black River basin historical real-time runoff data,sedimentation record data,and NPS sources survey information.The concept of NPS loss coefficient for the watershed or the loss coefficients (LC) for simplicity is brought up by examining NPS build-up and migration processes along riverbanks in natural river systems.The historical data is used for determining the nitrogenous NPS loss coefficient for five land use types including farmland,urban land,grassland,shrub land,and forest under different precipitation conditions.The comparison of outputs from Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model and coefficient export method showed that both methods could obtain reasonable LC.The high Pearson correlation coefficient (0.94722) between those two sets of calculation results justified the consistency of those two models.Another result in the study is that different combinations of precipitation condition and land use types could significantly affect the calculated loss coefficient.As for the adsorptive nitrogen,the order of impact on LC for different land use types can be sorted as:farm land > urban land > grassland > shrub land > forest while the order was farmland > grass land > shrub land > forest > urban land for soluble nitrogen.

  18. A New Approach for Removal of Nitrogen Oxides from Synthetic Gas-streams under High Concentration of Oxygen in Biofilters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Bin HUANG; Ju Guang ZHANG; He Ping HU; Yue SITU

    2005-01-01

    The potential of using denitrifying and nitrifying concurrent biofilters for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic gas streams was studied under the condition of high oxygen concentration. It was found that more than 85% of nitric oxide was removed from synthetic combustion gas-streams which contained 20% oxygen and 350 μL/L NO, with a residence time of60 seconds. In the process, it was found that the existing of oxygen showed no evident negative effect on the efficiency of nitrogen removal.

  19. Production of Hyperpolarized 129Xe Gas Without Nitrogen by Optical Pumping at 133Cs D2 line in Flow System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xin; SUN Xian-Ping; LUO Jun; ZENG Xi-Zhi; LIU Mai-Li; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report production of hyperpolarized 129Xe gas via spin-exchange with optically pumped Cs atoms at the D2 line, achieved at low magnetic field in a flow system and in the absence of nitrogen gas. The nuclear spin polarization of hyperpolarized 129Xe gas is enhanced by a factor of 10000 compared to that without optical pumping under the same condition, which corresponds to polarization of about 2.66%. Due to the high spin polarization, the radiation damping of hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has also been observed in the flow system.

  20. Regulation Effects of Water and Nitrogen on the Source-Sink Relationship in Potato during the Tuber Bulking Stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    Full Text Available The source-sink relationship determines crop yield, and it is largely regulated by water and nutrients in agricultural production. This has been widely investigated in cereals, but fewer studies have been conducted in root and tuber crops such as potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. The objective of this study was to investigate the source-sink relationship in potato and the regulation of water and nitrogen on the source-sink relationship during the tuber bulking stage. A pot experiment using virus-free plantlets of the Atlantic potato cultivar was conducted, using three water levels (50%, 70% and 90% of field capacity and three nitrogen levels (0, 0.2, 0.4 g N∙kg-1 soil. The results showed that, under all water and nitrogen levels, plant source capacity were small at the end of the experiment, since photosynthetic activity in leaves were low and non-structural reserves in underground stems were completely remobilized. While at this time, there were very big differences in maximum and minimum tuber number and tuber weight, indicating that the sink tuber still had a large potential capacity to take in assimilates. These results suggest that the source-supplied assimilates were not sufficient enough to meet the demands of sink growth. Thus, we concluded that, unlike cereals, potato yield is more likely to be source-limited than sink-limited during the tuber bulking stage. Water and nitrogen are two key factors in potato production management. Our results showed that water level, nitrogen level and the interaction between water and nitrogen influence potato yield mainly through affecting source capacity via the net photosynthetic rate, total leaf area and leaf life span. Well-watered, sufficient nitrogen and well-watered combined with sufficient nitrogen increased yield mainly by enhancing the source capacity. Therefore, this suggests that increasing source capacity is more crucial to improve potato yield.

  1. Regulation Effects of Water and Nitrogen on the Source-Sink Relationship in Potato during the Tuber Bulking Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenting; Xiong, Binglin; Wang, Shiwen; Deng, Xiping; Yin, Lina; Li, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    The source-sink relationship determines crop yield, and it is largely regulated by water and nutrients in agricultural production. This has been widely investigated in cereals, but fewer studies have been conducted in root and tuber crops such as potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). The objective of this study was to investigate the source-sink relationship in potato and the regulation of water and nitrogen on the source-sink relationship during the tuber bulking stage. A pot experiment using virus-free plantlets of the Atlantic potato cultivar was conducted, using three water levels (50%, 70% and 90% of field capacity) and three nitrogen levels (0, 0.2, 0.4 g N∙kg-1 soil). The results showed that, under all water and nitrogen levels, plant source capacity were small at the end of the experiment, since photosynthetic activity in leaves were low and non-structural reserves in underground stems were completely remobilized. While at this time, there were very big differences in maximum and minimum tuber number and tuber weight, indicating that the sink tuber still had a large potential capacity to take in assimilates. These results suggest that the source-supplied assimilates were not sufficient enough to meet the demands of sink growth. Thus, we concluded that, unlike cereals, potato yield is more likely to be source-limited than sink-limited during the tuber bulking stage. Water and nitrogen are two key factors in potato production management. Our results showed that water level, nitrogen level and the interaction between water and nitrogen influence potato yield mainly through affecting source capacity via the net photosynthetic rate, total leaf area and leaf life span. Well-watered, sufficient nitrogen and well-watered combined with sufficient nitrogen increased yield mainly by enhancing the source capacity. Therefore, this suggests that increasing source capacity is more crucial to improve potato yield.

  2. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas: Nineteenth Quarterly Progress Report (Second Quarter 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2006-06-30

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation, and is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

  3. Agronomic Efficiency of Biosolid as Source of Nitrogen to Banana Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Junqueira Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge (SS or biosolid has been studied as source of nutrient for several different plant species. It also contributes to soil fertility recycling organic matter and plant nutrients. This followup work examines a three-year (2001–2004 field experiment designed to evaluate the response of banana plants (Cavendish subgroup to the application of biosolid as source of nitrogen. The treatments consisted of control (mineral PK, no N, three rates of sludge, and two rates of mineral NPK fertilizer. Plant and soil N concentration, fruit yield, plant height, stem diameter, and foliar endurance index were measured. Fruit yield with mineral fertilization or sludge applications did not differ statistically (P>0.05. Application of biosolid resulted in statistically significant higher agronomic efficiency (P<0.05 in comparison to mineral fertilizers. The concentration of soil mineral nitrogen increased using mineral fertilizer or sludge until 0.80 m after three years of application. The effect of the source of N was smaller than the effect of the rate. Biosolid can be used as source of N for banana growers.

  4. Shifts and dynamics of greenhouse gas fluxes in coastal marshes: Responses to short- and long-term nitrogen additions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Kroeger, K. D.; Tang, J.; Fisher, K.; Bratton, J. F.; Crusius, J.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal wetlands are estimated to sequester carbon at faster rates than most ecosystems, and thus they are appealing targets for efforts to ameliorate climate change through biological C storage. However, to accurately estimate the climatic impact of such strategies, we must simultaneously consider fluxes of greenhouse gases from these ecosystems, including CH4 and N2O. Coastal salt marshes are currently thought to represent minor sources of greenhouse gases relative to freshwater wetlands, but the few measurements that exist for N2O and CH4 fluxes in these systems have not spanned the range of their dynamic environmental conditions. Further, multiple anthropogenic sources have disproportionately increased nitrogen loads in coastal ecosystems, which we hypothesized may significantly enhance N2O emissions from salt marshes. We tested this hypothesis with short- and long-term manipulative experiments at low to moderate nitrogen loads in pristine temperate Spartina patens marshes at Plum Island (MA). In July 2009, we compared background greenhouse gas fluxes with those measured immediately after either a single addition of nitrate (equivalent to 1.4g N m -2) or a control solution of artificial seawater. Prior to manipulations, the salt marsh sediments represented small sinks of N2O, as fluxes averaged -33 μmol N2O m-2 day-1. Yet, within one hour of manipulations, the plots with nitrate additions became sources of N2O, with fluxes averaging 42 and 108 μmol N2O m-2 day-1 in light and dark chambers, respectively. These exceeded fluxes in control plots by more than an order of magnitude. Respiratory CO2 fluxes were also significantly higher in nitrate-enriched plots (4.4 +/- 1 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) than in controls (2.4 +/- 0.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) immediately following the nitrate additions. Methane fluxes were not affected by nitrogen, but they varied spatially, ranging from 7.5 to 2200 μmol CH4 m-2 day-1. Although the enhanced N2O fluxes did not persist after 2 days, the

  5. [Research advances in identifying nitrate pollution sources of water environment by using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Liang, Zhi-wei; Li, Wei; Zhu, Yao; Yanng, Mu-yi; Jia, Chao-jie

    2013-04-01

    Water body' s nitrate pollution has become a common and severe environmental problem. In order to ensure human health and water environment benign evolution, it is of great importance to effectively identify the nitrate pollution sources of water body. Because of the discrepant composition of nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes in different sources of nitrate in water body, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes can be used to identify the nitrate pollution sources of water environment. This paper introduced the fractionation factors of nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes in the main processes of nitrogen cycling and the composition of these stable isotopes in main nitrate sources, compared the advantages and disadvantages of five pre-treatment methods for analyzing the nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate, and summarized the research advances in this aspect into three stages, i. e. , using nitrogen stable isotope alone, using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes simultaneously, and combining with mathematical models. The future research directions regarding the nitrate pollution sources identification of water environment were also discussed.

  6. Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides at a hardwood forest site in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Seok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of CO2, O3, and NOx (NO + NO2 were investigated at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS, a mid-latitude, low elevation hardwood forest site, during the 2007–2008 winter season. An automated trace gas sampling system was used to determine trace gas concentrations in the snowpack at multiple depths continuously throughout the snow-covered period from two adjacent plots. One natural plot and one with the soil covered by a Tedlar sheet were setup for investigating whether the primary source of measured trace gases was biogenic (i.e., from the soil or non-biogenic (i.e., from the snowpack. The results were compared with the “White on Green” study conducted at the Niwot Ridge (NWT Long Term Ecological Research site in Colorado. The average winter CO2 flux ± s.e. from the soil at UMBS was 0.54 ± 0.037 µmol m-2 s-1 using the gradient diffusion method and 0.71 ± 0.012 µmol m-2 s-1 using the eddy covariance method, and in a similar range as found for NWT. Observed snowpack-O3 exchange was also similar to NWT. However, nitrogen oxides (NOx fluxes from snow at UMBS were 10 times smaller than those at NWT, and fluxes were bi-directional with the direction of the flux dependent on NOx concentrations in ambient air. The compensation point for the change in the direction of NOx flux was estimated to be 0.92 nmol mol-1. NOx in snow also showed diurnal dependency on incident radiation. These NOx dynamics in the snow at UMBS were notably different compared to NWT, and primarily determined by snow-atmosphere interactions rather than by soil NOx emissions.

  7. Process for reducing nitrogen oxides in combustion gases by gas reactions with reduction substances containing nitrogen. Verfahren zur Minderung von Stickoxiden in Verbrennungsgasen durch Gasreaktionen mit stickstoffhaltigen Reduktionsmitteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, E.; Huebner, K.

    1986-03-06

    In the process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in waste gases from combustion, according to the invention the waste gas flow is brought into contact with quaternary alkyl ammonium hydroxides and/or salts of primary, secondary and tertiary amines and/or tertiary amines. Triethylamine, monoethanol amine sulphide, methylamine formate, hydrazene sulphate or a mixture of tetramethyl ammonium chloride/hydroxide are used as means of reduction.

  8. The design and performance of an effusive gas source of conical geometry for photoionization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccombe, D. P.; Collins, S. A.; Reddish, T. J.

    2001-06-01

    The design, construction, and performance of an effusive gas source of conical geometry is reported. This gas jet enables experiments that require the gas and photon beams to be essentially collinear and has a focusing multicapillary array with the central portion left free for the photon beam. In total, the source comprises 90 "tubes" in three layers and has been designed by modeling free molecular gas flow and optimizing for highest gas density ˜2-3 mm from the jet's exit plane. The nature of the gas flow through the source and its focusing properties are investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  9. Use of stable isotopes of nitrogen and water to identify sources of nitrogen in three urban creeks of Durham, North Carolina, 2011-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Young, Megan B.; Giorgino, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of nitrate sources was conducted in three creeks that feed nutrient impaired Falls and Jordan Lakes in the vicinity of Durham County, North Carolina, from July 2011 to June 2012. Cabin Branch, Ellerbe Creek, and Third Fork Creek were sampled monthly to determine if sources of nitrate in surface water could be identified on the basis of their stable isotopic compositions. Land use differs in the drainage basins of the investigated creeks—the predominant land use in Cabin Branch Basin is forest, and the Ellerbe and Third Fork Creek Basins are predominantly developed urban areas. Total nutrient concentrations were below 1 milligram per liter (mg/L). All measured nitrate plus nitrite concentrations were below the North Carolina standard of 10 mg/L as nitrogen with the highest concentration of 0.363 mg/L measured in Third Fork Creek. Concentrations of ammonia were generally less than 0.1 mg/L as nitrogen in all creek samples. More than 50 percent of the total nitrogen measured in the creeks was in the form of organic nitrogen. Total phosphorus and orthophosphate concentrations in all samples were generally less than 0.2 mg/L as phosphorus. The isotopic composition of surface water (δ2HH20 and δ18OH2O) is similar to that of modern-day precipitation. During July and August 2011 and May and June 2012, surface-water samples displayed a seasonal difference in isotopic composition, indicating fractionation of isotopes as a result of evaporation and, potentially, mixing with local and regional groundwater. The dominant source of nitrate to Cabin Branch, Ellerbe Creek, and Third Fork Creek was the nitrification of soil nitrogen. Two stormflow samples in Ellerbe Creek and Third Fork Creek had nitrate sources that were a mixture of the nitrification of soil nitrogen and an atmospheric source that had bypassed some soil contact through impermeable surfaces within the drainage basin. No influence of a septic or wastewater source was found in Cabin

  10. Fluxes of oxidised and reduced nitrogen above a mixed coniferous forest exposed to various nitrogen emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neirynck, J. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium)]. E-mail: johan.neirynck@inbo.be; Kowalski, A.S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicida, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Calle Fuentenueva, SP-18071 Granada (Spain); Carrara, A. [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Technologico, Calle Charles H. Darwin 14, SP-46980 Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Genouw, G. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium); Berghmans, P. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Ceulemans, R. [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Antwerp) (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    Concentrations of nitrogen gases (NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HONO and HNO{sub 3}) and particles (pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) were measured over a mixed coniferous forest impacted by high nitrogen loads. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) represented the main nitrogen form, followed by nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}). A combination of gradient method (NH{sub 3} and NO {sub x} ) and resistance modelling techniques (HNO{sub 3}, HONO, pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) was used to calculate dry deposition of nitrogen compounds. Net flux of NH{sub 3} amounted to -64 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1} over the measuring period. Net fluxes of NO {sub x} were upward (8.5 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) with highest emission in the morning. Fluxes of other gases or aerosols substantially contributed to dry deposition. Total nitrogen deposition was estimated at -48 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} and consisted for almost 80% of NH {sub x} . Comparison of throughfall nitrogen with total deposition suggested substantial uptake of reduced N ({+-}15 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) within the canopy. - Reduced nitrogen was found to be the main contributor to total deposition which was predominantly governed by dry deposition.

  11. New high-nitrogen energetic materials for gas generators in space ordnance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.S.; Lee, Kien-Yin; Hiskey, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    High-nitrogen nitroheterocyclic energetic compounds are used as explosives, propellants, and gas generants when safe, thermally stable, cool-burning energetic materials are desired. A series of compounds are compared for sensitivity properties and calculated burn performance. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations by NASA/Lewis rocket propellant and Blake gun propellant codes gave flame temperatures, average molecular weight, and identity of the equilibrium burn products for ambient, rocket, and gun pressure environments. These compounds were subjected to calculations both as monopropellants and as 50/50 weight ratio mixtures with ammonium nitrate (AN). Special attention was paid to calculated toxic products such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, and how these were affected by the addition of an oxidizer AN. Several compounds were noted for further calculations of a formulation ad experimental evaluation.

  12. Applying the Different Statistical Tests in Analysis of Electrical Breakdown Mechanisms in Nitrogen Filled Gas Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čedomir, A. Maluckov; Saša, A. Rančev; Miodrag, K. Radović

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of our investigations of breakdown mechanisms, as well as a description of their influence on the distributions of time delay distributions, for a gas tube filled with nitrogen at 4 mbar. The values of the time delay are measured for different voltages, and the values of the relaxation times and their distributions and probability plots are analyzed. The obtained density distributions have Gaussian distributions and exponential distributions for different values of relaxation times (Gaussian for small values and exponential for large values of relaxation time). It is shown that for middle values of relaxation time the delay distributions have a shape between Gaussian and exponential distributions, which is a result of the different influences of electrical breakdown.

  13. The reactivity of lattice carbon and nitrogen species in molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides prepared by single-source routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlShalwi, M. [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hargreaves, J.S.J., E-mail: Justin.Hargreaves@glasgow.ac.uk [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Liggat, J.J.; Todd, D. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides have been prepared from single source routes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen species are more reactive than carbon species within the carbonitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reactivity of nitrogen species is a function of carbonitride composition. -- Abstract: Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides of different compositions have been prepared from hexamethylenetetramine molybdate and ethylenediamine molybdate precursors and the reactivity of the lattice carbon and nitrogen species within them has been determined by temperature programmed reduction and thermal volatilisation studies. Nitrogen is found to be much more reactive than carbon and the nature of its reactivity is influenced by composition with the presence of carbon enhancing the reactivity of nitrogen. The difference in reactivity observed indicates that molybdenum carbonitrides are not suitable candidates as reagents for which the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon from the lattice would be desirable.

  14. Controlling composition and color characteristics of Monascus pigments by pH and nitrogen sources in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kan; Song, Da; Chen, Gong; Pistolozzi, Marco; Wu, Zhenqiang; Quan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Submerged fermentations of Monascus anka were performed with different nitrogen sources at different pH in 3 L bioreactors. The results revealed that the Monascus pigments dominated by different color components (yellow pigments, orange pigments or red pigments) could be selectively produced through pH control and nitrogen source selection. A large amount of intracellular pigments dominated by orange pigments and a small amount of water-soluble extracellular yellow pigments were produced at low pH (pH 2.5 and 4.0), independently of the nitrogen source employed. At higher pH (pH 6.5), the role of the nitrogen source became more significant. In particular, when ammonium sulfate was used as nitrogen source, the intracellular pigments were dominated by red pigments with a small amount of yellow pigments. Conversely, when peptone was used, intracellular pigments were dominated by yellow pigments with a few red pigments derivatives. Neither the presence of peptone nor ammonium sulfate promoted the production of intracellular orange pigments while extracellular pigments with an orangish red color were observed in both cases, with a higher yield when peptone was used. Two-stage pH control fermentation was then performed to improve desirable pigments yield and further investigate the effect of pH and nitrogen sources on pigments composition. These results provide a useful strategy to produce Monascus pigments with different composition and different color characteristics.

  15. Improvement of Growth and Periplocin Yield of Periploca sepium Adventitious Root Cultures by Altering Nitrogen Source Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian; GAO Wen-yuan; WANG Juan; LI Xing-lin; XIAO Pei-gen

    2011-01-01

    Objective To increase the ultimate yield of periplocin in Periploca sepium adventitious root cultures by a two-stage culture based on nitrogen source.Methods Firstly,the effects of nitrogen source(NH-NO-)at different ratios and different total initial nitrogen amounts on the accumulation of biomass and secondary metabolites in adventitious root cultures of P sepium were investigated,and growth and production media for the two-stage culture based on the above results were established.Results The highest biomass and periplocin content were obtained in the culture medium of 15 mmol/L total nitrogen amount with NH-NO(1:2)and 30 mmol/L total nitrogen amount with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source.By adopting a fed-batch cultivation strategy,the dry weight adventitious root,periplocin content and yield were increased by 136%,108%,and 389%,respectively when compared with those of the control,reaching up to 8.13 g/L,157.15 μg/g,and 1277.63 μg/L,respectively.Furthermore,it was found that in the process of two-stage culture,the adventitious roots grew thicker significantly after they were transferred into production medium directly.Conclusion The ultimate yield of periplocin in P.sepium adventitious root cultures could be significantly increased by a two-stage culture based on nitrogen source.

  16. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on carotenoids production by native strain of Aurantiochytrium Ch25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiye Esmizade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microorganisms produce carotenoids as a part of their response to environmental stresses. Carotenoids have many applications in human health, such as antioxidant, anti-cancer, light protection activity and as a precursor for hormones. Materials and methods: In this study, the effect of different carbon and nitrogen sources was evaluated on carotenoids production by native Aurantiochytrium strain. The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources were studied on biomass and carotenoid production. Then, carotenoids were extracted and analyzed by TLC, spectrophotometry and HPLC methods. Results: Results showed that glycerol is the best carbon source for production of high carotenoids content. Selected medium contained: glycerol (1.5% v/v, peptone (1g/l, yeast extract (1g/l and 50% of sea water. Total carotenoids content was 134.8 µg/g CDW in this medium. TLC analysis showed that the extracted carotenoid is included: beta-carotene, astaxanthin monoester, astaxanthin diester and free astaxanthin. The results of HPLC analysis showed presence of astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, echinenone and β-carotene in the carotenoid extract. Discussion and conclusion: In this research, production of carotenoids was investigated in native strain of Aurantiochytrium and carotenoids profile was included astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, β-carotene and echinenone.

  17. Nitrogen-isotope analysis of groundwater nitrate in carbonate aquifers: Natural sources versus human pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Charles W.; Browning, Lawrence A.

    1983-02-01

    Results of nitrogen-isotope analyses of nitrate in the waters of the Cretaceous Edwards aquifer in Texas, U.S.A., indicate that the source of the nitrate is naturally-occurring nitrogen compounds in the recharge streams. In contrast, nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the fresh waters of the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation on Grand Cayman Island, West Indies, indicate that human wastes are the source of the nitrate. The Cretaceous Edwards Limestone is a prolific aquifer that produces principally from fracture porosity along the Balcones Fault Zone. Recharge is primarily by streams crossing the fault zone. Rainfall is ˜ 70 cm yr. -1, and the water table is generally deeper than 30 m below land surface. The δ15 N of 73 samples of nitrate from Edwards waters ranged from + 1.9 to + 10‰ with an average of + 6.2‰. This δ15 N range is within the range of nitrate in surface water in the recharge streams ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 8.3‰ ) and within the range of nitrate in surface water from the Colorado River, Texas, ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 11‰ ). No sample was found to be enriched in 15N, which would suggest the presence of nitrate from animal waste ( δ 15N range = + 10 to + 22‰ ). The Ironshore Formation contains a small freshwater lens that is recharged entirely by percolation through the soil. Average rainfall is 165 cm yr. -1, and the water table is within 3 m of land surface. The δ15 N of four nitrate samples from water samples of the Ironshore Formation ranged from + 18 to + 23.9‰, which indicates a cesspool/septictank source of the nitrate. Limestone aquifers in humid environments that are recharged by percolation through the soil appear to be more susceptible to contamination by septic tanks than are aquifers in subhumid environments that feature thick unsaturated sections and are recharged by streams.

  18. Global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Xu, Xin; Liu, Yinglie; Wang, Jinyang; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of how global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on GWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent emissions from all sources, including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, agrochemical inputs and farm operations and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon sequestration). The ISSM mainly consisted of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates and split, manure, Zn and Na2SiO3 fertilization and planting density for the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Four ISSM scenarios consisting of different chemical N rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, ISSM-N1 (25 % reduction), ISSM-N2 (10 % reduction), ISSM-N3 (FP rate) and ISSM-N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 35 and 40 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the ISSM-N1 and ISSM-N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar GWPs. The ISSM-N3 and ISSM-N4 scenarios remarkably increased the GWP and GHGI by an average of 69 and 39 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of ISSM-N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  19. Effects of nitrogen sources on bacteriocin production by Enterococcus faecium A 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, A; Kabadjova, P; Valcheva, R; Danova, S; Dousset, X; Haertlé, T; Chobert, J M; Ivanova, I

    2002-01-01

    The production of a novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide enterococcin A 2000, active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms including Listeria subsp. and Escherichia coli, by Enterococcus faecium strain A 2000 isolated from the surface of traditional Bulgarian yellow cheese "kash-kaval" is considerably influenced by complex nitrogen sources in the production medium. Medium components, especially peptone and yeast extract, and their concentration contributed to the increase in bacteriocin production during the stationary phase (16-46 h) of cultivation even in the absence of one of the components present in the basal cultivation MRS medium.

  20. Effects of Carbon and Nitrogen Sources on Lipase Production by Candida rugosa

    OpenAIRE

    ERKMEN, Sibel FADILOĞLU and Osman

    2014-01-01

    The production of lipase by Candida rugosa growing on media with various carbon and nitrogen sources was studied. While high yields of enzyme activity (5.58 U mL-1) were obtained with yeast extract and proteose-peptone in the medium with olive oil, the minimum lipase activity (2.81 U mL-1) was observed with tryptone and lactose. In the absence of olive oil, the media with proteose peptone and glucose gave the maximum enzyme activity (2.21 U mL-1). The best results in the production of lipa...

  1. Variation in nitrogen source utilisation by nine Amanita muscaria genotypes from Australian Pinus radiata plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Nicole A; Chambers, Susan M; Cairney, John W G

    2003-08-01

    The abilities of nine genotypes of Amanita muscaria (L.:Fr) Pers. to utilise a range of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources for growth was examined in axenic liquid cultures. Considerable intraspecific variation was observed in biomass yields on all substrates; however biomass yield was highest on glutamine and/or NH4+ for all genotypes. Yields on aspartic acid, glutamic acid and histidine were generally low relative to NH4+, while utilisation of arginine and glycine showed marked variation between genotypes. Eight genotypes produced significantly less biomass on bovine serum albumin than on NH4+, raising questions regarding classification of A. muscaria as a 'protein fungus'.

  2. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  3. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  4. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  5. LPG ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing properties of nanostructured polypyrrole thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagul, Sagar B., E-mail: nano.sbbagul@gmail.com; Upadhye, Deepak S.; Sharma, Ramphal, E-mail: rps.phy@gmail.com [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Nanotechnology, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad (India)

    2016-05-06

    Nanostructured Polypyrrole thin film was synthesized by easy and economic chemical oxidative polymerization technique on glass at room temperature. The prepared thin film of Polypyrrole was characterized by optical absorbance study by UV-visible spectroscopy and electrical study by I-V measurement system. The optical absorbance spectrum of Polypyrrole shows two fundamental peaks in region of 420 and 890 nm, which confirms the formation of Polypyrrole on glass substrate. The I-V graph of nanostructured Polypyrrole represents the Ohmic nature. Furthermore, the thin film of Polypyrrole was investigated by Scanning electron microscopy for surface morphology study. The SEM micrograph represents spherical nanostructured morphology of Polypyrrole on glass substrate. In order to investigate gas sensing properties, 100 ppm of LPG, Ammonia and Nitrogen Dioxide were injected in the gas chamber and magnitude of resistance has been recorded as a function of time in second. It was observed that nanostructured Polypyrrole thin film shows good sensing behavior at room temperature.

  6. Direct determination of acrylamide in food by gas chromatography with nitrogen chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijun, Yao

    2015-07-01

    A method of gas chromatography with nitrogen chemiluminescence detection and using standard addition is described for the determination of acrylamide in heat-processed foods. Using a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) sample preparation method removes the acrylamide precursors completely, and the risk of overestimating acrylamide concentration due to additional analyte formation in the hot gas chromatograph inlet is also avoided. Sample preparation is rapid and inexpensive. A Deans switch device is utilized to heart-cut acrylamide and to prevent interferences from the solvent and matrix from reaching the detector. The pre-column is backflushed at high temperature to maintain a clean baseline and shorten the cycle time compared to baking out the column. Quantitation using standard addition is employed for compensation of potential variability in the acrylamide extraction efficiency in acetonitrile. The limit of detection and the limit of the quantification obtained for this method are 27 and 81 μg/kg, respectively, in food samples (equivalent to 3.5 and 10.6 μg/L in acetonitrile, respectively), and the linear range is 76-9697 μg/kg in food samples (equivalent to 10-1280 μg/L in acetonitrile) with an R(2) value of 0.9999.

