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Sample records for nitric oxide determines

  1. Nitric oxide: a physiologic messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, C J; Dinerman, J L; Snyder, S H

    1994-02-01

    To review the physiologic role of nitric oxide, an unusual messenger molecule that mediates blood vessel relaxation, neurotransmission, and pathogen suppression. A MEDLINE search of articles published from 1987 to 1993 that addressed nitric oxide and the enzyme that synthesizes it, nitric oxide synthase. Animal and human studies were selected from 3044 articles to analyze the clinical importance of nitric oxide. Descriptions of the structure and function of nitric oxide synthase were selected to show how nitric oxide acts as a biological messenger molecule. Biochemical and physiologic studies were analyzed if the same results were found by three or more independent observers. Two major classes of nitric oxide synthase enzymes produce nitric oxide. The constitutive isoforms found in endothelial cells and neurons release small amounts of nitric oxide for brief periods to signal adjacent cells, whereas the inducible isoform found in macrophages releases large amounts of nitric oxide continuously to eliminate bacteria and parasites. By diffusing into adjacent cells and binding to enzymes that contain iron, nitric oxide plays many important physiologic roles. It regulates blood pressure, transmits signals between neurons, and suppresses pathogens. Excess amounts, however, can damage host cells, causing neurotoxicity during strokes and causing the hypotension associated with sepsis. Nitric oxide is a simple molecule with many physiologic roles in the cardiovascular, neurologic, and immune systems. Although the general principles of nitric oxide synthesis are known, further research is necessary to determine what role it plays in causing disease.

  2. Continuous determination of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, S; Yamate, N; Mitsuzawa, S; Mori, M

    1966-10-01

    Continuous determinations of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in that atmospheric air by the use of a modified Saltzman reagent is described. Measurement was made intermittently, once every 30 min., by an automatic continuous analyzer equipped with a single-path colorimeter. The response of the analyzer was obtained as an average of the concentration of nitrogen oxides over a period of 25 min. Two bubblers were used for absorbing nitrogen oxides into the modified Saltzman reagent, whose transmittance was measured for the determination. One bubbler was designed to absorb nitrogen dioxide, and the other, nitric oxide plus nitrogen dioxide after the oxidation of the nitric oxide by permanganate. The oxidizing efficiency of the permanganate was 96-100%. The acetic acid in the Saltzman reagent was replaced with n-propyl alcohol in the modified Saltzman reagent; the spontaneous coloration and corrosive quality of the reagent was decreased by this substitution. The concentration of nitric oxide was obtained from the difference between the two responses of the analyzer, while the concentration of nitrogen dioxide could be read directly from the indication of the recorder. The transmittance ratio method was applied to the measurements, accurate determinations were possible, even at high blank values. Therefore, the reagent was used repeatedly by cycling it on the basis of measuring the difference in the coloration of the reagent before and after the absorption of nitrogen oxides. The analyzer could be used for a long period without changing the reagent.

  3. Nitric oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, David O.; Martinez, Luis R.; Blecher, Karin; Chouake, Jason S.; Nacharaju, Parimala; Gialanella, Philip; Friedman, Joel M.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Friedman, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical component of host defense against invading pathogens; however, its therapeutic utility is limited due to a lack of practical delivery systems. Recently, a NO-releasing nanoparticulate platform (NO-np) was shown to have in vitro broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy in a dermal abscess model. To extend these findings, both topical (TP) and intralesional (IL) NO-np administration was evaluated in a MRSA intramuscular murine abscess model and compared with vancomycin. All treatment arms accelerated abscess clearance clinically, histologically, and by microbiological assays on both days 4 and 7 following infection. However, abscesses treated with NO-np via either route demonstrated a more substantial, statistically significant decrease in bacterial survival based on colony forming unit assays and histologically revealed less inflammatory cell infiltration and preserved muscular architecture. These data suggest that the NO-np may be an effective addition to our armament for deep soft tissue infections. PMID:22286699

  4. Standardisation and application of the single-breath determination of nitric oxide uptake in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorsky, Gerald S; Hsia, Connie C W; Hughes, J Michael B; Borland, Colin D R; Guénard, Hervé; van der Lee, Ivo; Steenbruggen, Irene; Naeije, Robert; Cao, Jiguo; Dinh-Xuan, Anh Tuan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusing capacity of the lung for nitric oxide ( D LNO ), otherwise known as the transfer factor, was first measured in 1983. This document standardises the technique and application of single-breath D LNO This panel agrees that 1) pulmonary function systems should allow for mixing and measurement of both nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases directly from an inspiratory reservoir just before use, with expired concentrations measured from an alveolar "collection" or continuously sampled via rapid gas analysers; 2) breath-hold time should be 10 s with chemiluminescence NO analysers, or 4-6 s to accommodate the smaller detection range of the NO electrochemical cell; 3) inspired NO and oxygen concentrations should be 40-60 ppm and close to 21%, respectively; 4) the alveolar oxygen tension ( P AO 2 ) should be measured by sampling the expired gas; 5) a finite specific conductance in the blood for NO (θNO) should be assumed as 4.5 mL·min -1 ·mmHg -1 ·mL -1 of blood; 6) the equation for 1/θCO should be (0.0062· P AO 2 +1.16)·(ideal haemoglobin/measured haemoglobin) based on breath-holding P AO 2 and adjusted to an average haemoglobin concentration (male 14.6 g·dL -1 , female 13.4 g·dL -1 ); 7) a membrane diffusing capacity ratio ( D MNO / D MCO ) should be 1.97, based on tissue diffusivity. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  5. Therapeutic strategies to address neuronal nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpani, Cara A; Hayes, Alan; Rybalka, Emma

    2017-05-25

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a rare and fatal neuromuscular disease in which the absence of dystrophin from the muscle membrane induces a secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and the muscles capacity for endogenous nitric oxide synthesis. Since nitric oxide is a potent regulator of skeletal muscle metabolism, mass, function and regeneration, the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability is likely a key contributor to the chronic pathological wasting evident in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. As such, various therapeutic interventions to re-establish either the neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein deficit or the consequential loss of nitric oxide synthesis and bioavailability have been investigated in both animal models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and in human clinical trials. Notably, the efficacy of these interventions are varied and not always translatable from animal model to human patients, highlighting a complex interplay of factors which determine the downstream modulatory effects of nitric oxide. We review these studies herein.

  6. Nitric oxide plays a central role in determining lateral root development in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Graziano, Magdalena; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2004-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive molecule that functions in numerous physiological processes in plants, most of them involving cross-talk with traditional phytohormones. Auxin is the main hormone that regulates root system architecture. In this communication we report that NO promotes lateral root (LR) development, an auxin-dependent process. Application of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) to tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seedlings induced LR emergence and elongation in a dose-dependent manner, while primary root (PR) growth was diminished. The effect is specific for NO since the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO) blocked the action of SNP. Depletion of endogenous NO with CPTIO resulted in the complete abolition of LR emergence and a 40% increase in PR length, confirming a physiological role for NO in the regulation of root system growth and development. Detection of endogenous NO by the specific probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2 DA) revealed that the NO signal was specifically located in LR primordia during all stages of their development. In another set of experiments, SNP was able to promote LR development in auxin-depleted seedlings treated with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Moreover, it was found that LR formation induced by the synthetic auxin 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA) was prevented by CPTIO in a dose-dependent manner. All together, these results suggest a novel role for NO in the regulation of LR development, probably operating in the auxin signaling transduction pathway.

  7. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  8. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes

  9. Aqueous nitrite ion determination by selective reduction and gas phase nitric oxide chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, A. J.; Barkley, R. M.; Sievers, R. E.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An improved method of flow injection analysis for aqueous nitrite ion exploits the sensitivity and selectivity of the nitric oxide (NO) chemilluminescence detector. Trace analysis of nitrite ion in a small sample (5-160 microL) is accomplished by conversion of nitrite ion to NO by aqueous iodide in acid. The resulting NO is transported to the gas phase through a semipermeable membrane and subsequently detected by monitoring the photoemission of the reaction between NO and ozone (O3). Chemiluminescence detection is selective for measurement of NO, and, since the detection occurs in the gas-phase, neither sample coloration nor turbidity interfere. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample is 0.04 ppb of nitrite ion. The precision at the 10 ppb level is 2% relative standard deviation, and 60-180 samples can be analyzed per hour. Samples of human saliva and food extracts were analyzed; the results from a standard colorimetric measurement are compared with those from the new chemiluminescence method in order to further validate the latter method. A high degree of selectivity is obtained due to the three discriminating steps in the process: (1) the nitrite ion to NO conversion conditions are virtually specific for nitrite ion, (2) only volatile products of the conversion will be swept to the gas phase (avoiding turbidity or color in spectrophotometric methods), and (3) the NO chemiluminescence detector selectively detects the emission from the NO + O3 reaction. The method is free of interferences, offers detection limits of low parts per billion of nitrite ion, and allows the analysis of up to 180 microL-sized samples per hour, with little sample preparation and no chromatographic separation. Much smaller samples can be analyzed by this method than in previously reported batch analysis methods, which typically require 5 mL or more of sample and often need chromatographic separations as well.

  10. Influence of nitric oxide on histamine and carbachol – induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to determine the influence of nitric oxide (NO) on the action of histamine and carbachol on acid secretion in the common African toad – Bufo regularis. Gastric acidity was determined by titration method. The acid secretion was determined when nitric oxide was absent following administration of NO synthase ...

  11. α-Klotho expression determines nitric oxide synthesis in response to FGF-23 in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chung

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs express fibroblast growth factor (FGF receptors and are metabolically active after treatment with FGF-23. It is not known if this effect is α-Klotho independent or mediated by humoral or endogenous endothelial α-Klotho. In the present study, we aimed to characterize EC α-Klotho expression within the human vascular tree and to investigate the potential role of α-Klotho in determining FGF-23 mediated EC regulation. Human tissue and ECs from various organs were used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Primary cultures of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs were used to generate in vitro cell models. We found endogenous α-Klotho expression in ECs from various organs except in microvascular ECs from human brain. Furthermore, FGF-23 stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression, nitric oxide (NO production, and cell proliferation in HAECs. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in our HBMEC model in vitro. High phosphate treatment and endothelial α-Klotho knockdown mitigated FGF-23 mediated eNOS induction, NO production, and cell proliferation in HAECs. Rescue treatment with soluble α-Klotho did not reverse endothelial FGF-23 resistance caused by reduced or absent α-Klotho expression in HAECs. These novel observations provide evidence for differential α-Klotho functional expression in the human endothelium and its presence may play a role in determining the response to FGF-23 in the vascular tree. α-Klotho was not detected in cerebral microvascular ECs and its absence may render these cells nonresponsive to FGF-23.

  12. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Selim Gokay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg, or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg. After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P=0.044 positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  13. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  14. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Saraiva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology.

  15. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  16. Voltammetric determination of nitric oxide using a glassy carbon electrode modified with a nanohybrid consisting of myoglobin, gold nanorods, and reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlinda, Ab Rahman; Jayabal, Subramaniam; Yusoff, Norazriena; Huang, Nay Ming; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Suriani, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    Myoglobin-modified gold nanorods incorporating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) were fabricated and deposited on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to obtain a sensor for nitric oxide (NO). The Mb-AuNR/rGO nanohybrid showed a transverse localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band with a peak at 508 nm, and a longitudinal LSPR band at 724 nm. The AuNRs have an average length of 38 ± 3 nm and a width of 11 ± 1 nm. The GCE modified with the nanohybrid is shown to be a viable sensor for the determination of NO by linear sweep voltammetry. Its electrocatalytic response toward the oxidation of NO is distinctly enhanced compared to other electrodes. The sensor, best operated at a working voltage of 0.85 V (vs. SCE), showed two linear response ranges (from 10 to 100 μM, and from 100 to 1000 μM), with a detection limit of 5.5 μM. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent selectivity for NO over common interferents such as NaNO 3 , and also over electroactive species such as ascorbate, dopamine, glucose, and uric acid. These properties make it a promising tool for the detection of NO in situations such as capillary and pulmonary hypertension and embolism, and during vasodilation. (author)

  17. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to...

  18. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... chronic periodontitis (CP), 31 with gingivitis (G) and 50 healthy controls. Probing depth ..... Periodontal disease in pregnancy I. Prevalence and severity. ... endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene in premenopausal women with.

  19. Flavonoids as scavengers of nitric oxide radical.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Acker, S.A.B.E.; Tromp, M.N.J.L.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; van der Vijgh, W.J.F.; Bast, A.

    1995-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of naturally occurring compounds used, e.g., in the treatment of vascular endothelial damage. They are known to be excellent scavengers of oxygen free radicals. Since the nitric oxide radical (

  20. Unintended inhalation of nitric oxide by contamination of compressed air: physiologic effects and interference with intended nitric oxide inhalation in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzing, A; Loop, T; Mols, G; Geiger, K

    1999-10-01

    Compressed air from a hospital's central gas supply may contain nitric oxide as a result of air pollution. Inhaled nitric oxide may increase arterial oxygen tension and decrease pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, the authors wanted to determine whether unintentional nitric oxide inhalation by contamination of compressed air influences arterial oxygen tension and pulmonary vascular resistance and interferes with the therapeutic use of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide concentrations in the compressed air of a university hospital were measured continuously by chemiluminescence during two periods (4 and 2 weeks). The effects of unintended nitric oxide inhalation on arterial oxygen tension (n = 15) and on pulmonary vascular resistance (n = 9) were measured in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome by changing the source of compressed air of the ventilator from the hospital's central gas supply to a nitric oxide-free gas tank containing compressed air. In five of these patients, the effects of an additional inhalation of 5 ppm nitric oxide were evaluated. During working days, compressed air of the hospital's central gas supply contained clinically effective nitric oxide concentrations (> 80 parts per billion) during 40% of the time. Change to gas tank-supplied nitric oxide-free compressed air decreased the arterial oxygen tension by 10% and increased pulmonary vascular resistance by 13%. The addition of 5 ppm nitric oxide had a minimal effect on arterial oxygen tension and pulmonary vascular resistance when added to hospital-supplied compressed air but improved both when added to tank-supplied compressed air. Unintended inhalation of nitric oxide increases arterial oxygen tension and decreases pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The unintended nitric oxide inhalation interferes with the

  1. Nitric oxide in the stress axis

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Figueroa, M.O.; Day, H.E.W.; Akil, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a unique biological messenger. NO is a highly diffusible gas, synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Three unique subtypes of NOS have been described, each with a specific distribution profile in the brain and periphery. NOS subtype I is present, among other areas, in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal gland. Together these structures form the limbichypothalamic- ...

  2. On hydrazine oxidation in nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zil'berman, B.Ya.; Lelyuk, G.A.; Mashkin, A.N.; Yasnovitskaya, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Yield of products of radiolytic ( 60 Co gamma radiation) and chemical hydrazine (HZ) oxidation in nitric acid media is studied. Under radiolyte HZ oxidation by nitric acid hydrazoic acid, ammonia and nitrogen appear to be the reaction products. HN 3 yield maximum under HZN oxidation makes up ∼ 0.35 mol per a mol of oxiduzed HZN. Under chemical oxidation HZN is oxidized by HNO 3 according to reaction catalysed by technetium HN 3 yield makes up ∼ 0.35 mol per a mol of oxidized HZN. Radiation-chemical oxidation of HN 3 proceeds up to its complete decomposition, decomposition rate is comparable with HZ oxidation rate. Under the chemical oxidation HN 3 is more stable, it is slowly decomposed after complete HZ decomposition

  3. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  4. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles to deliver nitric oxide to inhibit Escherichia coli growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin film functionalized PLGA nanoparticles were modified to release nitric oxide from an s-nitrosothiol donor. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles were bacteriostatic against Escherichia coli. • The nitric oxide modified nanoparticles increased the effectiveness of tetracycline against Escherichia coli. • The modified nitric oxide nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxic effects against fibroblasts. - Abstract: Polymer nanoparticles consisting of poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) were surface functionalized to deliver nitric oxide. These biodegradable and biocompatible nanoparticles were modified with an S-nitrosothiol molecule, S-nitrosocysteamine, as the nitric oxide delivery molecule. S-nitrosocysteamine was covalently immobilized on the nanoparticle surface using small organic molecule linkers and carbodiimide coupling. Nanoparticle size, zeta potential, and morphology were determined using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Subsequent attachment of the S-nitrosothiol resulted in a nitric oxide release of 37.1 ± 1.1 nmol per milligram of nanoparticles under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli culture growth by 31.8%, indicating that the nitric oxide donor was effective at releasing nitric oxide even after attachment to the nanoparticle surface. Combining the nitric oxide modified nanoparticles with tetracycline, a commonly prescribed antibiotic for E. coli infections, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 87.8%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used in order to achieve the same effect. The functionalized nanoparticles were not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts.

  5. Nitric oxide: cancer target or anticancer agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone

    2009-03-01

    Despite the improved understanding of nitric oxide (NO) biology and the large amount of preclinical experiments testing its role in cancer development and progression, it is still debated whether NO should be considered a potential anticancer agent or instead a carcinogen. The complexity of NO effects within a cell and the variability of the final biological outcome depending upon NO levels makes it highly challenging to determine the therapeutic value of interfering with the activity of this intriguing gaseous messenger. This uncertainty has so far halted the clinical implementation of NO-based therapeutics in the field of oncology. Accordingly, only an in depth knowledge of the mechanisms leading to experimental tumor regression or progression in response to NO will allow us to exploit this molecule to fight cancer.

  6. Estimation of the nitric oxide formed from hydroxylamine by Nitrosomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. H.

    1965-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide that was produced by reducing nitrite with an excess of acidified potassium iodide under nitrogen in Warburg respirometer flasks was rapidly absorbed by a solution of permanganate in sodium hydroxide held in the side arm. A small amount of nitrous oxide (or nitrogen) that was also produced was not absorbed. 2. By using a quantitative method for the recovery of nitrite from samples of the alkaline permanganate, it was found that the sum of the nitrite N formed and the residual nitrous oxide N was equivalent to the nitrite N used to generate the gases. These results showed that alkaline permanganate completely oxidized nitric oxide to nitrite. The method was suitable for determining 0·4–20 μmoles of nitric oxide. 3. The technique was used to determine the nitric oxide content of the nitrogenous gas that was produced anaerobically from hydroxylamine by an extract of the autotrophic nitrifying micro-organism Nitrosomonas in the presence of methylene blue as electron acceptor. PMID:14342235

  7. Determinants of insulin responsiveness in young women: Impact of polycystic ovarian syndrome, nitric oxide, and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, D T M; Chan, W P; Rajendran, S; Heresztyn, T; Amarasekera, A; Sverdlov, A L; O'Loughlin, P D; Morris, H A; Chirkov, Y Y; Norman, R J; Horowitz, J D

    2011-10-30

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with incremental risk of atherosclerosis and possibly of cardiovascular events. Insulin resistance (IR) occurs frequently in PCOS subjects, which might be one of the mechanisms involved in engendering such risk. We sought to evaluate whether the impact of other factors potentially associated both with PCOS and with IR might differentially modulate degree of IR in women with and without PCOS. We measured body mass index (BMI), hs-CRP, plasma concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), vitamin D (25(OH)D3) levels and platelet responsiveness to nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (NO responsiveness) in 47 young women (n=27 with PCOS and n=20 weight-matched controls) without metabolic syndrome, hypertension or overt cardiovascular disease. We performed univariate and multivariate regression analyses to establish correlates of the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI), as a marker of IR. On univariate analysis, plasma 25(OH)D3 levels and low NO responsiveness tended to be direct correlates with QUICKI in the entire subject group. BMI, hs-CRP, and ADMA levels were significant inverse correlates of QUICKI in PCOS subjects, but not in subjects without PCOS. On multivariate analysis, NO responsiveness, and 25(OH)D3 levels, but not PCOS per se were significant correlates of QUICKI. In the entire cohort of young women, low NO responsiveness and vitamin D deficiency are associated with low QUICKI, while elevated ADMA, inflammatory activation and obesity are selectively associated with low QUICKI in PCOS subjects; this may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk associated with this syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    The haplotype analysis confirmed ... hand, no consistent association was shown between the two SNPs and SBP or. DBP. ... Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms and risk of MI .... type (-786T*+894G), the haplotypes ... Tests adjusted for age, BMI, diabetes, current smoking and alcohol consumption.

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) is involved in key steps of immune response. Genetic factors predispose individuals to periodontal disease. This study's aim was to explore the association between NOS3 gene polymorphisms and clinical parameters in patients with periodontal disease. Genomic DNA was obtained ...

  10. Nitric oxide enhances osmoregulation of tobacco ( Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of the intracellular signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) on osmoregulation of tobacco cells under osmotic stress caused by phenylethanoid glycosides 6000 (PEG 6000). The results show that the PEG stress induced a specific pattern of endogenous NO production with two ...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to be used in conjunction with a ventilator or other breathing gas administration system. (b) Classification...

  12. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, Cycleooxygenase-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Won Chung, Jin Uk Oh, Sehyung Lee and Sung-Jin Kim* ... was determined by Western blot analysis for iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW ..... Nitric oxide-scavenging and antioxidant effects ofUraria crinite root. Food.

  13. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    reduction in the serum iron status and a modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity of T. brucei infected rats. ... inflammation and tissue damage15. ... The serum iron level was determined ... concentration or of total nitrate and nitrite ... 15. 16. 17. 18. Days. S e ru m iro n lev e l mg. /ml. Infected treated. Infected untreated. 0.

  14. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    , the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes......Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  15. Nitric oxide in the rat cerebellum after hypoxia/ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, José; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Alonso, David; Serrano, Julia; Fernández-Vizarra, Paula; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Bentura, María Luisa; Martinez, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a regulatory biological substance and an important intracellular messenger that acts as a specific mediator of various neuropathological disorders. In mammals and invertebrates, nitric oxide is synthesized from L-arginine in the central and peripheral neural structures by the endothelial, neuronal and inducible enzymatic isoforms of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide may affect the function of various neurotransmitter-specific systems, and is involved in neuromodulation, reproductive function, immune response, and regulation of the cerebral blood circulation. This makes nitric oxide the main candidate in brain responses to brain ischemia/hypoxia. The cerebellum has been reported to be the area of the brain that has the highest nitric oxide synthase activity and the highest concentration of glutamate and aspartate. By glutamate receptors and physiological action of nitric oxide, cyclic guanisine-5'-monophosphate may be rapidly increased. The cerebellum significantly differs with respect to ischemia and hypoxia, this response being directly related to the duration and intensity of the injury. The cerebellum could cover the eventual need for nitric oxide during the hypoxia, boosting the nitric oxide synthase activity, but overall ischemia would require de novo protein synthesis, activating the inducible nitric oxide synthase to cope with the new situation. The specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis show neuroprotective effects.

  16. Cannula sensor for nitric oxide detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazier, S.A. [National Institute of Standard and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Nitric oxide (NO) has received much attention because of its numerous roles in mammalian systems. It has been found in the brain and nervous system to act as a neurotransmitter, in blood vessels as a blood pressure regulator, in the immune system to act as a bactericide and tumorcide, and in other postulated roles as well. Nitric oxide is produced in mammalian cells by the enzyme nitric oxide synthetase. Once produced, NO is oxidized or reacts rapidly with components in living systems and hence has a short half-life. Only a few sensors have been constructed which can detect NO at nanomolar to micromolar levels found in these systems. We are currently examining the use of a cannula sensor employing oxyhemoglobin for NO detection. This sensor continuously draws in liquid sample at a low rate and immediately reacts it with oxyhemoglobin. The absorbance changes which accompany the reaction are monitored. The sensor has a linear response range from approximately 50 to 1000 nM of NO in aqueous solution. Its utility in monitoring NO produced by stimulated murine macrophage cells (RAW 264.7) in culture is currently being examined. The sensor design is generic in that it can also employ fluorescence and chemiluminescence detection chemistries which may allow lower detection limits to be achieved. Details of the sensor`s performance will be given.

  17. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  18. A plasma needle generates nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffels, E; Gonzalvo, Y Aranda; Whitmore, T D; Seymour, D L; Rees, J A

    2006-01-01

    Generation of nitric oxide (NO) by a plasma needle is studied by means of mass spectrometry. The plasma needle is an atmospheric glow generated by a radio-frequency excitation in a mixture of helium and air. This source is used for the treatment of living tissues, and nitric oxide may be one of the most important active agents in plasma therapy. Efficient NO generation is of particular importance in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Mass spectrometric measurements have been performed under various plasma conditions; gas composition in the plasma and conversion of feed gases (nitrogen and oxygen) into other species has been studied. Up to 30% of the N 2 and O 2 input is consumed in the discharge, and NO has been identified as the main conversion product

  19. Interactions between cytokines and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, F Y

    1995-01-01

    There is now an impressive range of evidence supporting the important role of cytokines in sleep regulation (see Krueger et al., 1995; De Simoni et al., 1995). It has also been reported that inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis suppresses sleep in rabbits (Kapás et al., 1994). This is not surprising, since NO is closely involved in neurotransmission (Garthwaite, 1991; Schuman and Madison, 1994) and cytokines are the major inducers of NO synthesis (Hibbs et al., 1990). Further, it is now clear that NO plays an important role in modulating immune responses, possibly through the differential regulation of cytokine synthesis (Taylor-Robinson et al., 1994). In this article, I will provide evidence for the interactions between cytokines and nitric oxide, and discuss their implications in the regulation of immune responses. I shall illustrate these mainly with results from my coworkers and I, from our laboratory rather than attempting an exhaustive review of the subject.

  20. Mechanisms of electrochemical reduction and oxidation of nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooys, de A.C.A.; Beltramo, G.L.; Riet, van B.; Veen, van J.A.R.; Koper, M.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    A summary is given of recent work on the reactivity of nitric oxide on various metal electrodes. The significant differences between the reactivity of adsorbed NO and NO in solution are pointed out, both for the reduction and the oxidation reaction(s). Whereas adsorbed NO can be reduced only to

  1. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Perez, M.R. Del; Michelin, S.C.; Gisone, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  2. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  3. Neuroprotective properties of nitric oxide and S-nitrosoglutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauhala, Pekka; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Chiueh, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis may play an important role in the neurodegeneration. The present paper outlines antioxidative and antiapototic mechanisms of nitric oxide and S-nitrosothiols, which could mediate neuroprotection. Nitric oxide generated by nitric oxide synthase or released from an endogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitrosoglutathione may up-regulate antioxidative thioredoxin system and antiapototic Bcl-2 protein through a cGMP-dependent mechanism. Moreover, nitric oxide radicals have been shown to have direct antioxidant effect through their reaction with free radicals and iron-oxygen complexes. In addition to serving as a stabilizer and carrier of nitric oxide, S-nitrosoglutathione may have protective effect through transnitrosylation reactions. Based on these new findings, a hypothesis arises that the homeostasis of nitric oxide, S-nitrosothiols, glutathione, and thioredoxin systems is important for protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis, and related neurodegenerative disorders

  4. Increase of hepatic nitric oxide levels in a nutritional model of fatty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC), and also nitric oxide (NO) in over fed broiler breeder hens, 198 hens. (30 weeks old) .... The total protein in the liver tissue was determined by a method ... Table 1. Egg production and LHS in broiler breeder hens .... trations of nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates-nitrites) in rat.

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may overcome nitric oxide blockage during cyanide intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polzik, Peter; Hansen, Marco Bo; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effects of a blockade of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis on hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy during cyanide (CN) intoxication. METHODS: 39 anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CN intoxication (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially) with or without previous nitric oxide...

  6. Nitric oxide turnover in permeable river sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Frank; Stief, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2014-01-01

    We measured nitric oxide (NO) microprofiles in relation to oxygen (O2) and all major dissolved N-species (ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide [N2O]) in a permeable, freshwater sediment (River Weser, Germany). NO reaches peak concentrations of 0.13 μmol L-1 in the oxic zone and is consumed......-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) (1) confirmed denitrification as the main NO consumption pathway, with N2O as its major product, (2) showed that denitrification combines one free NO molecule with one NO molecule formed from nitrite to produce N2O, and (3) suggested that NO inhibits N2O reduction....

  7. Nitric oxide-induced interstrand cross-links in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Jennifer L; Wishnok, John S; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2003-05-01

    The DNA damaging effects of nitrous acid have been extensively studied, and the formation of interstrand cross-links have been observed. The potential for this cross-linking to occur through a common nitrosating intermediate derived from nitric oxide is investigated here. Using a HPLC laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system, the amount of interstrand cross-link formed on nitric oxide treatment of the 5'-fluorescein-labeled oligomer ATATCGATCGATAT was determined. This self-complimentary sequence contains two 5'-CG sequences, which is the preferred site for nitrous acid-induced cross-linking. Nitric oxide was delivered to an 0.5 mM oligomer solution at 15 nmol/mL/min to give a final nitrite concentration of 652 microM. The resulting concentration of the deamination product, xanthine, in this sample was found to be 211 +/- 39 nM, using GC/MS, and the amount of interstrand cross-link was determined to be 13 +/- 2.5 nM. Therefore, upon nitric oxide treatment, the cross-link is found at approximately 6% of the amount of the deamination product. Using this system, detection of the cross-link is also possible for significantly lower doses of nitric oxide, as demonstrated by treatment of the same oligomer with NO at a rate of 18 nmol/mL/min resulting in a final nitrite concentration of 126 microM. The concentration of interstrand cross-link was determined to be 3.6 +/- 0.1 nM in this sample. Therefore, using the same dose rate, when the total nitric oxide concentration delivered drops by a factor of approximately 5, the concentration of cross-link drops by a factor of about 4-indicating a qausi-linear response. It may now be possible to predict the number of cross-links in a small genome based on the number of CpG sequences and the yield of xanthine derived from nitrosative deamination.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase gene G298 allele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagib El-Kilany, Galal E.; Nayel, Ehab; Hazzaa, Sahar

    2004-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) has an important effect on blood pressure, arterial wall, and the basal release of endothelial NO in hypertension (HPN) may be reduced. Until now, there is no solid data revealing the potential role of the polymorphism of the nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS) in patients with HPN and microvascular angina. Aim: The aim of the present study is to investigate the gene of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as the polymorphism of this gene may be a putative candidate for HPN and initiate the process of atherosclerosis. Methods: Sixty participants were recruited for this study; 50 were hypertensive patients complaining of chest pain [30 of them have electrocardiogram (EKG) changes of ischemia], 20 had isolated HPN, and 10 healthy volunteers served as control. All patients underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary angiography. Genotyping of eNOS for all patients and controls was performed. The linkages between HPN, microvascular angina and eNOS gene polymorphism were investigated. Results: MPI and coronary angiography revealed that 15 patients had chest pain with true ischemia and reversible myocardial perfusion defects (multiple and mild) but normal epicardial coronary arteries (microvascular angina), while 15 patients had significant coronary artery disease (CAD), and 20 hypertensive patients showed normal perfusion scan and coronary angiography. The prevalence of the NOS G 298 allele was higher in the hypertensive group with microvascular angina (documented by MPI) than it was among the control participants (P<.005). The eNOS allele was significantly higher in the hypertensive group than in the control participants, but there was no significant difference in homozygote mutants among hypertensive participants, x-syndrome and patients with CAD. Conclusion: eNOS gene polymorphism is proved to be an important etiology in microvascular angina (x-syndrome) among hypertensive patients. In addition, the eNOS mutant

  9. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and cerebrovascular regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iadecola, C; Pelligrino, D A; Moskowitz, M A

    1994-01-01

    tone and may play an important role in selected vasodilator responses of the cerebral circulation. Furthermore, evidence has been presented suggesting that NO participates in the mechanisms of cerebral ischemic damage. Despite the widespread attention that NO has captured in recent years and the large......There is increasing evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecular messenger involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent data suggest that NO is also involved in the regulation of the cerebral circulation. Thus, NO participants in the maintenance of resting cerebrovascular...

  10. Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Bazeghi, Nassim; Bie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development of this ...

  11. Nitric oxide in the stress axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Figueroa, M O; Day, H E; Akil, H; Watson, S J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a unique biological messenger. NO is a highly diffusible gas, synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Three unique subtypes of NOS have been described, each with a specific distribution profile in the brain and periphery. NOS subtype I is present, among other areas, in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal gland. Together these structures form the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) or stress axis, activation of which is one of the defining features of a stress response. Evidence suggests that NO may modulate the release of the stress hormones ACTH and corticosterone, and NOS activity and transcription is increased in the LHPA axis following various stressful stimuli. Furthermore, following activation of the stress axis, glucocorticoids are thought to down-regulate the transcription and activity of NOS via a feedback mechanism. Taken together, current data indicate a role for NO in the regulation of the LHPA axis, although at present this role is not well defined. It has been suggested that NO may act as a cellular communicator in plasticity and development, to facilitate the activation or the release of other neurotransmitters, to mediate immune responses, and/or as a vasodilator in the regulation of blood flow. In the following review we summarize some of the latest insights into the function of NO, with special attention to its relationship with the LHPA axis.

  12. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  13. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  14. The correlation between total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA damage was measured by comet assay and nitric oxide concentration was evaluated by Griess assay. TAC was measured in seminal plasma based on the generation of peroxyl radicals from 2,2-azinobis (2-amidino propane) dihydrochlorid (AAPH). Our results show that the means of DNA damage and nitric oxide ...

  15. Nitrogen isotope exchange between nitric oxide and nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, D.; Abrudean, M.; Baldea, A.

    1996-01-01

    The rate of nitrogen isotope exchange between NO and HNO 3 has been measured as a function of nitric acid concentration of 1.5-4M x 1 -1 . The exchange rate law is shown to be R=k[HNO 3 ] 2 [N 2 O 3 ] and the measured activation energy is E=67.78 kJ x M -1 (16.2 kcal x M -1 ). It is concluded that N 2 O 3 participates in 15 N/ 14 N exchange between NO and HNO 3 at nitric acid concentrations higher than 1.5M x 1 -1 . (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Sensing nitric oxide with a carbon nanofiber paste electrode modified with a CTAB and nafion composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dongyun; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhu, Shanying; Cao, Huimin; Chen, Yaguang; Hu, Shengshui

    2015-01-01

    We describe an electrochemical sensor for nitric oxide that was obtained by modifying the surface of a nanofiber carbon paste microelectrode with a film composed of hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide and nafion. The modified microelectrode displays excellent catalytic activity in the electrochemical oxidation of nitric oxide. The mechanism was studied by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Under optimal conditions, the oxidation peak current at a working voltage of 0.75 V (vs. SCE) is related to the concentration of nitric oxide in the 2 nM to 0.2 mM range, and the detection limit is as low as 2 nM (at an S/N ratio of 3). The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of nitric oxide released from mouse hepatocytes. (author)

  17. Nitric Oxide Metabolites and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Concentrations in Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Öztürk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nitric oxide plays a preventive role in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis. Oral nitrite and nitrate intake has gained importance with the discovery of the conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide in acidic medium out of the synthesis of nitric oxide from L-arginine. Objective of this study was to examine the breast milk concentrations of nitric oxide and asymmetric dimethylarginine which is a competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide and to compare these concentrations in terms of gestational age and maturity of breast milk. Study Design: Forty-one women were included in the study. Milk samples were collected from 3 groups of mothers as term, late preterm and preterm on the postpartum days 3, 7 and 28. Results: When breast milk concentrations of nitric oxide were compared according to the postnatal day of the milk independently from gestational age; nitric oxide concentration was higher in the colostrum than in the transition milk and mature milk (p=0,035; p=0,001; respectively. For the comparison of asymmetric dimethylarginine concentrations among these groups and days; no statistically significant difference was observed in terms of gestational age and maturity of the milk (p=0.865, p=0.115; respectively. Conclusion: The highest nitric oxide concentration was found in the colostrum, suggesting that colostrum is a valuable food for newborns. Plasma concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine were negatively correlated with nitric oxide and did not show a correlation with breast milk, suggesting that asymmetric dimethylargininedoesn’t make nitric oxide inhibition in breast milk.

  18. Oxygen binding to nitric oxide marked hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, S.R.W.; Ribeiro, P.C.; Bemski, G.

    1979-04-01

    Electron spin resonance spectra of organic phosphate free human hemoglobin marked with nitric oxide at the sixth coordination position of one of the four hemes allow to observe the transition from the tense (T) to the relaxed (R) conformation, as a function of parcial oxygen pressure. The spectra are composites of contributions from α sub(T), α sub(R) and β chains spectra, showing the presence of only two conformations: T and R. In the absence of organic phosphates NO binds to α and β chains with the same probability, but in the presence of phosphates NO combines preferentially with α chains. The dissociation of NO proceeds at least an order of magnitude faster in T than in R configuration. (author) [pt

  19. Nitric oxide and mitochondria in metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Larisa; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Fattakhov, Nikolai; Vasilenko, Mariia; Zatolokin, Pavel; Kirienkova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders that collectively increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in the pathogeneses of MS components and is involved in different mitochondrial signaling pathways that control respiration and apoptosis. The present review summarizes the recent information regarding the interrelations of mitochondria and NO in MS. Changes in the activities of different NO synthase isoforms lead to the formation of metabolic disorders and therefore are highlighted here. Reduced endothelial NOS activity and NO bioavailability, as the main factors underlying the endothelial dysfunction that occurs in MS, are discussed in this review in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction. We also focus on potential therapeutic strategies involving NO signaling pathways that can be used to treat patients with metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The article may help researchers develop new approaches for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:25741283

  20. The role of nitric oxide in reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCann S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a crucial role in reproduction at every level in the organism. In the brain, it activates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH. The axons of the LHRH neurons project to the mating centers in the brain stem and by afferent pathways evoke the lordosis reflex in female rats. In males, there is activation of NOergic terminals that release NO in the corpora cavernosa penis to induce erection by generation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. NO also activates the release of LHRH which reaches the pituitary and activates the release of gonadotropins by activating neural NO synthase (nNOS in the pituitary gland. In the gonad, NO plays an important role in inducing ovulation and in causing luteolysis, whereas in the reproductive tract, it relaxes uterine muscle via cGMP and constricts it via prostaglandins (PG.

  1. Auroral nitric oxide concentration and infrared emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, W. P.; Degges, T. C.; Hurd, A. G.; Stair, A. T., Jr.; Ulwick, J. C.

    1982-05-01

    Rocket-borne measurements of infrared auroral emission by nitric oxide are analyzed. Four rocket flights provided opportunities to measure 5.3- and 2.7-micron NO emission by means of infrared fixed band radiometers and CVF spectrometers, narrow band photometers, and incident energy spectra on various occasions. Analysis of infrared emission profiles and electron flux data indicates the NO density to be significantly enhanced with respect to midlatitude values. NO emission in the fundamental 5.3-micron band is attributed to resonance excitation by warm earth radiation, collisional excitation primarily by O atoms and chemiluminescence from the reaction of N with O2; with an energy efficiency of 0.015. The overtone band emission at 2.7 microns is accounted for by chemiluminescence produced with an energy efficiency of 0.0054. Total photon yield for the chemiluminescence reaction is estimated to range from 1.2 to 2.4 vibrational quanta per NO molecule.

  2. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Nitric oxide, human diseases and the herbal products that affect the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achike, Francis I; Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2003-09-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed enzymatically from l-arginine in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide is generated constitutively in endothelial cells via sheer stress and blood-borne substances. Nitric oxide is also generated constitutively in neuronal cells and serves as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve endings. Furthermore, NO can also be formed via enzyme induction in many tissues in the presence of cytokines. 2. The ubiquitous presence of NO in the living body suggests that NO plays an important role in the maintenance of health. Being a free radical with vasodilatory properties, NO exerts dual effects on tissues and cells in various biological systems. At low concentrations, NO can dilate the blood vessels and improve the circulation, but at high concentrations it can cause circulatory shock and induce cell death. Thus, diseases can arise in the presence of the extreme ends of the physiological concentrations of NO. 3. The NO signalling pathway has, in recent years, become a target for new drug development. The high level of flavonoids, catechins, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds present in vegetables, fruits, soy, tea and even red wine (from grapes) is believed to contribute to their beneficial health effects. Some of these compounds induce NO formation from the endothelial cells to improve circulation and some suppress the induction of inducible NOS in inflammation and infection. 4. Many botanical medicinal herbs and drugs derived from these herbs have been shown to have effects on the NO signalling pathway. For example, the saponins from ginseng, ginsenosides, have been shown to relax blood vessels (probably contributing to the antifatigue and blood pressure-lowering effects of ginseng) and corpus cavernosum (thus, for the treatment of men suffering from erectile dysfunction; however, the legendary aphrodisiac effect of ginseng may be an overstatement). Many plant extracts or

  4. Inhaled nitric oxide augments nitric oxide transport on sickle cell hemoglobin without affecting oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Schechter, Alan N.; Shelhamer, James H.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Conway, Deirdre A.; Hrinczenko, Borys W.; Nichols, James S.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Rodgers, Griffin P.; Ognibene, Frederick P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) inhalation has been reported to increase the oxygen affinity of sickle cell erythrocytes. Also, proposed allosteric mechanisms for hemoglobin, based on S-nitrosation of β-chain cysteine 93, raise the possibilty of altering the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease by inhibiting polymerization or by increasing NO delivery to the tissue. We studied the effects of a 2-hour treatment, using varying concentrations of inhaled NO. Oxygen affinity, as measured by P50, did not respo...

  5. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  6. Genetic responses against nitric oxide toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Demple

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The threat of free radical damage is opposed by coordinated responses that modulate expression of sets of gene products. In mammalian cells, 12 proteins are induced by exposure to nitric oxide (NO levels that are sub-toxic but exceed the level needed to activate guanylate cyclase. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 synthesis increases substantially, due to a 30- to 70-fold increase in the level of HO-1 mRNA. HO-1 induction is cGMP-independent and occurs mainly through increased mRNA stability, which therefore indicates a new NO-signaling pathway. HO-1 induction contributes to dramatically increased NO resistance and, together with the other inducible functions, constitutes an adaptive resistance pathway that also defends against oxidants such as H2O2. In E. coli, an oxidative stress response, the soxRS regulon, is activated by direct exposure of E. coli to NO, or by NO generated in murine macrophages after phagocytosis of the bacteria. This response is governed by the SoxR protein, a homodimeric transcription factor (17-kDa subunits containing [2Fe-2S] clusters essential for its activity. SoxR responds to superoxide stress through one-electron oxidation of the iron-sulfur centers, but such oxidation is not observed in reactions of NO with SoxR. Instead, NO nitrosylates the iron-sulfur centers of SoxR both in vitro and in intact cells, which yields a form of the protein with maximal transcriptional activity. Although nitrosylated SoxR is very stable in purified form, the spectroscopic signals for the nitrosylated iron-sulfur centers disappear rapidly in vivo, indicating an active process to reverse or eliminate them.

  7. Nitric oxide in the psychobiology of mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altan Eşsizoğlu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is in a gaseous form and is widespread in the human body. It functions by acting as a secondary messenger in the modulatory activities of neuronal functions of the central nervous system. Nitric oxide is the first identified neurotransmitter of the nontraditional neurotransmitter family.Studies conducted on experimental animals demonstrate that nitric oxide has a neuromodulatory efficacy on the secretions of other neurotransmitters and that it has an effect on learning and memory functions, and on various neuronal mechanisms. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the location of nitric oxide in the central nervous system, its effect on anxiety and depression, its relationship with other neurotransmitters, and also about its role on neurotoxicity. There are clinical studies concerning the level of nitrate, a product of nitric oxide metabolism, and also experimental studies concerning its rewarding effect of alcohol and substance use, in patients with depression and schizophrenia. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate its relationship with stress, which is an important factor in the etiology of psychiatric disorders. These studies demonstrate that nitric oxide is closely related with stress physiology.Nitric oxide is a neuromodulator, which is frequently being mentioned about nowadays in psychiatry. Clinical and experimental studies play an important role in the psychobiology of psychiatric disorders.

  8. Myeloperoxidase potentiates nitric oxide-mediated nitrosation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Vijaya M; Nauseef, William M; Zenser, Terry V

    2005-01-21

    Nitrosation is an important reaction elicited by nitric oxide (NO). To better understand how nitrosation occurs in biological systems, we assessed the effect of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a mediator of inflammation, on nitrosation observed during NO autoxidation. Nitrosation of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ; 10 mum) to 2-nitrosoamino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (N-NO-IQ) was monitored by HPLC. Using the NO donor spermine NONOate at pH 7.4, MPO potentiated N-NO-IQ formation. The minimum effective quantity of necessary components was 8.5 nm MPO, 0.25 mum H(2)O(2)/min, and 0.024 mum NO/min. Autoxidation was only detected at >/=1.2 mum NO/min. MPO potentiation was not affected by a 40-fold excess flux of H(2)O(2) over NO or less than a 2.4-fold excess flux of NO over H(2)O(2). Potentiation was due to an 8.8-fold increased affinity of MPO-derived nitrosating species for IQ. Autoxidation was inhibited by azide, suggesting involvement of the nitrosonium ion, NO(+). MPO potentiation was inhibited by NADH, but not azide, suggesting oxidative nitrosylation with NO(2)(.) or an NO(2)(.)-like species. MPO nonnitrosative oxidation of IQ with 0.3 mm NO(2)(-) at pH 5.5 was inhibited by azide, but not NADH, demonstrating differences between MPO oxidation of IQ with NO compared with NO(2)(-). Using phorbol ester-stimulated human neutrophils, N-NO-IQ formation was increased with superoxide dismutase and inhibited by catalase and NADH, but not NaN(3). This is consistent with nitrosation potentiation by MPO, not peroxynitrite. Increased N-NO-IQ formation was not detected with polymorphonuclear neutrophils from two unrelated MPO-deficient patients. Results suggest that the highly diffusible stable gas NO could initiate nitrosation at sites of neutrophil infiltration.

  9. Nitric oxide bioavailability dysfunction involves in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Ye, Zi-Xin; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Chang, Jian; Yang, Mei-Wen; Zhong, Hua-Hua; Hong, Fen-Fang; Yang, Shu-Long

    2018-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of atherosclerosis (AS) include lipid accumulation, fibrosis formation and atherosclerotic plaque produced in artery intima, which leads to vascular sclerosis, lumen stenosis and irritates the ischemic changes of corresponding organs. Endothelial dysfunction was closely associated with AS. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. NO is also a potent endogenous vasodilator and enters for the key processes that suppresses the formation vascular lesion even AS. NO bioavailability indicates the production and utilization of endothelial NO in organisms, its decrease is related to oxidative stress, lipid infiltration, the expressions of some inflammatory factors and the alteration of vascular tone, which plays an important role in endothelial dysfunction. The enhancement of arginase activity and the increase in asymmetric dimethylarginine and hyperhomocysteinemia levels all contribute to AS by intervening NO bioavailability in human beings. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic kidney disease and smoking, etc., also participate in AS by influencing NO bioavailability and NO level. Here, we reviewed the relationship between NO bioavailability and AS according the newest literatures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Zeolites as catalyzer to environmental control. Nitric oxide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, C.; Zapata N, M; Villa H, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    Zeolites and the microporous materials related to them are a class of environmental catalysts, it which are used to remove the produced gases in combustion process (as mobile sources). In this work the importance that has catalysis for environment improvement is emphasized. A review of recent progress in the use of certain zeolitic material as catalysts for nitric oxide elimination of combustion systems is presented. More used nitric oxide removal methods are presented, as well as its advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, it is emphasized on the need of accomplishing more investigation projects on the development of an active catalyst for the decomposition of the nitric oxide in its elements (N and O)

  11. Smoking and gingivitis: focus on inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide and basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, B; Özmeric, N; Elgün, S; Barış, E

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal disease pathogenesis has been associated with smoking. Gingivitis is a mild and reversible form of periodontal disease and it tends to progress to periodontitis only in susceptible individuals. In the present study, we aimed to examine the impact of smoking on host responses in gingivitis and to evaluate and compare the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity in gingival tissue and NO and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) levels in the gingival crevicular fluid of patients with gingivitis and healthy individuals. Forty-one participants were assigned to the gingivitis-smoker (n = 13), gingivitis (n = 13), healthy-smoker (n = 7) and healthy groups (n = 8). Clinical indices were recorded; gingival biopsy and gingival crevicular fluid samples were obtained from papillary regions. iNOS expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. The immunoreactive cells were semiquantitatively assessed. For the quantitative determination of nitrite and nitrate in gingival crevicular fluid, the NO assay kit was used. The amount of bFGF in gingival crevicular fluid was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The gingivitis-smoker group demonstrated a stronger iNOS expression than the non-smoker gingivitis group. iNOS expression intensity was lower in the non-smoker healthy group compared to that in healthy-smokers. No significant gingival crevicular fluid NO and bFGF level changes were observed between groups. Among patients with gingivitis, a positive correlation was detected between gingival crevicular fluid NO and bFGF levels (r = 0.806, p = 0.001). Our data suggest that smoking has significant effects on iNOS expression but not on gingival crevicular fluid NO or bFGF levels in healthy and patients with gingivitis. However, our results suggest that bFGF might be involved in the regulation of NO production via iNOS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparison Between the Acute Pulmonary Vascular Effects of Oxygen with Nitric Oxide and Sildenafil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Day

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Right heart catheterization is performed in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension to determine the severity of disease and their pulmonary vascular reactivity. The acute pulmonary vascular effect of inhaled nitric oxide is frequently used to identify patients who will respond favorably to vasodilator therapy. This study sought to determine whether the acute pulmonary vascular effects of oxygen with nitric oxide and intravenous sildenafil are similar. Methods. A retrospective, descriptive study of 13 individuals with pulmonary hypertension who underwent heart catheterization and acute vasodilator testing was performed. The hemodynamic measurements during five phases (21% to 53% oxygen, 100% oxygen, 100% oxygen with 20 ppm nitric oxide, 21% to 51% oxygen, and 21% to 51% oxygen with 0.05 mg/kg to 0.29 mg/kg intravenous sildenafil of the procedures were compared.Results. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance acutely decreased with 100% oxygen with nitric oxide, and 21% to 51% oxygen with sildenafil. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mm Hg, mean ± standard error of the mean was 38 ± 4 during 21% to 53% oxygen, 32 ± 3 during 100% oxygen, 29 ± 2 during 100% oxygen with nitric oxide, 37 ± 3 during 21% to 51% oxygen, and 32 ± 2 during 21% to 51% oxygen with sildenafil. There was not a significant correlation between the percent change in pulmonary vascular resistance from baseline with oxygen and nitric oxide, and from baseline with sildenafil (r2 = 0.011, p = 0.738. Conclusions. Oxygen with nitric oxide and sildenafil decreased pulmonary vascular resistance. However, the pulmonary vascular effects of oxygen and nitric oxide cannot be used to predict the acute response to sildenafil. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the acute response to sildenafil can be used to predict the long-term response to treatment with an oral phosphodiesterase V inhibitor.

  13. Partial baroreceptor dysfunction and low plasma nitric oxide bioavailability as determinants of salt-sensitive hypertension: a reverse translational rat study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, A.S.; López-Rodríguez, J.F.; Calvo-Turrubiartes, M.Z. [Integrative Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Saavedra-Alanís, V.M. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Llamazares-Azuara, L. [Autonomous University of San Luis Potosí, Renal Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Rodríguez-Martínez, M. [Integrative Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, San Luis Potosí (Mexico)

    2013-10-02

    This study determined whether clinical salt-sensitive hypertension (cSSHT) results from the interaction between partial arterial baroreceptor impairment and a high-sodium (HNa) diet. In three series (S-I, S-II, S-III), mean arterial pressure (MAP) of conscious male Wistar ChR003 rats was measured once before (pdMAP) and twice after either sham (SHM) or bilateral aortic denervation (AD), following 7 days on a low-sodium (LNa) diet (LNaMAP) and then 21 days on a HNa diet (HNaMAP). The roles of plasma nitric oxide bioavailability (pNOB), renal medullary superoxide anion production (RMSAP), and mRNA expression of NAD(P)H oxidase and superoxide dismutase were also assessed. In SHM (n=11) and AD (n=15) groups of S-I, LNaMAP-pdMAP was 10.5±2.1 vs 23±2.1 mmHg (P<0.001), and the salt-sensitivity index (SSi; HNaMAP−LNaMAP) was 6.0±1.9 vs 12.7±1.9 mmHg (P=0.03), respectively. In the SHM group, all rats were normotensive, and 36% were salt sensitive (SSi≥10 mmHg), whereas in the AD group ∼50% showed cSSHT. A 45% reduction in pNOB (P≤0.004) was observed in both groups in dietary transit. RMSAP increased in the AD group on both diets but more so on the HNa diet (S-II, P<0.03) than on the LNa diet (S-III, P<0.04). MAP modeling in rats without a renal hypertensive genotype indicated that the AD*HNa diet interaction (P=0.008) increases the likelihood of developing cSSHT. Translationally, these findings help to explain why subjects with clinical salt-sensitive normotension may transition to cSSHT.

  14. Modulation of glucose uptake in adipose tissue by nitric oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    ion-dependent breakdown and trans-nitrosation reactions are ... [McGrowder D, Ragoobirsingh D and Brown P 2006 Modulation of glucose uptake in adipose tissue by nitric oxide-generating ... Briefly, nicotinamide (Sigma Chemical Co.,.

