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Sample records for nitrate solution shipments

  1. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  2. Radiation-induced nitration of organic compounds in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, B.G.; Gordeev, A.V.; Bykov, G.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Moisy, P. [CEA, Bagnols sur Ceze (France). Nuclear Energy Div.

    2012-07-01

    Radiolysis in aqueous nitrate and acetic acid solutions and nitrate/nitric acid and phenol was studied. The radiolysis of these solutes occurs with {sup circle} NO{sup 2} radical, which is the active nitrating agent. Accumulation of nitromethane and nitrite was determined during {gamma}-irradiation of aqueous solutions containing acetic and nitrate solutions. Irradiation of aqueous phenol-nitrate/nitric acid solutions results in the formation of 2- and 4-nitrophenols.

  3. Exclusion of Nitrate from Frozen Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, H. A.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions occurring at the surface of ice, sea ice, and snow in Earth's cryosphere have an impact on the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and model their contributions to atmospheric processes, the morphology of frozen aqueous surfaces and amounts of reactants contained therein must be determined. To this end, the exclusion of nitrate ions to the surface of frozen aqueous solutions has been studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In this technique the near-surface region of the frozen films are interrogated to a depth of a few hundred nanometers from the film-crystal interface. Aqueous solutions (0.001 to 0.01 M) of sodium nitrate (NaNO3), magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2), and nitric acid (HNO3) were quickly frozen on the germanium ATR crystal and observed at a constant temperature of about -18°C. In addition to ice and the solutes, liquid water in varying amounts was observed in the spectra. The amount of nitrate in the surface liquid is three to four orders of magnitude higher than in the unfrozen solution. While all the nitrate salts exhibit exclusion to the unfrozen surface, the dynamics are different for different counter-ions. Results are compared to freezing point depression data and the predictions of equilibrium thermodynamics.

  4. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  5. Denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolami, R.J.; Chao, E.I.; Choi, W.M.; Johnson, B.R.; Varlet, J.L.P.

    1976-04-26

    Growth rates for the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas Stutzeri were studied to minimize the time necessary to start up a bacterial denitrification reactor. Batch experiments were performed in nine 250-ml Erlenmeyer flasks, a 7-liter fermentor, and a 67-liter fermentor. All reactors maintained an anaerobic environment. Initial microorganism inoculum concentration was varied over four orders of magnitude. Initial nitrate and substrate carbon concentrations were varied from 200 to 6000 ppm and from 56 to 1596 ppm, respectively, with a carbon-to-nitrogen weight ratio of 1.18. In all experiments, except those with the highest initial substrate-to-bacteria ratio, no growth was observed due to substrate depletion during the lag period. In those experiments which did exhibit an increase in bacterial population, growth also stopped due to substrate depletion. A model simulating microbe growth during the induction period was developed, but insufficient data were available to properly adjust the model constants. Because of this, the model does not accurately predict microbe growth. The metabolism of Pseudomonas Stutzeri was studied in detail. This resulted in a prediction of the denitrification stoichiometry during steady state reactor operation. Iron was found to be an important component for bacterial anabolism.

  6. {gamma}-radiolysis of uranous nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisel, Isabelle; Lebouille, Odile; Rossetti, Thomas [CEA ValRHo - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The knowledge of uranous nitrate solutions stability under radiolysis effect is of interest for all the processes aiming its co-conversion into a solid form with other actinides. In the presence of hydrazine, the oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) under {gamma}-radiolysis ({sup 137}Cs) is due to the reaction with water radiolysis products, mainly hydrogen peroxide. Its kinetic law is of order 0. In addition, the zero order hydrazine consumption reaction, leads to the accumulation of hydrazoic acid related to its oxidation by nitrous acid himself generated by the radiolysis of the nitric acid. Lastly, the increase of acidity of the solution with a stoichiometry of 1.5 compared to uranium indicates multiple reactions. In absence of hydrazine, uranous nitrate is very quickly oxidized by the nitric and solutions acidity increases according to a complex mechanism catalysed by the nitrous acid. Results are not found to be sensitive to dose rate between 10 and 300 Gy/min. (authors)

  7. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas® reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used “to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations” (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenter’s logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  8. Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution Using Rice Chaff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Nitrate is largely dissolved in the surface and ground water, due to its high solubility. Continual uptake of nitrite through drinking water can lead to problems and diseases (such as blue baby for humans, especially children. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a new and inexpensive method for the removal of nitrate from water. In this regard, the possibility of using chaff for removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions was studied and the optimum operating conditions of nitrate removal was determined. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted in laboratory scale. The UV spectrophotometer at a wavelength of maximum absorbance (220 nm was used to determine the nitrate concentration. The effect of pH, amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time were investigated. Results The result of this study revealed that chaff as an absorbent could remove nitrate from solutions, and the efficiency of adsorption increased as contact time increased from 5 to 30 minutes, amount of chaff increased from 1 to 3 g, temperature increased in a range of 300 - 400°C and the amount of pH decreased from 10 to 3. The maximum adsorption rate was around pH 3 (53.14%. Conclusions It was shown that the removal efficiency of nitrate was directly proportional to the amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time but inversely to the pH. This study showed that nitrate removal by chaff is a promising technique.

  9. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

  10. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  11. Water rotational jump driven large amplitude molecular motions of nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous potassium nitrate solution reveal a highly complex rotational dynamics of nitrate ions where, superimposed on the expected continuous Brownian motion, are large amplitude angular jumps that are coupled to and at least partly driven by similar large amplitude jump motions in water molecules which are associated with change in the hydrogen bonded water molecule. These jumps contribute significantly to rotational and translational motions of these ions. We explore the detailed mechanism of these correlated (or, coupled) jumps and introduce a new time correlation function to decompose the coupled orientational- jump dynamics of solvent and solute in the aqueous electrolytic solution. Time correlation function provides for the unequivocal determination of the time constant involved in orientational dynamics originating from making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. We discover two distinct mechanisms-both are coupled to density fluctuation but are of different types.

  12. Removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solutions by microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Sayadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of microalgae Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris to remove nitrate and phosphate in aqueous solutions. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgar is microalgae was collected in 1000 ml of municipal water and KNO3, K2HPO4 was added as sources of nitrate and phosphate in three different concentrations (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45g/L. During the growth period, the concentration of nitrate and phosphate was recorded at 1, 4, 6 and 8 days. The highest nitrate removal on the 8 day for Chlorella vulgaris was 89.80% at the treatment of 0.25g/L and for Spirulina platensis was 81.49% at the treatment of 0.25g/L. The highest phosphate removal for Spirulina platensis was 81.49% at the treatment of 0.45g/L and for Chlorella vulgaris was 88% at the treatment of 0.45g/L. The statistical results showed that the amount of phosphate and nitrate removal during different time periods by Chlorella vulgaris depicted a significant difference at P

  13. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. An aqueous solution containing a mixture of silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide may be safely...

  14. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (US)

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

  15. Characterization of aqueous silver nitrate solutions for leakage tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Costa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the pH over a period of 168 h and the ionic silver content in various concentrations and post-preparation times of aqueous silver nitrate solutions. Also, the possible effects of these factors on microleakage test in adhesive/resin restorations in primary and permanent teeth were evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A digital pHmeter was used for measuring the pH of the solutions prepared with three types of water (purified, deionized or distilled and three brands of silver nitrate salt (Merck, Synth or Cennabras at 0, 1, 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h after preparation, and storage in transparent or dark bottles. Ionic silver was assayed according to the post-preparation times (2, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168 h and concentrations (1, 5, 25, 50% of solutions by atomic emission spectrometry. For each sample of each condition, three readings were obtained for calculating the mean value. Class V cavities were prepared with enamel margins on primary and permanent teeth and restored with the adhesive systems OptiBond FL or OptiBond SOLO Plus SE and the composite resin Filtek Z-250. After nail polish coverage, the permanent teeth were immersed in 25% or 50% AgNO3 solution and the primary teeth in 5% or 50% AgNO3 solutions for microleakage evaluation. ANOVA and the Tukey's test were used for data analyses (α=5%. RESULTS: The mean pH of the solutions ranged from neutral to alkaline (7.9±2.2 to 11.8±0.9. Mean ionic silver content differed depending on the concentration of the solution (4.75±0.5 to 293±15.3 ppm. In the microleakage test, significant difference was only observed for the adhesive system factor (p=0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Under the tested experimental conditions and based on the obtained results, it may be concluded that the aqueous AgNO3 solutions: have neutral/alkaline pH and service life of up to 168 h; the level of ionic silver is proportional to the concentration of the solution; even at 5% concentration, the solutions were

  16. Characterization of aqueous silver nitrate solutions for leakage tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    COSTA, José Ferreira; SIQUEIRA, Walter Luiz; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; REIS, Alessandra; de OLIVEIRA, Elizabeth; ALVES, Cláudia Maria Coelho; BAUER, José Roberto de Oliveira; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the pH over a period of 168 h and the ionic silver content in various concentrations and post-preparation times of aqueous silver nitrate solutions. Also, the possible effects of these factors on microleakage test in adhesive/resin restorations in primary and permanent teeth were evaluated. Material and Methods A digital pHmeter was used for measuring the pH of the solutions prepared with three types of water (purified, deionized or distilled) and three brands of silver nitrate salt (Merck, Synth or Cennabras) at 0, 1, 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h after preparation, and storage in transparent or dark bottles. Ionic silver was assayed according to the post-preparation times (2, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168 h) and concentrations (1, 5, 25, 50%) of solutions by atomic emission spectrometry. For each sample of each condition, three readings were obtained for calculating the mean value. Class V cavities were prepared with enamel margins on primary and permanent teeth and restored with the adhesive systems OptiBond FL or OptiBond SOLO Plus SE and the composite resin Filtek Z-250. After nail polish coverage, the permanent teeth were immersed in 25% or 50% AgNO3 solution and the primary teeth in 5% or 50% AgNO3 solutions for microleakage evaluation. ANOVA and the Tukey's test were used for data analyses (α=5%). Results The mean pH of the solutions ranged from neutral to alkaline (7.9±2.2 to 11.8±0.9). Mean ionic silver content differed depending on the concentration of the solution (4.75±0.5 to 293±15.3 ppm). In the microleakage test, significant difference was only observed for the adhesive system factor (p=0.000). Conclusions Under the tested experimental conditions and based on the obtained results, it may be concluded that the aqueous AgNO3 solutions: have neutral/alkaline pH and service life of up to 168 h; the level of ionic silver is proportional to the concentration of the solution; even at 5% concentration, the solutions were capable of