  7. Enhanced nitrogen removal in single-chamber microbial fuel cells with increased gas diffusion areas

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Hengjing

    2012-11-23

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with nitrifiers pre-enriched at the air cathodes have previously been demonstrated as a passive strategy for integrating nitrogen removal into current-generating bioelectrochemical systems. To further define system design parameters for this strategy, we investigated in this study the effects of oxygen diffusion area and COD/N ratio in continuous-flow reactors. Doubling the gas diffusion area by adding an additional air cathode or a diffusion cloth significantly increased the ammonia and COD removal rates (by up to 115% and 39%), ammonia removal efficiency (by up to 134%), the cell voltage and cathode potentials, and the power densities (by a factor of approximately 2). When the COD/N ratio was lowered from 13 to 3, we found up to 244% higher ammonia removal rate but at least 19% lower ammonia removal efficiency. An increase of COD removal rate by up to 27% was also found when the COD/N ratio was lowered from 11 to 3. The Coulombic efficiency was not affected by the additional air cathode, but decreased by an average of 11% with the addition of a diffusion cloth. Ammonia removal by assimilation was also estimated to understand the ammonia removal mechanism in these systems. These results showed that the doubling of gas diffusion area enhanced N and COD removal rates without compromising electrochemical performance. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Denitrification controls in urban riparian soils: implications for reducing urban nonpoint source nitrogen pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangjie; Chen, Zhenlou; Lou, Huanjie; Wang, Dongqi; Deng, Huanguang; Wang, Chu

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to thoroughly analyze the influences of environmental factors on denitrification processes in urban riparian soils. Besides, the study was also carried out to identify whether the denitrification processes in urban riparian soils could control nonpoint source nitrogen pollution in urban areas. The denitrification rates (DR) over 1 year were measured using an acetylene inhibition technique during the incubation of intact soil cores from six urban riparian sites, which could be divided into three types according to their vegetation. The soil samples were analyzed to determine the soil organic carbon (SOC), soil total nitrogen (STN), C/N ratio, extractable NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N, pH value, soil water content (SWC), and the soil nitrification potential to evaluate which of these factors determined the final outcome of denitrification. A nitrate amendment experiment further indicated that the riparian DR was responsive to added nitrate. Although the DRs were very low (0.099 ~ 33.23 ng N2O-N g(-1) h(-1)) due to the small amount of nitrogen moving into the urban riparian zone, the spatial and temporal patterns of denitrification differed significantly. The extractable NO3 (-)-N proved to be the dominant factor influencing the spatial distribution of denitrification, whereas the soil temperature was a determinant of the seasonal DR variation. The six riparian sites could also be divided into two types (a nitrate-abundant and a nitrate-stressed riparian system) according to the soil NO3 (-)-N concentration. The DR in nitrate-abundant riparian systems was significantly higher than that in the nitrate-stressed riparian systems. The DR in riparian zones that were covered with bushes and had adjacent cropland was higher than in grass-covered riparian sites. Furthermore, the riparian DR decreased with soil depth, which was mainly attributed to the concentrated nitrate in surface soils. The DR was not associated with the SOC, STN, C/N ratio, and

  9. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, E., E-mail: emanuele.sartori@igi.cnr.it; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, v.le dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  10. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  11. Analyzing the contribution of climate change to long-term variations in sediment nitrogen sources for reservoirs/lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xinghui, E-mail: xiaxh@bnu.edu.cn [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation/Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Wu, Qiong; Zhu, Baotong; Zhao, Pujun [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation/Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang, Shangwei [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, Leipzig 04318 (Germany); Yang, Lingyan [Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2015-08-01

    We applied a mixing model based on stable isotopic δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N, and C:N ratios to estimate the contributions of multiple sources to sediment nitrogen. We also developed a conceptual model describing and analyzing the impacts of climate change on nitrogen enrichment. These two models were conducted in Miyun Reservoir to analyze the contribution of climate change to the variations in sediment nitrogen sources based on two {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs dated sediment cores. The results showed that during the past 50 years, average contributions of soil and fertilizer, submerged macrophytes, N{sub 2}-fixing phytoplankton, and non-N{sub 2}-fixing phytoplankton were 40.7%, 40.3%, 11.8%, and 7.2%, respectively. In addition, total nitrogen (TN) contents in sediment showed significant increasing trends from 1960 to 2010, and sediment nitrogen of both submerged macrophytes and phytoplankton sources exhibited significant increasing trends during the past 50 years. In contrast, soil and fertilizer sources showed a significant decreasing trend from 1990 to 2010. According to the changing trend of N{sub 2}-fixing phytoplankton, changes of temperature and sunshine duration accounted for at least 43% of the trend in the sediment nitrogen enrichment over the past 50 years. Regression analysis of the climatic factors on nitrogen sources showed that the contributions of precipitation, temperature, and sunshine duration to the variations in sediment nitrogen sources ranged from 18.5% to 60.3%. The study demonstrates that the mixing model provides a robust method for calculating the contribution of multiple nitrogen sources in sediment, and this study also suggests that N{sub 2}-fixing phytoplankton could be regarded as an important response factor for assessing the impacts of climate change on nitrogen enrichment. - Highlights: • A mixing model was built to analyze sediment N sources of lakes/reservoirs. • Fertilizer/soil and macrophytes showed decreasing trends during

  12. Cultivation of Spirulina platensis by continuous process using ammonium chloride as nitrogen source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassano, C.E.N.; Gioielli, L.A.; Almeida, K.A.; Sato, S.; Carvalho, J.C.M. [Department of Biochemical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 580, Bloco 16, 05508-900 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Perego, P.; Converti, A. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering ' ' G.B. Bonino' ' , University of Genoa, via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    This work is focused on the influence of dilution rate (0.08{<=}D{<=}0.32 d{sup -1}) on the kinetics of continuous cultivation of Spirulina platensis at two different concentrations of ammonium chloride (N{sub 0}=1.0 and 10 mM) as nitrogen source. Cell productivity increased in both series of runs up to D{approx_equal}0.12-0.16 d{sup -1}, and then decreased. While at N{sub 0}=1.0 mM biomass washing was certainly the cause of progressive cell concentration decrease, a combination of this phenomenon with the toxic effect of excess ammonia was responsible, at N{sub 0}=10 mM and D{>=}0.20 d{sup -1}, for quick stop of cell growth just beyond the achievement of maximum cell productivity (92.4 mg l{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Similar profile was observed for protein productivity, that achieved a maximum value of 67.0 mg l{sup -1} d{sup -1}, because of the very high protein content (72.5%) of biomass produced under these conditions. The yield of nitrogen-to-biomass was much higher at the lower N{sub 0}, because of the low protein content, and reached a maximum value of 9.7 g g{sup -1} at D=0.08-0.12 d{sup -1}. The yield of nitrogen-to-protein showed less marked difference, being most of the nitrogen present in the cell as proteins or free amino-acids. (author)

  13. Headwater management alters sources, flowpaths, and fluxes of water, carbon, and nitrogen in urban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennino, M. J.; Kaushal, S.; Mayer, P. M.; Welty, C.; Miller, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Increased urbanization has altered watershed hydrology and increased nutrient pollution, leading to eutrophication and hypoxia in downstream coastal ecosystems. Due to urban stream degradation, there have been efforts to restore streams and reduce peak-flow discharges and contaminant export through stormwater management and stream restoration. However, there have been relatively few studies comparing watershed scale impacts of contrasting headwater management practices on sources and fluxes of water, carbon, and nutrients across space and time. In this study we compared sources and fluxes of water, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) along 4 watersheds of contrasting headwater management: 2 urban degraded watersheds with minimal or no stormwater management and 2 managed urban watersheds with stormwater controls and stream restoration. Surface water samples were collected biweekly at USGS gauging stations located within each watershed over 2 years. Spatially, watersheds were sampled longitudinally during 4 seasons. Sources of water, nitrate, and carbon were investigated using isotopic and spectroscopic tracer techniques. Indicator anions (F-, Cl-, I-, SO42-) were also used to trace anthropogenic vs. natural water sources. Hydrologic flowpaths (groundwater vs. overland flow) were assessed with longitudinal synoptic surveys using stable water isotopes of H and O. Annual fluxes of water, C, and N, were estimated using the USGS program LOADEST. H and O isotope data showed that the source of stream water is primarily groundwater during summer months, with greater contributions from stormflow during winter months for all 4 watersheds. Elevated levels of indicator anions (F-, Cl-, I-, SO42-) as well as greater "pulses" of C and N over time in the degraded vs. managed watersheds indicate potential sewage sources due to leaky sanitary sewers and greater stormdrain inputs. Unlike the managed watersheds where hydrologic flowpaths were from groundwater in headwaters, the longitudinal

  14. Effects of nitrogen and hydrogen in argon shielding gas on bead profile, delta-ferrite and nitrogen contents of the pulsed GTAW welds of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viyanit, Ekkarut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Pathaumthani (Thailand). Failure Analysis and Surface Technology Lab; Hartung, Fritz; Lothongkum, Gobboon [Chulalongkom University, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering,; Phakpeetinan, Panyasak; Chianpairot, Amnuysak

    2016-08-01

    The general effects of 1, 2, 3 and 4 vol.-% nitrogen and 1, 5 and 10 vol.-% hydrogen in argon shielding gas on weld bead profile (depth/width ratio: D/W) and the δ-ferrite content of AISI 316L pulsed GTAW welds were investigated. The limits for imperfections for the quality levels of welds were based on ISO 5817 B. The plates with a thickness of 6 mm were welded at the flat position and the bead on plate. Increasing hydrogen content in argon shielding gas increases the D/W ratio. Excessive hydrogen addition to argon shielding gas will result in incompletely filled groove and excessive penetration of weld. Increasing welding speed decreases the weld-metal volume and the D/W ratios. Nitrogen addition to argon shielding gas has no effect on the D/W ratio. The addition of a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen to argon shielding gas on the D/W ratio does not show any interaction between them. An effect on the D/W ratio can be exclusively observed as a function of hydrogen content. Increasing hydrogen content in argon shielding gas increases the δ-ferrite content of weld metal. Increasing either nitrogen content in shielding gas or welding speed decreases the δ-ferrite content of weld metal. The nitrogen addition increases the weld metal nitrogen content, however, the hydrogen addition leads to a decrease of weld metal nitrogen content.

  15. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope measurements of nitrate to survey the sources and transformation of nitrogen loads in rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Ohte, Nobuhito; Nagata, Toshi; Tayasu, Ichiro; KOHAZU, Ayato; Yoshimizu, Chikage

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the studies on evaluation of river environments in terms of water pollution, ecosystem disturbances, excess nutrient (nitrogen) loads, and developments in the isotopic measurements of nitrate and present an update and future perspectives regarding the application of nitrate isotopes to river nutrient assessments. Then, we present the advantages of simultaneous measurement of the nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate in streamwaters.Dual isotope measurement has recently be...

  16. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  17. Nitrogen-based copolymers as wax dispersants for paraffinic gas oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, I.M.; Khidr, T.T.; Ghuiba, F.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, Cairo (Egypt)

    1998-04-01

    n-Alkyl acrylates and n-alkyl methacrylates were prepared by esterification of acrylic and methacrylic acids with two linear long chain alcohol blends NAFOL 1822 and NAFOL 1822C. The four synthesized monomers were characterized and copolymerized with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio individually. The prepared copolymers were subjected to partial amidation with n-hexadecylamine. The amidated copolymers were purified, characterized, and then evaluated as wax dispersant flow improvers for improving the cold flow properties of a highly paraffinic gas oil G1 through cloud point (CP), cold filter plugging point (CFPP) and pour point (PP) tests. NAFOL 1822C methacrylate-n-hexadecylamine maleamic acid copolymer has achieved the highest CFPP and PP depression. Consequently, NAFOL 1822C methacrylate monomer was selected for further copolymerization with maleic anhydride in a molar ratio 1:4, respectively. The prepared copolymers were then submitted to partial and complete amidation with n-hexadecylamine, ditallowamine, tetraethylenepentamine and morpholine successively. In addition, combined esterification and amidation of the copolymer with NAFOL 1822C and morpholine, respectively, was carried out. Evaluation of the synthesized products as WDFIs in a less paraffinic gas oil G2 revealed that nitrogen and/or oxygen based functional groups of the copolymers are controlling parameters judging their dispersing effect and that NAFOL 1822C methacrylate-n-morpholine amide of NAFOL 1822C maleate copolymer has attained the optimum performance. Results also showed that no correlation is found between gas oil flowability improvements ({Delta}PP) and filterability amelioration ({Delta}CFPP). Stability of performance of the prepared additives as wax dispersants lasted for four weeks while for two weeks only as flow improvers. 18 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Gas Hydrate Production at Injection of Liquid Nitrogen into Water with Bubbles of Freon 134A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meleshkin Anton V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic processes during the injection of the cryogenic liquid into the volume of water with bubbles of gas freon 134a are studding experimentally. A processes during the explosive boiling of liquid nitrogen in the volume of water are registered. Video recording of identified gas hydrate flakes formed during this process is carried out by high speed camera. These results may be useful for the study of the new method of producing gas hydrates, based on the shock-wave method.

  19. EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis, George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methanecarbon dioxide (CH4-CO2) or methane-nitrogen (CH4-N2) with or without an aqueous phase and H2O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestration sites and natural gas reservoirs....

  20. Ammonia-Oxidizer Communities in an Agricultural Soil treated with Contrasting Nitrogen Sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussie Y. Habteselassie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The community of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes was examined in an agricultural soil treated for 6 seasons with contrasting nitrogen (N sources. Molecular tools based on the gene encoding ammonia monooxygenase were used to characterize the ammonia oxidizer communities and their abundance. Soil DNA was extracted from soils sampled from silage corn plots that received no additional N (control, dairy waste compost (DC, liquid dairy waste (LW, and ammonium sulfate (AS treatments at approximately 100 and 200 kg available N ha-1 over 6 years. The N treatment affected the quantity of ammonia oxidizers based on estimates of amoA by real-time PCR. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB were higher in soils from the AS200, AS100, and LW200 treatments (2.5 x107, 2.5x107, and 2.1 x107 copies g-1 soil, respectively than in the control (8.1x106copies/g while the abundance of amoA encoding archaea (AOA was not significantly affected by treatment (3.8x107copies g-1 soil, average. The ratio of AOA/AOB was higher in the control and compost treated soils, both treatments have the majority of their ammonium supplied through mineralization of organic nitrogen. Clone libraries of partial amoA sequences indicated AOB related to Nitrosospira multiformis and AOA related to uncultured Nitrososphaera similar to those described by soil fosmid 54d9 were prevalent. Profiles of the amoC-amoA intergenic region indicated that both Nitrosospira- and Nitrosomonas-type AOB were present in all soils examined. In contrast to the intergenic amoC-amoA profile results, Nitrosomonas-like clones were recovered only in the LW200 treated soil-DNA. The impact of six years of contrasting nitrogen sources applications caused changes in ammonia oxidizer abundance while the community composition remained relatively stable for both AOB and AOA.

  1. Features of the type Ⅲ-like source rock and its generated natural gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The mother matter of Ordovician source are mainly sapropelic and generate oil in mature stage, since the high plants did not appear in Ordovician period, which is well known by internal and external scholars. Now we find a kind of Orodovician source rock generating mainly light oil and gas in mature stage during appraising source rocks in the Tarim Basin. The organic matters of this source rock are chiefly constructed by benthic brown algae in organisms (showing as macro algae), and are similar to humic source in hydrocarbon generation. The natural gas generated by this kind of source matters is obviously different from the sapropelic gas.

  2. Xylanase Production from Trichoderma harzianum 1073 D3 with Alternative Carbon and Nitrogen Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Seyis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of some natural wastes (orange pomace, orange peel, lemon pomace, lemon peel, apple pomace, pear peel, banana peel, melon peel and hazelnut shell on the production of xylanase from Trichoderma harzianum 1073 D3 has been studied and maximum activity has been observed on melon peel (26.5 U/mg of protein followed by apple pomace and hazelnut shell. Also, molasses could be used as an additional carbon source as it decreased the production time approximately by 50 %. Finally, potential alternatives of organic nitrogen source (cotton leaf and soybean residue wastes were analyzed and it was concluded that peptone could be replaced with these residues especially when economics of the process is the major objective.

  3. Influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Noel A; Ortega, Eduardo; Rodés, Rosa; Lluch, Carmen

    2004-09-01

    The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were investigated. The amino acids asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid affected microbial growth and nitrogenase activity. Several enzymatic activities involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were affected by the carbon source used. In addition, glucose and gluconate significantly increased the oxygen consumption (respiration rate) of whole cells of G. diazotrophicus grown under aerobic conditions. Enzymes responsible for direct oxidation of glucose and gluconate were especially active in cells grown with sucrose and gluconate. The presence of amino acids in the apoplastic and symplastic sap of sugarcane stems suggests that these compounds might be of importance in the regulation of growth and nitrogenase activity during the symbiotic association. The information obtained from the plant-bacterium association together with the results of other biochemical studies could contribute to the development of biotechnological applications of G. diazotrophicus.

  4. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianxian [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yin, Shan, E-mail: yinshan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Yinsheng [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhuang, Honglei [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Changsheng [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall, College Road, NH 03824-3525 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2} were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields. - Highlights: • In Chongming Island, Shanghai, GHG emissions were measured under different nitrogen fertilizer rates from the paddy. • Low nitrogen fertilizer application reduced CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions. • The study showed that 210 kg N/ha was the suitable fertilizer application rate.

  5. QUALITY AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVIY OF TOMATO CULTIVATED UNDER DIFFERENT SOURCES AND DOSES OF NITROGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN SILVA PORTO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomatoes are an important component of the human diet because they are rich in minerals and antioxidants that sequester free radicals in cells, preventing various disorders that affect human health. Here, we aimed to evaluate the effects of different nitrogen sources and concentrations on antioxidant capacity and physical and chemical quality of tomato fruit. The experiment was conducted in Vitória da Conquista, state of Bahia, Brazil, in the experimental field of Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia. The experimental setup included a randomized block design with four replicates in a factorial layout of 3 × 3 + 1 (control, for a total of 40 plots. The three treatments comprised different nitrogen sources (calcium nitrate, urea, and ammonium sulfate, applied in three doses (140, 280, and 420 kg ha - 1 . We evaluated firmness, pH, titratable acidity - TA, soluble solid - SS, SS/TA ratio, ascorbic acid, carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and DPPH inhibition, were evaluated after samples were harvested. However, increasing concentrations of N adversely affected the acidity and led to an increase in the SS/TA ratio. Increasing the N concentration also reduced the content of bioactive compounds. excluding carotenoids, which consequently impaired antioxidant activity.

  6. Animal waste as a nitrogen source for Gracilaria tikvahie and Nevagardhiella baileyi in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agare, S.O.

    1980-01-01

    Animal waste from sheep and rabbit was used as a nitrogen source for culturing Gracilaria tikvahiae and Neoagardhiella baileyi (Rhodophyceae) at 23 degrees C, 56 mu Ein/m2/s 1 for 6 days. The culture media ranged from 0.008 to 0.08% dry weight animal waste. Optimal growth appeared between 0.04 and 0.08%. Sheep waste supported optimal growth of 0.19 and 0.18 g/g in Neoagardhiella baileyi and Gracilaria tikvahiae, respectively. Rabbit waste on the other hand supported a higher optimal growth of 0.45 and 0.28 g/g in Neoagardhiella baileyi and Gracilaria tikvahiae, respectively. Recommended concentrations of Provasoli's enrichment supported Gracilaria tikvahiae growth of 0.12 g/g during the experimental period. These results suggest a potential for the utilization of sheep and rabbit waste as a nutrient source for growing these economically important red algae. Although sheep waste had a higher inorganic nitrogen content than rabbit waste, the latter supported a better growth (1.5 - 2 times the optimal growth observed in the algae using sheep waste). This result was attributed to the greater turbidity produced from sheep waste, reducing the light reaching the algae in the culture dishes.

  7. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources and oxygenation on the production of inulinase by Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santisteban, Bernardo O Yépez; Converti, Attilio; Filho, Francisco Maugeri

    2009-02-01

    Cultivations of Kluyveromyces marxianus var. bulgaricus ATCC 16045 were performed on both minimal and complex media using different carbon and nitrogen sources either in the presence or absence of aeration. The results collected were worked out and compared so as to provide a useful contribution to the optimization of inulinase production. Kinetics of extracellular inulinase release were similar on glucose, fructose, and sucrose. Inulinase was detected at basal level since the beginning of batch runs on these three carbon sources and overproduced after their depletion. The highest inulinase activity in minimal medium containing 10 g/l sucrose (6.4 IU/ml) was obtained at an initial (NH(4))(2)SO(4) concentration of 5 g/l, whereas it was reduced to about one fourth of this value and detected only at the beginning under nitrogen-limited conditions. The best sucrose concentrations for the enzyme production were 30 and 20 g/l in minimal and complex media, yielding 15.4 and 208 IU/ml, respectively. In general, the enzyme activity was much higher in complex than in minimal medium under all conditions. O(2)-enriched air neither improved inulinase production nor prevented ethanol formation.

  8. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources, carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, and initial pH on the growth of nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia in liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Minghe; Xu, Chuankun; Zhang, Keqin

    2005-04-01

    The effects of carbon and nitrogen sources, carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C:N) and initial pH value on the growth and sporulation of the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia in liquid culture were examined. Among the 21 carbon sources and 15 nitrogen compounds tested, the optimal carbon and nitrogen sources for mycelial growth were sweet potato and L: -tyrosine, and for sporulation were sweet potato and casein peptone. A C:N ratio of 10:1 at pH 3.7 gave the maximum yield of conidia and a C:N ratio of 40:1 at pH 6.8 gave the maximum biomass. The initial pH value had a significant effect on mycelial growth and conidial production, with the optimal ranges being 3.5-4.5 for sporulation and 5-6 for growth. Maximum conidial production was obtained at an initial pH of 4.0 and the maximum biomass at pH 6.0. The results also showed that the final pH after 7 days cultivation was always higher than the initial value. The variability in growth and sporulation of seven strains of P. chlamydosporia in liquid culture was also compared and discussed.

  9. Use of corn steep liquor as an economical nitrogen source for biosuccinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. P.; Jahim, J. M.; Wu, T. Y.; Harun, S.; Mumtaz, T.

    2016-06-01

    Expensive raw materials are the driving force that leads to the shifting of the petroleum-based succinic acid production into bio-based succinic acid production by microorganisms. Cost of fermentation medium is among the main factors contributing to the total production cost of bio-succinic acid. After carbon source, nitrogen source is the second largest component of the fermentation medium, the cost of which has been overlooked for the past years. The current study aimed at replacing yeast extract- a costly nitrogen source with corn steep liquor for economical production of bio-succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z. In this study, a final succinic acid concentration of 20.6 g/L was obtained from the use of corn steep liquor as the nitrogen source, which was comparable with the use of yeast extract as the nitrogen source that had a final succinate concentration of 21.4 g/l. In terms of economical wise, corn steep liquor was priced at 200 /ton, which was one fifth of the cost of yeast extract at 1000 /ton. Therefore, corn steep liquor can be considered as a potential nitrogen source in biochemical industries instead of the costly yeast extract.

  10. Photon yields from nitrogen gas and dry air excited by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Nagano, M; Sakaki, N; Ando, K

    2003-01-01

    In order to detect ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECR), atmospheric fluorescence light from the trajectory of the extensive air shower may be measured by mirror-photosensor systems. In this type of experiment the photon yield from electrons exciting air of various densities and temperatures is most fundamental information for estimating the primary energy of UHECR. An experiment has been undertaken using a Sr90 $\\beta$ source to study the pressure dependence of photon yields, and the life times of the excited states, for radiation in nitrogen and dry air. The photon yield between 300 nm and 406 nm in air excited by 0.85 MeV electrons is 3.734+-0.148 (+-13.2 % systematic) photons per meter at 1000 hPa and 20 $^{\\circ}$C. The air density and temperature dependence is given for application to UHECR observations.

  11. Greenhouse Gas Source Attribution: Measurements Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Safta, Cosmin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sargsyan, Khachik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Najm, Habib N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); LaFranchi, Brian W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ivey, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Schrader, Paul E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michelsen, Hope A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bambha, Ray P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In this project we have developed atmospheric measurement capabilities and a suite of atmospheric modeling and analysis tools that are well suited for verifying emissions of green- house gases (GHGs) on an urban-through-regional scale. We have for the first time applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate atmospheric CO2 . This will allow for the examination of regional-scale transport and distribution of CO2 along with air pollutants traditionally studied using CMAQ at relatively high spatial and temporal resolution with the goal of leveraging emissions verification efforts for both air quality and climate. We have developed a bias-enhanced Bayesian inference approach that can remedy the well-known problem of transport model errors in atmospheric CO2 inversions. We have tested the approach using data and model outputs from the TransCom3 global CO2 inversion comparison project. We have also performed two prototyping studies on inversion approaches in the generalized convection-diffusion context. One of these studies employed Polynomial Chaos Expansion to accelerate the evaluation of a regional transport model and enable efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior for Bayesian inference. The other approach uses de- terministic inversion of a convection-diffusion-reaction system in the presence of uncertainty. These approaches should, in principle, be applicable to realistic atmospheric problems with moderate adaptation. We outline a regional greenhouse gas source inference system that integrates (1) two ap- proaches of atmospheric dispersion simulation and (2) a class of Bayesian inference and un- certainty quantification algorithms. We use two different and complementary approaches to simulate atmospheric dispersion. Specifically, we use a Eulerian chemical transport model CMAQ and a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model - FLEXPART-WRF. These two models share the same WRF

  12. Biogenic nitrogen gas production at the oxic–anoxic interface in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Montes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess nitrogen gas (N2xs was measured in samples collected at six locations in the eastern and western sub-basins of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, in September 2008 (non-upwelling conditions and March 2009 (upwelling conditions. During both sampling periods, N2xs concentrations were below detection in surface waters, increasing to ~ 22 μmol N kg−1 at the oxic–anoxic interface ([O2] < ~ 4 μmol kg−1, ~ 250 m. Below the oxic–anoxic interface (300–400 m, the average concentration of N2xs was 24.7 ± 1.9 μmol N kg−1 in September 2008 and 27.5 ± 2.0 μmol N kg−1 in March 2009, i.e., N2xs concentrations within this depth interval were ~ 3 μmol N kg−1 higher (p < 0.001 during the upwelling season compared to the non-upwelling period. These results suggest that N-loss in the Cariaco Basin may vary seasonally in response to changes in the flux of sinking particulate organic matter. We attribute the increase in N2xs concentrations, or N-loss, observed during upwelling to: (1 higher availability of fixed nitrogen derived from suspended and sinking particles at the oxic–anoxic interface and/or (2 enhanced ventilation at the oxic–anoxic interface during upwelling.

  13. Sources of nitrogen and phosphorus emissions to Irish rivers: estimates from the Source Load Apportionment Model (SLAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Eva; Deakin, Jenny; Archbold, Marie; Daly, Donal; Bruen, Michael

    2017-04-01

    More than half of the river and lake water bodies in Europe are at less than good ecological status or potential, and diffuse pollution from agriculture remains a major, but not the only, cause of this poor performance. In Ireland, it is evident that agri-environmental policy and land management practices have, in many areas, reduced nutrient emissions to water, mitigating the potential impact on water quality. However, additional measures may be required in order to further decouple the relationship between agricultural productivity and emissions to water, which is of vital importance given the on-going agricultural intensification in Ireland. Catchment management can be greatly supported by modelling, which can reduce the resources required to analyse large amounts of information and can enable investigations and measures to be targeted. The Source Load Apportionment Model (SLAM) framework was developed to support catchment management in Ireland by characterising the contributions from various sources of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) emissions to water. The SLAM integrates multiple national spatial datasets relating to nutrient emissions to surface water, including land use and physical characteristics of the sub-catchments to predict emissions from point (wastewater, industry discharges and septic tank systems) and diffuse sources (agriculture, forestry, peatlands, etc.). The annual nutrient emissions predicted by the SLAM were assessed against nutrient monitoring data for 16 major river catchments covering 50% of the area of Ireland. At national scale, results indicate that the total average annual emissions to surface water in Ireland are over 2,700 t yr-1 of P and 80,000 t yr-1 of N. The SLAM results include the proportional contributions from individual sources at a range of scales from sub-catchment to national, and show that the main sources of P are from wastewater and agriculture, with wide variations across the country related to local anthropogenic

  14. Physical refining of edible oils using nitrogen as stripping gas. Process optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciani Constante, E.

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of nitrogen as a stripping gas in physical refining of edible oils represents a technological improvement with potential advantages such as the possibilities of recovering high quality deodorized distillates and eliminating pollution.
    The objectives of the present paper are to study, evaluate and optimize, as far as possible, independent variables involved in the process (nitrogen flow, operating temperature and the height of the oil layer inside the deodorizer in reference to the quality of the obtained oils as well as the manufacturing requirements.
    All the experiments were carried out with sunflower oil in a discontinuous deodorizer with a 200 Kg capacity. A 4x4 latin square experimental design was used, consisting of three factors, each of which had four different levels.
    The results led to the establishment of charts that allow to determine the most suitable conditions in which to carry out the processing in accord with the desired quality of the finished oil and the functional objectives of the factory. These charts are presented in the paper. The results were checked by another set of experiments.

    La utilización de nitrógeno como gas de arrastre en la refinación física de aceites comestibles representa un avance tecnológico con ventajas potenciales, como la posibilidad tanto de recoger destilados de desodorización de alta calidad como de eliminar polución.
    Los objetivos del presente trabajo son estudiar, evaluar y optimizar, tanto como sea posible, las variables que intervienen en el proceso (flujo de nitrógeno, temperatura de operación y altura de la capa de aceite en el desodorizador en función de la calidad de los aceites obtenidos así como de los requerimientos de producción.
    Los ensayos se han realizado con aceite de girasol en un desodorizador discontinuo de 200 kg de capacidad. Se ha utilizado un diseño de experimento en cuadrado latino de 4x4, constituido por tres

  15. Performance Characterization of a Solenoid-type Gas Valve for the H- Magnetron Source at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa, A. [Fermilab; Bollinger, D. S. [Fermilab; Karns, P. R. [Fermilab

    2016-09-06

    The magnetron-style H- ion sources currently in operation at Fermilab use piezoelectric gas valves to function. This kind of gas valve is sensitive to small changes in ambient temperature, which affect the stability and performance of the ion source. This motivates the need to find an alternative way of feeding H2 gas into the source. A solenoid-type gas valve has been characterized in a dedicated off-line test stand to assess the feasibility of its use in the operational ion sources. H- ion beams have been extracted at 35 keV using this valve. In this study, the performance of the solenoid gas valve has been characterized measuring the beam current output of the magnetron source with respect to the voltage and pulse width of the signal applied to the gas valve.

  16. Effect of Different Nitrogen Sources and Levels on Quantitative and Qualitative Characteristics of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum Mill. in Jiroft Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hosein Saidi Goraghani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Parsley has a very high nutritional value, containing A, B and C vitamins and mineral nutrients. In order to investigation of the effect of different nitrogen sources on parsley an experiment conducted in a factorial combination of three nitrogen forms (calcium nitrate, ammonium sulphate and urea and four nitrogen levels (0, 100, 125, 150 kg ha-1 by using a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications. The results showed that the effect of nitrogen sources was significant on all measured parameters. As the highest shoot fresh weight, root fresh weight, vitamin C and leaf Ca concentration obtained at 150 kg ha-1 of calcium nitrate and the highest shoot dry weight, plant height, leaf length and leaf iron concentration at 150 kg ha-1 of ammonium sulphate and the highest amount of chlorophyll a+b at 150 kg ha-1 of urea.

  17. The Effects of Source and Rate of Nitrogen Fertilizer and Irrigation on Nitrogen Uptake of Silage Corn and Residual Soil Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Khodshenas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing irrigation demand for corn production, along side with draws of ground water from stressed water sources, should be limited due to scarce resources and environmental protection aspects. Nitrogen fertilizer applied at rates higher than the optimum requirement for crop production may cause an increase in nitrate accumulation below the root zone and pose a risk of nitrate leaching. Improving nitrogen management for corn production has a close relation with soil water content. In this study, we investigated the effects of source and rate of nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation on silage corn production and nitrogen concentration, nitrogen uptake and residual soil nitrate in two depths. Materials and Methods: This experiment carried out as split spli- plot in a Randomized Complete Block design (RCBD with three replications, in Arak station (Agricultural research center of markazi province, 34.12 N, 49.7 E; 1715 m above mean sea level during three years. The soil on the site was classified as a Calcaric Regosols (loamy skeletal over fragmental, carbonatic, thermic, calcixerollic xerochrepts. Main plots were irrigation treatments based on 70, 100 and 130 mm cumulative evaporation from A class Pan. Sub plots were two kinds of nitrogen fertilizers (Urea and Ammonium nitrate and sub sub-plots were five levels of nitrogen rates (0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kgN.ha-1. Nitrogen fertilizer rates were split into three applications: 1/3 was applied at planting, 1/3 at 7-9 leaf stage and 1/3 remainder was applied before tasseling as a banding method. Phosphorus was applied at a rate of 150 kg.ha-1in each season and potassium at a rate of 30kg.ha-1 (only in first growth season based on soil testing as triple super phosphate and potassium sulfate, respectively. The corn variety of single cross 704 was planted at 20 m2 plots. The plants were sampled at dough stage from the two rows and weighted in each plot. Plant samples were dried in a forced air

  18. Neutron spectroscopy with the Spherical Proportional Counter based on nitrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougamont, E.; Dastgheibi, A.; Derre, J.; Galan, J.; Gerbier, G.; Giomataris, I.; Gros, M.; Katsioulas, I.; Jourde, D.; Magnier, P.; Navick, X. F.; Papaevangelou, T.; Savvidis, I.; Tsiledakis, G.

    2017-03-01

    A novel large volume spherical proportional counter, recently developed, is used for neutron measurements. The pure N2 gas is studied for thermal and fast neutron detection, providing a new way for neutron spectroscopy. The neutrons are detected via the 14N (n , p)C14 and 14N (n , α)B11 reactions. The detector is tested for thermal and fast neutrons detection with 252Cf and 241Am -9Be neutron sources. The atmospheric neutrons are successfully measured from thermal up to several MeV, well separated from the cosmic ray background. A comparison of the spherical proportional counter with the current available neutron counters is also presented.

  19. Removal of nitrogen compounds from gasification gas by selective catalytic or non-catalytic oxidation; Typpiyhdisteiden poisto kaasutuskaasusta selektiivisellae katalyyttisellae ja ei-katalyyttisellae hapetuksella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In gasification reactive nitrogenous compounds are formed from fuel nitrogen, which may form nitrogen oxides in gas combustion. In fluidized bed gasification the most important nitrogenous compound is ammonia (NH{sub 3}). If ammonia could be decomposed to N{sub 2} already before combustion, the emissions if nitrogen oxides could be reduced significantly. One way of increasing the decomposition rate of NH{sub 3} could be the addition of suitable reactants to the gas, which would react with NH{sub 3} and produce N{sub 2}. The aim of this research is to create basic information, which can be used to develop a new method for removal of nitrogen compounds from gasification gas. The reactions of nitrogen compounds and added reactants are studied in reductive atmosphere in order to find conditions, in which nitrogen compounds can be oxidized selectively to N{sub 2}. The project consists of following subtasks: (1) Selective non-catalytic oxidation (SNCO): Reactions of nitrogen compounds and oxidizers in the gas phase, (2) Selective catalytic oxidation (SCO): Reactions of nitrogen compounds and oxidizers on catalytically active surfaces, (3) Kinetic modelling of experimental results in co-operation with the Combustion Chemistry Research Group of Aabo Akademi University. The most important finding has been that NH{sub 3} can be made to react selectively with the oxidizers even in the presence of large amounts of CO and H{sub 2}. Aluminium oxides were found to be the most effective materials promoting selectivity. (author)

  20. Effect of Irrigation and Preplant Nitrogen Fertilizer Source on Maize in the Southern Great Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Bushong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the demand for maize increasing, production has spread into more water limited, semiarid regions. Couple this with the increasing nitrogen (N fertilizer costs and environmental concerns and the need for proper management practices has increased. A trial was established to evaluate the effects of different preplant N fertilizer sources on maize cultivated under deficit irrigation or rain-fed conditions on grain yield, N use efficiency (NUE, and water use efficiency (WUE. Two fertilizer sources, ammonium sulfate (AS and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN, applied at two rates, 90 and 180 kg N ha−1, were evaluated across four site-years. Deficit irrigation improved grain yield, WUE, and NUE compared to rain-fed conditions. The preplant application of a pure ammoniacal source of N fertilizer, such as AS, had a tendency to increase grain yields and NUE for rain-fed treatments. Under irrigated conditions, the use of UAN as a preplant N fertilizer source performed just as well or better at improving grain yield compared to AS, as long as the potential N loss mechanisms were minimized. Producers applying N preplant as a single application should adjust rates based on a reasonable yield goal and production practice.