  15. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E 2 Expression by Methanol Extract of Polyopes affinis in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 Microglial Cells through Suppression of Akt-dependent NF-kB Activity and MAPK Pathway.

  16. Nitric oxide inhibits glycogen synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of intrahepatic regulation of glucose metabolism by Kupffer cell products. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to inhibit gluconeogenic flux through pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. However, NO may also influence glucose metabolism at

  17. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsiang Fu

    Full Text Available Unilateral sinus disease (USD can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19, chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS without nasal polyps (n = 13, CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12 and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22. nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0% and specificity (87.2% for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery.

  18. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dai Cas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium is a dynamic organ with many properties that takes part in the regulation of the principal mechanisms of vascular physiology. Its principal functions include the control of blood-tissue exchange and permeability, the vascular tonus, and the modulation of inflammatory or coagulatory mechanisms. Many vasoactive molecules, produced by the endothelium, are involved in the control of these functions. The most important is nitric oxide (NO, a gaseous molecule electrically neutral with an odd number of electrons that gives the molecule chemically reactive radical properties. Already known in the twentieth century, NO, sometimes considered as a dangerous molecule, recently valued as an important endogenous vasodilator factor. Recently, it was discovered that it is involved in several physiological mechanisms of endothelial protection (Tab. I. In 1992, Science elected it as “molecule of the year”; 6 yrs later three American researchers (Louis Ignarro, Robert Furchgott and Fried Murad obtained a Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology “for their discoveries about NO as signal in the cardiovascular system”.

  19. The myth of nitric oxide in central cardiovascular control by the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talman W.T.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence suggests that nitroxidergic mechanisms in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS participate in cardiovascular reflex control. Much of that evidence, being based on responses to nitric oxide precursors or inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis, has been indirect and circumstantial. We sought to directly determine cardiovascular responses to nitric oxide donors microinjected into the NTS and to determine if traditional receptor mechanisms might account for responses to certain of these donors in the central nervous system. Anesthetized adult Sprague Dawley rats that were instrumented for recording arterial pressure and heart rate were used in the physiological studies. Microinjection of nitric oxide itself into the NTS did not produce any cardiovascular responses and injection of sodium nitroprusside elicited minimal depressor responses. The S-nitrosothiols, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, S-nitrosoacetylpenicillamine (SNAP, and S-nitroso-D-cysteine (D-SNC produced no significant cardiovascular responses while injection of S-nitroso-L-cysteine (L-SNC elicited brisk, dose-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses. In contrast, injection of glyceryl trinitrate elicited minimal pressor responses without associated changes in heart rate. It is unlikely that the responses to L-SNC were dependent on release of nitric oxide in that 1 the responses were not affected by injection of oxyhemoglobin or an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis prior to injection of L-SNC and 2 L- and D-SNC released identical amounts of nitric oxide when exposed to brain tissue homogenates. Although GSNO did not independently affect blood pressure, its injection attenuated responses to subsequent injection of L-SNC. Furthermore, radioligand binding studies suggested that in rat brain synaptosomes there is a saturable binding site for GSNO that is displaced from that site by L-SNC. The studies suggest that S-nitrosocysteine, not nitric oxide, may be an

  20. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ-induced pulmonary inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeidler, Patti C.; Millecchia, Lyndell M.; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-γ were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-γ (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-γ were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-α, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-α, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-γ is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time

  1. Cellular signaling with nitric oxide and cyclic GMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Murad

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, nitric oxide signaling has been one of the most rapidly growing areas in biology. This simple free radical gas can regulate an ever growing list of biological processes. In most instances nitric oxide mediates its biological effects by activating guanylyl cyclase and increasing cyclic GMP synthesis. However, the identification of effects of nitric oxide that are independent of cyclic GMP is also growing at a rapid rate. The effects of nitric oxide can mediate important physiological regulatory events in cell regulation, cell-cell communication and signaling. Nitric oxide can function as an intracellular messenger, neurotransmitter and hormone. However, as with any messenger molecule, there can be too much or too little of the substance and pathological events ensue. Methods to regulate either nitric oxide formation, metabolism or function have been used therapeutically for more than a century as with nitroglycerin therapy. Current and future research should permit the development of an expanded therapeutic armamentarium for the physician to manage effectively a number of important disorders. These expectations have undoubtedly fueled the vast research interests in this simple molecule.

  2. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugusman, Azizah; Zakaria, Zaiton; Hui, Chua Kien; Nordin, Nor Anita Megat Mohd

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECS WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS: control, treatment with 180 microM hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), treatment with 150 microg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H(2)O(2) for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  3. Piper sarmentosum increases nitric oxide production in oxidative stress: a study on human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Ugusman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nitric oxide produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS possesses multiple anti-atherosclerotic properties. Hence, enhanced expression of eNOS and increased Nitric oxide levels may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Piper sarmentosum is a tropical plant with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper sarmentosum on the eNOS and Nitric oxide pathway in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. METHODS: HUVECs were divided into four groups: control, treatment with 180 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, treatment with 150 μg/mL aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum, and concomitant treatment with aqueous extract of PS and H2O2 for 24 hours. Subsequently, HUVECs were harvested and eNOS mRNA expression was determined using qPCR. The eNOS protein level was measured using ELISA, and the eNOS activity and Nitric oxide level were determined by the Griess reaction. RESULTS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum showed a marked induction of Nitric oxide. Treatment with PS also resulted in increased eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS protein level and eNOS activity in HUVECs. CONCLUSION: Aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum may improve endothelial function by promoting NO production in HUVECs.

  4. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions - Method by oxidation by cerium(IV), reduction by iron(II) ammonium sulfate and amperometric back-titration with potassium dichromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate analytical method for determining plutonium in nitric acid solutions. Plutonium is oxidized to plutonium(VI) in a 1 mol/l nitric acid solution with cerium(IV). Addition of sulfamic acid prevents nitrite-induced side reactions. The excess of cerium(IV) is reduced by adding a sodium arsenite solution, catalysed by osmium tetroxide. A slight excess of arsenite is oxidized by adding a 0.2 mol/l potassium permanganate solution. The excess of permanganate is reduced by adding a 0.1 mol/l oxalic acid solution. Iron(III) is used to catalyse the reduction. A small excess of oxalic acid does not interfere in the subsequent plutonium determination. These reduction and oxidation stages can be followed amperometrically and the plutonium is left in the hexavalent state. The sulfuric acid followed by a measured amount of standardized iron(II) ammonium sulfate solution in excess of that required to reduce the plutonium(VI) to plutonium(IV) is added. The excess iron(II) and any plutonium(III) formed to produce iron(III) and plutonium(IV) is amperometrically back-titrated using a standard potassium dichromate solution. The method is almost specifically for plutonium. It is suitable for the direct determination of plutonium in materials ranging from pure product solutions, to fast reactor fuel solutions with a uranium/plutonium ratio of up to 10:1, either before or after irradiation

  5. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide signaling in bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Moriarty, Roisin; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2018-01-01

    It is now well accepted that radiation induced bystander effects can occur in cells exposed to media from irradiated cells. The aim of this study was to follow the bystander cells in real time following addition of media from irradiated cells and to determine the effect of inhibiting these signals. A human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT cells, was irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) with γ irradiation, conditioned medium was harvested after one hour and added to recipient bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, Glutathione levels, caspase activation, cytotoxicity and cell viability was measured after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media to bystander cells. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in bystander cells treated with 0.5Gy ICCM were analysed in real time using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. The levels of reactive oxygen species were also measured in real time after the addition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase pathway inhibitors. ROS and glutathione levels were observed to increase after the addition of irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). Caspase activation was found to increase 4 hours after irradiated cell conditioned media treatment (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM) and this increase was observed up to 8 hours and there after a reduction in caspase activation was observed. A decrease in cell viability was observed but no major change in cytotoxicity was found in HaCaT cells after treatment with irradiated cell conditioned media (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy ICCM). This study involved the identification of key signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione and caspases generated in bystander cells. These results suggest a clear connection between reactive oxygen species and cell survival pathways with persistent production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in bystander cells following exposure to irradiated cell

  6. Critical evaluation of pressurized microwave-assisted digestion efficiency using nitric acid oxidizing systems (M7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The possibilities of enhancement of a medium-pressure microwave-assisted digestion system for sample preparation in trace element analysis of biological material was investigated. Based on optimal digestion conditions for oxidizing systems with nitric acid, different digestion procedures were examined to minimize residual carbon. The substitution of nitric acid and the addition of hydrogen peroxide and ozone to nitric acid was evaluated. The residual carbon content of the digestate was determined coulometrically. Addition of hydrogen peroxide during organic oxidation reactions does not lower the resolved carbon in the solution. Ozone was tested as an additional, potentially non-contaminating, digestion/oxidation system to the nitric acid used in the sample preparation method. (author)

  7. Nitric oxide amplifies the rat electroretinogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielma, Alex; Delgado, Luz; Elgueta, Claudio; Osorio, Rodrigo; Palacios, Adrián G; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that nitric oxide (NO) participates in retinal signal processing through stimulation of its receptor enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). However, under pathological conditions such as uveoretinitis, diabetic or ischemic retinopathy, elevated NO concentrations may cause protein S-nitrosation and peroxynitrite formation in the retina, promoting cellular injury and apoptosis. Previous electroretinogram (ERG) studies demonstrated deleterious effects of NO on the retinal light response, but showed no evidence for a role in normal signal processing. To better understand the function of NO in ocular physiology, we investigated the effects of exogenous NO, produced by NO donors with different release kinetics, on the flash ERG of the rat. Within a limited concentration range, NO strongly amplified ERG a- and b-waves, oscillatory potentials, and the scotopic threshold response. Amplification exceeded 100% under dark adaptation, whereas the photopic ERG and the isolated cone response were increased by less than 50%. Blocking photoreceptor-bipolar cell synapses by AP-4 demonstrated a significant increase of the isolated a-wave by NO, and modeling the ERG generator PIII supported photoreceptors as primary NO targets. The sGC inhibitors ODQ and NS2028 did not reduce NO-dependent ERG amplification, ruling out an involvement of the classical NO effector cyclic GMP. Using immunohistochemistry, we show that illumination and exogenous NO altered the S-nitrosation level of the photoreceptor layer, suggesting that direct protein modifications caused by elevated levels of NO may be responsible for the observed phenomenon. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. SOIL NITROUS OXIDE, NITRIC OXIDE, AND AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM A RECOVERING RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper presents two years of seasonal nitric oxide, ammonia, and nitrous oxide trace gas fluxes measured in a recovering riparian zone with cattle excluded and in an adjacent riparian zone grazed by cattle. In the recovering riparian zone, average nitric oxide, ammonia, and ni...

  10. Nitric oxide in health and disease of the respiratory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardolo, Fabio L. M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Gaston, Benjamin; Folkerts, Gert

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade a plethora of studies have unravelled the multiple roles of nitric oxide (NO) in airway physiology and pathophysiology. In the respiratory tract, NO is produced by a wide variety of cell types and is generated via oxidation of l-arginine that is catalyzed by the enzyme NO

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism G298T in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphism G298T in association with oxidative DNA damage in coronary atherosclerosis. Rajesh G. Kumar, Mrudula K. Spurthi, Kishore G. Kumar, Sanjib K. Sahu and Surekha H. Rani. J. Genet. 91, 349–352. Table 1. The demographic and clinical data of the CHD ...

  12. Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nianzhen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca2+ elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca2+ elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca2+ wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca2+ signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca2+-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca2+ signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca2+, possibly through store-operated Ca2+ channels. The NO-induced Ca2+ signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca2+ change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca2+ influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca2+ using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca2+ release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca2+ elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca2+ wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by

  13. Pain modulation by nitric oxide in the spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a versatile messenger molecule first associated with endothelial relaxing effects. In the central nervous system (CNS, NO synthesis is primarily triggered by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors and has a Janus face, with both beneficial and harmful properties, depending on concentration and the identity of its synthetic enzyme isoform. There are three isoforms of the NO synthesizing enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS: neuronal (nNOS, endothelial (eNOS, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, each one involved with specific events in the brain. In CNS, nNOS is involved with modulation of synaptic transmission through long-term potentiation in several regions, including nociceptive circuits in the spinal cord. Here, we review the role played by NO on central pain sensitization.

  14. Nitric oxide and TGF-β1 inhibit HNF-4α function in HEPG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Susana de; Lopez-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel; Bartolome, Javier; Carreno, Vicente

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzes if the profibrogenic factors nitric oxide and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) affect hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF-4α) function. For this purpose, HepG2 cells were treated with TGF-β1 or with a nitric oxide donor to determine mRNA levels of coagulation factor VII and HNF-4α. Treatment effect on factor VII gene promoter was assessed by chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase assays in cells transfected with the pFVII-CAT plasmid. HNF-4α binding and protein levels were determined by gel shift assays and Western blot. TGF-β1 and nitric oxide downregulated factor VII mRNA levels by inhibiting its gene promoter activity. This inhibition is caused by a decrease in the DNA binding of HNF-4α. TGF-β1 induces degradation of HNF-4α in the proteasome while nitric oxide provokes nitrosylation of cysteine residues in this factor. TGF-β1 and nitric oxide inhibit HNF-4α activity. These findings may explain the loss of liver functions that occurs during fibrosis progression

  15. Adrenoceptor-activated nitric oxide synthesis in salivary acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia; Dissing, Steen; Tritsaris, Katerina

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the cellular regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid and human labial salivary glands, using the newly developed fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) indicator, DAF-2. We found that sympathetic stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) caused...... a strong increase in NO synthesis that was not seen after parasympathetic stimulation with acetylcholine. In rat parotid acinar cells, we furthermore investigated to which extent the NOS activity was dependent on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by simultaneously measuring NO synthesis...

  16. A nitric oxide donor (nitroglycerin) triggers genuine migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Kruuse, C; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    Supersensitivity to induction of headache and arterial dilatation by a donor of nitric oxide (nitroglycerin) has recently been demonstrated in migraine sufferers. The aims of the present study were to examine whether the nitric oxide donor nitroglycerin may induce a typical migraine attack......, to exclude placebo-related effects and to describe the relation between middle cerebral artery dilatation and provoked migraine. Nitroglycerin (0.5 μg/kg/min for 20 min) or placebo was infused into 12 migraine patients in a double-blind cross-over trial. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery...

  17. Nitric oxide as a potential biomarker in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesina Avdagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate changes in serum nitric oxide (NO concentration in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD patients and its use as potential biomarker in differential diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD and in disease activity assessment. In 60 patients of both genders - 30 with ulcerative colitis and 30 with Crohn's disease - and 30 controls serum nitric oxide concentration was determined by measuring nitrite concentration, a stable metabolic product of NO with oxygen. Conversion of nitrates (NO3- to nitrites (NO2- was done with elementary zinc. The nitrite concentration was determined by classic colorimetrical Griess reaction. Median serum NO concentration was statistically different (p=0,0005 between UC patients (15.25 µmol/L; 13.47 - 19.88 µmol/L, CD patients (14.54 µmol/L; 13.03 -16.32 µmol/L and healthy controls (13.29 µmol/L; 12.40 - 13.92 µmol/L. When active UC and CD patients were compared with inactive UC and CD patients respectively a significant difference in serum NO level was found (p=0.0005. With a cut-off level of 17.39 µmol/L NO had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% in discriminating between active and inactive UC patients. With cut-off value of 14.01 µmol/L serum NO level had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 69% in distinguishing between patients with active CD and inactive CD. Serum NO concentration is a minimally invasive and rapid tool for discriminating between active and inactive IBD patients and could be used as useful biomarker in monitoring of disease activity in IBD patients.

  18. Radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells in vitro by nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Robert J.; Makepeace, Carol M.; Hur, Won-Joo; Song, Chang W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the radiosensitivity of SCK tumor cells in oxic and hypoxic environments in vitro were studied. Methods and Materials: NO was delivered to cell suspensions using the NO donors 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine sodium salt (DEA/NO), and a spermine/nitric oxide complex (SPER/NO), which release NO at half-lives of 2.1 min and 39 min at pH 7.4, respectively. The cells were suspended in media containing DEA/NO or SPER/NO for varying lengths of time under oxic or hypoxic conditions, irradiated, and the clonogenicity determined. Results: Both compounds markedly radiosensitized the hypoxic cells. The drug enhancement ratios (DER) for 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 mM DEA/NO were 2.0, 2.3 and 3.0, respectively, and those for 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 mM SPER/NO were 1.6, 2.3, and 2.8, respectively. Aerobic cells were not radiosensitized by DEA/NO or SPER/NO. When DEA/NO and SPER/NO were incubated in solution overnight to allow release of NO, they were found to have no radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic or oxic conditions indicating the sensitization by the NO donors was due to the NO molecule released from these drugs. At the higher concentrations, SPER/NO was found to be cytotoxic in aerobic conditions but not in hypoxic conditions. DEA/NO was only slightly toxic to the cells in both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Conclusions: NO released from NO donors DEA/NO and SPER/NO is as effective as oxygen to radiosensitize hypoxic cells in vitro. Its application to the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells in solid tumors remains to be investigated

  19. In vitro inducible nitric oxide synthesis inhibitory active constituents from Fraxinus rhynchophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N Y; Pae, H O; Ko, Y S; Yoo, J C; Choi, B M; Jun, C D; Chung, H T; Inagaki, M; Higuchi, R; Kim, Y C

    1999-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an H2O extract of the barks of Fraxinus rhynchophylla has furnished two inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitory compounds, ferulaldehyde (1) and scopoletin (3) together with a coumarin, fraxidin (2). Compounds 1 and 3 showed inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in a dose-dependent manner by murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The inhibition of NO synthesis of 1 was reflected in the decreased amount of iNOS protein, as determined by Western blotting.

  20. Weaning of inhaled nitric oxide: is there a best strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita M. Ware

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO has been used in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in neonates for many years. iNO was approved by the FDA in 1999 for hypoxic respiratory failure (HRF in term and near term infants, defined as > 34 weeks gestational age (GA. iNO is used for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN, secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by congenital heart disease (CHD, congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH, meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS, pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, and other pathologies. iNO has its effect locally on the pulmonary vasculature and has been studied extensively regarding its effect on morbidities such as: need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, oxygen requirements, and mechanical ventilatory support. However, protocols for weaning iNO and for the duration of iNO weaning have not been studied extensively. It has been shown that an abrupt discontinuation leads to rebound pulmonary hypertension.Methods: Electronic literature search and review of published articles on the use of iNO in the neonate.Results: Electronic databases including Medline and PubMed were searched from the years 1995-2015, using the keywords "iNO", "nitric oxide", "neonate", and "weaning nitric oxide." This search revealed 2,124 articles. Articles were determined to be eligible for review if they included a specific protocol for weaning iNO, and were published in English. 16 articles with specific protocols for iNO weaning have been identified and reviewed. The studies had enrolled a total of 1,735 neonates either at term either preterm and with a mean birth weight of 3.3 kg (± 2 kg. Main diagnoses included MAS, CHD (total anomalous pulmonary venous return [TAPVR], d-transposition of the great vessels [DTGV], atrial septal defect [ASD], pulmonary atresia [PA], hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLH], pneumonia, RDS, hyaline membrane disease (HMD, PPHN, CDH, sepsis, pulmonary hypoplasia

  1. Hypertension, nitric oxide, oxidants, and dietary plant polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galleano, Monica; Pechanova, Olga; Fraga, Cesar G

    2010-12-01

    Fruits and vegetables are key foods whose high ingestion is associated with the improvement of numerous pathological conditions, including hypertension. Such health promoting actions have been increasingly ascribed to the antioxidant characteristics of different polyphenols in fruits and vegetables. Consequently, based on this assumption, many beverages and foods rich in polyphenols, grape, tea, cocoa, and soy products and many of their chemical constituents purified, are being studied both, as antioxidants and antihypertensive agents. This paper reviews the current evidence linking high polyphenol consumption with reductions in blood pressure. Basic chemical aspects of flavanols, flavonols, isoflavones and stilbenes, as possible responsible for the observed effects of those foods on blood pressure are included. Human interventions studies by using grapes and wine, cocoa and chocolate, black and green tea, soy products, and purified compounds ((+)-catequin, quercetin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate) are summarized. The discussed hypothesis, strongly supported by experimental data in animals, is that by regulating nitric oxide bioavailability, polyphenols present in fruits and vegetables affect endothelial function and as a consequence, blood pressure. Even when data are not definitive and many questions remain open, the whole evidence is encouraging to start considering diets that can provide a benefit to hypertensive subjects, and those benefits will be more significant in people that do not have controlled his/her elevated blood pressure.

  2. Variation of nitric oxide levels in imported Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... ISSN 1684–5315 © 2008 Academic Journals. Full Length Research Paper. Variation of nitric oxide levels in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria episodes. De Sousa, Karina*, Silva, Marcelo S. and Tavira, Luís T. Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Centro de Malária e outras Doenças Tropicais, ...

  3. Nitric oxide radical scavenging potential of some Elburz medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some plants scavenge nitric oxide (NO) with high affinity. For this purpose, forty extracts from 26 medicinal plants, growing extensively in Elburz mountains, were evaluated for their NO scavenging activity. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of these extracts were also measured by Folin Ciocalteu and AlCl3 colorimetric ...

  4. On EPR detection of nitric oxide in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO ) is a peculiar radical: Ground state is not paramagnetic (g = 0 since orbital and spin magnetic moments cancel); low reactivity with other molecules except superoxide (O2 ); thermodynamically unstable; dimerizes to N2O2; difficult to detect in-vivo.

  5. Variation of nitric oxide levels in imported Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... Nitric oxide (NO) has been recognized during the past two decades as one of the most versatile players in the immune system. Even though the molecular mechanisms responsible by the naturally acquired immunity against malaria are still to be clarified, the production of NO seems to play an important role.

  6. Nitric oxide and neopterin in bipolar affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Fekkes, D.; Pepplinkhuizen, L.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Tuinier, S.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing interest in the role of nitric oxide (NO) and pterines in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The results so far show an inconsistent pattern. Methods: In the present study, neopterin and a measure of NO synthesis in plasma of symptomatic and

  7. Total Glucosides of Paeonia lactiflora Pall Suppress Nitric Oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iNOS) expression and ... Keywords: Total glucosides, Paeonia lactiflora, Nitric oxide, iNOs, Nuclear factor-κB. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is the key transcriptional factor regulating iNOS gene transcription.

  8. Localization of nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ulrik; Lopez-Figueroa, M.; Hellsten, Ylva

    1996-01-01

    The present study investigated the cellular localization of the neuronal type I and endothelial type III nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle. Type I NO synthase immunoreactivity was found in the sarcolemma and the cytoplasm of all muscle fibres. Stronger immunoreactivity was expressed...

  9. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research August 2016; 15 (8): 1595-1603 ... Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent apoptosis in ... apoptosis induced by a selective iNOS inhibitor, N-[(3-aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine (1400W), .... and nitrate. ... Nitrite production was measured in culture media.

  10. Water vapour and carbon dioxide decrease nitric oxide readings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMark, TW; Kort, E; Meijer, RJ; Postma, DS; Koeter, GH

    Measurement of nitric oxide levels in exhaled ah-is commonly performed using a chemiluminescence detector. However, water vapour and carbon dioxide affect the chemiluminescence process, The influence of these gases at the concentrations present in exhaled air has not vet been studied. For this in

  11. Melatonin inhibits endothelin-1 and induces endothelial nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although, I/R augmented the endothelin-1 (ET-1) gene expression and the level of big endothelin-1 (big ET-1) in liver tissue, melatonin attenuated these increases. Conversely, non-significant decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA expression in I/R group was significantly elevated by melatonin in ...

  12. Analysis of genetic variation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic diversity of 100 Malaysian native chickens was investigated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for two candidate genes: inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS) and natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1). The two genes were selected ...

  13. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  14. Association of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphisms With Acute Rejection in Liver Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarpira, Negar; Namazi, Soha; Malahi, Sayan; Kazemi, Kourosh

    2016-06-01

    Polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene have been associated with altered endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between endothelial nitric oxide synthase -786T/C and 894G/T polymorphism and their haplotypes on the occurrence of acute rejection episodes in liver transplant recipients. We conducted a case control study in which 100 liver transplant recipients and 100 healthy controls were recruited from Shiraz Transplant Center. The patients used triple therapy including tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone for immunosuppression maintenance. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and endothelial nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Patients included 60 men and 40 women (mean age, 32.35 ± 10.2 y). There was a significant association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase 894G/T and acute rejection episode. The GT* gen-otype and acute rejection episodes had a significant association (odds ratio, 2.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-6.15; P = .03). The GG and GT* genotype and T* allele frequency were significantly different between patients and control subjects (P = .001). Haplotype TT* was higher in recipients than control subjects (odds ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-4.25; P = .01). Haplotype TG was higher in the control group (odds ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.96; P = .02). Our results suggest a relation between different endothelial nitric oxide synthase geno-types and risk of acute rejection episodes. However, further study is necessary to determine genetic susceptibility for transplant patients.

  15. Nitric oxide synthesis and biological functions of nitric oxide released from ruthenium compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Pereira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available During three decades, an enormous number of studies have demonstrated the critical role of nitric oxide (NO as a second messenger engaged in the activation of many systems including vascular smooth muscle relaxation. The underlying cellular mechanisms involved in vasodilatation are essentially due to soluble guanylyl-cyclase (sGC modulation in the cytoplasm of vascular smooth cells. sGC activation culminates in cyclic GMP (cGMP production, which in turn leads to protein kinase G (PKG activation. NO binds to the sGC heme moiety, thereby activating this enzyme. Activation of the NO-sGC-cGMP-PKG pathway entails Ca2+ signaling reduction and vasodilatation. Endothelium dysfunction leads to decreased production or bioavailability of endogenous NO that could contribute to vascular diseases. Nitrosyl ruthenium complexes have been studied as a new class of NO donors with potential therapeutic use in order to supply the NO deficiency. In this context, this article shall provide a brief review of the effects exerted by the NO that is enzymatically produced via endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS activation and by the NO released from NO donor compounds in the vascular smooth muscle cells on both conduit and resistance arteries, as well as veins. In addition, the involvement of the nitrite molecule as an endogenous NO reservoir engaged in vasodilatation will be described.

  16. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup; Kumar, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development. (paper)

  17. Reproducibility of exhaled nitric oxide measurements in overweight and obese adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Willemien; de Mutsert, Renée; le Cessie, Saskia; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Rabe, Klaus F.

    2014-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive measure of airway inflammation that can be detected by a handheld device. Obesity may influence the reproducibility of exhaled nitric oxide measurements, by - for instance - decreased expiratory reserve volume. We analyzed triple exhaled nitric oxide

  18. Isoxazole derivatives as new nitric oxide elicitors in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Oancea

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several 3,5-disubstituted isoxazoles were obtained in good yields by regiospecific 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions between aromatic nitrile oxides, generated in situ from the corresponding hydroxyimidoyl chlorides, with non-symmetrical activated alkynes in the presence of catalytic amounts of copper(I iodide. Effects of 3,5-disubstituted isoxazoles on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation in Arabidopsis tissues was studied using specific diaminofluoresceine dyes as fluorescence indicators.

  19. Nitric oxide signalling and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the heart under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin Hua

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an imperative regulator of the cardiovascular system and is a critical mechanism in preventing the pathogenesis and progression of the diseased heart. The scenario of bioavailable NO in the myocardium is complex: 1) NO is derived from both endogenous NO synthases (endothelial, neuronal, and/or inducible NOSs [eNOS, nNOS, and/or iNOS]) and exogenous sources (entero-salivary NO pathway) and the amount of NO from exogenous sources varies significantly; 2) NOSs are located at discrete compartments of cardiac myocytes and are regulated by distinctive mechanisms under stress; 3) NO regulates diverse target proteins through different modes of post-transcriptional modification (soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]/cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]/protein kinase G [PKG]-dependent phosphorylation, S -nitrosylation, and transnitrosylation); 4) the downstream effectors of NO are multidimensional and vary from ion channels in the plasma membrane to signalling proteins and enzymes in the mitochondria, cytosol, nucleus, and myofilament; 5) NOS produces several radicals in addition to NO (e.g. superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and different NO-related derivatives) and triggers redox-dependent responses. However, nNOS inhibits cardiac oxidases to reduce the sources of oxidative stress in diseased hearts. Recent consensus indicates the importance of nNOS protein in cardiac protection under pathological stress. In addition, a dietary regime with high nitrate intake from fruit and vegetables together with unsaturated fatty acids is strongly associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Collectively, NO-dependent mechanisms in healthy and diseased hearts are better understood and shed light on the therapeutic prospects for NO and NOSs in clinical applications for fatal human heart diseases.

  20. Non-asthmatic patients show increased exhaled nitric oxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz M. Saraiva-Romanholo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate whether exhaled nitric oxide may serve as a marker of intraoperative bronchospasm. INTRODUCTION: Intraoperative bronchospasm remains a challenging event during anesthesia. Previous studies in asthmatic patients suggest that exhaled nitric oxide may represent a noninvasive measure of airway inflammation. METHODS: A total of 146,358 anesthesia information forms, which were received during the period from 1999 to 2004, were reviewed. Bronchospasm was registered on 863 forms. From those, three groups were identified: 9 non-asthmatic patients (Bronchospasm group, 12 asthmatics (Asthma group and 10 subjects with no previous airway disease or symptoms (Control group. All subjects were submitted to exhaled nitric oxide measurements (parts/billion, spirometry and the induced sputum test. The data was compared by ANOVA followed by the Tukey test and Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn's test. RESULTS: The normal lung function test results for the Bronchospasm group were different from those of the asthma group (p <0.05. The median percentage of eosinophils in induced sputum was higher for the Asthma [2.46 (0.45-6.83] compared with either the Bronchospasm [0.55 (0-1.26] or the Control group [0.0 (0] (p <0.05; exhaled nitric oxide followed a similar pattern for the Asthma [81.55 (57.6-86.85], Bronchospasm [46.2 (42.0 -62.6] and Control group [18.7 (16.0-24.7] (p< 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Non-asthmatic patients with intraoperative bronchospasm detected during anesthesia and endotracheal intubation showed increased expired nitric oxide.

  1. Stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis by the aqueous extract of Panax ginseng root in RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, R; Moeslinger, T; Kopp, B; Spieckermann, P G

    2001-12-01

    1. In this study, we investigated the effect of Panax ginseng root aqueous extracts upon inducible nitric oxide synthesis in RAW 264.7 cells. Panax ginseng root extract has been used in the Asian world for centuries as a traditional herb to enhance physical strength and resistance and is becoming more and more popular in Europe and North America. 2. Incubation of murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells) with increasing amounts of aqueous extracts of Panax ginseng (0.05 - 0.8 microg microl(-1)) showed a dose dependent stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthesis. 3. Polysaccharides isolated from Panax ginseng showed strong stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthesis, whereas a triterpene-enriched fraction from an aqueous extract of Panax ginseng did not show any stimulation. 4. Inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression was enhanced in a dose dependent manner as revealed by immunoblotting when cells were incubated with increasing amounts of Panax ginseng extract. This was associated with an incline in inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA-levels as determined by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and electromobility shift assay studies indicated enhanced nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding activity. 5. As nitric oxide plays an important role in immune function, Panax ginseng treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms due to stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  2. Nitric oxide synthase expression and apoptotic cell death in brains of AIDS and AIDS dementia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, V. A.; de Groot, C. J.; Lucassen, P. J.; Portegies, P.; Troost, D.; Tilders, F. J.; van Dam, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the occurrence and cellular localization of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), NOS activity and its association with cell death in brains of AIDS and AIDS dementia complex (ADC) patients. Post-mortem cerebral cortex tissue of eight AIDS patients, eight ADC patients and eight

  3. Interleukin 1 beta induces diabetes and fever in normal rats by nitric oxide via induction of different nitric oxide synthases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I; Bjerre, U; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    1994-01-01

    Substantial in vitro evidence suggests that nitric oxide may be a major mediator of interleukin 1 (IL-1) induced pancreatic beta-cell inhibition and destruction in the initial events leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Using NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of both...

  4. Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Goad, John T.; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey

    2007-01-01

    Glucose feeding can markedly exacerbate the toxicity of the anticholinesterase insecticide, parathion. We determined the effects of parathion on brain nitric oxide and its possible role in potentiation of toxicity by glucose feeding. Adult rats were given water or 15% glucose in water for 3 days and challenged with vehicle or parathion (18 mg/kg, s.c.) on day 4. Functional signs, plasma glucose and brain cholinesterase, citrulline (an indicator of nitric oxide production) and high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were measured 1-3 days after parathion. Glucose feeding exacerbated cholinergic toxicity. Parathion increased plasma glucose (15-33%) and decreased cortical cholinesterase activity (81-90%), with no significant differences between water and glucose treatment groups. In contrast, parathion increased brain regional citrulline (40-47%) and decreased HEPs (18-40%) in rats drinking water, with significantly greater changes in glucose-fed rats (248-363% increase and 31-61% decrease, respectively). We then studied the effects of inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by 7-nitroindazole (7NI, 30 mg/kg, i.p. x4) on parathion toxicity and its modulation by glucose feeding. Co-exposure to parathion and 7NI led to a marked increase in cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality, regardless of glucose intake. Thus, glucose feeding enhanced the accumulation of brain nitric oxide following parathion exposure, but inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis was ineffective at counteracting increased parathion toxicity associated with glucose feeding. Evidence is therefore presented to suggest that nitric oxide may play both toxic and protective roles in cholinergic toxicity, and its precise contribution to modulation by glucose feeding requires further investigation

  5. Simvastatin Attenuates Contrast-Induced Nephropathy through Modulation of Oxidative Stress, Proinflammatory Myeloperoxidase, and Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketab E. Al-Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast media- (CM- induced nephropathy is a serious complication of radiodiagnostic procedures. Available data suggests that the development of prophylaxis strategies is limited by poor understanding of pathophysiology of CM-induced nephropathy. Present study was designed to determine the role of oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase, and nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of iohexol model of nephropathy and its modification with simvastatin (SSTN. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. After 24 h of water deprivation, all the rats except in control and SSTN-only groups were injected (10 ml/kg with 25% glycerol. After 30 min, SSTN (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg was administered orally, daily for 4 days. Twenty-four hours after the glycerol injection, iohexol was infused (8 ml/kg through femoral vein over a period of 2 min. All the animals were sacrificed on day 5 and blood and kidneys were collected for biochemical and histological studies. The results showed that SSTN dose dependently attenuated CM-induced rise of creatinine, urea, and structural abnormalities suggesting its nephroprotective effect. A significant increase in oxidative stress (increased lipid hydroperoxides and reduced glutathione levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO and decreased nitric oxide in CM group were reversed by SSTN. These findings support the use of SSTN to combat CM-induced nephrotoxicity.

  6. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Saidkhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29 and control (placebo cream; n = 29. In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH. At the outset of the study (before using the cream, the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04. Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future.

  7. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidkhani, Vahid; Asadizaker, Marziyeh; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Latifi, Sayed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29) and control (placebo cream; n = 29). In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH). At the outset of the study (before using the cream), the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing) between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future. PMID:27186212

  8. Regulation and control of nitric oxide (NO) in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sahni, Sumit; Lok, K.H.

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a novel storage and transport mechanism for nitric oxide (NO) mediated by glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1), protects M1-macrophage (M1-MØ) models from large quantities of endogenous NO. This system stores and transp......We recently demonstrated that a novel storage and transport mechanism for nitric oxide (NO) mediated by glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1), protects M1-macrophage (M1-MØ) models from large quantities of endogenous NO. This system stores...... be responsible for delivering cytotoxic NO as DNICs via MRP1 from M1-MØs, to tumor cell targets....

  9. Arginine affects appetite via nitric oxide in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Hou, S S; Huang, W; Xu, T S; Rong, G H; Xie, M

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism by which arginine regulates feed intake in Pekin ducks. In experiment 1, one hundred forty-four 1-d-old male Pekin ducks were randomly allotted to 3 dietary treatments with 6 replicate pens of 8 birds per pen. Birds in each group were fed a corn-corn gluten meal diet containing 0.65, 0.95, and 1.45% arginine. Ducks fed the diet containing 0.65% arginine had lower feed intake and plasma nitric oxide level (P ducks were allotted to 1 of 2 treatments. After 2 h fasting, birds in the 2 groups were intraperitoneally administrated saline and l-NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester HCl (L-NAME) for 3 d, respectively. Feed intake (P study implied that arginine modifies feeding behavior possibly through controlling endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide in Pekin ducks. © Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. NITRIC OXIDE AND ENDOTHELIN-1 IN CHILDREN WITH DIGESTIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Panova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The important part in the group of biological compounds, participating in the regulation of the functions of the gastro-intestinal tract, is assigned to endothelial factors because of their impact on the majority of physiological and pathophysiological processes of the digestive system. The article provides information about physiological role of nitric oxide and endothelin-1 and presents a review of scientific data on the participation of nitric oxide and endothelin-1 in the pathogenesis of many digestive system diseases, emphasizing chronic inflammatory disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The authors accentuate the importance of endothelium endocrine function research in children with esophagogastroduodenal disorders at the beginning of puberty, which is the critical period of ontogenesis.

  11. [Potential protective role of nitric oxide and Hsp70 linked to functional foods in the atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main pathologic entities considered epidemic and a worldwide public health problem, is currently under constant review as regards its basic determining mechanisms and therapeutic possibilities. In this regard, all patients afflicted with the disease exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, nitric oxide - a known vasoactive messenger gas - has been closely related to the inflammatory, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctional process that characterizes atherosclerosis. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that alterations in the bioavailability of nitric oxide would induce the expression of heat shock proteins. This agrees with the use of functional foods as a strategy to prevent both vascular aging and the development of atherosclerosis. Finally, a greater knowledge regarding the mechanisms implied in the development of atherosclerosis will enable proposing new and possible hygiene, health and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase isoforms in spontaneous and salt hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hojná, Silvie; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, Suppl. 2 (2007), S 338-S 338 ISSN 0263-6352. [European Meeting on Hypertension /17./. 15.06.2007-19.06.2007, Milan] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : nitric oxide synthase isoforms * spontaneous and salt hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  13. Enhancement of vascular targeting by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Peter D.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Naylor, Matthew A.; Thomson, Peter; Lewis, Gemma; Hill, Sally A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the enhancement of the vascular targeting activity of the tubulin-binding agent combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) by various inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases. Methods and Materials: The syngeneic tumors CaNT and SaS growing in CBA mice were used for this study. Reduction in perfused vascular volume was measured by injection of Hoechst 33342 24 h after drug administration. Necrosis (hematoxylin and eosin stain) was assessed also at 24 h after treatment. Combretastatin A4 phosphate was synthesized by a modification of the published procedure and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors L-NNA, L-NMMA, L-NIO, L-NIL, S-MTC, S-EIT, AMP, AMT, and L-TC, obtained from commercial sources. Results: A statistically significant augmentation of the reduction in perfused vascular volume by CA4P in the CaNT tumor was observed with L-NNA, AMP, and AMT. An increase in CA4P-induced necrosis in the same tumor achieved significance with L-NNA, L-NMMA, L-NIL, and AMT. CA4P induced little necrosis in the SaS tumor, but combination with the inhibitors L-NNA, L-NMMA, L-NIO, S-EIT, and L-TC was effective. Conclusions: Augmentation of CA4P activity by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors of different structural classes supports a nitric oxide-related mechanism for this effect. L-NNA was the most effective inhibitor studied

  14. Nitric oxide and non-quantal acetylcholine release

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyskočil, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2003), s. 241-243 ISSN 1211-7579. [Celostátní konference biologické psychiatrie /11./. Luhačovice, 11.06.2003-14.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : nitric oxide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  15. Exercise promotes collateral artery growth mediated by monocytic nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Stephan H; Millenaar, Dominic N; Werner, Christian; Schuh, Lisa; Degen, Achim; Bettink, Stephanie I; Lipp, Peter; van Rooijen, Nico; Meyer, Tim; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis) is an important adaptive response to hampered arterial perfusion. It is unknown whether preventive physical exercise before limb ischemia can improve arteriogenesis and modulate mononuclear cell function. This study aimed at investigating the effects of endurance exercise before arterial occlusion on MNC function and collateral artery growth. After 3 weeks of voluntary treadmill exercise, ligation of the right femoral artery was performed in mice. Hindlimb perfusion immediately after surgery did not differ from sedentary mice. However, previous exercise improved perfusion restoration ≤7 days after femoral artery ligation, also when exercise was stopped at ligation. This was accompanied by an accumulation of peri-collateral macrophages and increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in hindlimb collateral and in MNC of blood and spleen. Systemic monocyte and macrophage depletion by liposomal clodronate but not splenectomy attenuated exercise-induced perfusion restoration, collateral artery growth, peri-collateral macrophage accumulation, and upregulation of iNOS. iNOS-deficient mice did not show exercise-induced perfusion restoration. Transplantation of bone marrow-derived MNC from iNOS-deficient mice into wild-type animals inhibited exercise-induced collateral artery growth. In contrast to sedentary controls, thrice weekly aerobic exercise training for 6 months in humans increased peripheral blood MNC iNOS expression. Circulating mononuclear cell-derived inducible nitric oxide is an important mediator of exercise-induced collateral artery growth. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so-called del......SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so......-called delayed headache that fulfils criteria for migraine without aura in migraine sufferers. Blockade of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) by L-nitromonomethylarginine effectively treats attacks of migraine without aura. Similar results have been obtained for chronic the tension-type headache and cluster headache....... Inhibition of the breakdown of cyclic guanylate phosphate (cGMP) also provokes migraine in sufferers, indicating that cGMP is the effector of NO-induced migraine. Similar evidence suggests an important role of NO in the tension-type headache and cluster headache. These very strong data from human...

  17. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  18. Heterogeneous reduction of nitric oxide on synthetic coal chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Pevida; A. Arenillas; F. Rubiera; J.J. Pis [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2005-12-01

    Model compounds, with a controlled heteroatoms content and well-defined functionalities, were used to study the release of nitrogen compounds from char combustion. In the present work, the mechanisms involved in NO-char heterogeneous reduction were studied with a synthetic coal (SC) char as carbon source. Another synthetic char (SN) without any nitrogen in its composition was also employed in these studies. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR) tests with a gas mixture of 400 ppm NO in argon and with isotopically labelled nitric oxide, {sup 15}NO (500 ppm {sup 15}NO in argon), were carried out. The gases produced were quantitatively determined by means of MS and FTIR analysers. Under the conditions of this work the main products of the NO-C reaction were found to be N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The main path of reaction involves the formation of surface nitrogen compounds that afterwards react with nitrogen from the reactive gas to form N{sub 2}. It was observed that fuel-N also participates in the overall heterogeneous reduction reaction, although to a lesser extent.

  19. The role of nitrite in nitric oxide homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrite is endogenously produced as an oxidative metabolite of nitric oxide, but it also functions as a NO donor that can be activated by a number of cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. This article discusses the physiological role of nitrite and nitrite-derived NO in blood flow regulation...... mechanisms. Nitrite reduction to NO provides cytoprotection in tissues during ischemia-reperfusion events by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration and limiting reactive oxygen species. It is argued that the study of hypoxia-tolerant lower vertebrates and diving mammals may help evaluate mechanisms and a full...

  20. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite: Lessons from extreme animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; B. Jensen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....

  1. Fiber type-specific nitric oxide protects oxidative myofibers against cachectic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengli Yu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative skeletal muscles are more resistant than glycolytic muscles to cachexia caused by chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism for the protection associated with oxidative phenotype remains elusive. We hypothesized that differences in reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO determine the fiber type susceptibility. Here, we show that intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS in mice resulted in higher level of ROS and greater expression of muscle-specific E3 ubiqitin ligases, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx/atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1, in glycolytic white vastus lateralis muscle than in oxidative soleus muscle. By contrast, NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNos and antioxidant gene expression were greatly enhanced in oxidative, but not in glycolytic muscles, suggesting that NO mediates protection against muscle wasting. NO donors enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and blocked cytokine/endotoxin-induced MAFbx/atrogin-1 expression in cultured myoblasts and in skeletal muscle in vivo. Our studies reveal a novel protective mechanism in oxidative myofibers mediated by enhanced iNos and antioxidant gene expression and suggest a significant value of enhanced NO signaling as a new therapeutic strategy for cachexia.

  2. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO x vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180 degrees C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200 degrees C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time

  3. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhang, Qunye, E-mail: wz.zhangqy@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Guorong, E-mail: grli@sdnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  4. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-01-01

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation

  5. Experience with inhaled nitric oxide therapy in hypoxic respiratory failure of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Arvind; Callander, Ian; Stack, Jacqueline; Momsen, Tracey; Sterling-Levis, Katy

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality in newborns. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been shown to be effective in the management of persistent pulmonory hypertension of newborn (PPHN). To retrospectively analyse data to determine the effectiveness of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in the management of newborns with PPHN in terms of survival and changes in oxygenation status. Neo-natal data since inception of iNO therapy at the unit (past six years) was reviewed. Pertinent demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records of newborns that received inhaled nitric oxide therapy during their stay. Details of underlying illnesses, other therapeutic modalities, arterial blood gas, ventilatory and nitric oxide parameters were assessed and analysed to ascertain efficacy of iNO. A total of 36 babies (gestational age ranging from 24-41 weeks) received iNO during this period; two were excluded from final analysis. Overall survival rate was 80 percent. There was a statistically significant increase in systemic oxygenation (PaO2) from 41.1 +/- 2.1 mmHg to 128.5 +/- 13.2 mmHg and a decline in oxygenation index (OI) from 49.4 +/- 5.9 to 17.3 +/- 2.5, when assessed after four hours (P < 0.001). Mean duration of iNO therapy was 63 +/- 7.3 hours and the maximum methaemoglobin levels were noted to be 2.1 percent. Inhaled nitric oxide appears to be an effective rescue therapy for the management of PPHN associated with hypoxic respiratory failure. It is safe and well tolerated with no evidence of clinical or biochemical side effects.

  6. The production of nitric oxide in EL4 lymphoma cells overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robyn E; Weigent, Douglas A

    2003-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is produced by immunocompetent cells and has been implicated in the regulation of a multiplicity of functions in the immune system involved in growth and activation. However, the actions of endogenous or lymphocyte GH and its contribution to immune reactivity when compared with those of serum or exogenous GH are still unclear. In the present study, we overexpressed lymphocyte GH in EL4 lymphoma cells, which lack the GH receptor (GHR), to determine the role of endogenous GH in nitric oxide (NO) production and response to genotoxic stress. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the levels of GH increased approximately 40% in cells overexpressing GH (GHo) when compared with cells with vector alone. The results also show a substantial increase in NO production in cells overexpressing GH that could be blocked by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), an L-arginine analogue that competitively inhibits all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). No evidence was obtained to support an increase in peroxynitrite in cells overexpressing GH. Overexpression of GH increased NOS activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter activity, and iNOS protein expression, whereas endothelial nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein levels were essentially unchanged. In addition, cells overexpressing GH showed increased arginine transport ability and intracellular arginase activity when compared with control cells. GH overexpression appeared to protect cells from the toxic effects of the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. This possibility was suggested by maintenance of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential in cells overexpressing GH when compared with control cells that could be blocked by L-NMMA. Taken together, the data support the notion that lymphocyte GH, independently of the GH receptor, may play a key role in the survival of lymphocytes exposed to stressful stimuli via the production of NO.

  7. Exhaled nitric oxide and asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAsthma was first described in the medical literature of Greek antiquity. It is difficult to determine whether by referring to “asthma”, Hippocrates and his school (460-360 B.C.) meant an autonomous clinical entity or a symptom. The clinical presentation of asthma nowadays has probably

  8. Role of Polymorphisms of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Idiopathic Environmental Intolerances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara De Luca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation play a pathogenetic role in idiopathic environmental intolerances (IEI, namely, multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS, fibromyalgia (FM, and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Given the reported association of nitric oxide synthase (NOS gene polymorphisms with inflammatory disorders, we aimed to investigate the distribution of NOS2A −2.5 kb (CCTTTn as well as Ser608Leu and NOS3 −786T>C variants and their correlation with nitrite/nitrate levels, in a study cohort including 170 MCS, 108 suspected MCS (SMCS, 89 FM/CFS, and 196 healthy subjects. Patients and controls had similar distributions of NOS2A Ser608Leu and NOS3 −786T>C polymorphisms. Interestingly, the NOS3 −786TT genotype was associated with increased nitrite/nitrate levels only in IEI patients. We also found that the NOS2A −2.5 kb (CCTTT11 allele represents a genetic determinant for FM/CFS, and the (CCTTT16 allele discriminates MCS from SMCS patients. Instead, the (CCTTT8 allele reduces by three-, six-, and tenfold, respectively, the risk for MCS, SMCS, and FM/CFS. Moreover, a short number of (CCTTT repeats is associated with higher concentrations of nitrites/nitrates. Here, we first demonstrate that NOS3 −786T>C variant affects nitrite/nitrate levels in IEI patients and that screening for NOS2A −2.5 kb (CCTTTn polymorphism may be useful for differential diagnosis of various IEI.

  9. Investigation of the direct and indirect electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine in nitric acid medium on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cames, B.

    1997-01-01

    In nuclear fuel processing by the PUREX process, the purification of plutonium in nitric acid medium requires the oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV), and of hydrazinium nitrate to nitrogen. The study helped to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the oxidation of hydrazinium nitrate and the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid, a compound which can chemically oxidize hydrazinium nitrate and Pu(III). Electro-analytical studies on polycrystalline platinum showed that hydrazine is oxidized in two potential zones, which depend on the surface texture of the platinum anode. Electrolysis in separate compartments, carried out in medium-acid media (2 and 4 mo/l) in the potential zone where these processes take place, showed that, at 0.9 V/ECS, the hydrazine oxidation reactions involved are: a four-electron process (75 %) with nitrogen formation and a one-electron process (25 %) with formation of nitrogen and ammonium ion. By contrast, electrolysis carried out at 0.65 V/ECS (with reactivation of the electrode at - 0.2 V/ECS to remove the poison from the platinum) allowed the selective oxidation of hydrazine to nitrogen by the four-electron reaction. Nitric acid can only be reduced to nitrous acid in the absence of hydrazine. For medium-acid media (≤ 6 mol/l), this reaction takes place at potentials below - 0.2 V/ECS. However, the production rate of nitrous acid (partial order 0 with respect to nitric acid) is very low compared with the values obtained for strongly-acid media (6 to 10 mol/l) at the potential of - 0.1 V/ECS. Note that, in concentrated nitric medium, the selectivity of the reduction reaction is 47 to 85 % for nitrous acid, depending on the nitric acid concentration (6 to 10 mol/l) and the potential imposed (- 0.1 ≤ E ≤ 0.6 V/ECS). A kinetic study helped to determine the hydrazine oxidation rates as a function of the operating conditions. In all cases, the reaction rate is of partial order 0 with respect to hydrazine. These studies accordingly

  10. Reduction of nitric oxide by arc vaporized carbons (AVC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, S C; Chen, Y K; Green, M L.H. [The Catalysis Centre, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-04

    The reduction of nitric oxide by arc vaporized carbons (AVC) including the compound C{sub 6}0, fullerene soot and carbon nanotubes, giving dinitrogen and carbon oxides has been studied. It is found that the AVC carbons are more active towards oxidation by NO than by oxygen gas at low temperatures (300-400C). In contrast, conventional carbons such as graphite and microporous carbons are more readily oxidised by oxygen than by NO. The addition of copper salts and to a lesser extent, cobalt salts, to fullerene soot substantially promote NO reduction. The high intrinsic activity for NO reduction by AVC carbons compared to graphitic carbons is attributed to the presence of five membered carbon rings in the AVC carbons

  11. Nanomaterials-based electrochemical sensors for nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Xueping; Hu, Hui; Wang, Shengfu; Hu, Shengshui

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical sensing has been demonstrated to represent an efficient way to quantify nitric oxide (NO) in challenging physiological environments. A sensing interface based on nanomaterials opens up new opportunities and broader prospects for electrochemical NO sensors. This review (with 141 refs.) gives a general view of recent advances in the development of electrochemical sensors based on nanomaterials. It is subdivided into sections on (i) carbon derived nanomaterials (such as carbon nanotubes, graphenes, fullerenes), (ii) metal nanoparticles (including gold, platinum and other metallic nanoparticles); (iii) semiconductor metal oxide nanomaterials (including the oxides of titanium, aluminum, iron, and ruthenium); and finally (iv) nanocomposites (such as those formed from carbon nanomaterials with nanoparticles of gold, platinum, NiO or TiO 2 ). The various strategies are discussed, and the advances of using nanomaterials and the trends in NO sensor technology are outlooked in the final section. (author)

  12. Dysfunctional nitric oxide signalling increases risk of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Jeanette; Stark, Klaus; Esslinger, Ulrike B; Rumpf, Philipp Moritz; Koesling, Doris; de Wit, Cor; Kaiser, Frank J; Braunholz, Diana; Medack, Anja; Fischer, Marcus; Zimmermann, Martina E; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Graf, Elisabeth; Eck, Sebastian; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Willenborg, Christina; Bruse, Petra; Brænne, Ingrid; Nöthen, Markus M; Hofmann, Per; Braund, Peter S; Mergia, Evanthia; Reinhard, Wibke; Burgdorf, Christof; Schreiber, Stefan; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; Bertram, Lars; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Li, Shu-Chen; März, Winfried; Reilly, Muredach; Kathiresan, Sekar; McPherson, Ruth; Walter, Ulrich; Ott, Jurg; Samani, Nilesh J; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Hengstenberg, Christian; Schunkert, Heribert

    2013-12-19

    Myocardial infarction, a leading cause of death in the Western world, usually occurs when the fibrous cap overlying an atherosclerotic plaque in a coronary artery ruptures. The resulting exposure of blood to the atherosclerotic material then triggers thrombus formation, which occludes the artery. The importance of genetic predisposition to coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is best documented by the predictive value of a positive family history. Next-generation sequencing in families with several affected individuals has revolutionized mutation identification. Here we report the segregation of two private, heterozygous mutations in two functionally related genes, GUCY1A3 (p.Leu163Phefs*24) and CCT7 (p.Ser525Leu), in an extended myocardial infarction family. GUCY1A3 encodes the α1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase (α1-sGC), and CCT7 encodes CCTη, a member of the tailless complex polypeptide 1 ring complex, which, among other functions, stabilizes soluble guanylyl cyclase. After stimulation with nitric oxide, soluble guanylyl cyclase generates cGMP, which induces vasodilation and inhibits platelet activation. We demonstrate in vitro that mutations in both GUCY1A3 and CCT7 severely reduce α1-sGC as well as β1-sGC protein content, and impair soluble guanylyl cyclase activity. Moreover, platelets from digenic mutation carriers contained less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein and consequently displayed reduced nitric-oxide-induced cGMP formation. Mice deficient in α1-sGC protein displayed accelerated thrombus formation in the microcirculation after local trauma. Starting with a severely affected family, we have identified a link between impaired soluble-guanylyl-cyclase-dependent nitric oxide signalling and myocardial infarction risk, possibly through accelerated thrombus formation. Reversing this defect may provide a new therapeutic target for reducing the risk of myocardial infarction.