  17. Study of accurate volume measurement system for plutonium nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoma, T. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-12-01

    It is important for effective safeguarding of nuclear materials to establish a technique for accurate volume measurement of plutonium nitrate solution in accountancy tank. The volume of the solution can be estimated by two differential pressures between three dip-tubes, in which the air is purged by an compressor. One of the differential pressure corresponds to the density of the solution, and another corresponds to the surface level of the solution in the tank. The measurement of the differential pressure contains many uncertain errors, such as precision of pressure transducer, fluctuation of back-pressure, generation of bubbles at the front of the dip-tubes, non-uniformity of temperature and density of the solution, pressure drop in the dip-tube, and so on. The various excess pressures at the volume measurement are discussed and corrected by a reasonable method. High precision-differential pressure measurement system is developed with a quartz oscillation type transducer which converts a differential pressure to a digital signal. The developed system is used for inspection by the government and IAEA. (M. Suetake)

  18. Hydrolysis-precipitation studies of aluminum (III) solutions. I. Titration of acidified aluminum nitrate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.C.; Geus, John W.; Stol, R.J.; Bruyn, P.L. de

    1975-01-01

    Acidified aluminum nitrate solutions were titrated with alkali (NaOH or KOH) over a temperature range of 24°C to 90°C. A homogeneous distribution of added base was achieved by: (i) in situ decomposition of urea (90°C); and (ii) a novel method involving injection through a capillary submerged in the

  19. Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockers Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors Antiarrhythmics Anticoagulants Antiplatelet Therapy Aspirin Beta-Blockers Blood Thinners Calcium Channel Blockers Digitalis Medicines Diuretics Inotropic Agents Statins, Cholesterol-Lowering Medicines Nitrates Disclaimer The information ...

  20. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  1. Sustaining Shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnardel-Azzarelli, Betty [World Nuclear Transport Institute, Remo House, 4th Floor, 310-312 Regent Street, London, London W1B 3AX (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    Transport plays an essential role in bringing the benefits of the atom to people the world over. Each day thousands of shipments of radioactive materials are transported on national and international routes. These consignments are essential to many aspects of modern life, from the generation of electricity, to medicine and health, scientific research and agriculture. Maintaining safe, cost-effective transport is essential to support them. Despite an outstanding safety record spanning over 45 years, the transport of radioactive materials cannot and must not be taken for granted. In an era of nuclear expansion, with increased transports required to more destinations, a worrisome trend for global supply is that some shipping companies, air carriers, ports and terminals, have instituted policies of not accepting radioactive materials. Experience has shown that the reasons for delays and denials of shipments are manifold and often have their origin in mis-perceptions about the nature of the materials and the requirements for their safe handling and carriage. There is growing recognition internationally of the problems created by shipment delays and denials and they now are being addressed in a more proactive way by such organisations as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The rapidly changing supply-demand equation for fuel cycle services: substantial new nuclear build planned or underway in several countries, twenty-first century 'gold rush' fever in uranium exploration and mining, proposed new mechanisms to assure fuel supply to more countries while minimising proliferation risks. But, can supply to meet demand be assured, unless and until transport can be assured? And is it reasonable to expect that transport can be assured to meet the emerging demand-side of the fuel cycle equation when industry already is facing increased instances of shipment delays and denials? It is a worrisome trend for global supply of Class 7 radioactive materials that

  2. Preparation and utilization of wheat straw anionic sorbent for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Bao-yu; Yue, Wen-wen; Yue, Qin-yan

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the impact of eutrophication caused by agricultural residues (i.e., excess nitrate) in aqueous solution, economic and effective anionic sorbents are required. In this article, we prepared anionic sorbent using wheat straw. Its structural characteristics and adsorption properties for nitrate removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The results indicate that the yield of the prepared anionic sorbent, the total exchange capacity, and the maximum adsorption capacity were 350%, 2.57 mEq/g, and 2.08 mmol/g, respectively. The Freundlich isotherm mode is more suitable than the Langmuir mode and the adsorption process accords with the first order reaction kinetic rate equation. When multiple anions (SO4(2-), H2PO4(-), NO3(-), and NO2(-)) were present, the isotherm mode of prepared anionic sorbent for nitrate was consistent with Freundlich mode; however, the capacity of nitrate adsorption was reduced by 50%. In alkaline solutions, about 90% of adsorbed nitrate ions could be desorbed from prepared anionic sorbent. The results of this study confirmed that the wheat straw anionic sorbent can be used as an excellent nitrate sorbent that removes nitrate from aqueous solutions.

  3. Electrosynthesis of 3-Nitrophenotiazine. Nitration in Non-Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Perlo

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The nitration of Phenothiazine (PHEN in acetonitrile (ACN in the presence of excess NaNO2 has been studied in detail. First, the electrochemical behavior of the reactants was investigated by cyclic voltammetry to determine the electrolysis conditions. Controlledpotential electrolysis was used for the electrosynthesis.

  4. [Removal of nitrate from aqueous solution using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-modified activated carbon as the adsorbent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen-Jing; Lin, Jian-Wei; Zhan, Yan-Hui; Fang, Qiao; Yang, Meng-Juan; Wang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Surfactant-modified activated carbon (SMAC) was prepared by loading cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) onto activated carbon and used as adsorbents to remove nitrate from aqueous solution. The SMAC was effective for removing nitrate from aqueous solution. The SMAC exhibited much higher nitrate adsorption capacity than that of the unmodified activated carbon. The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC increased with increasing the CPC loading. The adsorption kinetics of nitrate on SMAC followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium adsorption data of nitrate on SMAC could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model. Based on the Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC with CPC loading amount of444 mmol per 1 kg activated carbon was determined to be 16.1 mg x g(-1). The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC decreased with the increasing solution pH. The presence of competing anions such as chloride, sulfate and bicarbonate reduced the nitrate adsorption capacity. The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC slightly decreased with the increasing reaction temperature. Almost 95% of nitrate molecules adsorbed on SMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaCl solution. The main mechanisms for the adsorption of nitrate on SMAC are anionic exchange and electrostatic attraction. The results of this work indicate that SMAC is a promising adsorbent for removing nitrate from aqueous solution.

  5. Removal of nitrate from aqueous solution using cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) modified zeolite as adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan Yanhui [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Lin Jianwei, E-mail: jwlin@shou.edu.cn [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China); Zhu Zhiliang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2011-02-28

    Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZ) with different coverage types were prepared by loading the cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) onto the surface of the natural zeolites. The adsorption behavior of nitrate on SMZ was investigated. Natural zeolite and SMZ with monolayer CPB coverage were inefficient for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solution. However, SMZ with patchy bilayer or bilayer CPB coverage was efficient in nitrate removal, and the nitrate adsorption capacity of SMZ increased with its CPB loading. For typical SMZ with bilayer CPB coverage, the nitrate adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the experimental isotherm data fitted well with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and the results showed that the adsorption of nitrate on SMZ was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The presence of competing anions such as chloride, sulfate and bicarbonate ions slightly reduced the nitrate adsorption efficiency. Anionic exchange and electrostatic interaction were proven to be the main mechanisms that govern the adsorption of nitrate on SMZ.

  6. Removal of nitrate from aqueous solution using cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) modified zeolite as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yanhui; Lin, Jianwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2011-02-28

    Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZ) with different coverage types were prepared by loading the cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) onto the surface of the natural zeolites. The adsorption behavior of nitrate on SMZ was investigated. Natural zeolite and SMZ with monolayer CPB coverage were inefficient for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solution. However, SMZ with patchy bilayer or bilayer CPB coverage was efficient in nitrate removal, and the nitrate adsorption capacity of SMZ increased with its CPB loading. For typical SMZ with bilayer CPB coverage, the nitrate adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the experimental isotherm data fitted well with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and the results showed that the adsorption of nitrate on SMZ was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The presence of competing anions such as chloride, sulfate and bicarbonate ions slightly reduced the nitrate adsorption efficiency. Anionic exchange and electrostatic interaction were proven to be the main mechanisms that govern the adsorption of nitrate on SMZ.