  1. Global Pollution of Surface Waters from Point and Nonpoint Sources of Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van Drecht

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Global 0.5- by 0.5-degree resolution estimates are presented on the fate of nitrogen (N stemming from point and nonpoint sources, including plant uptake, denitrification, leaching from the rooting zone, rapid flow through shallow groundwater, and slow flow through deep groundwater to riverine systems. Historical N inputs are used to describe the N flows in groundwater. For nonpoint N sources (agricultural and natural ecosystems, calculations are based on local hydrology, climate, geology, soils, climate and land use combined with data for 1995 on crop production, N inputs from N fertilizers and animal manure, and estimates for ammonia emissions, biological N fixation, and N deposition. For point sources, our estimates are based on population densities and human N emissions, sanitation, and treatment. The results provide a first insight into the magnitude of the N losses from soil-plant systems and point sources in various parts of the world, and the fate of N during transport in atmosphere, groundwater, and surface water. The contribution to the river N load by anthropogenic N pollution is dominant in many river basins in Europe, Asia, and North Africa. Our model results explain much of the variation in measured N export from different world river basins.

  2. Productivity of irrigated beans due to sources of stabilized nitrogen fertilizer and controlled release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiely Gomes Bernardes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT New nitrogen fertilizers are available in the market actually, however, does not have results on the efficiency of the Cerrado conditions. With that objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of urea including stabilized and controlled release urea on yield of irrigated common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L in no-tillage system. The experiment was conducted in the winter crop, at Embrapa Arroz e Feijão, in Santo Antônio de Goiás, State of Goiás, Brazil. The experimental design was randomized blocks, with five replicates. Treatments consisted of five N sources (urea, urea + NBPT, urea + polymer, ammonium sulphate, and ammonium nitrate and a control (without N being applied 20 kg ha-1 of N at sowing and 80 kg ha-1 onf N in topdressing. We evaluated the chlorophyll content in leaves of common beans, the leaf N content and dry mass weight (MSPA in the flowering of common beans, the number of pods per plant, number of grains per pod, mass of 100 grains, grain yield and final stand of the common beans. The sources of nitrogen fertilizer did not influence, leaf N content, the mass of MSPA and the relative chlorophyll index of common beans. The use of polymerized urea and urea with urease inhibitor, did not produce increases in the number of grains per pod, number of pods per plant, mass of 100 grains and common beans yield compared to traditional sources of N, urea, ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate.

  3. Effect of Source and Amount of Nitrogen, the Amount of Calcium Carbonate of Soil and Different Amounts of Alfalfa Residue on Nitrogen Losses as Ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    tahereh mansouri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selecting the right source of nutrient in a particular cropping situation requires a consideration of economic, environmental, and social objectives. One of the objectives is to keep all nutrient losses to a minimum. Since the use of nitrogen chemical fertilizers began more than 100 years ago, it has been recognized that it can be lost as gaseous ammonia when an ammonical fertilizer is applied to calcareous soil. A process by which nitrogen exit from the soil in form of ammonia and enter to the atmosphere is called volatilization. Agricultural practices (use of chemical and animal fertilizers are known as major sources of ammonia volatilization into the atmosphere. Nitrogen losses not only economically but also in terms of environment pollution is important. Ammonia volatilization is one way of the nitrogen losses from agricultural and non-agricultural ecosystems. A variety of soil chemical properties interact with environmental conditions at the site of the fertilizer application to determine the extent of NH3 loss. This article study some of the major factors that contribute to NH3 loss from N fertilizer. The aims of this study were to evaluate the impacts of concentrations of soil calcium carbonate (experiment 1, plant residue application (experiment 2, nitrogen fertilizer rate and source on volatilization of ammonia from soil. Materials and Methods: Two factorial experiment with 36 treatments, three replications and 108 experimental unit for 25 days at a constant temperature of 30 ° C were conducted using a completely randomized design. The experimental treatments were three concentrations of soil calcium carbonate (20, 27 and 35% in experiment 1, three alfalfa plant residue application rates (0, 2.5 and 5% w/w in experiment 2, three rates of nitrogen (0, 200 and 400 kg/ha, four sources of nitrogen (urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and urea- sulfuric acid. Fertilizers were added to soil samples in form of solution and

  4. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (10 keV).

  5. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on fatty acid contents and composition in the green microalga, Chlorella sp. 227.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sunja; Lee, Dukhaeng; Luong, Thao Thanh; Park, Sora; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Taeho

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate and generalize the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth of and lipid production in Chlorella sp. 227, several nutritional combinations consisting of different carbon and nitrogen sources and concentrations were given to the media for cultivation of Chlorella sp. 227, respectively. The growth rate and lipid content were affected largely by concentration rather than by sources. The maximum specific growth was negatively affected by low concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. There is a maximum allowable inorganic carbon concentration (less than 500~1,000 mM bicarbonate) in autotrophic culture, but the maximum lipid content per gram dry cell weight (g DCW) was little affected by the concentration of inorganic carbon within the concentration. The lipid content per g DCW was increased when the microalga was cultured with the addition of glucose and bicarbonate (mixotrophic) at a fixed nitrogen concentration and with the lowest nitrogen concentration (0.2 mM), relatively. Considering that lipid contents per g DCW increased in those conditions, it suggests that a high ratio of carbon to nitrogen in culture media promotes lipid accumulation in the cells. Interestingly, a significant increase of the oleic acid amount to total fatty acids was observed in those conditions. These results showed the possibility to induce lipid production of high quality and content per g DCW by modifying the cultivation conditions.

  6. Influence of nitrogen and phosphorus sources on mycorrhizal lettuces under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Riccardo; Seguel, Alex; Cornejo, Pablo; Rao, Maria A.; Borie, Fernando

    2010-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) develop symbiotic associations with plants roots. These associations are very common in the natural environment and can provide a range of benefits to the host plant. AMF improve nutrition, enhance resistance to soil-borne pests and disease, increase resistance to drought and tolerance to heavy metals, and contribute to a better soil structure. However, agricultural intensive managements, such as the use of mineral fertilizes, pesticides, mouldboard tillage, monocultures and use of non-mycorrhizal crops, are detrimental to AMF. As a consequence, agroecosystems are impoverished in AMF and may not provide the full range of benefits to the crop. Organic farming systems may be less unfavourable to AMF because they exclude the use of water-soluble fertilisers and most pesticides, and generally they plan diverse crop rotations. The AMF develop the most common type of symbiosis in nature: about 90% of the plants are mycorrhizal and many agricultural crops are mycorrhizal. One of more mycorrhizal crops is lettuce, that is very widespread in intensive agricultural under greenhouse. Therefore, cultivated lettuce is know to be responsive to mycorrhizal colonization which can reach 80% of root length and contribute to phosphorus and nitrogen absorption by this plant specie. For this work four different lettuce cultivars (Romana, Milanesa, Grande Lagos and Escarola) were used to study mycorrhization under organic agricultural system, supplying compost from agricultural waste (1 kg m-2) as background fertilization for all plots, red guano as phosphorus source (75 U ha-1 and 150 U ha-1 of P2O5), lupine flour as nitrogen source (75 and 150 U/ha of N) and a combination of both. Lettuce plants were cultivated under greenhouse and after two months of growing, plants were harvested and dried and fresh weight of lettuce roots and shoots were evaluated. The number of spores, percentage of colonization, total mycelium and glomalin content were also

  7. Cryodeposition of nitrogen gas on a surface cooled by helium II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhuley, R. C.; Bosque, E. S.; Van Sciver, S. W. [Cryogenics Group, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 USA and Mechanical Engineering Department, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Catastrophic loss of beam tube vacuum in a superconducting particle accelerator can be simulated by sudden venting of a long high vacuum channel cooled on its outer surface by He II. The rapid rush of atmospheric air in such an event shows an interesting propagation effect, which is much slower than the shock wave that occurs with vacuum loss at ambient conditions. This is due to flash frosting/deposition of air on the cold walls of the channel. Hence to characterize the propagation as well as the associated heat transfer, it is first necessary to understand the deposition process. Here we attempt to model the growth of nitrogen frost layer on a cold plate in order to estimate its thickness with time. The deposition process can be divided into two regimes- free molecular and continuum. It is shown that in free molecular regime, the frost growth can be modeled reasonably well using cryopump theory and general heat transfer relations. The continuum regime is more complex to model, given the higher rate of gas incident on cryosurface causing a large heat load on helium bath and changing cryosurface temperature. Results from the continuum regime are discussed in the context of recent experiments performed in our laboratory.

  8. Prediction of final temperature following Joule-Thomson expansion of nitrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, F.-C.; Wu, S.-M.; Pai, C.-F.

    This paper shows a theoretical prediction of the final temperature Ta which can be obtained using the Joule-Thomson (J-T) effect by expanding nitrogen gas across a throttling valve to 0.101 MPa. An iteration method using the J-T coefficient μ is first used to predict Ta. The Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) and Redlich-Kwong (RK) equations are used to determine the specific volume and the derivatives of properties, respectively. Values of Ta can be well predicted by a five-step expansion simulation, except for cases where the isenthalpic lines to 0.101 M Pa cross a region around T = 120-160 K and P = 6.0 M Pa. In this region, calculated μ are lower than the experimental data. By equalizing the value of enthalpy after expansion to that before expansion and using the Peng-Robinson (PR) equation to calculate the departure function, the values of Ta can also be well predicted by the second method, except for Pb > 3.5 MPa in the cases where Tb = 170 and 150 K.

  9. Direct estimation of carbaryl by gas liquid chromatography with nitrogen phosphorus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battu, Raminderjit Singh; Mandal, Kousik; Urvashi; Pandher, Suneet; Takkar, Reenu; Singh, Balwinder

    2012-07-01

    A simple and efficient analytical method was standardized for the estimation of residues of carbaryl in various substrates comprising grape berries, kinnow pulps, kinnow rind and soil. The samples were refluxed using mixture of methanol: 0.5 N HCl (1:1 v/v); diluted with brine solution, partitioned into chloroform and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Further the samples were treated with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and primary secondary amine. Final clear extracts were concentrated under vacuum and reconstituted the volume into acetone. The residues were estimated directly on gas liquid chromatograph equipped with nitrogen phosphorus detection system equipped with a capillary column packed with 5 % diphenyl 95 % dimethyl polysiloxane non-polar phase. A consistent recovery from 82 % to 97 % for carbaryl was observed when samples were spiked at levels ranging from 0.05 to 1.00 mg kg(-1). The limit of quantification of the method was worked out to be 0.05 mg kg(-1) for grape berries, kinnow pulp, kinnow rind and soil.

  10. Impacts of temperature and nitrogen addition on greenhouse gas fluxes from turfgrass and coastal salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, K.; Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Brown, R.; Quinn, R. K.; Brannon, E.; Amador, J.; Craver, V.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change and nitrogen (N) loading from wastewater and fertilization are both increasingly significant anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem change. Among the ecosystems affected by these drivers are coastal salt marshes, although turf grasses are often direct recipients of N inputs prior to their discharge to the coast. To estimate changes in greenhouse gas emissions from coastal marsh grasses and turfgrasses, we created a mesocosm experiment using a common turfgrass (Schedonorus arundinaceus) and a dominant native coastal cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) in growth chambers kept under current and projected future temperatures with or without added N inputs. For N fertilization, we used recovered biosolids from wastewater sludge. We measured fluxes of N2O, CO2, and CH4 in the mesocosms through a growing season, the summer of 2016. Above and belowground biomass will be compared between experimental treatments and tested as a potential proxy for CO2 fluxes along with soil properties, including salinity, moisture, and DIN. Preliminary results indicate that there were few significant fluxes of N2O from the mesocosm plots. Both the highest N2O and CO2 emissions (9.6 umol m-2 h-1 and 15.1 m-2 s-1 respectively) were measured from turfgrass mesocosms. The highest CH4 emissions (61.9 umol m-2 h-1) were measured from cordgrass mesocosms. This data will be used to determine if fertilization using recovered biosolids is a sustainable method of fertilizer application.

  11. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang Seouk [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook, E-mail: Seunglee@pusan.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1–10 mm{sup 2}. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  12. Simulation of ideal-gas flow by nitrogen and other selected gases at cryogenic temperatures. [transonic flow in cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. M.; Adcock, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    The real gas behavior of nitrogen, the gas normally used in transonic cryogenic tunnels, is reported for the following flow processes: isentropic expansion, normal shocks, boundary layers, and interactions between shock waves and boundary layers. The only difference in predicted pressure ratio between nitrogen and an ideal gas which may limit the minimum operating temperature of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels occur at total pressures approaching 9 atm and total temperatures 10 K below the corresponding saturation temperature. These pressure differences approach 1 percent for both isentropic expansions and normal shocks. Alternative cryogenic test gases were also analyzed. Differences between air and an ideal diatomic gas are similar in magnitude to those for nitrogen and should present no difficulty. However, differences for helium and hydrogen are over an order of magnitude greater than those for nitrogen or air. It is concluded that helium and cryogenic hydrogen would not approximate the compressible flow of an ideal diatomic gas.

  13. Amino Acids as a Source of Organic Nitrogen in Antarctic Endolithic Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, G. D.; Sun, H. J.

    2002-12-01

    In the Antarctic Dry Valleys, cryptoendolithic microbial communities occur within porous sandstone rocks. Current understanding of the mechanisms of physiological adaptation of these communities to the harsh Antarctic environment is limited, because traditional methods of studying microbial physiology are very difficult to apply to organisms with extremely low levels of metabolic activity. In order to fully understand carbon and nitrogen cycling and nutrient uptake in cryptoendolithic communities, and the metabolic costs that the organisms incur in order to survive, it is necessary to employ molecular geochemical techniques such as amino acid analysis in addition to physiological methods. Low-molecular-weight biomolecules such as amino acids can be used as tracers of carbon and nitrogen uptake and loss by microbial communities living in solid-state matrices such as rock or sediment. We have measured the concentrations and D/L ratios for several amino acids as a function of depth in a large sandstone boulder. Concentrations of both free and bound amino acids decrease by more than two orders of magnitude from the surface to the visible base of the community (approximately 1.2 cm depth), while the D/L ratios of the amino acids increase from near zero to 0.2 or greater over the same depth interval. We interpret these data as an indication that one or more community members are selectively scavenging L-amino acids as the amino acids are transported through the rock by intermittently percolating meltwater. This is consistent with the known preference of lichens for amino acids as nitrogen sources rather than inorganic nitrogen under conditions of nutrient limitation. It is not yet clear whether there is also a contribution to amino acid uptake from heterotropic bacteria associated with the cryptoendolithic community. The increase in D/L ratios with depth observed in the rock is too great to be attributable solely to the natural occurrence of D-amino acids in bacteria

  14. Effect of nitrogen source on growth and lipid accumulation in Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella ellipsoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Garcinuño, Álvaro; Tabernero, Antonio; Sánchez-Álvarez, José Ma; Martin del Valle, Eva M; Galán, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    Discovering microalgae strains containing a high lipid yield and adequate fatty acid composition is becoming a crucial fact in algae-oil factories. In this study, two unknown strains, named Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella ellipsoidea, have been tested for their response to different nitrogen sources, in order to determine its influence in the production of lipids. For S. abundans, autotrophic culture with ammonium nitrate offers the maximum lipid yield, obtaining up to 3.55 mg L(-1) d(-1). For C. ellipsoidea, heterotrophic culture with ammonium nitrate has been shown to be the best condition, reaching a lipid production of 9.27 mg L(-1) d(-1). Moreover, fatty acid composition obtained from these cultures meets international biodiesel standards with an important amount of C18:1, achieving 70% of total fatty acids and thus representing a potential use of these two strains at an industrial scale.

  15. Analysis of Magnetism in High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel and Its Elimination by High Temperature Gas Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wan; Yibin Ren; Bingchun Zhang; Ke Yang

    2011-01-01

    Stable austenitic structure in medical stainless steels is basically required for surgical implantation. A weak magnetism was found in a high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel for cardiovascular stent application. This magnetic behavior in high nitrogen stainless steel was investigated by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The results showed that the magnetism came from the composition segregation of ferrite formation elements such as Cr and Mo in the steel and some δ-ferrites were locally formed during the pressurized electroslag remelting process. The magnetism of high nitrogen stainless steel could be eliminated by a proper high temperature gas nitriding (HTGN).

  16. Distribution and sources of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and biogenic silica in the sediments of Chilika lagoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sadaf Nazneen; N Janardhana Raju

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the spatial and vertical distribution of organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and biogenic silica (BSi) in the sedimentary environments of Asia’s largest brackish water lagoon. Surface and core sediments were collected from various locations of the Chilika lagoon and were analysed for grain-size distribution and major elements in order to understand their distribution and sources. Sand is the dominant fraction followed by silt+clay. Primary production within the lagoon, terrestrial input from river discharge and anthropogenic activities in the vicinity of the lagoon control the distribution of OC, TN, TP and BSi in the surface as well as in the core sediments. Low C/N ratios in the surface sediments (3.49–3.41) and cores (4–11.86) suggest that phytoplankton and macroalgae may be major contributors of organic matter (OM) in the lagoon. BSi is mainly associated with the mud fraction. Core C5 from Balugaon region shows the highest concentration of OC ranging from 0.58–2.34%, especially in the upper 30 cm, due to direct discharge of large amounts of untreated sewage into the lagoon. The study highlights that Chilika is a dynamic ecosystem with a large contribution of OM by autochthonous sources with some input from anthropogenic sources as well.

  17. Assessment of Nitrogen Pollutant Sources in Surface Waters of Taihu Lake Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ying-Xin; XIONG Zheng-Qin; XING Guang-Xi; SUN Guo-Qing; ZHU Zhao-Liang

    2007-01-01

    The nitrogen(N)pollution status of the 12 most important rivers in Changshu,Taihu Lake region was investigated.Water samples were collected from depths of 0.5-1.0 m with the aid of the global positioning system (GPS).The seasonal variations in the concentrations of different N components in the rivers were measured.Using tension-free monolith lysimeters and 15 N-labeled fertilizer,field experiments were carried out in this region to determine variations of 15Nabundance of NO-3 in the leachate during the rice and wheat growing seasons,respectively.Results showed that the main source of N pollution of surface waters in the Taihu Lake region was not the N fertilizer applied in the farmland but the urban domestic sewage and rural human and animal excreta directly discharged into the water bodies without treatment.Atmospheric dry and wet N deposition was another evident source of N pollutant of the surface waters.In conclusion.it would not be correct to attribute the N applied to farmlands as the source of N pollution of the surface waters in this region.

  18. Soybean cultivation for Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSSs): The effect of hydroponic system and nitrogen source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Roberta; Buonomo, Roberta; Dixon, Mike A.; Barbieri, Giancarlo; De Pascale, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the plant species selected within the European Space Agency (ESA) Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project for hydroponic cultivation in Biological Life Support Systems (BLSSs), because of the high nutritional value of seeds. Root symbiosis of soybean with Bradirhizobium japonicum contributes to plant nutrition in soil, providing ammonium through the bacterial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two hydroponic systems, Nutrient Film Technique (NFT) and cultivation on rockwool, and two nitrogen sources in the nutrient solution, nitrate (as Ca(NO3)2 and KNO3) and urea (CO(NH2)2), on root symbiosis, plant growth and seeds production of soybean. Plants of cultivar 'OT8914', inoculated with B. japonicum strain BUS-2, were grown in a growth chamber, under controlled environmental conditions. Cultivation on rockwool positively influenced root nodulation and plant growth and yield, without affecting the proximate composition of seeds, compared to NFT. Urea as the sole source of N drastically reduced the seed production and the harvest index of soybean plants, presumably because of ammonium toxicity, even though it enhanced root nodulation and increased the N content of seeds. In the view of large-scale cultivation for space colony on planetary surfaces, the possibility to use porous media, prepared using in situ resources, should be investigated. Urea can be included in the nutrient formulation for soybean in order to promote bacterial activity, however a proper ammonium/nitrate ratio should be maintained.

  19. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed in high temperature combustion processes such as in power generation and motor vehicles. Increasingly stringent regulation of these harmful emissions continues to drive interest in developing, understanding and studying new catalytic formulations for exhaust aftertreatment. For mobile sources, predominantly heavy duty diesel engines, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 has become the principal means of NO x abatement. An alternative technology developed, but now surpassed by SCR, is NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) catalysis. Both technologies have been studied in our laboratory and are the basis for this dissertation. We studied seven different lean NOx trap (LNT) monolith formulations for NSR ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 wt.% Pt and 4 to 20 wt.% Ba loadings on γ-Al 2O3. The noble metal component of a LNT oxidizes NO to NO 2 aiding in the storage of NO2 on the alkaline earth component. Before the storage component saturates, a reductant such as H2 is introduced into the vehicular exhaust and the stored NOx is released and reduced to N2. Once the storage component is free of NOx, reductant flow is ceased and storage is begun anew. Our research focused on understanding the effects that CO2 and H2O have on the storage capacity of the LNT over short as well as extended periods of time. We found that for high Ba loadings, CO 2 had a consistently detrimental effect on the fast NOx storage capacity (NSC), defined as the amount of NOx the catalyst can store before 1% of the inlet NOx is measured in the reactor outlet. Over long NOx storage periods, CO2 continued to inhibit storage compared to the same catalyst in CO2 free conditions. On low loadings of Ba, however, the inhibition of CO2 was significantly reduced. We found that the loading dependent characteristics of the Ba phase affected the way in which CO2 adsorbed on the storage component, which greatly affected the stability of the species on lower Ba loadings. The less stable

  20. Marine biogenic source of atmospheric organic nitrogen in the subtropical North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Katye E; Fawcett, Sarah E; Peters, Andrew J; Sigman, Daniel M; Hastings, Meredith G

    2016-01-26

    Global models estimate that the anthropogenic component of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to the ocean accounts for up to a third of the ocean's external N supply and 10% of anthropogenic CO2 uptake. However, there are few observational constraints from the marine atmospheric environment to validate these findings. Due to the paucity of atmospheric organic N data, the largest uncertainties related to atmospheric N deposition are the sources and cycling of organic N, which is 20-80% of total N deposition. We studied the concentration and chemical composition of rainwater and aerosol organic N collected on the island of Bermuda in the western North Atlantic Ocean over 18 mo. Here, we show that the water-soluble organic N concentration ([WSON]) in marine aerosol is strongly correlated with surface ocean primary productivity and wind speed, suggesting a marine biogenic source for aerosol WSON. The chemical composition of high-[WSON] aerosols also indicates a primary marine source. We find that the WSON in marine rain is compositionally different from that in concurrently collected aerosols, suggesting that in-cloud scavenging (as opposed to below-cloud "washout") is the main contributor to rain WSON. We conclude that anthropogenic activity is not a significant source of organic N to the marine atmosphere over the North Atlantic, despite downwind transport from large pollution sources in North America. This, in conjunction with previous work on ammonium and nitrate, leads to the conclusion that only 27% of total N deposition to the global ocean is anthropogenic, in contrast to the 80% estimated previously.

  1. On the Ratio of Sulfur Dioxide to Nitrogen Oxides as an Indicator of Air Pollution Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirel, Ronit; Dayan, Uri

    2001-07-01

    The ratio of sulfur dioxide to nitrogen oxides (RSN = SO2/NOx) is one indicator of air pollution sources. The role of this ratio in source attribution is illustrated here for the Ashdod area, located in the southern coastal plain of Israel. The main sources of pollution in the area are the tall stacks of the Eshkol power plant, the stacks of oil refineries, and areal sources (stationary and mobile). The factors that affect RSN are studied using four regression models: a binary regression tree in original scale, a tree in logarithmic scale, a data partition produced by a combination of the two trees, and a linear regression model. All models have similar relative prediction error, with the combined partition best highlighting the sources of variability in RSN: (a) very low values (interquartile range of [0.12, 0.48]) are associated with traffic, (b) low values ([0.43, 1.00]) are attributed to the power plant and to daytime emissions of local industry, (c) medium values ([0.74, 1.90]) are associated with local industry emissions during cooler hours of the day and refinery emissions mainly on slow wind episodes, and (d) high values ([1.07, 4.30]) are attributed to refinery emissions during moderate to fast wind episodes. Analysis of the number of episodes of increased concentrations indicates that, during 1996 and 1997, about 42% of SO2 episodes are attributable to the power plant and 33% to the refineries. Increased-NOx episodes are mainly contributed by traffic (91%) and power plant (4.5%) emissions.

  2. Variability in δ{sup 15}N of intertidal brown algae along a salinity gradient: Differential impact of nitrogen sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Inés G., E-mail: inesgviana@gmail.com; Bode, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    While it is generally agreed that δ{sup 15}N of brown macroalgae can discriminate between anthropogenic and natural sources of nitrogen, this study provides new insights on net fractionation processes occurring in some of these species. The contribution of continental and marine sources of nitrogen to benthic macroalgae in the estuary-ria system of A Coruña (NW Spain) was investigated by analyzing the temporal (at a monthly and annual basis) and spatial (up to 10 km) variability of δ{sup 15}N in the macroalgae Ascophyllum nodosum and three species of the genus Fucus (F. serratus, F. spiralis and F. vesiculosus). Total nitrate and ammonium concentrations and δ{sup 15}N-DIN, along with salinity and temperature in seawater were also studied to address the sources of such variability. Macroalgal δ{sup 15}N and nutrient concentrations decreased from estuarine to marine waters, suggesting larger dominance of anthropogenic nitrogen sources in the estuary. However, δ{sup 15}N values of macroalgae were generally higher than those of ambient nitrogen at all temporal and spatial scales considered. This suggests that the isotopic composition of these macroalgae is strongly affected by fractionation during uptake, assimilation or release of nitrogen. The absence of correlation between macroalgal and water samples suggests that the δ{sup 15}N of the species considered cannot be used for monitoring short-term changes. But their long lifespan and slow turnover rates make them suitable to determine the impact of the different nitrogen sources integrated over long-time periods. - Highlights: • Variability of Fucacean δ{sup 15}N indicates N sources along a salinity gradient. • δ{sup 15}N of Fucaceae and seawater are not correlated at short time scales. • Isotopic fractionation in macroalgal tissue varies at seasonal and at local scale. • Fucacean species are suitable for monitoring chronic N loadings.

  3. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from a few-terawatt laser driven plasma acceleration using a nitrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. S.; Moorti, A.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the laser plasma acceleration of electrons has been carried out using 3 TW, 45 fs duration titanium sapphire laser pulse interaction with a nitrogen gas jet at an intensity of 2 × 1018 W cm-2. We have observed the stable generation of a well collimated electron beam with divergence and pointing variation ˜10 mrad from nitrogen gas jet plasma at an optimum plasma density around 3 × 1019 cm-3. The energy spectrum of the electron beam was quasi-monoenergetic with an average peak energy and a charge around 25 MeV and 30 pC respectively. The results will be useful for better understanding and control of ionization injection and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in high-Z gases and also towards the development of practical LWFA for various applications including injectors for high energy accelerators.

  4. Nitrogen hydrides in interstellar gas II. Analysis of Herschel/HIFI observations towards W49N and G10.6-0.4 (W31C)

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, C M; Mookerjea, B; Olofsson, A O H; Black, J H; Gerin, M; Herbst, E; Bell, T A; Coutens, A; Godard, B; Goicoechea, J R; Hassel, G E; Hily-Blant, P; Menten, K M; Muller, H S P; Pearson, J C; Yu, S; 10.1051/0004-6361/201118686

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Herschel-HIFI instrument to observe interstellar nitrogen hydrides along the sight-lines towards W49N and G10.6-0.4 in order to elucidate the production pathways leading to nitrogen-bearing species in diffuse gas. All detections show absorption by foreground material over a wide range of velocities, as well as absorption associated directly with the hot-core source itself. As in the previously published observations towards G10.6-0.4, the NH, NH2 and NH3 spectra towards W49N show strikingly similar and non-saturated absorption features. We decompose the absorption of the foreground material towards W49N into different velocity components in order to investigate whether the relative abundances vary among the velocity components, and, in addition, we re-analyse the absorption lines towards G10.6-0.4 in the same manner. Abundances, with respect to molecular hydrogen, in each velocity component are estimated using CH. The analysis points to a co-existence of the nitrogen hydrides in diffuse or tr...

  5. Nitrogen-monoxide gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soojeong; Kim, Hyojin; Kim, Dojin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We report the nitrogen-monoxide (NO) gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide (CuO) nanorod arrays synthesized by using the hydrothermal method with a CuO nanoparticle seed layer deposited on a glass substrate via sputtering process. We synthesized polycrystalline CuO nanorods measuring 200 to 300 nm in length and 20 to 30 nm in diameter for three controlled molarity ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 between copper nitrate trihydrate [Cu(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O] and hexamethylenetetramine (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}). The crystal structures and morphologies of the synthesized CuO nanorod arrays were examined using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The gas-sensing measurements for NO gas in dry air indicated that the CuO nanorodarray-based gas sensors synthesized under hydrothermal condition at a molarity ratio of 1:2 showed the best gas sensing response to NO gas. These CuO nanorod-array gas sensors exhibited a highly sensitive response to NO gas, with a maximum sensitivity of about 650% for 10 ppm NO in dry air at an operating temperature of 100 .deg. C. These transparent p-type CuO nanorod-array gas sensors have shown a reversible and reliable response to NO gas over a range of operating temperatures. These results indicate certain potential use of p-type oxide semiconductor CuO nanorods as sensing materials for several types of gas sensors, including p - n junction gas sensors.

  6. Molecular mechanisms for the gas-phase conversion of intermediates during cellulose gasification under nitrogen and oxygen/nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukutome Asuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase conversions of volatile intermediates from cellulose (AvicelPH-101 were studied using a two-stage experimental setup and compared with those of levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-b-D-glucopyranose. Under N2or 7% O2/N2flow, vapors produced from the pyrolysis zone (500°C degraded in the secondary reaction zone at 400,500, 600 or 900°C (residence time:0.8-1.4 s. The 69.3% (C-based of levoglucosan was obtained at 400°C under N2flow along with 1,6-anhydro-b-D-glucofuranose (8.3 %, C-based, indicating that these anhydrosugars are the major volatile intermediates from cellulose pyrolysis. Levoglucosan and other volatiles started to fragment at 600°C, and cellulose was completely gasified at 900°C. Most gas/tar formations are explained by gas-phase reactions of levoglucosan reported previously, except for some minor reactions originating from the molten-phase pyrolysis, which produced benzene, furans and 1,6-anhydro-b-D-glucofuranose. Synergetic effects of O2and volatiles accelerated fragmentation and cellulose gasification was completed at 600°C, which reduced benzene and hydrocarbon gas productions. The molecular mechanisms including the action of O2as a biradical are discussed. These lines of information provide insights into the development of tar-free clean gasification that maintains high efficiency.

  7. Point source influences on the carbon and nitrogen geochemistry of sediments in the Stockholm inner archipelago, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlin, Hanna S. [Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: hanna.bohlin@geo.su.se; Moerth, Carl-Magnus [Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Holm, Nils G. [Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-07-31

    This study reports analyses of carbon and nitrogen content, and {delta} {sup 15}N and {delta} {sup 13}C in sediments of the Hoeggarnsfjaerden Bay near Stockholm. Samples have been taken upstream, near, and downstream of a point source of processed leach water from a garbage dump. The surface sediment at the upstream and downstream sites has {delta} {sup 15}N and {delta} {sup 13}C close to the expected background of the area, even though a contribution from the leach water can be observed downstream of the point source. The sediment close to the outflow is strongly influenced by the carbon and nitrogen in the leach water.