  13. THE ESTROGENS / CHROMIUM INTERACTION IN THE NITRIC OXIDE GENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Ewa; Piwowar, Agnieszka; Musiala, Tomasz; Dlugosz, Anna

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of estrogens with environmental toxins in free radicals generation: reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which participates in cancerogenesis is not yet recognized. Chromium(VI) is widely present in environment. One of its toxicity pathway is free radicals generation. Estrogens have the ability to scavenge free radicals, but may also act as prooxidants. Both chromium(VI) and estrogens are classified by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogens, so synergistic effect seems very dangerous. The interaction of chromium and estrogens in ROS generation are partly described but there are no reports on estrogen/chromium interaction on nitric oxide (NO) generation. The aim of the study was to examine the interaction of chromium(VI) and 17-p-estradiol (E2) on NO level in human blood as well as the role of E2 metabolites: 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2) and 16a-hydroxyestrone (16α-OHE1) in these processes. The NO level was estimated with the diagnostic kit (Nitric Oxide Colorimetric Detection Kit from Arbor Assays) in human blood in vitm. The results showed that Cr(VI) in used concentration (0.5; 1.0 and 5.0 gg/mL) decreases significantly NO level in blood, acting antagonistically to E2 and 4-OHE2. Estrogens (E2, 4-OHE2 and 16α-OHEI) do not protect against inhibiting effect of Cr(VI) on nitric oxide generation in blood because after combined exposure the decreased production of NO in blood was noted. In conclusion, presented results provide the information about the character of estrogen/Cr(VI) interaction in NO level in human blood. It is important knowledge for cardio protected effect e.g., hormone replacement therapy in environmental or occupational exposure to Cr(VI), chromium supplementation, also important for cancer risk evaluation.

  14. Arginase expression modulates nitric oxide production in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Stephanie Maia; Aoki, Juliana Ide; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Fernandes, Juliane Cristina Ribeiro; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2017-01-01

    Arginase is an enzyme that converts L-arginine to urea and L-ornithine, an essential substrate for the polyamine pathway supporting Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis replication and its survival in the mammalian host. L-arginine is also the substrate of macrophage nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) to produce nitric oxide (NO) that kills the parasite. This competition can define the fate of Leishmania infection. The transcriptomic profiling identified a family of oxidoreductases in L. (L.) amazonensis wild-type (La-WT) and L. (L.) amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg-) promastigotes and axenic amastigotes. We highlighted the identification of an oxidoreductase that could act as nitric oxide synthase-like (NOS-like), due to the following evidences: conserved domain composition, the participation of NO production during the time course of promastigotes growth and during the axenic amastigotes differentiation, regulation dependence on arginase activity, as well as reduction of NO amount through the NOS activity inhibition. NO quantification was measured by DAF-FM labeling analysis in a flow cytometry. We described an arginase-dependent NOS-like activity in L. (L.) amazonensis and its role in the parasite growth. The increased detection of NO production in the mid-stationary and late-stationary growth phases of La-WT promastigotes could suggest that this production is an important factor to metacyclogenesis triggering. On the other hand, La-arg- showed an earlier increase in NO production compared to La-WT, suggesting that NO production can be arginase-dependent. Interestingly, La-WT and La-arg- axenic amastigotes produced higher levels of NO than those observed in promastigotes. As a conclusion, our work suggested that NOS-like is expressed in Leishmania in the stationary growth phase promastigotes and amastigotes, and could be correlated to metacyclogenesis and amastigotes growth in a dependent way to the internal pool of L-arginine and arginase activity.

  15. Daily life negative mood and exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Thomas; Kullowatz, Antje; Bill, Michelle N; Rosenfield, David

    2016-07-01

    Psychosocial stress and negative affect have been linked to asthma exacerbations, but longitudinal studies demonstrating a daily life association between negative affect and airway nitric oxide are missing. The longitudinal association between negative mood fluctuations, exhaled nitric oxide, and lung function in asthma was examined. Self-assessments of the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), spirometry (forced expiratory volume in the first second, FEV1), negative mood, and daily activities were obtained from 20 patients with asthma for 2 months, resulting in 1108 assessments for the analyses (approximately 55 per patient). Concurrent and prospective associations between FeNO, FEV1, and negative mood were analyzed using mixed effects regression models for longitudinal data. Negative mood was positively associated with changes in FeNO during the same day, and to a stronger extent when prior day negative mood was included in the prediction. FeNO and negative mood were positively associated with same-day FEV1, with the latter relation being partially mediated by changes in FeNO. Associations between FeNO and FEV1 were stronger in younger patients, with earlier onset of asthma, or with lower asthma control. Findings were not changed when controlling for physical activity, medication, cold symptoms, air pollution, and hours spent outside. Daily life changes of negative mood in asthma are positively associated with FeNO changes and FeNO increases are associated with a mild bronchodilation. These findings indicate that psychological influences need to be considered when using FeNO as indicator of airway inflammation and guide for treatment decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  17. Nitric Oxide Manipulation: A Therapeutic Target for Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Risk factor modification and endovascular and surgical revascularisation are the main treatment options at present. However, a significant number of patients still require major amputation. There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO and its endogenous inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA play significant roles in the pathophysiology of PAD. This paper reviews experimental work implicating the ADMA-DDAH-NO pathway in PAD, focussing on both the vascular dysfunction and effects within the ischaemic muscle, and examines the potential of manipulating this pathway as a novel adjunct therapy in PAD.

  18. Nitric Oxide-Sensitive Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Rubella Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Raimondi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP=40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  19. Nitric oxide synthase expression and enzymatic activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, H; Andersen, B; Wanscher, B

    2004-01-01

    We used post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance to obtain paired biopsies from the brains of four patients with clinical definite multiple sclerosis (MS). Samples were analyzed for the immunoreactivity (IR) of the three nitric oxide (NO) synthase isoforms [inducible, neuronal......NOS expressing cells in active lesions. NOS IR expressing cells were widely distributed in plaques, in white and gray matter that appeared normal macroscopically, and on MR. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) was highly expressed in intraparenchymal vascular endothelial cells of MS patients. A control group matched for age...

  20. Nitric Oxide Generating Polymeric Coatings for Subcutaneous Glucose Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    primary polymer which was then aminated (2) for attachment of (Boc)3-cyclen-N-acetic acid (1). After the conjugation via EDC coupling chemistry, the Boc...dipping procedure is repeated 5 times. This is the needle-type NO sensor currently used (e.g., Figure 4 device but w/o the SePEI and alginic acid ...Cha, M. E. Meyerhoff, " Polymethacrylates with Covalently Linked Cu(II)-Cyclen Complex for the In-Situ Generation of Nitric Oxide from Nitrosothiols in

  1. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  2. Intestinal nitric oxide synthase activity changes during experimental colon obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palásthy, Zsolt; Kaszaki, József; Lázár, György; Nagy, Sándor; Boros, Mihály

    2006-08-01

    The experiments in this study were designed to follow the time course of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in the large bowel during acute mechanical ileus. Occlusion of the mid-transverse colon was maintained for 420 min in anesthetized dogs. Strain-gauge transducers were used to analyze motility changes on the hepatic and lienal flexures, respectively. Constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) activities were determined in tissue biopsies, and plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) level was measured in the portal blood. Following completion of the baseline studies, the animals were treated with either 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, selective neuronal NOS inhibitor), or N-nitro-L-arginine (NNA, non-selective NOS inhibitor). In the sham-operated group the cNOS activities differed significantly in the oral and aboral tissue samples (oral: 102.9; versus aboral: 62.1 fmol/mg protein/min). The obstruction elicited a significant increase in portal NOx and elevated tissue inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity. NNA treatment decreased the motility index in both intestinal segments for 60 min, but 120 min later the motility index was significantly elevated (2.5-fold increase in the oral part, and 1.8-fold enhancement in the aboral segment, respectively). Treatment with 7-NI decreased the cNOS activity in the oral and aboral parts by approximately 40% and 70%, respectively, and suppressed the motility increase in the aboral colon segment. The motility of the colon was either significantly increased or decreased, depending on the type and selectivity of the NOS inhibitor compounds applied. NO of neuronal origin is a transmitter that stimulates peristaltic activity; but an increased iNOS/nNOS ratio significantly moderates the obstruction-induced motility increase.

  3. Arsenic triggers the nitric oxide (NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) metabolism in Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, Marina; Airaki, Morad; Palma, José M.; Chaki, Mounira; Barroso, Juan B.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental contamination by arsenic constitutes a problem in many countries, and its accumulation in food crops may pose health complications for humans. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are involved at various levels in the mechanism of responding to environmental stress in higher plants. Using Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to different arsenate concentrations, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to determine the status of ROS and RNS metabolisms. Arsenate provoked a significant reduction in growth parameters and an increase in lipid oxidation. These changes were accompanied by an alteration in antioxidative enzymes and the nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, with a significant increase in NO content, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity and protein tyrosine nitration as well as a concomitant reduction in glutathione and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) content. Our results indicate that 500 μM arsenate (AsV) causes nitro-oxidative stress in Arabidopsis, being the glutathione reductase and the GSNOR activities clearly affected. - Highlights: ► In Arabidopsis, arsenate provokes damages in the membrane integrity of root cells. ► As induces an oxidative stress according to an increase in lipid oxidation. ► NO content and protein tyrosine nitration increases under arsenate stress. ► Arsenate provokes a reduction of GSH, GSSG and GSNO content. ► Arsenate induces a nitro-oxidative stress in Arabidopsis. - Arsenic stress affects nitric oxide (NO) and glutathione (GSH) metabolism which provokes a nitro-oxidative stress.

  4. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  5. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress is associated with severity of diabetic retinopathy and retinal structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shashi; Saxena, Sandeep; Srivastav, Khushboo; Shukla, Rajendra K; Mishra, Nibha; Meyer, Carsten H; Kruzliak, Peter; Khanna, Vinay K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine plasma nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in diabetic retinopathy and its association with severity of disease. Prospective observational study. A total of 60 consecutive cases and 20 healthy controls were included. Severity of retinopathy was graded according to early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) classification. Photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid band (ISel) disruption and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) alteration were graded using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Data were statistically analyzed. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, NO assay and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured using standard protocol. Increased severity of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with increase in plasma levels of LPO (P diabetic retinopathy. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that increased plasma LPO, NO and decreased GSH levels are associated with in vivo structural changes in inner segment ellipsoid and RPE. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Ti-6Al-4V Metal Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Nina A.; Meng, Wilson S.; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy materials are commonly used in joint replacements, due to the high strength of the materials. Pathogenic microorganisms can easily adhere to the surface of the metal implant, leading to an increased potential for implant failure. The surface of a titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) metal oxide implant material was functionalized to deliver an small antibacterial molecule, nitric oxide. S-nitroso-penicillamine, a S-nitrosothiol nitric oxide donor, was covalently immobilized on the metal oxide surface using self-assembled monolayers. Infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the attachment of the S-nitrosothiol donor to the Ti-Al-4V surface. Attachment of S-nitroso-penicillamine resulted in a nitric oxide (NO) release of 89.6 ± 4.8 nmol/cm2 under physiological conditions. This low concentration of nitric oxide reduced Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis growth by 41.5 ± 1.2% and 25.3 ± 0.6%, respectively. Combining the S-nitrosothiol releasing Ti-6Al-4V with tetracycline, a commonly-prescribed antibiotic, increased the effectiveness of the antibiotic by 35.4 ± 1.3%, which allows for lower doses of antibiotics to be used. A synergistic effect of ampicillin with S-nitroso-penicillamine-modified Ti-6Al-4V against S. epidermidis was not observed. The functionalized Ti-6Al-4V surface was not cytotoxic to mouse fibroblasts. PMID:28635681

  7. Nitric oxide is a mediator of methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity. In vitro evidence from primary cultures of mesencephalic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, P; Cerruti, C; Ali, S; Cadet, J L

    1996-10-31

    METH is a monoaminergic toxic that destroys dopamine terminals in vivo. Oxidative mechanisms associated with DA metabolism are thought to play an important role in its toxic effects. These ideas were supported by the demonstration that CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) transgenic mice were protected against the toxic effects of the drug. In the present study, we sought to determine if nitric oxide (NO) production was also involved in METH-induced neurotoxicity using primary cultures obtained from fetal rat mesencephalon. METH caused dose- and time-dependent cell death in vitro. Blockade of nitric oxide (NO) formation with several nitric oxide (NO) synthase blockers attenuated METH-mediated toxicity. Moreover, inhibition of ADP-ribosylation with nicotinamide and benzamide also provided protection against the toxicity of the drug. These results, together with our previous results in transgenic mice, support a role for free radicals in METH-induced toxic effects.

  8. Mid-Ir Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer for Biological Trace Nitric Oxide Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Vincent; Ragab, Ahemd; Stsiapura, Vitali; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2011-06-01

    S-nitrosothiols have received much attention in biochemistry and medicine as donors of nitrosonium ion (NO^+) and nitric oxide (NO) - physiologically active molecules involved in vasodilation and signal transduction. Determination of S-nitrosothiols content in cells and tissues is of great importance for fundamental research and medical applications. We will report on our ongoing development of a instrument to measure trace levels of nitric oxide gas (NO), released from S-nitrosothiols after exposure to UV light (340 nm) or reaction with L-Cysteine+CuCl mixture. The instrument uses the method of cavity ring-down spectroscopy, probing rotationally resolved lines in the vibrational fundamental transition near 5.2 μm. The laser source is a continuous-wave, room temperature external cavity quantum cascade laser. An acousto-optic modulator is used to abruptly turn off the optical power incident on the cavity when the laser and cavity pass through resonance.

  9. [Techniques and complementary techniques. Complementary treatments: nitric oxide, prone positioning and surfactant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos Sánchez, I; Vázquez Martínez, J L; Otheo de Tejada, E; Ros, P

    2003-11-01

    The management of hypoxic respiratory failure is based on oxygen delivery and ventilatory support with lung-protective ventilation strategies. Better understanding of acute lung injury have led to new therapeutic approaches that can modify the outcome of these patients. These adjunctive oxygenation strategies include inhaled nitric oxide and surfactant delivery, and the use of prone positioning. Nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator that when inhaled, improves oxygenation in clinical situations such as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). When applied early in ARDS, prone positioning improves distribution of ventilation and reduces the intrapulmonary shunt. The surfactant has dramatically decreased mortality caused by hyaline membrane disease in premature newborns, although the results have been less successful in ARDS. Greater experience is required to determine whether the combination of these treatments will improve the prognosis of these patients.

  10. Nitric Oxide - Its Importance in Swallowing, Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is a neurotransmitter found in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS is localized in the central nervous system, including the nucleus of the solitary tract, nucleus ambiguus and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. These are regions that are implicated in the central control of swallowing and esophageal motility. In rats and rabbits, NOS has been shown to be present in the nucleus subcentralis of the nucleus of the solitary tract, and is thought to be responsible for the central programming of the striated muscle component of esophageal peristalsis. Beyak and co-workers from the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario provided evidence that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway is implicated in the central control of swallowing and esophageal motility. They studied oropharyngeal swallowing as well as esophageal peristalsis, and determined the functional role of brain stem nitric oxide by examining the effects of blockade of central nervous system NOS on swallowing, and on primary and secondary peristalsis. Administering NOS inhibitors intravenously or intracerebroventricularly into the fourth ventricle produced a number of oropharyngeal swallows and induced primary peristalsis in the smooth muscle portion of the esophageal body. NOS reduced the number of oropharyngeal swallows and the incidence of primary peristalsis in both smooth and striated muscle, and reduced the amplitude of peristalsis and smooth muscle contraction. This suggests that nitric oxide is a functional neurotransmitter in the central pattern generator responsible for swallowing and the central control of esophageal peristalsis. Peripherally administered NOS inhibitor can access structures within the blood-brain barrier to affect neuronal activity and physiological function. The central pattern generated for swallowing and esophageal peristalsis is suggested to be a serial network of linked neurons within the nucleus of the solitary

  11. Role of Nitric Oxide in the Regulation of Renin and Vasopressin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    Research during recent years has established nitric oxide as a unique signaling molecule that plays important roles in the regulation of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and other systems. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the control of the secretion of hormones by the pancreas, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, and evidence is accumulating that it contributes to the regulation of the secretion of renin and vasopressin, hormones that play key roles in the control of sodium and water balance. Several lines of evidence have implicated nitric oxide in the control of renin secretion. The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in vascular and tubular elements of the kidney, particularly in cells of the macula densa, a structure that plays an important role in the control of renin secretion. Guanylyl cyclase, a major target for nitric oxide, is also present in the kidney. Drugs that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis generally suppress renin release in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a stimulatory role for the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in the control of renin secretion. Under some conditions, however, blockade of nitric oxide synthesis increases renin secretion. Recent studies indicate that nitric oxide not only contributes to the regulation of basal renin secretion, but also participates in the renin secretory responses to activation of the renal baroreceptor, macula densa, and beta adrenoceptor mechanisms that regulate renin secretion. Histochemical and immunocytochemical studies have revealed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary gland. Colocalization of nitric oxide synthase and vasopressin has been demonstrated in some hypothalamic neurons. Nitric oxide synthase activity in the hypothalamus and pituitary is increased by maneuvers known to stimulate vasopressin secretion, including salt loading and dehydration, Administration of L-arginine and nitric

  12. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin from Cimex lectularius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christmann, R.; Auerbach, H., E-mail: auerbach@physik.uni-kl.de [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany); Berry, R. E.; Walker, F. A. [The University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Schünemann, V. [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The nitrophorin from the bedbug Cimex lectularius (cNP) is a nitric oxide (NO) carrying protein. Like the nitrophorins (rNPs) from the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, cNP forms a stable heme Fe(III)-NO complex, where the NO can be stored reversibly for a long period of time. In both cases, the NPs are found in the salivary glands of blood-sucking bugs. The insects use the nitrophorins to transport the NO to the victim’s tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. However, the structure of cNP is significantly different to those of the rNPs from Rhodnius prolixus. Furthermore, the cNP can bind a second NO molecule to the proximal heme cysteine when present at higher concentrations. High field Mössbauer spectroscopy on {sup 57}Fe enriched cNP complexed with NO shows reduction of the heme iron and formation of a ferrous nitric oxide (Fe(II)-NO) complex. Density functional theory calculations reproduce the experimental Mössbauer parameters and confirm this observation.

  13. Exhaled nitric oxide in diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abba Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of biomarkers in exhaled breath constituents has recently become of great interest in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of many respiratory conditions. Of particular interest is the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO in breath. Its measurement is noninvasive, easy and reproducible. The technique has recently been standardized by both American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. The availability of cheap, portable and reliable equipment has made the assay possible in clinics by general physicians and, in the near future, at home by patients. The concentration of exhaled nitric oxide is markedly elevated in bronchial asthma and is positively related to the degree of esinophilic inflammation. Its measurement can be used in the diagnosis of bronchial asthma and titration of dose of steroids as well as to identify steroid responsive patients in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In primary ciliary dyskinesia, nasal NO is diagnostically low and of considerable value in diagnosis. Among lung transplant recipients, FENO can be of great value in the early detection of infection, bronchioloitis obliterans syndrome and rejection. This review discusses the biology, factors affecting measurement, and clinical application of FENO in the diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen upregulates cochlear constitutive nitric oxide synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Ming-Ching

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a known adjuvant for treating ischemia-related inner ear diseases. Controversies still exist in the role of HBOT in cochlear diseases. Few studies to date have investigated the cellular changes that occur in inner ears after HBOT. Nitric oxide, which is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, is an important signaling molecule in cochlear physiology and pathology. Here we investigated the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on eardrum morphology, cochlear function and expression of NOS isoforms in cochlear substructures after repetitive HBOT in guinea pigs. Results Minor changes in the eardrum were observed after repetitive HBOT, which did not result in a significant hearing threshold shift by tone burst auditory brainstem responses. A differential effect of HBOT on the expression of NOS isoforms was identified. Upregulation of constitutive NOS (nNOS and eNOS was found in the substructures of the cochlea after HBOT, but inducible NOS was not found in normal or HBOT animals, as shown by immunohistochemistry. There was no obvious DNA fragmentation present in this HBOT animal model. Conclusions The present evidence indicates that the customary HBOT protocol may increase constitutive NOS expression but such upregulation did not cause cell death in the treated cochlea. The cochlear morphology and auditory function are consequently not changed through the protocol.

  15. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Posttranslational Modifications: Impacts at the Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an important gasotransmitter molecule that is involved in numerous physiological processes throughout the nervous system. In addition to its involvement in physiological plasticity processes (long-term potentiation, LTP; long-term depression, LTD which can include NMDAR-mediated calcium-dependent activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, new insights into physiological and pathological consequences of nitrergic signalling have recently emerged. In addition to the canonical cGMP-mediated signalling, NO is also implicated in numerous pathways involving posttranslational modifications. In this review we discuss the multiple effects of S-nitrosylation and 3-nitrotyrosination on proteins with potential modulation of function but limit the analyses to signalling involved in synaptic transmission and vesicular release. Here, crucial proteins which mediate synaptic transmission can undergo posttranslational modifications with either pre- or postsynaptic origin. During normal brain function, both pathways serve as important cellular signalling cascades that modulate a diverse array of physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity, transcriptional activity, and neuronal survival. In contrast, evidence suggests that aging and disease can induce nitrosative stress via excessive NO production. Consequently, uncontrolled S-nitrosylation/3-nitrotyrosination can occur and represent pathological features that contribute to the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s.

  16. How to protect liver graft with nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassen Ben Abdennebi; Mohamed Amine Zaoualí; Izabel Alfany-Fernandez; Donia Tabka; Joan Roselló-Catafau

    2011-01-01

    Organ preservation and ischemia reperfusion injury associated with liver transplantation play an important role in the induction of graft injury. One of the earliest events associated with the reperfusion injury is endothelial cell dysfunction. It is generally accepted that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (e-NOS) is cell-protective by mediating vasodilatation, whereas inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates liver graft injury after transplantation. We conducted a critical review of the literature evaluating the potential applications of regulating and promoting e-NOS activity in liver preservation and transplantation, showing the most current evidence to support the concept that enhanced bioavailability of NO derived from e-NOS is detrimental to ameliorate graft liver preservation, as well as preventing subsequent graft reperfusion injury. This review deals mainly with the beneficial effects of promoting "endogenous" pathways for NO generation, via e-NOS inducer drugs in cold preservation solution, surgical strategies such as ischemic preconditioning, and alternative "exogenous" pathways that focus on the enrichment of cold storage liquid with NO donors. Finally, we also provide a basic bench-to-bed side summary of the liver physiology and cell signalling mechanisms that account for explaining the e-NOS protective effects in liver preservation and transplantation.

  17. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg Mohammed F S; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A; Habib, Syed S; Abba, Abdullah A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naive asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 22.00 + -6.69; P =0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 84.78+ - 39.32 P 0.0285). The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. (author)

  18. Requirement of argininosuccinate lyase for systemic nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Premkumar, Muralidhar H; Campeau, Philippe M; Chen, Yuqing; Garg, Harsha K; Li, Li; Mian, Asad; Bertin, Terry K; Black, Jennifer O; Zeng, Heng; Tang, Yaoping; Reddy, Anilkumar K; Summar, Marshall; O'Brien, William E; Harrison, David G; Mitch, William E; Marini, Juan C; Aschner, Judy L; Bryan, Nathan S; Lee, Brendan

    2011-11-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial in diverse physiological and pathological processes. We show that a hypomorphic mouse model of argininosuccinate lyase (encoded by Asl) deficiency has a distinct phenotype of multiorgan dysfunction and NO deficiency. Loss of Asl in both humans and mice leads to reduced NO synthesis, owing to both decreased endogenous arginine synthesis and an impaired ability to use extracellular arginine for NO production. Administration of nitrite, which can be converted into NO in vivo, rescued the manifestations of NO deficiency in hypomorphic Asl mice, and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-independent NO donor restored NO-dependent vascular reactivity in humans with ASL deficiency. Mechanistic studies showed that ASL has a structural function in addition to its catalytic activity, by which it contributes to the formation of a multiprotein complex required for NO production. Our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for ASL in NOS function and NO homeostasis. Hence, ASL may serve as a target for manipulating NO production in experimental models, as well as for the treatment of NO-related diseases.

  19. Changes in oxidative potential of soil and fly ash after reaction with gaseous nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ying; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Shafer, Martin M.; Rudich, Yinon; Pardo, Michal; Katra, Itzhak; Katoshevski, David; Schauer, James J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of simulated atmospheric aging on the oxidative potential of inorganic aerosols comprised primarily of crustal materials. Four soil samples and one coal fly ash sample were artificially aged in the laboratory through exposure to the vapor from 15.8 M nitric acid solution for 24 h at room temperature. Native and acid-aged samples were analyzed with a cellular macrophage and acellular dithionthreitol assays to determine oxidative potential. Additionally, the samples were analyzed to determine the concentration of 50 elements, both total and the water-soluble fraction of these elements by Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICMS) and crystalline mineral composition using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results show that reactions with gaseous nitric acid increase the water-soluble fraction of many elements, including calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and lead. The mineral composition analysis documented that calcium-rich minerals present in the soils (e.g., calcite) are converted into different chemical forms, such as calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2). The nitric acid aging process, which can occur in the atmosphere, leads to a 200-600% increase in oxidative potential, as measured by cellular and acellular assays. This laboratory study demonstrates that the toxic effects of aged versus freshly emitted atmospheric dust may be quite different. In addition, the results suggest that mineralogical analysis of atmospheric dust may be useful in understanding its degree of aging.

  20. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Induction in the Antitumorigenic and Neurotoxic Effects of 2-Methoxyestradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Gorska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 2-Methoxyestradiol, one of the natural 17β-estradiol derivatives, is a novel, potent anticancer agent currently being evaluated in advanced phases of clinical trials. The main goal of the study was to investigate the anticancer activity of 2-methoxy-estradiol towards osteosarcoma cells and its possible neurodegenerative effects. We used an experimental model of neurotoxicity and anticancer activity of the physiological agent, 2-methoxyestradiol. Thus, we used highly metastatic osteosarcoma 143B and mouse immortalized hippocampal HT22 cell lines. The cells were treated with pharmacological (1 μM, 10 μM concentrations of 2-methoxyestradiol. Experimental: Neuronal nitric oxide synthase and 3-nitrotyrosine protein levels were determined by western blotting. Cell viability and induction of cell death were measured by MTT and PI/Annexin V staining and a DNA fragmentation ELISA kit, respectively. Intracellular levels of nitric oxide were determined by flow cytometry. Results: Here we demonstrated that the signaling pathways of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer may overlap. We presented evidence that 2-methoxyestradiol, in contrast to 17β-estradiol, specifically affects neuronal nitric oxide synthase and augments 3-nitrotyrosine level leading to osteosarcoma and immortalized hippocampal cell death. Conclusions: We report the dual facets of 2-methoxyestradiol, that causes cancer cell death, but on the other hand may play a key role as a neurotoxin.

  1. Biological indication of nitric oxides; Zum bioindikativen Nachweis von Stickoxiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotti, E.; Kaemmerer, D.; Mangold, U.; Tempes, D.; Arndt, U.

    1992-12-31

    The authors demonstrate the need for a nitrogen oxide bio-indicator and suggest to use nitrate reductase activity in exposed plant leaves to be established in vivo as the action criterium. Studies on the suitability of different plants and cultivation conditions are presented. Their results are taken to show that large-leaved plants like sunflower or tomato grown with ammonia as the only nitrogen source are best suited for bio-indication of nitric oxides. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Beitrag zeigt die Notwendigkeit eines Bioindikators fuer Stickoxide auf und schlaegt als Wirkungskriterium die Nitratreduktase-Aktivitaet in den Blaettern exponierter Pflanzen, ermittelt mit der in-vivo-Methode, vor. Untersuchungen zur Eignung verschiedener Pflanzen und Anzuchtbedingungen werden vorgestellt. Aus ihnen ist abzuleiten, dass mit Ammonium als einziger Stickstoffquelle angezogene grossblaettrige Kulturpflanzen, etwa Sonnenblume oder Tomate, am ehesten fuer den bioindikativen Nachweis von Stickoxiden geeignet sind. (orig.)

  2. Localization of Nitric Oxide in Wheat Roots by DAF Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wany, Aakanksha; Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a free radical signal molecule. Various methods are available for measurement of NO. Out of all methods, fluorescent probes to localize NO is very widely used method. Diaminofluorescein in diacetate form (DAF-2DA) is most widely probe for NO measurement. This method is based on application of 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) which is actively diffused into cells, once taken up by cells cytoplasmic esterases cleave the acetate groups to generate 4,5-diaminofluorescein; DAF-2. The generated DAF-2 can readily react with N2O3, which is an oxidation product of NO to generate the highly fluorescent DAF-2T (triazolofluorescein). There are various advantages and disadvantages associated with this method, but to its advantage in diffusion closely to NO producing sites, it is widely used for localization studies. Here, we describe method to make sections of the roots and localization of NO in roots subjected to hypoxic stress.

  3. Estimation of nitric oxide as an inflammatory marker in periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menaka K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is not only important in host defense and homeostasis but it is also regarded as harmful and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The presence of NO in periodontal disease may reflect the participation of an additional mediator of bone resorption responsible for disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess the level of NO in serum in chronic periodontitis, and correlate these levels with the severity of periodontal disease. Sixty subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups. NO levels were assayed by measuring the accumulation of stable oxidative metabolite, nitrite with Griess reaction. Results showed subjects with periodontitis had significantly high nitrite in serum than healthy subjects. NO production is increased in periodontal disease, this will enable us to understand its role in disease progression and selective inhibition of NO may be of therapeutic utility in limiting the progression of periodontitis.

  4. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in endotoxemic rat hepatocytes is dependent on the cellular glutathione status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, TA; van Goor, H; Tuyt, L; de Jager-Krikken, A; Leuvenink, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter contains nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) binding sites. NF-kappa B activation is determined, in part, by the intracellular redox status, The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the cellular glutathione status in relation to

  5. Lack of endothelial nitric oxide synthase aggravates murine accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, P; van Goor, H; Itoh-Lindstrom, Y; Maeda, N; Falk, RJ; Assmann, KJM; Kallenberg, CGM; Jennette, JC

    Nitric oxide (NO) radicals generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. In addition, NO radicals derived from eNOS inhibit platelet aggregation and leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium and, thus, may have anti-inflammatory effects. To study

  6. Nitric-oxide supplementation for treatment of long-term complications in argininosuccinic aciduria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both urea...

  7. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Romano

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  8. Role of nitric oxide in glucose-, fructose and galactose-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have shown that the infusion of glucose, fructose and galactose resulted in significant increases in intestinal glucose uptake (IGU) and the role of nitric oxide in these responses was not known. The present study was designed to investigate the role of nitric oxide in the observed increases in IGU.

  9. Modulation of cholinergic airway reactivity and nitric oxide production by endogenous arginase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Hamer, M.A M; Pethe, S; Vadon-Le Goff, S; Boucher, J.-L; Zaagsma, Hans

    1 Cholinergic airway constriction is functionally antagonized by agonist-induced constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO). Since cNOS and arginase, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, use L-arginine as a common substrate, competition between both enzymes

  10. Role of nitric oxide in methamphetamine neurotoxicity: protection by 7-nitroindazole, an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monte, D A; Royland, J E; Jakowec, M W; Langston, J W

    1996-12-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO.) in the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH) was evaluated using 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a potent inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Treatment of mice with 7-NI (50 mg/kg) almost completely counteracted the loss of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity observed 5 days after four injections of 10 or 7.5 mg/kg METH. With the higher dose of METH, this protection at 5 days occurred despite the fact that combined administration of METH and 7-NI significantly increased lethality and exacerbated METH-induced dopamine release (as indicated by a greater dopamine depletion at 90 min and 1 day). Combined treatment with 4 x 10 mg/kg METH and 7-NI also slightly increased the body temperature of mice as compared with METH alone. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of 7-NI are independent from lethality, are not likely to be related to a reduction of METH-induced dopamine release, and are not due to a decrease in body temperature. These results indicate that NO. formation is an important step leading to METH neurotoxicity, and suggest that the cytotoxic properties of NO. may be directly involved in dopaminergic terminal damage.

  11. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Fu-Tian [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Guang-Wei, E-mail: gwyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Wang, Yin, E-mail: yinwang@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Xing, Zhen-Jiao [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Loading manganese oxides on activated carbon effectively promotes NO oxidation. • NO adsorption-desorption on activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation. • A high Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio contributes to NO oxidation by promoting lattice O transfer. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnO{sub x})-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnO{sub x} and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnO{sub x} (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O{sub 2}, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h{sup −1}. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O{sub 2} concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnO{sub x} loading is assumed to be related to Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnO{sub x} lattice O transfer is proposed.

  12. The role of nitric oxide radicals in removal of hyper-radiosensitivity by priming irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edin, Nina Jeppesen; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Pettersen, Erik Olai; Vollan, Hilde Synnove; Reger, Katharina; Görlach, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a mechanism in which low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is permanently removed, induced by low-dose-rate (LDR) (0.2 - 0.3 Gy/h for 1 h) but not by high-dose-rate priming (0.3 Gy at 40 Gy/h) was investigated. One HRS-negative cell line (NHIK 3025) and two HRS-positive cell lines (T-47D, T98G) were used. The effects of different pretreatments on HRS were investigated using the colony assay. Cell-based ELISA was used to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) levels, and microarray analysis to compare gene expression in primed and unprimed cells. The data show how permanent removal of HRS, previously found to be induced by LDR priming irradiation, can also be induced by addition of nitric oxide (NO)-donor DEANO combined with either high-dose-rate priming or exposure to prolonged cycling hypoxia followed by reoxygenation, a treatment not involving radiation. The removal of HRS appears not to involve DNA damage induced during priming irradiation as it was also induced by LDR irradiation of cell-conditioned medium without cells present. The permanent removal of HRS in LDR-primed cells was reversed by treatment with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor 1400W. Furthermore, 1400W could also induce HRS in an HRS-negative cell line. The data suggest that LDR irradiation for 1 h, but not 15 min, activates iNOS, and also that sustained iNOS activation is necessary for the permanent removal of HRS by LDR priming. The data indicate that nitric oxide production is involved in the regulatory processes determining cellular responses to low-dose-rate irradiation. (author)

  13. Tolerance and withdrawal to anticonvulsant action of clonazepam: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Bhargava, V K; Pandhi, P

    2000-05-01

    The use of clonazepam in the long-term treatment of epilepsy is greatly inhibited by its capacity to induce tolerance and dependence. A means of preventing or minimizing the tolerance and dependence inducing properties is required. Here the role of nitric oxide in preventing the development of tolerance and withdrawal hyperexcitability was studied. In Wistar rats, clonazepam at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg i.p. twice daily produced tolerance to its anticonvulsant action in 28 days. After sudden cessation of therapy it produced hyperexcitability. Tolerance was shown by a decrease in seizure threshold to near control value while withdrawal hyperexcitability was evidenced by a significant decrease in seizure threshold below the control value. L-Arginine (a donor of nitric oxide) and N omega-nitro-L-arginine (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) were given in doses of 150 mg/kg and 8 mg/kg, respectively on day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 with clonazepam. Withdrawal hyperexcitability was seen on day 1, 2 and 4 after cessation of drug therapy. Electroshock was used as a model of epilepsy and seizure thresholds were determined by an up and down method of Kimball et al. L-Arginine was found to inhibit the development tolerance as well as withdrawal hyperexcitability when administered with clonazepam while N omega-L-arginine did not prevent either the development of tolerance or withdrawal hyperexcitability in the electroshock model. In the PTZ model, however, L-arginine had no effect on the anticonvulsant action and withdrawal hyperexcitability while inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis prevented withdrawal hyperexcitability in PTZ-induced seizures.

  14. Fe-Chlorophyllin Promotes the Growth of Wheat Roots Associated with Nitric Oxide Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available : Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from 0.01 to 10 mg/L. At the relatively lower Fe-chlorophyllin concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the activity of IAA oxidase displayed a remarkable decrease, being 40.1% lower than the control. Meanwhile, Fe-chlorophyllin treatment could increase the activities of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD, as determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that Fe-chlorophyllin contributes to the growth of wheat root associated with nitric oxide generation.

  15. Estriol-induced fibrinolysis due to the activation of plasminogen to plasmin by nitric oxide synthesis in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Pradipta; Maiti, Smarajit; Kahn, Nighat N; Sinha, Asru K

    2015-04-01

    Estriol, an oestrogen, at 0.6 nmol/l was reported to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation through nitric oxide synthesis. As nitric oxide has been reported to cause fibrinolysis due to the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, the role of estriol as a fibrinolytic agent was investigated. Also, the mechanism of estriol-induced nitric oxide synthesis in anucleated platelets was investigated. The estriol-induced lysis of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) clot was determined by photography of the clot lysis and by the assay of fibrin degradation products in the lysate and was obtained by SDS-PAGE. Nitric oxide was determined by methemoglobin method. The platelet membrane protein was isolated from the platelets by using Triton X-100 (0.05% v/v). The binding of estriol to the protein was determined by Scatchard plot by using an ELISA for estriol. Estriol at 0.6 nmol/l was found to lyse the clotted PRP due to fibrinolysis that produced fibrin degradation products in the lysate. The amino acid analysis of the platelet membrane protein, which resembles with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, was activated nearly 10-fold over the control in the presence of estriol and was identified to be a human serum albumin precursor (Mr. 69 kDa) that binds to estriol with Kd1 of 6.0 × 10 mol/l and 39 ± 2 molecules of estriol bound the NOS molecule. The estriol-induced nitric oxide is capable of inducing fibrinolysis of the clotted PRP. The binding of estriol to platelet membrane NOS activated the enzyme in the absence of DNA in the platelet.

  16. Protective effect of nitric oxide against arsenic-induced oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of NO on alleviating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in tall fescue leaves were investigated. Arsenic (25 M) treatment induced significantly accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and led to serious lipid peroxidation in tall fescue leaves and the application of 100 M SNP before arsenic stress resulted ...

  17. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. Bacterial nitric oxide (NO) signaling via heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) proteins regulates biofilm formation, playing an important role in protecting bacteria from oxidative stress and other environmental stresses. Biofilms are also an important part of symbiosis, allowing the organism to remain in a

  18. Corn silk induces nitric oxide synthase in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung A; Choi, Sang Kyu; Choi, Hye Seon

    2004-12-31

    Corn silk has been purified as an anticoagulant previously and the active component is a polysaccharide with a molecular mass of 135 kDa. It activates murine macrophages to induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and generate substantial amounts of NO in time and dose-dependent manners. It was detectable first at 15 h after stimulation by corn silk, peaked at 24 h, and undetectable by 48 h. Induction of NOS is inhibited by pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and genistein, an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and tyrosine kinase, respectively, indicating that iNOS stimulated by corn silk is associated with tyrosine kinase and NF-kappaB signaling pathways. IkappaB-alpha degradation was detectible at 10 min, and the level was restored at 120 min after treatment of corn silk. Corn silk induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB by phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha.

  19. Ethylene, nitric oxide and haemoglobins in plant tolerance to flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Gupta, Kapuganti J; Chakraborty, U

    2015-01-01

    -tolerant species Rumex palustris and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been extensively exploited to reveal some key molecular events. Our groups have recently demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) triggers the biosynthesis of ethylene during stress and that NO plays key roles in PCD and the hyponastic......As much as 12% of the world's soils may suffer excess water so that flooding is a major limiting factor on crop production in many areas. Plants attempt to deal with submergence by forming root aerenchyma to facilitate oxygen diffusion from the shoot to the root, initiating a hyponastic response....... This chapter will detail our understanding of the roles of ethylene, NO and haemoglobin in flooding stress....

  20. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration in patients after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadziakiewicz, P; Knapik, P; Zakliczyński, M; Zembala, M; Urbańska, E; Pacholewicz, J

    2007-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in exhaled air in humans and its level may decrease in heart diseases. In the present study we prospectively investigated how heart transplantation treated with oral immunosuppresive drugs based on ciclosporine A influences the exhaled NO concentration (exNO). The study was performed in 17 patients after heart transplantation in various time after procedure and 15 nonsmoking healthy volunteers as a control group. Patients after heart transplantation were free of clinical signs of rejection. End-tidal concentration of exNO was measured by the use of a chemiluminescence method. We found no statistically significant differences in the exNO level between patients after heart transplantation and healthy controls (6.81+/-2.70 part per billion (ppb) in the transplant group vs. 6.01+/-3.43 ppb in the control group). We conclude that heart transplantation and immunosuppresive therapy do not influence the exhaled NO concentration.

  1. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    -called delayed headache that fulfils criteria for migraine without aura in migraine sufferers. Blockade of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) by L-nitromonomethylarginine effectively treats attacks of migraine without aura. Similar results have been obtained for chronic the tension-type headache and cluster headache....... Inhibition of the breakdown of cyclic guanylate phosphate (cGMP) also provokes migraine in sufferers, indicating that cGMP is the effector of NO-induced migraine. Similar evidence suggests an important role of NO in the tension-type headache and cluster headache. These very strong data from human...... experimentation make it highly likely that antagonizing NO effects will be effective in the treatment of primary headaches. Nonselective NOS inhibitors are likely to have side effects whereas selective compounds are now in early clinical trials. Antagonizing the rate limiting cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin seems...

  2. Curcumin overcomes the inhibitory effect of nitric oxide on Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marion Man-Ying; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Fong, Dunne

    2005-04-01

    Upon Leishmania infection, macrophages are activated to produce nitrogen and oxygen radicals simultaneously. It is well established that the infected host cells rely on nitric oxide (NO) as the major weapon against the intracellular parasite. In India where leishmaniasis is endemic, the spice turmeric is used prolifically in food and for insect bites. Curcumin, the active principle of turmeric, is a scavenger of NO. This report shows that curcumin protects promastigotes and amastigotes of the visceral species, Leishmania donovani, and promastigotes of the cutaneous species, L. major, against the actions of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and DETANONOate, which release NO, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), which releases NO and superoxide, and peroxynitrite, which is formed from the reaction of NO with superoxide. Thus, curcumin, as an antioxidant, is capable of blocking the action of both NO and NO congeners on the Leishmania parasite.

  3. The role of nitric oxide in the object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos

    2015-05-15

    The novel object recognition task (NORT) assesses recognition memory in animals. It is a non-rewarded paradigm that it is based on spontaneous exploratory behavior in rodents. This procedure is widely used for testing the effects of compounds on recognition memory. Recognition memory is a type of memory severely compromised in schizophrenic and Alzheimer's disease patients. Nitric oxide (NO) is sought to be an intra- and inter-cellular messenger in the central nervous system and its implication in learning and memory is well documented. Here I intended to critically review the role of NO-related compounds on different aspects of recognition memory. Current analysis shows that both NO donors and NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors are involved in object recognition memory and suggests that NO might be a promising target for cognition impairments. However, the potential neurotoxicity of NO would add a note of caution in this context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO. In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  5. Role of nitric oxide in cellular iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2003-03-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) which are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO*, a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO+ (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO+-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  6. Doxycycline reduces nitric oxide production in guinea pig inner ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Kai; Wodarzcyk, Karl; Brieger, Jürgen; Schmidtmann, Irene; Li, Huige; Mann, Wolf J; Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger

    2011-12-01

    Gentamicin application is an important therapeutic option to control vertigo spells in Ménière's disease. However, even in the case of low-dose intratympanic application, gentamicin might contribute to a pathological NO-increase leading to cochlear damage and hearing impairment. The study was performed to evaluate the nitric oxide (NO) reducing capacity of doxycycline in the inner ear after NO-induction by gentamicin. In a prospective animal study, a single dose of gentamicin (10mg/kg body weight) was injected intratympanically into male guinea pigs (n=48). The auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded prior to application and 3, 5 and 7 days afterwards. The organ of Corti and the lateral wall of 42 animals were isolated after 7 days and incubated separately for 6h in cell culture medium. Doxycycline was adjusted to organ cultures of 5 animals. Two NOS inhibitors, N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and NG-monomethyl-l-arginine monoacetate (l-NMMA), were applied in three different concentrations to the organ cultures of 30 animals in total (5 animals per concentration). As controls, seven animals received no further substance except gentamicin. The NO-production was quantified by chemiluminescence. Additional six gentamicin-treated animals were used for immunohistochemical studies. The ABRs declined continuously from the first to the seventh day after gentamicin application. Doxycycline reduced NO-production in the lateral wall by 54% (p=.029) comparable to the effect of the applied nitric oxide inhibitors. In the organ of Corti, NO-production was reduced by about 41% showing no statistical significance in respect to great inter-animal variations. The application of doxycycline might offer a new therapeutic approach to prevent NO-induced cochlea damage through ototoxic substances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Triazine herbicides inhibit relaxin signaling and disrupt nitric oxide homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Si Eun; Lim, Sa Rang; Choi, Hyung-kyoon; Bae, Jeehyeon, E-mail: jeehyeon@cau.ac.kr

    2016-09-15

    Triazines are herbicides that are widely used worldwide, and we previously observed that the maternal exposure of mice to simazine (50 or 500 μg/kg) resulted in smaller ovaries and uteri of their female offspring. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanism that may account for the reproductive dysfunction induced by simazine. We found that following maternal exposure, simazine is transmitted to the offspring, as evidenced by its presence in the offspring ovaries. Analyses of the simazine-exposed offspring revealed that the expression of the relaxin hormone receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), prominently decreased in their ovaries and uteri. In addition, downstream target genes of the relaxin pathway including nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (Nos2), Nos3, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) were downregulated in their ovaries. Moreover, AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) levels and their phosphorylated active forms decreased in simazine-exposed ovaries. In vitro exposure of the human ovarian granulosa cells (KGN) and uterine endometrium cells (Hec-1A) to very low concentrations (0.001 to 1 nM) of triazines including atrazine, terbuthylazine, and propazine repressed NO production with a concurrent reduction in RXFP1, NOS2, and NOS3. The inhibitory action of triazines on NO release was dependent on RXFP1, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and ERK. Radioligand-binding assay also confirmed that triazines competitively inhibited the binding of relaxin to its receptor. Therefore, the present study suggests that triazine herbicides act as endocrine disrupters by interfering with relaxin hormone signaling. Thus, further evaluation of their impact on human health is imperative. - Highlights: • Triazines downregulate critical molecules involved in the relaxin signaling pathway. • Triazines act as potent antagonists of binding of relaxin to its receptor. • Triazines disrupt nitric oxide

  8. [Ultrasound induced the formation of nitric oxide and nitrosonium ions in water and aqueous solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepuro, I I; Adamchuk, R I; Stepuro, V I

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide, nitrosonium ions, nitrites, and nitrates are formed in water saturated with air under the action of ultrasound. Nitrosonium ions react with water and hydrogen peroxide to form nitrites and nitrates in sonicated solution, correspondingly. Nitric oxide is practically completely released from sonicated water into the atmosphere and reacts with air oxygen, forming NOx compounds. The oxidation of nitric oxide in aqueous medium by hydroxyl radicals and dissolved oxygen is a minor route of the formation of nitrites and nitrates in ultrasonic field.

  9. Nitric oxide, cholesterol oxides and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in plasma of patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moriel

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to identify disturbances of nitric oxide radical (·NO metabolism and the formation of cholesterol oxidation products in human essential hypertension. The concentrations of·NO derivatives (nitrite, nitrate, S-nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine, water and lipid-soluble antioxidants and cholesterol oxides were measured in plasma of 11 patients with mild essential hypertension (H: 57.8 ± 9.7 years; blood pressure, 148.3 ± 24.8/90.8 ± 10.2 mmHg and in 11 healthy subjects (N: 48.4 ± 7.0 years; blood pressure, 119.4 ± 9.4/75.0 ± 8.0 mmHg.Nitrite, nitrate and S-nitrosothiols were measured by chemiluminescence and nitrotyrosine was determined by ELISA. Antioxidants were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and cholesterol oxides by gas chromatography. Hypertensive patients had reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to reactive hyperemia (H: 9.3 and N: 15.1% increase of diameter 90 s after hyperemia, and lower levels of ascorbate (H: 29.2 ± 26.0, N: 54.2 ± 24.9 µM, urate (H: 108.5 ± 18.9, N: 156.4 ± 26.3 µM, ß-carotene (H: 1.1 ± 0.8, N: 2.5 ± 1.2 nmol/mg cholesterol, and lycopene (H: 0.4 ± 0.2, N: 0.7 ± 0.2 nmol/mg cholesterol, in plasma, compared to normotensive subjects. The content of 7-ketocholesterol, 5alpha-cholestane-3ß,5,6ß-triol and 5,6alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholestan-3alpha-ol in LDL, and the concentration of endothelin-1 (H: 0.9 ± 0.2, N: 0.7 ± 0.1 ng/ml in plasma were increased in hypertensive patients. No differences were found for ·NO derivatives between groups. These data suggest that an increase in cholesterol oxidation is associated with endothelium dysfunction in essential hypertension and oxidative stress, although ·NO metabolite levels in plasma are not modified in the presence of elevated cholesterol oxides.

  10. Inducible nitric oxide synthase catalyzes ethanol oxidation to α-hydroxyethyl radical and acetaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porasuphatana, Supatra; Weaver, John; Rosen, Gerald M.

    2006-01-01

    The physiologic function of nitric oxide synthases, independent of the isozyme, is well established, metabolizing L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). This enzyme can also transfer electrons to O 2 , affording superoxide (O 2 · - ) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). We have demonstrated that NOS1, in the presence of L-arginine, can biotransform ethanol (EtOH) to α-hydroxyethyl radical (CH 3 ·CHOH). We now report that a competent NOS2 with L-arginine can, like NOS1, oxidize EtOH to CH 3 ·CHOH. Once this free radical is formed, it is metabolized to acetaldehyde as shown by LC-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC analysis. These observations suggest that NOS2 can behave similarly to cytochrome P-450 in the catalysis of acetaldehyde formation from ethanol via the generation of α-hydroxyethyl radical when L-arginine is present

  11. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  12. Detection of nitric acid and nitric oxides in the terrestrial atmosphere in the middle-infrared spectral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Blecka

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available A proposal for combined space and ground-based observations of the vertical distributions and the column densities of nitric acid and nitric oxide concentrations in the earth's atmosphere is discussed. We focus on the aspects that are particular to the idea of correlative measurements: geometrical considerations, simulations of the solar absorption spectra in the middle-infrared region corresponding to the different observational geometries, and the associated retrieval methods. These studies are done specifically for the Belgian-French experiment MIRAS (MIR Infrared Atmospheric Spectrometer onboard the Russian Space Station MIR and correlative ground-based FTIR measurements in the Tatra mountains.