  7. Effects of over-winter green cover on soil solution nitrate concentrations beneath tillage land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premrov, Alina; Coxon, Catherine E; Hackett, Richard; Kirwan, Laura; Richards, Karl G

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing need to reduce nitrogen losses from agricultural systems to increase food production while reducing negative environmental impacts. The efficacy of vegetation cover for reducing nitrate leaching in tillage systems during fallow periods has been widely investigated. Nitrate leaching reductions by natural regeneration (i.e. growth of weeds and crop volunteers) have been investigated to a lesser extent than reductions by planted cover crops. This study compares the efficacy of natural regeneration and a sown cover crop (mustard) relative to no vegetative cover under both a reduced tillage system and conventional plough-based system as potential mitigation measures for reducing over-winter soil solution nitrate concentrations. The study was conducted over three winter fallow seasons on well drained soil, highly susceptible to leaching, under temperate maritime climatic conditions. Mustard cover crop under both reduced tillage and conventional ploughing was observed to be an effective measure for significantly reducing nitrate concentrations. Natural regeneration under reduced tillage was found to significantly reduce the soil solution nitrate concentrations. This was not the case for the natural regeneration under conventional ploughing. The improved efficacy of natural regeneration under reduced tillage could be a consequence of potential stimulation of seedling germination by the autumn reduced tillage practices and improved over-winter plant growth. There was no significant effect of tillage practices on nitrate concentrations. This study shows that over winter covers of mustard and natural regeneration, under reduced tillage, are effective measures for reducing nitrate concentrations in free draining temperate soils.

  8. On the influence of molecular structure on the conductivity of electrolyte solutions - sodium nitrate in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Krienke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the conductivity of sodium nitrate in water are presented and compared with experimental measurements. The method of direct correlation force in the framework of the interionic theory is used for the calculation of transport properties in connection with the associative mean spherical approximation (AMSA. The effective interactions between ions in solutions are derived with the help of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics calculations on the Born-Oppenheimer level. This work is based on earlier theoretical and experimental studies of the structure of concentrated aqueous sodium nitrate solutions.

  9. Thermodynamic equilibrium of bismuth hydrometallurgy in chloride and nitrate solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王云燕; 彭文杰; 柴立元

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous equilibrium was applied to the thermodynamic analysis and calculation of Bi( Ⅲ )-X(Cl- ,NO3- )-H2O systems, based on which the diagrams of the logarithm of equilibrium concentration of Bi( Ⅲ ) of series precipitation vs pH value of these two systems at 25 ℃ were obtained, and the pH ranges of the stable zones of various precipitations were analyzed and determined. In Bi( Ⅲ )-Cl -H2O system, the variations of c0 (Bi3+) and c0 (Cl-) have little effect on the equilibria of Bi(OH)3-solution and BiOOH-solution, but has great influence on the equilibrium of BiOCl-solution. However, in Bi( Ⅲ )-NO3-H2O system, the variations of c0 (Bi3+) and C0 (NO3-)have little effect on equilibria of Bi(OH)3-solution, BiOOH-solution and Bi2O3-solution. When pH value is high,Bi2O3 is the thermodynamic stable phase, its stable zone is the widest, almost including the stable zones of BiOCl or BiONO3, Bi(OH)3 and BiOOH. Bi(OH)3 cannot be obtained from Bi( Ⅲ )-Cl--H2O system, even strong alkaline media. Bi2O3 can be obtained from the solution directly, and highly pure BiOCl or BiONO3 can also be obtained through strictly controlling pH value.

  10. Insensitive Ammonium Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    is reduced by replacing the ammonium nitrate with a solid solution of potassium nitrate in form III ammonium nitrate wherein the potassium nitrate...constitutes from more than zero to less than 50 weight percent of the solid solution . (Author)

  11. Nitrate adsorption from aqueous solution using granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qili [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China); Key Laboratory of Groundwater Cycle and Environment Evolution,China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083 (China); Chen, Nan, E-mail: chennan@cugb.edu.cn [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China); Key Laboratory of Groundwater Cycle and Environment Evolution, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083 (China); Feng, Chuanping [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China); Key Laboratory of Groundwater Cycle and Environment Evolution, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100083 (China); Hu, WeiWu [The Journal Center, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex had high performance for nitrate adsorption. • Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex had shorter equilibrium time (1.5 h). • Nitrate adsorption was ascribed to ion exchange and electrostatic attraction. • Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex could be regenerated using NaCl solution. - Abstract: In the present study, In order to efficiently remove nitrate, granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex with high chemical stability and good environmental adaptation was synthesized through precipitation method and characterized using SEM, XRD, BET and FTIR. The nitrate adsorption performance was evaluated by batch experiments. The results indicated that granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex was an amorphous and mesoporous material. The BET specific surface area and average pore size were 8.98 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 56.94 Å, respectively. The point of zero charge was obtained at pH 5. The maximum adsorption capacity reached 8.35 mg NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N g{sup −1} based on Langmuir–Freundlich model. Moreover, no significant change in the nitrate removal efficiency was observed in the pH range of 3.0–10.0. The adverse influence of sulphate on nitrate removal was the most significant, followed by bicarbonate and fluoride, whereas chloride had slightly adverse effect. Adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the experimental equilibrium data were fitted well with the Langmuir–Freundlich and D–R isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that nitrate adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Granular chitosan-Fe{sup 3+} complex could be effectively regenerated by NaCl solution.

  12. Kinetic studies of nitrate removal from aqueous solution using granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qili; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Weiwu; Lv, Long

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex was prepared as a feasible adsorbent for the removal of nitrate from an aqueous solution. There was no significant change in terms of nitrate removal efficiency over a wide pH range of 3-11. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. In order to more accurately reflect adsorption and desorption behaviors at the solid/solution interface, kinetic model I and kinetic model II were proposed to simulate the interfacial process in a batch system. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and kinetic model I. The proposed half-time could provide useful information for optimizing process design. Adsorption and desorption rate constants obtained from kinetic model I and kinetic model II were beneficial to understanding the interfacial process and the extent of adsorption reaction. Kinetic model I and kinetic model II implied that nitrate uptake exponentially approaches a limiting value.

  13. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery.

  14. Improvement of INVS Measurement Uncertainty for Pu and U-Pu Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Marlow, Johnna Boulds [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makino, Risa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai (Japan); Nakamura, Hironbu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai (Japan)

    2017-04-27

    In the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) and the Plutonium Conversion Development Facility (PCDF), a large amount of plutonium nitrate solution which is recovered from light water reactor (LWR) and advanced thermal reactor (ATR), FUGEN are being stored. Since the solution is designated as a direct use material, the periodical inventory verification and flow verification are being conducted by Japan Safeguard Government Office (JSGO) and International Atomic Agency (IAEA).

  15. Study of vapour pressure of lithium nitrate solutions in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verevkin, Sergey [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Safarov, Javid [Heat and Refrigeration Techniques, Azerbaijan Technical University, H. Javid Avn. 25, AZ1073 Baku (Azerbaijan)]. E-mail: javids@azdata.net; Bich, Eckard [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany); Hassel, Egon [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Fakultaet Maschinenbau und Schiffstechnik, Universitaet Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 2, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Heintz, Andreas [Abteilung Physikalische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Hermannstrasse, 14, D-18055 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Vapour pressure p of (LiNO{sub 3} + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K were measured, osmotic, activity coefficients ({phi}, {gamma}) and activity of solvent a {sub s} have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in the molality range m = (0.19125 to 2.21552) mol . kg{sup -1}. The Antoine equation was used for the empirical description of the experimental vapour pressure results and the (Pitzer + Mayorga) model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient for the calculated osmotic coefficients were used. The parameters of the Archer for the extended Pitzer model was used for the evaluation of activity coefficients.

  16. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  17. Adsorptive Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solution Using Nitrogen Doped Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Motoi; Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Iida, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been widely applied for adsorptive removal of organic contaminants from aqueous phase, but not for ionic pollutants. In this study, nitrogen doped AC was prepared to increase the adsorption capacity of nitrate from water. AC was oxidized with (NH4)2S2O8 solution to maximize oxygen content for the first step, and then NH3 gas treatment was carried out at 950°C to aim at forming quaternary nitrogen (N-Q) species on AC surface (Ox-9.5AG). Influence of solution pH was examined so as to elucidate the relationship between surface charge and adsorption amounts of nitrate. The results showed that Ox-9.5AG exhibited about twice higher adsorption capacity than non-treatment AC at any initial nitrate concentration and any equilibrium solution pH (pHe) investigated. The more decrease in pHe value, the more adsorption amount of negatively charged nitrate ion, because the surface charge of AC and Ox-9.5AG could become more positive in acidic solution. The oxidation and consecutive ammonia treatments lead to increase in nitrogen content from 0.35 to 6.4% and decrease in the pH of the point of zero charge (pHpzc) from 7.1 to 4.0 implying that positively charged N-Q of a Lewis acid was created on the surface of Ox-9.5AG. Based on a Langmuir data analysis, maximum adsorption capacity attained 0.5-0.6 mmol/g of nitrate and adsorption affinity was 3.5-4.0 L/mmol at pHe 2.5 for Ox-9.5AG.

  18. A modified NSGA-II solution for a new multi-objective hub maximal covering problem under uncertain shipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Zade, Amir; Sadegheih, Ahmad; Lotfi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Hubs are centers for collection, rearrangement, and redistribution of commodities in transportation networks. In this paper, non-linear multi-objective formulations for single and multiple allocation hub maximal covering problems as well as the linearized versions are proposed. The formulations substantially mitigate complexity of the existing models due to the fewer number of constraints and variables. Also, uncertain shipments are studied in the context of hub maximal covering problems. In many real-world applications, any link on the path from origin to destination may fail to work due to disruption. Therefore, in the proposed bi-objective model, maximizing safety of the weakest path in the network is considered as the second objective together with the traditional maximum coverage goal. Furthermore, to solve the bi-objective model, a modified version of NSGA-II with a new dynamic immigration operator is developed in which the accurate number of immigrants depends on the results of the other two common NSGA-II operators, i.e. mutation and crossover. Besides validating proposed models, computational results confirm a better performance of modified NSGA-II versus traditional one.