  8. Photosynthetic response to nitrogen source and different ratios of nitrogen and phosphorus in toxic cyanobacteria, Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guotao Peng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequent outbreak of cyanobacterial blooms has become a worldwide phenomenon in freshwater ecosystems. Studies have elucidated the close relationship between harmful algal blooms and nutrient contents, including the loading of nitrogen and the ratios of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P. In this study, the effect of inorganic (nitrate and ammonium and organic (urea nitrogen at varied N/P ratios on the Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 accumulation and photosynthesis was investigated.  The optimal NO3/P in this study were 30~50 indicated by the cell abundance (4.1×106/mL, pigment concentration (chlorophyll a 3.1 mg/L,  phycocyanin 8.3mg/L, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (rETR, Ek, α, φPSII and Fv/Fm values, while too high NO3-N (N/P=100:1 would cause an intracellular nitrate inhibition, leading to a decrease of photosynthetic activity. In addition, low concentration of NH4-N (N/P=4:1 would favor the M. aeruginosa growth and photosynthesis, and high NH4/P ratio (>16 would rise the ammonium toxicity of algal cells and affect the N assimilation. In urea treatments, M. aeruginosa responded similarly to the NH4-N treatments both in growth curves and pigment contents, and the favorable N/P ratio was between 16~30, suggested by the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. The results demonstrated that the various chemical forms of N and N/P ratios have a significant impact on Microcystis abundance and photosynthesis. More work is needed to figure out the mechanism of nitrogen utilization by Microcystis and  the photosynthetic response to nutrient stress at the molecular level.

  9. Sources and amounts of Nitrogen Deposited in Sky-Island Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, X.; McIntosh, J. C.; Sorooshian, A.; Lohse, K. A.; Brooks, P. D.; Troch, P. A.; Chorover, J.; Heidbuechel, I.

    2011-12-01

    Wet and dry deposition of ammonia, amines, and oxidation products of nitrogen (N) oxides represent major inputs of N onto land. High altitude ecosystems, which are common in Arizona, are especially vulnerable to the effects of N deposition. Recent measurements in the Rocky Mountain region indicate that N deposition fluxes have increased nearly 20-fold since pre-industrial times. Nitrate is one of the most common contaminants degrading water quality worldwide. In Arizona, over 1,000 groundwater wells contain nitrate concentrations above the EPA drinking water standard (10 mg/L NO3-N). Recent studies in the Tucson Basin, using multiple-isotope tracers show that atmospheric deposition of N may be a significant contributor to nitrate contamination to surface and ground water (up to 50%). The primary objective of this research is to determine the sources and amount of nitrogen deposition in the Santa Catalina Mountains in southeastern Arizona, north of Tucson. To meet this objective, NO3, NO2, NH4, amines, organic-N, 15N, 18O, and 17O in atmospheric deposition, soil waters and surface waters were measured from the Marshall Gulch and Mt. Bigelow sites at the top of the Catalina mountains, since 2008. Nutrient data was coupled with hydrologic measurements (e.g. amount of precipitation, stream discharge) and catchment characteristics (e.g. soil depth, bedrock lithology) to investigate controls on nutrient dynamics. The results show that total dissolved nitrogen (TN), nitrate (NO3-N), nitrite (NO2-N), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were slightly higher in water draining the granite versus schist hillslopes. Mean and median concentrations of DOC, TN, NO3-N and NO2-N decrease downstream at the Marshall Gulch, upper elevation site. Measurements of the composition of aerosol particles at the base and top of the Catalina Mountains show that dust aerosol is a major contributor to dry deposition at both sites during the spring and summer. In addition, NO3, NO2

  10. Feasibility of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel source for refuse trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietsman, Josias; Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul; Rand, Aaron J; Gokhale, Bhushan; Lord, Dominique; Kumar, Sunil

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology to evaluate the feasibility of using landfill gas (LFG) as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel source for heavy-duty refuse trucks operating on landfills. Using LFG as a vehicle fuel can make the landfills more self-sustaining, reduce their dependence on fossil fuels, and reduce emissions and greenhouse gases. Acrion Technologies Inc. in association with Mack Trucks Inc. developed a technology to generate LNG from LFG using the CO2 WASH process. A successful application of this process was performed at the Eco Complex in Burlington County, PA. During this application two LNG refuse trucks were operated for 600 hr each using LNG produced from gases from the landfill. The methodology developed in this paper can evaluate the feasibility of three LFG options: doing nothing, electricity generation, and producing LNG to fuel refuse trucks. The methodology involved the modeling of several components: LFG generation, energy recovery processes, fleet operations, economic feasibility, and decision-making. The economic feasibility considers factors such as capital, maintenance, operational, and fuel costs, emissions and tax benefits, and the sale of products such as surplus LNG and food-grade carbon dioxide (CO2). Texas was used as a case study. The 96 landfills in Texas were prioritized and 17 landfills were identified that showed potential for converting LFG to LNG for use as a refuse truck fuel. The methodology was applied to a pilot landfill in El Paso, TX. The analysis showed that converting LFG to LNG to fuel refuse trucks proved to be the most feasible option and that the methodology can be applied for any landfill that considers this option.

  11. Sources and sinks of nitrogen and phosphorus to a deep, oligotrophic lake, Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.W.; Cox, S.E.; Embrey, S.S.; Huffman, R.L.; Olsen, T.D.; Fradkin, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Crescent, in Olympic National Park in the northwest corner of Washington State is a deep-water lake renowned for its pristine water quality and oligotrophic nature. To examine the major sources and sinks of nutrients (as total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and dissolved nitrate), a study was conducted in the Lake Crescent watershed. The study involved measuring five major inflow streams, the Lyre River as the major outflow, recording weather and climatic data, coring lake bed sediment, and analyzing nutrient chemistry in several relevant media over 14 months. Water samples for total nitrogen, total phosphorous, and dissolved nitrate from the five inflow streams, the outlet Lyre River, and two stations in the lake were collected monthly from May 2006 through May 2007. Periodic samples of shallow water from temporary sampling wells were collected at numerous locations around the lake. Concentrations of nutrients detected in Lake Crescent and tributaries were then applied to the water budget estimates to arrive at monthly and annual loads from various environmental components within the watershed. Other sources, such as leaf litter, pollen, or automobile exhaust were estimated from annual values obtained from various literature sources. This information then was used to construct a nutrient budget for total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The nitrogen budget generally highlights vehicle traffic-diesel trucks in particular-along U.S. Highway 101 as a potential major anthropogenic source of nitrogen compounds in the lake. In contrast, contribution of nitrogen compounds from onsite septic systems appears to be relatively minor related to the other sources identified.

  12. Sources and sinks of nitrogen and phosphorus to a deep, oligotrophic lake, Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.W.; Cox, S.E.; Embrey, S.S.; Huffman, R.L.; Olsen, T.D.; Fradkin, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Crescent, in Olympic National Park in the northwest corner of Washington State is a deep-water lake renowned for its pristine water quality and oligotrophic nature. To examine the major sources and sinks of nutrients (as total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and dissolved nitrate), a study was conducted in the Lake Crescent watershed. The study involved measuring five major inflow streams, the Lyre River as the major outflow, recording weather and climatic data, coring lake bed sediment, and analyzing nutrient chemistry in several relevant media over 14 months. Water samples for total nitrogen, total phosphorous, and dissolved nitrate from the five inflow streams, the outlet Lyre River, and two stations in the lake were collected monthly from May 2006 through May 2007. Periodic samples of shallow water from temporary sampling wells were collected at numerous locations around the lake. Concentrations of nutrients detected in Lake Crescent and tributaries were then applied to the water budget estimates to arrive at monthly and annual loads from various environmental components within the watershed. Other sources, such as leaf litter, pollen, or automobile exhaust were estimated from annual values obtained from various literature sources. This information then was used to construct a nutrient budget for total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The nitrogen budget generally highlights vehicle traffic-diesel trucks in particular-along U.S. Highway 101 as a potential major anthropogenic source of nitrogen compounds in the lake. In contrast, contribution of nitrogen compounds from onsite septic systems appears to be relatively minor related to the other sources identified.

  13. On determining the sources of hot gas in the halo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Shelton

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available El gas caliente sobre el disco gal actico representa un problema importante e interesante. >Podr a este gas haber sido lanzado desde el disco por burbujas calientes, provenir de fuera de la Galaxia o ser calentado in situ? Cada una de estas posibilidades tiene consecuencias importantes para la evoluci on de la Galaxia, por lo que es necesario tener mejores pruebas. Discutimos varios modelos sobre el origen del gas caliente, su historial de ionizaci on y su apariencia espectral, as como un esquema que permita diferenciar los diferentes modelos con los datos de rayos-X y lejano UV que colectar an los nuevos observatorios.

  14. From middens to modern estuaries, oyster shells sequester source-specific nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Elizabeth S.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; Andrus, C. Fred T.; Jackson, H. Edwin

    2017-04-01

    Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were an important food resource for native peoples of the northern Gulf of Mexico, who deposited waste shells in middens. Nitrogen (N) stable isotopes (δ15N) in bivalve shells have been used as modern proxies for estuarine N sources because they approximate δ15N in suspended particulate matter. We tested the use of midden shell δ15N as a proxy for ancient estuarine N sources. We hypothesized that isotopic signatures in ancient shells from coastal Mississippi would differ from modern shells due to increased anthropogenic N sources, such as wastewater, through time. We decalcified shells using an acidification technique previously developed for modern bivalves, but modified to determine δ15N, δ13C, %N, and % organic C of these low-N, high-C specimens. The modified method resulted in the greatest percentage of usable data from midden shells. Our results showed that oyster shell δ15N did not significantly differ between ancient (500-2100 years old) and modern oysters from the same locations where the sites had undergone relatively little land-use change. δ15N values in modern shells, however, were positively correlated with water column nitrate concentrations associated with urbanization. When N content and total shell mass were combined, we estimated that middens sequestered 410-39,000 kg of relic N, buried at a rate of up to 5 kg N m-2 yr-1. This study provides a relatively simple technique to assess baseline conditions in ecosystems over long time scales by demonstrating that midden shells can be an indicator of pre-historic N source to estuaries and are a potentially significant but previously uncharacterized estuarine N sink.

  15. Optical and Electron Spin Resonance Studies of Destruction of Porous Structures Formed by Nitrogen-Rare Gas Nanoclusters in Bulk Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Patrick T.; Meraki, Adil; Boltnev, Roman E.; Lee, David M.; Khmelenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-11-01

    We studied optical and electron spin resonance spectra during destruction of porous structures formed by nitrogen-rare gas (RG) nanoclusters in bulk superfluid helium containing high concentrations of stabilized nitrogen atoms. Samples were created by injecting products of a radio frequency discharge of nitrogen-rare gas-helium gas mixtures into bulk superfluid helium. These samples have a high energy density allowing the study of energy release in chemical processes inside of nanocluster aggregates. The rare gases used in the studies were neon, argon, and krypton. We also studied the effects of changing the relative concentrations between nitrogen and rare gas on thermoluminescence spectra during destruction of the samples. At the beginning of the destructions, α -group of nitrogen atoms, Vegard-Kaplan bands of N_2 molecules, and β -group of O atoms were observed. The final destruction of the samples were characterized by a series bright flashes. Spectra obtained during these flashes contain M- and β -bands of NO molecules, the intensities of which depend on the concentration of molecular nitrogen in the gas mixture as well as the type of rare gas present in the gas mixture.

  16. Liquefaction of remote sources of natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.W.

    1981-12-01

    The objective was to determine the technical and financial feasibility of liquefying remote reserves of natural gas and transporting the liquefied product to users. The proposed methodology included efforts to (1) identify any prohibitive or limiting laws and/or regulations; (2) identify sufficient unutilized reserves in remote areas to justify further investigation; (3) identify existing portable liquefaction equipment (or an interested manufacturer that could supply the needed equipment) to obtain cost and performance data; (4) determine site preparation, supply and production costs for use in assessing economic feasibility; and (5) identify potential users. The conclusion is that the liquefaction of natural gas in remote areas of Appalachia is not economically feasible as long as an adequate and reliable supply of pipeline gas is perceived to be available for the forseable future and the price per Btu of pipeline gas remains so far below other fuels. 3 tables.

  17. Nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions from a riparian wetland soil: An undisturbed soil column study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Leoz, Borja [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Antigueedad, Inaki [Department of Geodynamic, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Garbisu, Carlos [Department of Ecosystems, NEIKER-Tecnalia, E-48160 Derio (Spain); Ruiz-Romera, Estilita, E-mail: estilita.ruiz@ehu.es [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Riparian wetlands bordering intensively managed agricultural fields can act as biological filters that retain and transform agrochemicals such as nitrate and pesticides. Nitrate removal in wetlands has usually been attributed to denitrification processes which in turn imply the production of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O). Denitrification processes were studied in the Salburua wetland (northern Spain) by using undisturbed soil columns which were subsequently divided into three sections corresponding to A-, Bg- and B2g-soil horizons. Soil horizons were subjected to leaching with a 200 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -} L{sup -1} solution (rate: 90 mL day{sup -1}) for 125 days at two different temperatures (10 and 20 {sup o}C), using a new experimental design for leaching assays which enabled not only to evaluate leachate composition but also to measure gas emissions during the leaching process. Column leachate samples were analyzed for NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. Emissions of greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) were determined in the undisturbed soil columns. The A horizon at 20 {sup o}C showed the highest rates of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal (1.56 mg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O production (5.89 mg CO{sub 2} kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1} and 55.71 {mu}g N-N{sub 2}O kg{sup -1} DW soil day{sup -1}). For the Salburua wetland riparian soil, we estimated a potential nitrate removal capacity of 1012 kg N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}, and potential greenhouse gas emissions of 5620 kg CO{sub 2} ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} and 240 kg N-N{sub 2}O ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}. - Research Highlights: {yields}A new experimental design is proposed for leaching assays to simulate nitrogen transformations in riparian wetland soil. {yields}Denitrification is the main process responsible for nitrate removal in the riparian zone of Salburua wetland. {yields

  18. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianxian; Yin, Shan; Li, Yinsheng; Zhuang, Honglei; Li, Changsheng; Liu, Chunjiang

    2014-02-15

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH4) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH4 and N2O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N2O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N2O/m(2) were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields.

  19. New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Feng; Dou, Zheng-Xia; He, Pan; Ju, Xiao-Tang; Powlson, David; Chadwick, Dave; Norse, David; Lu, Yue-Lai; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Liang; Chen, Xin-Ping; Cassman, Kenneth G; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2013-05-21

    Synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer has played a key role in enhancing food production and keeping half of the world's population adequately fed. However, decades of N fertilizer overuse in many parts of the world have contributed to soil, water, and air pollution; reducing excessive N losses and emissions is a central environmental challenge in the 21st century. China's participation is essential to global efforts in reducing N-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions because China is the largest producer and consumer of fertilizer N. To evaluate the impact of China's use of N fertilizer, we quantify the carbon footprint of China's N fertilizer production and consumption chain using life cycle analysis. For every ton of N fertilizer manufactured and used, 13.5 tons of CO2-equivalent (eq) (t CO2-eq) is emitted, compared with 9.7 t CO2-eq in Europe. Emissions in China tripled from 1980 [131 terrogram (Tg) of CO2-eq (Tg CO2-eq)] to 2010 (452 Tg CO2-eq). N fertilizer-related emissions constitute about 7% of GHG emissions from the entire Chinese economy and exceed soil carbon gain resulting from N fertilizer use by several-fold. We identified potential emission reductions by comparing prevailing technologies and management practices in China with more advanced options worldwide. Mitigation opportunities include improving methane recovery during coal mining, enhancing energy efficiency in fertilizer manufacture, and minimizing N overuse in field-level crop production. We find that use of advanced technologies could cut N fertilizer-related emissions by 20-63%, amounting to 102-357 Tg CO2-eq annually. Such reduction would decrease China's total GHG emissions by 2-6%, which is significant on a global scale.

  20. Hygroscopicity and ammonia volatilization losses from nitrogen sources in coated urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Abreu Faria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hygroscopic fertilizers tend to absorb moisture from the air and may have undesirable characteristics such as moistness, clumping and lower fluidity, hampering the application. The increasing use of urea is due to its numerous advantages, although this nitrogen (N source is highly susceptible to volatilization losses, particularly when applied to the soil surface of management systems with conservation of crop residues. The volatilization losses can be minimized by slow or controlled-release fertilizers, with controlled water solubility of the urea-coating materials; and by stabilized fertilizers, which prolong the period during which N remains in the amide or ammonia forms by urease inhibitors. This study evaluated the hygroscopicity of and ammonia volatilization from urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate or with sulfur. The hygroscopicity of the sources was evaluated over time after exposure to five levels of relative humidity (RH and volatilization evaluated after application to the soil surface covered with sugarcane trash. Ammonium nitrate has a low potential for volatilization losses, but is highly hygroscopic. Although coating with boric acid and copper sulfate or elemental sulfur reduced the critical humidity level of urea, the delay in the volatilization process is a potential positive factor.

  1. Influence of straw types and nitrogen sources on mushroom composting emissions and compost productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, R; Hobbs, P J; Mead, A; Dobrovin-Pennington, A

    2002-09-01

    The effects of different straw types and organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) sources on the chemical composition and odor concentration (OC) of mushroom composting emissions, compost parameters, and mushroom yield were examined using bench-scale and large-scale (windrows and aerated tunnels) composting systems. There were close correlations between the butanol or combined H(2)S+dimethyl sulfide (DMS) concentration and OC of air samples taken from different composting ingredients (r=0.83 and 0.76-0.87, Pcocoa shells, ammonium sulfate) produced lower mushroom yields than materials in which the N was more readily available (poultry manure, urea, brewers' grains, hop and molasses wastes, cocoa meal). Replacement of poultry manure with the other N sources at 50-100% or wheat straw with rape, bean, or linseed straw in aerated tunnel or windrow composts reduced the OC and emissions of odorous sulfur-containing compounds, but also reduced yield. Urea and cocoa meal may be suitable for "low odor" prewetting of straw, with addition of poultry manure immediately before aerated tunnel composting. Rape straw in compost reduces the formation of anaerobic zones and resulting odorous emissions, since it maintains its structure and porosity better than wheat straw.

  2. Determination of food sources for benthic invertebrates in a salt marsh (Aiguillon Bay, France) by carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes: importance of locally produced sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riera, P.; Stal, L.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Richard, P.; Blanchard, G.F.; Gentil, F.

    1999-01-01

    delta(13)C and delta(15)N were measured in benthic invertebrates and food sources collected in the salt marsh of the Aiguillon Bay, France. The results showed that, although Spartina anglica was dominant, this marine phanerogame did not contribute significantly to the carbon and nitrogen requirement

  3. Sources and sinks of atmospheric N2O and the possible ozone reduction due to industrial fixed nitrogen fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. C.; Cicerone, R. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Chameides, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The terrestrial and marine nitrogen cycles are examined in an attempt to clarify how the atmospheric content of N2O is controlled. We review available data on the various reservoirs of fixed nitrogen, the transfer rates between the reservoirs, and estimate how the reservoir contents and transfer rates can change under man's influence. It is seen that sources, sinks and lifetime of atmospheric N2O are not understood well. Based on our limited knowledge of the stability of atmospheric N2O we conclude that future growth in the usage of industrial fixed nitrogen fertilizers could cause a 1% to 2% global ozone reduction in the next 50 years. However, centuries from now the ozone layer could be reduced by as much as 10% if soils are the major source of atmospheric N2O.

  4. Nitrogen Source and Rate Management Improve Maize Productivity of Smallholders under Semiarid Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanullah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is one of the most important factor affecting maize (Zea mays L. yield and income of smallholders under semiarid climates. Field experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of different N-fertilizer sources [urea, calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN, and ammonium sulfate (AS] and rates (50, 100, 150, and 200 kg ha−1 on umber of rows ear−1 (NOR ear−1, number of seeds row−1 (NOS row−1, number of seeds ear−1 (NOS ear−1, number of ears per 100 plants (NOEP 100 plants−1, grain yield plant−1, stover yield (kg ha−1, and shelling percentage (% of maize genotypes “Local cultivars (Azam and Jalal vs. hybrid (Pioneer-3025.” The experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Research Farm of the University of Agriculture Peshawar during summers of 2008 (year one and 2010 (year two. The results revealed that the N treated (rest plots (the average of all the experimental plots treated with N had produced higher yield and yield components, and shelling percentage over N-control plots (plots where N was not applied. Application of nitrogen at the higher rate increased yield and yield components in maize (200 > 150 > 100 > 50 kg N ha−1. Application of AS and CAN had more beneficial impact on yield and yield components of maize as compared to urea (AS > CAN > urea. Hybrid maize (P-3025 produced significantly higher yield and yield components as well as higher shelling percentage than the two local cultivars (P-3025 > Jalal = Azam. Application of ammonium sulfate at the rate of 200 kg N ha−1 to hybrid maize was found most beneficial in terms of higher productivity and grower's income in the study area. For the two local cultivars, application of 150 kg N ha−1 was found more beneficial over 120 kg N ha−1 (recommended N rate in terms of greater productivity and growers income.

  5. Changes in free amino acid content and activities of amination and transamination enzymes in yeasts grown on different inorganic nitrogen sources, including hydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkrans, B; Tunblad-Johansson, I

    1981-01-01

    This study concerns inter- and intraspecific differences between yeasts at assimilation of different nitrogen sources. Alterations in the content of free amino acids in cells and media as well as in the related enzyme activities during growth were studied. The hydroxylamine (HA)-tolerant Endomycopsis lipolytica was examined and compared with the nitrate-reducing Cryptococcus albidus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, requiring fully reduced nitrogen for growth. Special attention was paid to alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, the amino acids closely related to the Krebs cycle keto acids. The amino acids were analyzed as their n-propyl N-acetyl esters by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The composition of the amino acid pool was similar for the three yeasts. Glutamic acid was predominant; in early log-phase cells of E. lipolytica contents of 200-234 micromol . g(-1) dry weight were found. A positive correlation between the specific growth rate and the size of the amino acid pool was observed. The assimilation of ammonia was mediated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The NADP-GDH was the dominating enzyme in all three yeasts showing the highest specific activity in Cr. albidus grown on nitrate (6980 nmol . (min(-1)).(mg protein(-1)). Glutamine synthetase (GS) displayed a high specific activity in S. cerevisiae, which also had a high amount of glutamine. The assimilation of HA did not differ greatly from the assimilation of ammonium in E. lipolytica. The existing differences could rather be explained as provoked by the concentration of available nitrogen.

  6. Back-trajectory-based source apportionment of airborne sulfur and nitrogen concentrations at Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Kristi A.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Malm, William C.; Barna, Michael G.; Rodriguez, Marco A.; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study (RoMANS), conducted during the spring and summer of 2006, was designed to assess the sources of nitrogen and sulfur species that contribute to wet and dry deposition and visibility impairment at Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado. Several source apportionment methods were utilized for RoMANS, including the Trajectory Mass Balance (TrMB) Model, a receptor-based method in which the hourly measured concentrations are the dependent variables and the residence times of back trajectories in several source regions are the independent variables. The regression coefficients are estimates of the mean emissions, dispersion, chemical transformation, and deposition between the source areas and the receptors. For RoMANS, a new ensemble technique was employed in which input parameters were varied to explore the range, variability, and model sensitivity of source attribution results and statistical measures of model fit over thousands of trials for each set of concentration measurements. Results showed that carefully chosen source regions dramatically improved the ability of TrMB to reproduce temporal patterns in the measured concentrations, and source attribution results were also very sensitive to source region choices. Conversely, attributions were relatively insensitive to trajectory start height, trajectory length, minimum endpoints per source area, and maximum endpoint height, as long as the trajectories were long enough to reach contributing source areas and were not overly restricted in height or horizontal location. Source attribution results estimated that more than half the ammonia and 30-45% of sulfur dioxide and other nitrogen-containing species at the RoMANS core site were from sources within the state of Colorado. Approximately a quarter to a third of the sulfate was from within Colorado.

  7. Study on the threshold value of organic enrichment of carbonate as gas source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Haitao; LU Shuangfang; ZHONG Ningning; WANG Bo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, calculations have been performed about gas quantity of generation, adsorption, dissolving in oil, dissolving in water, diffusion of unit area carbonate rocks at different geologic conditions in the Tarim basin. According to the material balance principle, the corresponding organic carbon content when gas started expelling from source rocks with separate phases has been worked out. We regard it as the theoretical threshold value (TOCmin) of gas source rocks under the same geologic condition. Based on the simulating calculation, a fact has been discovered that TOCmin decreases with the increasing source rocks thickness, decreases at the beginning and then increases with the increasing maturity and decreases with the better type of organic matter. TOCmin evaluation table of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin has been established. Investigations indicate that the TOCmin of carbonate gas source rocks varies greatly with the differences of geologic conditions, and gas source rocks cannot be evaluated with a unified TOC threshold value. And we also establish a preliminary evaluation table of TOC industrial threshold value, TOCgy, of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin.

  8. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance.

  9. Effect of Inoculum Age, Carbon and Nitrogen Sources on the Production of Lipase by Candida Cylindracea 2031 in Batch Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Noor

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of extracellular lipase by Candida cylindracea DSMZ 2031  was studied in a seven liters batch bioreactor, using palm oil (PO, palmitic acid (PA, lauric acid (LA, olive oil (OO and cooking oil (CO as carbon source.   The effect of  carbon and nitrogen sources  were studied by measuring the lipase activity.  The maximum lipase activity was found to be 12.7 kLU on palm oil as carbon source, urea as nitrogen sources and at 36 h inoculum age. This was achieved at a temperature of 30o C, pH of 6.0, agitation speed of 500 rpm and aeration of 1vvm.

  10. Simulation study to determine the feasibility of injecting hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas injection to improve gas and oil recovery oil-rim reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed El Gohary

    This study is combining two important and complicated processes; Enhanced Oil Recovery, EOR, from the oil rim and Enhanced Gas Recovery, EGR from the gas cap using nonhydrocarbon injection gases. EOR is proven technology that is continuously evolving to meet increased demand and oil production and desire to augment oil reserves. On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industrial and urban development has generated an unprecedented power demand, particularly during summer months. The required gas supplies to meet this demand are being stretched. To free up gas supply, alternative injectants to hydrocarbon gas are being reviewed to support reservoir pressure and maximize oil and gas recovery in oil rim reservoirs. In this study, a multi layered heterogeneous gas reservoir with an oil rim was selected to identify the most optimized development plan for maximum oil and gas recovery. The integrated reservoir characterization model and the pertinent transformed reservoir simulation history matched model were quality assured and quality checked. The development scheme is identified, in which the pattern and completion of the wells are optimized to best adapt to the heterogeneity of the reservoir. Lateral and maximum block contact holes will be investigated. The non-hydrocarbon gases considered for this study are hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, utilized to investigate miscible and immiscible EOR processes. In November 2010, re-vaporization study, was completed successfully, the first in the UAE, with an ultimate objective is to examine the gas and condensate production in gas reservoir using non hydrocarbon gases. Field development options and proces schemes as well as reservoir management and long term business plans including phases of implementation will be identified and assured. The development option that maximizes the ultimate recovery factor will be evaluated and selected. The study achieved satisfactory results in integrating gas and oil

  11. UTILIZATION OF ORGANIC NITROGEN-SOURCES BY 2 PHYTOPLANKTON SPECIES AND A BACTERIAL ISOLATE IN PURE AND MIXED CULTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IETSWAART, T; SCHNEIDER, PJ; PRINS, RA

    1994-01-01

    Algal production of dissolved organic carbon and the regeneration of nutrients from dissolved organic carbon by bacteria are important aspects of nutrient cycling in the sea, especially when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Dissolved free amino acids are a major carbon source for bacteria and can be

  12. A standardized method for the determination of the intrinsic carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity of natural organic matter sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigatti, M.; Perez, M.D.; Blok, W.J.; Ciavatta, C.; Veeken, A.

    2007-01-01

    A new method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the intrinsic carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity of organic matter (OM) sources by means of an aerobic incubation in suspension. The proposed method is based on determination of the oxygen consumption, monitored indirectly via

  13. Sources of variation for indoor nitrogen dioxide in rural residences of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonen Eyassu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unprocessed biomass fuel is the primary source of indoor air pollution (IAP in developing countries. The use of biomass fuel has been linked with acute respiratory infections. This study assesses sources of variations associated with the level of indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO2. Materials and methods This study examines household factors affecting the level of indoor pollution by measuring NO2. Repeated measurements of NO2 were made using a passive diffusive sampler. A Saltzman colorimetric method using a spectrometer calibrated at 540 nm was employed to analyze the mass of NO2 on the collection filter that was then subjected to a mass transfer equation to calculate the level of NO2 for the 24 hours of sampling duration. Structured questionnaire was used to collect data on fuel use characteristics. Data entry and cleaning was done in EPI INFO version 6.04, while data was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. Analysis of variance, multiple linear regression and linear mixed model were used to isolate determining factors contributing to the variation of NO2 concentration. Results A total of 17,215 air samples were fully analyzed during the study period. Wood and crop were principal source of household energy. Biomass fuel characteristics were strongly related to indoor NO2 concentration in one-way analysis of variance. There was variation in repeated measurements of indoor NO2 over time. In a linear mixed model regression analysis, highland setting, wet season, cooking, use of fire events at least twice a day, frequency of cooked food items, and interaction between ecology and season were predictors of indoor NO2 concentration. The volume of the housing unit and the presence of kitchen showed little relevance in the level of NO2 concentration. Conclusion Agro-ecology, season, purpose of fire events, frequency of fire activities, frequency of cooking and physical conditions of housing are predictors of NO2 concentration. Improved

  14. Chemiluminescent method for detection of eutrophication sources by estimation of organic amino nitrogen and ammonium in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer-Lloret, S; Molins-Legua, C; Verdú-Andrés, J; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2006-11-01

    An automatic method has been developed for the estimation of organic amino nitrogen (CH2-NH) and ammonium in water samples. We propose a continuous flow system in which nitrogen compounds react with hypochlorite reagent to produce chloramines. Subsequently, the mixture is mixed with luminol, generating a chemiluminescence signal. The signal emission at 425 nm, registered as a function of time, decreases as nitrogen concentration increases, due to the decrease on hypochlorite concentration. A large number of nitrogen compounds have been assayed and their sensitivities compared, in milligrams per liter nitrogen. The ammonium calibration graph, expressed as N, can be used for most of the assayed compounds. The linear interval was 0.24-4 mg L(-1) N, with the detection limit 0.07 mg L(-1) N. The chemiluminescence method was applied to the analysis of several kinds of real water samples, natural, lake, irrigation ditch, fountain, residual, and seawater in order to detect possible sources of eutrophication. The accuracy (% relative error) and precision were satisfactory, with mean values of 5 +/- 4 and 3 +/- 2, respectively. This procedure has been used to estimate nitrogen content in samples before and after Kjeldahl treatment. In the same samples, the N found for the untreated samples provided a good estimation of the N Kjeldahl. Sixty samples per hour can be analyzed, and the procedure can also be used for in situ monitoring.

  15. [Effects of nitrogen application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes in Eucalyptus plantations with different soil organic carbon content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Da; Zhang, Kai; Su, Dan; Lu, Fei; Wan, Wu-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Zheng, Hua

    2014-10-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilization or nitrogen deposition on soil greenhouse gases fluxes has been well studied, while little has been piloted about the effects of nitrogen application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes and its discrepancy with different soil organic carbon content. In our study, we conducted field control experiment in a young Eucalyptus plantation in Southeast China. We compared the effects of 4 levels of nitrogen fertilization (Control: 0 kg · hm(-2); Low N: 84.2 kg · hm(-2); Medium N: 166.8 kg · hm(-2); High N: 333.7 kg · hm(-2)) on soil GHGs fluxes from 2 sites (LC and HC) with significantly different soil organic carbon (SOC) content (P Fertilization had significant priming effect on CO2 and N2O emission fluxes. One month after fertilization, both CO2 and N2O had the flux peak and decreased gradually, and the difference among the treatments disappeared at the end of the growing season. However, fertilization had no significant effect on CH4 oxidation between the 2 sites. (2) Fertilization and SOC were two crucial factors that had significant effects on CO2 and N2O emission. Fertilization had a significant positive effect on CO2 and N2O emission fluxes (P 0.05). The CO2 and N2O emission fluxes were significantly higher in HC than those in LC (P Fertilization and SOC had great interactive effect on CO2 and N2O emission (P fertilization on soil GHGs fluxes were not only in connection with the intensify of nitrogen, but also closely tied to the SOC content. When we assess the effects of nitrogen on soil GHGs fluxes, the difference induced by SOC should not be ignored.