  13. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, is often present in diabetic (DB patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J (db/db mice (10 weeks old and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic, IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic, IADB (intermittent air diabetic, and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  14. [Studies on the oxidation reaction of octanol-2 with nitric acid by infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G; Zhao, G; Wang, Y; Zhang, Q; Zhang, S; Lu, F

    1998-04-01

    In this paper, the reaction process of oxidation of octanol-2 with nitric acid has been studied by IR spectroscopy. It is found that the main components of non-sapoifiable matter are different in different oxidation degrees. The relation between oxidation products and the amount of nitric acid are investigated,the reaction mechanism has also been studied. Experimental results show that the oxidation process of octanol-2 is as follows: first, octanol-2 is oxidated to octanone-2, or to nitrate, nitrite and nitrile copmpounds, then these compounds are reoxidated to caproic acid in the meantime some by-products, such as valeric, enanthic acids are also found in oxidated products.

  15. Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P.; Bazeghi, N.; Bie, P.

    2011-01-01

    (x) and exhaled NO were determined in the supine and sitting positions and related to haemodynamics, RAAS and lung diffusing capacity (D(L)CO). Eight matched healthy individuals served as controls. Results: All patients with cirrhosis had portal hypertension. We found no significant difference in exhaled...... NO between patients and controls and no changes from the supine to the sitting position. Exhaled NO in the patients correlated significantly with plasma volume, heart rate and DLCO. NO(x) concentrations were not significantly increased in the patients. NO(x) correlated with portal pressure and haemodynamic...

  16. Vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide is reduced in healthy adults with increased adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Demetra D.; Pierce, Gary L.; Walker, Ashley E.; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Seals, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide, as assessed by nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NID), is impaired in clinical cardiovascular disease, but its relation to adiposity is unknown. We determined the relation of NID to total and abdominal adiposity in healthy adults varying widely in adiposity. In 224 men and women [age, 18–79 years; body mass index (BMI), 16.4–42.2 kg/m2], we measured NID (brachial artery dilation to 0.4 mg sublingual nitroglycerin), total body adiposity [BMI...

  17. Flow-Tagging Velocimetry for Hypersonic Flows Using Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; OByrne, S.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a new type of flow-tagging velocimetry technique for hypersonic flows. The technique involves exciting a thin line of nitric oxide molecules with a laser beam and then, after some delay, acquiring an image of the displaced line. One component of velocity is determined from the time of flight. This method is applied to measure the velocity profile in a Mach 8.5 laminar, hypersonic boundary layer in the Australian National Universities T2 free-piston shock tunnel. The velocity is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 2%. Comparison with a CFD simulation of the flow shows reasonable agreement.

  18. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow......, respectively (P exercise in humans. These findings demonstrate an important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction....... was quantified by near infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green in six healthy humans during dynamic knee extension exercise with and without combined pharmacological inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) and PG by L-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. Microdialysis was applied to determine interstitial release...

  19. Production and consumption of nitric oxide by three methanotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, T; Roy, R; Knowles, R

    2000-09-01

    We studied nitrogen oxide production and consumption by methanotrophs Methylobacter luteus (group I), Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b (group II), and an isolate from a hardwood swamp soil, here identified by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Methylobacter sp. strain T20 (group I). All could consume nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, NO), and produce small amounts of nitrous oxide (N(2)O). Only Methylobacter strain T20 produced large amounts of NO (>250 parts per million by volume [ppmv] in the headspace) at specific activities of up to 2.0 x 10(-17) mol of NO cell(-1) day(-1), mostly after a culture became O(2) limited. Production of NO by strain T20 occurred mostly in nitrate-containing medium under anaerobic or nearly anaerobic conditions, was inhibited by chlorate, tungstate, and O(2), and required CH(4). Denitrification (methanol-supported N(2)O production from nitrate in the presence of acetylene) could not be detected and thus did not appear to be involved in the production of NO. Furthermore, cd(1) and Cu nitrite reductases, NO reductase, and N(2)O reductase could not be detected by PCR amplification of the nirS, nirK, norB, and nosZ genes, respectively. M. luteus and M. trichosporium produced some NO in ammonium-containing medium under aerobic conditions, likely as a result of methanotrophic nitrification and chemical decomposition of nitrite. For Methylobacter strain T20, arginine did not stimulate NO production under aerobiosis, suggesting that NO synthase was not involved. We conclude that strain T20 causes assimilatory reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which then decomposes chemically to NO. The production of NO by methanotrophs such as Methylobacter strain T20 could be of ecological significance in habitats near aerobic-anaerobic interfaces where fluctuating O(2) and nitrate availability occur.

  20. Nitric oxide emissions from soils amended with municipal waste biosolids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelle, P.A.; Aneja, V.P.

    2002-01-01

    Land spreading nitrogen-rich municipal waste biosolids (NO 3 - -N -1 dry weight, NH 3 -N∼23,080mg Nkg -1 dry weight, Total Kjeldahl N∼41,700mg Nkg -1 dry weight) to human food and non-food chain land is a practice followed throughout the US. This practice may lead to the recovery and utilization of the nitrogen by vegetation, but it may also lead to emissions of biogenic nitric oxide (NO), which may enhance ozone pollution in the lower levels of the troposphere. Recent global estimates of biogenic NO emissions from soils are cited in the literature, which are based on field measurements of NO emissions from various agricultural and non-agricultural fields. However, biogenic emissions of NO from soils amended with biosolids are lacking. Utilizing a state-of-the-art mobile laboratory and a dynamic flow-through chamber system, in-situ concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were measured during the spring/summer of 1999 and winter/spring of 2000 from an agricultural soil which is routinely amended with municipal waste biosolids. The average NO flux for the late spring/summer time period (10 June 1999-5 August 1999) was 69.4±34.9ngNm -2 s -1 . Biosolids were applied during September 1999 and the field site was sampled again during winter/spring 2000 (28 February 2000-9 March 2000), during which the average flux was 3.6±l.7ngNm -2 s -1 . The same field site was sampled again in late spring (2-9 June 2000) and the average flux was 64.8±41.0ng Nm -2 s -1 . An observationally based model, developed as part of this study, found that summer accounted for 60% of the yearly emission while fall, winter and spring accounted for 20%, 4% and 16% respectively. Field experiments were conducted which indicated that the application of biosolids increases the emissions of NO and that techniques to estimate biogenic NO emissions would, on a yearly average, underestimate the NO flux from this field by a factor of 26. Soil temperature and % water filled pore space (%WFPS) were observed

  1. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stimulated emission pumping for nitric oxide was studied using picosecond lasers. ► Weak and tightly focused pulses provide sufficient energy for population transfer. ► Selective excitation at the bandhead yields strong fluorescence depletion signals. ► We observe 19% population transfer to v″ = 2 of the X 2 Π 1/2 ground electronic state. - Abstract: Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17–25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ‘‘pump–dump” arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin (λ pump =226.35(1)nm) of the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) ← X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246–248 nm within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ pump =226.35(1)nm and λ dump =247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A 2 Σ + (V′ = 0, J′) excited electronic state to the X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  2. Release by ultraviolet B (u.v.B) radiation of nitric oxide (NO) from human keratinocytes: a potential role for nitric oxide in erythema production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deliconstantinos, G.; Villiotou, V.; Stravrides, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of human sunburn is poorly understood but its characteristic features include the development of erythema. In this study we attempted to determine whether human keratinocytes possess a nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS), if this enzyme could be activated to release NO following exposure to ultraviolet B (u.v.B) and to define whether this photo-induced response could be involved in the pathogenesis of sunburn erythema. The present results indicate that u.v.B radiation acts as a potent stimulator of NOS in keratinocytes. NO is lipophilic and may diffuse out of the keratinocytes, activating sGC in endothelial cells and neighbouring smooth muscle cells. This may be a major part of the integrated response of the skin leading to vasodilatation and erythema. (author)

  3. NOpiates: Novel Dual Action Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors with μ-Opioid Agonist Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Paul; Green, Brenda; Maddaford, Shawn; Rakhit, Suman; Andrews, John S

    2012-03-08

    A novel series of benzimidazole designed multiple ligands (DMLs) with activity at the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) enzyme and the μ-opioid receptor was developed. Targeting of the structurally dissimilar heme-containing enzyme and the μ-opioid GPCR was predicated on the modulatory role of nitric oxide on μ-opioid receptor function. Structure-activity relationship studies yielded lead compound 24 with excellent nNOS inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.44 μM), selectivity over both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (10-fold) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (125-fold), and potent μ-opioid binding affinity, K i = 5.4 nM. The functional activity as measured in the cyclic adenosine monosphospate secondary messenger assay resulted in full agonist activity (EC50 = 0.34 μM). This work represents a novel approach in the development of new analgesics for the treatment of pain.

  4. Calcium-activated potassium channels - a therapeutic target for modulating nitric oxide in cardiovascular disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel; Simonsen, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Cardiovascular risk factors are often associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is also prognostic for occurrence of cardiovascular events. Endothelial dysfunction is reflected by blunted vasodilatation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Endothelium...

  5. Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients after intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate, while the effect is insignificant in severe patients. Thus, sodium hyaluronate can effectively improve nitric oxide levels in synovial fluid, reduce ..... Modern Med Health, 2014; 1:.

  6. The effect of inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, O; Gebistorf, F; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    on mortality in adults and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We included all randomised, controlled trials, irrespective of date of publication, blinding status, outcomes reported or language. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. We performed several subgroup and sensitivity......Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Inhaled nitric oxide has been used to improve oxygenation but its role remains controversial. Our primary objective in this systematic review was to examine the effects of inhaled nitric oxide administration......% CI) 1.59 (1.17-2.16)) with inhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence to support inhaled nitric oxide in any category of critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome despite a transient improvement in oxygenation, since mortality is not reduced and it may...

  7. Dual inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E-2 production by polysubstituted 2-aminopyrimidines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Z.; Kverka, Miloslav; Dusilová, Adéla; Kmoníčková, E.; Jansa, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, July 1 (2016), s. 48-56 ISSN 1089-8603 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Pyrimidines * Nitric oxide * Prostaglandin E-2 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.181, year: 2016

  8. Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in Nitric Oxide Level and Thickness Index of Synovial Fluid in Osteoarthritis Patients ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... and moderate phase patients after intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate, while the effect ...

  9. Arginase attenuates inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced nitric oxide generation and airway smooth muscle relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, H; Tio, MA; Zaagsma, J; Meurs, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that endogenous arginase activity potentiates airway responsiveness to methacholine by attenuation of agonist-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, presumably by competition with epithelial constitutive NO synthase for the common substrate, L-arginine. Using

  10. Arginase strongly impairs neuronal nitric oxide-mediated airway smooth muscle relaxation in allergic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, H; Leusink, J; Bos, I Sophie T; Zaagsma, J; Meurs, H

    2006-01-01

    Background: Using guinea pig tracheal preparations, we have recently shown that endogenous arginase activity attenuates inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic (iNANC) nerve-mediated airway smooth muscle relaxation by reducing nitric oxide (NO) production - due to competition with neuronal

  11. Nitric oxide mediates insect cellular immunity via phospholipase A2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    After infection or invasion is recognized, biochemical mediators act in signaling insect immune functions. These include biogenic amines, insect cytokines, eicosanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Treating insects or isolated hemocyte populations with different mediators often leads to similar results. Se...

  12. Nitric Oxide (NO) Measurements in Stomatal Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurla, Srinivas; Gayatri, Gunja; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells acquired great importance, in view of the multifaceted function and involvement of NO as a signal in various plant processes. Monitoring of NO in guard cells is quite simple because of the large size of guard cells and ease of observing the detached epidermis under microscope. Stomatal guard cells therefore provide an excellent model system to study the components of signal transduction. The levels and functions of NO in relation to stomatal closure can be monitored, with the help of an inverted fluorescence or confocal microscope. We can measure the NO in guard cells by using flouroprobes like 4,5-diamino fluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA). This fluorescent dye, DAF-2DA, is cell permeable and after entry into the cell, the diacetate group is removed by the cellular esterases. The resulting DAF-2 form is membrane impermeable and reacts with NO to generate the highly fluorescent triazole (DAF-2T), with excitation and emission wavelengths of 488 and 530 nm, respectively. If time-course measurements are needed, the epidermis can be adhered to a cover-glass or glass slide and left in a small petri dishes. Fluorescence can then be monitored at required time intervals; with a precaution that excitation is done minimally, only when a fluorescent image is acquired. The present method description is for the epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum and should work with most of the other dicotyledonous plants.

  13. Differential modulation of nitric oxide synthases in aging: therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stêfany Bruno De Assis Cau

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular aging is the term that describes the structural and functional disturbances of the vasculature with advancing aging. The molecular mechanisms of aging-associated endothelial dysfunction are complex, but reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability and altered vascular expression and activity of NO synthase (NOS enzymes have been implicated as major players. Impaired vascular relaxation in aging has been attributed to reduced endothelial NOS (eNOS-derived NO, while increased inducible NOS (iNOS expression seems to account for nitrosative stress and disrupted vascular homeostasis. Although eNOS is considered the main source of NO in the vascular endothelium, neuronal NOS (nNOS also contributes to endothelial cells-derived NO, a mechanism that is reduced in aging. Pharmacological modulation of NO generation and expression/activity of NOS isoforms may represent a therapeutic alternative to prevent the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Accordingly, this review will focus on drugs that modulate NO bioavailability, such as nitrite anions and NO-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, hormones (dehydroepiandrosterone and estrogen, statins, resveratrol and folic acid, since they may be useful to treat/to prevent aging-associated vascular dysfunction. The impact of these therapies on life quality in elderly and longevity will be discussed.

  14. Dynamics of the water dimer + nitric oxide collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ree, Jong Baik [Dept. of Chemistry Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoo Hang [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyung Kyu [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Nevada (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Collision-induced intermolecular energy transfer and intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the collision of a water dimer and nitric oxide are studied by use of quasiclassical procedures. Intermolecular energy flow is shown to occur mainly through a direct-mode mechanism transferring relatively large amounts in strong collisions. About a quarter of the energy initially deposited in the dimer transfers to the ground state NO, while the rest redistributes among internal motions of the collision system. The main portion of initial energy deposited in the dimer redistributes in the stretches of the donor monomer through the 1:1 resonance followed by in the bend through the 1:2 resonance. Energy transfer from the excited NO to the ground-state dimer is equally efficient, transferring more than half the initial excitation to the donor monomer, the efficiency that is attributed to the internal modes operating as energy reservoirs. The hydrogen bond shares about 15% of the initial excitation stored in both dimer-to-NO and NO-to-dimer processes as a result of strong coupling of the hydrogen bond with the proton-donor OH bond of the monomer. A small fraction of collisions proceeds through a complex-mode mechanism and lead to NO dissociation, the dissociated O atom showing a propensity to form a new hydrogen bond.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on nitric oxide myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarei, A.R.; Karel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Bovine nitric oxide myoglobin (NOMb) was irradiated with 40-4000 krad of γ-radiation, and the effects on the haem studied using absorption spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (e.s.r.) spectroscopy. The results show the following behaviour: (a) The bright red colour of NOMb changes to brown upon irradiation. This is similar to changes observed in radiation sterilized, nitrite-containing meats. (b) NOMb becomes progressively denitrosylated, with met-myoglobin (metMb) as the immediate product. (c) Upon increasing doses of radiation (up to 800 krad) at O 0 C parallel to NOMb denitrosylation, metMb is gradually converted, by water radiolytic products, to other products, believed to be ferromyoglobin and ferrimyoglobin peroxide. A minor quantity of 'choleglobin-type' pigments may also be formed at the highest doses. (d) Freezing of NOMb has a substantial protective effect against radiation. (e) Native bovine NOMb behaves as a pentaco-ordinate (hfs of 3 peaks with equal intensity); the bond between iron and Nsub(epsilon) is thus dramatically stretched and weakened. (f) Using a thermal energy analyser, no NO could be detected over irradiated NOMb solution, indicating rapid reaction of NO liberated from NOMb by radiation, with radiolytic products of water. (author)

  16. Sodium nitrite: the "cure" for nitric oxide insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2012-11-01

    This process of "curing" food is a long practice that dates back thousands of years long before refrigeration or food safety regulations. Today food safety and mass manufacturing are dependent upon safe and effective means to cure and preserve foods including meats. Nitrite remains the most effective curing agent to prevent food spoilage and bacterial contamination. Despite decades of rigorous research on its safety and efficacy as a curing agent, it is still regarded by many as a toxic undesirable food additive. However, research within the biomedical science community has revealed enormous therapeutic benefits of nitrite that is currently being developed as novel therapies for conditions associated with nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency. Much of the same biochemistry that has been understood for decades in the meat industry has been rediscovered in human physiology. This review will highlight the fundamental biochemistry of nitrite in human physiology and highlight the risk benefit evaluation surrounding nitrite in food and meat products. Foods or diets enriched with nitrite can have profound positive health benefits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrosation of melatonin by nitric oxide: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjanski, A G; Sáenz, D A; Doctorovich, F; Estrin, D A; Rosenstein, R E

    2001-09-01

    Melatonin is being increasingly promoted as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of jet lag and insomnia, and is an efficient free radical scavenger. We have recently characterized a product for the reaction of melatonin with nitric oxide (NO), N-nitrosomelatonin. In the present work, reaction pathways with N1, C2, C4, C6 and C7 as possible targets for its reaction with NO that yield the respective nitroso derivatives have been investigated using semiempirical AM1 computational tools, both in vacuo and aqueous solution. Specifically, two different pathways were studied: a radical mechanism involving the hydrogen atom abstraction to yield a neutral radical followed by NO addition, and an ionic mechanism involving addition of nitrosonium ion to the indolic moiety. Our results show that the indolic nitrogen is the most probable site for nitrosation by the radical mechanism, whereas different targets are probable considering the ionic pathway. These results are in good agreement with previous experimental findings and provide a coherent picture for the interaction of melatonin with NO.

  18. Nitric oxide mediated bystander responses induced by microbeam targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, C.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Michael, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Considerable evidence has recently been accumulated in support of the existence of a 'bystander effect', which cells having received no irradiation show biological consequences from their vicinal irradiated cells. The application of microbeams is providing new insights into the radiation-induced bystander effect. The present study found that when a fraction of radioresistant human glioblastoma cells were individually targeted with a precise number of helium ions generated from the Gray Cancer Institute Charged Particle Microbeam, micronucleus (MN) induction significantly exceeded the expected value that was calculated from the number of MN observed when all of the cells were targeted assuming no bystander effect occurring. Even when only a single cell within a population was hit by one helium ion, the MN induction in the population could be increased by 16%. These results provide direct evidence of radiation-induced bystander effect. Moreover, MN was effectively induced in the unirradiated primary human fibroblasts and glioblastoma cells either co-cultured with irradiated cells or treated with the medium harvested from irradiated cells, indicating a signal molecule was produced from the irradiated cells. However, when c-PTIO, a nitric oxide (NO)-specific scavenger, was present in the medium during and after irradiation until MN analysis, the production of MN in all of the above cases was reduced to low levels. Consequently, NO plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effect

  19. Exhaled nitric oxide - circadian variations in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antosova M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO has been suggested as a marker of airway inflammatory diseases. The level of eNO is influenced by many various factor including age, sex, menstrual cycle, exercise, food, drugs, etc. The aim of our study was to investigate a potential influence of circadian variation on eNO level in healthy subjects. Methods Measurements were performed in 44 women and 10 men, non-smokers, without respiratory tract infection in last 2 weeks. The eNO was detected at 4-hour intervals from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. using an NIOX analyzer. We followed the ATS/ERS guidelines for eNO measurement and analysis. Results Peak of eNO levels were observed at 10 a.m. (11.1 ± 7.2 ppb, the lowest value was detected at 10 p.m. (10.0 ± 5.8 ppb. The difference was statistically significant (paired t-test, P Conclusions The daily variations in eNO, with the peak in the morning hours, could be of importance in clinical practice regarding the choice of optimal time for monitoring eNO in patients with respiratory disease.

  20. Exhaled nitric oxide in paediatric asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, J O; Nordvall, S L; Weitzberg, E; Kollberg, H; Alving, K

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in exhaled air of humans. This NO is mostly produced in the upper airways, whereas basal NO excretion in the lower airways is low. Children with Kartagener's syndrome have an almost total lack of NO in nasally derived air, whereas adult asthmatics have increased NO in orally exhaled air. NO excretion was measured in the nasal cavity and in orally exhaled air in 19 healthy children, in 36 age matched subjects with asthma, and in eight children with cystic fibrosis. NO levels in orally exhaled air were similar in controls and in children with cystic fibrosis, at 4.8 (SD 1.2) v 5.8 (0.8) parts per billion (ppb), but were increased in asthmatic children who were untreated or were being treated only with low doses of inhaled steroids (13.8 (2.5) ppb). Nasal NO levels were reduced by about 70% in children with cystic fibrosis compared to controls and asthmatics. Measurements of airway NO release in different parts of the airways may be useful in non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:8984919

  1. Role of nitric oxide and superoxide in Giardia lamblia killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Fernandes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia trophozoites were incubated for 2 h with activated murine macrophages, nitric oxide (NO donors or a superoxide anion generator (20 mU/ml xanthine oxidase plus 1 mM xanthine. Activated macrophages were cytotoxic to Giardia trophozoites (~60% dead trophozoites. This effect was inhibited (>90% by an NO synthase inhibitor (200 µM and unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD, 300 U/ml. Giardia trophozoites were killed by the NO donors, S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP and sodium nitroprusside (SNP in a dose-dependent manner (LD50 300 and 50 µM, respectively. A dual NO-superoxide anion donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1, did not have a killing effect in concentrations up to 1 mM. However, when SOD (300 U/ml was added simultaneously with SIN-1 to Giardia, a significant trophozoite-killing effect was observed (~35% dead trophozoites at 1 mM. The mixture of SNAP or SNP with superoxide anion, which yields peroxynitrite, abolished the trophozoite killing induced by NO donors. Authentic peroxynitrite only killed trophozoites at very high concentrations (3 mM. These results indicate that NO accounts for Giardia trophozoite killing and this effect is not mediated by peroxynitrite

  2. Nitric Oxide: A Multitasked Signaling Gas in Plants

    KAUST Repository

    Domingos, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous reactive oxygen species (ROS) that has evolved as a signaling hormone in many physiological processes in animals. In plants it has been demonstrated to be a crucial regulator of development, acting as a signaling molecule present at each step of the plant life cycle. NO has also been implicated as a signal in biotic and abiotic responses of plants to the environment. Remarkably, despite this plethora of effects and functional relationships, the fundamental knowledge of NO production, sensing, and transduction in plants remains largely unknown or inadequately characterized. In this review we cover the current understanding of NO production, perception, and action in different physiological scenarios. We especially address the issues of enzymatic and chemical generation of NO in plants, NO sensing and downstream signaling, namely the putative cGMP and Ca2+ pathways, ion-channel activity modulation, gene expression regulation, and the interface with other ROS, which can have a profound effect on both NO accumulation and function. We also focus on the importance of NO in cell–cell communication during developmental processes and sexual reproduction, namely in pollen tube guidance and embryo sac fertilization, pathogen defense, and responses to abiotic stress.

  3. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  4. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4b inhibits nitric oxide generation through calcium-induced dynamic interaction with neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenjuan; Zhou, Juefei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Teng; Chen, Qianqian; Yang, Fuyu; Wei, Taotao

    2013-04-01

    The activation and deactivation of Ca(2+)- and calmodulindependent neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the central nervous system must be tightly controlled to prevent excessive nitric oxide (NO) generation. Considering plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) is a key deactivator of nNOS, the present investigation aims to determine the key events involved in nNOS deactivation of by PMCA in living cells to maintain its cellular context. Using time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determined the occurrence of Ca(2+)-induced protein-protein interactions between plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4b (PMCA4b) and nNOS in living cells. PMCA activation significantly decreased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), which deactivates nNOS and slowdowns NO synthesis. Under the basal [Ca(2+)]i caused by PMCA activation, no protein-protein interactions were observed between PMCA4b and nNOS. Furthermore, both the PDZ domain of nNOS and the PDZ-binding motif of PMCA4b were essential for the protein-protein interaction. The involvement of lipid raft microdomains on the activity of PMCA4b and nNOS was also investigated. Unlike other PMCA isoforms, PMCA4 was relatively more concentrated in the raft fractions. Disruption of lipid rafts altered the intracellular localization of PMCA4b and affected the interaction between PMCA4b and nNOS, which suggest that the unique lipid raft distribution of PMCA4 may be responsible for its regulation of nNOS activity. In summary, lipid rafts may act as platforms for the PMCA4b regulation of nNOS activity and the transient tethering of nNOS to PMCA4b is responsible for rapid nNOS deactivation.

  5. Requirement of the inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway for IL-1-induced osteoclastic bone resorption

    OpenAIRE

    van't Hof, R. J.; Armour, K. J.; Smith, L. M.; Armour, K. E.; Wei, X. Q.; Liew, F. Y.; Ralston, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of bone turnover, especially in pathological conditions characterized by release of bone-resorbing cytokines. The cytokine IL-1 is thought to act as a mediator of periarticular bone loss and tissue damage in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. IL-1 is a potent stimulator of both osteoclastic bone resorption and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in bone cells and other cell types. In this study,...

  6. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice have impaired Renin release but normal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Carlström, Mattias; Jensen, Boye L

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundNitric oxide deficiency is involved in the development of hypertension, but the mechanisms are currently unclear. This study was conducted to further elucidate the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in blood pressure regulation and renin release in relation to different sodiu......-116; doi:10.1038/ajh.2007.16American Journal of Hypertension (2008) 21 111-116; doi:10.1038/ajh.2007.16....

  7. Inhibition of mammalian nitric oxide synthases by agmatine, an endogenous polyamine formed by decarboxylation of arginine.

    OpenAIRE

    Galea, E; Regunathan, S; Eliopoulos, V; Feinstein, D L; Reis, D J

    1996-01-01

    Agmatine, decarboxylated arginine, is a metabolic product of mammalian cells. Considering the close structural similarity between L-arginine and agmatine, we investigated the interaction of agmatine and nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which use L-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline. Brain, macrophages and endothelial cells were respectively used as sources for NOS isoforms I, II and III. Enzyme activity was measured by the production of nitrites or L-citrulline. Agmatine was ...

  8. Nitric oxide coordinates metabolism, growth, and development via the nuclear receptor E75

    OpenAIRE

    Cáceres, Lucía; Necakov, Aleksandar S.; Schwartz, Carol; Kimber, Sandra; Roberts, Ian J.H.; Krause, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide gas acts as a short-range signaling molecule in a vast array of important physiological processes, many of which include major changes in gene expression. How these genomic responses are induced, however, is poorly understood. Here, using genetic and chemical manipulations, we show that nitric oxide is produced in the Drosophila prothoracic gland, where it acts via the nuclear receptor ecdysone-induced protein 75 (E75), reversing its ability to interfere with its heterodimer part...

  9. Continuous electrochemical monitoring of nitric oxide production in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pekarová, Michaela; Králová, Jana; Kubala, Lukáš; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín; Gregor, Č.; Hrbáč, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 394, č. 5 (2009), s. 1497-1504 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040507 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GP524/05/P135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nitric oxide * macrophage s RAW 264.7 * nitric oxide sensor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.480, year: 2009

  10. Thalidomide ameliorates portal hypertension via nitric oxide synthase independent reduced systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Nicholas G; Wang, Yining N; Korshunov, Vyacheslav A; Maluccio, Mary A; Skill, Nicholas J

    2015-04-14

    Portal hypertension is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and significantly increases mortality and morbidity. Previous reports have suggested that the compound thalidomide attenuates portal hypertension (PHT). However, the mechanism for this action is not fully elucidated. One hypothesis is that thalidomide destabilizes tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA and therefore diminishes TNFα induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the production of nitric oxide (NO). To examine this hypothesis, we utilized the murine partial portal vein ligation (PVL) PHT model in combination with endothelial or inducible NOS isoform gene knockout mice. Wild type, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)(-/-) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)(-/-) mice received either PVL or sham surgery and were given either thalidomide or vehicle. Serum nitrate (total nitrate, NOx) was measured daily for 7 d as a surrogate of NO synthesis. Serum TNFα level was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TNFα mRNA was quantified in liver and aorta tissue by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. PHT was determined by recording splenic pulp pressure (SPP) and abdominal aortic flow after 0-7 d. Response to thalidomide was determined by measurement of SPP and mean arterial pressure (MAP). SPP, abdominal aortic flow (Qao) and plasma NOx were increased in wild type and iNOS(-/-) PVL mice when compared to sham operated control mice. In contrast, SPP, Qao and plasma NOx were not increased in eNOS(-/-) PVL mice when compared to sham controls. Serum TNFα level in both sham and PVL mice was below the detection limit of the commercial ELISA used. Therefore, the effect of thalidomide on serum TNFα levels was undetermined in wild type, eNOS(-/-) or iNOS(-/-) mice. Thalidomide acutely increased plasma NOx in wild type and eNOS(-/-) mice but not iNOS(-/-) mice. Moreover, thalidomide temporarily (0-90 min) decreased mean arterial pressure, SPP and Qao in wild type, e

  11. The effect of piracetam on brain damage and serum nitric oxide levels in dogs submitted to hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Seda; Ikizceli, Ibrahim; Sözüer, Erdoğan Mütevelli; Avşaroğullari, Levent; Oztürk, Figen; Muhtaroğlu, Sebahattin; Akdur, Okhan; Küçük, Can; Durukan, Polat

    2008-10-01

    To demonstrate the effect of piracetam on changes in brain tissue and serum nitric oxide levels in dogs submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The subjects were randomized into four subgroups each consisting of 10 dogs. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in Group I for 1 hour and no treatment was given to this group. Blood and saline solutions were administered to Group II following 1 hour hemorrhagic shock. Blood and piracetam were given to Group III following 1 hour shock. No shock was induced and no treatment was applied to Group IV. Blood samples were obtained at the onset of the experiment and at 60, 120 and 180 minutes for nitric oxide analysis. For histopathological examination, brain tissue samples were obtained at the end of the experiment. The observed improvement in blood pressure and pulse rates in Group III was more than in Group II. Nitric oxide levels were increased in Group I; however, no correlation between piracetam and nitric oxide levels was determined. It was seen that recovery in brain damage in Group III was greater than in the control group. Piracetam, added to the treatment, may ecrease ischemic damage in hemorrhagic shock.

  12. Development of High-Throughput Method for Measurement of Vascular Nitric Oxide Generation in Microplate Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Hay, Soad S; Colyer, Christa L

    2017-01-13

    Despite the importance of nitric oxide (NO) in vascular physiology and pathology, a high-throughput method for the quantification of its vascular generation is lacking. By using the fluorescent probe 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM), we have optimized a simple method for the determination of the generation of endothelial nitric oxide in a microplate format. A nitric oxide donor was used (3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride, SIN-1). Different factors affecting the method were studied, such as the effects of dye concentration, different buffers, time of reaction, gain, and number of flashes. Beer's law was linear over a nanomolar range (1-10 nM) of SIN-1 with wavelengths of maximum excitation and emission at 495 and 525 nm; the limit of detection reached 0.897 nM. Under the optimized conditions, the generation of rat aortic endothelial NO was measured by incubating DAF-FM with serial concentrations (10-1000 µM) of acetylcholine (ACh) for 3 min. To confirm specificity, N ω -Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)-the standard inhibitor of endothelial NO synthase-was found to inhibit the ACh-stimulated generation of NO. In addition, vessels pre-exposed for 1 h to 400 µM of the endothelial damaging agent methyl glyoxal showed inhibited NO generation when compared to the control stimulated by ACh. The capability of the method to measure micro-volume samples makes it convenient for the simultaneous handling of a very large number of samples. Additionally, it allows samples to be run simultaneously with their replicates to ensure identical experimental conditions, thus minimizing the effect of biological variability.

  13. Development of High-Throughput Method for Measurement of Vascular Nitric Oxide Generation in Microplate Reader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soad S. Abd El-Hay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of nitric oxide (NO in vascular physiology and pathology, a high-throughput method for the quantification of its vascular generation is lacking. Objective: By using the fluorescent probe 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM, we have optimized a simple method for the determination of the generation of endothelial nitric oxide in a microplate format. Methods: A nitric oxide donor was used (3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride, SIN-1. Different factors affecting the method were studied, such as the effects of dye concentration, different buffers, time of reaction, gain, and number of flashes. Results: Beer’s law was linear over a nanomolar range (1–10 nM of SIN-1 with wavelengths of maximum excitation and emission at 495 and 525 nm; the limit of detection reached 0.897 nM. Under the optimized conditions, the generation of rat aortic endothelial NO was measured by incubating DAF-FM with serial concentrations (10–1000 µM of acetylcholine (ACh for 3 min. To confirm specificity, Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME—the standard inhibitor of endothelial NO synthase—was found to inhibit the ACh-stimulated generation of NO. In addition, vessels pre-exposed for 1 h to 400 µM of the endothelial damaging agent methyl glyoxal showed inhibited NO generation when compared to the control stimulated by ACh. Conclusions: The capability of the method to measure micro-volume samples makes it convenient for the simultaneous handling of a very large number of samples. Additionally, it allows samples to be run simultaneously with their replicates to ensure identical experimental conditions, thus minimizing the effect of biological variability.

  14. Studies on nitric oxide removal in simulated gas compositions under plasma-dielectric/catalytic discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajanikanth, B.S.; Rout, Satyabrata

    2001-01-01

    Application of pulsed electrical discharges for gas cleaning is gaining prominence, mainly from the energy consideration point of view. This present paper presents recent work on applying the electrical discharge plasma technology for treating gaseous pollutants, in general, and nitric oxide, in particular, as this is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The present work focuses attention on pulsed electrical discharge technique for nitric oxide removal from simulated gas compositions and study of effect of packed dielectric pellets, with and without a coating of catalyst, on the removal process. Experiments were conducted in a cylindrical corona reactor energized by repetitive high voltage pulses. The effects of various parameters, viz. pulse voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, initial nitric oxide concentration and gas mixture composition on nitric oxide removal efficiency, are discussed. When the reactors were filled with different dielectric pellets like, barium titanate, alumina, and alumina coated with palladium catalyst, the improvement in nitric oxide removal efficiency is studied and discussed. The power dissipated in the reactor and the energy consumed per nitric oxide molecule removed was calculated. Further results and comparative study of various cases are presented in the paper

  15. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection.

  16. Lithium-Vanadium bronzes as model catalysts for the selective reduction of nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.; Bongers, Annemie; Enoch, Gert; Snel, Ruud; Ross, Julian R.H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of alkali metals on the selective reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia has been studied on bulk iron oxide and bulk vanadium oxide. The influence of additions of LiOH, NaOH and KOH on the activity was screened by pulse experiments carried out in the absence of gaseous oxygen; FTIR

  17. Remote Sensing the Thermosphere's State Using Emissions From Carbon Dioxide and Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, D. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Doornbos, E.

    2017-12-01

    Measurements of emissions from nitric oxide and carbon dioxide in the thermosphere have strong correlations with properties that are very useful to the determination of thermospheric densities. We have compared emissions measured with the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite with neutral density measurements from the Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP), the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), the Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), and the three Swarm satellites, spanning a time period of over 15 years. It has been found that nitric oxide emissions match changes in the exospheric temperatures that have been derived from the densities through use of the Naval Reasearch Laboratory Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRLMSISE-00) thermosphere model. Similarly, our results indicate that the carbon dioxide emissions have annual and semiannual oscillations that correlate with changes in the amount of oxygen in the thermosphere, also determined by use of the NRLMSISE-00 model. These annual and semi-annual variations are found to have irregular amplitudes and phases, which make them very difficult to accurately predict. Prediction of exospheric temperatures through the use of geomagnetic indices also tends to be inexact. Therefore, it would be possible and very useful to use measurements of the thermosphere's infrared emissions for real-time tracking of the thermosphere's state, so that more accurate calculations of the density may be obtained.

  18. Inhaled Nitric Oxide in preterm infants: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber Michael D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm infants requiring assisted ventilation are at significant risk of both pulmonary and cerebral injury. Inhaled Nitric Oxide, an effective therapy for pulmonary hypertension and hypoxic respiratory failure in the full term infant, has also been studied in preterm infants. The most recent Cochrane review of preterm infants includes 11 studies and 3,370 participants. The results show a statistically significant reduction in the combined outcome of death or chronic lung disease (CLD in two studies with routine use of iNO in intubated preterm infants. However, uncertainty remains as a larger study (Kinsella 2006 showed no significant benefit for iNO for this combined outcome. Also, trials that included very ill infants do not demonstrate significant benefit. One trial of iNO treatment at a later postnatal age reported a decrease in the incidence of CLD. The aim of this individual patient meta-analysis is to confirm or refute these potentially conflicting results and to determine the extent to which patient or treatment characteristics may explain the results and/or may predict benefit from inhaled Nitric Oxide in preterm infants. Methods/Design The Meta-Analysis of Preterm Patients on inhaled Nitric Oxide (MAPPiNO Collaboration will perform an individual patient data meta-analysis to answer these important clinical questions. Studies will be included if preterm infants receiving assisted ventilation are randomized to receive inhaled Nitric Oxide or to a control group. The individual patient data provided by the Collaborators will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis where possible. Binary outcomes will be analyzed using log-binomial regression models and continuous outcomes will be analyzed using linear fixed effects models. Adjustments for trial differences will be made by including the trial variable in the model specification. Discussion Thirteen (13 trials, with a total of 3567 infants are eligible for inclusion

  19. Lower thermospheric nitric oxide concentrations derived from WINDII observations of the green nightglow continuum at 553.1 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. A. von Savigny

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of nitric oxide in the altitude range 90 to 105 km are derived from 553 nm nightglow continuum measurements made with the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. The profiles are derived under the assumption that the continuum emission is due entirely to the NO+O air afterglow reaction. Vertical profiles of the atomic oxygen density, which are required to determine the nitric oxide concentrations, are derived from coordinated WINDII measurements of the atomic oxygen OI 557.7 nm nightglow emission. Data coverage for local solar times ranging from 20 h to 04 h, and latitudes ranging from 42°S to 42°N, is achieved by zonally averaging and binning data obtained on 18 nights during a two-month period extending from mid-November 1992 until mid-January 1993. The derived nitric oxide concentrations are significantly smaller than those obtained from rocket measurements of the airglow continuum but they do compare well with model expectations and nitric oxide densities measured using the resonance fluorescence technique on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite. The near-global coverage of the WINDII observations and the similarities to the nitric oxide global morphology established from other satellite measurements strongly suggests that the NO+O reaction is the major source of the continuum near 553 nm and that there is no compelling reason to invoke additional sources of continuum emission in this immediate spectral region.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (airglow and aurora; thermosphere – composition and chemistry; instruments and techniques

  20. Indoor-outdoor nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide concentrations at three sites in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, D.R. (D.R. Rowe Engineering Services, Inc., Bowling Green, KY (United States)); Al-Dhowalia, K.H.; Mansour, M.E. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the nitric oxide and nitrogen oxide concentrations indoors and outdoors at three sites in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results show that the outdoor and indoor concentrations for NO were at least 270 and 16 times the reported average worldwide NO concentrations, respectively. The NO(sub 2) concentrations were about 14 times reported outdoor worldwide levels; however, NO(sub 2) concentrations indoors were generally below those reported in the literature. The data presented, in combination with information presented in previous articles, will provide a valuable background database for use in dispersion models to determine the effect of the Kuwaiti oil well fires on the air quality of Riyadh.

  1. Inducible nitric oxide synthase mediates bone loss in ovariectomized mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuzzocrea, S.; Mazzon, E.; Dugo, L.; Genovese, T.; Paola, R. Di; Ruggeri, Z.; Vegeto, E.; Caputi, A.P.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Puzzolo, D.; Maggi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that bone loss may be attributed to osteoclast recruitment induced by mediators of inflammation. In different experimental paradigms we have recently demonstrated that estrogen exhibits antiinflammatory activity by preventing the induction of inducible nitric

  2. Progress report on nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this program has been to demonstrate a nitric-phosphoric acid destruction technology which can treat a heterogeneous waste stream. This technology is being developed to convert hazardous liquid and solid organics to inorganic gases and salts while simultaneously performing a surface decontamination of the noncombustible items. Pu-238 waste is an issue because it must be shipped to WIPP. However, the presence of organics and Pu-238 waste is an issue because it must be shipped to WIPP. However, the presence of organics and Pu-238 exceeds packaging requirements because of concerns of hydrogen generation. If the TRU can be separated from the organics, the allowable heat load of a container increases a factor of 25. More importantly, since the current shipping package is limited by volume and not heat loading, destroying the organic compounds and decontaminating noncombustible can potentially create a three-order magnitude decrease in the number of shipments that must be made to WIPP. The process envisioned will be configured to handle 1 million pounds (as of 12/91) of a wide range of solid TRU-contaminated waste of which 600,000 pounds is combustible. The process will oxidize the combustibles (a mixture of 14% cellulose, 3% rubber, 64% plastics, 9% absorbed oil, 4% resins and sludges, and 6% miscellaneous organics) without requiring separation from the 400,000 pounds of noncombustibles. The system is being developed to operate below 200 C at moderate pressures (0--15 psig). This report primarily discusses results obtained over the past 3 1/2 months and their impact on the feasibility of a pilot-scale system

  3. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F. [Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Robinson, Jonathan L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Brynildsen, Mark P., E-mail: mbrynild@princeton.edu [Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availability in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. -- Highlights: •Carbon source availability is critical to aerobic E. coli NO detoxification. •Carbon source starvation, under NO stress, preserves intracellular NADH levels. •Preservation of NADH depends on starvation-dependent inhibition of Hmp induction.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase-3 promotes embryonic development of atrioventricular valves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Liu

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3 has recently been shown to promote endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT in the developing atrioventricular (AV canal. The present study was aimed to investigate the role of NOS3 in embryonic development of AV valves. We hypothesized that NOS3 promotes embryonic development of AV valves via EndMT. To test this hypothesis, morphological and functional analysis of AV valves were performed in wild-type (WT and NOS3(-/- mice at postnatal day 0. Our data show that the overall size and length of mitral and tricuspid valves were decreased in NOS3(-/- compared with WT mice. Echocardiographic assessment showed significant regurgitation of mitral and tricuspid valves during systole in NOS3(-/- mice. These phenotypes were all rescued by cardiac specific NOS3 overexpression. To assess EndMT, immunostaining of Snail1 was performed in the embryonic heart. Both total mesenchymal and Snail1(+ cells in the AV cushion were decreased in NOS3(-/- compared with WT mice at E10.5 and E12.5, which was completely restored by cardiac specific NOS3 overexpression. In cultured embryonic hearts, NOS3 promoted transforming growth factor (TGFβ, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2 and Snail1expression through cGMP. Furthermore, mesenchymal cell formation and migration from cultured AV cushion explants were decreased in the NOS3(-/- compared with WT mice. We conclude that NOS3 promotes AV valve formation during embryonic heart development and deficiency in NOS3 results in AV valve insufficiency.

  5. Nitric oxide inhibitory substances from Curcuma mangga rhizomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanidta Kaewkroek

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma mangga Val. & Zijp. is a member of the Zingiberaceae family commonly grown in Thailand. It is locally known as mango tumeric because of its mango-like smell when the fresh rhizomes are cut. C. mangga is a popular vegetable, the tips of the young rhizomes and shoots are consumed raw with rice. Medicinally, the rhizomes are used as a stomachic and for chest pains, fever, and general debility. It is also used in postpartum care. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of the extract and compounds from C. mangga rhizomes against lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO production in RAW 264.7 cell line. From bioassay-guided fractionation, the chloroform fraction exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 2.1 g/ml, followed by the hexane fraction (IC50 = 3.8 g/ml and the ethyl acetate fraction (IC50 = 23.5 g/ml, respectively. Demethoxycurcumin (1 and 3-buten-2-one, 4-[(1R, 4aR, 8aR-decahydro-5, 5, 8a-trimethyl-2-methylene-1-naphthalenyl]-, (3E-rel- (2 were isolated from the chloroform- and hexane fractions, respectively. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (3 whose structure is similar to that of 1 was also tested for NO inhibitory activity. Of the tested compounds, compound 1 exhibited the highest activity with an IC50 value of 12.1 μM, followed by 3(IC50 = 16.9 M and 2 (IC50 = 30.3 M. These results suggest that C. mangga and its compounds exert NO inhibitory activity and have a potential to be developed as a pharmaceutical preparation for treatment of inflammatory-related diseases. Moreover, this is the first report of compound 2 that was isolated from C. mangga rhizomes.

  6. Regulation of adrenomedullin and nitric oxide production by periodontal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Q A; McKay, I J; Gonzales-Marin, C; Allaker, R P

    2015-10-01

    In periodontitis the host response to bacterial challenge includes activity of the multifunctional molecules adrenomedullin (AM) and nitric oxide (NO). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of periodontal bacteria in regulating the production of these molecules from cultured cells. Regulation of AM and NO production from oral keratinocytes when challenged with culture supernatants from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Veillonella atypica, Streptococcus salivarius and Candida albicans was examined. AM and NO were measured in cell culture supernatants using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the nitrate/nitrite (NO metabolites) Griess assay respectively. Cellular production of AM and inducible NO synthase was also analysed in target cells by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. The inter-relationship of AM and NO production were further investigated with macrophages. A. actinomycetemcomitans and C. rectus induced maximal levels of both AM and NO after 6 and 48 h respectively from oral keratinocytes. AM production in macrophages was upregulated in response to the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione and partially blocked by the inducible NO synthase inhibitor, N(ω) -Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. Likewise, NO production was increased upon exposure to AM, while the AM receptor antagonist AM 22-52 reduced the release of NO. Pathogens associated with aggressive periodontitis, A. actinomycetemcomitans and C. rectus, were more effective than those associated with chronic periodontitis, P. gingivalis and Prev. intermedia, and commensals, S. salivarius and V. atypica, as regards the upregulation of AM and NO production from oral keratinocytes. Interaction between these molecules was also demonstrated with macrophages. Understanding the coordinated regulation of AM and NO production in response to periodontal bacteria may identify

  7. The Antibiofilm efficacy of nitric oxide on soft contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Ju; Park, Joo-Hee; Kim, Marth; Park, Choul Yong

    2017-11-21

    To investigate the antibiofilm efficacy of nitric oxide (NO) on soft contact lenses. Nitrite (NO precursor) release from various concentrations (0-1000 μM) of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2, NO donor) was measured by Griess Assay. Cell viability assay was performed using human corneal epithelial cell under various concentration (0-1000 μM) of NaNO 2 . Biofilm formation on soft contact lenses was achieved by adding Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the culture media. Various concentrations of NaNO 2 (0-1000 μM) were added to the culture media, each containing soft contact lens. After incubation in NaNO 2 containing culture media for 1, 3, or 7 days, each contact lens was transferred to a fresh, bacteria-free media without NaNO 2 . The bacteria in the biofilm were dispersed in the culture media for planktonic growth. After reculturing the lenses in the fresh media for 24 h, optical density (OD) of media was measured at 600 nm and colony forming unit (CFU) was counted by spreading media on tryptic soy agar plate for additional 18 h. Nitrite release from NaNO 2 showed dose-dependent suppressive effect on biofilm formation. Most nitrite release from NaNO 2 tended to occur within 30 min. The viability of human corneal epithelial cells was well maintained at tested NaNO 2 concentrations. The bacterial CFU and OD showed dose-dependent decrease in the NaNO 2 treated samples on days 1, 3 and 7 for both Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. NO successfully inhibited the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa on soft contact lenses in dose-dependent manner.

  8. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17-25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ''pump-dump" arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin ( λ=226.35(1)nm) of the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') ← X2Π1/2( v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246-248 nm within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ=226.35(1)nm and λ=247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A2Σ+( V' = 0, J') excited electronic state to the X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  9. Nitric Oxide-Induced Polycystic Ovaries in The Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Hassani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nitric oxide (NO involves in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a causeof infertility in women during the reproductive age. The PCOS is now categorized as aninflammatory phenomenon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of NO, a proinflammatoryagent, in this syndrome at histological and biochemical levels.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, animals were female Wistar rats(weighing 200-250 g kept under standard conditions. L-Arginine (50-200 mg/kg, a precursorof NO, was injected intra-peritoneally (i.p. through a period ranging from 9 to14 days/once a day. The rats' estrous cycle was studied using Papanicolaou test; those showing phaseof Diestrous were grouped into experimental and control groups. The control group solelyreceived saline (1 ml/kg, i.p. throughout all experiments. To evaluate the inflammatory effectof NO, the rats were treated an anti-inflammatory agent, naloxone hydrochloride (0.4 mg/kg,i.p., prior to L-arginine. At the end of the treatment period all animals’ ovaries were assessedfor histopathological and histochemical investigations. Also, activation of NO synthase (NOSin the experiments was studied using NADPH-diaphorase technique.Results: The ovaries of rats treated with L-arginine showed polycystic characteristics incontrast to those collected from control or naloxone pretreated groups, based on image analysis.A difference in enzyme activation was also shown in the sections that belonged to thegroups that received L-arginine when compared with the pre-naloxone and control groups.Conclusion: Based on these results, we believe that NO may play a major role in thepathophysiology of PCOS.

  10. Nitric Oxide in Plants: The Roles of Ascorbate and Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Hargrove, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbic acid and hemoglobins have been linked to nitric oxide metabolism in plants. It has been hypothesized that ascorbic acid directly reduces plant hemoglobin in support of NO scavenging, producing nitrate and monodehydroascorbate. In this scenario, monodehydroascorbate reductase uses NADH to reduce monodehydroascorbate back to ascorbate to sustain the cycle. To test this hypothesis, rates of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin reduction by ascorbate were measured directly, in the presence and absence of purified rice monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. Solution NO scavenging was also measured methodically in the presence and absence of rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and monodehydroascorbate reductase, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, in an effort to gauge the likelihood of these proteins affecting NO metabolism in plant tissues. Our results indicate that ascorbic acid slowly reduces rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin at a rate identical to myoglobin reduction. The product of the reaction is monodehydroascorbate, which can be efficiently reduced back to ascorbate in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase and NADH. However, our NO scavenging results suggest that the direct reduction of plant hemoglobin by ascorbic acid is unlikely to serve as a significant factor in NO metabolism, even in the presence of monodehydroascorbate reductase. Finally, the possibility that the direct reaction of nitrite/nitrous acid and ascorbic acid produces NO was measured at various pH values mimicking hypoxic plant cells. Our results suggest that this reaction is a likely source of NO as the plant cell pH drops below 7, and as nitrite concentrations rise to mM levels during hypoxia. PMID:24376554

  11. Role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2000-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the role of nitric oxide in long-term potentiation induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by high-frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. The nitric oxide scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide ] and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester were administered before and after induction of potentiation. Both drugs completely prevented long-term potentiation, whereas they did not impede the potentiation build-up, or affect the already established potentiation. These results demonstrate that the induction, but not the maintenance of vestibular long-term potentiation, depends on the synthesis and release into the extracellular medium of nitric oxide. In addition, we analysed the effect of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside on vestibular responses. Sodium nitroprusside induced long-term potentiation, as evidenced through the field potential enhancement and unit peak latency decrease. This potentiation was impeded by D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was reduced under blockade of synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors by ginkgolide B and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors by (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1, 5-dicarboxylic acid. When reduced, potentiation fully developed following the washout of antagonist, demonstrating an involvement of platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in its full development. Potentiation induced by sodium nitroprusside was also associated with a decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio, which persisted under ginkgolide B, indicating that nitric oxide increases glutamate release independently of platelet-activating factor-mediated presynaptic events. We suggest that nitric oxide, released after the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, acts as a retrograde messenger leading to an enhancement of glutamate release to a

  12. Pu-erh Tea Reduces Nitric Oxide Levels in Rats by Inhibiting Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression through Toll-Like Receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Guan; Li, Chunjie; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Hang; Sheng, Jun; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pu-erh tea undergoes a unique fermentation process and contains theabrownins, polysaccharides and caffeine; although it is unclear about which component is associated with the down regulation of nitric oxide levels or how this process is mediated. To address this question we examined the effects of pu-erh tea on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes. Cohorts of rats were separately given four-week treatments of water as control, pu-erh tea, or the tea components: theabrownins, caffeine or polysaccharides. Five experimental groups were injected with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to induce nitric oxide (NO) production, while the corresponding five control groups were injected with saline as a negative control. The serum and liver NO concentrations were examined and the NOS expression of both mRNA and protein was measured in liver. The results showed that the rats which were fed pu-erh tea or polysaccharides had lower levels of NO which corresponded with the down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We further demonstrate that this effect is mediated through reduction of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Thus we find that the polysaccharide components in pu-erh tea reduce NO levels in an animal model by inhibiting the iNOS expression via signaling through TLR4. PMID:22837686

  13. Interaction between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species, Heme Oxygenase, and Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulates Phagocytosis in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Müllebner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMacrophages are cells of the innate immune system that populate every organ. They are required not only for defense against invading pathogens and tissue repair but also for maintenance of tissue homeostasis and iron homeostasis.AimThe aim of this study is to understand whether heme oxygenase (HO and nitric oxide synthase (NOS contribute to the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX activity and phagocytosis, two key components of macrophage function.MethodsThis study was carried out using resting J774A.1 macrophages treated with hemin or vehicle. Activity of NOS, HO, or NOX was inhibited using specific inhibitors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS formation was determined by Amplex® red assay, and phagocytosis was measured using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bacteria. In addition, we analyzed the fate of the intracellular heme by using electron spin resonance.ResultsWe show that both enzymes NOS and HO are essential for phagocytic activity of macrophages. NOS does not directly affect phagocytosis, but stimulates NOX activity via nitric oxide-triggered ROS production of mitochondria. Treatment of macrophages with hemin results in intracellular accumulation of ferrous heme and an inhibition of phagocytosis. In contrast to NOS, HO products, including carbon monoxide, neither clearly affect NOX activity nor clearly affect phagocytosis, but phagocytosis is accelerated by HO-mediated degradation of heme.ConclusionBoth enzymes contribute to the bactericidal activity of macrophages independently, by controlling different pathways.