  19. Optimizing Electrocoagulation Process for the Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background High levels of nitrate anion are frequently detected in many groundwater resources in Fars province. Objectives The present study aimed to determine the removal efficiency of nitrate from aqueous solutions by electrocoagulation process using aluminum and iron electrodes. Materials and Methods A laboratory-scale batch reactor was conducted to determine nitrate removal efficiency using the electrocoagulation method. The removal of nitrate was determined at pH levels of 3, 7, and 11, different voltages (15, 20, and 30 V, and operation times of 30, 60, and 75 min, respectively. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 16 (Chicago, Illinois, USA and Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between the parameters. Results Results of the present study showed that the removal efficiency was increased from 27% to 86% as pH increased from 3 to 11 at the optimal condition of 30 V and 75 min operation time. Moreover, by increasing the reaction time from 30 V to 75 min the removal efficiency was increased from 63% to 86%, respectively (30 V and pH = 11. Pearson’s correlation analysis showed that there was a significant relationship between removal efficiency and voltage and reaction time as well (P < 0.01. Conclusions In conclusion, the electrocoagulation process can be used for removing nitrate from water resources because of high efficiency, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  20. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Youker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration on Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.

  1. Electrical conductivity of solutions of copper(II) nitrate crystalohydrate in dimethyl sulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyrbekova, Aigul K.; Mamitova, A. D.; Mamyrbekova, Aizhan K.

    2016-06-01

    Conductometry is used to investigate the electric conductivity of Cu(NO3)2 ṡ 3H2O solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide in the 0.01-2.82 M range of concentrations and at temperatures of 288-318 K. The limiting molar conductivity of the electrolyte and the mobility of Cu2+ and NO 3 - ions, the effective coefficients of diffusion of copper(II) ions and nitrate ions, and the degree and constant of electrolytic dissociation are calculated for different temperatures from the experimental results. It is established that solutions containing 0.1-0.6 M copper nitrate trihydrate in DMSO having low viscosity and high electrical conductivity can be used in electrochemical deposition.

  2. [Adsorption Characteristics of Nitrate and Phosphate from Aqueous Solution on Zirconium-Hexadecyltrimethylammonium Chloride Modified Activated Carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen-jing; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhan, Yan-hui; Wang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    A novel adsorbent material, i.e., zirconium-cationic surfactant modified activated carbon (ZrSMAC) was prepared by loading zirconium hydroxide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) on activated carbon, and was used as an adsorbent for nitrate and phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption characteristics of nitrate and phosphate on ZrSMAC from aqueous solution were investigated in batch mode. Results showed that the ZrSMAC was effective for nitrate and phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted both the nitrate and phosphate kinetic experimental data well. The equilibrium isotherm data of nitrate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC were well fitted to the Langmuir, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Freundlich isotherm models. The equilibrium isotherm data of phosphate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC could be described by the Langmuir and,D- R isotherm models. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacities for the ZrSMAC were 7.58 mg x g(-1) and 10.9 mg x g(-1), respectively. High pH value was unfavorable for nitrate and phosphate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC. The presence of Cl-, HCO3- and SO4(2-) in solution reduced the nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacities for the ZrSMAC. The nitrate adsorption capacity for the ZrSMAC was reduced by the presence of coexisting phosphate in solution, and the phosphate adsorption capacity for the ZrSMAC was also reduced by the presence of coexisting nitrate in solution. About 90% of nitrate adsorbed on the ZrSMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaCl solution, and about 78% of phosphate adsorbed on the ZrSMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaOH solution. The adsorption mechanism of nitrate on the ZrSMAC included the anion exchange interactions and electrostatic attraction, and the adsorption mechanism of phosphate on the ZrSMAC included the ligand exchange interaction, electrostatic attraction and anion exchange interaction.

  3. Preparation1 and utilization of wheat straw anionic sorbent for the removal of nitrate from aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the impact of eutrophication caused by agricultural residues (i.e. excess nitrate) in aqueous solution, economic and effective anionic sorbents are required. In this article, we prepared anionic sorbent using wheat straw. Its structural characteristics and adsorption properties for nitrate removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The results indicate that the yield of the prepared anionic sorbent, the total exchange capacity, and the maximum adsorption capacity were 350%, 2.57 mEq/g, and 2.08 mmol/g, respectively. The Freundlich isotherm mode is more suitable than the Langmuir mode and the adsorption process accords with the first order reaction kinetic rate equation. When multiple anions (SO42-, H2PO4-, NO3-, and NO2-) were present, the isotherm mode of prepared anionic sorbent for nitrate was consistent with Freundlich mode; however, the capacity of nitrate adsorption was reduced by 50%. In alkaline solutions, about 90% of adsorbed nitrate ions could be desorbed from prepared anionic sorbent. The results of this study confirmed that the wheat straw anionic sorbent can be used as an excellent nitrate sorbent that removes nitrate from aqueous solutions.

  4. Seasonal dynamics of nitrate and ammonium ion concentrations in soil solutions collected using MacroRhizon suction cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Cezary; Karczewska, Anna; Gałka, Bernard; Cuske, Mateusz; Sowiński, Józef

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the study were to analyse the concentration of nitrate and ammonium ions in soil solutions obtained using MacroRhizon miniaturized composite suction cups under field conditions and to determine potential nitrogen leaching from soil fertilized with three types of fertilizers (standard urea, slow-release urea, and ammonium nitrate) at the doses of 90 and 180 kg ha(-1), applied once or divided into two rates. During a 3-year growing experiment with sugar sorghum, the concentration of nitrate and ammonium ions in soil solutions was the highest with standard urea fertilization and the lowest in variants fertilized with slow-release urea for most of the months of the growing season. Higher concentrations of both nitrogen forms were noted at the fertilizer dose of 180 kg ha(-1). One-time fertilization, at both doses, resulted in higher nitrate concentrations in June and July, while dividing the dose into two rates resulted in higher nitrate concentrations between August and November. The highest potential for nitrate leaching during the growing season was in July. The tests confirmed that the miniaturized suction cups MacroRhizon are highly useful for routine monitoring the concentration of nitrate and ammonium ions in soil solutions under field conditions.

  5. Evaluation of natural zeolite clinoptilolite efficiency for the removal of ammonium and nitrate from aquatic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhdeh Murkani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surface water and groundwater pollution with various forms of nitrogen such as ammonium and nitrate ions is one of the main environmental risks. The major objectives of this study were to evaluate the capacity of natural zeolite (clinoptilolite to remove NO3– and NH4+ from polluted water under both batch and column conditions. Methods: The laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of clinoptilolite as the adsorbent for removal of nitrate (NO3– and ammonium (NH4+ ions from aqueous solution. The effects of pH, clinoptilolite dosage, contact time, and initial metal ion concentration on NO3– and NH4+ removal were investigated in a batch system. Results: Equilibrium time for NO3– and NH4+ ions exchange was 60 minutes and the optimum adsorbent dosage for their removal was 1 and 2.5 g/L, respectively. The adsorption isotherm of reaction (r> 0.9 and optimum entered concentration of ammonium and nitrate (30 and 6.5 mg/L, respectively were in accordance with Freundlich isotherm model. The ammonium removal rate increased by 98% after increasing the contact time. Conclusion: Our findings confirmed that natural Clinoptilolite can be used as one of effective, suitable, and low-costing adsorbent for removing ammonium from polluted waters.

  6. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  7. Modeling pitting corrosion of iron exposed to alkaline solutions containing nitrate and nitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifeng

    2001-07-01

    Pitting corrosion could be extremely serious for dilute high-level radioactive waste stored or processed in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site. In these solutions, nitrate is an aggressive ion with respect to pitting of carbon steel while nitrite can be used as an inhibitor. Excessive additions of nitrite increase the risk of generating unstable nitrogen compounds during waste processing, and insufficient additions of nitrite could increase the risk of corrosion-induced failure. Thus there are strong incentives to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in pitting corrosion prevention with these solution chemistries. In this dissertation, both a 1-D and a 2-D model are used to study the pitting mechanism as a function of nitrite/nitrate ratios. The 1-D model used BAND(J) to test a reaction mechanism for the passivation behavior by comparing the predicted Open Circuit Potential (OCP) with OCP data from experiments at different NO2-/NO3- ratio. The model predictions are compared with Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) experiments. A 2-D model was developed for the propagation of a pit in iron by writing subroutines for finite element software of GAMBIT and FIDAP. Geometrically distributed anodic and cathodic reactions are assumed. The results show three partial explanations describing the inhibition influence of nitrite to iron corrosion: the competing reduction reaction of nitrate to nitrite, the formation of Fe(OH)+, and the function of the porous film. The current distributions and the effect of porosity of the film on pH are also explained. The calculation results also show that rate of pit growth decreases as the pit diameter increases until it reaches a constant value. The profile of the local current density on the pit wall is parabolic for small pits and it changes to a linear distribution for large pits. The model predicts that addition of nitrite will decrease the production of ferrous ions and those can prevent iron from

  8. Effectiveness of the temporary sealing of three restorative materials to the 50% silver nitrate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Pandonor Motcy de OLIVEIRA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to analyze threetemporary restorative materials – Coltosol®, Cavit® W and Cimpat®–, concerning their sealing capacity to the 50% silver nitrate solution.Material and methods: 30 samples were divided into 3 experimental groups. Inside of each sample there was an antibiogram disc with 5 mm of diameter and 1 mm of depth, with 4 mm of one of the three sealing materials on it. After restorations, the samples were inserted into recipients with 50% silver nitrate solution, which were taken to the heater at 37ºC, where they remained for 7 days. Following this period and with the restorative materials removed, antibiogram disc analyses were performed, which were scored according to the leakage. Results and conclusion: Data obtained were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric statistical test, with a level of significance of 5%. Results showed that Cimpat® had the greatest levels of leakage, while Coltosol® and Cavit® W did not differ between themselves (p > 0.05.