  16. Sources and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in the shallow groundwater of agricultural areas (Poyang Lake basin, China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Evgeniya; Guseva, Natalia; Sun, Zhanxue; Bychinsky, Valeriy; Boeckx, Pascal; Gao, Bai

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen contamination of natural water is a typical problem for various territories throughout the world. One of the regions exposed to nitrogen pollution is located in the Poyang Lake basin. As a result of agricultural activity and dense population, the shallow groundwater of this area is characterised by a high concentration of nitrogen compounds, primarily NO3(-), with the concentration varying from 0.1mg/L to 206mg/L. Locally, high ammonium content occurs in the shallow groundwater with low reduction potential Eh (groundwater of the Poyang Lake basin has Eh>100mV. To identify sources of nitrogen species and the factors that determine their behaviour, the dual stable isotope approach (δ(15)N and δ(18)О) and physical-chemical modelling were applied. Actual data were collected by sampling shallow groundwater from domestic water supply wells around the lake. The δ(18)О values from -4.1‰ to 13.9‰ with an average value of 5.3 permille indicate a significant influence of nitrification on nitrogen balance. The enrichment of nitrate with the (15)N isotope indicates that manure and domestic sewage are the principal sources of nitrogen compounds. Inorganic nitrogen speciation and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate the high stability of nitrate in the studied groundwater. Computer simulation and field observations indicate the reducing conditions formed under joint effects of anthropogenic factors and appropriate natural conditions, such as the low-level topography in which decreased water exchange rate can occur. The simulation also demonstrates the growth in pH of the groundwater as a consequence of fertilisation, which, in turn, conduced to the clay mineral formation at lower concentrations of aqueous clay-forming components than the ones under the natural conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sources and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in the shallow groundwater of agricultural areas (Poyang Lake basin, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatova, Evgeniya; Guseva, Natalia; Sun, Zhanxue; Bychinsky, Valeriy; Boeckx, Pascal; Gao, Bai

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen contamination of natural water is a typical problem for various territories throughout the world. One of the regions exposed to nitrogen pollution is located in the Poyang Lake basin. As a result of agricultural activity and dense population, the shallow groundwater of this area is characterised by a high concentration of nitrogen compounds, primarily NO3-, with the concentration varying from 0.1 mg/L to 206 mg/L. Locally, high ammonium content occurs in the shallow groundwater with low reduction potential Eh ( 100 mV. To identify sources of nitrogen species and the factors that determine their behaviour, the dual stable isotope approach (δ15N and δ18O) and physical-chemical modelling were applied. Actual data were collected by sampling shallow groundwater from domestic water supply wells around the lake. The δ18O values from - 4.1‰ to 13.9‰ with an average value of 5.3 permille indicate a significant influence of nitrification on nitrogen balance. The enrichment of nitrate with the 15N isotope indicates that manure and domestic sewage are the principal sources of nitrogen compounds. Inorganic nitrogen speciation and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate the high stability of nitrate in the studied groundwater. Computer simulation and field observations indicate the reducing conditions formed under joint effects of anthropogenic factors and appropriate natural conditions, such as the low-level topography in which decreased water exchange rate can occur. The simulation also demonstrates the growth in pH of the groundwater as a consequence of fertilisation, which, in turn, conduced to the clay mineral formation at lower concentrations of aqueous clay-forming components than the ones under the natural conditions.

  18. Exploring a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and ensure rice yields in paddy fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yiming; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jingping, E-mail: jpyang@zju.edu.cn; Zhao, Xing; Ye, Xinyi

    2016-09-15

    The application rate of nitrogen fertilizer was believed to dramatically influence greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from paddy fields. Thus, providing a suitable nitrogen fertilization rate to ensure rice yields, reducing GHG emissions and exploring emission behavior are important issues for field management. In this paper, a two year experiment with six rates (0, 75, 150, 225, 300, 375 kg N/ha) of nitrogen fertilizer application was designed to examine GHG emissions by measuring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) flux and their cumulative global warming potential (GWP) from paddy fields in Hangzhou, Zhejiang in 2013 and 2014. The results indicated that the GWP and rice yields increased with an increasing application rate of nitrogen fertilizer. Emission peaks of CH{sub 4} mainly appeared at the vegetative phase, and emission peaks of CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O mainly appeared at reproductive phase of rice growth. The CO{sub 2} flux was significantly correlated with soil temperature, while the CH{sub 4} flux was influenced by logging water remaining period and N{sub 2}O flux was significantly associated with nitrogen application rates. This study showed that 225 kg N/ha was a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to minimize GHG emissions with low yield-scaled emissions of 3.69 (in 2013) and 2.23 (in 2014) kg CO{sub 2}-eq/kg rice yield as well as to ensure rice yields remained at a relatively high level of 8.89 t/ha in paddy fields. - Highlights: • Exploiting co-benefits of rice yield and reduction of greenhouse gas emission. • Global warming potential and rice yield increased with nitrogen fertilizer rate up. • Emission peaks of CH{sub 4,} CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O appeared at vegetative and reproductive phase. • 225 kg N/ha rate benefits both rice yields and GWP reduction.

  19. Analyzer for measurement of nitrogen oxide concentration by ozone content reduction in gas using solid state chemiluminescent sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelibanov, V. P.; Ishanin, G. G.; Isaev, L. N.

    2014-05-01

    Role of nitrogen oxide in ambient air is described and analyzed. New method of nitrogen oxide concentration measurement in gas phase is suggested based on ozone concentration measurement with titration by nitrogen oxide. Research of chemiluminescent sensor composition is carried out on experimental stand. The sensor produced on the base of solid state non-activated chemiluminescent composition is applied as ozone sensor. Composition is put on the surface of polymer matrix with developed surface. Sensor compositions includes gallic acid with addition of rodamine-6G. Model of interaction process between sensor composition and ozone has been developed, main products appeared during reaction are identified. The product determining the speed of luminescense appearance is found. This product belongs to quinone class. Then new structure of chemiluminescent composition was suggested, with absence of activation period and with high stability of operation. Experimental model of gas analyzer was constructed and operation algorithm was developed. It was demonstrated that developed NO measuring instrument would be applied for monitoring purposes of ambient air. This work was partially financially supported by Government of Russian Federation, Grant 074-U01

  20. Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, William A.

    1998-01-01

    A biofilter for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described.

  1. A discussion on gas sources of the Feixianguan Formation H2S-rich giant gas fields in the northeastern Sichuan Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In recent years several H2S-rich oolite giant gas pools have been discovered in the Lower Triassic Feixianguan Formation of the northeastern Sichuan basin, and their explored gas reserves have been over 5000x108 m3. However, gas sources remain unsolved due to multiple source horizons with high maturity in this area and TSR alterations. By integrating analytical data of natural gas samples with conprehensive investigations on many factors, such as oil-gas geology, distribution and evolution of source rocks, charging and adjustment of gas pools, mixture of natural gases and secondery alterations, the present study concluded that the dominant source for the Feixianguan Fr. gas pools is the Permian Longtan Fr. source rock and secondly the Silurian Longmaxi Fr. source rock. Natural gases from the various gas pools differ genetically due to the matching diversity of seal configurations with phases of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion by different source rocks, among which natural gases in Puguang Gasfield are dominated by the trapped gas generated from the Longtan Fr. source rock and commingled with the gas cracked from the Silurian crude oil, while those in Dukouhe,Tieshangpo and Luojiazhai Gasfields are composed mainly of the Silurian oil-cracking gas and commingled with the natural gas derived from the Longtan Fr. source rock.

  2. Growth characteristics and hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides using various amino acids as nitrogen sources and their combinations with carbon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrielyan, Lilit; Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen [Department of Biophysics, Biological Faculty, Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2010-11-15

    Some amino acids (alanine, asparagine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tyrosine) were used as nitrogen sources in combination with carbon sources (succinate and malate) to study growth properties and H{sub 2} production by purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides strains A-10 and D-3. Both strains produced H{sub 2} in succinate-glutamate and malate-glutamate media. Succinate was a better carbon source than malate. In comparison with strain D-3, strain A-10 was able to utilize proline, alanine or tyrosine as nitrogen sources in succinate medium and to produce H{sub 2}. Both strains were unable to produce H{sub 2} in the presence of asparagine or glycine as nitrogen sources. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, the F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase inhibitor, led to marked inhibition of H{sub 2} production activity of R. sphaeroides. The results suggest that the R. sphaeroides cells growth can be achieved by the use of a large diversity of substrates but only some of them can increase the H{sub 2} production rate. (author)

  3. Genetic basis of variations in nitrogen source utilization in four wine commercial yeast strains

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Gutiérrez; Gemma Beltran; Jonas Warringer; Jose M Guillamón

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of wine yeast to utilize the nitrogen available in grape must directly correlates with the fermentation and growth rates of all wine yeast fermentation stages and is, thus, of critical importance for wine production. Here we precisely quantified the ability of low complexity nitrogen compounds to support fast, efficient and rapidly initiated growth of four commercially important wine strains. Nitrogen substrate abundance in grape must failed to correlate with the rate or the effi...

  4. Global expression profiling of Bacillus subtilis cells during industrial-close fed-batch fermentations with different nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgen, Britta; Tobisch, Steffen; Wümpelmann, Mogens; Gördes, Dirk; Koch, Andreas; Thurow, Kerstin; Albrecht, Dirk; Hecker, Michael; Schweder, Thomas

    2005-11-05

    A detailed gene expression analysis of industrial-close Bacillus subtilis fed-batch fermentation processes with casamino acids as the only nitrogen source and with a reduced casamino acid concentration but supplemented by ammonia was carried out. Although glutamine and arginine are supposed to be the preferred nitrogen sources of B. subtilis, we demonstrate that a combined feeding of ammonia and casamino acids supports cell growth under fed-batch fermentation conditions. The transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed that the additional feeding of ammonia in combination with a reduced amino acid concentration results in a significantly lower expression level of the glnAR or tnrA genes, coding for proteins, which are mainly involved in the nitrogen metabolism of B. subtilis. However, the mRNA levels of the genes of the ilvBHC-leuABD and hom-thrCB operons were significantly increased, indicating a valine, leucine, isoleucine, and threonine limitation under these fermentation conditions. In contrast, during the fermentation with casamino acids as the only nitrogen source, several genes, which play a crucial role in nitrogen metabolism of B. subtilis (e.g., glnAR, nasCDE, nrgAB, and ureABC), were up-regulated, indicating a nitrogen limitation under these conditions. Furthermore, increased expression of genes, which are involved in motility and chemotaxis (e.g., hag, fliT) and in acetoin metabolism (e.g., acoABCL), was determined during the fermentation with the mixed nitrogen source of casamino acids and ammonia, indicating a carbon limitation under these fermentation conditions. Under high cell density and slow growth rate conditions a weak up-regulation of autolysis genes could be observed as well as the induction of a number of genes involved in motility, chemotaxis and general stress response. Results of this study allowed the selection of marker genes, which could be used for the monitoring of B. subtilis fermentation processes. The data suggest for example aco

  5. Fungal Pretreatment of Willow Sawdust with Abortiporus biennis for Anaerobic Digestion: Impact of an External Nitrogen Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alexandropoulou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of nitrogen (N supplementation in the fungal pretreatment of willow sawdust (WSD via the white rot fungus Abortiporus biennis (A. biennis was studied in terms of the fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and biochemical methane potential (BMP. Thus, different external nitrogen sources (yeast extract (YE, urea (UR, and ammonium nitrate (AN at different ratios (N/C of 1/250 and 1/50 were added and the effect of the above parameters on the chemical composition of WSD during solid-state fermentation (SSF experiments with A. biennis was assessed and compared to the experiment of fungal pretreatment without N supplementation (N/C was 1/500, control experiment. The results indicated that the addition of an external nitrogen source did not facilitate delignification, regardless of the type of nitrogen source and the ratio of N/C used. On the other hand, enhanced cellulose uptake was observed. Samples of the 28th day of cultivation, with and without N supplementation, were used for BMP tests, where a reduction in methane yield was observed, compared to the control experiment. In addition, a combination of fungal with alkali (20% NaOH w/w dry mass pretreatment was performed in order to assess the effect of combined pretreatment on the lignocellulosic content and the BMP.

  6. Influence of lanthanum level and interactions with nitrogen source on early development of Juglans nigra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicodemus; Michael A; Salifu; K Francis; Jacobs; Douglass F

    2009-01-01

    Rare earth elements have been used for 30 years in Chinese agriculture to improve growth and yield. Numerous scientific studies have shown improvements in physiology, mineral nutrition, and growth, though deleterious effects may also occur. Very few studies have been performed on woody species. We exponentially fertilized one-year old black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) seedlings with 0, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 mg lanthanum (La) and 800 mg nitrogen (N) as NaNO3, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, or no N. One month following final fertilization, growth, mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, chlorophyll, and nitrate reductase activity were assessed. Plants fertilized with the highest level of La had reduced fine root growth, concentrations of magnesium, calcium, nickel, and phosphorus, photosynthesis levels, and chlorophyll a content. Foliar La concentration showed an interaction effect, with three to four times greater concentration in plants fed at 100 mg La to those given 10 mg La for (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 treatments. The results suggested no beneficial effects of La addition at levels used in this study and interactions between N source and La levels did not have an important impact on the growth, mineral nutrition, or physiology of black walnut seedlings.

  7. Kerong fish (Terapon jarbua) peptone production using papain enzyme as nitrogen source in bacterial media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikandace, Y.; Priatni, S.; Pudjiraharti, S.; Kosasih, W.; Indrarti, L.

    2017-03-01

    Terapon jarbua fish is a widespread species distributed mainly in the Indo-West Pacific region and occurs in shallow coastal waters, mangroves and freshwater. In West-Java of Indonesia, the consumption of T. jarbua was not bound to arouse interest, but otherwise the fish contain the important protein, such as peptone. Peptone is used to support the growth of bacteria as nitrogen source. The present study was aimed to optimize the fish peptone of T. jarbua using papain enzyme concentration and to characterize the fish peptone product. The parameter of fish peptone development was enzyme concentration (0.1-0.5%), temperature (50-65°C), hydrolysis time (4-7 h) and pH (5-8). The fish peptone product was characterized on the content of soluble protein, N-amino acid, AN/TN, and growth curve of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The optimum fish peptone production was obtained with 0.2% of papain enzyme pH 7 at 65°C for 4 hr. The soluble protein content was of 3,63 mg/ml, N-amino content 0.29%, and AN/TN 0.54%. Fish peptone of T. jarbua was more selective for E. coli than S. aureus.

  8. Mass transfer phenomena of gaseous hydrocarbons and nitrogen dioxide across gas-inorganic pigments boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbatakou, S.; Pagopoulou, I.; Kalantzopoulos, A.; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F.

    1998-11-01

    Reversed-flow gas chromatography was used to study the kinetics of the action of five hydrocarbons namely, ethane, ethene, ethyne, propene and butene and of the nitrogen dioxide, on three known and widely used pigments, the white one TiO2, and the yellows CdS and PbCrO4. The calculation of kinetic parameters and mass transfer coefficients is based on an experimental adsorption isotherm. All these calculations are based on a non linear adsorption isotherm model as it is well accepted that the linear one is inadequate for inorganic substances like these mentioned in this work. The inadequacy is mainly attributed to the non-uniformity of the solid surface. Five physicochemical parameters have been obtained for each of the twenty heterogeneous reactions studied. With these systematic experiments under conditions which are similar to the atmospheric ones, an extrapolation of the results obtained to “real" atmospheres with a high degree of confidence is possible. Some of the calculations were based on the linear model for comparison. La cinétique de la réaction de cinq hydrocarbures (éthane, éthylène, acétylène, propène, boutène) et du dioxyde d'azote avec trois pigments (le blanc de TiO2 et les jaunes de CdS et PbCrO4) a été étudiée par chromatographie en phase gazeuse a flux inversé. Le calcul des paramètres cinétiques et des coefficients de transfert de masse a été effectué à partir des isothermes d'adsorption expérimentales en faisant l'hypothèse d`un modèle d'adsorption non-linéaire, qui résulte de la non-uniformité de la surface. Cinq paramètres physico-chimiques ont été obténus pour chacune des vingt réaction hétérogènes étudiées. À partir de ces résultats obténus dans des conditions similaires aux conditions atmosphériques, l'extrapolation à des atmosphères réelles paraît possible avec une bonne confiance. Quelques calculs ont été effectués avec un modèle linéaire pour comparaison.

  9. Competition for nitrogen sources between European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J; Waldhecker, P; Brüggemann, N; Rennenberg, H

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the short-term consequences of direct competition between beech and sycamore maple on root N uptake and N composition, mycorrhizal seedlings of both tree species were incubated for 4 days (i.e. beech only, sycamore maple only or both together) in an artificial nutrient solution with low N availability. On the fourth day, N uptake experiments were conducted to study the effects of competition on inorganic and organic N uptake. For this purpose, multiple N sources were applied with a single label. Furthermore, fine roots were sampled and analysed for total amino acids, soluble protein, total nitrogen, nitrate and ammonium content. Our results clearly show that both tree species were able to use inorganic and organic N sources. Uptake of inorganic and organic N by beech roots was negatively affected in the presence of the competing tree species. In contrast, the presence of beech stimulated inorganic N uptake by sycamore maple roots. Both the negative effect of sycamore maple on N uptake of beech and the positive effect of beech on N uptake of sycamore maple led to an increase in root soluble protein in beech, despite an overall decrease in total N concentration. Thus, beech compensated for the negative effects of the tree competitor on N uptake by incorporating less N into structural N components, but otherwise exhibited the same strategy as the competitor, namely, enhancing soluble protein levels in roots when grown under competition. It is speculated that enhanced enzyme activities of so far unknown nature are required in beech as a defence response to inter-specific competition.

  10. Nitrogen Source Apportionment for the Catchment, Estuary, and Adjacent Coastal Waters of the River Scheldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan E. Vermaat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the systems approach framework (SAF, a coupled model suite was developed for simulating land-use decision making in response to nutrient abatement costs and water and nutrient fluxes in the hydrological network of the Scheldt River, and nutrient fluxes in the estuary and adjacent coastal sea. The purpose was to assess the efficiency of different long-term water quality improvement measures in current and future climate and societal settings, targeting nitrogen (N load reduction. The spatial-dynamic model suite consists of two dynamically linked modules: PCRaster is used for the drainage network and is combined with ExtendSim modules for farming decision making and estuarine N dispersal. Model predictions of annual mean flow and total N concentrations compared well with data available for river and estuary (r² ≥ 0.83. Source apportionment was carried out to societal sectors and administrative regions; both households and agriculture are the major sources of N, with the regions of Flanders and Wallonia contributing most. Load reductions by different measures implemented in the model were comparable (~75% remaining after 30 yr, but costs differed greatly. Increasing domestic sewage connectivity was more effective, at comparatively low cost (47% remaining. The two climate scenarios did not lead to major differences in load compared with the business-as-usual scenario (~88% remaining. Thus, this spatially explicit model of water flow and N fluxes in the Scheldt catchment can be used to compare different long-term policy options for N load reduction to river, estuary, and receiving sea in terms of their effectiveness, cost, and optimal location of implementation.

  11. Greenhouse Gas reduction for scenarios of power sources development of the Republic of Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comendant I.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available For the new power market conditions, Moldova power sources development options up to 2033 are evaluated, and for the six scenarios selected the greenhouse gas reduction impact is determined.

  12. Age and quality of ground water and sources of nitrogen in the aquifers in Pumpkin Creek Valley, western Nebraska, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, G.V.; Cannia, J.C.; Sibray, S.S.; McGuire, V.L.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water is the source of drinking water for the residents of Pumpkin Creek Valley, western Nebraska. In this largely agricultural area, shallow aquifers potentially are susceptible to nitrate contamination. During the last 10 years, ground-water levels in the North Platte Natural Resources District have declined and contamination has become a major problem for the district. In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Platte Natural Resources District began a cooperative study to determine the age and quality of the ground water and the sources of nitrogen in the aquifers in Pumpkin Creek Valley. Water samples were collected from 8 surface-water sites, 2 springs, and 88 ground-water sites during May, July, and August 2000. These samples were analyzed for physical properties, nutrients or nitrate, and hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. In addition, a subset of samples was analyzed for any combination of chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, tritium/helium, sulfur-hexafluoride, carbon-14, and nitrogen-15. The apparent age of ground water in the alluvial aquifer typically varied from about 1980 to modern, whereas ground water in the fractured Brule Formation had a median value in the 1970s. The Brule Formation typically contained ground water that ranged from the 1940s to the 1990s, but low-yield wells had apparent ages of 5,000 to 10,000 years before present. Data for oxygen-18 and deuterium indicated that lake-water samples showed the greatest effects from evaporation. Ground-water data showed no substantial evaporative effects and some ground water became isotopically heavier as the water moved downgradient. In addition, the physical and chemical ground-water data indicate that Pumpkin Creek is a gaining stream because little, if any, of its water is lost to the ground-water system. The water-quality type changed from a sodium calcium bicarbonate type near Pumpkin Creek's headwaters to a calcium sodium bicarbonate type near its mouth. Nitrate concentrations were

  13. Using geochemical tracing system to identify new types of gas sources in marine strata of the Hotan River Gas Field in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    There are natural gas sources of various modes of occurrence in superimposed basins. Besides the conventional kerogen and ancient oil reservoir, dispersed soluble organic matter (DSOM) is an important direct gas source. Because of its wide distribution, great potential to generate gas and proneness to crack under catalysis, DSOM is an important type of gas source in the highly evolved zones in marine strata. Through the geological and geochemical analysis that reflects the long-period evolvement and multiple gas accumulation processes in marine strata, and using the ternary geochemical tracing system, here we study the origin and accumulation of the natural gas in the Hotan River Gas Field in the Tarim Basin. The natural gas is produced from highly evolved and cracked DSOM in the Hotan River Gas Field, and it is accumulated after migrating for a long distance along faults. This conclusion is of great significance to the further expansion of the oil and gas exploration fields in the Tarim Basin.

  14. Monitoring of conditions inside gas aggregation cluster source during production of Ti/TiOx nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousal, J.; Kolpaková, A.; Shelemin, A.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Choukourov, A.; Biederman, H.

    2017-10-01

    Gas aggregation sources are nowadays rather widely used in the research community for producing nanoparticles. However, the direct diagnostics of conditions inside the source are relatively scarce. In this work, we focused on monitoring the plasma parameters and the composition of the gas during the production of the TiOx nanoparticles. We studied the role of oxygen in the aggregation process and the influence of the presence of the particles on the plasma. The construction of the source allowed us to make a 2D map of the plasma parameters inside the source.

  15. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization of Boreal Forest Land on Greenhouse Gas Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, L.; Sathre, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Forest growth on mineral soils in boreal regions is often limited by a low availability of nitrogen (N), and fertilization has shown particular promise in increasing yields in productive boreal forests. In this study we analyze the greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of increasing forest biomass production through N fertilization and using the increased production for bioenergy and biomaterials in place of non-renewable fuels and materials. We begin with a stand-level analysis of the radiative forcing implications of forest fertilization and biomass substitution, with explicit consideration of the temporal patterns of GHG emissions to and removals from the atmosphere. We model and compare the production and use of biomass from a hectare of fertilized and non-fertilized forest land in northern Sweden. We calculate the annual net emissions of CO2, N2O and CH4 for each system, over a 225-year period with 1-year time steps. We calculate the annual atmospheric concentration decay of each of these emissions, and calculate the resulting annual changes in instantaneous and cumulative radiative forcing. We find that forest fertilization can significantly increase biomass production, which increases the potential for material and energy substitution. The average carbon stock in tree biomass, forest soils and wood products all increase when fertilization is used. The additional GHG emissions due to fertilizer production and application are small compared to increases in carbon stock and substitution benefits. By the end of the 225-year simulation period, the cumulative radiative forcing reduction of the fertilized stand is over twice that of the non-fertilized stand. We then consider a steady-state landscape-level scenario where 10% of Swedish forest land is fertilized. We estimate the primary energy use and GHG emissions from forest management including production and application of N and NPK fertilizers. Based on modelled growth response, we then estimate the net GHG benefits

  16. 77 FR 22391 - Standards of Performance for Greenhouse Gas Emissions for New Stationary Sources: Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... report, ``Each additional ton of greenhouse gases emitted commits us to further change and greater risks... Greenhouse Gas Concentrations; Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, Division of Earth and Life Sciences... Greenhouse Gas Emissions for New Stationary Sources; Electric Utility Generating Units; Proposed Rule...

  17. Nitrogen-gas-stream cryostat for general X-ray diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosier, J.; Glazer, A.M.

    1986-04-01

    A continuous nitrogen-flow cooling device, generally applicable to X-ray diffraction studies, is described. The device works in the range 77.4 to 323.0 K with a precision of +-0.1 K and a liquid-nitrogen constant consumption rate of 0.5 l h/sup -1/ over the whole temperature range. The supply vessel is unpressurised, so that refilling can be done without any observable influence on the cooling of the sample.

  18. Source of nutrient substrates for microbes in deep biosphere and characteristics of biogenic gas source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To understand the biogas formation in geological basins, the present work investigated the reactive organic matter in sediments of the Sanhu depression of Qaidam Basin, a prolific region of biogenic gases with a proved reserve of 300 bil steres. The ROC (reactive organic carbon) was obtained by ultrasonic extraction from sediment samples in the solution of 6 mol/L HCl and 5% K2SO4. To investigate the effect of early diagenesis, parts of the samples were heated at 80°C before extraction. The results showed that the ROC content at a constant temperature decreased with increasing burial depths, which should be attributed to the microbial consumption. For the same sample, the ROC content heated at 80°C was dramatically higher than the unheated. The increment of the ROC content for some samples was as high as 200% in the experiment. The dramatically increasing ROC by thermal action should be the major nutrient substrate for the deep biospheres in most geological basins. There is a positive correlation between the reactive organic carbon (ROC) and the traditional insoluble organic carbon (TOC), not only for its absolute content of the ROC, but also for the ’ROC’ produced in thermal action, all of these are clearly related with TOC. These data showed that higher abundance of organic matter can contribute more to the reactive organic matter, and is more favorable to the formation of biogenic gases. In the Sanhu depression of Qaidam Basin, more than 85% of the biogenic gas reserves occur in the lower layers (K5-K13) with a relatively high abundance of organic matter. The exploration has provided further evidence that deposits with higher abundance of organic matter are effective biogas source rocks.

  19. Sporulation of several biocontrol fungi as affected by carbon and nitrogen sources in a two-stage cultivation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Liu, Xingzhong

    2010-12-01

    The development of fungal biopesticides requires the efficient production of large numbers spores or other propagules. The current study used published information concerning carbon concentrations and C:N ratios to evaluate the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on sporulation of Paecilomyces lilacinus (IPC-P and M-14) and Metarhizium anisopliae (SQZ-1-21 and RS-4-1) in a two-stage cultivation system. For P. lilacinus IPCP, the optimal sporulation medium contained urea as the nitrogen source, dextrin as the carbon source at 1 g/L, a C:N ratio of 5:1, with ZnSO(4)·7H(2)O at 10 mg/L and CaCl(2) at 3 g/L. The optimal sporulation medium for P. lilacinus M-14 contained soy peptone as the nitrogen source and maltose as the carbon source at 2 g/L, a C:N ratio of 10:1, with ZnSO(4)·7H(2)O at 250 mg/L, CuSO(4)·5H(2)O at 10 mg/L, H(3)BO(4) at 5 mg/L, and Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O at 5 mg/L. The optimum sporulation medium for M. anisopliae SQZ-1-21 contained urea as the nitrogen source, sucrose as the carbon source at 16 g/ L, a C:N ratio of 80:1, with ZnSO(4)·7H(2)O at 50 mg/L, CuSO(4)·5H(2)O at 50 mg/L, H(3)BO(4) at 5 mg/L, and MnSO(4)·H(2)O at 10 mg/L. The optimum sporulation medium for M. anisopliae RS-4-1 contained soy peptone as the nitrogen source, sucrose as the carbon source at 4 g/L, a C:N ratio of 5:1, with ZnSO(4)·7H(2)O at 50 mg/L and H(3)BO(4) at 50 mg/L. All sporulation media contained 17 g/L agar. While these results were empirically derived, they provide a first step toward low-cost mass production of these biocontrol agents.

  20. Effect of delayed wrapping and wrapping source on nitrogen balance and blood urea nitrogen in gestating sheep offered alfalfa silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposing ensiled forage to oxygen can result in DM deterioration and reduce silage intake by animals. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of 2 different wrapping sources and time intervals between baling and wrapping on N balance and blood urea N in gestating sheep offered alfalfa si...

  1. Effects of biochar amendment and fertilizer sources on serrano chili pepper yield, uptake, and nitrogen fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient nitrogen (N) management strategies are a key approach in addressing the increase of food demand and environmental protection. Failing to achieve adequate nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in agricultural systems can cause damaging outcomes including degradative water quality, increase in green...

  2. Carbon and nitrogen balance of leaf-eating sesarmid crabs ( Neoepisesarma versicolor) offered different food sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongtham, Nalinee; Kristensen, Erik

    2005-10-01

    Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the leaf-eating crab, Neoepisesarma versicolor, were established for individuals living on pure leaf diets. Crabs were fed fresh (green), senescent (yellow) and partly degraded (brown) leaves of the mangrove tree Rhizophora apiculata. Ingestion, egestion and metabolic loss of carbon and nitrogen were determined from laboratory experiments. In addition, bacterial abundance in various compartments of the crabs' digestive tract was enumerated after dissection of live individuals. Ingestion and egestion rates (in terms of dry weight) were highest, while the assimilation efficiency was poorest for crabs fed on brown leaves. The low assimilation efficiency was more than counteracted by the high ingestion rate providing more carbon for growth than for crabs fed green and yellow leaves. In any case, the results show that all types of leaves can provide adequate carbon while nitrogen was insufficient to support both maintenance (yellow leaves) and growth (green, yellow and brown leaves). Leaf-eating crabs must therefore obtain supplementary nitrogen by other means in order to meet their nitrogen requirement. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (1) crabs supplement their diet with bacteria and benthic microalgae by ingesting own faeces and/or selective grazing at the sediment surface; (2) assimilation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the crabs' own intestinal system; and (3) nitrogen storage following occasional feeding on animal tissues (e.g. meiofauna and carcasses). It appears that hypothesis 1 is of limited importance for N. versicolor since faeces and sediment can only supply a minor fraction of the missing nitrogen due to physical constraints on the amount of material the crabs can consume. Hypothesis 2 can be ruled out because tests showed no nitrogen fixation activity in the intestinal system of N. versicolor. It is therefore likely that leaf-eating crabs provide most of their nitrogen requirement from intracellular deposits

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of Aureobasidium pullulans in the presence of high and low levels of nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Long; Zhu, Guilan; Tong, Qunyi

    2014-10-29

    Pullulan, produced by Aureobasidium pullulans strain, has been broadly used in the food and medical industries. However, relatively little is known concerning the molecular basis of pullulan biosynthesis of this strain. In this paper, the effect of different concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 on pullulan fermentation was studied. Proteomics containing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) were used to analyze the protein with different expressions of A. pullulans cells between the nitrogen limitation and nitrogen repletion. Maximum pullulan production reached 37.72 g/L when 0.6 g/L of initial (NH4)2SO4 was added. Excess nitrogen source would impel carbon flux flow toward biomass production, but decreased the pullulan production. Nitrogen limitation in A. pullulans seemed to influence the flux change of carbon flux flow toward exopolysaccharide accumulation. The findings indicated that 12 identified protein spots were involved in energy-generating enzymes, antioxidant-related enzymes, amino acid biosynthesis, glycogen biosynthesis, glycolysis, protein transport, and transcriptional regulation. These results presented more evidence of pullulan biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited environment, which would provide a molecular understanding of the physiological response of A. pullulans for optimizing the performance of industrial pullulan fermentation.

  4. Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG - Marcellus Gas Well Water Sources View

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains all approved water sources within water managment plans (WMP). A WMP contains water sources utilized in the fracture stimulation of Marcellus...

  5. Utilizing Gas Filled Cavities for the Generation of an Intense Muon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys; Neuffer, David V.

    2015-05-01

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  6. Utilizing gas-filled cavities for the generation of an intense muon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Neuffer, David V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A key requirement for designing intense muon sources is operating rf cavities in multi-tesla magnetic fields. Recently, a proof-of-principle experiment demonstrated that an rf cavity filed with high pressure hydrogen gas could meet this goal. In this study, rigorous simulation is used to design and evaluate the performance of an intense muon source with gas filled cavities. We present a new lattice design and compare our results with conventional schemes. We detail the influence of gas pressure on the muon production rate.

  7. Optical sensors of gas on the basis of semiconductor sources of infrared emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabatsiy V. N.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Various constructions of optic sensors of gas and gas analyzers on their basis with the use of low-powered semiconductor sources of infrared emission for wave-length of 2,5–5,0 mm made on basis of InGaAs/InAs and InAsSbP/InAs heterostructures are worked out. The experimental results demonstrating the ability of application of semiconductor sources of infrared emission in optic sensors for measuring of metan concentration (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 are given. The availability of use of such sensors in the gas analysis equipment of new generation is shown.