  14. Nitric Oxide Synthesis Is Increased in Cybrid Cells with m.3243A>G Mutation

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    Juliana Gamba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a free radical and a signaling molecule in several pathways, produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS from the conversion of L-arginine to citrulline. Supplementation of L-arginine has been used to treat MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke like syndrome, a mitochondrial disease caused by the m.3243A>G mutation. Low levels of serum arginine and endothelium dysfunction have been reported in MELAS and this treatment may increase NO in endothelial cells and promote vasodilation, decreasing cerebral ischemia and strokes. Although clinical benefits have been reported, little is known about NO synthesis in MELAS. In this study we found that osteosarcoma derived cybrid cells with high levels of m.3243A>G had increased nitrite, an NO metabolite, and increased intracellular NO, demonstrated by an NO fluorescent probe (DAF-FM. Muscle vessels from patients with the same mutation had increased staining in NADPH diaphorase, suggestive of increased NOS. These results indicate increased production of NO in cells harboring the m.3243A>G, however no nitrated protein was detected by Western blotting. Further studies are necessary to clarify the exact mechanisms of L-arginine effect to determine the appropriate clinical use of this drug therapy.

  15. Efficacy of Nitric Oxide Fumigation for Controlling Codling Moth in Apples

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    Yong-Biao Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO fumigation under ultralow oxygen (ULO conditions was studied for its efficacy in controlling codling moth and effects on postharvest quality of apples. NO fumigation was effective against eggs and larvae of different sizes on artificial diet in 48 h treatments. Small larvae were more susceptible to nitric oxide than other stages at 0.5% NO concentration. There were no significant differences among life stages at 1.0% to 2.0% NO concentrations. In 24 h treatments of eggs, 3.0% NO fumigation at 2 °C achieved 100% egg mortality. Two 24 h fumigation treatments of infested apples containing medium and large larvae with 3.0% and 5.0% NO resulted in 98% and 100% mortalities respectively. Sound apples were also fumigated with 5.0% NO for 24 h at 2 °C to determine effects on apple quality. The fumigation treatment was terminated by flushing with nitrogen and had no negative impact on postharvest quality of apples as measured by firmness and color at 2 and 4 weeks after fumigation. This study demonstrated that NO fumigation was effective against codling moth and safe to apple quality, and therefore has potential to become a practical alternative to methyl bromide fumigation for control of codling moth in apples.

  16. Efficacy of Nitric Oxide Fumigation for Controlling Codling Moth in Apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Biao; Yang, Xiangbing; Simmons, Gregory

    2016-12-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) fumigation under ultralow oxygen (ULO) conditions was studied for its efficacy in controlling codling moth and effects on postharvest quality of apples. NO fumigation was effective against eggs and larvae of different sizes on artificial diet in 48 h treatments. Small larvae were more susceptible to nitric oxide than other stages at 0.5% NO concentration. There were no significant differences among life stages at 1.0% to 2.0% NO concentrations. In 24 h treatments of eggs, 3.0% NO fumigation at 2 °C achieved 100% egg mortality. Two 24 h fumigation treatments of infested apples containing medium and large larvae with 3.0% and 5.0% NO resulted in 98% and 100% mortalities respectively. Sound apples were also fumigated with 5.0% NO for 24 h at 2 °C to determine effects on apple quality. The fumigation treatment was terminated by flushing with nitrogen and had no negative impact on postharvest quality of apples as measured by firmness and color at 2 and 4 weeks after fumigation. This study demonstrated that NO fumigation was effective against codling moth and safe to apple quality, and therefore has potential to become a practical alternative to methyl bromide fumigation for control of codling moth in apples.

  17. Immune effector mechanisms of the nitric oxide pathway in malaria: cytotoxicity versus cytoprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nahrevanian

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to be an important mediator and critical signaling molecule for malaria immunopathology; it is also a target for therapy and for vaccine. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is synthesized by a number of cell types under inflammatory conditions. The most relevant known triggers for its expression are endotoxins and cytokines. To date, there have been conflicting reports concerning the clinical significance of NO in malaria. Some researchers have proposed that NO contributes to the development of severe and complicated malaria, while others have argued that NO has a protective role. Infection with parasites resistant to the microbicidal action of NO may result in high levels of NO being generated, which could then damage the host, instead of controlling parasitemia. Consequently, the host-parasite interaction is a determining factor for whether the parasite is capable of stimulating NO production; the role of NO in resistance to malaria appears to be strain specific. It is known that NO and/or its related molecules are involved in malaria, but their involvement is not independent of other immune events. NO is an important, but possibly not an essential contributor to the control of acute-phase malaria infection. The protective immune responses against malaria parasite are multifactorial; however, they necessarily involve final effector molecules, including NO, iNOS and RNI.

  18. [Role of restricted nitric oxide overproduction in the cardioprotective effect of adaptation to intermittent hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    goriacheva, A V; Belkina, L M; Terekhina, O L; Dawney, H F; Mallet, R T; Smirin, B V; Smirnova, E A; Mashina, S Iu; Manukhina, E B

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to intermittent normobaric hypoxia is cardioprotective and can stimulate nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. However the role of nitric oxide (NO) in prevention of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of myocardium is controversial. This study was focused on evaluating the effect of adaptation to hypoxia and IR on NO production and development of nitrative stress in the myocardium. Adaptation to hypoxia tended to increase NO production, which was determined by the total level of plasma nitrite and nitrate, and prevented IR-induced NO overproduction. The IR-induced NO overproduction was associated with significant 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) accumulation in the left ventricle but not in septum or aorta. In hypoxia-adapted rats, 3-NT after IR was similar to that of control rats without IR. IHC induced marked accumulation of HIF-1alpha in the left ventricle. We suggest that HIF-1alpha contributes to NO-synthase expression during adaptation to hypoxia and thereby facilitates the increase in NO production. NO, in turn, may subsequently prevent NO overproduction during IR by a negative feedback mechanism.

  19. Isoeugenin, a Novel Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Isolated from the Rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jin An

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical studies on the constituents of the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica (Gramineae were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. We also aimed to search for any biologically active substance capable of inhibiting nitric oxide (NO formation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated macrophage 264.7 cells, by testing four compounds isolated from this plant. Four compounds, including a new chromone, isoeugenin, along with ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and caffeic acid were isolated and identified by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of isoeugenin was determined as 7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-2-methylchromone by the 2D-NMR technique. Among the four compounds, isoeugenin has the lowest IC50 value on the inhibition of NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW264.7 cells (IC50, 9.33 μg/mL. In addition, isoeugenin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and proinflammatory cytokines mRNA levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of isoeugenin is associated with the down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW264.7 cells. Accordingly, our results suggest that the new chromone isoegenin should be considered a potential treatment for inflammatory disease.

  20. Isoeugenin, a Novel Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Isolated from the Rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyo-Jin; Nugroho, Agung; Song, Byong-Min; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2015-12-01

    Phytochemical studies on the constituents of the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica (Gramineae) were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We also aimed to search for any biologically active substance capable of inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) formation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophage 264.7 cells, by testing four compounds isolated from this plant. Four compounds, including a new chromone, isoeugenin, along with ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and caffeic acid were isolated and identified by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of isoeugenin was determined as 7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-2-methylchromone by the 2D-NMR technique. Among the four compounds, isoeugenin has the lowest IC50 value on the inhibition of NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW264.7 cells (IC50, 9.33 μg/mL). In addition, isoeugenin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and proinflammatory cytokines mRNA levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of isoeugenin is associated with the down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW264.7 cells. Accordingly, our results suggest that the new chromone isoegenin should be considered a potential treatment for inflammatory disease.

  1. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous solution of nitric oxide in different formal oxidation states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Mateus F.; Rocha, Willian R.

    2015-10-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the early chemical events involved in the dynamics of nitric oxide (NOrad), nitrosonium cation (NO+) and nitroxide anion (NO-) in aqueous solution. The NO+ ion is very reactive in aqueous solution having a lifetime of ∼4 × 10-13 s, which is shorter than the value of 3 × 10-10 s predicted experimentally. The NO+ reacts generating the nitrous acid as an intermediate and the NO2- ion as the final product. The dynamics of NOrad revealed the reversibly formation of a transient anion radical species HONOrad -.

  2. Increasing the Fungicidal Action of Amphotericin B by Inhibiting the Nitric Oxide-Dependent Tolerance Pathway

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    Kim Vriens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphotericin B (AmB induces oxidative and nitrosative stresses, characterized by production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, in fungi. Yet, how these toxic species contribute to AmB-induced fungal cell death is unclear. We investigated the role of superoxide and nitric oxide radicals in AmB’s fungicidal activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using a digital microfluidic platform, which enabled monitoring individual cells at a spatiotemporal resolution, and plating assays. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME was used to interfere with nitric oxide radical production. L-NAME increased and accelerated AmB-induced accumulation of superoxide radicals, membrane permeabilization, and loss of proliferative capacity in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione inhibited AmB’s action. Hence, superoxide radicals were important for AmB’s fungicidal action, whereas nitric oxide radicals mediated tolerance towards AmB. Finally, also the human pathogens Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were more susceptible to AmB in the presence of L-NAME, pointing to the potential of AmB-L-NAME combination therapy to treat fungal infections.

  3. Platelet hyperaggregability in obesity: is there a role for nitric oxide impairment and oxidative stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Natália Rodrigues Pereira; Siqueira de Medeiros, Mariana; Mury, Wanda Vianna; Matsuura, Cristiane; Perszel, Monique Bandeira Moss; Noronha Filho, Gerson; Brunini, Tatiana Mc; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Claúdio

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that platelet activation markers are consistently elevated in obesity, contributing to its prothrombotic state. In order to improve the understanding of the regulation of platelet function in obesity, the aim of this study was to investigate the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway in obese adults without other cardiovascular risk factor. Seventeen obese (body mass index [BMI] 35.9±1.0 kg/m(2) ) and eighteen age-matched normal weight subjects (BMI 22.0±0.6 kg/m(2) ) were included in this study. l-arginine influx was measured with incubation of l-[(3) H]-arginine. NO synthase (NOS) and arginase activities were determined by the citrulline assay and the conversion of l-[(14) C]-arginine to [(14) C]-urea, respectively. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) content was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, the study analyzed: platelet aggregation; intraplatelet antioxidant enzymes, via superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities; and systemic levels of l-arginine, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Obese patients presented a significant decrease of platelet l-arginine influx, NOS activity, and cGMP levels, along with platelet hyperaggregability. On the presence of NO donor, platelet aggregation was similar between the groups. The fibrinogen and CRP systemic levels were significantly higher and SOD activity was reduced in obesity. No significant differences were observed in plasma levels of l-arginine and intraplatelet arginase and catalase activities between groups. The diminished NO bioavailability associated with inflammatory status and impaired enzymatic antioxidant defence may contribute to future cardiovascular complications in obesity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. The Semireduced Mechanism for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Non-Heme Diiron Complexes: Modeling Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corey J; Speelman, Amy L; Kupper, Claudia; Demeshko, Serhiy; Meyer, Franc; Shanahan, James P; Alp, E Ercan; Hu, Michael; Zhao, Jiyong; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2018-02-21

    Flavodiiron nitric oxide reductases (FNORs) are a subclass of flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) capable of preferential binding and subsequent reduction of NO to N 2 O. FNORs are found in certain pathogenic bacteria, equipping them with resistance to nitrosative stress, generated as a part of the immune defense in humans, and allowing them to proliferate. Here, we report the spectroscopic characterization and detailed reactivity studies of the diiron dinitrosyl model complex [Fe 2 (BPMP)(OPr)(NO) 2 ](OTf) 2 for the FNOR active site that is capable of reducing NO to N 2 O [Zheng et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 4902-4905]. Using UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and spectro-electrochemistry, we show that one reductive equivalent is in fact sufficient for the quantitative generation of N 2 O, following a semireduced reaction mechanism. This reaction is very efficient and produces N 2 O with a first-order rate constant k > 10 2 s -1 . Further isotope labeling studies confirm an intramolecular N-N coupling mechanism, consistent with the rapid time scale of the reduction and a very low barrier for N-N bond formation. Accordingly, the reaction proceeds at -80 °C, allowing for the direct observation of the mixed-valent product of the reaction. At higher temperatures, the initial reaction product is unstable and decays, ultimately generating the diferrous complex [Fe 2 (BPMP)(OPr) 2 ](OTf) and an unidentified ferric product. These results combined offer deep insight into the mechanism of NO reduction by the relevant model complex [Fe 2 (BPMP)(OPr)(NO) 2 ] 2+ and provide direct evidence that the semireduced mechanism would constitute a highly efficient pathway to accomplish NO reduction to N 2 O in FNORs and in synthetic catalysts.

  5. Fluorescence-based detection of nitric oxide in aqueous and methanol media using a copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Biplab; Kumar, Pankaj; Ghosh, Pokhraj; Kalita, Apurba

    2011-03-14

    The quenched fluorescent intensity of a copper(II) complex, 1, of a fluorescent ligand, in degassed methanol or aqueous (buffered at pH 7.2) solution, was found to reappear on exposure to nitric oxide. Thus, it can function as a fluorescence based nitric oxide sensor. It has been found that the present complex can be used to sense nanomolar quantities of nitric oxide in both methanol and pH 7.2 buffered-water medium.

  6. DMPD: Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17513437 Regulation of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and arginin...tion of nitric oxide synthesis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. A...erecycling. Mori M. J Nutr. 2007 Jun;137(6 Suppl 2):1616S-1620S. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of nitric oxide synthe...sis and apoptosis by arginase and argininerecycling. PubmedID 17513437 Title Regula

  7. Reduction of nitric oxide catalyzed by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase from an anammox bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisa, Tatsuya; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji; Fujii, Takao

    2014-12-01

    The hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from the anammox bacterium, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis has been reported to catalyze the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitric oxide (NO) by using bovine cytochrome c as an oxidant. In contrast, we investigated whether the HAO from anammox bacterium strain KSU-1 could catalyze the reduction of NO with reduced benzyl viologen (BVred) and the NO-releasing reagent, NOC 7. The reduction proceeded, resulting in the formation of NH2OH as a product. The oxidation rate of BVred was proportional to the concentration of BVred itself for a short period in each experiment, a situation that was termed quasi-steady state. The analyses of the states at various concentrations of HAO allowed us to determine the rate constant for the catalytic reaction, (2.85 ± 0.19) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), governing NO reduction by BVred and HAO, which was comparable to that reported for the HAO from the ammonium oxidizer, Nitrosomonas with reduced methyl viologen. These results suggest that the anammox HAO functions to adjust anammox by inter-conversion of NO and NH2OH depending on the redox potential of the physiological electron transfer protein in anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Intracellular conversion of environmental nitrate and nitrite to nitric oxide with resulting developmental toxicity to the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany R Hannas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate and nitrite (jointly referred to herein as NO(x are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which aquatic organisms are at particularly high risk of exposure. We tested the hypothesis that NO(x undergo intracellular conversion to the potent signaling molecule nitric oxide resulting in the disruption of endocrine-regulated processes.These experiments were performed with insect cells (Drosophila S2 and whole organisms Daphnia magna. We first evaluated the ability of cells to convert nitrate (NO(3(- and nitrite (NO(2(- to nitric oxide using amperometric real-time nitric oxide detection. Both NO(3(- and NO(2(- were converted to nitric oxide in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. Further, nitric oxide trapping and fluorescent visualization studies revealed that perinatal daphnids readily convert NO(2(- to nitric oxide. Next, daphnids were continuously exposed to concentrations of the nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside (positive control and to concentrations of NO(3(- and NO(2(-. All three compounds interfered with normal embryo development and reduced daphnid fecundity. Developmental abnormalities were characteristic of those elicited by compounds that interfere with ecdysteroid signaling. However, no compelling evidence was generated to indicate that nitric oxide reduced ecdysteroid titers.Results demonstrate that nitrite elicits developmental and reproductive toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations due likely to its intracellular conversion to nitric oxide.

  9. Ultra-low power thin film transistors with gate oxide formed by nitric acid oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Kim, W. B.; Matsumoto, T.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature fabrication method of SiO 2 /Si structure by use of nitric acid, i.e., nitric acid oxidation of Si (NAOS) method, and applied it to thin film transistors (TFT). A silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ) layer formed by the NAOS method at room temperature possesses 1.8 nm thickness, and its leakage current density is as low as that of thermally grown SiO 2 layer with the same thickness formed at ∼900 deg C. The fabricated TFTs possess an ultra-thin NAOS SiO 2 /CVD SiO 2 stack gate dielectric structure. The ultrathin NAOS SiO 2 layer effectively blocks a gate leakage current, and thus, the thickness of the gate oxide layer can be decreased from 80 to 20 nm. The thin gate oxide layer enables to decrease the operation voltage to 2 V (cf. the conventional operation voltage of TFTs with 80 nm gate oxide: 12 V) because of the low threshold voltages, i.e., -0.5 V for P-ch TFTs and 0.5 V for N-ch TFTs, and thus the consumed power decreases to 1/36 of that of the conventional TFTs. The drain current increases rapidly with the gate voltage, and the sub-threshold voltage is ∼80 mV/dec. The low sub-threshold swing is attributable to the thin gate oxide thickness and low interface state density of the NAOS SiO 2 layer. (authors)

  10. Proteasomal control of cytokinin synthesis protects Mycobacterium tuberculosis against nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Tu, Shengjiang; Novák, Ondřej; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; McAllister, Fiona E.; Aravind, L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Strnad, Miroslav; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Summary One of several roles of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome is to defend against host-produced nitric oxide (NO), a free radical that can damage numerous biological macromolecules. Mutations that inactivate proteasomal degradation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in bacteria that are hypersensitive to NO and attenuated for growth in vivo, but it was not known why. To elucidate the link between proteasome function, NO-resistance, and pathogenesis, we screened for suppressors of NO hypersensitivity in a mycobacterial proteasome ATPase mutant and identified mutations in Rv1205. We determined that Rv1205 encodes a pupylated proteasome substrate. Rv1205 is a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY, which catalyzes the production of hormones called cytokinins. Remarkably, we report for the first time that an obligate human pathogen secretes several cytokinins. Finally, we determined that the Rv1205-dependent accumulation of cytokinin breakdown products is likely responsible for the sensitization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome-associated mutants to NO. PMID:25728768

  11. Comparison of nitric oxide binding to different pure and mixed protoporphyrin IX monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoben, W.; Crego-Calama, M.; Brongersma, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) binding properties of monolayers of four different protoporphyrins IX adsorbed on aluminum oxide surfaces have been investigated. XPS and AFM results are consistent with the presence of a monolayer of porphyrins, bound to the surface by their carboxylic acid groups and with the

  12. Modeling of the Nitric Oxide Transport in the Human Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamaoun, Cyril; Van Muylem, Alain; Haut, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    In the human lungs, nitric oxide (NO) acts as a bronchodilatator, by relaxing the bronchial smooth muscles and is closely linked to the inflammatory status of the lungs, owing to its antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air has been shown to be higher for asthmatic patients than for healthy patients. Multiple models have been developed in order to characterize the NO dynamics in the lungs, owing to their complex structure. Indeed, direct measurements in the lungs are difficult and, therefore, these models are valuable tools to interpret experimental data. In this work, a new model of the NO transport in the human lungs is proposed. It belongs to the family of the morphological models and is based on the morphometric model of Weibel (1963). When compared to models published previously, its main new features are the layered representation of the wall of the airways and the possibility to simulate the influence of bronchoconstriction (BC) and of the presence of mucus on the NO transport in lungs. The model is based on a geometrical description of the lungs, at rest and during a respiratory cycle, coupled with transport equations, written in the layers composing an airway wall and in the lumen of the airways. First, it is checked that the model is able to reproduce experimental information available in the literature. Second, the model is used to discuss some features of the NO transport in healthy and unhealthy lungs. The simulation results are analyzed, especially when BC has occurred in the lungs. For instance, it is shown that BC can have a significant influence on the NO transport in the tissues composing an airway wall. It is also shown that the relation between BC and the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air is complex. Indeed, BC might lead to an increase or to a decrease of this molar fraction, depending on the extent of the BC and on the possible presence of mucus. This should be confirmed experimentally and might

  13. Mars’ seasonal mesospheric transport seen through nitric oxide nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby, Zachariah; Stiepen, Arnaud; Jain, Sonal; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Stevens, Michael H.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Evans, J. Scott; Stewart, A. Ian; Chaffin, Michael; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William E.; Clarke, John T.; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Forget, Francois; Lo, Daniel Y.; Hubert, Benoît; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    We analyze the ultraviolet nightglow in the atmosphere of Mars through nitric oxide (NO) δ and γ band emissions as observed by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft when it is at apoapse and periapse.In the dayside thermosphere of Mars, solar extreme-ultraviolet radiation dissociates CO2 and N2 molecules. O(3P) and N(4S) atoms are carried from the dayside to the nightside by the day-night hemispheric transport process, where they descend through the nightside mesosphere and can radiatively recombine to form NO(C2Π). The excited molecules rapidly relax by emitting photons in the UV δ and γ bands. These emissions are indicators of the N and O atom fluxes from the dayside to Mars’ nightside and the descending circulation pattern from the nightside thermosphere to the mesosphere (e.g. Bertaux et al., 2005 ; Bougher et al., 1990 ; Cox et al., 2008 ; Gagné et al., 2013 ; Gérard et al., 2008 ; Stiepen et al., 2015, 2017).Observations of these emissions are gathered from a large dataset spanning different seasonal conditions.We present discussion on the variability in the brightness and altitude of the emission with season, geographical position (longitude), and local time, along with possible interpretation by local and global changes in the mesosphere dynamics. We show the possible impact of atmospheric waves forcing longitudinal variability and data-to-model comparisons indicating a wave-3 structure in Mars’ nightside mesosphere. Quantitative comparison with calculations of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique-Mars Global Climate Model (LMD-MGCM) suggests the model reproduces both the global trend of NO nightglow emission and its seasonal variation. However, it also indicates large discrepancies, with the emission up to a factor 50 times fainter in the model, suggesting that the predicted transport is too efficient toward the night winter pole in the thermosphere by

  14. ExoMol line list - XXI. Nitric Oxide (NO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andy; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Bernath, Peter; Müller, Holger S. P.; McConkey, Stephanie; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Line lists for the X 2Π electronic ground state for the parent isotopologue of nitric oxide (14N16O) and five other major isotopologues (14N17O, 14N18O, 15N16O, 15N17O and 15N18O) are presented. The line lists are constructed using empirical energy levels (and line positions) and high-level ab initio intensities. The energy levels were obtained using a combination of two approaches, from an effective Hamiltonian and from solving the rovibronic Schrödinger equation variationally. The effective Hamiltonian model was obtained through a fit to the experimental line positions of NO available in the literature for all six isotopologues using the programs spfit and spcat. The variational model was built through a least squares fit of the ab initio potential and spin-orbit curves to the experimentally derived energies and experimental line positions of the main isotopologue only using the duo program. The ab initio potential energy, spin-orbit and dipole moment curves (PEC, SOC and DMC) are computed using high-level ab initio methods and the marvel method is used to obtain energies of NO from experimental transition frequencies. The line lists are constructed for each isotopologue based on the use of the most accurate energy levels and the ab initio DMC. Each line list covers a wavenumber range from 0 to 40 000 cm-1 with approximately 22 000 rovibronic states and 2.3-2.6 million transitions extending to Jmax = 184.5 and vmax = 51. Partition functions are also calculated up to a temperature of 5000 K. The calculated absorption line intensities at 296 K using these line lists show excellent agreement with those included in the HITRAN and HITEMP data bases. The computed NO line lists are the most comprehensive to date, covering a wider wavenumber and temperature range compared to both the HITRAN and HITEMP data bases. These line lists are also more accurate than those used in HITEMP. The full line lists are available from the CDS http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr and ExoMol www

  15. Antibacterial activity of nitric oxide releasing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Amedea B.; Manosalva, Nixson; de Araujo Lima, Bruna; Pelegrino, Milena T.; Brocchi, Marcelo; Rubilar, Olga; Duran, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are well known potent antimicrobial agents. Similarly, the free radical nitric oxide (NO) has important antibacterial activity, and due to its instability, the combination of NO and nanomaterials has been applied in several biomedical applications. The aim of this work was to synthesize, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of a new NO-releasing AgNPs. Herein, AgNPs were synthesized by the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by catechin, a natural polyphenol and potent antioxidant agent, derived from green tea extract. Catechin acts as a reducing agent and as a capping molecule on the surface of AgNPs, minimizing particle agglomeration. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques. The results showed the formation of AgNPs with average hydrodynamic size of 44 nm, polydispersity index of 0.21, and zeta potential of -35.9 mV. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the presence of the AgNP core and cathecin as capping agent. The low molecular weight mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which contain free thiol group, was added on the surface of catechin-AgNPs, leading to the formation of MSA-catechin-AgNPs (the NO precursor nanoparticle). Free thiol groups of MSA-catechin-AgNPs were nitrosated leading to the formation of S-nitroso-mercaptosuccinic acid (S-nitroso-MSA), the NO donor. The amount of 342 ± 16 µmol of NO was released per gram of S-nitroso-MSA-catechin-AgNPs. The antibacterial activities of catechin-AgNPs, MSA-catechin-AgNPs, and S-nitroso-MSA-catechin-AgNPs were evaluated towards different resistant bacterial strains. The results demonstrated an enhanced antibacterial activity of the NO-releasing AgNP. For instance, the minimal inhibitory concentration values for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) incubated with AgNPs-catechin, AgNPs-catechin-MSA, and AgNPs-catechin-S-nitroso-MSA were found to be 62, 125 and 3 µg/mL, respectively. While in the case of

  16. Nitric oxide levels of aqueous humor after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiguzel, U; Bilgihan, K; Ozdek, S C; Sancak, B; Hasanreisoglu, B

    2004-01-01

    To measure the nitric oxide (NO) levels of aqueous humor in rabbits after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and to evaluate the alterations of NO levels according to the PRK surgery steps, ablation depth, and time. Fifty eyes of 25 New Zealand white rabbits were included in the study. One eye was later randomly excluded from the study in order to equalize the number of eyes in groups. Eyes were divided into seven groups, each comprising seven eyes: unwounded control (Group 1), epithelial scrape (Group 2; aqueous humor samples taken at the 4th hour), superficial PRK (Group 3; samples taken at the 4th hour), deep PRK (Group 4; samples taken at the 4th hour), epithelial scrape (Group 5; samples taken at the 24th hour), superficial PRK (Group 6; samples taken at the 24th hour), and deep PRK (Group 7; samples taken at the 24th hour). The corneal epithelium was mechanically removed in surgical groups. The authors performed superficial corneal ablation (59 microm) in Groups 3 and 6 and deep corneal ablation (99 microm) in Groups 4 and 7. Aqueous humor samples were taken at the 4th hour (Groups 2-4) or 24th hour (Groups 5-7) after corneal surgeries. NO measurements were performed indirectly by using the Griess reaction with a spectrophotometer. Aqueous humor NO levels 4 hours after corneal surgery were statistically significantly lower than the control group (p0.05). At the 24th hour, the deep PRK group had significantly lower NO levels than both the control group and Groups 5 and 6 (p0.05) but remained stable at lower levels in deep PRK groups (p<0.05). Corneal surgery caused low NO levels in aqueous humor 4 hours after surgery. However, 24 hours after surgery, NO levels normalized following epithelial scrape and superficial PRK and were stable at lower levels in the deep PRK group. Complications of deep PRK application are possibly induced by low NO existence in the aqueous humor.

  17. Cellular targets of nitric oxide in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Bartus

    Full Text Available In the hippocampus, as in many other CNS areas, nitric oxide (NO participates in synaptic plasticity, manifested as changes in pre- and/or postsynaptic function. While it is known that these changes are brought about by cGMP following activation of guanylyl cyclase-coupled NO receptors attempts to locate cGMP by immunocytochemistry in hippocampal slices in response to NO have failed to detect the cGMP elevation where expected, i.e. in the pyramidal neurones. Instead, astrocytes, unidentified varicose fibres and GABA-ergic nerve terminals are reported to be the prominent NO targets, raising the possibility that NO acts indirectly via other cells. We have re-investigated the distribution of cGMP generated in response to endogenous and exogenous NO in hippocampal slices using immunohistochemistry and new conditions designed to optimise cGMP accumulation and, hence, its detectability. The conditions included use of tissue from the developing rat hippocampus, a potent inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-2, and an allosteric enhancer of the NO-receptive guanylyl cyclase. Under these conditions, cGMP was formed in response to endogenous NO and was found in a population of pyramidal cell somata in area CA3 and subiculum as well as in structures described previously. The additional presence of exogenous NO resulted in hippocampal cGMP reaching the highest level recorded for brain tissue (1700 pmol/mg protein and in cGMP immunolabelling throughout the pyramidal cell layer. Populations of axons and interneurones were also stained. According with these results, immunohistochemistry for the common NO receptor β1-subunit indicated widespread expression. A similar staining pattern for the α1-subunit with an antibody used previously in the hippocampus and elsewhere, however, proved to be artefactual. The results indicate that the targets of NO in the hippocampus are more varied and extensive than previous evidence had suggested and, in particular, that the

  18. Trigeminocardiac reflex by mandibular extension on rat pial microcirculation: role of nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominga Lapi

    Full Text Available In the present study we have extended our previous findings about the effects of 10 minutes of passive mandibular extension in anesthetized Wistar rats. By prolonging the observation time to 3 hours, we showed that 10 minutes mandibular extension caused a significant reduction of the mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate respect to baseline values, which persisted up to 160 minutes after mandibular extension. These effects were accompanied by a characteristic biphasic response of pial arterioles: during mandibular extension, pial arterioles constricted and after mandibular extension dilated for the whole observation period. Interestingly, the administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone abolished the vasoconstriction observed during mandibular extension, while the administration of Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, abolished the vasodilation observed after mandibular extension. Either drug did not affect the reduction of mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate induced by mandibular extension. By qRT-PCR, we also showed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene expression was significantly increased compared with baseline conditions during and after mandibular extension and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression markedly increased at 2 hours after mandibular extension. Finally, western blotting detected a significant increase in neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. In conclusion mandibular extension caused complex effects on pial microcirculation involving opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide release by both neurons and endothelial vascular cells at different times.

  19. Nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of vitrectomized eyes with silicon oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Escarião

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of eyes who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with silicone oil. METHODS: Patients who underwent PPV with silicon oil injection, from february 2005 to august 2007, were selected. Nine patients (nine eyes participated in the study (five women and four men. Nitric oxide concentration was quantified after the aspiration of aqueous humor samples during the procedure of silicon oil removal. Data such as: oil emulsification; presence of oil in the anterior chamber; intraocular pressure and time with silicone oil were evaluated. Values of p <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: A positive correlation between nitric oxide concentration and time with silicon oil in the vitreous cavity (r=0.799 was observed. The nitric oxide concentration was significantly higher (p=0.02 in patients with silicon oil more than 24 months (0.90µmol/ml ± 0.59, n=3 in the vitreous cavity comparing to patients with less than 24 months (0.19µmol/ml ± 0.10, n=6. CONCLUSION: A positive correlation linking silicone oil time in the vitreous cavity with the nitric oxide concentration in the anterior chamber was observed.

  20. Caffeinated nitric oxide-releasing lozenge improves cycling time trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Kim, H T; Solares, G J; Kim, K; Ding, Z; Ivy, J L

    2015-02-01

    Boosting nitric oxide production during exercise by various means has been found to improve exercise performance. We investigated the effects of a nitric oxide releasing lozenge with added caffeine (70 mg) on oxygen consumption during steady-state exercise and cycling time trial performance using a double-blinded randomized, crossover experimental design. 15 moderately trained cyclists (7 females and 8 males) were randomly assigned to ingest the caffeinated nitric oxide lozenge or placebo 5 min before exercise. Oxygen consumption and blood lactate were assessed at rest and at 50%, 65% and 75% maximal oxygen consumption. Exercise performance was assessed by time to complete a simulated 20.15 km cycling time-trial course. No significant treatment effects for oxygen consumption or blood lactate at rest or during steady-state exercise were observed. However, time-trial performance was improved by 2.1% (p<0.01) when participants consumed the nitric oxide lozenge (2,424±69 s) compared to placebo (2,476±78 s) and without a significant difference in rating of perceived exertion. These results suggest that acute supplementation with a caffeinated nitric oxide releasing lozenge may be a practical and effective means of improving aerobic exercise performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Oxidation of urate by a therapeutic nitric oxide/air mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, M.; Nguyen, L.; Day, R.; Rogers, P.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Little is known about the potential toxicological consequences of therapeutic exposure of lung tissue to inhaled nitric oxide (NO). This route of administration is currently being successfully employed for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension and other lung pathologies including acute reperfusion injury in lung transplant patients. The toxicity of NO lies in its ability to act as an oxidant either in its own right or in concert with oxygen or with the superoxide free radical. One important interaction may be the reaction of these products with protective antioxidants in the lung epithelial lining fluid. One such antioxidant found in significant concentrations in both upper and lower airways is uric acid. In the present study, urate solutions (30μM) were exposed to a therapeutic concentration of NO gas, (35 ppm in air), for up to 90 minutes. Oxidative changes were followed spectrophotometrically and by HPLC. Significant loss of uric acid was observed with a concomitant formation of nitrite and allantoin, the stable oxidation product of NO and the major oxidation product of uric acid, respectively. No oxidation of urate was observed in the presence of air alone or when urate was incubated with nitrite. Uric acid oxidation could also be prevented by passing the NO / air stream through 10% KOH before the uric acid solution. This strategy removed trace amounts of higher oxides of nitrogen, (especially NO 2 ), from the NO / air stream. Thus, therapeutic inhalation of NO may deplete soluble antioxidants such as uric acid, especially during long-term chronic exposure unless care is taken to minimise formation of higher oxides of nitrogen

  2. Propolis attenuates oxidative injury in brain and lung of nitric oxide synthase inhibited rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Selamoglu-Talas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The blocking of nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity may reason vasoconstriction with formation of reactive oxygen species. Propolis has biological and pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant. The aim of this study was to examine the antioxidant effects of propolis which natural product on biochemical parameters in brain and lung tissues of acute nitric oxide synthase inhibited rats by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME.Methods: Rats have been received L-NAME (40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, NOS inhibitor for 15 days to produce hypertension and propolis (200mg/kg, by gavage the lastest 5 of 15 days.Results: There  were  the  increase  (P<0.001  in  the  malondialdehyde  levels  in  the  L-NAME treatment groups when compared to control rats, but the decrease (P<0.001 in the catalase activities in both brain and lung tissues. There were statistically changes (P<0.001 in these parameters of L-NAME+propolis treated rats as compared with L-NAME-treated group.Conclusion: The application of L-NAME to the Wistar rats resulted in well developed oxidative stress. Also, propolis may influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of hypertensive diseases and oxidative stress.

  3. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of milligram amounts of plutonium in nitric acid solutions - Potentiometric titration with potassium dichromate after oxidation by Ce(IV) and reduction by Fe(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This International Standard describes a precise and accurate analytical method for determining 1 mg to 5 mg of plutonium per millilitre in nitric acid solutions. The method is very selective for plutonium. It is suitable for the direct determination of plutonium in materials ranging from pure product solutions, to solutions of mixed nuclear materials with a uranium/plutonium ratio up to 20:1. However, potential application to the assay of plutonium in solutions of irradiated nuclear fuels and solutions of mixed nuclear materials with uranium/plutonium ratios of 20:1 to 33:1 has not yet been documented. The method recommends that the aliquot be weighed and that the titration burettes be calibrated gravimetrically in order to obtain adequate precision and accuracy. This does not preclude using any alternative technique which can be shown to give an equivalent accuracy. As the reproducibility of the reaction conditions is important to maintain good performance, extensive automatization of the procedure is beneficial

  4. Different natriuretic responses in obese and lean rats in response to nitric oxide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrozewicz, Marta A; Khraibi, Ali A; Simsek-Duran, Fatma; DeBose, Sophia C; Baydoun, Hind A; Dobrian, Anca D

    2011-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of renal sodium transport and participates in the control of natriuresis and diuresis. In obesity, the nitric oxide bioavailability was reportedly reduced, which may contribute to the maintenance of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of NO depletion on renal sodium handling in a model of diet-induced obesity hypertension. Obese hypertensive (obesity-prone (OP)) and lean normotensive (obesity-resistant (OR)) Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 1.2 mg/kg/day N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) for 4 weeks to inhibit NO synthesis. Acute pressure natriuresis and diuresis were measured in response to an increase in perfusion pressure. NHE3 and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase protein expression were measured by Western blot and NHE3 activity was determined as the rate of pH change in brush border membrane vesicles. NHE3 membrane localization was determined by confocal microscopy. L-NAME did not significantly attenuate the natriuretic and diuretic responses to increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP) in OP rats while inducing a significant reduction in OR rats. Following chronic NO inhibition, NHE3 protein expression and activity and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase protein expression were significantly increased in the OR but not in the OP group. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that the increase in NHE3 activity could be, at least in part, due to NHE3 membrane trafficking. Obese hypertensive rats have a weaker natriuretic response in response to NO inhibition compared to lean rats and the mechanism involves different regulation of the apical sodium exchanger NHE3 expression, activity, and trafficking.

  5. A meta-analysis of biomarkers related to oxidative stress and nitric oxide pathway in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Monica; Frustaci, Alessandra; Milic, Mirta; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Fini, Massimo; Bonassi, Stefano; Barbanti, Piero

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress are considered key events in the still unclear pathophysiology of migraine. Studies comparing the level of biomarkers related to nitric oxide (NO) pathway/oxidative stress in the blood/urine of migraineurs vs. unaffected controls were extracted from the PubMed database. Summary estimates of mean ratios (MR) were carried out whenever a minimum of three papers were available. Nineteen studies were included in the meta-analyses, accounting for more than 1000 patients and controls, and compared with existing literature. Most studies measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD) showed lower activity in cases, although the meta-analysis in erythrocytes gave null results. On the contrary, plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), an aspecific biomarker of oxidative damage, showed a meta-MR of 2.20 (95% CI: 1.65-2.93). As for NOs, no significant results were found in plasma, serum and urine. However, higher levels were shown during attacks, in patients with aura, and an effect of diet was found. The analysis of glutathione precursor homocysteine and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an NO synthase inhibitor, gave inconclusive results. The role of the oxidative pathway in migraine is still uncertain. Interesting evidence emerged for TBARS and SOD, and concerning the possible role of diet in the control of NOx levels. © International Headache Society 2015.

  6. Progesterone modulates the LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone-receptor independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Manuel Luis; Schander, Julieta Aylen; Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Franchi, Ana María

    2015-12-15

    Genital tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria induce miscarriage and are one of the most common complications of human pregnancy. LPS administration to 7-day pregnant mice induces embryo resorption after 24h, with nitric oxide playing a fundamental role in this process. We have previously shown that progesterone exerts protective effects on the embryo by modulating the inflammatory reaction triggered by LPS. Here we sought to investigate whether the in vivo administration of progesterone modulated the LPS-induced nitric oxide production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We found that progesterone downregulated LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone receptor-independent mechanism. Moreover, our results suggest a possible participation of glucocorticoid receptors in at least some of the anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of Nitric Oxide production by murine peritoneal macrophages induced by Brucella Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavoosi G

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Brueclla is a gram negative bacteria that causes Brucellosis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS ", the pathogenic agent of Brucella is composed of O-chain, core oligosaccharide and lipid A. in addition, the structural and biological properties of different LPS extracted from different strains are not identical. The first defense system against LPS is nonspecific immunity that causes macrophage activation. Activated macrophages produce oxygen and nitrogen radicals that enhance the protection against intracellular pathogens.In this experiment LPS was extracted by hot phenol- water procedure and the effect of various LPSs on nitric oxide prodution by peritoneal mouse macrophages was examined.Our results demonstrated that the effect of LPS on nitric oxide production is concentration-dependent we observed the maximum response in concentration of 10-20 microgram per milliliter. Also our results demonstrate that LPS extracted from vaccine Brucella abortus (S 19 had a highe effect on nitric oxide production than the LPS from other strains

  8. Placebo neural systems: nitric oxide, morphine and the dopamine brain reward and motivation circuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricchione, Gregory; Stefano, George B

    2005-05-01

    Evidence suggests that the placebo response is related to the tonic effects of constitutive nitric oxide in neural, vascular and immune tissues. Constitutive nitric oxide levels play a role in the modulation of dopamine outflow in the nigrostriatal movement and the mesolimbic and mesocortical reward and motivation circuitries. Endogenous morphine, which stimulates constitutive nitric oxide, may be an important signal molecule working at mu receptors on gamma aminobutyric acid B interneurons to disinhibit nigral and tegmental dopamine output. We surmise that placebo induced belief will activate the prefrontal cortex with downstream stimulatory effects on these dopamine systems as well as on periaqueductal grey opioid output neurons. Placebo responses in Parkinson's disease, depression and pain disorder may result. In addition, mesolimbic/mesocortical control of the stress response systems may provide a way for the placebo response to benefit other medical conditions.

  9. Nitric oxide signaling pathways involved in the inhibition of spontaneous activity in the guinea pig prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Anupa; Lang, Richard J; Exintaris, Betty

    2012-06-01

    We investigated nitric oxide mediated inhibition of spontaneous activity recorded in young and aging guinea pig prostates. Conventional intracellular microelectrode and tension recording techniques were used. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (10 μM) abolished spontaneous contractions and slow wave activity in 5 young and 5 aging prostates. Upon adding the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (10 μM) the frequency of spontaneous contractile and electrical activity was significantly increased in each age group. This increase was significantly larger in 4 to 8 preparations of younger vs aging prostates (about 40% to 50% vs about 10% to 20%, 2-way ANOVA pguinea pig prostates (Student paired t test pproduction. This may further explain the increase in prostatic smooth muscle tone observed in age related prostate specific conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron(II) porphyrins induced conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting Ting; Liu, Yong Dong; Zhong, Ru Gang

    2015-09-01

    Nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by heme proteins was reported as a protective mechanism to hypoxic injury in mammalian physiology. In this study, the pathways of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrin (P) complexes, which were generally recognized as models for heme proteins, were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). In view of two type isomers of combination of nitrite and Fe(II)(P), N-nitro- and O-nitrito-Fe(II)-porphyrin complexes, and two binding sites of proton to the different O atoms of nitrite moiety, four main pathways for the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide mediated by iron(II) porphyrins were proposed. The results indicate that the pathway of N-bound Fe(II)(P)(NO2) isomer into Fe(III)(P)(NO) and water is similar to that of O-bound isomer into nitric oxide and Fe(III)(P)(OH) in both thermodynamical and dynamical aspects. Based on the initial computational studies of five-coordinate nitrite complexes, the conversion of nitrite into NO mediated by Fe(II)(P)(L) complexes with 14 kinds of proximal ligands was also investigated. Generally, the same conclusion that the pathways of N-bound isomers are similar to those of O-bound isomer was obtained for iron(II) porphyrin with ligands. Different effects of ligands on the reduction reactions were also found. It is notable that the negative proximal ligands can improve reactive abilities of N-nitro-iron(II) porphyrins in the conversion of nitrite into nitric oxide compared to neutral ligands. The findings will be helpful to expand our understanding of the mechanism of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide by iron(II) porphyrins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lignans from Arctium lappa and their inhibition of LPS-induced nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Hong, Seong Su; Han, Xiang Hua; Hwang, Ji Sang; Lee, Dongho; Ro, Jai Seup; Hwang, Bang Yeon

    2007-01-01

    A new butyrolactone sesquilignan, isolappaol C (1), together with four known lignans, lappaol C (2), lappaol D (3), lappaol F (4), and diarctigenin (5), were isolated from the methanolic extract of the seeds from the Arctium lappa plant. The structure of isolappaol C (1) was determined by spectral analysis including 1D- and 2D-NMR. All the isolates were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the LPS-induced nitric oxide production using murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Lappaol F (4) and diarctigenin (5) strongly inhibited NO production in the LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells with IC(50) values of 9.5 and 9.6 microM, respectively.

  12. Black lung persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Saudi experience with sildenafil and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnemri, AbdulRahman M

    2017-01-01

    To determine the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment outcome of Saudi infants with black lung persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Methods: This is a retrospective review of all neonates with PPHN presented to the Armed Force Hospital Southern Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2012 to December 2014. Results: Ten term and near term infants presented with PPHN were included. Maternal diabetes and Down syndrome were the most common identified risk factors for PPHN in the study group. Nine infants were treated with oral sildenafil and did not require mechanical ventilation. Only one infant required mechanical ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide in addition to oral sildenafil. Conclusion: Most of the patients in this cohort with PPHN had risk factors, they did not require mechanical ventilation and responded well to oral sildenafil.

  13. Black lung persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Saudi experience with sildenafil and nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman M. Alnemri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment outcome of Saudi infants with black lung persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all neonates with PPHN presented to the Armed Force Hospital Southern Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2012 to December 2014. Results: Ten term and near term infants presented with PPHN were included. Maternal diabetes and Down syndrome were the most common identified risk factors for PPHN in the study group. Nine infants were treated with oral sildenafil and did not require mechanical ventilation. Only one infant required mechanical ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide in addition to oral sildenafil. Conclusion: Most of the patients in this cohort with PPHN had risk factors, they did not require mechanical ventilation and responded well to oral sildenafil.

  14. Clinical application of exhaled nitric oxide measurement in pediatric lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is a non invasive method for assessing the inflammatory status of children with airway disease. Different ways to measure FeNO levels are currently available. The possibility of measuring FeNO levels in an office setting even in young children, and the commercial availability of portable devices, support the routine use of FeNO determination in the daily pediatric practice. Although many confounding factors may affect its measurement, FeNO is now widely used in the management of children with asthma, and seems to provide significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than lung function or bronchial challenge tests. The role of FeNO in airway infection (e.g. viral bronchiolitis and common acquired pneumonia, in bronchiectasis, or in cases with diffuse lung disease is less clear. This review focuses on the most recent advances and the current clinical applications of FeNO measurement in pediatric lung disease.

  15. Nitric oxide scavenging by hemoglobin or nitric oxide synthase inhibition by N-Nitro-L-arginine induces cortical spreading ischemia when K+0+ is increased in the subarachnoid space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, J.P.; Körner, K.; Ebert, Nathalie

    1998-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow, nitric oxide, potassium, spreading depression, vasospasm, migraine, migrainous stroke, mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS)......Cerebral blood flow, nitric oxide, potassium, spreading depression, vasospasm, migraine, migrainous stroke, mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS)...

  16. Carboxyhemoglobin formation secondary to nitric oxide therapy in the setting of interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisi, Phillip; Ruisi, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been widely recognized as an exogenous poison, although endogenous mechanisms for its formation involve heme-oxygenase (HO) isoforms, more specifically HO-1, in the setting of oxidative stress such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, trauma, and nitric oxide use have been studied. In patients with refractory hypoxemia, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy is used to selectively vasodilate the pulmonary vasculature and improve ventilation-perfusion match. Inhaled nitric oxide is rapidly inactivated on binding to hemoglobin in the formation of nitrosyl- and methemoglobin in the pulmonary vasculature. Hence, inhaled nitric oxide has minimal systemic dissemination. Several experimental design studies involving lab rats have demonstrated increased levels of carboxyhemoglobin and exhaled CO as a result of nitric oxide HO-1 induction.

  17. The effect of energetic electron precipitation on the nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saetre, Camilla

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this thesis has been the study of the chemical effects of the electron precipitation in the upper atmosphere, and mainly the increase of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO). NO plays an important role in the temperature balance for the mesosphere and thermosphere.In this project auroral electron precipitation data, derived from the Polar Ionospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (PIXIE) and the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite, have been used together with NO density measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE)

  18. Nitric oxide coordinates metabolism, growth, and development via the nuclear receptor E75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Lucía; Necakov, Aleksandar S; Schwartz, Carol; Kimber, Sandra; Roberts, Ian J H; Krause, Henry M

    2011-07-15

    Nitric oxide gas acts as a short-range signaling molecule in a vast array of important physiological processes, many of which include major changes in gene expression. How these genomic responses are induced, however, is poorly understood. Here, using genetic and chemical manipulations, we show that nitric oxide is produced in the Drosophila prothoracic gland, where it acts via the nuclear receptor ecdysone-induced protein 75 (E75), reversing its ability to interfere with its heterodimer partner, Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3). Manipulation of these interactions leads to gross alterations in feeding behavior, fat deposition, and developmental timing. These neuroendocrine interactions and consequences appear to be conserved in vertebrates.

  19. Altered contractile response due to increased beta3-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy: the role of nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Loyer, Xavier; Le Guen, Morgan; Mabrouk, Nejma; David, Jean-Stéphane; Camors, Emmanuel; Carusio, Nunzia; Vivien, Benoît; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Heymes, Christophe; Riou, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    In the diabetic heart, the positive inotropic response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation is altered and beta1 and beta2 adrenoceptors are down-regulated, whereas beta3 adrenoceptor is up-regulated. In heart failure, beta3-adrenoceptor stimulation induces a negative inotropic effect that results from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3)-derived nitric oxide production. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of beta3-adrenoceptor in diabetic cardiomyopathy. beta-Adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (dobutamine echocardiography) and in vitro (left ventricular papillary muscle) in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The effect of beta3-adrenoceptor inhibition on the inotropic response was studied in vitro. Immunoblots and NOS activities were performed in heart homogenates (electron paramagnetic resonance) and isolated cardiomyocytes. Data are mean percentage of baseline +/- SD. The impaired positive inotropic effect was confirmed in diabetes both in vivo (121 +/- 15% vs. 160 +/- 16%; P < 0.05) and in vitro (112 +/- 5% vs. 179 +/- 15%; P < 0.05). In healthy rat, the positive inotropic effect was not significantly modified in presence of beta3-adrenoceptor antagonist (174 +/- 20%), nonselective NOS inhibitor (N -nitro-l-arginine methylester [l-NAME]; 183 +/- 19%), or selective NOS1 inhibitor (vinyl-l-N-5-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine [l-VNIO]; 172 +/- 13%). In diabetes, in parallel with the increase in beta3-adrenoceptor protein expression, the positive inotropic effect was partially restored by beta3-adrenoceptor antagonist (137 +/- 8%; P < 0.05), l-NAME (133 +/- 11%; P < 0.05), or l-VNIO (130 +/- 13%; P < 0.05). Nitric oxide was exclusively produced by NOS1 within diabetic cardiomyocytes. NOS2 and NOS3 proteins were undetectable. beta3-Adrenoceptor is involved in altered positive inotropic response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This effect is mediated by NOS1-derived nitric oxide in diabetic

  20. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in heart tissue and nitric oxide in serum of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys: association with heart injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Marcelo Espinola Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The factors contributing to chronic Chagas' heart disease remain unknown. High nitric oxide (NO levels have been shown to be associated with cardiomyopathy severity in patients. Further, NO produced via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2 is proposed to play a role in Trypanosoma cruzi control. However, the participation of iNOS/NOS2 and NO in T. cruzi control and heart injury has been questioned. Here, using chronically infected rhesus monkeys and iNOS/NOS2-deficient (Nos2(-/- mice we explored the participation of iNOS/NOS2-derived NO in heart injury in T. cruzi infection. METHODOLOGY: Rhesus monkeys and C57BL/6 and Nos2(-/- mice were infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain. Parasite DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction, T. cruzi antigens and iNOS/NOS2(+ cells were immunohistochemically detected in heart sections and NO levels in serum were determined by Griess reagent. Heart injury was assessed by electrocardiogram (ECG, echocardiogram (ECHO, creatine kinase heart isoenzyme (CK-MB activity levels in serum and connexin 43 (Cx43 expression in the cardiac tissue. RESULTS: Chronically infected monkeys presented conduction abnormalities, cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, which resembled the spectrum of human chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC. Importantly, chronic myocarditis was associated with parasite persistence. Moreover, Cx43 loss and increased CK-MB activity levels were primarily correlated with iNOS/NOS2(+ cells infiltrating the cardiac tissue and NO levels in serum. Studies in Nos2(-/- mice reinforced that the iNOS/NOS2-NO pathway plays a pivotal role in T. cruzi-elicited cardiomyocyte injury and in conduction abnormalities that were associated with Cx43 loss in the cardiac tissue. CONCLUSION: T. cruzi-infected rhesus monkeys reproduce features of CCC. Moreover, our data support that in T. cruzi infection persistent parasite-triggered iNOS/NOS2 in the cardiac tissue and NO overproduction might contribute

  1. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in tumor biology: the two sides of the same coin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lechner, Matthias; Lirk, Philipp; Rieder, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is one of three key enzymes generating nitric oxide (NO) from the amino acid l-arginine. iNOS-derived NO plays an important role in numerous physiological (e.g. blood pressure regulation, wound repair and host defence mechanisms) and pathophysiological

  2. Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase Deficiency Impairs the Long-Term Memory of Olfactory Fear Learning and Increases Odor Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Heldt, Scott A.; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    Experience-induced changes associated with odor learning are mediated by a number of signaling molecules, including nitric oxide (NO), which is predominantly synthesized by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brain. In the current study, we investigated the role of nNOS in the acquisition and retention of conditioned olfactory fear. Mice…

  3. Nitric oxide synthase in the gill of Atlantic salmon: colocalization with and inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesson, Lars O E; Tipsmark, Christian K; Holmqvist, Bo

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between nitric oxide (NO) and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) in the gill of anadromous Atlantic salmon. Cells containing NO-producing enzymes were revealed by means of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunocytochemistry and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphor...