  9. Determination of hydroxyl radicals with salicylic acid in aqueous nitrate and nitrite solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xi; ZHAN Man-jun; KONG Ling-ren; WANG Lian-sheng

    2004-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species are essential to determine their steady-state concentration and related reaction mechanisms in environmental aquatic systems. In this study, salicylic acid was employed as an innovative molecular probe of hydroxyl radical(OH) generated in aqueous nitrate and nitrite solutions through photochemical reactions. Kinetic studies showed that the steady-state concentrations of OH in aqueous NO3-(10 mmol/L, pH = 5) and NO2- (10 mmol/L, pH = 5) solutions under ultraviolet irradiation were at a same magnitude, 10-15 mol/L. Apparent quantum yields of OH at 313 nm were measured as 0.011 and 0.07 for NO3- and NO2- respectively, all comparable to the results of previous studies.

  10. Purifying behavior of photocatalytic TiO2 anodized in nitrate ion containing solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Wook CHOI; Seong-Eun LEE; Byung-Gwan LEE; Yong-Soo JEONG; Han-Jun OH; Choong-Soo CHI

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous titanium dioxide films were fabricated on titanium plates by micro-arc oxidation method. To increase the photocatalytic activity of the films, NH4NO3 was added to the H2SO4 solution, and anodizing was carried out at high voltages using a DC power supply. The crystal structure, chemical composition, surface morphology and the optical property of the films were investigated by XPS, XRD, UV-VIS spectroscopy and SEM. The photocatalytic activity of the films was evaluated by the decomposition of aniline blue, and the activity of the films for the degradation turned out to be improved by the additives to the electrolyte solution. The enhanced photocatalytic activity might result from the increased porosity and nitrate ion incorporation into the anodic films by micro arcing, and thereby the TiO2 layer might exhibit an improved absorption property for the visible light.

  11. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  12. Solubility of PdI/sub 2/ in nitrate and perchlorate solutions. [For use in spent fuels processing; solvents are water, nitric acid, calcium nitrate, and sodium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, D.E.; Mailen, J.C.; Bigelow, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports the solubilities of PdI/sub 2/ as measured in nitric acid by a tracer technique and in water, calcium nitrate, and sodium perchlorate solutions by a specific ion electrode technique. The tracer technique measures all the soluble iodine species, whereas the specific ion electrode measures only simple iodide ions (I/sup -/). When compared on the basis of ionic strength, the values obtained in the nitrate solutions by the two methods were in reasonable agreement. The solubilities in perchlorate solution were much higher than in nitrate, possibly because of ionic equilibria involving Pd/sup 4 +/, but this was not resolved in this work. The activity product constant, K/sub ap(PdI/sub 2/)/ = (2.5 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -23/ (25/sup 0/C), was calculated from PdI/sub 2/ solubility in water. With this value and the standard electrode potentials from the literature, the free energy of formation for PdI/sub 2/ was calculated to be --13.6 kcal/mol.

  13. Efficient frequency conversion by stimulated Raman scattering in a sodium nitrate aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganot, Yuval, E-mail: yuvalga@sapir.ac.il, E-mail: ibar@bgu.ac.il [Department of Engineering, Sapir Academic College, D. N. Hof Ashkelon 79165 (Israel); Bar, Ilana, E-mail: yuvalga@sapir.ac.il, E-mail: ibar@bgu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2015-09-28

    Frequency conversion of laser beams, based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is an appealing technique for generating radiation at new wavelengths. Here, we investigated experimentally the SRS due to a single pass of a collimated frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) through a saturated aqueous solution of sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), filling a 50 cm long cell. These experiments resulted in simultaneous generation of 1st (564 nm) and 2nd (599 nm) Stokes beams, corresponding to the symmetric stretching mode of the nitrate ion, ν{sub 1}(NO{sub 3}{sup −}), with 40 and 12 mJ/pulse maximal converted energies, equivalent to 12% and 4% efficiencies, respectively, for a 340 mJ/pulse pump energy. The results indicate that the pump and SRS beams were thermally defocused and that four-wave mixing was responsible for the second order Stokes process onset.

  14. Acoustic cavitation for engineering of gold sols in silver nitrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziuk, Darya V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2011-07-01

    Binary gold-silver nanostructures of preformed gold nanoparticles (25nm) in silver nitrate solutions are produced by a two step sonication (20kHz). Ultrasonic treatment of gold-silver mixtures is carried out in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate in water or 2-propanol, and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) in ethylene glycol solutions. Gold-silver nano-worms, which consist of ripened gold particles connected by ultrasonically reduced silver, are formed after 1h of sonication in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate aqueous solution. In 2-propanol bimetallic nano-worms have a well defined core-shell structure. Polygonal alloy nanoparticles with gold as a core material and a silver shell are produced after 180min of sonication in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) in ethylene glycol solution. Bimetallic gold-silver nanostructures have defected face centered cubic structure and represent polycrystals with a large number of crystallites randomly oriented. For the first time, the mechanism of gold particle design by ultrasound is examined in detail. The role of additives (sodium dodecyl sulfate, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, ethylene glycol and 2-propanol) as reductants of silver at the gold contact surface or stabilizers of particles is highlighted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SCC Susceptibility of Steel 16Mn in Nitrate Solution and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The SCC (stress corrosion cracking) susceptibility of steel 16Mn in nitrate solution was studied. The results showed that applied potential polarization would accelerate (anodic polarization) or retard (cathodic polarization) the SCC process. The study on phase electrochemistry revealed that there was significant difference in electrochemical performance between ferrite and pearlite of steel 16Mn. Pearlite preferentially corroded under the action of galvanic cell. The observation on time and in situ showed that corrosion started first at the phase boundary between ferrite and pearlite, and the pearlite gradually corroded until disappeared, and then corrosion crossed the phase boundary extending into the ferrite phase. According to this, an anodic dissolution mechanism of SCC was proposed, on which pre-existing active path and phase electrochemistry (PEAP-PEC) jointly came into action (SCC mechanism of PEAP-PEC).

  16. MCNP-DSP calculations of measurements with uranyl nitrate solution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method has been used to determine the subcriticality of various configurations of fissile materials. In the past, the application of this method was limited because point-kinetics models had to be used to interpret the data; however, with the development of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP, the measurements can be analyzed using the more general Monte Carlo models. The results of the Monte carlo calculations will be dependent on the ability to model the experiment accurately and on the nuclear data used to perform the calculations. This paper presents a comparison of the measured and calculated ratio of spectral densities for a subset of measurements performed with a uranyl nitrate solution tank filled to various heights. The results presented are for calculations that were performed with both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V cross-section data sets.

  17. Analysis of experimental series of plutonium nitrate in aqueous solution and their correlation coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Kilger, Robert; Stuke, Maik

    2016-01-01

    In this work we performed a detailed analysis on the calculation of 43 critical experiments from 6 experimental series all describing plutonium nitrate in aqueous solution contained in metal spheres. The underlying experimental data is taken from the handbook of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Working Group. We present our modeling assumptions which were derived from the interpretation of the experimental data and discuss the resulting sensitivity analysis. Although the experiments share some components, the derived correlation coefficients are for many cases statistically not significant. Comparing our findings for the correlation coefficients with available data from the DICE Database we find an agreement for the correlation coefficients due to nuclear data. We also compare our results for the correlation coefficients due to experimental uncertainty. Our findings indicate that for the reliable Determination of correlation coefficients a detailed study of the underl...

  18. Sonochemical synthesis of silver nanorods by reduction of silver nitrate in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-ping; Wang, Xi-kui; Guo, Wei-lin; Wang, Jin-gang; Wang, Chen

    2010-04-01

    The sonochemical synthesis of silver nanorods has been achieved by ultrasonic irradiation of the aqueous solution of silver nitrate, methenamine (HMTA) and poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) for 60 min. The silver nanorods obtained have lengths of 4-7 microm and mean diameters of about 100 nm. The structures of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and the chemical composition of the sample was examined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS). The effects of the irradiation time, the concentration of PVP and the reaction temperature on the morphology of silver nanorods were discussed, and the mechanism of the silver nanorods formation was tentatively inferred.

  19. Supply Chain Shipment Pricing Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This data set provides supply chain health commodity shipment and pricing data. Specifically, the data set identifies Antiretroviral (ARV) and HIV lab shipments to...

  20. Formation of colloidal dispersions from supersaturated iron(III) nitrate solutions. III. Development of goethite at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P.L. de; Woude, J.H.A. van der; Pieters, J.

    1984-01-01

    The development of colloidal goethite from partially neutralized iron(III) nitrate solutions has been investigated by high resolution electronmicroscopy and ultracentrifuge analysis. Monocrystalline rod-like particles characterized by (001) faces and very flat (010) and (120) faces are observed to f

  1. EFFECT OF RICE STRAW AND NITRATE LEVELS IN SOIL SOLUTION ON NITROUS OXIDE EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Carlos Cruz Copetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide (N2O is considered important, in view of a global warming potential 296 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 and its dynamics strongly depend on the availability of C and mineral N in the soil. The understanding of the factors that define emissions is essential to develop mitigation strategies. This study evaluated the dynamics of N2O emissions after the application of different rice straw amounts and nitrate levels in soil solution. Pots containing soil treated with sodium nitrate rates (0, 50 and 100 g kg-1 of NO−3-N and rice straw levels (0, 5 and 10 Mg ha-1, i.e., nine treatments, were subjected to anaerobic conditions. The results showed that N2O emissions were increased by the addition of greater NO−3 amounts and reduced by large straw quantities applied to the soil. On the 1st day after flooding (DAF, significantly different N2O emissions were observed between the treatments with and without NO−3 addition, when straw had no significant influence on N2O levels. Emissions peaked on the 4th DAF in the treatments with highest NO−3-N addition. At this moment, straw application negatively affected N2O emissions, probably due to NO−3 immobilization. There were also alterations in other soil electrochemical characteristics, e.g., higher straw levels raised the Fe, Mn and dissolved C contents. These results indicate that a lowering of NO−3 concentration in the soil and the increase of straw incorporation can decrease N2O emissions.