  8. Chicken feather hydrolysate as an inexpensive complex nitrogen source for PHA production by Cupriavidus necator on waste frying oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesova, P; Kucera, D; Marova, I; Obruca, S

    2017-08-01

    The chicken feather hydrolysate (FH) has been tested as a potential complex nitrogen source for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Cupriavidus necator H16 when waste frying oil was used as a carbon source. The addition of FH into the mineral salt media with decreased inorganic nitrogen source concentration improved the yields of biomass and polyhydrohyalkanoates. The highest yields were achieved when 10 vol.% of FH prepared by microwave-assisted alkaline hydrolysis of 60 g l(-1) feather was added. In this case, the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) yields were improved by more than about 50% as compared with control cultivation. A positive impact of FH was also observed for accumulation of copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) when sodium propionate was used as a precursor. The copolymer has superior processing and mechanical properties in comparison with PHB homopolymer. The application of FH eliminated the inhibitory effect of propionate and resulted in altered content of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) in copolymer. Therefore, the hydrolysed feather can serve as an excellent complex source of nitrogen for the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production. Moreover, by the combination of two inexpensive types of waste, such as waste frying oil and feather hydrolysate, it is possible to produce PHA with substantially improved efficiency and sustainability. Millions of tons of feathers, important waste product of poultry-processing industry, are disposed off annually without any further benefits. Thus, there is an inevitable need for new technologies that enable ecologically and economically sensible processing of this waste. Herein, we report that alkali-hydrolysed feathers can be used as a complex nitrogen source considerably improving polyhydroxyalkanoates production on waste frying oil employing Cupriavidus necator. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Overlap in nitrogen sources and redistribution of nitrogen between trees and grasses in a semi-arid savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, K V R; Prins, Herbert H T; de Bie, Steven; Heitkönig, Ignas M A; Woodborne, Stephan; Gort, Gerrit; Kirkman, Kevin; Fry, Brian; de Kroon, Hans

    2014-04-01

    A key question in savanna ecology is how trees and grasses coexist under N limitation. We used N stable isotopes and N content to study N source partitioning across seasons from trees and associated grasses in a semi-arid savanna. We also used (15)N tracer additions to investigate possible redistribution of N by trees to grasses. Foliar stable N isotope ratio (δ(15)N) values were consistent with trees and grasses using mycorrhiza-supplied N in all seasons except in the wet season when they switched to microbially fixed N. The dependence of trees and grasses on mineralized soil N seemed highly unlikely based on seasonal variation in mineralization rates in the Kruger Park region. Remarkably, foliar δ(15)N values were similar for all three tree species differing in the potential for N fixation through nodulation. The tracer experiment showed that N was redistributed by trees to understory grasses in all seasons. Our results suggest that the redistribution of N from trees to grasses and uptake of N was independent of water redistribution. Although there is overlap of N sources between trees and grasses, dependence on biological sources of N coupled with redistribution of subsoil N by trees may contribute to the coexistence of trees and grasses in semi-arid savannas.

  10. Trends of nitrogen and phosphorus input into Lake Neusiedl from wastewater treatment plants and non-point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Paul; Heiss, Gerhard; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    nitrogen load amounted to 304 tons in 2010, compared to 47 tons in 2001. In the period 1992-2010 the nitrogen load caused by diffuse sources was 4.3 times higher than the point source nitrogen load (2 wastewater treatment plants). The proportion of total discharge, of inorganic nitrogen load and of phosphorus load caused by the two wastewater treatment plants depended on the discharge rate of the river Wulka (monitoring station Schützen). In 2001 (low precipitation year: 578 mm annual sum) point sources contributed about 47% of the discharge, 51% of the nitrogen load and 65% of the phosphorus load of the river Wulka. In 2010 (high precipitation year: 945 mm annual sum) point sources contributed 25% of the discharge, 11% of the nitrogen load and 31% of the total phosphorus load. In the period 1992 to 2010 the inorganic nitrogen load caused by surface water (Wulka, WWTP, creeks and channels) varied from 65 t/a to 675 t/a (mean:233 t/a).

  11. PALATABILITY AND DRY MATTER INTAKE BY SHEEP FED CORN STOVER TREATED WITH DIFFERENT NITROGEN SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. ALI, J. P. FONTENOT1 AND V. G. ALLEN2

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A trial was conducted to measure the dry matter intake by sheep fed basal and basal + corn stover treated with different nitrogen sources. The diets were: 1 basal, 2 basal + untreated corn stover, 3 basal + 3% NH3-treated stover, 4 basal + 50% poultry litter treated stover, 5 basal + 5.8% urea-treated stover, and 6 basal + 5.8% urea + 10% cattle waste-treated stover. Thirty-six crossbred (1/2 Dorset x ¼ Finn x ¼ Rambouillet wethers were assigned according to the initial body weight into six equal blocks and the sheep within blocks were randomly allotted to the experimental diets. The animals were kept in individual pens with free access to feed and water. Dry matter intake was higher (P<0.01 for sheep fed the basal diet compared to other diets. Intake was higher (P<0.05 for sheep fed NH3- and urea treated corn stover diets, compared to untreated stover. Similarly, the intake was higher (P<0.01 for sheep fed 3% NH3 treated corn stover than urea treated stovers. In conclusion, ammonia treatment of corn stover was more effective in enhancing the dry matter intake by sheep than those fed urea or poultry litter-treated diets. Addition of cattle waste in urea treated stover tended to improve the palatability of corn stover over urea treatment alone, but the difference was non significant. Similarly, the treatment of corn stover with poultry litter did not improve dry matter intake or palatability compared to untreated control.

  12. Modification of antioxidant systems in cell walls of maize roots by different nitrogen sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Hadži-Tašković Šukalović

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant systems of maize root cell walls grown on different nitrogen sources were evaluated. Plants were grown on a medium containing only NO3- or the mixture of NO3-+NH4+, in a 2:1 ratio. Eleven-day old plants, two days after the initiation of lateral roots, were used for the experiments. Cell walls were isolated from lateral roots and primary root segments, 2-7 cm from tip to base, representing zones of intense or decreased growth rates, respectively. Protein content and the activity of enzymes peroxidase, malate dehydrogenase and ascorbate oxidase ionically or covalently bound to the walls, as well as cell wall phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, were determined. Cell walls of plants grown on mixed N possess more developed enzymatic antioxidant systems and lower non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses than cell walls grown on NO3-. Irrespective of N treatment, the activities of all studied enzymes and protein content were higher in cell walls of lateral compared to primary roots. Phenolic content of cell walls isolated from lateral roots was higher in NO3--grown than in mixed N grown plants. No significant differences could be observed in the isozyme patterns of cell wall peroxidases isolated from plants grown on different nutrient solution. Our results indicate that different N treatments modify the antioxidant systems of root cell walls. Treatment with NO3- resulted in an increase of constitutive phenolic content, while the combination of NO3-+NH4+ elevated the redox enzyme activities in root cell walls.

  13. Influence of nickel nutrition and nitrogen source on growth and yield of lettuce in hydroponic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hosseini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel (Ni is the most recently discovered essential element for higher plants. But there is limited information about the effect of this element on yield and nitrogen (N metabolism of different plants. In this research, the interaction of Ni supplement and N source was studied on nitrate accumulation and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Baker in solution culture. In a greenhouse experiment, lettuce plants were exposed to two Ni levels (0 and 0.04 µM in the form of NiCl2 and three N levels (5, 10, and 20 µM in the form of urea and ammonium nitrate. The plants were harvested 6 weeks after transplanting and the fresh weight of shoots and roots, total N concentration, nitrate concentration and Fe content of shoots were determined. The results indicated that shoot and root fresh weight of nitrate-fed plants were higher than urea-fed plants. Ni nutrition significantly enhanced the yield of urea-fed plants. The shoot nitrate concentration in nitrate-fed plants was significantly greater in comparison with urea-fed plants. On the other hand, nitrate concentration in the shoots of lettuce plants decreased significantly with Ni nutrition. Ni supplementation in urea-fed plants increased the shoot Fe content. The shoot concentration of total-N in the urea-fed plants increased with the Ni supplement. While, Ni had no significant effect on shoot concentration of total-N in the nitrate-fed plants. Addition of low levels of Ni to the nutrient solution, particularly to the urea-containing solution, improved the yield of lettuce. In addition, these plant leaves are safer for human consumption because the shoot nitrate content is significantly reduced by application of Ni.

  14. NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN LOADING SOURCES FOR THREE COASTAL LAGOONS FROM ATMOSPHERIC AND WATERSHED SOURCES, ADJACENT COASTAL MARSHES, TIDAL EXCHANGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract and Oral Presentation Gulf Estuarine Research Society.Standing stocks and inputs of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) to three coastal lagoons, hereafter referred to as Kee's Bayou, Gongora, and State Park, with varying adjacent land-use, geomorphology, and water re...

  15. Electrochemical behavior of nitrogen gas species adsorbed onto boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo-Robledo, A; Lévy-Clément, C; Alonso-Vante, N

    2007-11-06

    The adsorption of nitrogen species, in neutral electrolyte solutions, onto boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode surfaces from dissolved NO2, NO, and N2O gases was induced at 0 V/SCE. Modified BDD electrode surfaces showed a different electrochemical response toward the hydrogen evolution reaction than did a nonmodified electrode surface in electrolyte base solution. The formation of molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gaseous species was confirmed by the online differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) technique. Among the three nitrogen oxides gases, NO2 substantially modifies the electrolyte via hydrolysis leading to the formation of NO3- and its adsorption on the BDD electrode surface. The BDD/(NO3-) interface was the only N2O and N2 species generating system.

  16. Optimization of nitrogen plasma source parameters by measurements of emitted light intensity for growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klosek, K.; Sobanska, M.; Tchutchulashvili, G.; Zytkiewicz, Z.R., E-mail: zytkie@ifpan.edu.pl; Teisseyre, H.; Klopotowski, L.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of operating parameters of Addon RF nitrogen plasma source was made in order to determine how a ratio of different active nitrogen species depends on operating parameters of the source such as supplied power and nitrogen flow. We show that output signal of the optical sensor that measures intensity of the light emitted by the plasma is a direct measure of the amount of active nitrogen available for growth. Results of optical emission spectroscopy and measurements of growth kinetics show that nitrogen excited metastable molecules are the species mainly contributing to the growth of GaN under Ga-rich conditions. A procedure is presented allowing to find an optimal conditions of the plasma cell for high-quality GaN growth. Under these conditions the nitrogen flux contains maximum amount of excited metastable molecules and minimal amount of ionic and atomic nitrogen species to minimize GaN lattice damage, even at high growth rates. - Highlights: ► Operating parameters of Addon radio-frequency nitrogen plasma source studied ► Their influence on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaN analyzed ► MBE growth rate of GaN well correlates with output of the plasma emission sensor. ► Optical emission spectroscopy measurements of the nitrogen plasma made ► Nitrogen excited molecules mainly contribute to plasma-assisted MBE growth of GaN.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of water table lowering and nitrogen deposition in affecting greenhouse gas emissions from a Tibetan alpine wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yu, Lingfei; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Chen, Litong; Cao, Guangmin; Yue, Haowei; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Tang, Yanhong; He, Jin-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Rapid climate change and intensified human activities have resulted in water table lowering (WTL) and enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition in Tibetan alpine wetlands. These changes may alter the magnitude and direction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, affecting the climate impact of these fragile ecosystems. We conducted a mesocosm experiment combined with a metagenomics approach (GeoChip 5.0) to elucidate the effects of WTL (-20 cm relative to control) and N deposition (30 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) on carbon dioxide (CO2 ), methane (CH4 ) and nitrous oxide (N2 O) fluxes as well as the underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that WTL reduced CH4 emissions by 57.4% averaged over three growing seasons compared with no-WTL plots, but had no significant effect on net CO2 uptake or N2 O flux. N deposition increased net CO2 uptake by 25.2% in comparison with no-N deposition plots and turned the mesocosms from N2 O sinks to N2 O sources, but had little influence on CH4 emissions. The interactions between WTL and N deposition were not detected in all GHG emissions. As a result, WTL and N deposition both reduced the global warming potential (GWP) of growing season GHG budgets on a 100-year time horizon, but via different mechanisms. WTL reduced GWP from 337.3 to -480.1 g CO2 -eq m(-2) mostly because of decreased CH4 emissions, while N deposition reduced GWP from 21.0 to -163.8 g CO2 -eq m(-2) , mainly owing to increased net CO2 uptake. GeoChip analysis revealed that decreased CH4 production potential, rather than increased CH4 oxidation potential, may lead to the reduction in net CH4 emissions, and decreased nitrification potential and increased denitrification potential affected N2 O fluxes under WTL conditions. Our study highlights the importance of microbial mechanisms in regulating ecosystem-scale GHG responses to environmental changes.

  18. Bioremediation of oil sludge using a type of nitrogen source and the consortium of bacteria with composting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Inayah; Ni'matuzahroh, Surtiningsih, Tini

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this research are to know the effect of addition of different nitrogen source, consortium of bacteria, incubation time and the interaction between those variables to the total number of bacteria (CFU/g-soil) and the percentage of degradation (%) in the bioremediation of oil sludge contaminated soil; as well as degraded hydrocarbon components at the best treatment on 6th week. The experiments carried out by mixing the materials and placed them in each bath with and without adding different nitrogen source and bacterial consortium. pH and moisture were measured for every week. An increase in total number of bacteria and percent of maximum degradation recorded at treatment with the addition of NPK+Azotobacter+bacteria consortium; with the TPC value was 14.24 log CFU/g, percent degradation was 77.8%, organic C content was 10.91%, total N was 0.12% and organic matter content was 18.87%, respectively.

  19. Nitrogen gas emissions and their genetic potential in tropical peatlands of French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasak, Kuno; Oopkaup, Kristjan; Järveoja, Järvi; Maddison, Martin; Ligi, Teele; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Mander, Ülo

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, nitrogen gas (N2, N2O) emissions from tropical peatlands (French Guiana) were measured and their relationships with the soil chemical parameters, water regime, and abundances of genes encoding denitrification associated nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases were analysed. The measurements and soil sampling (from 0-10 cm layer) were carried out in October 2013 in two sites (undisturbed and drainage influenced) of the northern part of French Guiana. In both study sites, three transects along the groundwater depth gradient with three sampling points in each transect were established. At each sampling point, N2O emissions were measured in six sessions during three days using static closed chambers. N2 emission from the top-soil samples were measured in the laboratory applying He-O (N2) method. Soil pHKCl, NO3-N, NH4-N, soluble P, K, Ca and Mg, totN and soil organic matter content were determined from the collected samples. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (and marker genes for measuring denitrification potential) nirS, nirK, nosZ clade I and clade II copies were quantified in the soils using qPCR method. Whole genome shotgun sequencing of DNA extracted from soil samples was performed on Illumina NextSeq system. Metagenomes were used for microbial profiling, identifying functional genes and relating them to biogeochemical cycles and biological processes. N2O emissions were significantly lower and N2 emissions higher (p<0.05 in both cases) in natural sites (mean values -0.3 and 10 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O, and 1477 and 637 μg m-2 h-1 for N2 in natural and drained sites, respectively). Results from molecular analyses show that the bacterial community was significantly more abundant (p<0.001) in the natural site while the N2O production potential (by the abundance of nir genes) was not different between the two sites. N2O reduction potential (by the abundance of nosZ genes) was higher (p<0.01) in the natural area where also the lower mineral N content and high

  20. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source for VASIMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Glover, Timothy W.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; Baity, F. Wally; Carter, Mark D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    In the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a plasma flux to input gas rate ratio near 100% for both helium and deuterium at power levels up to 10 kW. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show enhanced efficiency operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 10 kW of input power. The data here uses a Boswell double-saddle antenna design with a magnetic cusp just upstream of the antenna. Similar to ORNL, for deuterium at near 10 kW, we find an enhanced performance of operation at magnetic fields above the lower hybrid matching condition.

  1. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source for VASIMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Glover, Timothy W.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; Baity, F. Wally; Carter, Mark D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    In the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a plasma flux to input gas rate ratio near 100% for both helium and deuterium at power levels up to 10 kW. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show enhanced efficiency operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 10 kW of input power. The data here uses a Boswell double-saddle antenna design with a magnetic cusp just upstream of the antenna. Similar to ORNL, for deuterium at near 10 kW, we find an enhanced performance of operation at magnetic fields above the lower hybrid matching condition.

  2. Sources of Combustion Products: An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to environmental tobacco smoke, other sources of combustion products are unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, woodstoves, fireplaces, and gas stoves. The major pollutants released are carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particles.

  3. Gas feeding molecular phosphorous ion source for semiconductor implanters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Bugaev, A. S.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Hershcovitch, A.

    2014-02-01

    Phosphorus is a much used dopant in semiconductor technology. Its vapors represent a rather stable tetratomic molecular compound and are produced from one of the most thermodynamically stable allotropic forms of phosphorus—red phosphorus. At vacuum heating temperatures ranging from 325 °C, red phosphorus evaporates solely as P4 molecules (P4/P2 ˜ 2 × 105, P4/P ˜ 1021). It is for this reason that red phosphorus is best suited as a source of polyatomic molecular ion beams. The paper reports on experimental research in the generation of polyatomic phosphorus ion beams with an alternative P vapor source for which a gaseous compound of phosphorus with hydrogen - phosphine - is used. The ion source is equipped with a specially designed dissociator in which phosphine heated to temperatures close to 700 °C decomposes into molecular hydrogen and phosphorus (P4) and then the reaction products are delivered through a vapor line to the discharge chamber. Experimental data are presented reflecting the influence of the discharge parameters and temperature of the dissociator heater on the mass-charge state of the ion beam.

  4. The efficiency of biological aerobic treatment of piggery wastewater to control nitrogen, phosphorus, pathogen and gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béline, F; Daumer, M L; Loyon, L; Pourcher, A M; Dabert, P; Guiziou, F; Peu, P

    2008-01-01

    Due to the water pollution and in order to reduce the nitrogen load applied on soils, biological nitrogen removal treatment of piggery wastewaters was developed in Brittany (France), with 250-300 units running. Four types of treatment processes were built including a biological reactor allowing to remove about 60-70% of the nitrogen content as gas by nitrification/denitrification. The addition of different mechanical separators (screw-press, centrifuge decanter ...) led to concentration of phosphorus in an exportable solid phase, allowing a reduction up to 80% of the phosphorus applied locally on soils. Moreover, a reduction of the gaseous emissions was observed using this management process as compared to conventional management (storage + land spreading) including ammonia (up to 68%) and greenhouse gases (55%). Finally, the level of enteric and pathogenic bacteria was also decreased with the treatment process as compared to conventional management systems. However, in spite of these results, the significant cost of the treatment must be underlined and alternative systems including anaerobic digestion will have to be studied.

  5. Evaluating nitrogen oxide sources and oxidation pathways impacting aerosol production on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation using geochemical isotopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael Z.

    Increased emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO 2) as a result of the development of oil, gas and coal resources in the Four Corners region of the United States have caused concern for area American Indian tribes that levels of ozone, acid rain, and aerosols or particulate matter (PM) may increase on reservation lands. NOx in the atmosphere plays an important role in the formation of these pollutants and high levels are indicators of poor air quality and exposure to them has been linked to a host of human health effects and environmental problems facing today's society. Nitrogen oxides are eventually oxidized in the atmosphere to form nitrate and nitric acid which falls to earth's surface by way of dry or wet deposition. In the end, it is the removal of NOx from the atmosphere by chemical conversion to nitrate that halts this production of oxidants, acids, and aerosols. Despite the importance of understanding atmospheric nitrate (NO3- = HNO3-(g), NO3-(aq), NO3-(s)) production there remains major deficiencies in estimating the significant key reactions that transform NOx into atmospheric nitrate. Stable isotope techniques have shown that variations in oxygen (16O, 17O, 18O) and nitrogen (14N, 15N) isotope abundances in atmospheric nitrate provide significant insight to the sources and oxidation pathways that transform NOx. Therefore, this project applied this resolution using high pressure liquid chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to determine the chemical and isotopic composition of particulate nitrate (PM2.5 and PM10), collected on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation. It was determined that the observed particulate nitrate concentrations on tribal lands were likely linked to seasonal changes in boundary layer height (BLH), local sources, meteorology, photochemistry and increases in windblown crustal material. The Southern Ute Indian Reservation indicated higher delta15N values in comparison to the Navajo Nation study site

  6. Low temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline titanium nitride from a single-source precursor of titanium and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Meining, E-mail: wmn-wz@163.co [Oujiang College, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325027 (China)

    2009-11-03

    Nanocrystalline titanium nitride has been prepared via a convenient route from a single-source precursor of titanium and nitrogen (ammonium fluotitanate) in an autoclave at 650 deg. C. X-ray powder diffraction patterns indicate that the product is cubic titanium nitride, and the cell constant is a = 4.235 A. Transmission electron microscopy image shows that it consists of particles with an average size of about 40 nm in diameter. The product was also studied by BET and TGA.

  7. Greenhouse gas and soil nutrient dynamics at Haliburton Forest: nitrogen and phosphorous amendments to soils to study the effects of high nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.

    2011-12-01

    Many of Canada's forests are currently experiencing a major environmental disturbance in the form of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition from fossil fuel burning and agricultural practices. Nitrogen is a major nutrient required for plants and soil microorganisms and is normally in short supply relative to biological demands. However, when N is in excess various negative impacts result including nutrient leaching, increased nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and disturbances to carbon and methane (CH4) cycling. Introducing soil amendments might have the potential to mitigate the negative impacts of excess N in forest soils. Previous research at Haliburton Forest in southeastern Ontario, Canada has demonstrated that N is no longer a limiting nutrient for plants, but rather phosphorous (P), where the addition of P resulted in rapid increased growth in sugar maple trees. We characterized long term (>5 years) and more immediate/short-term effects of P additions and short-term effects of N and N+P additions to soils at Haliburton Forest on the exchange of greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2) and cycling of N and P to determine the extent of excess N impact and potential N saturation. Long-term effects of P addition demonstrated suppressed levels of CH4 uptake likely due to an N limitation of CH4 oxidizing bacteria. Decreased pools of N with P addition suggest that P additions alleviate P limitation and induce N uptake, however overall low inorganic N pools suggest that N saturation has not yet appeared. Immediate effects demonstrated increased N2O and CO2 efflux and suppressed CH4 uptake in N amended plots while P amended plots remained similar to control plots. 1- and 2-year post-application greenhouse gas and nutrient data will help to elucidate these findings.

  8. Nitrogen fixation during an unusual summer Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Maren; Dalsgaard, Tage; Fabian, Jenny

    Nitrogen fixation is a major nitrogen source for the open ocean. Also the land-locked, partly anoxic Baltic Sea receives almost as much nitrogen from nitrogen fixation as it receives from eutrophied rivers. Growth conditions for cyanobacteria are usually very favorable with low N/P ratios after...... variety in nitrogen fixing species than usual was observed. Under these conditions nitrogen fixation rates were studied over a three weeks period throughout the upper water column. Moreover, a methods comparison was performed to test the dissolved dinitrogen gas additions against the bubble addition...

  9. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas.

  10. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli gains a competitive advantage by using ethanolamine as a nitrogen source in the bovine intestinal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Yolande; Girardeau, J P; Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Lyan, Bernard; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Harel, Josée; Martin, Christine

    2011-02-01

    The bovine gastrointestinal tract is the main reservoir for enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) responsible for food-borne infections. Characterization of nutrients that promote the carriage of these pathogens by the ruminant would help to develop ecological strategies to reduce their survival in the bovine gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we show for the first time that free ethanolamine (EA) constitutes a nitrogen source for the O157:H7 EHEC strain EDL933 in the bovine intestinal content because of induction of the eut (ethanolamine utilization) gene cluster. In contrast, the eut gene cluster is absent in the genome of most species constituting the mammalian gut microbiota. Furthermore, the eutB gene (encoding a subunit of the enzyme that catalyses the release of ammonia from EA) is poorly expressed in non-pathogenic E. coli. Accordingly, EA is consumed by EHEC but is poorly metabolized by endogenous microbiota of the bovine small intestine, including commensal E. coli. Interestingly, the capacity to utilize EA as a nitrogen source confers a growth advantage to E. coli O157:H7 when the bacteria enter the stationary growth phase. These data demonstrate that EHEC strains take advantage of a nitrogen source that is not consumed by the resident microbiota, and suggest that EA represents an ecological niche favouring EHEC persistence in the bovine intestine.

  11. Influence of the carbon and nitrogen sources on keratinase production by Myrothecium verrucaria in submerged and solid state cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Gioppo, Nereida Mello Rosa; Moreira-Gasparin, Fabiana G; Costa, Andréa M; Alexandrino, Ana Maria; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques; Peralta, Rosane M

    2009-05-01

    Myrothecium verrucaria is a nondermatophytic filamentous fungus able to grow and to produce keratinase in submerged (93.0 +/- 19 U/ml) and solid state (98.8 +/- 7.9 U/ml) cultures in which poultry feather powder (PFP) is the only substrate. The purpose of the present work was to verify how different carbon and nitrogen sources can influence the production of keratinase by this fungus. Addition of carbohydrates, such as glucose and sucrose, caused only slight improvements in keratinase production, but the addition of starch caused a significant improvement (135.0 +/- 25 U/ml). The highest levels of keratinase activity, however, were obtained by supplementing the PFP cultures with cassava bagasse, 168.0 +/- 28 U/ml and 189.0 +/- 26 U/ml in submerged and solid state cultures, respectively. Contrarily, the supplementation of PFP medium with organic or inorganic nitrogen sources, such as casein, soy bean protein, gelatin, ammonium nitrate and alanine, decreased the production of keratinase in both types of cultures (around 20 U/ml), showing that the production of keratinase by M. verrucaria is repressed by nitrogen sources. The results obtained in this work suggest that the association of the two residues PFP plus cassava bagasse could be an excellent option as a cheap culture medium for the production of keratinase in submerged and solid state cultures.

  12. Nitrogen Source Inventory and Loading Tool: An integrated approach toward restoration of water-quality impaired karst springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Kirstin T; Katz, Brian G

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) from anthropogenic sources has contaminated groundwater used as drinking water in addition to impairing water quality and ecosystem health of karst springs. The Nitrogen Source Inventory and Loading Tool (NSILT) was developed as an ArcGIS and spreadsheet-based approach that provides spatial estimates of current nitrogen (N) inputs to the land surface and loads to groundwater from nonpoint and point sources within the groundwater contributing area. The NSILT involves a three-step approach where local and regional land use practices and N sources are evaluated to: (1) estimate N input to the land surface, (2) quantify subsurface environmental attenuation, and (3) assess regional recharge to the aquifer. NSILT was used to assess nitrogen loading to groundwater in two karst spring areas in west-central Florida: Rainbow Springs (RS) and Kings Bay (KB). The karstic Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) is the source of water discharging to the springs in both areas. In the KB study area (predominantly urban land use), septic systems and urban fertilizers contribute 48% and 22%, respectively, of the estimated total annual N load to groundwater 294,400 kg-N/yr. In contrast for the RS study area (predominantly agricultural land use), livestock operations and crop fertilizers contribute 50% and 13%, respectively, of the estimated N load to groundwater. Using overall groundwater N loading rates for the KB and RS study areas, 4.4 and 3.3 kg N/ha, respectively, and spatial recharge rates, the calculated groundwater nitrate-N concentration (2.1 mg/L) agreed closely with the median nitrate-N concentration (1.7 mg/L) from groundwater samples in agricultural land use areas in the RS study area for the period 2010-2014. NSILT results provide critical information for prioritizing and designing restoration efforts for water-quality impaired springs and spring runs affected by multiple sources of nitrogen loading to groundwater. The calculated groundwater N concentration for

  13. Design and Development of Surface Modified p and n Type Silicon Sensor for Nitrogen Gas Flow Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Satheesh, U; Devaprakasam, D

    2014-01-01

    We report a gas flow driven voltage generation of Octyltrichlorosilane (OTS) molecules self assembled on silicon wafers (Si wafers). OTS Self assembled Monolayer (SAM) has been coated on both p-type and n-type doped silicon wafers (p-Si and n-Si wafers) using dip coating method. We have measured the flow induced voltage generation on OTS SAM coated Si wafers/ Uncoated Si wafers at modest gas flow velocities of subsonic regime (Mach number < 0.2) using national instruments NI-PXI-1044 Workstation. The gas flow driven voltage generation is mainly due to the interplay mechanisms of Bernoulli principle and Seebeck effect. The surface morphology of OTS SAM coated p-Si and n-Si wafers were characterized by SEM analysis. In this study, our results shows that OTS SAM coated p-Si and n-Si wafers shows better sensitivity towards nitrogen gas flow when compared with the uncoated Si wafers. OTS SAM also exhibits high thermal stability and hydrophobicity.

  14. Does nitrogen gas bubbled through a low density polymer gel dosimeter solution affect the polymerization process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: It appeared that reactions between gelatin-free radicals and monomers, due to an increase in the gel temperature during rotation in the household mixer, led to a higher R 2 -background response. In the second type of gel, it seemed that the collapse of the nitrogen bubbles was the main factor that affected the R 2 -responses.

  15. Effects of Nitrogen Deposition on Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes for Forests and Grasslands of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human activities have substantially elevated the atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) onto terrestrial ecosystems of North America. Some of this N can stimulate carbon (C) storage in terrestrial ecosystems, but the fertilization effect of added N can be diminished by e...

  16. Flame deposition of diamond : gas phase diagnostics and the effects of nitrogen addition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Robert Leendert

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents research on oxyacetylene flame deposition of diamond. Two main topics are addressed, namely the development and application of laser spectroscopic techniques for flame diagnostics, and the influence of nitrogen addition on the flame and diamond layer properties. Flame diagnostic

  17. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity influenced by irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information exists about sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) affected by management practices to account for net emissions from agroecosystems. We evaluated the effects of irrigation, tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas...

  18. Low NOx emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen in gas turbine combustors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adouane, B.

    2006-01-01

    Biomass-derived LCV (Low Calorific Value) gas represents one of the best alternatives for fossil fuels. It is very attractive, because it is CO2 neutral as biomass consumes an amount of CO2 when growing and releases almost the same amount when combusted. However, the raw gasifier producer gas

  19. Low NOx emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen in gas turbine combustors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adouane, B.

    2006-01-01

    Biomass-derived LCV (Low Calorific Value) gas represents one of the best alternatives for fossil fuels. It is very attractive, because it is CO2 neutral as biomass consumes an amount of CO2 when growing and releases almost the same amount when combusted. However, the raw gasifier producer gas contai

  20. The effect of long-term exposure to elevated CO2 on nitrogen gas emissions from Mojave Desert soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalley, Carmody K.; Strahm, Brian D.; Sparks, Kimberlee L.; Eller, Allyson S. D.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2011-09-01

    In arid regions, emissions of nitrogen (N) gases are important to long-term soil fertility and regional atmospheric chemistry, making alterations in N gas emissions an important aspect of ecosystem response to climate change. Studies at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility suggest that rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations impact ecosystems N dynamics in the Mojave Desert; our objective was to identify whether those responses translate into changes in trace N gas emissions. We measured soil fluxes of reactive N gases (NO, NOy, NH3) and N2O in plots receiving long-term fumigation with ambient and elevated (550 ppm) CO2. Reactive N gas emissions were significantly lower under elevated CO2 during high soil moisture conditions in the spring and fall. The strongest responses occurred in the islands of fertility created by the dominant shrub Larrea tridentata, where fluxes were 3-5 ng N m-2 s-1 lower in elevated CO2 plots. Changes in total N gas emissions were driven by reduced NO and NH3 emissions, with smaller changes in NOy efflux and little to no production of N2O. Lower N gas emissions under elevated CO2 reflect changes in plant and microbial demand for N, suggesting increased uptake or immobilization coupled with decreased rates of N mineralization and nitrification. This response of N gas efflux to elevated CO2 in the growing season suggests that in deserts, elevated CO2 promotes ecosystem retention of N during periods of peak biological demand. Concomitantly, exposure to elevated CO2 alters inputs of new reactive gases into the atmosphere, potentially impacting local atmospheric processes.