  4. The Role of Nitric Oxide Metabolites in the Formation of Endothelial Dysfunction in Children with Persistent Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Odinets

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the role of nitric oxide metabolites in the development of endothelium dysfunction in children with persistent bronchial asthma in acute period and during remission Material and methods. Fifty eight children aged 6–17 years old suffering from persistent bronchial asthma in the period of exacerbation and remission of disease and 15 healthy children of control group have been exa­mined in order to evaluate the role of the metabolites of nitric oxide levels for the development of endothelium dysfunction in the children with persistent bronchial asthma. There were determined serum blood S-nitrosothiol, NO2, NO3, the intima-media complex by the ultrasound duplex scanning and endothelium-dependent dilation status of the brachial artery by cuff probe. Results. It showed a reduction in the levels of nitric oxide metabolites and endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery, intima-media thickening in the period of exacerbation. There was revealed a significant increase in the levels of nitric oxide metabolites and endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery compared with the period of exacerbation, but these findings are still lower in comparison with the control group, which indicates the presence of persistent changes in the vascular wall. Conclusion. The nitric oxide metabolites as well as the carotid intimal medial thickness and endothelium-dependent dilation of brachial artery should be marders of endothelium dysfunction in the children with bronchial asthma.

  5. Chemical kinetic models for combustion of hydrocarbons and formation of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Wilson, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of nitrogen oxides NOx during combustion of methane, propane, and a jet fuel, JP-4, was investigated in a jet stirred combustor. The results of the experiments were interpreted using reaction models in which the nitric oxide (NO) forming reactions were coupled to the appropriate hydrocarbon combustion reaction mechanisms. Comparison between the experimental data and the model predictions reveals that the CH + N2 reaction process has a significant effect on NO formation especially in stoichiometric and fuel rich mixtures. Reaction models were assembled that predicted nitric oxide levels that were in reasonable agreement with the jet stirred combustor data and with data obtained from a high pressure (5.9 atm (0.6 MPa)), prevaporized, premixed, flame tube type combustor. The results also suggested that the behavior of hydrocarbon mixtures, like JP-4, may not be significantly different from that of pure hydrocarbons. Application of the propane combustion and nitric oxide formation model to the analysis of NOx emission data reported for various aircraft gas turbines showed the contribution of the various nitric oxide forming processes to the total NOx formed.

  6. Effect of Exposure to Pill Contraceptive Low-dose Levels of Homocysteine and Nitric Oxide in Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is one of the public health priorities. Consumption of oral contraceptives increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and it still remains a concern. This study aimed to investigate the effect of exposure on pill contraceptive low-dose  levels on homocysteine and nitric oxide. methods: In this cohort ( retrospective+ prospective study, 100 women with normal menstrual cycle aged betwen 20-35 years old refered to health care centers of Yazd, Iran in 2015.  This study was conducted through face to face interviews by the researcher who asked for demographic and anthropometric characteristics. Anthropometic indices  was measured and the levels of homosysteine and nitric oxide was determined. The data were analyzed using t-test, chi- square test and ANOVA by SPSS 21. Results: The mean and standard deviation of homocysteine levels in the exposed group acompared to non-exposed group were (3/848±2/357 μmol/L and (3/284±1/616 μmol/L as well as the mean and standard deviation of nitric oxide in the exposed group were (p-value=0/41 and (181/360±90/44μM and in the non-exposed group were (162/654±90/913 μM and (p-value=0/29 , respectively.According to these results, there was not found any statistical significant  difference among these results. Conclusion: Taking low dose oral contraceptives in healthy women did not change any differences in homocysteine and nitric oxide levels as a modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  7. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure HF plasma source: generation of nitric oxide and ozone for bio-medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, S.; Bibinov, N.; Gesche, R.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new miniature high-frequency (HF) plasma source intended for bio-medical applications is studied using nitrogen/oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be used as an element of a plasma source array for applications in dermatology and surgery. Nitric oxide and ozone which are produced in this plasma source are well-known agents for proliferation of the cells, inhalation therapy for newborn infants, disinfection of wounds and blood ozonation. Using optical emission spectroscopy, microphotography and numerical simulation, the gas temperature in the active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined for varied nitrogen/oxygen flows. The influence of the gas flows on the plasma conditions is studied. Ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in the effluent of the plasma source are measured using absorption spectroscopy and electro-chemical NO-detector at variable gas flows. Correlations between plasma parameters and concentrations of the particles in the effluent of the plasma source are discussed. By varying the gas flows, the HF plasma source can be optimized for nitric oxide or ozone production. Maximum concentrations of 2750 ppm and 400 ppm of NO and O3, correspondingly, are generated.

  8. Determination of free nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Ravi, S.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1981-01-01

    Potentiometric titration of uranyl nitrate solution with sodium hydroxide exhibits two peaks. The first peak characterises the following reaction, UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )+NaOH Na[UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )(OH)]. This reaction, indicating the partial hydrolysis of uranyl oxalate complex, appears to be complete at pH9. If the titration is carried out to this end-point pH, the total alkali consumed can be equated to the sum of uranium content and the free acidity present in the sample volume. Based on this, a method was standardised to determine the free acidity in uranyl nitrate solution. The sample, taken in a solution of potassium oxalate previously adjusted to pH9, is titrated to this pH with standard sodium hydroxide. The free acidity in the sample can be computed by subtracting the alkali reacted with uranium from the total alkali consumed. Analyses of several synthetic samples containing uranium and nitric acid in a wide range of combinations indicate that the free acidity can be accurately determined by this method, if uranium concentration in the sample is known. The results are compared to those obtained by two other widely used methods, viz., (i) titration of pH7 in the presence of neutral potassium oxalate to suppress hydrolysis and (ii) separation of hydrolyzable ions on a cationic resin and alkali titration of the free acid released. The advantages of and the precision obtained with the present method over the above two methods are discussed. (author)

  9. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide on mercury oxidation and reduction under homogeneous conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongxin Zhao; Michael D. Mann; Edwin S. Olson; John H. Pavlish; Grant E. Dunham [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-15

    This paper is particularly related to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation and divalent mercury (Hg{sup 2+} reduction under simulated flue gas conditions in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). As a powerful oxidant and chlorinating reagent, Cl{sub 2} has the potential for Hg oxidation. However, the detailed mechanism for the interactions, especially among chlorine (Cl)-containing species, SO{sub 2}, NO, as well as H{sub 2}O, remains ambiguous. Research described in this paper therefore focused on the impacts of SO{sub 2} and NO on Hg{sup 0} oxidation and Hg{sup 2+} reduction with the intent of unraveling unrecognized interactions among Cl species, SO{sub 2}, and NO most importantly in the presence of H{sub 2}O. The experimental results demonstrated that SO{sub 2} and NO had pronounced inhibitory effects on Hg{sup 0} oxidation at high temperatures when H{sub 2}O was also present in the gas blend. Such a demonstration was further confirmed by the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} back into its elemental form. Data revealed that SO{sub 2} and NO were capable of promoting homogeneous reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} with H{sub 2}O being present. However, the above inhibition or promotion disappeared under homogeneous conditions when H{sub 2}O was removed from the gas blend. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Glufosinate ammonium stimulates nitric oxide production through N-methyl D-aspartate receptors in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaki, T; Mishima, A; Suzuki, E; Shintani, F; Fujii, T

    2000-09-01

    Glufosinate ammonium, a structural analogue of glutamate, is an active herbicidal ingredient. The neuronal activities of this compound were investigated by use of a microdialysis system that allowed us to measure nitric oxide production in the rat cerebellum in vivo. Kainate (0.3-30 nmol/10 microliter), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (3-300 nmol/10 microliter) and glufosinate ammonium (30-3000 nmol/10 microliter), which were administered through the microdialysis probe at a rate of 1 microliter/min for 10 min, stimulated nitric oxide production. The glufosinate ammonium-elicited increase in nitric oxide production was suppressed by an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and was antagonized by NMDA receptor antagonists, but not by a kainate/(+/-)-alphaamino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor antagonist. These results suggest that glufosinate ammonium stimulates nitric oxide production through NMDA receptors.

  11. Nitric oxide as a mediator of gastrointestinal mucosal injury?—Say it ain't so

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kubes

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide has been suggested as a contributor to tissue injury in various experimental models of gastrointestinal inflammation. However, there is overwhelming evidence that nitric oxide is one of the most important mediators of mucosal defence, influencing such factors as mucus secretion, mucosal blood flow, ulcer repair and the activity of a variety of mucosal immunocytes. Nitric oxide has the capacity to down-regulate inflammatory responses in the gastrointestinal tract, to scavenge various free radical species and to protect the mucosa from injury induced by topical irritants. Moreover, questions can be raised regarding the evidence purported to support a role for nitric oxide in producing tissue injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting a role for nitric oxide in protecting the gastrointestinal tract from injury.

  12. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengan, Celia H.; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-01-01

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle

  13. Genetic influence on the relation between exhaled nitric oxide and pulse wave reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Medda, Emanuela; Littvay, Levente; Lazar, Zsofia; Toccaceli, Virgilia; Fagnani, Corrado; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Nisticó, Lorenza; Brescianini, Sonia; Penna, Luana; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Boatta, Emanuele; Zini, Chiara; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Baracchini, Claudio; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Koller, Akos; Osztovits, Janos; Jermendy, Gyorgy; Preda, Istvan; Kiss, Robert Gabor; Karlinger, Kinga; Lannert, Agnes; Horvath, Tamas; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Garami, Zsolt; Berczi, Viktor; Horvath, Ildiko

    2013-06-01

    Nitric oxide has an important role in the development of the structure and function of the airways and vessel walls. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) is inversely related to the markers and risk factors of atherosclerosis. We aimed to estimate the relative contribution of genes and shared and non-shared environmental influences to variations and covariation of FE(NO) levels and the marker of elasticity function of arteries. Adult Caucasian twin pairs (n = 117) were recruited in Hungary, Italy and in the United States (83 monozygotic and 34 dizygotic pairs; age: 48 ± 16 SD years). FE(NO) was measured by an electrochemical sensor-based device. Pulse wave reflection (aortic augmentation index, Aix(ao)) was determined by an oscillometric method (Arteriograph). A bivariate Cholesky decomposition model was applied to investigate whether the heritabilities of FE(NO) and Aix(ao) were linked. Genetic effects accounted for 58% (95% confidence interval (CI): 42%, 71%) of the variation in FE(NO) with the remaining 42% (95%CI: 29%, 58%) due to non-shared environmental influences. A modest negative correlation was observed between FE(NO) and Aix(ao) (r = -0.17; 95%CI:-0.32,-0.02). FE(NO) showed a significant negative genetic correlation with Aix(ao) (r(g) = -0.25; 95%CI:-0.46,-0.02). Thus in humans, variations in FE(NO) are explained both by genetic and non-shared environmental effects. Covariance between FE(NO) and Aix(ao) is explained entirely by shared genetic factors. This is consistent with an overlap among the sets of genes involved in the expression of these phenotypes and provides a basis for further genetic studies on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.

  14. Combination of aerobic exercise and Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn. increased nitric oxide in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Adriani Kusumadewi Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Hypertension and myocardial infarction account for the high rate of mortality globally. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS Linn. is rich in antioxidants and previous studies have demonstrated its anti-hypertensive effects. Several studies show that regular physical activity is an important component to reduce cardiovascular mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a combination of aerobic exercise and HS extract on nitric oxide (NO and endothelin-1 (ET-1 in rats.   Methods An experimental study was conducted on 36 male Wistar rats, aged 4 weeks and 60-70 g in weight. The interventions were aerobic exercises and HS at 400 mg/kg BW/day administered for 4, 8 and 12 weeks. The rats were randomized into 12 groups: 3 control groups (C4, C8, C12, 3 aerobic exercise groups (A4, A8, A12, 3 HS groups (H4, H8, H12, and 3 combination groups [aerobic exercise and HS] (HA4, HA8, HA12. After 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the rats were sacrificed and their abdominal aorta was collected for determination of nitric oxide and ET-1 concentrations. One way ANOVA was used to analyze the data.   Results There was a significant difference in NO levels between all groups, with the 4-week aerobic exercise group (A4 showing the highest NO levels compared to the other eleven groups (p<0.05. In contrast, the ET-1 levels were not significantly different between all groups.   Conclusions This study demonstrated that the combination of HS supplementation and aerobic exercise increases NO in rats, and provided further evidence to the traditional use of the plant as an antioxidants agent.

  15. Preserved microvascular endothelial function in young, obese adults with functional loss of nitric oxide signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eHarrell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data indicate endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD may be preserved in the skeletal muscle microcirculation of young, obese adults. Preserved EDD might be mediated by compensatory mechanisms, impeding insight into preclinical vascular dysfunction. We aimed to determine the functional roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX toward EDD in younger obese adults. We first hypothesized EDD would be preserved in young, obese adults. Further, we hypothesized a reduced contribution of NOS in young, obese adults would be replaced by increased COX signaling. Microvascular EDD was assessed with Doppler ultrasound and brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (ACh in younger (27±1 yr obese (n=29 and lean (n=46 humans. Individual and combined contributions of NOS and COX were examined with intra-arterial infusions of L-NMMA and ketorolac, respectively. Vasodilation was quantified as an increase in forearm vascular conductance (ΔFVC. Arterial endothelial cell biopsies were analyzed for protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. ΔFVC to ACh was similar between groups. After L-NMMA, ΔFVC to ACh was greater in obese adults (p<0.05. There were no group differences in ΔFVC to ACh with ketorolac. With combined NOS-COX inhibition, ΔFVC was greater in obese adults at the intermediate dose of ACh. Surprisingly, arterial endothelial cell eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS were similar between groups. Younger obese adults exhibit preserved EDD and eNOS expression despite functional dissociation of NOS-mediated vasodilation and similar COX signaling. Compensatory NOS- and COX-independent vasodilatory mechanisms conceal reduced NOS contributions in otherwise healthy obese adults early in life, which may contribute to vascular dysfunction.

  16. Involvement of nitric oxide in granisetron improving effect on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Zakeri, Marjan; Norouzi, Abbas; Rastegar, Hossein; Mirazi, Naser; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-06

    Granisetron, a serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, widely used as an antiemetic drug following chemotherapy, has been found to improve learning and memory. In this study, effects of granisetron on spatial recognition memory and fear memory and the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) have been determined in a Y-maze and passive avoidance test. Granisetron (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered to scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice prior to acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases, either in the presence or in the absence of a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, l-NAME (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally); a specific inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); and a NO precursor, l-arginine (750 mg/kg). It is demonstrated that granisetron improved memory acquisition in a dose-dependent manner, but it was ineffective on consolidation and retrieval phases of memory. The beneficial effect of granisetron (10mg/kg) on memory acquisition was significantly reversed by l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); however, l-arginine (750 mg/kg) did not potentiate the effect of sub-effective dose of granisetron (3mg/kg) in memory acquisition phase. It is concluded that nitric oxide is probably involved in improvement of memory acquisition by granisetron in both spatial recognition memory and fear memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Cognitive Neuroscience. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation and role of nitric oxide (NO) and BCL-2 in duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawed, F.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, degenerative muscle disease caused by a genetic mutation that leads to the complete absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin in muscle fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying muscle degeneration are still uncertain, oxidative-damage and regenerating aging have been proposed to play a key role. The aim of the present study was to test for these two theories, and to evaluate the possible ameliorative effect of He;Ne laser on them. Subjects and Methods: twenty-two duchenne muscular dystrophy boys (7-15 years old ) with proven dystrophin gene mutation, together with twenty-two normal males, who served as controls, were enrolled for this study. Initial blood samples were taken for the determinations of creatine kinase (CK), markers of replicative aging; in terms of plasma and lymphocyte Bcl-2 protein and apoptosis percentage in circulating mononuclear cells, along with those of oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation (as plasma malondialdehyde MDA), catalase activity, cholesterol, triacylglycerol and nitric oxide. Whole blood samples were then irradiated with 2.5 j/cm 2 by He-Ne laser at wave length 632.8 nm and power output 10 MW.

  18. Nitric Oxide Detection with Glassy Carbon Electrodes Coated with Charge-different Polymer Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Lei

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Trace amounts of nitric oxide (NO have been determined in aqueous phosphate buffersolutions (pH=7.4 by using a glassy carbon electrode coated with three charge-different polymerfilms. The glassy carbon electrode was coated first with negatively charged Nafion film containingtetrakis(pentafluorophenylporphyrin iron(III chloride (Fe(IIITPFPP as the NO oxidation catalyst,and then with positively charged poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PADDAand with neutral poly(dimethylsiloxane (silicone at the outermost layer. This polymer-coatedelectrode showed an excellent selectivity towards NO against possible concomitants in blood such asnitrite, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and dopamine. All current ratios between each concomitant and NOat the cyclic voltammogram was in 10-3 ~ 10-4. This type of electrode showed a detection limit of80 nM for NO. It was speculated from the electrochemical study in methanol that high-valent oxoiron(IV of Fe(TPFPP participated in the catalytic oxidation of NO.

  19. Nitric oxide circulates in mammalian plasma primarily as an S-nitroso adduct of serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamler, J S; Jaraki, O; Osborne, J; Simon, D I; Keaney, J; Vita, J; Singel, D; Valeri, C R; Loscalzo, J

    1992-01-01

    We have recently shown that nitric oxide or authentic endothelium-derived relaxing factor generated in a biologic system reacts in the presence of specific protein thiols to form S-nitrosoprotein derivatives that have endothelium-derived relaxing factor-like properties. The single free cysteine of serum albumin, Cys-34, is particularly reactive toward nitrogen oxides (most likely nitrosonium ion) under physiologic conditions, primarily because of its anomalously low pK; given its abundance in plasma, where it accounts for approximately 0.5 mM thiol, we hypothesized that this plasma protein serves as a reservoir for nitric oxide produced by the endothelial cell. To test this hypothesis, we developed a methodology, which involves UV photolytic cleavage of the S--NO bond before reaction with ozone for chemiluminescence detection, with which to measure free nitric oxide, S-nitrosothiols, and S-nitrosoproteins in biologic systems. We found that human plasma contains approximately 7 microM S-nitrosothiols, of which 96% are S-nitrosoproteins, 82% of which is accounted for by S-nitroso-serum albumin. By contrast, plasma levels of free nitric oxide are only in the 3-nM range. In rabbits, plasma S-nitrosothiols are present at approximately 1 microM; 60 min after administration of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine at 50 mg/ml, a selective and potent inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetases, S-nitrosothiols decreased by approximately 40% (greater than 95% of which were accounted for by S-nitrosoproteins, and approximately 80% of which was S-nitroso-serum albumin); this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in mean arterial blood pressure of 22%. These data suggest that naturally produced nitric oxide circulates in plasma primarily complexed in S-nitrosothiol species, principal among which is S-nitroso-serum albumin. This abundant, relatively long-lived adduct likely serves as a reservoir with which plasma levels of highly reactive, short-lived free nitric oxide can be

  20. Skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise in humans: a PET study with nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide and prostanoids on microcirculation and oxygen uptake specifically in the active skeletal muscle by use of positron emission tomography (PET). Healthy males performed 3 five min bouts of light knee-extensor exercise. Skeletal...... muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake were measured at rest and during the exercise using PET with H(2)O(15) and (15)O(2) during: 1) control conditions; 2) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition by arterial infusion of L-NMMA and 3) combined NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by arterial infusion of L...

  1. Sesquiterpene lactone trilobolide activates production of interferon-γ and nitric oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kmoníčková, Eva; Harmatha, Juraj; Vokáč, Karel; Kostecká, Petra; Farghali, H.; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 8 (2010), s. 1213-1219 ISSN 0367-326X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/07/0061 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : trilobolide * nitric oxide * sesquiterpene lactones Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.899, year: 2010

  2. Efficacy and residue analysis of nitric oxide fumigation of strawberries for control of Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been demonstrated as an effective fumigant against various insect pests on postharvest products under ultralow oxygen (ULO) conditions. NO showed efficacy against all life stages of insect pests with varied fumigation time and temperature, and had feasible cost-effectiveness to...

  3. Testing a Conceptual Model of Soil Emissions of Nitrous and Nitric Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric A. Davidson; Michael Keller; Heather E. Erickson; Verchot NO-VALUE; Edzo Veldkamp

    2000-01-01

    Nitrous and nitric oxides are often studied separately by atmospheric chemists because they play such different roles in the atmosphere. N2O is a stable greenhouse gas in the lower atmosphere (the troposphere; Ramanathan et al. 1985), but it participates in photochemical reactions in the upper atmosphere (the stratosphere) that destroy ozone (Crutzen 1970). In contrast...

  4. Chemiluminescence from the reaction of Ba 3D with nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.A.; Solarz, R.W.; Dubrin, J.W.; Brotzmann, R.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction of laser excited Ba*( 3 D) states with nitric oxide is presented. BaO product is not detected, although the channel is thermodynamically open, and instead chemiluminescence is observed. Experiments which suggest that radiative recombination, Ba + NO → BaNO* → BaNO, is the observed reaction channel will also be presented

  5. Acute and chronic effects of dinner with alcoholic beverages on nitric oxide metabolites in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, A.; Gaag, M.S. van der; Grobbee, D.E.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2003-01-01

    1. The present study investigated the acute and chronic effect of dinner with alcoholic beverages on serum nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, namely nitrate and nitrite (NOx), in 11 healthy, non-smoking middle-aged men. 2. In a randomized, diet-controlled, cross-over trial, subjects consumed dinner with

  6. Bronchoconstriction induced by citric acid inhalation in guinea pigs: role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardolo, F. L.; Rado, V.; Fabbri, L. M.; Sterk, P. J.; Di Maria, G. U.; Geppetti, P.

    1999-01-01

    Gastroesophageal acid reflux into the airways can trigger asthma attacks. Indeed, citric acid inhalation causes bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs, but the mechanism of this effect has not been fully clarified. We investigated the role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide (NO) on the citric

  7. Kinetic analysis of nitric oxide reduction using biogas as reburning fuel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Emission of nitric oxide (NO) from coal combustion continues to be a significant ... mass has been focused as a renewable fuel without CO2 addition, and researches ..... Giles DE, Som S, Aggarwal SK (2006). NOx emission ...

  8. In vivo measurement of nitric oxide production in porcine gut, liver and muscle during hyperdynamic endotoxaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Maaike J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Meijer, Alfred J.; Soeters, Peter B.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2002-01-01

    1. During prolonged endotoxaemia, an increase in arginine catabolism may result in limiting substrate availability for nitric oxide (NO) production. These effects were quantitated in a chronically instrumented porcine endotoxaemia model. 2. Ten days prior to the beginning of the experiments, pigs

  9. Dual inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production by polysubstituted 2-aminopyrimidines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Zdeněk; Kverka, Miloslav; Dusilová, Adéla; Kmoníčková, Eva; Jansa, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, jul (2016), s. 48-56 ISSN 1089-8603 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/0172 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : pyrimidines * nitric oxide * prostaglandin E-2 Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 4.181, year: 2016

  10. S-nitrosylation mediates nitric oxide -auxin crosstalk in auxin signaling and polar auxin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitric oxide (NO) and auxin phytohormone cross talk has been implicated in plant development and growth. Addition and removal of NO moieties to cysteine residues of proteins, is termed S-nitrosylation and de-nitrosylation, respectively and functions as an on/off switch of protein activity. This dyna...

  11. Nitric oxide production and monoamine oxidase activity in cancer patients during interferon-a therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fekkes (Durk); A.R. van Gool (Arthur); M. Bannink (Marjolein); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); W.H.J. Kruit (Wim); B. van der Holt (Bronno); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); M.W. Hengeveld (Michiel); G. Stoter (Gerrit)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Both increased and decreased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis have been reported in patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Animal studies showed that IFN-alpha administration results in increased levels of biogenic amines, subsequent activation of monoamine oxidases

  12. Serum uric acid levels and leukocyte nitric oxide production in multiple sclerosis patients outside relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, JP; Ramsaransing, GSM; Heerserna, DJ; Heerings, M; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: A number of studies found that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have low serum levels of uric acid. It is unclear whether this represents a primary deficit or secondary effect. Uric acid is a scavenger of peroxynitrite, which is the product of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide.

  13. Nitric oxide metabolites in gnotobiotic piglets orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trebichavský, Ilja; Zídek, Zdeněk; Franková, Daniela; Zahradníčková, Marie; Šplíchal, Igor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2001), s. 353-358 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/01/0917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : nitric oxide metabolites Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2001

  14. Exhaled nitric oxide in spray painters exposed to isocyanates : Effect modification by atopy and smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonaid, Badri Sadat; Pronk, Anjoeka; Doekes, Gert; Heederik, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isocyanate asthma is one of the most frequently identified forms of occupational asthma in industrialised countries. The underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. There is only limited information about the relationship between exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and occupational exposure to

  15. Exhaled nitric oxide in spray painters exposed to isocyanates: Effect modification by atopy and smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonaid, B.S.; Pronk, A.; Doekes, G.; Heederik, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isocyanate asthma is one of the most frequently identified forms of occupational asthma in industrialised countries. The underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. There is only limited information about the relationship between exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and occupational exposure to

  16. Nitric Oxide Binds to and Modulates the Activity of a Pollen Specific Arabidopsis Diacylglycerol Kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO

  17. Caveolin versus calmodulin. Counterbalancing allosteric modulators of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, J B; Feron, O; Sase, K; Prabhakar, P; Michel, T

    1997-10-10

    Nitric oxide is synthesized in diverse mammalian tissues by a family of calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthases. The endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is targeted to the specialized signal-transducing membrane domains termed plasmalemmal caveolae. Caveolin, the principal structural protein in caveolae, interacts with eNOS and leads to enzyme inhibition in a reversible process modulated by Ca2+-calmodulin (Michel, J. B., Feron, O., Sacks, D., and Michel, T. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 15583-15586). Caveolin also interacts with other structurally distinct signaling proteins via a specific region identified within the caveolin sequence (amino acids 82-101) that appears to subserve the role of a "scaffolding domain." We now report that the co-immunoprecipitation of eNOS with caveolin is completely and specifically blocked by an oligopeptide corresponding to the caveolin scaffolding domain. Peptides corresponding to this domain markedly inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity in endothelial membranes and interact directly with the enzyme to inhibit activity of purified recombinant eNOS expressed in Escherichia coli. The inhibition of purified eNOS by the caveolin scaffolding domain peptide is competitive and completely reversed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These studies establish that caveolin, via its scaffolding domain, directly forms an inhibitory complex with eNOS and suggest that caveolin inhibits eNOS by abrogating the enzyme's activation by calmodulin.

  18. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebistorf, Fabienne; Karam, Oliver; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF) and mostly acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions. AHRF results from several systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in individuals of all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has been...

  19. of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and serum level of vascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uwerhiavwe

    Davignon and Ganz, 2004). NO is synthe- sized via a reaction that includes the conversion of L- arginine to L-citruline catalyzed by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which is one of the three isoforms of the enzyme (Mayer and Hemmens, 1997) ...

  20. Nitric oxide in a diesel engine : laser-based detection and interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, G.G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most polluting components in the exhaust gases of a diesel engines. Therefore, knowledge of the time and place where it is produced during the combustion process is of interest to find a way to reduce diesel engine emissions. Non-intrusive optical diagnostics, based

  1. Intercellular calcium signaling and nitric oxide feedback during constriction of rabbit renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrenholt, Torben Rene; Schjerning, J; Vanhoutte, Paul M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Vasoconstriction and increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) of vascular smooth muscle cells may cause an increase of endothelial cell [Ca(2+)](i), which, in turn, augments nitric oxide (NO) production and inhibits smooth muscle cell contraction. This hypothesis was test...

  2. Manipulation of nitric oxide in an animal model of acute liver injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the impact of altering nitric oxide release on acute liver injury, the associated gut injury and bacterial translocation, at different time intervals. Methods: An acute rat liver injury model induced by D-galactosamine was used. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four main groups: normal control, acute liver ...

  3. Novel Insights into the Electrochemical Detection of Nitric Oxide in Biological Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pekarová, Michaela; Lojek, Antonín; Hrbáč, J.; Kuchta, R.; Kadlec, J.; Kubala, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 8-12 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GP13-40882P Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : nitric oxide * electrochemical detector * biological systems Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  4. Variations in exhaled nitric oxide concentration after three types of dives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Pieter-Jan; Houtkooper, Antoinette; van Hulst, Rob

    2010-01-01

    An increase in exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FENO) occurs during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive lung disease or other inflammatory processes of the airway. Raised FENO levels are also observed during normobaric, mild hyperoxic exposures, whereas after hyperbaric hyperoxic exposure the

  5. Nitric oxide formation in H2/CO syngas non-premixed jet flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranga Dinesh, K.K.J.; Richardson, E.S.; van Oijen, J.A.; Luo, K.H.; Jiang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of high hydrogen content (HHC) syngas nonpremixed jet flames have been carried out to study the nitric oxide (NO) formation. The detailed chemistry employed is the GRI 3.0 updated with the influence of the NCN radical chemistry using flamelet generated manifolds

  6. Decrease in emissions of nitric oxides during burning of Kuznetsk hard coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Gedike, I.A.; Lobov, G.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of introducing and studying the plan for gradual combustion of Kuznetsk hard coals on a BKZ-210-140 F type boiler. Supply of 16-18% theoretically necessary air through the nozzle of the tertiary injection made it possible to reduce 1.5-fold the emissions of nitric oxides without reducing the economy of the furnace process.

  7. A method for nitric oxide radical scavenging properties of sulfur containing compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriesman, M.F.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Westerveld, G.J.; Paquay, J.B.G.; Voss, H.P.; Bast, A.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for the quantification of the nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of compounds in aqueous solutions is described using an amperometric NO sensor. After correction for the spontaneous degradation of NO, second-order rate kinetics of the scavenging reaction are observed.

  8. Formation of nitric oxide in an industrial burner measured by 2-D laser induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A; Bombach, R; Kaeppeli, B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence (2-D LIF) measurements of nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical distributions in an industrial burner at atmospheric pressure. The relative 2-D LIF data of NO were set to an absolute scale by calibration with probe sampling combined with gas analysis. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs.

  9. L-arginine increases nitric oxide and attenuates pressor and heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    heart rate responses to change in posture in sickle cell anemia subjects. 1 .... the standing position and measurements made immediately. Arterial ... pressure was the difference between systolic and diastolic ... Table 3. Effect of L-Arginine Supplementation on Blood Pressure Parameters, Plasma L-Arginine and Nitric Oxide.

  10. Quantitative laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbiezen, K.; Klein-Douwel, R. J. H.; van Viet, A. P.; Donkerbroek, A. J.; Meerts, W. L.; Dam, N. J.; ter Meulen, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present quantitative, in-cylinder, UV-laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide in a heavy-duty Diesel engine. Processing of the raw fluorescence signals includes a detailed correction, based on additional measurements, for the effect of laser beam and fluorescence attenuation, and

  11. Nitric Oxide and Interlukin-6 Levels in Intellectual Disability Adults with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Eli; Beiker, Reut; Morad, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) are highly reactive mediators that have been shown to play different roles in a variety of different biological process. The role of NO and IL-6 in the neuropathogenesis of brain seizures is still questionable. In order to evaluate the role of NO and IL-6 in neurological disorders such as seizures, we…

  12. Medicinal chemistry and anti-inflammatory activity of nitric oxide-releasing NSAI drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç And, Esra; Küçükgüzel, S Güniz

    2009-05-01

    Nitric Oxide, which acts as a non-specific cytotoxic mediator and a biological messenger on immunological competence, has been gaining significantly increasing importance. As an alternative to conventional NSAIDs having significant side effects, pharmacologically improved and therapeutically enhanced NO releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with less side effects are being planned to produce.

  13. Oxidative markers, nitric oxide and homocysteine alteration in hypercholesterolimic rats: role of atorvastatine and cinnamon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Kamal A; Abd El-Twab, Thanaa M

    2009-10-05

    To investigate the effects of atorvastatin and cinnamon on serum lipid profile, oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, hepatic enzymes activities, nitric oxide (NO) as well as homocysteine (Hcy) in hypercholesterolemic rats, 48 male albino rats, weighing 130-190 gm were divided into 2 groups, normal group fed on basal rat chow diet (n=12) and high cholesterol group (HCD) were fed on 1% cholesterol-enriched diet for 15 day (n=36). Hypercholesterolemic rats were divided into 3 subgroups (n=12 for each) fed the same diet and treated with atorvastatine (HCD+Atorvastatin) or cinnamon extract (HCD+cinnamon) or none treated (HCD) for 3&6 weeks. Serum triglycerides (TG), Total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), ALT, AST, NO, Hcy, hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes, Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity were measured. Results showed that HCD increased significantly TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST, Hcy and hepatic MDA, while lowered significantly antioxidant enzyme activities and NO levels. Atorvastatin therapy significantly increased HDL-C, NO and antioxidant activity while decreased LDL-C, MDA and Hcy concentrations. Serum TG, TC, LDL-C, ALT, AST and hepatic MDA levels were significantly lowered meanwhile, serum HDL, NO values and hepatic antioxidant activities were significantly, higher in cinnamon-treated than untreated group. These results indicate that lipid abnormalities, oxidative injury and hyperhomocystienemia were induced by HCD and this study recommend that administration of atorvastatine or cinnamon provided protection against the lipemic-oxidative disorder and act as hypocholesterolemic, hepatoprotective agent and improve cardiovascular function through modulation of oxidative stress, NO and Hcy.

  14. Differential requirement for nitric oxide in IGF-1-induced anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and anti-atherosclerotic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergiy; Higashi, Yusuke; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Blackstock, Christopher; Galvez, Sarah; Vaughn, Charlotte; Titterington, Jane; Delafontaine, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    We have shown previously that insulin like-growth factor I (IGF-1) suppressed atherosclerosis in Apoe−/− mice and activated endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase. To determine whether IGF-1-induced atheroprotection depends on NO, IGF-1- or saline-infused mice were treated with L-NAME, the pan-NO synthase inhibitor or with D-NAME (control). IGF-1 reduced atherosclerosis in both the D-NAME and L-NAME groups suggesting that IGF-1’s anti-atherogenic effect was NO-independent. IGF-1 increased plaque smooth muscle cells, suppressed cell apoptosis and downregulated lipoprotein lipase and these effects were also NO-independent. On the contrary, IGF-1 decreased oxidative stress and suppressed TNF-α levels and these effects were blocked by L-NAME. Thus IGF-1’s anti-oxidant effect is dependent on its ability to increase NO but is distinct from its anti-atherosclerotic effect which is NO-independent. PMID:21872589

  15. A possible mechanism for transpupillary thermotherapy: nitric-oxide-related cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdek, Sengul; Urgancioglu, Berrak; Turkcu, Ummuhani Ozel; Bilgihan, Ayse

    2007-08-01

    To determine the oxidative stress markers on rabbit vitreous following transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) application. The pigmented rabbit eyes were divided into 3 groups, each containing 6 eyes. Group 1 was used as a control group. Twelve eyes underwent TTT with a power of 250 mW (group 2) and 800 mW (group 3), with a diameter of 3000 microm and duration of 60 s; 24 h after laser application, vitreous samples were collected. Nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in all groups. NO levels were statistically significantly higher in all groups when compared with the control group (p 0.05). Our results support the hypothesis that TTT application induces NO synthesis, which may lead to occlusion at choroidal neovessels. Because of the nonsignificantly increased levels of MDA and decrease of SOD activities there maybe only a weak relation between lipid peroxidation induced by free oxygen radicals and TTT-induced vascular damage.

  16. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua G Choudhury

    Full Text Available The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS (a bacterial endotoxin, and (b to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted

  17. Effects of various nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on AlCl3-induced neuronal injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA STEVANOVIĆ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at determining the effectiveness of nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitors: N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, 7-nitroindazole and aminoguanidine in modulating the toxicity of AlCl3 on superoxide production and the malondialdehyde concentration of Wistar rats. The animals were sacrificed 10 min and 3 days after the treatment and the forebrain cortex was removed. The results show that AlCl3 exposure promotes oxidative stress in different neural areas. The biochemical changes observed in the neuronal tissues show that aluminum acts as pro-oxidant, while NOS inhibitors exert an anti-oxidant action in AlCl3-treated animals.

  18. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Embriette R; Andrade, Fernando; Vaksman, Zalman; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Jiang, Hong; Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Tribble, Gena; Kaplan, Heidi B; Petrosino, Joseph F; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  19. Serum ferritin, serum nitric oxide, and cognitive function in pediatric thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septiana Nur Qurbani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Hemolysis and repeated blood transfusions in children with thalassemia major cause iron overload in various organs, including the brain, and may lead to neurodegeneration. Hemolysis also causes decreased levels of nitric oxide, which serves as a volume transmitter and slow dynamic modulation, leading to cognitive impairment. Objective To assess for correlations between serum ferritin as well as nitric oxide levels and cognitive function in children with thalassemia major.  Methods This analytical study with cross-sectional design on 40 hemosiderotic thalassemia major patients aged 6−14 years, was done at the Thalassemia Clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, West Java, from May to June 2015. Serum ferritin measurements were performed by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay; serum nitric oxide was assayed by a colorimetric procedure based on Griess reaction; and cognitive function was assessed by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test. Statistical analysis was done using Spearman’s Rank correlation, with a significance value of 0.05. Results Abnormal values in verbal, performance, and full scale IQ were found in 35%, 57.5% and 57.5%, respectively. Serum nitric oxide level was significantly correlated with performance IQ (P=0.022, but not with verbal IQ (P=0.359 or full scale IQ (P=0.164. There were also no significant correlations between serum ferritin level and full scale, verbal, or performance IQ (P=0.377, 0.460, and 0.822, respectively. Conclusion Lower serum nitric oxide level is significantly correlated to lower cognitive function, specifically in the performance IQ category. However, serum ferritin level has no clear correlation with cognitive function.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embriette R Hyde

    Full Text Available The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  1. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G., E-mail: bipin@amrita.edu

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  2. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G.

    2016-01-01

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase Pathways: A Complex Interplay in Cellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The cellular reaction to external challenges is a tightly regulated process consisting of integrated processes mediated by a variety of signaling molecules, generated as a result of modulation of corresponding biosynthetic systems. Both, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) systems, consist of constitutive forms (NOS1, NOS3 and COX-1), which are mostly involved in housekeeping tasks, and inducible forms (NOS2 and COX-2), which shape the cellular response to stress and variety of bioactive agents. The complex interplay between NOS and COX pathways can be observed at least at three levels. Firstly, products of NOS and Cox systems can mediate the regulation and the expression of inducible forms (NOS2 and COX-2) in response of similar and dissimilar stimulus. Secondly, the reciprocal modulation of cyclooxygenase activity by nitric oxide and NOS activity by prostaglandins at the posttranslational level has been shown to occur. Mechanisms by which nitric oxide can modulate prostaglandin synthesis include direct S-nitrosylation of COX and inactivation of prostaglandin I synthase by peroxynitrite, product of superoxide reaction with nitric oxide. Prostaglandins, conversely, can promote an increased association of dynein light chain (DLC) (also known as protein inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase) with NOS1, thereby reducing its activity. The third level of interplay is provided by intracellular crosstalk of signaling pathways stimulated by products of NOS and COX which contributes significantly to the complexity of cellular signaling. Since modulation of COX and NOS pathways was shown to be principally involved in a variety of pathological conditions, the dissection of their complex relationship is needed for better understanding of possible therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on implications of interplay between NOS and COX for cellular function and signal integration.

  4. Mechanism of vasoconstriction induced by chronic inhibition of nitric oxide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, N; Aynedjian, H S; Khan, G A

    1994-09-01

    Either acute or chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis by L-arginine analogues results in increases in mean arterial pressure and reductions in renal blood flow. The role of endogenous vasoconstrictors in mediating these effects is not entirely clear. In the present study, nitric oxide was inhibited in male Sprague-Dawley rats by oral administration of nitro-L-arginine for 3 weeks. At the end of this time, mean arterial pressure was 30 to 40 mm Hg higher than in normal controls, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were 25% to 30% lower, and renal vascular resistance was markedly increased. Intravenous infusion of receptor antagonists for angiotensin II, thromboxane, epinephrine, and endothelin-1 had no significant effect on the hypertension. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and furosemide-induced diuresis in the presence of angiotensin blockade also had no effect on blood pressure. Renal vascular resistance was also unaffected by these interventions, except that saralasin did reduce renal resistance in both control and nitric oxide-inhibited groups. However, the absolute level of renal vascular resistance remained higher in the latter group. Calcium channel blockade partially corrected blood pressure and renal resistance, but the levels remained significantly higher than in control animals. The findings are consistent with the view that the increase in vascular smooth muscle tone caused by inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis cannot be accounted for by overexpression of common endogenous vasoconstrictors. Rather, the generalized increase in vascular smooth muscle tone appears to be due to a direct effect of reduced nitric oxide availability, which may lead to an increase in intracellular calcium concentration or sensitivity.

  5. Training Status as a Marker of the Relationship between Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and Blood Pressure in Older Adult Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mourão Jacomini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of functional fitness and oxidative capacity on the nitric oxide concentration associated with hemodynamic control in older adult women. The sample consisted of 134 women (65.73 ± 6.14 years old. All subjects underwent a physical examination to assess body mass index, waist-hip ratio, body fat measurement by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and blood pressure (BP. Training status (TS was evaluated by indirect determination of maximal oxygen uptake by a treadmill test using Balke protocol modified for older adults. Functional fitness was also evaluated through a “Functional Fitness Battery Test” to determine the general fitness functional index (GFFI. All participants were separated according to the functional fitness (TS1, very weak and weak; TS2, regular; TS3, good and very good. Plasma blood samples were used to evaluate prooxidant and antioxidant activity and nitrite and nitrate concentrations. The general results of this study showed that good levels of TS were related to lower levels of lipoperoxidation and protein damage, higher levels of antioxidant, and higher concentration of nitrite and nitrate. This combination may be responsible for the lower levels of BP in subjects with better TS.

  6. Training Status as a Marker of the Relationship between Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and Blood Pressure in Older Adult Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomini, André Mourão; de Souza, Hugo Celso Dutra; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Brito, Janaina de Oliveira; Pinheiro, Lucas Cezar; da Silva, Anderson Bernardino; da Silva, Roberta Fernanda; Trapé, Atila Alexandre; De Angelis, Kátia; Tanus-Santos, José Eduardo; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Zago, Anderson Saranz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of functional fitness and oxidative capacity on the nitric oxide concentration associated with hemodynamic control in older adult women. The sample consisted of 134 women (65.73 ± 6.14 years old). All subjects underwent a physical examination to assess body mass index, waist-hip ratio, body fat measurement by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and blood pressure (BP). Training status (TS) was evaluated by indirect determination of maximal oxygen uptake by a treadmill test using Balke protocol modified for older adults. Functional fitness was also evaluated through a "Functional Fitness Battery Test" to determine the general fitness functional index (GFFI). All participants were separated according to the functional fitness (TS1, very weak and weak; TS2, regular; TS3, good and very good). Plasma blood samples were used to evaluate prooxidant and antioxidant activity and nitrite and nitrate concentrations. The general results of this study showed that good levels of TS were related to lower levels of lipoperoxidation and protein damage, higher levels of antioxidant, and higher concentration of nitrite and nitrate. This combination may be responsible for the lower levels of BP in subjects with better TS.

  7. Nitric oxide is an obligate bacterial nitrification intermediate produced by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranto, Jonathan D; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2017-08-01

    Ammonia (NH 3 )-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) emit substantial amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O), both of which contribute to the harmful environmental side effects of large-scale agriculture. The currently accepted model for AOB metabolism involves NH 3 oxidation to nitrite (NO 2 - ) via a single obligate intermediate, hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH). Within this model, the multiheme enzyme hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of NH 2 OH to NO 2 - We provide evidence that HAO oxidizes NH 2 OH by only three electrons to NO under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. NO 2 - observed in HAO activity assays is a nonenzymatic product resulting from the oxidation of NO by O 2 under aerobic conditions. Our present study implies that aerobic NH 3 oxidation by AOB occurs via two obligate intermediates, NH 2 OH and NO, necessitating a mediator of the third enzymatic step.

  8. Soil fluxes of methane, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide from aggrading forests in coastal Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Heather E.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil exchanges of greenhouse and other gases are poorly known for Pacific Northwest forests where gradients in nutrient availability and soil moisture may contribute to large variations in fluxes. Here we report fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxide (NO) over multiple seasons from three naturally N-rich, aggrading forests of coastal Oregon, USA. Mean methane uptake rates (3.2 mg CH4 m−2 d−1) were high compared with forests globally, negatively related to water-filled pore space (WFPS), but unrelated to N availability or temperature. Emissions of NO (6.0 μg NO–N m−2 h−1) exceeded N2O (1.4 μg N2O–N m−2 h−1), except when WFPS surpassed 55%. Spatial variation in NO fluxes correlated positively with soil nitrate concentrations (which generally exceeded ammonium concentrations, indicating the overall high N status for the sites) and negatively with soil pH, and at one site increased with basal area of N2-fixing red alder. Combined NO and N2O emissions were greatest from the site with highest annual net N mineralization and lowest needle litterfall C/N. Our findings of high CH4 uptake and NO/N2O ratios generally >1 most likely reflect the high porosity of the andic soils underlying the widespread regenerating forests in this seasonally wet region.

  9. The effects of fire on biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Boston, Penelope J.; Winstead, Edward L.; Sebacher, Shirley

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) before and after a controlled burn conducted in a chaparral ecosystem on June 22, 1987, showed significantly enhanced emissions of both gases after the burn. Mean NO emissions from heavily burned and wetted (to simulate rainfall) sites exceeded 40 ng N/sq m s, and increase of 2 to 3 compared to preburn wetted site measurements. N2O emissions from burned and wetted sites ranged from 9 to 22 ng N/sq m s. Preburn N2O emissions from these wetted sites were all below the detection level of the instrumentation, indicating a flux below 2 ng N/sq m s. The flux of NO exceeded the N2O flux from burned wetted sites by factors ranging from 2.7 to 3.4. These measurements, coupled with preburn and postburn measurements of ammonium and nitrate in the soil of this chaparral ecosystem and measurements of NO and N2O emissions obtained under controlled laboratory conditions, suggest that the postfire enhancement of NO and N2O emissions is due to production of these gases by nitrifying bacteria.

  10. Nitric oxide protects carbon assimilation process of watermelon from boron-induced oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed; Najeeb, Ullah; Yang, Jinghua; Hu, Zhongyuan; Fang, Zhang Ming

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates plant response to a variety of abiotic stresses; however, limited information is available on its effect on boron (B)-stressed watermelon plants. The present study investigates the mechanism through which NO protects watermelon seedlings from B deficiency and toxicity stresses. Five days old watermelon seedlings were exposed to B (0, 0.5 and 10 mg L -1 ) alone or with 75 μmole of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for 30 days. Both low and high B concentrations in the media altered nutrient accumulation and impaired various physiological processes of watermelon seedlings, leading to a significant reduction in biomass production. The plants exposed to B deficient or toxic concentrations had 66 and 69% lower shoot dry weight, respectively compared with optimum B levels. B toxicity-induced growth inhibition of watermelon seedlings was associated with high B translocation to shoot tissues, which caused lipid membrane peroxidation (12% increase) and chlorophyll destruction (25% reduction). In contrast, B deficiency accelerated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically OH -1 and induced cellular oxidative injury. Exogenously applied SNP promoted leaf chlorophyll, photosynthesis and consequently biomass production in B-stressed watermelon seedlings by reducing B accumulation, lipid membrane peroxidation and ROS generation. It also activated antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, POD and APX, and protected the seedlings from ROS-induced cellular burst. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin induces nitric oxide synthesis via oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riganti, Chiara; Costamagna, Costanzo; Doublier, Sophie; Miraglia, Erica; Polimeni, Manuela; Bosia, Amalia; Ghigo, Dario

    2008-01-01

    We have recently shown that apocynin elicits an oxidative stress in N11 mouse glial cells and other cell types. Here we report that apocynin increased the accumulation of nitrite, the stable derivative of nitric oxide (NO), in the extracellular medium of N11 cell cultures, and the NO synthase (NOS) activity in cell lysates. The increased synthesis of NO was associated with increased expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA, increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB and decreased intracellular level of its inhibitor IkBα. These effects, accompanied by increased production of H 2 O 2 , were very similar to those observed after incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and were inhibited by catalase. These results suggest that apocynin, similarly to LPS, induces increased NO synthesis by eliciting a generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes NF-κB activation and increased expression of iNOS. Therefore, the increased bioavailability of NO reported in the literature after in vivo or in vitro treatments with apocynin might depend, at least partly, on the drug-elicited induction of iNOS, and not only on the inhibition of NADPH oxidase and the subsequent decreased scavenging of NO by oxidase-derived ROS, as it is often supposed

  12. Si0.85Ge0.15 oxynitridation in nitric oxide/nitrous oxide ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Takoudis, Christos G.; Lei Yuanyuan; Browning, Nigel D.

    2003-01-01

    Low temperature, nitric oxide (NO)/nitrous oxide (N 2 O) aided, sub-35 Aa Si 0.85 Ge 0.15 oxynitrides have been grown at 550 and 650 deg. C, while the oxynitridation feed gases have been preheated to 900 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, before entering the reaction zone. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) data suggest that NO-assisted oxynitridation incorporates more nitrogen than the N 2 O-assisted one, while there is minimal Ge segregation towards the dielectric/substrate interface in both oxynitridation processes. Moreover, SIMS results suggest that nitrogen is distributed throughout the film in contrast to high temperature Si oxynitridation, where nitrogen incorporation takes place near the dielectric/substrate interface. Z-contrast imaging with scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that the oxynitride grown in NO at 650 degree sign C has a sharp interface with the bulk Si 0.85 Ge 0.15 , while the roughness of the dielectric/Si 0.85 Ge 0.15 substrate interface is less than 2 Aa. These results are discussed in the context of an overall mechanism of SiGe oxynitridation

  13. Simulation of nitrous oxide and nitric oxide emissions from tropical primary forests in the Costa Rican Atlantic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuguanga Liu; William A. Reiners; Michael Keller; Davis S. Schimel

    2000-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) are important atmospheric trace gases participating in the regulation of global climate and environment. Predictive models on the emissions of N2O and NO emissions from soil into the atmosphere are required. We modified the CENTURY model (Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 51 (1987) 1173) to simulate the emissions of N2O and NO from...

  14. Interaction of nitric oxide with human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lu, Shen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2003-01-24

    NO and CO may complement each other as signaling molecules in some physiological situations. We have examined the binding of NO to human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an enzyme that oxidizes heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron, to determine whether inhibition of hHO-1 by NO can contribute to the signaling interplay of NO and CO. An Fe(3+)-NO hHO-1-heme complex is formed with NO or the NO donors NOC9 or 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide.sodium salt. Resonance Raman spectroscopy shows that ferric hHO-1-heme forms a 6-coordinated, low spin complex with NO. The nu(N-O) vibration of this complex detected by Fourier transform IR is only 4 cm(-1) lower than that of the corresponding metmyoglobin (met-Mb) complex but is broader, suggesting a greater degree of ligand conformational freedom. The Fe(3+)-NO complex of hHO-1 is much more stable than that of met-Mb. Stopped-flow studies indicate that k(on) for formation of the hHO-1-heme Fe(3+)-NO complex is approximately 50-times faster, and k(off) 10 times slower, than for met-Mb, resulting in K(d) = 1.4 microm for NO. NO thus binds 500-fold more tightly to ferric hHO-1-heme than to met-Mb. The hHO-1 mutations E29A, G139A, D140A, S142A, G143A, G143F, and K179A/R183A do not significantly diminish the tight binding of NO, indicating that NO binding is not highly sensitive to mutations of residues that normally stabilize the distal water ligand. As expected from the K(d) value, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited upon exposure to pathologically, and possibly physiologically, relevant concentrations of NO. Inhibition of hHO-1 by NO may contribute to the pleiotropic responses to NO and CO.