  2. Presence of nitrate NO 3 a ects animal production, photocalysis is a possible solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Molina, Heli; Barba-Ortega, J.; Joya, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    Farmers and ranchers depend on the successful combination of livestock and crops. However, they have lost in the production by nitrate pollution. Nitrate poisoning in cattle is caused by the consumption of an excessive amount of nitrate or nitrite from grazing or water. Both humans and livestock can be affected. It would appear that well fertilised pasture seems to take up nitrogen from the soil and store it as nitrate in the leaf. Climatic conditions, favour the uptake of nitrate. Nitrate poisoning is a noninfectious disease condition that affects domestic ruminants. It is a serious problem, often resulting in the death of many animals. When nitrogen fertilizers are used to enrich soils, nitrates may be carried by rain, irrigation and other surface waters through the soil into ground water. Human and animal wastes can also contribute to nitrate contamination of ground water. A possible method to decontaminate polluted water by nitrates is with methods of fabrication of zero valent iron nanoparticles (FeNps) are found to affect their efficiency in nitrate removal from water.

  3. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

    1999-06-01

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  4. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

    1999-06-14

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  5. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry. (JMT)

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  7. Passivation of chalcopyrite during the leaching with sulphuric acid solution in presence of sodium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the process of the chalcopyrite leaching in sulphuric acid solution was investigated. Sodium nitrate was used as oxidant in the leaching process. Chemical reactions of leaching and their thermodynamic possibilities are predicted based on the calculated Gibbs energies and analysis of E−pH diagrams. The negative values of the Gibbs energy show that all chemical reactions are thermodynamically feasible at atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range 25-90°C. At high electrode potential and low pH values, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions exist in water solutions. The increase of temperature reduces the probability of Fe3+ ion existence in the system. The chalcopyrite concentrate, enriched in the “Rudnik” flotation plant, with 27.08% Cu, 25.12% Fe, 4.15% Zn and 2.28% Pb was used in the work. XRD and DTA analysis of the concentrate reveals that the sample contains mainly the chalcopyrite with small amount of sphalerite. For the description of the reaction of leaching process the leach residuals, obtained at different conditions, were chosen for XRD, TG/DTA and SEM/EDX analyses. The elemental sulphur and chalcopyrite phases identified in leach residuals confirm our prediction that the elemental sulphur is formed during the leaching process. Accordingly, elemental sulphur is the main product of the reaction, while a minor amount of sulphide sulphur is oxidized to sulphate during the leaching. The sulphur formed during the reaction was precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process. In the initial stage, the reaction rate was controlled by the surface reaction. The mechanism, latter has been changed into a diffusion controlled one.

  8. Fabrication process for sintered mixed oxides soluble in nitric acid from nitrate solutions. [nuclear fuels]. Procede d'obtention d'oxydes mixtes frittes solubles dans l'acide nitrique a partir de solutions de nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelard, R.; Germanaz, P.

    1987-10-02

    Mixed oxide nuclear fuels are obtained by mixing the nitrate solutions, concentration, heat treatment for an intermediary mixed oxide containing U(VI) and Pu(IV or VI), calcination to obtain U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, reduction in U(IV) and Pu(IV), pelletizing, sintering and machining. Less wastes are produced and the fuel pellets are soluble in nitric acid.

  9. Optimization of nitrate removal from aqueous solutions by electrocoagulation using response surface methodology method

    OpenAIRE

    HA. Jamali; Moradnia M; MM. Emamjomeh; Panahifard M

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Nitrate is one of the most important contaminants in nature that makes serious threats to health and quality of water resources. Electrocoagulation is one of the most efficient methods to remove this pollutant. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in a pilot scale. The samples were prepared using synthetic water at 100-300 mg/l initial concentration of nitrate. The independent variables were reaction time, electrical difference potential and pH. The process p...

  10. An Electronic Tongue Designed to Detect Ammonium Nitrate in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An electronic tongue has been developed to monitor the presence of ammonium nitrate in water. It is based on pulse voltammetry and consists of an array of eight working electrodes (Au; Pt; Rh; Ir; Cu; Co; Ag and Ni encapsulated in a stainless steel cylinder. In a first step the electrochemical response of the different electrodes was studied in the presence of ammonium nitrate in water in order to further design the wave form used in the voltammetric tongue. The response of the electronic tongue was then tested in the presence of a set of 15 common inorganic salts; i.e.; NH4NO3; MgSO4; NH4Cl; NaCl; Na2CO3; (NH42SO4; MgCl2; Na3PO4; K2SO4; K2CO3; CaCl2; NaH2PO4; KCl; NaNO3; K2HPO4. A PCA plot showed a fairly good discrimination between ammonium nitrate and the remaining salts studied. In addition Fuzzy Art map analyses determined that the best classification was obtained using the Pt; Co; Cu and Ni electrodes. Moreover; PLS regression allowed the creation of a model to correlate the voltammetric response of the electrodes with concentrations of ammonium nitrate in the presence of potential interferents such as ammonium chloride and sodium nitrate.

  11. Insight into the electroreduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode, in neutral solution, after determination of their diffusion coefficient by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouina, Nizar; Cachet, Hubert [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Debiemme-chouvy, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.debiemme-chouvy@upmc.f [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Tran, Thi Tuyet Mai [Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques - UPR15 du CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4, place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-10-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate ions at a copper electrode in an unbuffered neutral aqueous solution is studied. Using a two compartment electrochemical cell, three stationary cathodic waves, noted P1, P2 and P3, were evidenced by cyclic voltammetry at -0.9, -1.2 and -1.3 V/SCE, respectively. By comparing the electrochemical response of nitrate and nitrite containing solutions, P1 was attributed to the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. In order to assign P2 and P3 features by determining the number of electrons involved at the corresponding potential, rotating disk electrode experiments at various rotation speeds, combined with linear sweep voltammetry, were performed. Current data analysis at a given potential was carried out using Koutecky-Levich treatment taking into account water reduction. Confident values of the diffusion coefficient D of nitrate ions were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for nitrate concentrations of 10{sup -3}, 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -1} M. For a nitrate concentration of 10{sup -2} M, D was found to be 1.31 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} allowing the number of electrons to be determined as 6 for P2 and 8 for P3, in accordance with nitrate reduction into hydroxylamine and ammonia, respectively. The formation of hydroxylamine was confirmed by the observation of its reoxidation at a Pt microelectrode present at the Cu electrode/nitrate solution interface.

  12. A study on the microstructure of a nitrate ester plasticized polyether propellant dissolved in HCl and KOH solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONG LIU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of how the properties and performance of nitrate ester plasticized polyether (NEPE propellants relate to microstructure is complicated by numerous components that have different characteristics. One approach to alleviating these complications is to observe a microstructure that has lost one or several components. This article examines the dissolution process, mass loss and change of the ion concentration of propellants in acid and alkali solutions. A scanning electron microscope was used to observe the dissolved residual of the propellants. The results revealed that the main constituents of NEPE propellant have different dissolving properties in solutions of HCl and KOH. By monitoring the dissolution process of NEPE propellant in HCl and KOH solutions, it was found that the microstructure of the propellant is generally compact and the polymer binder not only binds all the other components, but also protects the inner part of the propellant in solution.

  13. Fate of process solution cyanide and nitrate at three nevada gold mines inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.A.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope methods have been used to identify the mechanisms responsible for cyanide consumption at three heap-leach operations that process Carlin-type gold ores in Nevada, U.S.A. The reagent cyanide had ??15N values ranging from -5 to -2??? and ??13C values from -60 to -35???. The wide ??13C range reflects the use by different suppliers of isotopically distinct natural-gas feedstocks and indicates that isotopes may be useful in environmental studies where there is a need to trace cyanide sources. In heap-leach circuits displaying from 5 to 98% consumption of cyanide, barren-solution and pregnant-solution cyanide were isotopically indistinguishable. The similarity is inconsistent with cyanide loss predominantly by HCN offgassing (a process that in laboratory experiments caused substantial isotopic changes), but it is consistent with cyanide retention within the heaps as solids, a process that caused minimal isotopic changes in laboratory simulations, or with cyanide oxidation, which also appears to cause minimal changes. In many pregnant solutions cyanide was carried entirely as metal complexes, which is consistent with ferrocyanides having precipitated or cyanocomplexes having been adsorbed within the heaps. It is inferred that gaseous cyanide emissions from operations of this type are less important than has generally been thought and that the dissolution or desorption kinetics of solid species is an important control on cyanide elution when the spent heaps undergo rinsing. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium had ??15N values of 1-16???. The data reflect isotopic fractionation during ammonia offgassing or denitrification of nitrate - particularly in reclaim ponds - but do not indicate the extent to which nitrate is derived from cyanide or from explosive residues. ?? The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 2000.