  1. Sources of nitrogen deposition in Federal Class I areas in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-M.; Paulot, F.; Henze, D. K.; Travis, K.; Jacob, D. J.; Pardo, L. H.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    It is desired to control excessive reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition due to its detrimental impact on ecosystems. Using a three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem, Nr deposition in the contiguous US and eight selected Class I areas (Voyageurs (VY), Smoky Mountain (SM), Shenandoah (SD), Big Bend (BB), Rocky Mountain (RM), Grand Teton (GT), Joshua Tree (JT), and Sequoia (SQ)) is investigated. First, modeled Nr deposition is compared with National Trends Network (NTN) and Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) deposition values. The seasonality of measured species is generally well represented by the model (R2 > 0.6), except in JT. While modeled Nr is generally within the range of seasonal observations, large overestimates are present in sites such as SM and SD in the spring and summer (up to 0.6 kg N ha month-1), likely owing to model high-biases in surface HNO3. The contribution of non-measured species (mostly dry deposition of NH3) to total modeled Nr deposition ranges from 1 to 55 %. The spatial distribution of the origin of Nr deposited in each Class I area and the contributions of individual emission sectors are estimated using the GEOS-Chem adjoint model. We find the largest role of long-range transport for VY, where 50 % (90 %) of annual Nr deposition originates within 670 (1670) km of the park. In contrast, the Nr emission footprint is most localized for SQ, where 50 % (90 %) of the deposition originates from within 130 (370) km. Emissions from California contribute to the Nr deposition in remote areas in the western US (RM, GT). Mobile NOx and livestock NH3 are found to be the major sources of Nr deposition in all sites except BB, where contributions of NOx from lightning and soils to natural levels of Nr deposition are significant (˜ 40 %). The efficiency in terms of Nr deposition per kg emissions of NH3-N, NOx-N, and SO2-S are also estimated. Unique seasonal features are found in JT (opposing efficiency distributions for

  2. Noble gas signatures in the Island of Maui, Hawaii: Characterizing groundwater sources in fractured systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yi; Castro, M. Clara; Hall, Chris M.; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Scholl, Martha A.; Warrier, Rohit B.

    2017-01-01

    Uneven distribution of rainfall and freshwater scarcity in populated areas in the Island of Maui, Hawaii, renders water resources management a challenge in this complex and ill-defined hydrological system. A previous study in the Galapagos Islands suggests that noble gas temperatures (NGTs) record seasonality in that fractured, rapid infiltration groundwater system rather than the commonly observed mean annual air temperature (MAAT) in sedimentary systems where infiltration is slower thus, providing information on recharge sources and potential flow paths. Here we report noble gas results from the basal aquifer, springs, and rainwater in Maui to explore the potential for noble gases in characterizing this type of complex fractured hydrologic systems. Most samples display a mass-dependent depletion pattern with respect to surface conditions consistent with previous observations both in the Galapagos Islands and Michigan rainwater. Basal aquifer and rainwater noble gas patterns are similar and suggest direct, fast recharge from precipitation to the basal aquifer. In contrast, multiple springs, representative of perched aquifers, display highly variable noble gas concentrations suggesting recharge from a variety of sources. The distinct noble gas patterns for the basal aquifer and springs suggest that basal and perched aquifers are separate entities. Maui rainwater displays high apparent NGTs, incompatible with surface conditions, pointing either to an origin at high altitudes with the presence of ice or an ice-like source of undetermined origin. Overall, noble gas signatures in Maui reflect the source of recharge rather than the expected altitude/temperature relationship commonly observed in sedimentary systems.

  3. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N 2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-08-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N 2O, CH 4, and CO 2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N 2O, CH 4 and respiratory CO 2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO 3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m -2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N 2O and CH 4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N 2O in July 2009 averaged -33 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N 2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N 2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N 2O and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N 2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N 2O and CH 4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  4. Volatile organic compound emissions from unconventional natural gas production: Source signatures and air quality impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarthout, Robert F.

    Advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing over the past two decades have allowed access to previously unrecoverable reservoirs of natural gas and led to an increase in natural gas production. Intensive unconventional natural gas extraction has led to concerns about impacts on air quality. Unconventional natural gas production has the potential to emit vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. Many VOCs can be toxic, can produce ground-level ozone or secondary organic aerosols, and can impact climate. This dissertation presents the results of experiments designed to validate VOC measurement techniques, to quantify VOC emission rates from natural gas sources, to identify source signatures specific to natural gas emissions, and to quantify the impacts of these emissions on potential ozone formation and human health. Measurement campaigns were conducted in two natural gas production regions: the Denver-Julesburg Basin in northeast Colorado and the Marcellus Shale region surrounding Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An informal measurement intercomparison validated the canister sampling methodology used throughout this dissertation for the measurement of oxygenated VOCs. Mixing ratios of many VOCs measured during both campaigns were similar to or higher than those observed in polluted cities. Fluxes of natural gas-associated VOCs in Colorado ranged from 1.5-3 times industry estimates. Similar emission ratios relative to propane were observed for C2-C6 alkanes in both regions, and an isopentane:n-pentane ratio ≈1 was identified as a unique tracer for natural gas emissions. Source apportionment estimates indicated that natural gas emissions were responsible for the majority of C2-C8 alkanes observed in each region, but accounted for a small proportion of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Natural gas emissions in both regions accounted for approximately 20% of hydroxyl radical reactivity, which could hinder federal ozone standard

  5. Performance improvement of air source heat pump by using gas-injected rotary compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. L.; Liu, X. R.; Ding, Y. C.; Shi, W. X.

    2017-08-01

    Rotary compressor is most widely used in small capacity refrigeration and heat pump systems. For the air source heat pump, the heating capacity and the COP will be obviously degraded when it is utilized in low temperature ambient. Gas injection is an effective method to enhance its performance under those situations, which has been well applied in air source heat pump with scroll compressor. However, the development of the gas injection technology in rotary compressor is relatively slow due to limited performance improvement. In this research, the essential reason constraining the improvement of the gas injection on the rotary compressor and its heat pump system is identified. Two new injection structures for rotary compressors has been put forward to overcome the drawback of traditional injection structures. Based on a verified numerical model, the thermodynamic performance of air source heat pumps with the new gas-injected rotary compressor are investigated. The results indicate that, compared to the air source heat pump with the traditional gas injected rotary compressor, the new injection structures both can enhance heating capacity and COP of the air source heat pump obviously.

  6. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and mycotoxin production by isolates of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis from wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Bouras

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died. Drechs. infects the leaves and kernels of wheat, causing tan spot and red smudge, respectively. Isolates of P. tritici-repentis have been reported to be both phytopathogenic and mycotoxigenic. This research investigates the influence of nitrogen sources on growth and production of mycotoxins by eight different isolates of P. tritici-repentis. A synthetic agar medium (SAM was used with different nitrogen sources, both inorganic [(NH4Cl, NH4NO3 and (NH42SO4] and organic (l-alanine, l-histidine, and l-lysine, at a concentration of 37.5 mmol L− 1. Individual isolates exhibited different growth rates that varied according to the nitrogen source added to the medium. The choice of nitrogen source also had a major effect on production of the mycotoxins emodin, catenarin and islandicin. The highest concentrations of emodin, 54.40 ± 4.46 μg g− 1, 43.07 ± 23.39 μg g− 1 and 28.91 ± 4.64 μg g− 1 of growth medium, were produced on the complex medium (V8-potato dextrose agar by the isolates Alg-H2, 331-2 and TS93-71B, respectively. A relatively high concentration of emodin also was produced by isolates Az35-5 (28.29 ± 4.71 μg g− 1 of medium and TS93-71B (27.03 ± 4.09 μg g− 1 of medium on synthetic medium supplemented with l-alanine. The highest concentrations of catenarin (174.54 ± 14.46 μg g− 1 and 104.87 ± 6.13 μg g− 1 of medium were recorded for isolates TS93-71B and Alg-H2 on synthetic medium supplemented with l-alanine and NH4Cl, respectively. The highest concentration of islandicin (4.64 ± 0.36 μg g− 1 medium was observed for isolate 331-2 in the presence of l-lysine. There was not a close relationship between mycelial growth and mycotoxin production by the fungal isolates. This is the first report on the influence of nitrogen sources on the production of mycotoxins by P. tritici-repentis.

  7. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and mycotoxin production by isolates of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis from wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noureddine Bouras; Michael D. Holtz; Reem Aboukhaddour; Stephen E. Strelkova

    2016-01-01

    The fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died.) Drechs. infects the leaves and kernels of wheat, causing tan spot and red smudge, respectively. Isolates of P. tritici-repentis have been reported to be both phytopathogenic and mycotoxigenic. This research investigates the influence of nitrogen sources on growth and production of mycotoxins by eight different isolates of P. tritici-repentis. A synthetic agar medium (SAM) was used with different nitrogen sources, both inorganic [(NH4Cl, NH4NO3 and (NH4)2SO4)] and organic (L-alanine, L-histidine, and L-lysine), at a concentration of 37.5 mmol L−1. Individual isolates exhibited different growth rates that varied according to the nitrogen source added to the medium. The choice of nitrogen source also had a major effect on production of the mycotoxins emodin, catenarin and islandicin. The highest concentrations of emodin, 54.40 ± 4.46μg g−1, 43.07 ± 23.39μg g−1 and 28.91 ± 4.64μg g−1 of growth medium, were produced on the complex medium (V8-potato dextrose agar) by the isolates Alg-H2, 331-2 and TS93-71B, respectively. A relatively high concentration of emodin also was produced by isolates Az35-5 (28.29 ± 4.71μg g−1 of medium) and TS93-71B (27.03 ± 4.09μg g−1 of medium) on synthetic medium supplemented with L-alanine. The highest concentrations of catenarin (174.54 ± 14.46μg g−1 and 104.87 ± 6.13μg g−1 of medium) were recorded for isolates TS93-71B and Alg-H2 on synthetic medium supplemented with L-alanine and NH4Cl, respectively. The highest concentration of islandicin (4.64 ± 0.36μg g−1 medium) was observed for isolate 331-2 in the presence of L-lysine. There was not a close relationship between mycelial growth and mycotoxin production by the fungal isolates. This is the first report on the influence of nitrogen sources on the production of mycotoxins by P. tritici-repentis.

  8. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and mycotoxin production by isolates of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis from wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noureddine Bouras; Michael D.Holtz; Reem Aboukhaddour; Stephen E.Strelkov

    2016-01-01

    The fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis(Died.) Drechs. infects the leaves and kernels of wheat,causing tan spot and red smudge, respectively. Isolates of P. tritici-repentis have been reported to be both phytopathogenic and mycotoxigenic. This research investigates the influence of nitrogen sources on growth and production of mycotoxins by eight different isolates of P. tritici-repentis. A synthetic agar medium(SAM) was used with different nitrogen sources, both inorganic [(NH4Cl, NH4NO3and(NH4)2SO4)] and organic(L-alanine, L-histidine, and L-lysine), at a concentration of 37.5 mmol L-1. Individual isolates exhibited different growth rates that varied according to the nitrogen source added to the medium. The choice of nitrogen source also had a major effect on production of the mycotoxins emodin, catenarin and islandicin. The highest concentrations of emodin, 54.40 ± 4.46 μg g-1, 43.07 ± 23.39 μg g-1and28.91 ± 4.64 μg g-1of growth medium, were produced on the complex medium(V8-potato dextrose agar) by the isolates Alg-H2, 331-2 and TS93-71 B, respectively. A relatively high concentration of emodin also was produced by isolates Az35-5(28.29 ± 4.71 μg g-1of medium)and TS93-71B(27.03 ± 4.09 μg g-1of medium) on synthetic medium supplemented with L-alanine. The highest concentrations of catenarin(174.54 ± 14.46 μg g-1and 104.87 ±6.13 μg g-1of medium) were recorded for isolates TS93-71 B and Alg-H2 on synthetic medium supplemented with L-alanine and NH4 Cl, respectively. The highest concentration of islandicin(4.64 ± 0.36 μg g-1medium) was observed for isolate 331-2 in the presence of L-lysine. There was not a close relationship between mycelial growth and mycotoxin production by the fungal isolates. This is the first report on the influence of nitrogen sources on the production of mycotoxins by P. tritici-repentis.

  9. Nitrogen Injection To Flush Coal Seam Gas Out Of Coal: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Aziz, Naj; Ren, Ting; Nemcik, Jan; Tu, Shihao

    2015-12-01

    Several mines operating in the Bulli seam of the Sydney Basin in NSW, Australia are experiencing difficulties in reducing gas content within the available drainage lead time in various sections of the coal deposit. Increased density of drainage boreholes has proven to be ineffective, particularly in sections of the coal seam rich in CO2. Plus with the increasing worldwide concern on green house gas reduction and clean energy utilisation, significant attention is paid to develop a more practical and economical method of enhancing the gas recovery from coal seams. A technology based on N2 injection was proposed to flush the Coal Seam Gas (CSG) out of coal and enhance the gas drainage process. In this study, laboratory tests on CO2 and CH4 gas recovery from coal by N2 injection are described and results show that N2 flushing has a significant impact on the CO2 and CH4 desorption and removal from coal. During the flushing stage, it was found that N2 flushing plays a more effective role in reducing adsorbed CH4 than CO2. Comparatively, during the desorption stage, the study shows gas desorption after N2 flushing plays a more effective role in reducing adsorbed CO2 than CH4.

  10. Thick c-BN films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in argon/nitrogen gas mixture with additional hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Gao, Wei; Xu, Bo; Li, Ying-Ai; Li, Hong-Dong; Gu, Guang-Rui; Yin, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The excellent physical and chemical properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) film make it a promising candidate for various industry applications. However, the c-BN film thickness restricts its practical applications in many cases. Thus, it is indispensable to develop an economic, simple and environment-friend way to synthesize high-quality thick, stable c-BN films. High-cubic-content BN films are prepared on silicon (100) substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering from an h-BN target at low substrate temperature. Adhesions of the c-BN films are greatly improved by adding hydrogen to the argon/nitrogen gas mixture, allowing the deposition of a film up to 5-μm thick. The compositions and the microstructure morphologies of the c-BN films grown at different substrate temperatures are systematically investigated with respect to the ratio of H2 gas content to total working gas. In addition, a primary mechanism for the deposition of thick c-BN film is proposed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51572105, 61504046, and 51272224), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China, the Development and Reform Commission of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 2015Y050), and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas of Jilin Province, China.

  11. Effects of Nitrogen Sources and C/N Ratios on the Lipid-Producing Potential of Chlorella sp. HQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jingjing; Hong, Yu; Hu, Hongying

    2016-07-28

    Microalgae are being researched for their potential as attractive biofuel feedstock, particularly for their lipid production. For maximizing biofuel production, it is necessary to explore the effects of environmental factors on algal lipid-producing potential. In this study, the effects of nitrogen (N) sources (NO2-N, NO3-N, urea-N, NH4-N, and N-deficiency) and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios (C/N= 0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0) on algal lipid-producing potential of Chlorella sp. HQ were investigated. The results showed that for Chlorella growth and lipid accumulation potential, NO2-N was the best amongst the nitrogen sources, and NO3-N and urea-N also contributed to algal growth and lipid accumulation potential, but NH4-N and N-deficiency instead caused inhibitory effects. Moreover, the results indicated that algal lipid-producing potential was related to C/N ratios. With NO2-N treatment and carbon addition (C/N = 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0), total lipid yield was enhanced by 12.96-20.37%, but triacylglycerol (TAG) yields decreased by 25.52-94.31%. As for NO3-N treatment, carbon addition led to a 17.82-57.43%/ 25.86-82.67% reduction of total lipid/TAG yields. When NH4-N was used as the nitrogen source, total lipid/TAG yields were increased by 46.67-113.33%/28.99-74.76% with carbon addition. The total lipid/TAG yields of urea-N treatment varied with C/N ratios. Overall, the highest TAG yield (TAG yield: 38.75 ± 5.21 mg/l; TAG content: 44.16 ± 4.35%) was achieved under NO2-N treatment without carbon addition (C/N = 0), the condition that had merit for biofuel production.

  12. Role of integrated use of nitrogen fertilizer sources in improving seed quality of canola (Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman EL Sabagh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary for developing strategies of integrated fertilization for crops to maximize production of crops and reducing the risk of pollution from chemical fertilizers. Therefore, the objectives of this study to evaluate the impact of bio-organic, chemical nitrogen on seed quality of canola. A study was conducted for two consecutive years (2005 to 2006 at the Farm of Faculty of Agriculture, Kafr El-Sheikh University, Egypt. Bio fertilizer (control and bio-fertilizer, compost (control, 6, 12 and 18 ton ha-1 and chemical nitrogen (control, 36, 72 and 108 kg N ha-1. The result indicated that, bio-fertilizer was significantly effects on protein % and iodine value except oil percent was decreased. On the other hand, the Maximum values oil and protein were recorded by using compost fertilizer at (18 ton ha-1. In respect to chemical fertilizer, adding nitrogen affected significantly on protein % and the maximum value was obtained at (108 N ha-1 while, oil percent and iodine value were decreased. Interestingly, it is clear that from results that cultivar belongs to canola (LEAR that contains < 2% erucic acid and a nitrogen source has almost slight effect on oil physical properties. Totally, the interaction among treatments application compost (6ton ha-1 and (72 N kg ha-1 with combined bio- fertilizer was achieved suitable oil percent and could be improve canola seed yield and quality and environment would have a better condition.

  13. Temporal patterns and source apportionment of nitrate-nitrogen leaching in a paddy field at Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hazilia; Yusoff, Mohd Kamil; Ramli, Mohd Firuz; Abd Latif, Puziah; Juahir, Hafizan; Zawawi, Mohamed Azwan Mohammed

    2013-11-15

    Nitrate-nitrogen leaching from agricultural areas is a major cause for groundwater pollution. Polluted groundwater with high levels of nitrate is hazardous and cause adverse health effects. Human consumption of water with elevated levels of NO3-N has been linked to the infant disorder methemoglobinemia and also to non-Hodgkin's disease lymphoma in adults. This research aims to study the temporal patterns and source apportionment of nitrate-nitrogen leaching in a paddy soil at Ladang Merdeka Ismail Mulong in Kelantan, Malaysia. The complex data matrix (128 x 16) of nitrate-nitrogen parameters was subjected to multivariate analysis mainly Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Analysis (DA). PCA extracted four principal components from this data set which explained 86.4% of the total variance. The most important contributors were soil physical properties confirmed using Alyuda Forecaster software (R2 = 0.98). Discriminant analysis was used to evaluate the temporal variation in soil nitrate-nitrogen on leaching process. Discriminant analysis gave four parameters (hydraulic head, evapotranspiration, rainfall and temperature) contributing more than 98% correct assignments in temporal analysis. DA allowed reduction in dimensionality of the large data set which defines the four operating parameters most efficient and economical to be monitored for temporal variations. This knowledge is important so as to protect the precious groundwater from contamination with nitrate.

  14. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  15. Study on the Requirement of Nitrogen Sources by Scheffersomyces Stipitis NRRL Y-7124 to Produce Ethanol from Xylose Based-media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussatto, Solange I.; Carneiro, L. M.; Roberto, I. C.

    hydrolysate produced from rice straw. Interesting results were achieved, which revealed that it is important to add nitrogen sources to the medium to achieve efficient ethanol production by this yeast strain. However, from rice straw hydrolysate medium, the nitrogen supplementation was not necessary...

  16. Muonium formation by collisions of muons with solid rare-gas and solid nitrogen layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prokscha, T; Morenzoni, E; Meyberg, M; Wutzke, T; Matthias, BE; Fachat, A; Jungmann, K; Putlitz, GZ

    1998-01-01

    We report an observation of the formation of muonium [Mu=(mu(+)e(-)) bound state] with kinetic energies between 1 and 40 keV on 500-nm-thick solid argon, xenon, and nitrogen (N-2) layers. The thin films are deposited on a 250-mu m-thick aluminum target which is bombarded with a 3.6-MeV mu(+) beam. W

  17. Aerodynamic testing in cryogenic nitrogen gas - A precursor to testing in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, Pierce L.

    1989-01-01

    Testing techniques for transonic cryogenic tunnels using nitrogen as the test fluid are presented. The measurement of static aerodynamic coefficients used to determine component efficiency is discussed, focusing on tests of two-dimensional airfoils at transonic Mach numbers. Also, three-dimensional tests of complete configurations and sidewall mounted wings are examined. Consideration is given to time-dependent phenomena, fluid mechanics, nonintrusive laser techniques, the detection of transition and separation, and testing for flutter, buffet, and oscillating airfoil characteristics.

  18. Agronomic performance and chemical response of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) to some organic nitrogen sources and conventional nitrogen fertilizers under sandy soil conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmy, A. M.; Fawzy Ramadan, M. F.

    2009-07-01

    Sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) is an option for oilseed production, particularly in dry land areas due to good root system development. In this study, two field experiments were performed in the El-Khattara region (Sharkia Governorate, Egypt) during the 2005 season. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of organic nitrogen (ON) sources and their combinations as well as to compare the effect of ON and ammonium sulfate (AS) as a conventional fertilizer added individually or in combination on growth, yield components, oil percentage and the uptake of some macro nutrients by sunflowers grown on sandy soil.The treatments of chicken manure (CM) and a mixture of farmyard manure (FYM) with CM were superior to the other treatments and gave the highest yield, dry matter yield, NPK uptake by plants at all growth stages along with seed yield at the mature stage. The effect of the different ON on crop yield and its components may follow the order; CM> palma residues (PR)> FYM. This was more emphasized when the materials were mixed with AS at a ratio of 3:1 and 1:1. The uptake of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) by plants was affected by the addition of different N sources and treatments. The highest nutrient content and uptake by straw were obtained when treated with CM followed by PR at all growth stages, while it was PR followed by CM for seeds. Oil recovery was shown to respond to the N supply and the changes in individual fatty acids were not statistically different. However, it seems that the application of organic fertilizers resulted in an increase in total unsaturated fatty acids compared to the control. (Author) 58 refs.

  19. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4+, NO2−, and NO3−, and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents. PMID:26495313

  20. Nitrogen source and external medium pH interaction differentially affects root and shoot metabolism in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier eSarasketa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nutrition often represents an important growth-limiting stress in plants. Some of the symptoms that plants present under ammonium nutrition have been associated with pH deregulation, in fact external medium pH control is known to improve plants ammonium tolerance. However, the way plant cell metabolism adjusts to these changes is not completely understood. Thus, in this work we focused on how Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root respond to different nutritional regimes by varying the nitrogen source (NO3- and NH4+, concentration (2 and 10 mM and pH of the external medium (5.7 and 6.7 to gain a deeper understanding of cell metabolic adaptation upon altering these environmental factors. The results obtained evidence changes in the response of ammonium assimilation machinery and of the anaplerotic enzymes associated to Tricarboxylic Acids (TCA cycle in function of the plant organ, the nitrogen source and the degree of ammonium stress. A greater stress severity at pH 5.7 was related to NH4+ accumulation; this could not be circumvented in spite of the stimulation of glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle anaplerotic enzymes. Moreover, this study suggests specific functions for different gln and gdh isoforms based on the nutritional regime. Overall, NH4+ accumulation triggering ammonium stress appears to bear no relation to nitrogen assimilation impairment.

  1. Response of irrigated wheat cultivars to different nitrogen rates and sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carvalho Minhoto Teixeira Filho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available High wheat yields require good N fertilization management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different N applications at sowing using Entec (N source with nitrification inhibitor and urea (traditional N source at covering, on four wheat cultivars. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design in a factorial scheme, with four replications, at the Experimental Station of the Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira - UNESP, on a dystrophic, epi-eutrophic alic Red Latosol with loamy texture, formerly under savannah vegetation. Four N rates (0, 60, 120, and 180 kg ha-1 were tested, applied at sowing in the case of Entec and top-dressed 40 days after plant emergence in the case of urea, and the four wheat cultivars E 21, E 22, E 42, and IAC 370. The yield of the wheat cultivars E 21 and E 42 was highest. Plant height and lodging index of cultivar E 22 were greatest, with consequently lowest grain yield. There was no significant difference between Entec (applied at sowing and urea (top-dressed in terms of grain yield and yield components. Nevertheless, urea resulted in a higher N leaf content, and Entec in a larger number of undeveloped spikelets. High nitrogen rates influenced the hectoliter mass negatively, affecting wheat grain quality. Grain yield increased under N rates of up to 82 kg ha-1 N, through Entec applied at sowing or top-dressed urea.Altas produtividades de trigo requerem um bom manejo da adubação nitrogenada. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos de diferentes doses de nitrogênio na semeadura usando o Entec (fonte de N com inibidor de nitrificação, ou em cobertura, utilizando a ureia, em quatro cultivares de trigo. O experimento foi desenvolvido em área experimental pertencente à Faculdade de Engenharia de Ilha Solteira - UNESP, em um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico epieutrófico álico textura argilosa, o qual foi nativamente ocupado por vegetação de Cerrado. O delineamento estat

  2. Moss-cyanobacteria associations as biogenic sources of nitrogen in boreal forest ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Kathrin eRousk; Jones, Davey L; Thomas H Deluca

    2013-01-01

    The biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen (N) is a major pathway for available N entering ecosystems. In N-limited boreal forests, a significant amount of N2 is fixed by cyanobacteria living in association with mosses, contributing up to 50% to the total N input. In this review, we synthesize reports on the drivers of N2 fixation in feather moss-cyanobacteria associations to gain a deeper understanding of their role for ecosystem-N-cycling. Nitrogen fixation in moss-cyanobacteria associ...

  3. Modeling the Flow Regime Near the Source in Underwater Gas Releases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lakshitha T. Premathilake; Poojitha D. Yapa; Indrajith D. Nissanka; Pubudu Kumarage

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in calculating gas bubble sizes in a plume, based on phenomenological approaches using the release conditions is a significant improvement to make the gas plume models self-reliant. Such calculations require details of conditions Near the Source of Plume (NSP); (i.e. the plume/jet velocity and radius near the source), which inspired the present work. Determining NSP conditions for gas plumes are far more complex than that for oil plumes due to the substantial density difference between gas and water. To calculate NSP conditions, modeling the early stage of the plume is important. A novel method of modeling the early stage of an underwater gas release is presented here. Major impact of the present work is to define the correct NSP conditions for underwater gas releases, which is not possible with available methods as those techniques are not based on the physics of flow region near the source of the plume/jet. We introduce super Gaussian profiles to model the density and velocity variations of the early stages of plume, coupled with the laws of fluid mechanics to define profile parameters. This new approach, models the velocity profile variation from near uniform, across the section at the release point to Gaussian some distance away. The comparisons show that experimental data agrees well with the computations.

  4. Modeling the flow regime near the source in underwater gas releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premathilake, Lakshitha T.; Yapa, Poojitha D.; Nissanka, Indrajith D.; Kumarage, Pubudu

    2016-12-01

    Recent progress in calculating gas bubble sizes in a plume, based on phenomenological approaches using the release conditions is a significant improvement to make the gas plume models self-reliant. Such calculations require details of conditions Near the Source of Plume (NSP); (i.e. the plume/jet velocity and radius near the source), which inspired the present work. Determining NSP conditions for gas plumes are far more complex than that for oil plumes due to the substantial density difference between gas and water. To calculate NSP conditions, modeling the early stage of the plume is important. A novel method of modeling the early stage of an underwater gas release is presented here. Major impact of the present work is to define the correct NSP conditions for underwater gas releases, which is not possible with available methods as those techniques are not based on the physics of flow region near the source of the plume/jet. We introduce super Gaussian profiles to model the density and velocity variations of the early stages of plume, coupled with the laws of fluid mechanics to define profile parameters. This new approach, models the velocity profile variation from near uniform, across the section at the release point to Gaussian some distance away. The comparisons show that experimental data agrees well with the computations.

  5. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Brescaccin, L.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production—detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion—are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared.

  6. Gas-phase Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Air Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharges by FTIR and UV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Graves, David B.

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas are considered promising for biomedical treatment purpose due to the production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species during the discharge. In this study, a surface micro-discharge system which operates at 10 kHz, 0.01 -- 1 W/cm^2 in ambient air is used. FTIR and UV-absorbance are used to investigate the time-average gas phase composition and time-resolved ozone concentration, respectively. The results showed that the gas composition is greatly influenced by the power consumption in plasmas. At 0.3 W/cm^2, the gas phase is dominant by NOx species and nearly no ozone is observed while at 0.05 W/cm^2 the amount of NOx is less and the ozone is dominant. Also, time-resolved ozone measurement by means of UV (254 nm) absorbance shows that ozone concentration reaches higher than 1000 ppm in the first tens of seconds and quenched within 1 minutes at high power condition. However, at low power condition no obvious quench of ozone is observed and the ozone concentration attains a steady state in response to the equilibrium of ozone generation and diffusion loss

  7. Effect of nitrogen source and acclimatization on specific growth rates of microalgae determined by a high-throughput in vivo microplate autofluorescence method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podevin, Mike; De Francisci, Davide; Holdt, Susan Løvstad

    2015-01-01

    Specific growth rates (SGR) of freshwater algaespecies (Chlorella vulgaris, Auxenochlorella protothecoides,and Chlorella sorokiniana) and the marine speciesNannochloropsis oculata on various nitrogen sources (ammoniumcarbonate, ammonium chloride, sodium nitrate, andurea) could be determined by in...

  8. Experimental Investigations on the Effects of Carbon and Nitrogen Sources on Concomitant Amylase and Polygalacturonase Production by Trichoderma viride BITRS-1001 in Submerged Fermentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juwon, Arotupin Daniel; Emmanuel, Ogunmolu Funso

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the effects of different commercial carbon and nitrogen sources on the concomitant synthesis of amylase and polygalacturonase enzymes with the aim of optimizing them for maximal enzyme production...

  9. The AreA transcription factor in Fusarium graminearum regulates the use of some nonpreferred nitrogen sources and secondary metabolite production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sorensen, Jens Laurids

    2013-01-01

    Growth conditions are known to affect the production of secondary metabolites in filamentous fungi. The influence of different nitrogen sources and the transcription factor AreA on the production of mycotoxins in Fusarium graminearum was examined. Growth on glutamine or NH4-sources was poor...... and asparagine was found to be a preferential nitrogen source for F. graminearum. Deletion of areA led to poor growth on NaNO3 suggesting its involvement in regulation of the nitrate reduction process. In addition utilization of aspartic acid, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine, tyrosine, and valine...... as nitrogen sources was shown to depend of a functional AreA. AreA was shown to be required for the production of the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone, and fusarielin H regardless of the nutrient medium. Deletion of nmr, the repressor of AreA under nitrogen sufficient conditions, had little effect...

  10. Comparing Ion Exchange Adsorbents for Nitrogen Recovery from Source-Separated Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpeh, William A; Udert, Kai M; Nelson, Kara L

    2017-02-21

    Separate collection of urine, which is only 1% of wastewater volume but contains the majority of nitrogen humans excrete, can potentially reduce the costs and energy input of wastewater treatment and facilitate recovery of nitrogen for beneficial use. Ion exchange was investigated for recovery of nitrogen as ammonium from urine for use as a fertilizer or disinfectant. Cation adsorption curves for four adsorbents (clinoptilolite, biochar, Dowex 50, and Dowex Mac 3) were compared in pure salt solutions, synthetic urine, and real stored urine. Competition from sodium and potassium present in synthetic and real urine did not significantly decrease ammonium adsorption for any of the adsorbents. Dowex 50 and Dowex Mac 3 showed nearly 100% regeneration efficiencies. Estimated ion exchange reactor volumes to capture the nitrogen for 1 week from a four-person household were lowest for Dowex Mac 3 (5 L) and highest for biochar (19 L). Although Dowex Mac 3 had the highest adsorption capacity, material costs ($/g N removed) were lower for clinoptilolite and biochar because of their substantially lower unit cost.

  11. Characterization of an atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, X.; Chéron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Yu, L.; Cen, K. F.

    2008-05-01

    In the framework of studies devoted to hazardous waste destruction, an original dc double anode plasma torch has been designed and tested, which produces an elongated, weak fluctuation and reproducible plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The arc instabilities and dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet are investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals by combined means of fast Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. In our experiment, the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra and Wigner distributions exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which reveals that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the undulation of the power supply and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. In addition, the microscopic properties of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy, which yields excitation, electronic, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, as well as the electron number density. The results allow us to examine the validity criteria of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state in the plasma arc. The measured electron densities are in good agreement with those calculated from the LTE model, which indicates that the atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma in the core region is close to the LTE state under our experimental conditions.