  15. Investigations on the oxidation of nitric acid plutonium solutions with ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of ozone with nitric acid Pu solutions was studied as a function of reaction time, acid concentration and Pu concentration. Strong nitric acid Pu solutions are important in nuclear fuel element production and reprocessing. The Pu must be converted into hexavalent Pu before precipitation from the homogeneous solution together with uranium-IV, ammonia and CO 2 in the form of ammonium uranyl/plutonyl carbonate (AUPuC). Formation of a solid phase during ozonation was observed for the first time. The proneness to solidification increases with incrasing plutonium concentrations and with decreasing acid concentrations. If the formation of a solid phase during ozonation of nitric acid Pu solutions cannot be prevented, the PU-IV oxidation process described is unsuitable for industrial purposes as Pu solutions in industrial processes have much higher concentrations than the solutions used in the present investigation. (orig./EF) [de

  16. Effect of selective inhibition of renal inducible nitric oxide synthase on renal blood flow and function in experimental hyperdynamic sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ken; Calzavacca, Paolo; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bailey, Michael; May, Clive N

    2012-08-01

    Nitric oxide plays an important role in the control of renal blood flow and renal function. In sepsis, increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase produce excessive nitric oxide, which may contribute to the development of acute kidney injury. We, therefore, examined the effects of intrarenal infusion of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in a large animal model of hyperdynamic sepsis in which acute kidney injury occurs in the presence of increased renal blood flow. Prospective crossover randomized controlled interventional studies. University-affiliated research institute. Twelve unilaterally nephrectomized Merino ewes. Infusion of a selective (1400W) and a partially selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (aminoguanidine) into the renal artery for 2 hrs after the induction of sepsis, and comparison with a nonselective inhibitor (Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In sheep with nonhypotensive hyperdynamic sepsis, creatinine clearance halved (32 to 16 mL/min, ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.51 [0.28-0.92]) despite increased renal blood flow (241 to 343 mL/min, difference [95% confidence interval] 102 [78-126]). Infusion of 1400W did not change renal blood flow, urine output, or creatinine clearance, whereas infusion of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and a high dose of aminoguanidine normalized renal blood flow, but did not alter creatinine clearance. In hyperdynamic sepsis, intrarenal infusion of a highly selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor did not reduce the elevated renal blood flow or improve renal function. In contrast, renal blood flow was reduced by infusion of a nonselective NOS inhibitor or a high dose of a partially selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. The renal vasodilatation in septic acute kidney injury may be due to nitric oxide derived from the endothelial and neural isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, but their blockade did not restore renal function.

  17. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of solid and liquid organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.; Poprik, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation has been developed specifically to address issues that face the Savannah River Site, other defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate SRS solid, Pu-contaminated job-control waste, the technology has also exhibited potential for remediating hazardous and mixed-hazardous waste forms. The process is unique to Savannah River and offers a valuable alternative to other oxidation processes that require extreme temperatures and/or elevated pressures. To address the broad categories of waste, many different organic compounds which represent a cross-section of the waste that must be treated have been successfully oxidized. Materials that have been quantitatively oxidized at atmospheric pressure below 180 degrees C include neoprene, cellulose, EDTA, tributylphosphate, and nitromethane. More stable compounds such as benzoic acid, polyethylene, oils, and resins have been completely decomposed below 200 degrees C and 10 psig. The process uses dilute nitric acid in a concentrated phosphoric acid media as the main oxidant for the organic compounds. Phosphoric acid allow nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction forms NOx vapors which can be reoxidized and recycled using air and water. The addition of 0.001M Pd(II) reduces CO generation to near 1% of the released carbon gases. The advantages of this process are that it is straightforward, uses relatively inexpensive reagents, operates at relatively low temperature and pressure, and produces final solutions which are compatible with stainless steel equipment. For organic wastes, all carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are converted to gaseous products. If interfaced with an acid recovery system which converts NOx back to nitric acid, the net oxidizer would be oxygen from air

  18. Nitric oxide dysregulation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia among Ghanaian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adu-Bonsaffoh K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kwame Adu-Bonsaffoh,1,2 Daniel Ansong Antwi,1 Samuel Amenyi Obed,3 Ben Gyan4 1Department of Physiology, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana; 4Department of Immunology, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana Background: Preeclampsia (PE is still a disease of theories as the exact cause remains uncertain. Widespread vascular endothelial cell dysfunction is thought to mediate the generalized vasospasm and hypertension characteristic of PE. Altered nitric oxide (NO production has been associated with the endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of PE but conflicting results have emerged from previous studies. Objectives: To determine maternal serum levels of NO, a biomarker of endothelial function, in nonpregnant, normal pregnant, and preeclamptic women. Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional case–control study of 277 women comprising 75 nonpregnant, 102 normal pregnant, and 100 preeclamptic women conducted at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital between April and June 2011. About 5 mL of venous blood was obtained from the participants for the various investigations after meeting the inclusion criteria and signing to a written consent. Serum levels of NO were determined by Griess reaction. The data obtained were analyzed with SPSS version 20. Results: The study showed significantly elevated serum levels of NO in preeclamptic women (82.45±50.31 µM compared with normal pregnant (33.12±17.81 µM and nonpregnant (16.92±11.41 µM women with P<0.001. The alteration in maternal serum NO levels was significantly more profound in early-onset (severe PE (119.63±45.860 µM compared to that of late-onset (mild disease (62.44±40.44 µM with P<0.001, indicating a more severe vascular endothelial cell dysfunction in the

  19. Nitric oxide coordinates development of genomic instability in realization of combined effect with ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V M; Diomina, E A; Muzalov, I I; Gerashchenko, B I

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of environmental nitrogen oxides or natural nitric oxide (NO) donors to modify free radicals ba-lance and development of genomic instability alone or in combination with ionizing radiation. Genotoxicity and cytogenetic abnormalities were assessed in vitro in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) isolated from healthy humans or in vivo in rats PBL. Human PBL were treated with physiologically relevant NO donor - S-Nitrosoglutathione and X-ray irradiation. The inhalation treatment of animals with NO was carried out in chamber with purified gaseous NO mixed inside with air. Levels of S-Nitrosohemoglobin and methemoglobin in the blood were assessed with electron paramagnetic resonance. The total level of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in PBL was determined fluorometrically, and serum levels of reactive oxygen species was determined by spectrophotometric assay. DNA damages were assessed by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in human PBL measured with the conventional cytogenetic assay in metaphase cells on short-term (52 h) and long-term (72 h) cultures. Environmental nitrogen oxides or release of NO from stable complexes with biomolecules (such as S-Nitrosothiols) intensified generation of free radicals, DNA damage and development of genomic instability alone or in combination with ionizing radiation. Treatment of PBL by S-Nitrosoglutathione caused prevalent induction of chromatid type but irradiation - chromosome aberrations. The dose dependence of chromatid-type aberrations observed in human PBL after combined influence of S-Nitrosoglutathione and ionizing radiation indicates a crucial role of NO in the formation of chromosomal instability. NO can deregulate free radicals balance resulted in genotoxic effect, posttranslational modification of repair enzymes and thus coordinated development of genomic instability and increase of cancer risk.

  20. Involvement of beta 3-adrenoceptor in altered beta-adrenergic response in senescent heart: role of nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birenbaum, Aurélie; Tesse, Angela; Loyer, Xavier; Michelet, Pierre; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Heymes, Christophe; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2008-12-01

    In senescent heart, beta-adrenergic response is altered in parallel with beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptor down-regulation. A negative inotropic effect of beta3-adrenoceptor could be involved. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that beta3-adrenoceptor plays a role in beta-adrenergic dysfunction in senescent heart. beta-Adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography-dobutamine, electron paramagnetic resonance) and in vitro (isolated left ventricular papillary muscle, electron paramagnetic resonance) in young adult (3-month-old) and senescent (24-month-old) rats. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunolabeling (confocal microscopy), nitric oxide production (electron paramagnetic resonance) and beta-adrenoceptor Western blots were performed in vitro. Data are mean percentages of baseline +/- SD. An impaired positive inotropic effect (isoproterenol) was confirmed in senescent hearts in vivo (117 +/- 23 vs. 162 +/- 16%; P < 0.05) and in vitro (127 +/- 10 vs. 179 +/- 15%; P < 0.05). In the young adult group, the positive inotropic effect was not significantly modified by the nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME; 183 +/- 19%), the selective NOS1 inhibitor vinyl-L-N-5(1-imino-3-butenyl)-L-ornithine (L-VNIO; 172 +/- 13%), or the selective NOS2 inhibitor 1400W (183 +/- 19%). In the senescent group, in parallel with beta3-adrenoceptor up-regulation and increased nitric oxide production, the positive inotropic effect was partially restored by L-NAME (151 +/- 8%; P < 0.05) and L-VNIO (149 +/- 7%; P < 0.05) but not by 1400W (132 +/- 11%; not significant). The positive inotropic effect induced by dibutyryl-cyclic adenosine monophosphate was decreased in the senescent group with the specific beta3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 37344 (167 +/- 10 vs. 142 +/- 10%; P < 0.05). NOS1 and NOS2 were significantly up-regulated in the senescent rat. In senescent cardiomyopathy, beta3-adrenoceptor overexpression plays an important role in the

  1. Decreased hippocampal homoarginine and increased nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase levels in rats parallel training in a radial arm maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Ajinkya; Nawaratna, Gayan; Hu, Shengdi; Wu, Guoyao; Lubec, Gert

    2016-09-01

    L-homoarginine (hArg) is derived from enzymatic guanidination of lysine. It was demonstrated that hArg is a substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, blocks lysine transport and inhibits the uptake of arginine into synaptosomes and modulates GABA responses ex vivo. As there is limited information on its physiological roles in the brain, the aim of the study was to show whether hippocampal or frontal lobe (FL) hArg is paralleling training in the radial arm maze (RAM) or NO formation. Hippocampi and FL of male Sprague-Dawley rats were taken from trained or yoked in a RAM. Then hArg and metabolites, NO and NO synthase (NOS) were determined by standard methods. The animals learned the task in the RAM showing significant reduction of working memory errors. hArg showed decreased levels in both brain regions of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) concentrations and NOS activity were significantly increased in hippocampi, F(1,36) = 170.5; P ≤ 0.0001 and FL, F(1,36) = 74.67; P ≤ 0.0001 of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Levels of hArg were negatively correlated with NOx in hippocampus (r = -0.6355; P = 0.0483) but not in FL and with lysine in the FL (r = -0.6650; P = 0.0358). NOx levels were positively correlated with NOS in both the hippocampus (r = 0.7474; P = 0.0129) and FL (r = 0.9563; P ≤  0.0001). These novel findings indicate that hArg is linked to NO formation in hippocampus but not in FL and is paralleling spatial memory in the RAM.

  2. Modeling the solar cycle change in nitric oxide in the thermosphere and upper mesosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite have shown that low-latitude nitric oxide densities at 110 km decrease by about a factor of 8 from January 1982 to April 1985. This time period corresponds to the descending phase of the last solar cycle where the monthly smoothed sunspot number decreased from more than 150 to less than 25. In addition, nitric oxide was observed to vary by a factor of 2 over a solar rotation, during high solar activity. A one-dimensional, globally averaged model of the thermosphere and upper mesosphere has been used to study the height distribution of nitric oxide (NO) and its response to changes in the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV) through the solar cycle and over a solar rotation. The primary source of nitric oxide is the reaction of excited atomic nitrogen, N( 2 D), with molecular oxygen. The atomic nitrogen is created by a number of ion-neutral reactions and by direct dissociation of molecular nitrogen by photons and photoelectrons. The occurrence of the peak nitric oxide density at or below 115 km is a direct consequence of ionization and dissociation of molecular nitrogen by photoelectrons, which are produced by the solar flux below 30.0 nm (XUV). Nitric oxide is shown to vary over the solar cycle by a factor of 7 at low latitudes in the lower thermosphere E region, due to the estimated change in the solar EUV flux, in good agreement with the SME satellite observations. The NO density is shown to be strongly dependent on the temperature profile in the lower thermosphere and accounts for the difference between the current model and previous work. Wavelengths less than 1.8 nm have little impact on the NO profile. A factor of 3 change in solar flux below 5.0 nm at high solar activity produced a factor of 2 change in the peak NO density, consistent with SME observations over a solar rotation; this change also lowered the peak to 100 km, consistent with rocket data. 52 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Sesquiterpenes from Curcuma wenyujin with their inhibitory activities on nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Suyu; Xia, Guiyang; Wang, Liqing; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Jian; Chen, Lixia

    2017-03-01

    One new sesquiterpene, 7α,11-epoxy-6α-hydroxy-carabrane-4,8-dione, along with 10 known ones were isolated from the essential oil of Curcuma wenyujin Y.H. Chen et C. Ling. Their structures were established based on extensive spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was determined by the CD analysis of the insitu formed [Rh 2 (OCOCF 3 ) 4 ] complex, and the CD data analysis based on the octane rule of cyclohexanone. The inhibitory effects of these sesquiterpenes on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages were also evaluated. Furthermore, the biosynthesis pathway of the isolated compounds was proposed.

  4. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  5. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lima-Cabello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome.

  6. Exogenous nitric oxide donor protects Artemisia annua from oxidative stress generated by boron and aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M Masroor A; Naeem, M; Idrees, Mohd; Moinuddin; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Ram, M

    2012-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signal molecule modulating the response of plants to environmental stress. Here we report the effects of boron (B) and aluminium (Al) contamination in soil, carried out with or without application of exogenous SNP (NO donor), on various plant processes in Artemisia annua, including changes in artemisinin content. The addition of B or Al to soil medium significantly reduced the yield and growth of plants and lowered the values of net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO(2) concentration and total chlorophyll content. The follow-up treatment of NO donor favoured growth and improved the photosynthetic efficiency in stressed as well as non-stressed plants. Artemisinin content was enhanced by 24.6% and 43.8% at 1mmole of soil-applied B or Al. When SNP was applied at 2mmole concentration together with either 1mmole of B and/or Al, it further stimulated artemisinin biosynthesis compared to the control. Application of B+Al+SNP proved to be the best treatment combination for the artemisinin content in Artemisia annua leaves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elba Gonzalez-Mejia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO, has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf, infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME, non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels.

  8. Nitric oxide production by Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia infected with Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsy Nalleli Loría-Cervera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae is a primary reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae. Nitric oxide (NO generally plays a crucial role in the containment and elimination of Leishmania. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of NO produced by P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L. mexicana. Subclinical and clinical infections were established in P. yucatanicus through inoculation with 1 x 10 2 and 2.5 x 10 6 promastigotes, respectively. Peritoneal macrophages were cultured alone or co-cultured with lymphocytes with or without soluble Leishmania antigen. The level of NO production was determined using the Griess reaction. The amount of NO produced was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.0001 in co-cultured macrophages and lymphocytes than in macrophages cultured alone. No differences in NO production were found between P. yucatanicus with subclinical L. (L. mexicana infections and animals with clinical infections. These results support the hypothesis that the immunological mechanisms of NO production in P. yucatanicus are similar to those described in mouse models of leishmaniasis and, despite NO production, P. yucatanicus is unable to clear the parasite infection.

  9. Protective effects of agmatine on lipopolysaccharide-injured microglia and inducible nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soo Kyung; Hong, Samin; Park, Yu Mi; Choi, Ja Yong; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2012-12-17

    Proinflammatory factors released from activated microglia contribute to maintaining homeostasis against various noxious stimuli in the central nervous system. If excessive, however, they may initiate a pathologic neuroinflammatory process. In this investigation, we evaluated whether agmatine, a primary polyamine known to protect neurons, reduces lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced damage to microglia in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro study, BV2-immortalized murine microglia were exposed to LPS with agmatine treatment. After 24hours, cell viability and the amount of nitrite generated were determined. For in vivo study, LPS was microinjected into the corpus callosum of adult male albino mice. Agmatine was intraperitoneally administered at the time of injury. Brains were evaluated 24hours after LPS microinjection to check for immunoreactivity with a microglial marker of ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Using western blot analysis, protein expression of iNOS as well as that of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β, was determined. Agmatine significantly reduced the LPS-induced BV2 microglial cytotoxicity from over 80% to less than 60% (pAgmatine also decreased the activities of microglia and iNOS induced by LPS microinjection into corpus callosum. Our findings reveal that agmatine attenuates LPS-induced microglial damage and suggest that agmatine may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of weight loss on serum concentrations of nitric oxide induced by short - term exercise in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Olszanecka-Glinianowicz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of present study was to examine the effect of weight loss comprising regular moderate physical activity on resting serum concentrations of nitric oxide metabolites and exercise induced NO release. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in 43 obese women without additional diseases (age 41.8±11.9y, body weight 94.5±15.1kg, BMI 36.5±4.6kg/m2. All obese patients participated in a 3-month weight reduction programme that consisted of 1 a group instruction in behavioural and dietary methods of weight control every two weeks; 2 1000-1400kcal/day balanced diet, and 3 moderate physical exercises (30 minutes, 3 times a week. Before and after treatment body mass and height were measured, body mass index (BMI was calculated. Body composition was determined by impedance analysis using a Bodystat analyser. The serum concentration of nitric oxide metabolites before and after exercise was measured using spectrophotometry method by Griess. The serum concentrations of lactate before and after exercise were measured with the use of strip test (ACCUSPORT analyzer. Serum concentration of insulin was measured with the use of RIA. Plasma glucose, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglicerydes were determined by enzymatic procedure. Results: The mean weight loss during treatment was 8.3±4.3 kg. We did not observe differences between resting serum concentrations of NO and lactate before and after weight loss. During exercise serum NO concentrations increased significantly both before and after weight loss treatment. After the weight reduction treatment, the time of exercise test increased significantly P<0.005, but there were no significant differences between the value of NO before and after weight loss. Conclusion: 3 – month regular physical activity and weight loss did not influence exercise-induced nitric oxide production.

  11. Alleviating effect of exogenous nitric oxide in cucumber seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... oxidation (Shi et al., 2007). To protect cells and organelles from the damaging effects of ROS, complex antioxidant defense system have been evolved which comprises of enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase. (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione reeducate (GR). (Lee et al., 2000; ...

  12. Human endogenous retrovirus W env increases nitric oxide production and enhances the migration ability of microglia by regulating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ran; Li, Shan; Cao, Qian; Wang, Xiuling; Yan, Qiujin; Tu, Xiaoning; Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Fan

    2017-06-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus W env (HERV-W env) plays a critical role in many neuropsychological diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis (MS). These diseases are accompanied by immunological reactions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia are important immunocytes in brain inflammation that can produce a gasotransmitter-nitric oxide (NO). NO not only plays a role in the function of neuronal cells but also participates in the pathogenesis of various neuropsychological diseases. In this study, we reported increased NO production in CHME-5 microglia cells after they were transfected with HERV-W env. Moreover, HERV-W env increased the expression and function of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) and enhanced the promoter activity of hiNOS. Microglial migration was also enhanced. These data revealed that HERV-W env might contribute to increase NO production and microglial migration ability in neuropsychological disorders by regulating the expression of inducible NOS. Results from this study might lead to the identification of novel targets for the treatment of neuropsychological diseases, including neuroinflammatory diseases, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Calcium mobilization in HeLa cells induced by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to be involved in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the mechanism by which nitric oxide modulates cancer cell growth and metastasis on cellular and molecular level is still not fully understood. This work utilized confocal microscopy and fluorescence microplate reader to investigate the effects of exogenous NO on the mobilization of calcium, which is one of the regulators of cell migration, in HeLa cells. The results show that NO elevates calcium in concentration-dependent manner in HeLa cells. And the elevation of calcium induced by NO is due to calcium influx and calcium release from intracellular calcium stores. Moreover, calcium release from intracellular stores is dominant. Furthermore, calcium release from mitochondria is one of the modulation pathways of NO. These findings would contribute to recognizing the significance of NO in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The influence of nitric oxide and mercury chloride on leaf mesophyll structure under natural drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola M. Musiyenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is established that under natural drought conditions starch was accumulated in the central part of chloroplasts of mesophyll cells and chloroplasts were localized on the periphery of cells at plasmalemma. After treatment wheat plants by nitric oxide donor the decreasing of starch deposits number and close contacts between chloroplasts were indicated, elongated nucleus was localized in the centre of cells. After treatment wheat plant by mercury chloride chloroplasts in the cells lost their oval shape and contacts, increased eventually deposition of starch, indicating the acceleration of aging tissues. Thus, nitric oxide in drought conditions reduced the destructive effect of drought on mesophyll cells, and mercury chloride caused deformation of the membrane cell.

  15. Gastroprotective Effect of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Is Dependent on Production of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerônimo Aparecido Ribeiro-Junior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective activity of ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP from Melipona scutellaris and to investigate the possible mechanisms of action. The gastroprotective activity of the EEGP was evaluated using model ulcer induced by ethanol. To elucidate the possible mechanisms of action, we investigated the involvement of the nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH groups, nitric oxide and prostaglandins. In addition, the antisecretory activity of EEGP was also evaluated by pylorus ligated model. The EEGP orally administrated (300 mg/kg reduced the ulcerative lesions induced by the ethanol (P0.05. These results support the alternative medicine use of geopropolis as gastroprotective and the activities observed show to be related to nitric oxide and prostaglandins production.

  16. Nitric oxide-sphingolipid interplays in plant signalling: a new enigma from the Sphinx?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle eGuillas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO emerged as one of the major signalling molecules operating during plant development and plant responses to its environment. Beyond the identification of the direct molecular targets of NO, a series of studies considered its interplay with other actors of signal transduction and the integration of nitric oxide into complex signalling networks. Beside the close relationships between NO and calcium or phosphatidic acid signalling pathways that are now well-established, recent reports paved the way for interplays between NO and sphingolipids. This mini-review summarises our current knowledge of the influence NO and sphingolipids might exert on each other in plant physiology. Based on comparisons with examples from the animal field, it further indicates that, although sphingolipid-NO interplays are common features in signalling networks of eukaryotic cells, the underlying mechanisms and molecular targets significantly differ.

  17. Gastroprotective Effect of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Is Dependent on Production of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Junior, Jerônimo Aparecido; Franchin, Marcelo; Cavallini, Miriam Elias; Denny, Carina; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective activity of ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and to investigate the possible mechanisms of action. The gastroprotective activity of the EEGP was evaluated using model ulcer induced by ethanol. To elucidate the possible mechanisms of action, we investigated the involvement of the nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) groups, nitric oxide and prostaglandins. In addition, the antisecretory activity of EEGP was also evaluated by pylorus ligated model. The EEGP orally administrated (300 mg/kg) reduced the ulcerative lesions induced by the ethanol (P 0.05). These results support the alternative medicine use of geopropolis as gastroprotective and the activities observed show to be related to nitric oxide and prostaglandins production.

  18. Nitric oxide in plants: an assessment of the current state of knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Mandon, Julien; Persijn, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims After a series of seminal works during the last decade of the 20th century nitric oxide (NO) is now firmly placed in the pantheon of plant signals. NO acts in plant-microbe interactions, responses to abiotic stress, stomatal regulation and a range of developmental processes...... of NO production from DEANO (diethylamine nitric oxide), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) following infiltration of tobacco leaves which could aid workers in their experiments. Further, based on current data it is difficult to define a bespoke plant NO signalling pathway, but rather....... By considering the recent advances in plant NO biology, this review will highlight certain key aspects that require further attention. Scope and conclusions The following questions will be considered. Whilst cytosolic nitrate reductase is an important source of NO, the contributions of other mechanisms...

  19. Inhibition of the adrenomedullin/nitric oxide signaling pathway in early diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Jan J; Giove, Thomas J; Favazza, Tara L; Akula, James D; Eldred, William D

    2011-06-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway is integrally involved in visual processing and changes in the NO pathway are measurable in eyes of diabetic patients. The small peptide adrenomedullin (ADM) can activate a signaling pathway to increase the enzyme activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). ADM levels are elevated in eyes of diabetic patients and therefore, ADM may play a role in the pathology of diabetic retinopathy. The goal of this research was to test the effects of inhibiting the ADM/NO signaling pathway in early diabetic retinopathy. Inhibition of this pathway decreased NO production in high-glucose retinal cultures. Treating diabetic mice with the PKC β inhibitor ruboxistaurin for 5 weeks lowered ADM mRNA levels and ADM-like immunoreactivity and preserved retinal function as assessed by electroretinography. The results of this study indicate that inhibiting the ADM/NO signaling pathway prevents neuronal pathology and functional losses in early diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in trigeminal ganglion cells during culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Zhou, MingFang; Zinck, Tina Jovanovic

    2005-01-01

    RNA and protein could be detected. The data suggest that iNOS expression may be a molecular mechanism mediating the adaptive response of trigeminal ganglia cells to the serum free stressful stimulus the culture environment provides. It may act as a cellular signalling molecule that is expressed after cell......Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule that has been suggested to be a key molecule for induction and maintenance of migraine attacks based on clinical studies, animal experimental studies and the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity within the trigeminovascular......, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. In trigeminal ganglia cells not subjected to culture, endothelial (e) and neuronal (n) but not inducible (i) NOS mRNA and protein were detected. Culture of rat neurones resulted in a rapid axonal outgrowth of NOS positive...

  1. Involvement of the nitric oxide in melatonin-mediated protection against injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenguo; He, Yifan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gu, Wenzhen; Wu, Zhi; Zhu, Xiao; Huang, Fang; He, Hongwen

    2018-05-01

    Melatonin is a hormone mainly synthesized by the pineal gland in vertebrates and known well as an endogenous regulator of circadian and seasonal rhythms. It has been demonstrated that melatonin is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes showing antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas in the biological system, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family. NO acts as a biological mediator and plays important roles in different systems in humans. The NO/NOS system exerts a broad spectrum of signaling functions. Accumulating evidence has clearly revealed that melatonin regulates NO/NOS system through multiple mechanisms that may influence physiological and pathophysiological processes. This article reviews the latest evidence for the effects of melatonin on NO/NOS regulation in different organs and disease conditions, the potential cellular mechanisms by which melatonin is involved in organ protection are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ribavirin in Cancer Immunotherapies: Controlling Nitric Oxide Augments Cytotoxic Lymphocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Kast

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Either ribavirin (RBV or cyclophosphamide (CY can shift an immune response from Th2 toward a Thi cytokine profile. CY is used in this role in various current cancer immunotherapy attempts but with mixed success. More potent and reliable immunoadjuvants and Th1 response biasing methods are needed. RBV is used today mainly to augment interferon-alpha treatment of hepatitis C. RBV shifts an immune response from Th2 toward Th1 more effectively than CY and may be a safe and useful adjuvant for current cancer immunotherapeutic efforts. RBV is thought to act by inhibition of tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis. Tetrahydrobiopterin is an essential cofactor for all known isoforms of nitric oxide synthase. Lowered nitric oxide favors Th1 development as high levels favor Th2 weighting.

  3. Nitric oxide and HSV vaginal infection in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benencia, Fabian; Gamba, Gisela; Cavalieri, Hernan; Courreges, Maria Cecilia; Benedetti, Ruben; Villamil, Soledad Maria; Massouh, Ernesto Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Here we study the role of nitric oxide in the vaginal infection of Balb/c mice with herpes simplex virus type 2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in vaginal tissue and inguinal lymph nodes early postinfection. iNOS was also found to be activated in cells recovered from vaginal washings of infected animals. Animals treated with aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor, showed a dose-dependent increase in vaginal pathology after viral infection compared to controls. Viral titers in vaginal washings and vaginas were higher in AG-treated mice. Treated animals presented higher PMN counts in vaginal washings compared to controls. Histopathology studies revealed a profound inflammatory exudate in vaginal tissue of treated animals. Finally, RT-PCR analysis showed increased expression of the chemokines MIP-2 and RANTES in vaginal tissue and inguinal lymph nodes of these animals

  4. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for the Prevention of Impaired Arterial Oxygenation during Myocardial Revascularization with Extracorporeal Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide used intraoperatively to prevent lung oxygenating dysfunction in patients with coronary heart disease after myocardial revascularization under extracorporeal circulation (EC. Subjects and methods. Thirty-two patients aged 55.0±2.0 years were examined. The inclusion criteria were the standard course of surgical intervention (the absence of hemorrhage, acute cardiovascular insufficiency, perioperative myocardial infarction, etc., a pulmonary artery wedge pressure of less than 15 – mm Hg throughout the study, and the baseline arterial partial oxygen tension/inspired mixture oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2 ratio of at least 350 mm Hg. There was a control group (n=21; Group 1 that used no special measures to prevent and/or to correct lung oxygenating dysfunction and Group 2 (n=11 that received inhaled nitric oxide. Ihe administration of inhaled nitric oxide at a concentration of 10 ppm was initiated after water anesthesia, stopped during EC, and resumed in the postperfusion period. Results. At the end, PaO2/FiO2 and intrapulmonary shunt fraction did not differ between the groups (p>0.05. Before EC, the patients receiving inhaled nitric oxide had a lower intrapulmonary blood shunting (8.9±0.7 and 11.7±1.0%; p<0.05. There were no intergroup differences in the values of PaO2/FiO2 at this stage. In the earliest postperfusion period, PaO2/FiO2 was higher in Group 2 than that in Group 1. At the end of operations, Groups 1 and 2 had a PaO2/FiO2 of 336.0±16.8 and 409.0±24.3 mm Hg, respectively (p<0.05 and an intrapulmonary shunt fraction of 14.5±1.0 and 10.4±1.0% (p<0.05. At the end of surgery, the rate of a reduction in PaO2/FiO2 to the level below 350 mm Hg was 52.4±11.1% in Group 1 and 18.2±11.6% in Group 2 (p<0.05. Six hours after surgery, PaO2/FiO2 values less than 300 mm Hg were diagnosed in 61.9±10.5% of Group 1 patients and in 27.3±13.4% of Group 2 ones (p<0.05. Conclusion. The

  5. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule -R-ES-O-N-A-N--CE--I-A-p-r-il-2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sciences and Biology at ... cancer and diabetes mellitus to coronary artery disease. (heart attack) and hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO), an inorganic molecule formed by vascular ... cell types from which they were first cloned: neuronal NOS.

  6. Enhancement of fracture healing in the rat, modulated by compounds that stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Rajfer, R. A.; Kilic, A.; Neviaser, A. S.; Schulte, L. M.; Hlaing, S. M.; Landeros, J.; Ferrini, M. G.; Ebramzadeh, E.; Park, S-H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the effects on fracture healing of two up-regulators of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a rat model of an open femoral osteotomy: tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and the recently reported nutraceutical, COMB-4 (consisting of L-citrulline, Paullinia cupana, ginger and muira puama), given orally for either 14 or 42 days. Materials and Methods Unilateral femoral osteotomies were created in 58 male rats and fixed with an intramedullary compression na...

  7. Exhaled Nitric Oxide is Decreased by Exposure to the Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zudin A. Puthucheary

    2006-01-01

    or 40% oxygen, 1 ATA. In an in vitro study, nitrate/nitrite release decreased after 90 minutes HBOT in airway epithelial (A549 cells. Conclusion. HBO exposure causes a fall in eNO. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS may cause elevated eNO in patients secondary to inflammation, and inhibition of iNOS may be the mechanism of the reduction of eNO seen with HBOT.

  8. The role of nitric oxide during embryonic epidermis development of Xenopus laevis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tománková, Silvie; Abaffy, Pavel; Šindelka, Radek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2017), s. 862-871 ISSN 2046-6390 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR LK21305; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Development * Nitric oxide * Epidermis * Xenopus laevis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Developmental biology Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2016

  9. Anti-Biofilm Efficacy of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hetrick, Evan M.; Shin, Jae Ho; Paul, Heather S.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing silica nanoparticles to kill biofilm-based microbial cells is reported. Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans were formed in vitro and exposed to NO-releasing silica nanoparticles. Replicative viability experiments revealed that ≥ 99% of cells from each type of biofilm were killed via NO release, with the greatest efficacy (≥ 99.999% killing) against gram-negative...

  10. Plant hemoglobins: Important players at the crossroads between oxygen and nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Kapuganti J; Hebelstrup, Kim; Mur, Luis A J

    2011-01-01

    Plant hemoglobins constitute a diverse group of hemeproteins and evolutionarily belong to three different classes. Class 1 hemoglobins possess an extremely high affinity to oxygen and their main function consists in scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) at very low oxygen levels. Class 2 hemoglobins have...... at high O2 concentrations. Depending on their physical properties, hemoglobins belong either to hexacoordinate non-symbiotic or pentacoordinate symbiotic groups. Plant hemoglobins are plausible targets for improving resistance to multiple stresses....

  11. Nitric oxide increases myocardial efficiency in the hypoxia-tolerant turtle Trachemys scripta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Mikkel; Fago, Angela; Gesser, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) may influence cardiac mechanical performance relative to O2 consumption by depressing respiration rate and by affecting the excitation-contraction coupling. Such effects of NO should be particularly important during hypoxia in species such as the hypoxia-tolerant turtle Trachemys....... This effect was particularly pronounced under O2 deficiency and may therefore contribute towards preserving cardiac function and to the overall excellent hypoxic tolerance of the turtle...

  12. The role of nitric oxide in the maintenance of vasoactive balance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecháňová, Olga; Šimko, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, Suppl.2 (2007), S7-S16 ISSN 0862-8408 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/6148/26; VEGA(SK) 1/3429/06; APPV(SK) 0596-06 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : nitric oxide * vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction factors * hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  13. Inhibition by sodium nitroprusside of the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariotto, S; Cuzzolin, L; Adami, A; Del Soldato, P; Suzuki, H; Benoni, G

    1995-01-01

    A well-known nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), decreases in a dose-dependent manner NO synthase (NOS) activity induced in rat neutrophils by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This inhibitory action of SNP seems not to be due to its direct effect on the enzyme activity. The strong nitrosonium ion (NO+) character of SNP could be responsible for its inhibition of NOS induction in neutrophils.

  14. Inhibition by sodium nitroprusside of the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotto, S; Cuzzolin, L; Adami, A; Del Soldato, P; Suzuki, H; Benoni, G

    1995-01-01

    A well-known nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), decreases in a dose-dependent manner NO synthase (NOS) activity induced in rat neutrophils by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This inhibitory action of SNP seems not to be due to its direct effect on the enzyme activity. The strong nitrosonium ion (NO+) character of SNP could be responsible for its inhibition of NOS induction in neutrophils. PMID:7542530

  15. Nitric Oxide Synthesis Is Reduced in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes and Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Tessari, Paolo; Cecchet, Diego; Cosma, Alessandra; Vettore, Monica; Coracina, Anna; Millioni, Renato; Iori, Elisabetta; Puricelli, Lucia; Avogaro, Angelo; Vedovato, Monica

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nitric oxide (NO) is a key metabolic and vascular regulator. Its production is stimulated by insulin. A reduced urinary excretion of NO products (NOx) is frequently found in type 2 diabetes, particularly in association with nephropathy. However, whether the decreased NOx excretion in type 2 diabetes is caused by a defective NOx production from arginine in response to hyperinsulinemia has never been studied. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured NOx fractional (FSR) and absolute (A...

  16. Nitric oxide nanoparticles: Pre-clinical utility as a therapeutic for intramuscular abscesses

    OpenAIRE

    Schairer, David O.; Martinez, Luis R.; Blecher, Karin; Chouake, Jason S.; Nacharaju, Parimala; Gialanella, Philip; Friedman, Joel M.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Friedman, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical component of host defense against invading pathogens; however, its therapeutic utility is limited due to a lack of practical delivery systems. Recently, a NO-releasing nanoparticulate platform (NO-np) was shown to have in vitro broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy in a dermal abscess model. To extend these findings, both topical (TP) and intralesional (IL) NO-np administration was evaluated in a MRSA intramuscular murine absce...

  17. Melatonin effect on hypertension and nitric oxide balance in the heart and aorta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecháňová, Olga; Paulis, L.; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Šimko, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. S6 (2006), s. 395-395 ISSN 0263-6352. [Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension /21./. 15.10.2006-19.10.2006, Fukuoka] Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/6148/26 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : melatonin * nitric oxide balance * hypertension * SHR and WKY rat * heart and aorta Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  18. Effect of a nitric oxide donor (glyceryl trinitrate) on nociceptive thresholds in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1996-01-01

    Several animal studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in central and peripheral modulation of nociception. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) exerts its physiological actions via donation of NO. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of this NO donor on nociceptive...... central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, we regard convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO as a more likely explanation of our findings....

  19. Effect of Genistein on reproductive parameter and serum nitric oxide levels in morphine-treated mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrus Jalili

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The predominant phytoestrogen in soy and derived products is the isoflavone Genistein. Genistein has antioxidant properties. Morphine is a main psychoactive chemical in opium that can increase the generation of free radicals and therefore it could adversely affects the spermatogenesis. Objective: The main goal was to investigate whether the Genistein could protect morphine adverse effects on sperm cells viability, count, motility, and testis histology and testosterone hormone and nitric oxide in blood serum. Materials and Methods: In this study, various doses of Genistein (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg and Genistein plus morphine (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg were administered interaperitoneally to 48 male mice for 30 consequent days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=6 and sperm parameters (sperm cells viability, count, motility and morphology, testis weight and histology, testosterone hormone (ELISA method, FSH and LH hormones (immunoradiometry and serum nitric oxide (griess assay were analyzed and compared. Results: The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased testosterone (0.03 ng/mg LH and FSH level, histological parameters, count, viability (55.3%, morphology and motility of sperm cells (1%, testis weight (0.08 gr and increase nitric oxide compared to saline group (p=0.00. However, administration of Genistein and Genistein plus morphine significantly boosted motility, morphology, count, viability of sperm cells, seminiferous tubules diameter, germinal thickness, testosterone, LH and FSH while decrease nitric oxide level in all groups compared to morphine group (p<0.025. Conclusion: It seems that Genistein administration could increase the quality of spermatozoa and prevent morphine- induced adverse effects on sperm parameters.

  20. Role of nitric oxide in pheromone-mediated intraspecific communication in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Pavón, Carmen; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2009-12-07

    Nitric oxide is known to take part in the control of sexual and agonistic behaviours. This is usually attributed to its role in neural transmission in the hypothalamus and other structures of the limbic system. However, socio-sexual behaviours in rodents are mainly directed by chemical signals detected by the vomeronasal system, and nitric oxide is abundant in key structures along the vomeronasal pathway. Thus, here we check whether pharmacological treatments interfering with nitrergic transmission could affect socio-sexual behaviour by impairing the processing of chemical signals. Treatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (Nomega-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, L-NAME, 100mg/kg) blocks the innate preference displayed by female mice for sexual pheromones contained in male-soiled bedding, with a lower dose of the drug (50mg/kg) having no effect. Animals treated with the high dose of L-NAME show no reduction of olfactory discrimination of male urine in a habituation-dishabituation test, thus suggesting that the effect of the drug on the preference for male pheromones is not due to an inability to detect male urine. Alternatively, it may result from an alteration in processing the reinforcing value of pheromones as sexual signals. These results add a new piece of evidence to our understanding of the neurochemistry of intraspecific chemical communication in rodents, and suggest that the role of nitric oxide in socio-sexual behaviours should be re-evaluated taking into account the involvement of this neuromodulator in the processing of chemical signals.

  1. Association of indoor air pollution with rhinitis symptoms, atopy and nitric oxide levels in exhaled air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) outdoors can induce airway inflammation and exacerbation of asthma in adults. However, there is limited knowledge about the effects of exposure to indoor PM. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of exposure to indoor sources of PM...... with rhinitis symptoms, atopy and nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) as a measure of airway inflammation....

  2. Nitric oxide improves the hemodynamic performance of the hypoxic goldfish (Carassius auratus) heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imbrogno, Sandra; Capria, C.; Tota, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Goldfish tolerate prolonged and severe hypoxia, thus representing a well-suited model to study the maintenance of cardiac function when O2 availability represents a limiting factor. Using a working heart preparation, we explored the role of the intracardiac nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- derived...... complemented by Western blotting analysis which revealed increased expressions of NOS and hypoxia inducible factor α(HIF-1α). In conclusion, we demonstrated that intracardiac NO/NOS enhances goldfish heart performance, remarkably expanding its hypoxic tolerance....

  3. Nasal nitric oxide is associated with exhaled NO, bronchial responsiveness and poor asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, C; Janson, C; Borres, M P; Nordvall, L; Alving, K; Malinovschi, A

    2014-06-01

    The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is an established marker of airway inflammation in asthma. Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) has initially been regarded as a promising marker of inflammation of nasal mucosa. However, due to its dual origins, paranasal sinuses and nasal mucosa, the clinical use of nNO is controversial. There is an inflammatory link between inflammation in the upper and lower airways within the united airways' paradigm, but the study of the clinical value of nNO in asthma has been limited. The objective of this study is to analyse nNO in asthmatics and its relationship to FeNO, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, allergic sensitization and asthma control. A total of 371 children and young adults from an asthma cohort were included in this study, which performed measurements of nNO (through aspiration at 5 mL s(-1)), FeNO, bronchial responsiveness to methacholine, blood eosinophil count (B-Eos) and IgE sensitization. The asthma control test (ACT) and a questionnaire regarding medical treatment, symptoms of asthma, rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis were completed by all subjects. An association was found between higher nNO levels and increased bronchial responsiveness (p < 0.001), FeNO (p < 0.001) and B-Eos (p = 0.002). Sensitization to furry animals related to higher levels of nNO (p < 0.001). Subjects with poorly controlled asthma (ACT < 15) had lower levels of nNO than subjects with a higher ACT score (619 ± 278 ppb, versus 807 ± 274 ppb, p = 0.002). Loss of smell showed the strongest association with lower nNO levels among the upper airway symptoms recorded. In patients with asthma, nNO was positively correlated with exhaled NO, bronchial responsiveness and asthma control. This study suggests clinical utility of nNO in subjects with asthma, but in order to get better understanding of the nNO determinants, simultaneous mapping of upper airway comorbidities by clinical examination is appropriate.

  4. Normalization of hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier-201 induced vasoconstriction: targeting nitric oxide and endothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverne, Yannick J; de Wijs-Meijler, Daphne; Te Lintel Hekkert, Maaike; Moon-Massat, Paula F; Dubé, Gregory P; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2017-05-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC)-201 is a cell-free modified hemoglobin solution potentially facilitating oxygen uptake and delivery in cardiovascular disorders and hemorrhagic shock. Clinical use has been hampered by vasoconstriction in the systemic and pulmonary beds. Therefore, we aimed to 1 ) determine the possibility of counteracting HBOC-201-induced pressor effects with either adenosine (ADO) or nitroglycerin (NTG); 2 ) assess the potential roles of nitric oxide (NO) scavenging, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and endothelin (ET) in mediating the observed vasoconstriction; and 3 ) compare these effects in resting and exercising swine. Chronically instrumented swine were studied at rest and during exercise after administration of HBOC-201 alone or in combination with ADO. The role of NO was assessed by supplementation with NTG or administration of the eNOS inhibitor N ω -nitro-l-arginine. Alternative vasoactive pathways were investigated via intravenous administration of the ET A /ET B receptor blocker tezosentan or a mixture of ROS scavengers. The systemic and to a lesser extent the pulmonary pressor effects of HBOC-201 could be counteracted by ADO; however, dosage titration was very important to avoid systemic hypotension. Similarly, supplementation of NO with NTG negated the pressor effects but also required titration of the dose. The pressor response to HBOC-201 was reduced after eNOS inhibition and abolished by simultaneous ET A /ET B receptor blockade, while ROS scavenging had no effect. In conclusion, the pressor response to HBOC-201 is mediated by vasoconstriction due to NO scavenging and production of ET. Further research should explore the effect of longer-acting ET receptor blockers to counteract the side effect of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC)-201 can disrupt hemodynamic homeostasis, mimicking some aspects of endothelial dysfunction, resulting in elevated systemic and pulmonary blood

  5. Auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiming; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang; Cui, Dayong; Cai, Weiming

    Gravitropism is the asymmetric growth or curvature of plant organs in response to gravistimulation. There is a complex signal transduction cascade which involved in the differential growth of plants in response to changes in the gravity vector. The role of auxin in gravitropism has been demonstrated by many experiments, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. In our studies before, mediation of the gravitropic bending of soybean roots and rice leaf sheath bases by nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins, are induced by auxin. The asymmetrical distribution of nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins resulted from the asymmetrical synthesis of them in bending sites. In soybean roots, inhibitions of NO and cGMP synthesis reduced differential NO and cGMP accumulation respectively, which both of these effects can lead to the reduction of gravitropic bending. Gibberellin-induced OsXET, OsEXPA4 and OsRWC3 were also found involved in the gravitropic bending. These data indicated that auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism. More experiments need to prove the more detailed mechanism of them.

  6. The nitric oxide prodrug JS-K and its structural analogues as cancer therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciag, Anna E; Saavedra, Joseph E; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) prodrugs of the diazeniumdiolate class are routinely used as reliable sources of nitric oxide in chemical and biological laboratory settings. O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates, which are derivatized forms of ionic diazeniumdiolates, have been found to show potent anti-proliferative activity in a variety of cancer cells, presumably through the effects of NO. One important member of this class of diazeniumdiolates, O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K), has shown promise as a novel cancer therapeutic agent in a number of animal models. This review describes the developments in chemical and biochemical characterization and structure-activity relationship of JS-K and its analogues. In addition, some molecular mechanistic insights into the observed anti-proliferative activity of JS-K are discussed. Finally, a structural motif is presented for O(2)-(aryl) diazeniumdiolate nitric oxide prodrugs that show potency comparable with that of JS-K.

  7. Immune-relevant thrombocytes of common carp undergo parasite-induced nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Inge R; Ribeiro, Carla M S; Forlenza, Maria; Taverne-Thiele, Anja; Rombout, Jan H W M; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wiegertjes, Geert F

    2015-06-01

    Common carp thrombocytes account for 30-40% of peripheral blood leukocytes and are abundant in the healthy animals' spleen, the thrombopoietic organ. We show that, ex vivo, thrombocytes from healthy carp express a large number of immune-relevant genes, among which several cytokines and Toll-like receptors, clearly pointing at immune functions of carp thrombocytes. Few studies have described the role of fish thrombocytes during infection. Carp are natural host to two different but related protozoan parasites, Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii, which reside in the blood and tissue fluids. We used the two parasites to undertake controlled studies on the role of fish thrombocytes during these infections. In vivo, but only during infection with T. borreli, thrombocytes were massively depleted from the blood and spleen leading to severe thrombocytopenia. Ex vivo, addition of nitric oxide induced a clear and rapid apoptosis of thrombocytes from healthy carp, supporting a role for nitric oxide-mediated control of immune-relevant thrombocytes during infection with T. borreli. The potential advantage for parasites to selectively deplete the host of thrombocytes via nitric oxide-induced apoptosis is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in the pathogenesis of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jayendrakumar B; Shah, Franky D; Shukla, Shilin N; Shah, Pankaj M; Patel, Prabhudas S

    2009-01-01

    Oral cancer is the leading malignancy in India. Nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes play an important role in etiology of oral cancer. Therefore, the present study evaluates nitric oxide and antioxidant enzyme levels in healthy individual without tobacco habits (NHT, N=30) and healthy individuals with tobacco habits (WHT, n=90), patients with oral precancers (OPC, n=15) and oral cancer patients (n=126). Blood samples were collected from the subjects. NO2 + NO3 (nitrite+nitrate), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase levels were estimated using highly specific spectrophotometeric methods. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS statistical software version 10. Mean plasma NO2 + NO3 levels were elevated in patients with OPC and oral cancer patients as compared to the controls. Mean activities of erythrocyte SOD and catalase were higher in WHT than NHT. Erythrocyte SOD and catalase levels were higher in WHT and patients with OPC as compared to NHT. The erythrocyte SOD and catalase activities were lower in oral cancer patients than patients with OPC. The erythrocyte SOD activity was higher in advanced oral cancer than the early disease. Erythrocyte catalase activity was lower in poorly differentiated tumors than well and moderately differentiated tumors. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that alterations in plasma NO2 + NO3 levels were negatively associated with changes in erythrocyte SOD activities. The data revealed that the alterations in antioxidant activities were associated with production of nitric oxide in oral cancer, which may have significant role in oral carcinogenesis.

  9. Treatment Of Sunitinib-Induced Hypertension In Solid Tumors By Nitric Oxid Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís A. Leon

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension (HT is one of the most common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibitors. Hypertension observed in clinical trials appears to correlate with the potency of VEGF kinase inhibitor against VEGFR-2: agents with higher potency are associated with a higher incidence of hypertension. Although the exact mechanism by TKIs induce hypertension has not yet been completely clarified, two key hypotheses have been postulated. First, some studies have pointed to a VEGF inhibitors-induced decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS and nitric oxide (NO production, that can result in vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. VEGF, mediated by PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway, upregulates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme leading to up-regulation of NO production. So inhibition of signaling through the VEGF pathway would lead to a decrease in NO production, resulting in an increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure. Secondly a decrease in the number of microvascular endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of normal microvessel density (rarefaction occurs upon VEGF signaling inhibition.

  10. Integrative medical therapy: examination of meditation's therapeutic and global medicinal outcomes via nitric oxide (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Esch, Tobias

    2005-10-01

    Relaxation techniques are part of the integrative medicine movement that is of growing importance for mainstream medicine. Complementary medical therapies have the potential to affect many physiological systems. Repeatedly studies show the benefits of the placebo response and relaxation techniques in the treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety and mild and moderate depression, premenstrual syndrome, and infertility. In itself, relaxation is characterized by a decreased metabolism, heart rate, blood pressure, and rate of breathing as well as an increase in skin temperature. Relaxation approaches, such as progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, meditation and biofeedback, are effective in lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients by a significant margin. Given this association with changes in vascular tone, we have hypothesized that nitric oxide, a demonstrated vasodilator substance, contribute to physiological activity of relaxation approaches. We examined the scientific literature concerning the disorders noted earlier for their nitric oxide involvement in an attempt to provide a molecular rationale for the positive effects of relaxation approaches, which are physiological and cognitive process. We conclude that constitutive nitric oxide may crucially contribute to potentially beneficial outcomes and effects in diverse pathologies, exerting a global healing effect.

  11. Induction of insulin secretion in engineered liver cells by nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Sabire

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus results from an autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. The lack of insulin leads to chronic hyperglycemia and secondary complications, such as cardiovascular disease. The currently approved clinical treatments for diabetes mellitus often fail to achieve sustained and optimal glycemic control. Therefore, there is a great interest in the development of surrogate beta cells as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Normally, pancreatic beta cells produce and secrete insulin only in response to increased blood glucose levels. However in many cases, insulin secretion from non-beta cells engineered to produce insulin occurs in a glucose-independent manner. In the present study we engineered liver cells to produce and secrete insulin and insulin secretion can be stimulated via the nitric oxide pathway. Results Expression of either human insulin or the beta cell specific transcription factors PDX-1, NeuroD1 and MafA in the Hepa1-6 cell line or primary liver cells via adenoviral gene transfer, results in production and secretion of insulin. Although, the secretion of insulin is not significantly increased in response to high glucose, treatment of these engineered liver cells with L-arginine stimulates insulin secretion up to three-fold. This L-arginine-mediated insulin release is dependent on the production of nitric oxide. Conclusion Liver cells can be engineered to produce insulin and insulin secretion can be induced by treatment with L-arginine via the production of nitric oxide.

  12. Constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS activity in Langerhans islets from streptozotocin diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonovich de Schroeder T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide synthase activity was measured in Langerhans islets isolated from control and streptozotocin diabetic rats. The activity of the enzyme was linear up to 150 µg of protein from control rats and was optimal at 0.1 µM calcium, when it was measured after 45 min of incubation at 37oC in the presence of 200 µM arginine. Specific activity of the enzyme was 25 x 10-4 nmol [3H]citrulline 45 min-1 mg protein-1. Streptozotocin diabetic rats exhibited less enzyme activity both in total pancreas homogenate and in isolated Langerhans islets when compared to control animals. Nitric oxide synthase activity measured in control and diabetic rats 15 days after the last streptozotocin injection in the second group of animals corresponded only to a constitutive enzyme since it was not inhibited by aminoguanidine in any of the mentioned groups. Hyperglycemia in diabetic rats may be the consequence of impaired insulin release caused at least in part by reduced positive modulation mediated by constitutive nitric oxide synthase activity, which was dramatically reduced in islets severely damaged after streptozotocin treatment.

  13. Different sources of nitric oxide mediate neurovascular coupling in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen De Labra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the link between neuronal responses and metabolic signals is fundamental to our knowledge of brain function and it is a milestone in our efforts to interpret data from modern non invasive optical techniques such as fMRI, which are based on the close coupling between metabolic demand of active neurons and local changes in blood flow. The challenge is to unravel the link. Here we show, using spectrophotometry to record oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb and metahemoglobin (MetHb (surrogate markers of cerebral flow and nitric oxide levels respectively together with extracellular neuronal recordings in vivo and applying a multiple polynomial regression model, that the markers are able to predict up about 80% of variability in neuronal response. Furthermore, we show that the coupling between blood flow and neuronal activity is heavily influenced by nitric oxide (NO. While neuronal responses show the typical saturating response, blood flow shows a linear behaviour during contrast-response curves, with nitric oxide from different sources acting differently for low and high intensity.