  14. Measuring calcium, potassium, and nitrate in plant nutrient solutions using ion-selective electrodes in hydroponic greenhouse of some vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Gökay; Altıkatoğlu, Melda; Ortaç, Deniz; Cemek, Mustafa; Işıldak, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Generally, the life cycle of plants depends on the uptake of essential nutrients in a balanced manner and on toxic elements being under a certain concentration. Lack of control of nutrient levels in nutrient solution can result in reduced plant growth and undesired conditions such as blossom-end rot. In this study, sensitivity and selectivity tests for various polyvinylchloride (PVC)-based ion-selective membranes were conducted to identify those suitable for measuring typical concentration ranges of macronutrients, that is, NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+), in hydroponic solutions. The sensitivity and selectivity of PVC-membrane-based ion-selective sensors prepared with tetradodecylammoniumnitrate for NO(3-), valinomycin for K(+), and Ca ionophore IV for Ca(2+) were found to be satisfactory for measuring NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+) ions in nutrient solutions over typical ranges of hydroponic concentrations. Potassium, calcium, and nitrate levels that were utilized by cucumber and tomato seedlings in the greenhouse were different. The findings show that tomato plants consumed less amounts of nitrate than cucumber plants over the first 2 months of their growth. We also found that the potassium intake was higher than other nutritional elements tested for all plants. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  16. Preparation of activated carbons from Iris tectorum employing ferric nitrate as dopant for removal of tetracycline from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Man; Huang, Ji; Huang, Lihui

    2013-12-01

    Ferric nitrate was employed to modify activated carbon prepared from Iris tectorum during H₃PO₄ activation and ability of prepared activated carbon for removal of tetracycline (TC) was investigated. The properties of the activated carbon samples with or without ferric nitrate, ITAC-Fe and ITAC, were measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N₂ adsorption/desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Boehm's titration. The results showed that mixing with iron increased the BET surface area, total pore volume and the adsorption capacity as compared to the original carbon. FTIR and Boehm's titration suggested that ITAC-Fe was characteristic of more acidic functional groups than ITAC. Adsorption of TC on both samples exhibited a strong pH-dependent behavior and adsorption capacity reduced rapidly with the increasing solution pH. The adsorption kinetics agreed well with the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption isotherms data were well described by Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 625.022 mg/g for ITAC and 769.231 mg/g for ITAC-Fe. The present work suggested that ITAC-Fe could be used to remove tetracycline effectively from aqueous solutions.

  17. Removal of nitrate, ammonia and phosphate from aqueous solutions in packed bed filter using biochar augmented sand media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hanandeh Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients from wastewater are a major source of pollution because they can cause significant impact on the ecosystem. Accordingly, it is important that the nutrient concentrations are kept to admissible levels to the receiving environment. Often regulatory limits are set on the maximum allowable concentrations in the effluent. Therefore, wastewater must be treated to meet safe levels of discharge. In this study, laboratory investigation of the efficiency of packed bed filters to remove nitrate, ammonium and phosphate from aqueous solutions were conducted. Sand and sand augmented with hydrochloric acid treated biochar (SBC were used as packing media. Synthetic wastewater solution was prepared with PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ concentrations 20, 10, 50 mg/L, respectively. Each experiment ran for a period of five days; samples from the effluent were collected on alternate days. All experiments were duplicated. Over the experiment period, the average removal efficiency of PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ were 99.2%, 72.9%, 96.7% in the sand packed columns and 99.2%, 82.3%, 97.4% in the SBC packed columns, respectively. Although, the presence of biochar in the packing media had little effect on phosphate and ammonium removal, it significantly improved nitrate removal.

  18. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  19. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  20. Nitrate conversion and supercritical fluid extraction of UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution prepared by an electrolytic reduction-coprecipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L.Y. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology; China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Duan, W.H.; Wen, M.F.; Xu, J.M.; Zhu, Y.J. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology

    2014-04-01

    A low-waste technology for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) has been developed recently, which involves the conversion of actinide and lanthanide oxides with liquid N{sub 2}O{sub 4} into their nitrates followed by supercritical fluid extraction of the nitrates. The possibility of the reprocessing of SNF from high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with nitrate conversion and supercritical fluid extraction is a current area of research in China. Here, a UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution was prepared as a surrogate for a UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} solid solution, and the recovery of U and Ce from the UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution with liquid N{sub 2}O{sub 4} and supercritical CO{sub 2} containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) was investigated. The UO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} solid solution prepared by electrolytic reduction-coprecipitation method had square plate microstructures. The solid solution after heat treatment was completely converted into nitrates with liquid N{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The XRD pattern of the nitrates was similar to that of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} . 3H{sub 2}O. After 120 min of online extraction at 25 MPa and 50 , 99.98% of the U and 98.74% of the Ce were recovered from the nitrates with supercritical CO{sub 2} containing TBP. The results suggest a promising potential technology for the reprocessing of SNF from HTGRs. (orig.)

  1. Enthalpies of Solution of Complexes of Rare Earth Nitrate with L-α-Histidine in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 房艳; 高胜利; 陈三平; 史启祯

    2002-01-01

    The enthalpies of solution in water of complexes of RE(NO3)3 (RE=La~Nd, Sm~Lu, Y) with L-α-Histidine (His) were measured at 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formation of RE(His)3+(aq) were calculated. The "tetrad effect" regularity was observed from the curve, which is the enthalpies of solution plotted against the atomic numbers of the elements in lanthanide series.

  2. Oxidation of olefins with H2O2 catalyzed by gallium(III) nitrate and aluminum(III) nitrate in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandelli, Dalmo; Kozlov, Yuriy N.; da Silva, Cezar A R; Carvalho, Wagner A.; Pescarmona, Paolo P.; Cella, Daniele de A; de Paiva, Polyana T.; Shul'pin, Georgiy B.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble gallium and aluminum nitrates (simple salts of non-transition metals) are good catalysts for the epoxidation of olefins (cyclooctene, dec-1-ene) including terpenes (carvone, limonene) with hydrogen peroxide in ethyl acetate or tetrahydrofurane (THF). Typically, the gallium salt is more effic

  3. 49 CFR 175.704 - Plutonium shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.704 Plutonium shipments. Shipments of plutonium which are subject to 10 CFR 71.88(a)(4) must comply with the following: (a) Each package... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plutonium shipments. 175.704 Section...

  4. Thermodynamics of complexation in an aqueous solution of Tb(III) nitrate at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobacheva, O. L.; Berlinskii, I. V.; Dzhevaga, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    The pH of the formation of hydroxo complexes and hydrates in an aqueous solution of terbium Tb(III) is determined using combined means of potentiometric and conductometric titration. The stability constants of the hydroxo complexes, the products of hydroxide solubility, and the Gibbs energy of terbium hydroxo complex formation are calculated.

  5. Chitosan /Zeolite Y/Nano ZrO2 nanocomposite as an adsorbent for the removal of nitrate from the aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Abbas; Nasab, Shima Ghanavati; Vahdatpoor, Niaz; Habibollahi, Saeed; Salavati, Hossein; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, a series of chitosan/Zeolite Y/Nano Zirconium oxide (CTS/ZY/Nano ZrO2) nanocomposites were made by controlling the molar ratio of chitosan (CTS) to Zeolite Y/Nano Zirconium oxide in order to remove nitrate (NO3(-)) ions in the aqueous solution. The nanocomposite adsorbents were characterized by XRD, FTIR, BET, SEM and TEM. The influence of different molar ratios of CTS to ZY/Nano ZrO2, the initial pH value of the nitrate solution, contact time, temperature, the initial concentration of nitrate and adsorbent dose was studied. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also analyzed. It was attempted to describe the sorption processes by the Langmuir equation and the theoretical adsorption capacity (Q0) was found to be 23.58mg nitrate per g of the adsorbent. The optimal conditions for nitrate removal were found to be: molar ratio of CTS/ZY/Nano ZrO2: 5:1; pH: 3; 0.02g of adsorbent and temperature: 35°C, for 60min. The adsorption capacities of CTS, ZY, Nano ZrO2, CTS/Nano ZrO2, CTS/ZY and CTS/ZY/Nano ZrO2 nanocomposites for nitrate removal were compared, showing that the adsorption ability of CTS/ZY/Nano ZrO2 nanocomposite was higher than the average values of those of CTS (1.95mg/g for nitrate removal), ZY, Nano ZrO2, CTS/Nano ZrO2, and CTS/ZY.

  6. Structured ZnO films: Effect of copper nitrate addition to precursor solution on topography, band gap energy and photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, S.; Nikkanen, J.-P.; Kaleva, A.; Hyvärinen, L.; Levänen, E.

    2017-02-01

    ZnO is a widely studied semiconductor material with interesting properties such as photocatalytic activity leading to wide range of applications, for example in the field of opto-electronics and self-cleaning and antimicrobial applications. Doping of photocatalytic semiconductor materials has been shown to introduce variation in the band gap energy of the material. In this work, ZnO rods were grown on a stainless steel substrates using hydrothermal method introducing copper nitrate into the precursor solution. Zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine were used as precursor materials and the growth was conducted at 90 °C for 2 h in order to achieve a well-aligned evenly distributed rod structure. Copper was introduced as copper nitrate that was added in the precursor solution in the beginning of the growth. The as-prepared films were then heat-treated at 350 °C and band gap measurements were performed for prepared films. It was found that increase in the copper concentration in the precursor solution decreased the band gap of the ZnO film. Methylene blue discolouration tests were then performed in order to study the effect of the copper nitrate addition to precursor solution on photocatalytic activity of the structured ZnO films.