  12. Nitrogen budget of Lago Maggiore: the relative importance of atmospheric deposition and catchment sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele TARTARI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological and chemical data of 1996 and 1997 are used to evaluate the relative contributions of atmospheric deposition and urban/industrial wastewaters to the nitrogen budget of Lago Maggiore. The atmospheric load of nitrogen was about 80% of the total input to the lake, with negligible variations in dry (1997 and wet (1996 years. A comparison of the two study years with the yearly N budgets evaluated from 1978 to 1998, showed that the N load was higher with increasing amounts of precipitation/water inflow. Soils and vegetation act as N sinks; the % retention varies between 40-60% for the forested catchments with low population density in the central-northern part of the basin, to values close to zero or even negative in the south, indicating a net leaching from the soils. The Traaen & Stoddard (1995 approach revealed that all the catchments of the major inflowing rivers were oversaturated with nitrogen. The long-term trend of nitrogen concentrations in Lago Maggiore (1955-99 is analogous to the trend for atmospheric deposition (1975-99, which is related to emissions of nitrogen oxides and ammonia in the atmosphere. The relationships between the present N load and in-lake concentrations are discussed using a budget model, which is also used to infer the pristine load of N. The close relationships between N trends in lakes Maggiore, Como and Iseo, and the geographical and anthropogenic features common to their catchments, suggest that the results obtained for Lago Maggiore can be extended to a wider area.

  13. An approach to noble-gas isotopic compositions in natural gases and gas-source tracing in the Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of noble gases, i.e. He Ar Kr and Xe, are measured in natural gases from the Zhongbu gasfield in the Ordos Basin. And heavy noble-gas isotopes (Kr, Xe) are here first used in geochemically studying natural gases and gas-source correlation. Isotopic compositions of heavy noble gases in natural gases, especially Xe, show two-source mixing in the Zhongbu gasfield. Gas sources are somewhat different in the northeast and the southwest of the gasfield. Generally, the gas source of the Lower Paleozoic makes a greater contribution in the southwest than in the northeast in the field. Two kinds of gases can be differentiated from isotopic compositions of heavy noble gases and from their relation with the Ar isotopic composition, Therefore, the comprehensive study on isotopic compositions of light and heavy noble gases can supply more useful information on gas-source correlation and tracing.

  14. An innovative wood-chip-framework substrate used as slow-release carbon source to treat high-strength nitrogen wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huai; Chi, Zifang; Yan, Baixing; Cheng, Long; Li, Jianzheng

    2017-01-01

    Removal of nitrogen in wastewater before discharge into receiving water courses is an important consideration in treatment systems. However, nitrogen removal efficiency is usually limited due to the low carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio. A common solution is to add external carbon sources, but amount of liquid is difficult to determine. Therefore, a combined wood-chip-framework substrate (with wood, slag and gravel) as a slow-release carbon source was constructed in baffled subsurface-flow constructed wetlands to overcome the problem. Results show that the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N), total nitrogen (TN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) could reach 37.5%-85%, 57.4%-86%, 32.4%-78%, respectively, indicating the combined substrate could diffuse sufficient oxygen for the nitrification process (slag and gravel zone) and provide carbon source for denitrification process (wood-chip zone). The nitrification and denitrification were determined according to the location of slag/gravel and wood-chip, respectively. Nitrogen removal was efficient at the steady phase before a shock loading using slag-wood-gravel combined substrate because of nitrification-denitrification process, while nitrogen removal was efficient under a shock loading with wood-slag-gravel combined substrate because of ANAMMOX process. This study provides a new idea for wetland treatment of high-strength nitrogen wastewater.

  15. Global distribution and sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export to the coastal zone: Results from a spatially explicit, global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, E.; Harrison, J. A.; Kroeze, C.; Bakker, E. J.; Seitzinger, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    Here we describe, test, and apply a spatially explicit, global model for predicting dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by rivers to coastal waters (NEWS-DIN). NEWS-DIN was developed as part of an internally consistent suite of global nutrient export models. Modeled and measured DIN export values agree well (calibration R2 = 0.79), and NEWS-DIN is relatively free of bias. NEWS-DIN predicts: DIN yields ranging from 0.0004 to 5217 kg N km-2 yr-1 with the highest DIN yields occurring in Europe and South East Asia; global DIN export to coastal waters of 25 Tg N yr-1, with 16 Tg N yr-1 from anthropogenic sources; biological N2 fixation is the dominant source of exported DIN; and globally, and on every continent except Africa, N fertilizer is the largest anthropogenic source of DIN export to coastal waters.

  16. Magnetocaloric effect of Sr-substituted BaFeO3 in the liquid nitrogen and natural gas temperature regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Kenji; Hayashi, Naoaki; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Takano, Mikio

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of Ba1-xSrxFe4+O3 (x≤0.2), a series of cubic perovskites showing a field-induced transition from helical antiferromagnetism to ferromagnetism. The maximum magnetic entropy change (-ΔSmax) at 50 kOe varies from ˜5.8 J kg-1K-1 (x=0) to ˜4.9 J kg-1K-1 (x=0.2), while the refrigerant capacity remains almost the same at ˜165 J kg-1. Interestingly, the temperature of -ΔSmax decreases from ˜116 K to ˜77 K with increasing x, providing this series of rare-earth-free oxides with potential as a magnetic refrigerant for the liquefaction of nitrogen and natural gas.

  17. The Effect of Irrigation and Nitrogen on Growth Attributes and Chlorophyll Content of Garlic in Line Source Sprinkler Irrigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rahim motalebifard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With 12 million tons production per year, garlic is the fourth important crop in world. In addition to its medical value, it has been used in food industry. The Hamedan province with 1900 ha cultivation area and 38 percent of production is one of the most important garlic area productions in Iran. Few studies on water use and management of garlic exist in the world. Garlic is very sensitive to water deficit especially in tubers initiation and ripening periods. The current research was done because of scarce research on garlic production under water deficit condition in Iran and importance of plant nutrition and nutrients especially nitrogen on garlic production under stressful conditions. Nitrogen is necessary and important element for increasing the yield and quality of garlic. Application of nitrogen increases the growth trend of garlic such as number of leaves, leaf length and plant body. Reports have shown that garlic has high nitrogen requirement, particularly in the early stages of growth. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted for evaluating the combined effects of nitrogen and irrigation on the yield and quality of garlic (Allium sativumL.. The study was performed as a split-block based on randomized complete blocks design with factors of irrigation at four levels (0-3(normal irrigation, 3-6 (slight water deficit, 6-9 (moderate water deficit and 9-12 (sever water deficit meters distance from main line source sprinkler system, nitrogen at four levels (0, 50,100 and 150 kg nitrogen per ha using three replications and line source sprinkler irrigation system. The total water of irrigation levels was measured by boxes that were fixed in meddle of each plot. The statistical analysis of results were performed using themethod described by Hanks (1980. The chlorophyll index was measured using the chlorophyll meter 502 (Minolta, Spain. The chlorophyll a and bwas measured by the method described by Arnon (1946 and Gross (1991

  18. Denitrification rates and excess nitrogen gas concentrations in the Arabian Sea oxygen deficient zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devol, A.H.; Uhlenhopp, A.G.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Brandes, J.A.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Naik, H.; Gaurin, S.; Codispoti, L.A.; Yoshinari, T.

    Rates of canonical, i.e. heterotrophic, water-column denitrification were measured by sup(15)N incubation techniques at a number of coastal and open ocean stations in the Arabian Sea. Measurements of N2 :Ar gas ratios were also made to obtain...

  19. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is available about management practice effects on the net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) under dryland cropping systems. We evaluated the effects of cropping sequences (conventional-tillage malt barley [Hordeum vulgaris L.]–fallow [CTB-F], no-ti...

  20. Sources and potential application of waste heat utilization at a gas processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehhi, Alyas Ali

    Waste heat recovery (WHR) has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of oil and gas plants, chemical and other processing facilities, and reduce their environmental impact. In this Thesis a comprehensive energy audit at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd. (GASCO) ASAB gas processing facilities is undertaken to identify sources of waste heat and evaluate their potential for on-site recovery. Two plants are considered, namely ASAB0 and ASAB1. Waste heat evaluation criteria include waste heat grade (i.e., temperature), rate, accessibility (i.e., proximity) to potential on-site waste heat recovery applications, and potential impact of recovery on installation performance and safety. The operating parameters of key waste heat source producing equipment are compiled, as well as characteristics of the waste heat streams. In addition, potential waste heat recovery applications and strategies are proposed, focusing on utilities, i.e., enhancement of process cooling/heating, electrical/mechanical power generation, and steam production. The sources of waste heat identified at ASAB facilities consist of gas turbine and gas generator exhaust gases, flared gases, excess propane cooling capacity, excess process steam, process gas air-cooler heat dissipation, furnace exhaust gases and steam turbine outlet steam. Of the above waste heat sources, exhaust gases from five gas turbines and one gas generator at ASAB0 plant, as well as from four gas turbines at ASAB1 plant, were found to meet the rate (i.e., > 1 MW), grade (i.e., > 180°C), accessibility (i.e., absorption refrigeration unit for gas turbine inlet air cooling, which would result in additional electric or mechanical power generation, and pre-cooling of process gas, which could reduce the need for or eliminate air coolers, as well as reduce propane chiller load, and ii) serve for heating of lean gas, which would reduce furnace load. At ASAB1, it is proposed that exhaust gases from all four gas turbines be used to

  1. EFFECT OF NITROGEN SOURCE AND INITIAL SUGAR CONCENTRATION ON LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION OF PINEAPPLE WASTE USING L.DELBRUECKII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Moch Busairi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid pineapple waste contains mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for lactic acid fermentation. The lactic acid is utilised in food technology as pH regulator, microbial preservative, buffering agent and in the chemical industry. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for production of biodegradable lactate polymer. The experiments were carried out in batch fermentation at anaerobic condition with stirring speed: 50 rpm, temperature: 40 oC, pH: 6.0, and inoculum size: 5%. Effect of nitrogen source and initial sugar concentration were studied. The effect of nitrogen source on lactic acid production shows that the yeast extract is highest yield , followed by urea , corn steep liquor, malt sprout and ammonium sulphates with the yield of 78.52; 26.68; 19.14; 14.10 and 5.6 %, respectively. The highest yield of initial sugar concentration on lactic acid production obtained was 78.52 % (54.97 g/l at 70 g/l, if the concentration of sugar was increased to 110 g/l , the lactic acid production or yield decrease to51.53 g/l or 54.24%.

  2. Volatile organic compounds released from Microcystis flos-aquae under nitrogen sources and their toxic effects on Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghuan; Yang, Lin; Yang, Wangting; Bai, Yan; Hou, Ping; Zhao, Jingxian; Zhou, Lv; Zuo, Zhaojiang

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication promotes massive growth of cyanobacteria and algal blooms, which can poison other algae and reduce biodiversity. To investigate the differences in multiple nitrogen (N) sources in eutrophicated water on the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from cyanobacteria, and their toxic effects on other algal growth, we analyzed VOCs emitted from Microcystis flos-aquae with different types and concentrations of nitrogen, and determined the effects under Normal-N and Non-N conditions on Chlorella vulgaris. M. flos-aquae released 27, 22, 20, 27, 19, 25 and 17 compounds, respectively, with NaNO3, NaNO2, NH4Cl, urea, Ser, Lys and Arg as the sole N source. With the reduction in N amount, the emission of VOCs was increased markedly, and the most VOCs were found under Non-N condition. C. vulgaris cell propagation, photosynthetic pigment and Fv/Fm declined significantly following exposure to M. flos-aquae VOCs under Non-N condition, but not under Normal-N condition. When C. vulgaris cells were treated with two terpenoids, eucalyptol and limonene, the inhibitory effects were enhanced with increasing concentrations. Therefore, multiple N sources in eutrophicated water induce different VOC emissions from cyanobacteria, and reduction in N can cause nutrient competition, which can result in emissions of more VOCs. Those VOCs released from M. flos-aquae cells under Non-N for nutrient competition can inhibit other algal growth. Among those VOCs, eucalyptol and limonene are the major toxic agents.

  3. Helicon Discharge with Selectable Nitrogen Reactive Species Production as a Plasma Source for III-group Nitrides Growth by MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biloiu, Costel; Doss, Forest; Scime, Earl

    2004-11-01

    Plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) of III-N materials is a potential alternative to MOCVD for fabrication of high quality wide band gap semiconductor devices. In the helicon plasma source, it may be possible to control the population of specific reactive nitrogen species by modification of the electron energy distribution function through the resonant wave-particle interaction arising from electrons traveling at same velocity as the helicon wave phase velocity. We report preliminary results on control of reactive nitrogen species performed in a steady state, high density, helicon plasma source CHEWIE (Compact HElicon Waves and Instabilities Experiment). The helicon vacuum chamber is a 12 cm long, Pyrex tube, 6 cm in diameter, connected to a stainless steel diffusion chamber. RF power of up to 1.0 kW over a frequency range of 3-28 MHz is used to create the steady state plasma. A 7 cm long, half wave, m = +1, helical antenna couples the rf energy into the plasma. A single solenoidal magnetic field coil surrounds the source and is capable of generating axial magnetic fields up to 600 G. Optical emission spectroscopy investigations show that under certain conditions, the decay from the long lived A^3Σ_u^+ state dominates the emission spectrum of the plasma.

  4. Cr(Vi) reduction capacity of activated sludge as affected by nitrogen and carbon sources, microbial acclimation and cell multiplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro Orozco, A.M., E-mail: mferro@cidca.org.ar [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA) CCT La Plata CONICET - Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ) La Plata (Argentina); Contreras, E.M.; Zaritzky, N.E. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA) CCT La Plata CONICET - Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ) La Plata (Argentina); Fac. de Ingenieria, UNLP. 47 y 1 (B1900AJJ) - La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    The objectives of the present work were: (i) to analyze the capacity of activated sludge to reduce hexavalent chromium using different carbon sources as electron donors in batch reactors, (ii) to determine the relationship between biomass growth and the amount of Cr(VI) reduced considering the effect of the nitrogen to carbon source ratio, and (iii) to determine the effect of the Cr(VI) acclimation stage on the performance of the biological chromium reduction assessing the stability of the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the activated sludge. The highest specific Cr(VI) removal rate (q{sub Cr}) was attained with cheese whey or lactose as electron donors decreasing in the following order: cheese whey {approx} lactose > glucose > citrate > acetate. Batch assays with different nitrogen to carbon source ratio demonstrated that biological Cr(VI) reduction is associated to the cell multiplication phase; as a result, maximum Cr(VI) removal rates occur when there is no substrate limitation. The biomass can be acclimated to the presence of Cr(VI) and generate new cells that maintain the ability to reduce chromate. Therefore, the activated sludge process could be applied to a continuous Cr(VI) removal process.

  5. Modeling the Injection of Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen into a Methane Hydrate Reservoir and the Subsequent Production of Methane Gas on the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, N.; McGuire, P. C.; Liu, Y.; Anderson, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    HydrateResSim (HRS) is an open-source finite-difference reservoir simulation code capable of simulating the behavior of gas hydrate in porous media. The original version of HRS was developed to simulate pure methane hydrates, and the relationship between equilibrium temperature and pressure is given by a simple, 1-D regression expression. In this work, we have modified HydrateResSim to allow for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates made from gas mixtures. This modification allows one to model the ConocoPhillips Ignik Sikumi #1 field test performed in early 2012 on the Alaska North Slope. The Ignik Sikumi #1 test is the first field-based demonstration of gas production through the injection of a mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen gases into a methane hydrate reservoir and thereby sequestering the greenhouse gas CO2 into hydrate form. The primary change to the HRS software is the added capability of modeling a ternary mixture consisting of CH4 + CO2 + N2 instead of only one hydrate guest molecule (CH4), therefore the new software is called Mix3HydrateResSim. This Mix3HydrateResSim upgrade to the software was accomplished by adding primary variables (for the concentrations of CO2 and N2), governing equations (for the mass balances of CO2 and N2), and phase equilibrium data. The phase equilibrium data in Mix3HydrateResSim is given as an input table obtained using a statistical mechanical method developed in our research group called the cell potential method. An additional phase state describing a two-phase Gas-Hydrate (GsH) system was added to consider the possibility of converting all available free water to form hydrate with injected gas. Using Mix3HydrateResSim, a methane hydrate reservoir with coexisting pure-CH4-hydrate and aqueous phases at 7.0 MPa and 5.5°C was modeled after the conditions of the Ignik Sikumi #1 test: (i) 14-day injection of CO2 and N2 followed by (ii) 30-day production of CH4 (by depressurization of the well). During the

  6. Growth Kinetics of Diazotrophic Bacillus sphaericus UPMB10 Cultured Using Different Types and Concentrations of Carbon and Nitrogen Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth kinetics of newly isolated diazotrophic Bacillus sphaericus UPMB10 grown in various carbon (lactate, acetate, glycerol, malate, fructose, xylose and sucrose and nitrogen (glutamate, yeast extract, arginine, hystadine, glycine, polypeptone, tryptophan, lysine, NH4Cl and urea sources was investigated using 2 L stirred tank fermenter. The highest growth was obtained in a medium containing lactate as a carbon source, which gave the highest maximum cell concentration of 2.30 g/L, which is corresponding to maximum viable cell count of 4.60 x 10^9 cfu/mL. However, the highest cell yield (1.06 g cell/g carbon consumed was obtained in cultivation using glycerol though slightly lower maximum viable cell count was obtained (3.22 x 10^9 cfu/mL. In addition, cost for the production of live cell using glycerol was about 15 times lower than the cost using lactate. Growth performance of this bacterium when yeast extract was used as a nitrogen source was comparable to the use of pure amino acid. The medium containing 1.8 g/L glycerol and 2 g/L yeast extract was suggested as optimal for growth of this bacterium, which gave carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N of 10:1. The maximum viable cell count obtained in cultivation using optimised medium in 2 L stirred tank fermenter was 3.34 x 10^9 cfu/mL and the cells maintained its capacity for N2 fixation at 18 nmol C2H2/h.mL.

  7. Emission Spectroscopy of the 4X Source Discharge With and Without N2 Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Horace Vernon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-14

    This tech note summarizes the December, 1988 emission spectroscopy measurements made on the 4X source discharge with and without N₂ gas added to the H + Cs discharge. This study is motivated by the desire to understand why small amounts of N₂ gas added to the source discharge results in a reduction in the H⁻ beam noise. The beneficial effect of N₂ gas on H⁻ beam noise was first discovered by Bill Ingalls and Stu Orbesen on the ATS SAS source. For the 4X source the observed effect is that when N2 gas is added to the discharge the H⁻ beam noise is reduced about a factor of 2.

  8. Microwave synthesis of non-crystalline BCNO phosphors using thiourea as nitrogen source and their tunable luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Zhao, Yang; Mao, Zhiyong; Wang, Dajian; Bie, Lijian

    2017-02-01

    Thiourea was employed as nitrogen source to synthesize BCNO phosphors by a simple microwave heating route. The phase structure, chemical composition, and the dependence of photoluminescent properties on the carbon content and incident excitation light for as-prepared BCNO phosphors were investigated in detail. Non-crystalline powder samples constituted by B, C, N, O elements with a slight of S dopant were identified for the prepared BCNO phosphors. Tunable luminescence induced by carbon content and incident excitation light implies the obtained non-crystalline BCNO phosphors could be used as an excellent candidate for LED conversion phosphor.

  9. Admittance spectroscopy of Mg-doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy using RF nitrogen sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D J; Kim, K H; Bojarczuk, N A; Karasinski, J; Guha, S; Lee, H G

    1999-01-01

    Thermal activation energies of Mg in GaN grown using RF nitrogen source with varying Mg flux were examined using an admittance spectroscopy technique. There was no noticeable difference or trend in the activation energy with varying Mg flux. The thermal activation energy for GaN:Mg was approx 115 meV under the investigated Mg flux range. Negligible persistent photo-conductivity and yellow luminescence peak in PL observed in the samples suggest possible reduction of the thermal activation energies compared to the values in the literature.

  10. Some properties of a microwave boosted glow discharge source using neon as the operating gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, F; Steers, E B

    1996-07-01

    The use of neon as the operating gas for the analysis of aluminium samples with the microwave boosted glow discharge source has been studied. A new type of anode tube allowed the gas to enter the source near the sample surface so that more material was transported into the discharge. Erosion rates have been measured under conditions optimised for high line-to-background ratios and found to be lower than with argon (9 and 21 n/s, respectively). Despite the lower erosion rate the detection limits measured for a number of elements in aluminium are in the range 0.02-1 microg/g and comparable to those obtained with argon as the operating gas.

  11. Calculation of temperature field in gas flow with internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas flow sequentially moving through three zones (input z1 of a cylindrical channel was considered. Analytical solutions taking into account the influence of heat source limitation in the axial direction and intensity of air flow in this direction on thermal balance were obtained.

  12. SEDIMENTARY ORGANIC MATTER' S CLASSIFICATION OF OIL-GAS SOURCE ROCKS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinKuili; LiuDameng; XiaoXianming

    1996-01-01

    According to the study on the oil-gas source rocks in China for ten years,in connection with the microscopic, submicroscopic levels, the authors used the microscope photometry together with transmission electronic microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and proposed a new classification for Sedimentary organic matters.

  13. The morphology of mass selected ruthenium nanoparticles from a magnetron-sputter gas-aggregation source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Munksgård; Murphy, Shane; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the morphology of mass selected ruthenium nanoparticles produced with a magnetron-sputter gas-aggregation source. The nanoparticles are mass selected using a quadrupole mass filter, resulting in narrow size distributions and average diameters between 2 and 15 nm. The particle...

  14. Potential sources of nitrogen in an ant-garden tank-bromeliad

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Epiphytic plants in general and bromeliads in particular live in a water and nutrient-stressed environment often limited in nitrogen. Thus, these plants have developed different ways to survive in such an environment. We focused on Aechmea mertensii (Bromeliaceae), which is both a tank-bromeliad and an ant-garden (AG) epiphyte initiated by either the ants Camponotus femoratus or Pachycondyla goeldii. By combining a study of plant morphology and physiology associated with aquatic insect biolog...

  15. Nitrogen cycling in the suboxic waters of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devol, A.H.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Codispoti, L.A.

    due to nitrogen fixation either in the Arabian Sea or in the ODZ source waters, anammox, or sedimentary denitrification. Nitrate deficit based estimates of overall denitrification rate are about 40 Tg N a sup(-1), but if the larger excess nitrogen gas...

  16. EFFECT OF NITROGEN NUTRITION SOURCES ON CAROTENOIDS SYNTHESIS FOR SOME BASIDIOMYCETES STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Veligodska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of certain nitrogen compounds - components of glucose-peptone medium (GPM on the accumulation of carotenoids by some strains was investigated by surface cultivating basidiomycetes. The total carotenoid content was set in acetone extracts of mycological material spectrophotometrically and calculated using the Vetshteyn formula. As the nitrogen-containing components used GPM with 9 compounds, such as peptone, DL-valine, L-asparagine, DL-serine, DL-tyrosine, L-proline, L-alanine, urea, NaNO3. The effect on the accumulation of specific compounds both in the mycelium and in the culture fluid of carotenoids by culturing certain strains of Basidiomycetes was identified. Adding to standard glucose-peptone medium peptone at 5 g/l causes an increase of carotenoid accumulation by strain L. sulphureus Ls-08, and in a concentration of 4 g/l by strains of F. hepatica Fh-18 and F. fomentarius Ff-1201. In order to increase the accumulation of carotenoids in the mycelium  we suggested to make a standard glucose-peptone medium with proline or valine for cultivating of L. sulphureus Ls- 08 strain; alanine for F. fomentarius Ff-1201 strain; proline, asparagine and serine - for strain Fh-18 of F. hepatica. The results can be implemented in further optimization of the composition of the nutrient medium for culturing strains of Basidiomycetes wich producing carotenoids. Keywords: nitrogen-containing substances, Basidiomycetes, mycelium, culture filtrate, carotenoids

  17. Fed-batch cultivation of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis: potassium nitrate and ammonium chloride as simultaneous nitrogen sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M S; Ferreira, L S; Converti, A; Sato, S; Carvalho, J C M

    2010-06-01

    Arthrospiraplatensis was cultivated in minitanks at 13 klux, using a mixture of KNO(3) and NH(4)Cl as nitrogen source. Fed-batch daily supply of NH(4)Cl at exponentially-increasing feeding rate allowed preventing ammonia toxicity and nitrogen deficiency, providing high maximum cell concentration (X(m)) and high-quality biomass (21.85 mg chlorophyll g cells(-1); 20.5% lipids; 49.8% proteins). A central composite design combined to response surface methodology was utilized to determine the relationships between responses (X(m), cell productivity and nitrogen-to-cell conversion factor) and independent variables (KNO(3) and NH(4)Cl concentrations). Under optimum conditions (15.5mM KNO(3); 14.1mM NH(4)Cl), X(m) was 4327 mg L(-1), a value almost coincident with that obtained with only 25.4mM KNO(3), but more than twice that obtained with 21.5mM NH(4)Cl. A 30%-reduction of culture medium cost can be estimated when compared to KNO(3)-batch runs, thus behaving as a cheap alternative for the commercial production of this cyanobacterium.

  18. Nitrogen recovery from source-separated human urine using clinoptilolite and preliminary results of its use as fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beler-Baykal, B; Allar, A D; Bayram, S

    2011-01-01

    The use of source separated human urine as fertilizer is one of the major suggestions of the new sanitation concept ECOSAN. Urine is rich in nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium which act as plant nutrients, however its salinity is high for agricultural and landscape purposes. Moreover, characteristics change significantly throughout storage where salinity increases to higher values as the predominant form of nitrogen shifts from urea to ammonium. Transferring nitrogen in human urine onto the natural zeolite clinoptilolite and using the subsequently recovered ammonium from the exhausted clinoptilolite for agricultural/landscape purposes is suggested as an indirect route of using urine in this work. Results reporting the outcome of the proposed process together with characterization of fresh and stored urine, and preliminary work on the application of the product on the landscape plant Ficus elastica are presented. Up to 97% of the ammonium in stored urine could be transferred onto clinoptilolite through ion exchange and about 88% could be recovered subsequently from exhausted clinoptilolite, giving an overall recovery of 86%. Another important merit of the suggested process was the successful elimination of salinity. Preliminary experiments with Ficus elastica had shown that the product, i.e. clinoptilolite exhausted with ammonium, was compatible with the synthetic fertilizer tested.

  19. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO3(-), NO2(-), and NH4(+) shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10(8) copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  20. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in rice agriculture driven by high yields and nitrogen use efficiency: a 5 year field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, Z.; Liu, Y.; Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Zhang, H.; Xiong, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of how net global warming potential (NGWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) is affected by management practices aimed at food security with respect to rice agriculture remains limited. In the present study, a 5 year field experiment was conducted in China to evaluate the effects of integrated soil-crop system management (ISSM) on NGWP and GHGI after accounting for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from all sources (methane, CH4, and nitrous oxide, N2O, emissions, agrochemical inputs, Ei, and farm operations, Eo) and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon, SOC, sequestration). For the improvement of rice yield and agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), four ISSM scenarios consisting of different nitrogen (N) fertilization rates relative to the local farmers' practice (FP) rate were carried out, namely, N1 (25 % reduction), N2 (10 % reduction), N3 (FP rate) and N4 (25 % increase). The results showed that compared with the FP, the four ISSM scenarios, i.e., N1, N2, N3 and N4, significantly increased the rice yields by 10, 16, 28 and 41 % and the agronomic NUE by 75, 67, 86 and 82 %, respectively. In addition, compared with the FP, the N1 and N2 scenarios significantly reduced the GHGI by 14 and 18 %, respectively, despite similar NGWPs. The N3 and N4 scenarios remarkably increased the NGWP and GHGI by an average of 67 and 36 %, respectively. In conclusion, the ISSM strategies are promising for both food security and environmental protection, and the ISSM scenario of N2 is the optimal strategy to realize high yields and high NUE together with low environmental impacts for this agricultural rice field.

  1. Geochemistry of inorganic nitrogen in waters released from coal-bed natural gas production wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L; Repert, Deborah A; Hart, Charles P

    2009-04-01

    Water originating from coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) production wells typically contains ammonium and is often disposed via discharge to ephemeral channels. A study conducted in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, documented downstream changes in CBNG water composition, emphasizing nitrogen-cycling processes and the fate of ammonium. Dissolved ammonium concentrations from 19 CBNG discharge points ranged from 95 to 527 microM. Within specific channels, ammonium concentrations decreased with transport distance, with subsequent increases in nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Removal efficiency, or uptake, oftotal dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) varied between channel types. DIN uptake was greater in the gentle-sloped, vegetated channel as compared to the incised, steep, and sparsely vegetated channel and was highly correlated with diel patterns of incident light and dissolved oxygen concentration. In a larger main channel with multiple discharge inputs (n=13), DIN concentrations were >300 microM, with pH > 8.5, after 5 km of transport. Ammonium represented 25-30% of the large-channel DIN, and ammonium concentrations remained relatively constant with time, with only a weak diel pattern evident. In July 2003, the average daily large-channel DIN load was 23 kg N day(-1) entering the Powder River, an amount which substantially increased the total Powder River DIN load after the channel confluence. These results suggest that CBNG discharge may be an important source of DIN to western watersheds, at least at certain times of the year, and that net oxidation and/or removal is dependent upon the extent of contact with sediment and biomass, type of drainage channel, and time of day.

  2. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  3. A chemical reactor network for oxides of nitrogen emission prediction in gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nguyen Thanh

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the use of a new chemical reactor network (CRN) model and non-uniform injectors to predict the NOx emission pollutant in gas turbine combustor. The CRN uses information from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) combustion analysis with two injectors of CH4-air mixture. The injectors of CH4-air mixture have different lean equivalence ratio, and they control fuel flow to stabilize combustion and adjust combustor's equivalence ratio. Non-uniform injector is applied to improve the burning process of the turbine combustor. The results of the new CRN for NOx prediction in the gas turbine combustor show very good agreement with the experimental data from Korea Electric Power Research Institute.

  4. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field.

  5. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This…

  6. Effect of increased fuel temperature on emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a gas turbine combustor burning ASTM jet-A fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    An annular gas turbine combustor was tested with heated ASTM Jet-A fuel to determine the effect of increased fuel temperature on the formation of oxides of nitrogen. Fuel temperature ranged from ambient to 700 K. The NOx emission index increased at a rate of 6 percent per 100 K increase in fuel temperature.

  7. Exploring the Ideal Gas Law through a Quantitative Gasometric Analysis of Nitrogen Produced by the Reaction of Sodium Nitrite with Sulfamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The gasometric analysis of nitrogen produced in a reaction between sodium nitrite, NaNO[superscript 2], and sulfamic acid, H(NH[superscript 2])SO[superscript 3], provides an alternative to more common general chemistry experiments used to study the ideal gas law, such as the experiment in which magnesium is reacted with hydrochloric acid. This…

  8. Quantifying the effect of interactions between disease control, nitrogen supply and land use change on the greenhouse gas emissions associated with wheat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berry, P M; Kindred, D R; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2010-01-01

    A method for calculating the effect of disease control on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with wheat production, reported previously, was developed further to account for effects of disease control on the amount of fertilizer nitrogen (N) which should be applied and on changes in land use...

  9. Methane sources in gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps: Evidence from radiocarbon and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L.; Mitchell, C.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil methane from the large and dynamic marine gas hydrate reservoir has the potential to influence oceanic and atmospheric carbon pools. However, natural radiocarbon (14C) measurements of gas hydrate methane have been extremely limited, and their use as a source and process indicator has not yet been systematically established. In this study, gas hydrate-bound and dissolved methane recovered from six geologically and geographically distinct high-gas-flux cold seeps was found to be 98 to 100% fossil based on its 14C content. Given this prevalence of fossil methane and the small contribution of gas hydrate (??? 1%) to the present-day atmospheric methane flux, non-fossil contributions of gas hydrate methane to the atmosphere are not likely to be quantitatively significant. This conclusion is consistent with contemporary atmospheric methane budget calculations. In combination with ??13C- and ??D-methane measurements, we also determine the extent to which the low, but detectable, amounts of 14C (~ 1-2% modern carbon, pMC) in methane from two cold seeps might reflect in situ production from near-seafloor sediment organic carbon (SOC). A 14C mass balance approach using fossil methane and 14C-enriched SOC suggests that as much as 8 to 29% of hydrate-associated methane carbon may originate from SOC contained within the upper 6??m of sediment. These findings validate the assumption of a predominantly fossil carbon source for marine gas hydrate, but also indicate that structural gas hydrate from at least certain cold seeps contains a component of methane produced during decomposition of non-fossil organic matter in near-surface sediment.

  10. Nitrogen use efficiency by a slow-growing species as affected by CO2 levels, root tempe