  14. Thermal-grating contributions to degenerate four-wave mixing in nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danehy, P.M.; Paul, P.H.; Farrow, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    We report investigations of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) line intensities in the A 2 Σ + left-arrow X 2 Π electronic transitions of nitric oxide. Contributions from population gratings (spatially varying perturbations in the level populations of absorbing species) and thermal gratings (spatially varying perturbations in the overall density) were distinguished and compared by several experimental and analytical techniques. For small quantities of nitric oxide in a strongly quenching buffer gas (carbon dioxide), we found that thermal-grating contributions dominated at room temperature for gas pressures of ∼0.5 atm and higher. In a nearly nonquenching buffer (nitrogen) the population-grating mechanism dominated at pressures of ∼1.0 atm and lower. At higher temperatures in an atmospheric-pressure methane/air flame, population gratings of nitric oxide also dominated. We propose a simple model for the ratio of thermal- to population-grating scattering intensities that varies as P 4 T -4.4 . Preliminary investigations of the temperature dependence and detailed studies of the pressure dependence are in agreement with this model. Measurements of the temporal evolution and the peak intensity of isolated thermal-grating signals are in detailed agreement with calculations based on a linearized hydrodynamic model [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 12, 384 (1995)]. copyright 1995 Optical Society of America

  15. Bifunctional effects of fucoidan on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin Won; Yoon, Se Young; Oh, Soo Jin; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kang, Keon Wook

    2006-01-01

    Algal fucoidan is a marine sulfated polysaccharide with a wide variety of biological activities including anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. This study evaluated the effect of fucoidan on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Low concentration range of fucoidan (10 μg/ml) increased the basal expression level of iNOS in quiescent macrophages. However, we found for the first time that fucoidan inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blot analysis revealed that fucoidan suppressed the LPS-induced expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene. Moreover, the activation of both nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) are key steps in the transcriptional activation of the iNOS gene. Here, it was revealed that fucoidan selectively suppressed AP-1 activation, and that the activation of AP-1 appears to be essential for the induction of iNOS in activated macrophages. This inhibitory effect on AP-1 activation by fucoidan might be associated with its NO blocking and anti-inflammatory effects

  16. The Effect of Central Amygdala Nitric Oxide in Expression Of Drug Seeking Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Rahimpour

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies shows L-arginin (nitric oxide precursor increases conditioned place preference and drug seeking behaviors whereas LG-nitro-arginine methyl ester L-NAME( as nitric oxide synthase inhibitor decreases this process. In this project, effects of intra-central amygdale bilateral injection of nitric oxide agents on drug-seeking behaviors including rearing, sniffing and compartment entrance were investigated. Method: animals were wistar male rats (200-250 g which allowed to be recovered after they’re being suffered from a surgery by strereotaxis apparatus to be cannulated in coordination of central amygdale nucleus (CeA. CPP was conducted using a five-day schedule of unbiased procedure. Findings: morphine (2.5-10 mg/kg s.c induced significant drug-seeking behaviors. Naloxone (0.1-0.4 mg/kg i.p injection pretesting (after conditioning by morphine 7.5 mg/kg decreased the expression of behaviors. When L-arginine (0.3-3 µgr/rat injected intra–CeA prior to naloxone (0.4 mg/kg, increased behaviors but L-NAME (0.3-3 µgr/rat intra–CeA injections prior to L-arginine (0.3 µgr/rat pretesting, caused significant decreasement of L-arginine response. Conclusion: NO in the CeA may play an important role in the drug seeking behaviors induced of morphine.

  17. Placental Vesicles Carry Active Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Their Activity is Reduced in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mejia, Carolina; Kandzija, Neva; Zhang, Wei; Mhlomi, Vuyane; Cerdeira, Ana Sofia; Burdujan, Alexandra; Tannetta, Dionne; Dragovic, Rebecca; Sargent, Ian L; Redman, Christopher W; Kishore, Uday; Vatish, Manu

    2017-08-01

    Preeclampsia, a multisystem hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is associated with increased systemic vascular resistance. Placentae from patients with preeclampsia have reduced levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and, thus, less nitric oxide (NO). Syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV), comprising microvesicles (STBMV) and exosomes, carry signals from the syncytiotrophoblast to the mother. We hypothesized that STBEV-bound eNOS (STBEV-eNOS), capable of producing NO, are released into the maternal circulation. Dual-lobe ex vivo placental perfusion and differential centrifugation was used to isolate STBEV from preeclampsia (n=8) and normal pregnancies (NP; n=11). Plasma samples of gestational age-matched preeclampsia and NP (n=6) were used to isolate circulating STBMV. STBEV expressed placental alkaline phosphatase, confirming placental origin. STBEV coexpressed eNOS, but not inducible nitric oxide synthase, confirmed using Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunodepletion. STBEV-eNOS produced NO, which was significantly inhibited by N   G -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (eNOS inhibitor; P preeclampsia-perfused placentae had lower levels of STBEV-eNOS (STBMV; P preeclampsia women had lower STBEV-eNOS expression compared with that from NP women ( P preeclampsia placentae, as well as in plasma. The lower STBEV-eNOS NO production seen in preeclampsia may contribute to the decreased NO bioavailability in this disease. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Geomagnetic control of mesospheric nitric oxide concentration from simultaneous D and F region ionization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, S.N.; Shirke, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations are made of D-region electron density profiles derived from 'partial reflection' measurements over a low latitude station (Ahmedabad) during a year of low solar activity. The index relating the electron density with the solar zenith angle is found to increase towards lower zenith angles suggesting both diurnal and seasonal variations in the Nitric oxide concentration. A close correlation is also found between the electron density at 80 km and the maximum ionization density in the F region above. This is interpreted as due to concomitant variation of a sizeable fraction of the Nitric oxide concentration in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere with the overhead F region ionization. A simplified global model is presented for the mesospheric Nitric oxide concentration based on the morphological features of F region and the relationship existing between the ionization levels in F and D regions. Many observed features of the D region ionization including the solar zenith angle dependence, latitudinal and geomagnetic anomaly and long term variability are explained on the basis of this model

  19. L-Arginine Increases Cytotoxicity in Irradiated Ehrlich Carcinoma Cell Line: Possible Potential Role of Nitric Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noaman, E.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer cells possess nitric oxide syntheses (NOS) which metabolize L-Arginine (L-Arg) for producing nitric oxide (NO) The present study investigates the relations between NO and ionizing radiation in the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cell line. NOS activity was stimulated by exposure of cells to L-Arg just after irradiation. L-Arg (5 m M) supply led to an increase in ionizing radiation induced cytotoxicity (% of viability 18± 3 %) whereas, neither L-Arg itself nor ionizing irradiation caused cell death at the doses used in this study. Also, cells were treated either with L-Thio citrulline (L-Thio), an irreversible inhibitor of NOS or with exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. L-Thio and SOD prevented L-Arg mediated deleterious effects on Irradiated cells, whereas catalase was ineffective. Intracellular antioxidant enzyme activity was also determined. Ionizing radiation + L-Arg stress altered the activity of catalase (66 % decrease) and glutathione peroxidase (83 % decrease). Our findings demonstrated that L-Arg induces increase the radiation-mediated deleterious effects in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells cytotoxicity and that the ratio NO/ O 2 plays a key role in these processes. NO could participate the deleterious effect of irradiation, in conjugation with others reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during the oxidation of intracellular components by ionizing radiation (dose 6 Gy)

  20. Role of heat shock protein 90 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase during early anesthetic and ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Billstrom, Amie R; Zielonka, Jacek; Krolikowski, John G; Bienengraeber, Martin W; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Philip F; Kersten, Judy R

    2009-02-01

    Nitric oxide is known to be essential for early anesthetic preconditioning (APC) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) of myocardium. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that Hsp90-eNOS interactions modulate APC and IPC. Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits after coronary occlusion and reperfusion in the absence or presence of preconditioning within 30 min of isoflurane (APC) or 5 min of coronary artery occlusion (IPC), and with or without pretreatment with geldanamycin or radicicol, two chemically distinct Hsp90 inhibitors, or N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase NOS inhibitor. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells or mouse cardiomyocytes, in the absence or presence of Hsp90 inhibitors or N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Interactions between Hsp90 and eNOS, and eNOS activation, were assessed with immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy. APC and IPC decreased infarct size (by 50% and 59%, respectively), and this action was abolished by Hsp90 inhibitors. N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester blocked APC but not IPC. Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells concomitantly with an increase in Hsp90-eNOS interaction (immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry). Pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors abolished isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production and decreased Hsp90-eNOS interactions. Isoflurane did not increase nitric oxide production in mouse cardiomyocytes, and eNOS was below the level of detection. The results indicate that Hsp90 plays a critical role in mediating APC and IPC through protein-protein interactions, and suggest that endothelial cells are important contributors to nitric oxide-mediated signaling during APC.

  1. Hyperglycemia adversely modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase during anesthetic preconditioning through tetrahydrobiopterin- and heat shock protein 90-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K; Jager, Zachary; Sullivan, Corbin; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Du, Jianhai; Vladic, Nikolina; Shi, Yang; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Phillip F; Kersten, Judy R

    2010-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity is regulated by (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and heat shock protein 90. The authors tested the hypothesis that hyperglycemia abolishes anesthetic preconditioning (APC) through BH4- and heat shock protein 90-dependent pathways. Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits in the absence or presence of APC (30 min of isoflurane), with or without hyperglycemia, and in the presence or absence of the BH4 precursor sepiapterin. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells cultured in normal (5.5 mm) or high (20 mm) glucose conditions, with or without sepiapterin (10 or 100 microm). APC decreased myocardial infarct size compared with control experiments (26 +/- 6% vs. 46 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05), and this action was blocked by hyperglycemia (43 +/- 4%). Sepiapterin alone had no effect on infarct size (46 +/- 3%) but restored APC during hyperglycemia (21 +/- 3%). The beneficial actions of sepiapterin to restore APC were blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (47 +/- 2%) and the BH4 synthesis inhibitor N-acetylserotonin (46 +/- 3%). Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production to 177 +/- 13% of baseline, and this action was attenuated by high glucose concentrations (125 +/- 6%). Isoflurane increased, whereas high glucose attenuated intracellular BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2) (high performance liquid chromatography), heat shock protein 90-endothelial nitric oxide synthase colocalization (confocal microscopy) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation (immunoblotting). Sepiapterin increased BH4/BH2 and dose-dependently restored nitric oxide production during hyperglycemic conditions (149 +/- 12% and 175 +/- 9%; 10 and 100 microm, respectively). The results indicate that tetrahydrobiopterin and heat shock protein 90-regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity play a central

  2. Synthesis of N-(Methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas and Evaluation of Their Interaction with Inducible and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Threadgill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two isomeric N-(methoxycarbonylthienylmethylthioureas were synthesised by a sequence of radical bromination of methylthiophenecarboxylic esters, substitution with trifluoroacetamide anion, deprotection, formation of the corresponding isothiocyanates and addition of ammonia. The interaction of these new thiophene-based thioureas with inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase was evaluauted. These novel thienylmethylthioureas stimulated the activity of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS.

  3. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  4. The influence of propofol on P-selectin expression and nitric oxide production in re-oxygenated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corcoran, T B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Reperfusion injury is characterized by free radical production and endothelial inflammation. Neutrophils mediate much of the end-organ injury that occurs, requiring P-selectin-mediated neutrophil-endothelial adhesion, and this is associated with decreased endothelial nitric oxide production. Propofol has antioxidant properties in vitro which might abrogate this inflammation. METHODS: Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to 20 h of hypoxia and then returned to normoxic conditions. Cells were treated with saline, Diprivan 5 microg\\/l or propofol 5 microg\\/l for 4 h after re-oxygenation and were then examined for P-selectin expression and supernatant nitric oxide concentrations for 24 h. P-selectin was determined by flow cytometry, and culture supernatant nitric oxide was measured as nitrite. RESULTS: In saline-treated cells, a biphasic increase in P-selectin expression was demonstrated at 30 min (P = 0.01) and 4 h (P = 0.023) after re-oxygenation. Propofol and Diprivan prevented these increases in P-selectin expression (P < 0.05). Four hours after re-oxygenation, propofol decreased endothelial nitric oxide production (P = 0.035). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of propofol upon endothelial P-selectin expression. Such an effect may be important in situations of reperfusion injury such as cardiac transplantation and coronary artery bypass surgery. We conclude that propofol attenuates re-oxygenation-induced endothelial inflammation in vitro.

  5. Effect of Shisha (Waterpipe Smoking on Lung Functions and Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO among Saudi Young Adult Shisha Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Shisha (waterpipe smoking is becoming a more prevalent form of tobacco consumption, and is growing worldwide, particularly among the young generation in the Middle East. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the effects of shisha smoking on lung functions and Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO among Saudi young adults. We recruited 146 apparently healthy male subjects (73 control and 73 shisha smokers. The exposed group consisted of male shisha smokers, with mean age 21.54 ± 0.41 (mean ± SEM range 17–33 years. The control group consisted of similar number (73 of non-smokers with mean age 21.36 ± 0.19 (mean ± SEM range 18–28 years. Between the groups we considered the factors like age, height, weight, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status to estimate the impact of shisha smoking on lung function and fractional exhaled nitric oxide. Lung function test was performed by using an Spirovit-SP-1 Electronic Spirometer. Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO was measured by using Niox Mino. A significant decrease in lung function parameters FEV1, FEV1/FVC Ratio, FEF-25%, FEF-50%, FEF-75% and FEF-75–85% was found among shisha smokers relative to their control group. There was also a significant reduction in the Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide among Shisha smokers compared to control group.

  6. [Cost effectiveness and budget impact analysis of inhaled nitric oxide in a neonatal unit from the perspective of the public health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilchemmann Fuentes, Carlos; Vallejos Vallejos, Carlos; Román Navarro, Andrés

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is currently the first-line therapy in severe hypoxaemic respiratory failure of the newborn. Most of regional neonatal centres in Chile do not have this therapeutic alternative. To determine the cost effectiveness of inhaled nitric oxide in the treatment of respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension of the newborn compared to the usual care, including the transfer to a more complex unit. A clinical decision tree was designed from the perspective of Chilean Public Health Service. Incremental cost effectiveness rates (ICER) were calculated, deterministic sensitivity analysis was performed, and probabilistic budget impact was estimated using: TreeAge Pro Healthcare 2014 software. The iNO option leads to an increase in mean cost of $ 11.7 million Chilean pesos (€15,000) per patient treated, with an ICER compared with the usual care of $23 million pesos (€30,000) in case of death or ECMO avoided. By sensitising the results by incidence, it was found that from 7 cases and upwards treated annually, inhaled nitric oxide is less costly than the transfer to a more complex unit. From the perspective of a Chilean regional hospital, incorporating inhaled nitric oxide into the management of neonatal respiratory failure is the optimal alternative in most scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Vasodilatory effect of asafoetida essential oil on rat aorta rings: The role of nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Hassan; Sharifi, Mozhdeh; Esmailidehaj, Mansour; Rezvani, Mohammad Ebrahim; Hafizibarjin, Zeynab

    2017-12-01

    Asafoetida is an oleo-gum resin mainly obtained from Ferula assa-foetida L. species in the apiaceae family. Previous studies have shown that it has antispasmodic effects on rat's and pig's ileums. The main goals of this study were to assess the vasodilatory effect of asafoetida essential oil (AEO) on the contractile response of rat's aorta rings and to find the role of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, and calcium channels. Thoracic aorta rings were stretched under a steady-state tension of 1 g in an organ bath apparatus for 1 h and then precontracted by KCl (80 mM) in the presence and absence of AEO. L-NAME (blocker of nitric oxide synthase) and indomethacin (blocker of cyclooxygenase) were used to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin in the vasodilatory effect of AEO. Also, the effect of AEO on the influx of calcium through the cell membrane calcium channels was determined. Data showed that AEO had vasodilatory effects on aorta rings with both intact (IC 50  = 1.6 µl/l) or denuded endothelium (IC 50  = 19.2 µl/l) with a significantly higher potency in intact endothelium rings. The vasodilatory effects of AEO were reduced, but not completely inhibited, in the presence of L-NAME or indomethacin. Adding AEO to the free-calcium medium also significantly reduced the CaCl 2 -induced contractions. The results indicated that AEO has a potent vasodilatory effect that is endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent. Also, it reduced the influx of calcium into the cell through plasma membrane calcium channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of Fibrosis in Systemic Sclerosis by Nitric Oxide and Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Dooley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma: SSc is a multisystem, connective tissue disease of unknown aetiology characterized by vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity, and enhanced fibroblast activity resulting in fibrosis of the skin, heart, and lungs, and ultimately internal organ failure, and death. One of the most important and early modulators of disease activity is thought to be oxidative stress. Evidence suggests that the free radical nitric oxide (NO, a key mediator of oxidative stress, can profoundly influence the early microvasculopathy, and possibly the ensuing fibrogenic response. Animal models and human studies have also identified dietary antioxidants, such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, to function as a protective system against oxidative stress and fibrosis. Hence, targeting EGCG may prove a possible candidate for therapeutic treatment aimed at reducing both oxidant stress and the fibrotic effects associated with SSc.

  9. A mechanistic study on the simultaneous elimination of soot and nitric oxide from engine exhaust

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet; Zainuddin, Zakwan; Sander, Markus; Kraft, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The non-catalytic interaction between soot and nitric oxide (NO) resulting in their simultaneous elimination was studied on different types of reactive site present on soot. The reaction mechanism proposed previously was extended by including seven new reaction pathways for which the reaction energetics and kinetics were studied using density functional theory and transition state theory. This has led to the calculation of a new rate for the removal of carbon monoxide (CO) from soot. The new pathways have been added to our polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth model and used to simulate the NO-soot interaction to form CO, N2 and N2O. The simulation results show satisfactory agreement with experiment for the new CO removal rate. The NO-soot reaction was found to depend strongly on the soot site type and temperature. For a set of temperatures, computed PAH structures were analysed to determine the functional groups responsible for the decrease in the reactivity of soot with NO with increasing reaction time. In isothermal conditions, it was found that as temperature is increased, the number of oxygen atoms remaining on the soot surface decreases, while the number of nitrogen atoms increases for a given reaction time. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Silver Modified Degussa P25 for the Photocatalytic Removal of Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Bowering

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the photocatalytic behaviour of silver modified titanium dioxide materials for the decomposition and reduction of nitric oxide (NO gas has been carried out. The effects of silver loading, calcination temperature, and reaction conditions have been investigated. Prepared photocatalysts were characterised using XRD, TEM, and XPS. A continuous flow reactor was used to determine the photocatalytic activity and selectivity of NO decomposition in the absence of oxygen as well as NO reduction using CO as the reducing agent, over the prepared photocatalysts. XRD and TEM analysis of the photocatalysts showed that crystalline silver nitrate particles were present on the titanium dioxide surface after calcination at temperatures of up to 200∘C. The silver nitrate particles are thermally decomposed to form metallic silver clusters at higher temperatures. XPS analysis of the photocatalysts showed that for each of the temperatures used, both Ag+ and Ag0 were present and that the Ag0/Ag+ ratio increased with increasing calcination temperature. The presence of metallic silver species on the TiO2 surface dramatically increased the selectivity for N2 formation of both decomposition and reduction reactions. When CO was present in the reaction gas, selectivities of over 90% were observed for all the Ag-TiO2 photocatalysts that had been calcined at temperatures above 200∘C. Unfortunately these high selectivities were at the expense of photocatalytic activity, with lower NO conversion rates than those achieved over unmodified TiO2 photocatalysts.

  11. Nitric oxide, a double edged sword in cancer biology: searching for therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Bronte, Vincenzo; Nitti, Donato

    2007-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic molecule critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. The last decade has witnessed major advances in dissecting NO biology and its role in cancer pathogenesis. However, the complexity of the interactions between different levels of NO and several aspects of tumor development/progression has led to apparently conflicting findings. Furthermore, both anti-NO and NO-based anticancer strategies appear effective in several preclinical models. This paradoxical dichotomy is leaving investigators with a double challenge: to determine the net impact of NO on cancer behavior and to define the therapeutic role of NO-centered anticancer strategies. Only a comprehensive and dynamic view of the cascade of molecular and cellular events underlying tumor biology and affected by NO will allow investigators to exploit the potential antitumor properties of drugs interfering with NO metabolism. Available data suggest that NO should be considered neither a universal target nor a magic bullet, but rather a signal transducer to be modulated according to the molecular makeup of each individual cancer and the interplay with conventional antineoplastic agents. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Serum nitric oxide metabolites and disease activity in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Mo Yin; Fung, Peter Chin Wah; Ooi, Clara; Tse, Hung Fat; Wong, Yik; Lam, Yui Ming; Wong, Woon Sing; Lau, Chak Sing

    2008-03-01

    There is no surrogate marker in serum for defining disease activity in scleroderma (SSc). Nitric oxide (NO), which regulates vasodilation and possesses pro-inflammatory actions, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SSc. We compared serum NO(x) (total nitrate and nitrite) level in SSc patients to healthy controls and evaluated its correlation with detailed symptomatology and scoring systems for various organ involvement. Symptoms and physical findings that suggested disease activity in regard to various organs were documented. Lung function test, high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) scan of thorax and echocardiography were performed. Serum NO(x) was measured by chemiluminescence. Serum NO(x) levels in SSc (n = 43) were significantly higher (72.4 +/- 47.8 microM) than age- and sex-matched controls (n = 41; 37.1 +/- 13.5 microM; p n = 9; OR 145.3, p = 0.01) were predictive factors for elevated serum NO(x). Prednisolone use was associated with lower serum NO(x) level (OR 0.06, p = 0.04). Elevated PAP of increasing severity was found to be associated with higher level of serum NO(x) (p = 0.004 by trend). Serum NO(x) in SSc patients were elevated compared to healthy controls. Serum NO(x) level was determined by multiple factors including age, prednisolone use, and elevated PAP.

  13. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam M. Cortese-Krott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO by inducible NO synthase (iNOS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  14. A mechanistic study on the simultaneous elimination of soot and nitric oxide from engine exhaust

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Abhijeet

    2011-04-01

    The non-catalytic interaction between soot and nitric oxide (NO) resulting in their simultaneous elimination was studied on different types of reactive site present on soot. The reaction mechanism proposed previously was extended by including seven new reaction pathways for which the reaction energetics and kinetics were studied using density functional theory and transition state theory. This has led to the calculation of a new rate for the removal of carbon monoxide (CO) from soot. The new pathways have been added to our polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth model and used to simulate the NO-soot interaction to form CO, N2 and N2O. The simulation results show satisfactory agreement with experiment for the new CO removal rate. The NO-soot reaction was found to depend strongly on the soot site type and temperature. For a set of temperatures, computed PAH structures were analysed to determine the functional groups responsible for the decrease in the reactivity of soot with NO with increasing reaction time. In isothermal conditions, it was found that as temperature is increased, the number of oxygen atoms remaining on the soot surface decreases, while the number of nitrogen atoms increases for a given reaction time. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of nitric oxide in Salmonella typhimurium-mediated cancer cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barak, Yoram; Schreiber, Frank; Thorne, Steve H; Contag, Christopher H; DeBeer, Dirk; Matin, A

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial targeting of tumours is an important anti-cancer strategy. We previously showed that strain SL7838 of Salmonella typhimurium targets and kills cancer cells. Whether NO generation by the bacteria has a role in SL7838 lethality to cancer cells is explored. This bacterium has the mechanism for generating NO, but also for decomposing it. Mechanism underlying Salmonella typhimurium tumour therapy was investigated through in vitro and in vivo studies. NO measurements were conducted either by chemical assays (in vitro) or using Biosensors (in vivo). Cancer cells cytotoxic assay were done by using MTS. Bacterial cell survival and tumour burden were determined using molecular imaging techniques. SL7838 generated nitric oxide (NO) in anaerobic cell suspensions, inside infected cancer cells in vitro and in implanted 4T1 tumours in live mice, the last, as measured using microsensors. Thus, under these conditions, the NO generating pathway is more active than the decomposition pathway. The latter was eliminated, in strain SL7842, by the deletion of hmp- and norV genes, making SL7842 more proficient at generating NO than SL7838. SL7842 killed cancer cells more effectively than SL7838 in vitro, and this was dependent on nitrate availability. This strain was also ca. 100% more effective in treating implanted 4T1 mouse tumours than SL7838. NO generation capability is important in the killing of cancer cells by Salmonella strains

  16. Perioperative plasma concentrations of stable nitric oxide products are predictive of cognitive dysfunction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    In this study our objectives were to determine the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia in patients aged >40 and <85 yr and to examine the associations between plasma concentrations of i) S-100beta protein and ii) stable nitric oxide (NO) products and POCD in this clinical setting. Neuropsychological tests were performed on 42 ASA physical status I-II patients the day before, and 4 days and 6 wk after surgery. Patient spouses (n = 13) were studied as controls. Cognitive dysfunction was defined as deficit in one or more cognitive domain(s). Serial measurements of serum concentrations of S-100beta protein and plasma concentrations of stable NO products (nitrate\\/nitrite, NOx) were performed perioperatively. Four days after surgery, new cognitive deficit was present in 16 (40%) patients and in 1 (7%) control subject (P = 0.01). Six weeks postoperatively, new cognitive deficit was present in 21 (53%) patients and 3 (23%) control subjects (P = 0.03). Compared with the "no deficit" group, patients who demonstrated a new cognitive deficit 4 days postoperatively had larger plasma NOx at each perioperative time point (P < 0.05 for each time point). Serum S-100beta protein concentrations were similar in the 2 groups. In conclusion, preoperative (and postoperative) plasma concentrations of stable NO products (but not S-100beta) are associated with early POCD. The former represents a potential biochemical predictor of POCD.

  17. A stress surveillance system based on calcium and nitric oxide in marine diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Vardi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, responsible for about 20% of global primary productivity. Study of the functional role of chemical signaling within phytoplankton assemblages is still in its infancy although recent reports in diatoms suggest the existence of chemical-based defense strategies. Here, we demonstrate how the accurate perception of diatom-derived reactive aldehydes can determine cell fate in diatoms. In particular, the aldehyde (2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DD can trigger intracellular calcium transients and the generation of nitric oxide (NO by a calcium-dependent NO synthase-like activity, which results in cell death. However, pretreatment of cells with sublethal doses of aldehyde can induce resistance to subsequent lethal doses, which is reflected in an altered calcium signature and kinetics of NO production. We also present evidence for a DD-derived NO-based intercellular signaling system for the perception of stressed bystander cells. Based on these findings, we propose the existence of a sophisticated stress surveillance system in diatoms, which has important implications for understanding the cellular mechanisms responsible for acclimation versus death during phytoplankton bloom successions.

  18. Nitric oxide-mediated intersegmental modulation of cycle frequency in the crayfish swimmeret system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Misaki; Nagayama, Toshiki; Newland, Philip

    2018-05-21

    Crayfish swimmerets are paired appendages located on the ventral side of each abdominal segment that show rhythmic beating during forward swimming produced by central pattern generators in most abdominal segments. For animals with multiple body segments and limbs, intersegmental coordination of central pattern generators in each segment is crucial for the production of effective movements. Here we develop a novel pharmacological approach to analyse intersegmental modulation of swimmeret rhythm by selectively elevating nitric oxide levels and reducing them with pharmacological agents, in specific ganglia. Bath application of L-arginine, the substrate NO synthesis, increased the cyclical spike responses of the power-stroke motor neurons. By contrast the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME decreased them. To determine the role of the different local centres in producing and controlling the swimmeret rhythm, these two drugs were applied locally to two separate ganglia following bath application of carbachol. Results revealed that there was both ascending and descending intersegmental modulation of cycle frequency of the swimmeret rhythm in the abdominal ganglia and that synchrony of cyclical activity between segments of segments was maintained. We also found that there were gradients in the strength effectiveness in modulation, that ascending modulation of the swimmeret rhythm was stronger than descending modulation. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression in histologically normal margins of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelatto, Rosana; Itoiz, María-Elina; Guiñazú, Natalia; Piccini, Daniel; Gea, Susana; López-de Blanc, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 (NOS2) was found in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) but not in normal mucosa. Molecular changes associated to early carcinogenesis have been found in mucosa near carcinomas, which is considered a model to study field cancerization. The aim of the present study is to analyze NOS2 expression at the histologically normal margins of OSCC. Eleven biopsy specimens of OSCC containing histologically normal margins (HNM) were analyzed. Ten biopsies of normal oral mucosa were used as controls. The activity of NOS2 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Salivary nitrate and nitrite as well as tobacco and alcohol consumption were also analyzed. The Chi-squared test was applied. Six out of the eleven HNM from carcinoma samples showed positive NOS2 activity whereas all the control group samples yielded negative (p=0.005). No statistically significant association between enzyme expression and tobacco and/or alcohol consumption and salivary nitrate and nitrite was found. NOS2 expression would be an additional evidence of alterations that may occur in a state of field cancerization before the appearance of potentially malignant morphological changes.

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase deficiency influences normal cell cycle progression and apoptosis in trabecular meshwork cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Liao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To clarify how the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3 make effect on outflow facility through the trabecular meshwork (TM. METHODS: Inhibition of NOS3 gene expression in human TM cells were conducted by three siRNAs. Then the mRNA and protein levels of NOS3 in siRNA-treated and negative control (NC cells were determined, still were the collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1 and fibronectin 1 by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, NOS3 concentrations in culture supernatant fluids of TM cells were measured. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis analysis were performed using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The mRNA level of NOS3 was decreased by three different siRNA interference, similar results were obtained not only of the relative levels of NOS3 protein, but also the expression levels of COL4A1 and fibronectin 1. The number of cells in S phase was decreased, while contrary result was obtained in G2 phase. The number of apoptotic cells in siRNA-treated groups were significant increased compared to the NC samples. CONCLUSION: Abnormal NOS3 expression can make effects on the proteins levels of extracellular matrix component (e.g. fibronectin 1 and COL4A1. Reduced NOS3 restrains the TM cell cycle progression at the G2/M-phase transition and induced cell apoptosis.

  1. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M.; Kulakov, Larissa; Opländer, Christian; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D.; Suschek, Christoph V.

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein) and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation. PMID:25180171

  2. Discrimination and Nitric Oxide Inhibitory Activity Correlation of Ajwa Dates from Different Grades and Origin

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    Nur Ashikin Abdul-Hamid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at examining the variations in the metabolite constituents of the different Ajwa grades and farm origins. It is also targeted at establishing the correlations between the metabolite contents and the grades and further to the nitric oxide (NO inhibitory activity. Identification of the metabolites was generated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy metabolomics analyses utilizing multivariate methods. The NO inhibitory activity was determined using a Griess assay. Multivariate data analysis, for both supervised and unsupervised approaches, showed clusters among different grades of Ajwa dates obtained from different farms. The compounds that contribute towards the observed separation between Ajwa samples were suggested to be phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid and phenylalanine. Ajwa dates were shown to have different metabolite compositions and exhibited a wide range of NO inhibitory activity. It is also revealed that Ajwa Grade 1 from the al-Aliah farm exhibited more than 90% NO inhibitory activity compared to the other grades and origins. Phenolic compounds were among the compounds that played a role towards the greater capacity of NO inhibitory activity shown by Ajwa Grade 1 from the al-Aliah farm.

  3. Prenatal Brain Damage in Preeclamptic Animal Model Induced by Gestational Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

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    Begoña Pellicer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is a major neonatal handicap with unknown aetiology. There is evidence that prenatal brain injury is the leading cause of CP. Severe placental pathology accounts for a high percentage of cases. Several factors predispose to prenatal brain damage but when and how they act is unclear. The aim of this paper was to determine if hypoxia during pregnancy leads to damage in fetal brain and to evaluate the localization of this injury. An animal model of chronic hypoxia produced by chronic administration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME was used to evaluate apoptotic activity in fetal brains and to localize the most sensitive areas. L-NAME reproduces a preeclamptic-like condition with increased blood pressure, proteinuria, growth restriction and intrauterine mortality. Apoptotic activity was increased in L-NAME brains and the most sensitive areas were the subventricular and pallidum zone. These results may explain the clinical features of CP. Further studies are needed.

  4. Association between high risk papillomavirus DNA and nitric oxide release in the human uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkola, Paivi; Mikkola, Tomi S; Ylikorkala, Olavi; Vaisanen-Tommiska, Mervi

    2009-08-01

    Local cervical factors may determine the outcome of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Nitric oxide (NO) may be one such factor, since it is produced by uterine cervical cells and it takes part in both immunological and carcinogenic reactions. We studied the association between the presence of cervical high risk (hr) HPV DNA and NO in the cervical canal in women. High risk HPV DNA status was assessed from 328 women by using a specific DNA test and the release of cervical NO was assessed as nitrate/nitrite in cervical fluid. Cervical NO was then compared between women showing different status of hr HPV DNA and different cytological and histological findings. High risk HPV DNA was present in 175/328 (53%) women. The cervical NO release in women with hr HPV DNA was 90% higher compared to hr HPV DNA negative women (poral contraception, intrauterine devices, or signs of bacterial vaginosis or candida infection. Cytologically healthy epithelium and epithelium with mild cytological or histological changes showed elevated NO release if hr HPV DNA was present. The presence of hr HPV DNA is associated with an increased release of NO in the human uterine cervix. The clinical significance of this phenomenon remains open.

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium and plutonium in nitric acid solutions at their co-presence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levakov, B.I.; Mishenev, V.B.; Nezgovorov, N.Yu.; Ryazanova, G.K.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The method of spectrophotometric determination of uranium (6) and plutonium (4) in nitric acid solutions is described. Uranium is determined by light absorption of the complex with arsenazo 3 in 0.05 mol/l nitric acid at λ=654 nm, plutonium - by light absorption of the complex with xylenol orange in 0.1 mol/l nitric acid at λ=540 nm. To disguise plutonium, tetravalent and certain trivalent elements DTPA is introduced into photometered solution for uranium determination. The relative root-mean square deviation of determination results does not exceed 0.03 in uranium concenration ranges 0.5-5 μg/ml, of plutonium -1-3 μg/ml

  6. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciyama, T; Arakawa, T; Matsuda, T; Yamazoe, N; Takita, Y

    1975-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia was studied over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolite (Me-Y) catalysts. The reaction products are nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water in all cases. Selectivities to N/sub 2/ are 60 to 80% on all the cation exchanged zeolite catalysts exhibiting a relatively minor variation with the cationic species exchanged. The copper (II)-Y catalyst exhibits low temperature activity and has an unusual catalytic activity-temperature profile with a maximum at 120/sup 0/C. The catalytic activity is enhanced considerably when a second cation, especially cobalt (II) or iron (III) is coexchanged together with Cu (II) in Y zeolite.

  7. Nitrite: A physiological store of nitric oxide and modulator of mitochondrial function

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    Sruti Shiva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite, long considered a biologically inert metabolite of nitric oxide (NO oxidation, is now accepted as a physiological storage pool of NO that can be reduced to bioactive NO in hypoxic conditions to mediate a spectrum of physiological responses in blood and tissue. This graphical review will provide a broad overview of the role of nitrite in physiology, focusing on its formation and reduction to NO as well as its regulation of the mitochondrion—an emerging subcellular target for its biological actions in tissues.

  8. Antioxidant factors, nitric oxide levels, and cellular damage in leprosy patients

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    Taysa Ribeiro Schalcher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The immune response caused by Mycobacterium leprae is a risk factor for the development of oxidative stress (OS in leprosy patients. This study aimed to assess OS in leprosy patients before the use of a multidrug therapy. Methods We evaluated the nitric oxide (NO concentration; antioxidant capacity; levels of malondialdehyde, methemoglobin and reduced glutathione; and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD in leprosy patients. Results We observed lower SOD activity in these leprosy patients; however, the NO levels and antioxidant capacity were increased. Conclusions The infectious process in response to M. leprae could primarily be responsible for the OS observed in these patients.

  9. Effects of Diabetes on Salivary Gland Protein Expression of Tetrahydrobiopterin and Nitric Oxide Synthesis and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cassandra R; Obi, Nneka; Epane, Elodie C; Akbari, Alexander A; Halpern, Leslie; Southerland, Janet H; Gangula, Pandu R

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is defined as dry mouth resulting from a change in the amount or composition of saliva and is often a major oral health complication associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Studies have shown that xerostomia is more common in females at the onset of DM. Evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in healthy salivary gland function. However, the specific mechanisms by which NO regulates salivary gland function at the onset of DM have yet to be determined. This study has two aims: 1) to determine whether protein expression or dimerization of NO synthase enzymes (neuronal [nNOS] and endothelial [eNOS]) are altered in the onset of diabetic xerostomia; and 2) to determine whether the changes in nNOS/eNOS protein expression or dimerization are correlated with changes in NO cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthetic enzymes (guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase-1 and dihydrofolate reductase). Functional and Western blot studies were performed in streptozotocin-induced and control Sprague-Dawley female rats with DM (type 1 [t1DM]) using standardized protocols. Confirmation of xerostomia was determined by increased water intake and decreased salivary flow rate. The results showed that in female rats with DM, salivary hypofunction is correlated with decreased submandibular and parotid gland sizes. The results also show a decrease in NOS and BH4 biosynthetic enzyme in submandibular glands. These results indicate that a decrease in submandibular NO-BH4 protein expression may provide insight pertaining to mechanisms for the development of hyposalivation in DM-induced xerostomia. Furthermore, understanding the role of the NO-BH4 pathway may give insight into possible treatment options for the patient with DM experiencing xerostomia.

  10. Osteopontin protects against hyperoxia-induced lung injury by inhibiting nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Guang-Fa; Foda, Hussein D

    2010-04-05

    Exposure of adult mice to more than 95% O(2) produces a lethal injury by 72 hours. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of murine hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein produced principally by macrophages. OPN inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which generates large amounts of nitric oxide production. However, the relationship between nitric oxide and endogenous OPN in lung tissue during hyperoxia-induced ALI has not yet been elucidated, thus we examined the role that OPN plays in the hyperoxia-induced lung injury and its relationships with NOS. One hundred and forty-four osteopontin knock-out (KO) mice and their matched wild type background control (WT) were exposed in sealed cages > 95% oxygen or room air for 24- 72 hours, and the severity of lung injury was assessed; expression of OPN, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and iNOS mRNA in lung tissues at 24, 48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed for the detection of iNOS, eNOS, and OPN protein in lung tissues. OPN KO mice developed more severe acute lung injury at 72 hours of hyperoxia. The wet/dry weight ratio increased to 6.85 +/- 0.66 in the KO mice at 72 hours of hyperoxia as compared to 5.31 +/- 0.92 in the WT group (P < 0.05). iNOS mRNA (48 hours: 1.04 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.63 +/- 0.09, P < 0.01; 72 hours: 0.89 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05) and eNOS mRNA (48 hours: 0.62 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.43 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05; 72 hours: 0.67 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.45 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05) expression was more significantly increased in OPN KO mice than their matched WT mice when exposed to hyperoxia. IHC study showed higher expression of iNOS (20.54 +/- 3.18 vs. 12.52 +/- 2.46, P < 0.05) and eNOS (19.83 +/- 5.64 vs. 9.45 +/- 3.82, P < 0.05) in lung tissues of OPN KO mice at 72 hours of hyperoxia. OPN can protect against

  11. Locally Different Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Protein Levels in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Aortic Valve

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    Salah A. Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Dysregulated expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is observed in aortic aneurysms associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. We determined eNOS protein levels in various areas in ascending aortic aneurysms. Methods and Results. Aneurysmal specimens were collected from 19 patients, 14 with BAV and 5 with tricuspid aortic valve (TAV. ENOS protein levels were measured in the outer curve (convexity, the opposite side (concavity, the distal and above the sinotubular junction (proximal aneurysm. Cultured aortic cells were treated with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME and the amounts of 35 apoptosis-related proteins were determined. In patients with BAV, eNOS levels were significantly lower in the proximal aorta than in the concavity and distal aorta. ENOS protein levels were also lower in the convexity than in the concavity. While the convexity and distal aorta showed similar eNOS protein levels in BAV and TAV patients, levels were higher in TAV proximal aorta. Inhibition of NO synthesis in aneurysmal aortic cells by L-NAME led to a cytosolic increase in the levels of mitochondrial serine protease HTRA2/Omi. Conclusion. ENOS protein levels were varied at different areas of the aneurysmal aorta. The dysregulation of nitric oxide can lead to an increase in proapoptotic HTRA2/Omi.

  12. Nitric oxide reduces oxidative damage induced by water stress in sunflower plants

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    Inês Cechin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the main environmental constraints that can reduce plant yield. Nitric oxide (NO is a signal molecule involved in plant responses to several environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective effect of a single foliar application of 0, 1, 10 or 100 µM of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP in sunflower plants under water stress. Water stressed plants treated with 1μM SNP showed an increase in the relative water content compared with 0 μM SNP. Drought reduced the shoot dry weight but SNP applications did not result in alleviation of drought effects. Neither drought nor water stress plus SNP applications altered the content of photosynthetic pigments. Stomatal conductance was reduced by drought and this reduction was accompanied by a significant reduction in intercellular CO2 concentration and photosynthesis. Treatment with SNP did not reverse the effect of drought on the gas exchange characteristics. Drought increased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA and proline and reduced pirogalol peroxidase (PG-POD activity, but did not affect the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD. When the water stressed plants were treated with 10 μM SNP, the activity of PG-POD and the content of proline were increased and the level of MDA was decreased. The results show that the adverse effects of water stress on sunflower plants are dependent on the external NO concentration. The action of NO may be explained by its ability to increase the levels of antioxidant compounds and the activity of ROS-scavenging enzymes.

  13. Can nitric oxide induce migraine in normal individuals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For many years, scientists have debated the possibility that an individual "migraine threshold" determines the likelihood with which individuals may express migraine attacks. DISCUSSION: Recent discoveries provided evidence for both genetic and environmental influences on individual...

  14. Effects of exercise training on stress-induced vascular reactivity alterations: role of nitric oxide and prostanoids

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    Thiago Bruder-Nascimento

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical exercise may modify biologic stress responses. Objective: To investigate the impact of exercise training on vascular alterations induced by acute stress, focusing on nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathways. Method: Wistar rats were separated into: sedentary, trained (60-min swimming, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, carrying a 5% body-weight load, stressed (2 h-immobilization, and trained/stressed. Response curves for noradrenaline, in the absence and presence of L-NAME or indomethacin, were obtained in intact and denuded aortas (n=7-10. Results: None of the procedures altered the denuded aorta reactivity. Intact aortas from stressed, trained, and trained/stressed rats showed similar reduction in noradrenaline maximal responses (sedentary 3.54±0.15, stressed 2.80±0.10*, trained 2.82±0.11*, trained/stressed 2.97± 0.21*, *P<0.05 relate to sedentary. Endothelium removal and L-NAME abolished this hyporeactivity in all experimental groups, except in trained/stressed rats that showed a partial aorta reactivity recovery in L-NAME presence (L-NAME: sedentary 5.23±0,26#, stressed 5.55±0.38#, trained 5.28±0.30#, trained/stressed 4.42±0.41, #P<0.05 related to trained/stressed. Indomethacin determined a decrease in sensitivity (EC50 in intact aortas of trained rats without abolishing the aortal hyporeactivity in trained, stressed, and trained/stressed rats. Conclusions: Exercise-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial vasodilator prostaglandins and nitric oxide. Stress-induced vascular adaptive response involved an increase in endothelial nitric oxide. Beside the involvement of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway, the vascular response of trained/stressed rats involved an additional mechanism yet to be elucidated. These findings advance on the understanding of the vascular processes after exercise and stress alone and in combination.

  15. Role of the decreased nitric oxide bioavailability in the vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masha, Andi; Dinatale, Stefano; Allasia, Stefano; Martina, Valentino

    2011-09-01

    This mini-review takes into consideration the physiology, synthesis and mechanisms of action of the nitric oxide (NO) and, subsequently, the causes and effects of the NO bioavailability impairment. In diabetes mellitus the reduced NO bioavailability is caused by the increased free radicals production, secondary to hyperglycemia. The reactive oxygen species oxidize the cofactors of the nitric oxide synthase, diminishing their active forms and consequently leading to a decreased NO production. Furthermore the decreased concentration of reduced glutathione results in a diminished production of nitrosoglutathione. These molecules are important intermediates of the NO pathway and physiologically activate the soluble guanylate cyclase. Their decrease in oxidative states of the cell, therefore, leads to a reduced cGMP production which represents the principal molecule that carries out NO's major effects. Finally we considered the eventual therapeutic strategies to improve NO bioavailability by acting on the causes of its decrease. Therefore the treatments proposed are based on the possibility to counteract the oxidation and, in this context, the physiopathological mechanisms strongly support the treatment with thiols.

  16. Impact of nutrient excess and endothelial nitric oxide synthase on the plasma metabolite profile in mice

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    Brian E Sansbury

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An increase in calorie consumption is associated with the recent rise in obesity prevalence. However, our current understanding of the effects of nutrient excess on major metabolic pathways appears insufficient to develop safe and effective metabolic interventions to prevent obesity. Hence, we sought to identify systemic metabolic changes caused by nutrient excess and to determine how endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS—which has anti-obesogenic properties—affects systemic metabolism by measuring plasma metabolites. Wild-type (WT and eNOS transgenic (eNOS-TG mice were placed on low fat or high fat diets for six weeks, and plasma metabolites were measured using an unbiased metabolomic approach. High fat feeding in WT mice led to significant increases in fat mass, which was associated with significantly lower plasma levels of 1,5-anhydroglucitol, lysophospholipids, 3-dehydrocarnitine, and bile acids, as well as branched chain amino acids (BCAAs and their metabolites. Plasma levels of several lipids including sphingomyelins, stearoylcarnitine, dihomo-linoleate and metabolites associated with oxidative stress were increased by high fat diet. In comparison with low fat-fed WT mice, eNOS-TG mice showed lower levels of several free fatty acids, but in contrast, the levels of bile acids, amino acids, and BCAA catabolites were increased. When placed on a high fat diet, eNOS overexpressing mice showed remarkably higher levels of plasma bile acids and elevated levels of plasma BCAAs and their catabolites compared with WT mice. Treatment with GW4064, an inhibitor of bile acid synthesis, decreased plasma bile acid levels but was not sufficient to reverse the anti-obesogenic effects of eNOS overexpression. These findings reveal unique metabolic changes in response to high fat diet and eNOS overexpression and suggest that the anti-obesity effects of eNOS are likely independent of changes in the bile acid pool.

  17. Inhaled nitric oxide pretreatment but not posttreatment attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced pulmonary microvascular leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetham, P M; Sefton, W D; Bridges, J P; Stevens, T; McMurtry, I F

    1997-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) pulmonary edema probably reflects a leukocyte-dependent, oxidant-mediated mechanism. Nitric oxide (NO) attenuates leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and I/R-induced microvascular leak. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) agonists reverse and prevent I/R-induced microvascular leak, but reversal by inhaled NO (INO) has not been tested. In addition, the role of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activation in the NO protection effect is unknown. Rat lungs perfused with salt solution were grouped as either I/R, I/R with INO (10 or 50 ppm) on reperfusion, or time control. Capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc) were estimated 25 min before ischemia (baseline) and after 30 and 75 min of reperfusion. Perfusate cell counts and lung homogenate myeloperoxidase activity were determined in selected groups. Additional groups were treated with either INO (50 ppm) or isoproterenol (ISO-10 microM) after 30 min of reperfusion. Guanylyl cyclase was inhibited with 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ-15 microM), and Kfc was estimated at baseline and after 30 min of reperfusion. (1) Inhaled NO attenuated I/R-induced increases in Kfc. (2) Cell counts were similar at baseline. After 75 min of reperfusion, lung neutrophil retention (myeloperoxidase activity) and decreased perfusate neutrophil counts were similar in all groups. (3) In contrast to ISO, INO did not reverse microvascular leak. (4) 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-br-cGMP) prevented I/R-induced microvascular leak in ODQ-treated lungs, but INO was no longer effective. Inhaled NO attenuates I/R-induced pulmonary microvascular leak, which requires sGC activation and may involve a mechanism independent of inhibition of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. In addition, INO is ineffective in reversing I/R-induced microvascular leak.

  18. Influence of environmental ammonia on the production of nitric oxide and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Mahua G. [Biochemical Adaptation Laboratory, Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022 (India); Saha, Nirmalendu, E-mail: nsaha@nehu.ac.in [Biochemical Adaptation Laboratory, Department of Zoology, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High environmental ammonia caused more production and accumulation of NO in air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyper-ammonia stress caused induction and zonal specific expression of iNOS enzyme protein, mRNA expression in different tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of NF{kappa}B that resulted under hyper-ammonia stress was believed to be the cause of induction of iNOS gene. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly versatile and unique ubiquitous signaling molecule, and is known to play diverse physiological functions in mammals including those of adaptation to various stresses. The present study reports on the influence of exposure to high external ammonia (HEA) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), that produces NO from L-arginine in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis), which is reported to tolerate a very HEA. Some levels of NO were found to be present in all the tissues and also in plasma of control fish, which further enhanced significantly in fishes treated with high concentrations of environmental ammonia (25 and 50 mM ammonium chloride) for 7 days, accompanied by more efflux of NO from the perfused liver. This was accomplished by the induction of iNOS activity in different tissues of fish exposed to HEA, which otherwise was not detectable in control fish. Exposure to 25 mM ammonium chloride also led to a significant expression of iNOS protein in different tissues, followed by further increase at 50 mM ammonium chloride. Further, there was an increase in the expression of iNOS mRNA in ammonia-treated fish, thus suggesting that the expression of iNOS gene under hyper-ammonia stress was probably regulated at the transcriptional level. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that the expression of iNOS in different tissues was zonal specific and not expressed uniformly

  19. Influence of environmental ammonia on the production of nitric oxide and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Mahua G.; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High environmental ammonia caused more production and accumulation of NO in air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis). ► Hyper-ammonia stress caused induction and zonal specific expression of iNOS enzyme protein, mRNA expression in different tissues. ► Activation of NFκB that resulted under hyper-ammonia stress was believed to be the cause of induction of iNOS gene. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly versatile and unique ubiquitous signaling molecule, and is known to play diverse physiological functions in mammals including those of adaptation to various stresses. The present study reports on the influence of exposure to high external ammonia (HEA) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), that produces NO from L-arginine in the freshwater air-breathing catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis), which is reported to tolerate a very HEA. Some levels of NO were found to be present in all the tissues and also in plasma of control fish, which further enhanced significantly in fishes treated with high concentrations of environmental ammonia (25 and 50 mM ammonium chloride) for 7 days, accompanied by more efflux of NO from the perfused liver. This was accomplished by the induction of iNOS activity in different tissues of fish exposed to HEA, which otherwise was not detectable in control fish. Exposure to 25 mM ammonium chloride also led to a significant expression of iNOS protein in different tissues, followed by further increase at 50 mM ammonium chloride. Further, there was an increase in the expression of iNOS mRNA in ammonia-treated fish, thus suggesting that the expression of iNOS gene under hyper-ammonia stress was probably regulated at the transcriptional level. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that the expression of iNOS in different tissues was zonal specific and not expressed uniformly throughout the organ. Hyper-ammonia stress also led to activation and nuclear

  20. Nitric oxide donors prevent while the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME increases arachidonic acid plus CYP2E1-dependent toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Defeng; Cederbaum, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) play an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury. AA promotes toxicity in rat hepatocytes with high levels of cytochrome P4502E1 and in HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1. Nitric oxide (NO) participates in the regulation of various cell activities as well as in cytotoxic events. NO may act as a protectant against cytotoxic stress or may enhance cytotoxicity when produced at elevated concentrations. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of endogenously or exogenously produced NO on AA toxicity in liver cells with high expression of CYP2E1 and assess possible mechanisms for its actions. Pyrazole-induced rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 were treated with AA in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase L-N G -Nitroarginine Methylester (L-NAME) or the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and (Z)-1-[-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-aminoethyl)]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NONO). AA decreased cell viability from 100% to 48 ± 6% after treatment for 48 h. In the presence of L-NAME, viability was further lowered to 23 ± 5%, while, SNAP or DETA-NONO increased viability to 66 ± 8 or 71 ± 6%. The L-NAME potentiated toxicity was primarily necrotic in nature. L-NAME did not affect CYP2E1 activity or CYP2E1 content. SNAP significantly lowered CYP2E1 activity but not protein. AA treatment increased lipid peroxidation and lowered GSH levels. L-NAME potentiated while SNAP prevented these changes. Thus, L-NAME increased, while NO donors decreased AA-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants prevented the L-NAME potentiation of AA toxicity. Damage to mitochondria by AA was shown by a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). L-NAME potentiated this decline in MMP in association with its increase in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. NO donors decreased this decline in MMP in association with their decrease in AA-induced oxidative stress and