  7. Enhanced Remediation of Toluene in the Vadose Zone via a Nitrate-Rich Nutrient Solution: Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, J. A.; Friedel, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of nitrate-rich nutrient solutions and hydrogen peroxide (H202) to enhance in-situ microbial remediation of toluene. Three sand filled plots (2 m2 surface area and 1.5 meters deep) were tested in three phases (each phase lasting approximately 2 weeks). During each phase, toluene (21.6 mol as an emulsion in 50L of water) was applied uniformly via sprinkler irrigation. Passive remediation was allowed to occur during the first (control) phase. A nutrient solution (modified Hoagland), concentrated in 40L of water, was tested during the second phase. The final phase involved addition of 230 moles of H202 in 50L of water to increase the available oxygen needed for aerobic biodegradation. During the first phase, toluene concentrations in soil gas were reduced from 120 ppm to 25 ppm in 14 days. After the addition of nutrients during the second phase, concentrations were reduced from 90 ppm to about 8 ppm within 14 days, and for the third phase (H202), toluene concentrations were about 1 ppm after only five days. Initial results suggest that this method could be an effective means of remediating a contaminated site, directly after a BTEX spill, without the intrusiveness and high cost of other abatement technologies such as bioventing and soil vapor extraction. However, further tests need to be completed to determine the effect of each of the BTEX components.

  8. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Janet E.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NOthat introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured δ18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO. These procedures are demonstrated for SO isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SOsources and reaction mechanisms.

  9. Mercury adsorption on granular activated carbon in aqueous solutions containing nitrates and chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, F; Erto, A; Lancia, A; Musmarra, D

    2011-09-15

    Adsorption is an effective process to remove mercury from polluted waters. In spite of the great number of experiments on this subject, the assessment of the optimal working conditions for industrial processes is suffering the lack of reliable models to describe the main adsorption mechanisms. This paper presents a critical analysis of mercury adsorption on an activated carbon, based on the use of chemical speciation analysis to find out correlations between mercury adsorption and concentration of dissolved species. To support this analysis, a comprehensive experimental study on mercury adsorption at different mercury concentrations, temperatures and pH was carried out in model aqueous solutions. This study pointed out that mercury capture occurs mainly through adsorption of cationic species, the adsorption of anions being significant only for basic pH. Furthermore, it was shown that HgOH(+) and Hg(2+) are captured to a higher extent than HgCl(+), but their adsorption is more sensitive to solution pH. Tests on the effect of temperature in a range from 10 to 55 °C showed a peculiar non-monotonic trend for mercury solution containing chlorides. The chemical speciation and the assumption of adsorption exothermicity allow describing this experimental finding without considering the occurrence of different adsorption mechanisms at different temperature.

  10. A Piecewise Local Partial Least Squares (PLS) Method for the Quantitative Analysis of Plutonium Nitrate Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert; O'Rourke, Patrick E; Kyser, Edward A

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a piecewise local (PL) partial least squares (PLS) analysis method for total plutonium measurements by absorption spectroscopy in nitric acid-based nuclear material processing streams. Instead of using a single PLS model that covers all expected solution conditions, the method selects one of several local models based on an assessment of solution absorbance, acidity, and Pu oxidation state distribution. The local models match the global model for accuracy against the calibration set, but were observed in several instances to be more robust to variations associated with measurements in the process. The improvements are attributed to the relative parsimony of the local models. Not all of the sources of spectral variation are uniformly present at each part of the calibration range. Thus, the global model is locally overfitting and susceptible to increased variance when presented with new samples. A second set of models quantifies the relative concentrations of Pu(III), (IV), and (VI). Standards containing a mixture of these species were not at equilibrium due to a disproportionation reaction. Therefore, a separate principal component analysis is used to estimate of the concentrations of the individual oxidation states in these standards in the absence of independent confirmatory analysis. The PL analysis approach is generalizable to other systems where the analysis of chemically complicated systems can be aided by rational division of the overall range of solution conditions into simpler sub-regions.

  11. Pyroelectric properties and conduction mechanism in solution grown glycine sodium nitrate single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Nidhi [Crystal Lab, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 7 (India); Sinha, Nidhi [Crystal Lab, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 7 (India); Department of Electronics, SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi 7 (India); Yadav, Harsh [Crystal Lab, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 7 (India); Kumar, Binay, E-mail: b3kumar69@yahoo.co.in [Crystal Lab, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 7 (India)

    2015-04-01

    Nonlinear optical “glycine sodium nitrate” transparent single crystals were grown from aqueous solution by the solvent evaporation technique. The ferroelectric transition temperature was determined by dielectric measurement for GSN crystal. Temperature dependent pyroelectric coefficient and figure of merit were measured. The conduction mechanism of GSN crystal has been discussed. The ln σ−E{sup 1/2} characteristic in the high-field region supports dominating the Poole–Frenkel conduction while in the low field region; there are possibility of both Richardson–Schottky and Poole–Frenkel conduction mechanism. The activation energy of GSN crystal was found to be 0.58 eV. A low value of dielectric constant and good value of the figure of merit suggest the GSN crystal more promising for IR sensing applications. Hardness value shows the stability of GSN crystal.

  12. Solubility and reactivity of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in dilute aqueous salt solutions and in sulphuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, A.; Kutsuna, S.; Takeuchi, K.; Ibusuki, T.

    The loss rates of PAN in several dilute aqueous salt solutions (NaBr, Na 2SO 3, KI, NaNO 2, FeCl 3, and FeSO 4) and in sulphuric acid were measured at 279 K with a simple bubbler experiment. They are little different from that in pure water. For 5 M sulphuric acid hydrolysis and solubility were determined in the temperature range of 243-293 K. The hydrolysis rate kh=3.2×10 -4 s -1 at 293 K is close to that in water. The observed temperature dependence of the Henry's Law constant H=10- 6.6±0.6exp((4780±420)/T) M atm -1 leads to enthalpy and entropy of solvation Δ Hsolv=-39.7±3.5 kJ mol -1 and Δ Ssolv=-126±11 J mol -1 K -1, respectively.

  13. Solid state and solution nitrate photochemistry: photochemical evolution of the solid state lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Sanford A; Tuschel, David D; Vargson, Todd A; Wang, Luling; Geib, Steven J

    2011-05-01

    We examined the deep UV 229 nm photochemistry of NaNO(3) in solution and in the solid state. In aqueous solution excitation within the deep UV NO(3)¯ strong π → π* transition causes the photochemical reaction NO(3)¯ → NO(2)¯ + O·. We used UV resonance Raman spectroscopy to examine the photon dose dependence of the NO(2)¯ band intensities and measure a photochemical quantum yield of 0.04 at pH 6.5. We also examined the response of solid NaNO(3) samples to 229 nm excitation and also observe formation of NO(2)¯. The quantum yield is much smaller at ∼10(-8). The solid state NaNO(3) photochemistry phenomena appear complex by showing a significant dependence on the UV excitation flux and dose. At low flux/dose conditions NO(2)¯ resonance Raman bands appear, accompanied by perturbed NO(3)¯ bands, indicating stress in the NaNO(3) lattice. Higher flux/dose conditions show less lattice perturbation but SEM shows surface eruptions that alleviate the stress induced by the photochemistry. Higher flux/dose measurements cause cratering and destruction of the NaNO(3) surface as the surface layers are converted to NO(2)¯. Modest laser excitation UV beams excavate surface layers in the solid NaNO(3) samples. At the lowest incident fluxes a pressure buildup competes with effusion to reach a steady state giving rise to perturbed NO(3)¯ bands. Increased fluxes result in pressures that cause the sample to erupt, relieving the pressure.

  14. Critical experiments with mixed plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions having Pu:(Pu + U) ratios greater than 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, R.T. III [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1986-04-01

    A series of critical experiments was conducted with mixed plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions having Pu:(Pu+U) ratios >0.5. Three geometries and four conditions of reflection were examined. The plutonium concentrations ranged from 170 to 350 g/L. The value of k-effective for each experiment was calculated using the KENO-IV code and 27-group cross sections derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File B--version IV (ENDF/B-IV). The mean value for the set of 26 experiments was 1.003, with a minimum value of 0.987 and a maximum of 1.022. The spread in the distribution of calculated k-effectives is believed to be the result of uncertainties in analytical chemistry measurements. No correlation between condition of reflection and calculated k-effective was found. An allowable multiplication factor to be used in the evaluation of reprocessing equipment at conditions that have been investigated was calculated to be 0.945.

  15. LaMnO{sub 3} perovskite thin film deposition, from aqueous nitrate solutions of La and Mn, in a low pressure plasma expanded through a nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miralaie, S.F.; Morvan, D.; Amouroux, J. [ENSCP rue Pierret et Marie Curie, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    In the inductively coupled RF Plasma Expanded Through a Nozzle (PETN) of Ar + O{sub 2} mixtures, perovskite thin films as LaMnO{sub 3} were deposited from La and Mn nitrate aqueous solutions. The PETN using aqueous solutions is a new method to deposit thin films of ceramic oxides. An ultrasonic nebulizer operating at atmospheric pressure introduce the precursors aerosol through a valve in a pulsating mode. The aerosol passing the RF Ar + O{sub 2} plasma produces a shock wave prior to the nozzle, evaporating the excess of H{sub 2}O and decomposing the H{sub 2}O and the nitrate of La and Mn. The molecular spectra of LaO and MnO was measured in the shock wave prior expanding through the nozzle. This a new low-temperature process for ceramic oxide thin film deposition.

  16. Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxides based catalysts for the reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulić Tatjana J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The secondary waste and bacterial contamination in physico-chemical and biological separation processes used today for nitrate removal from ground water make novel catalytic technologies that convert nitrates to unharmful gaseous nitrogen, very attractive for scientific research. The Mg-Cu-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH based catalysts with different Mg/Al ratio were investigated in water denitrification reaction in the presence of hydrogen and with solely copper as an active phase. Since LDHs have ion exchange properties and their derived mixed oxides possess memory effect (restoration of layered structure after thermal decomposition, their adsorption capacity for nitrates was also measured in the same model system. All studied samples showed nitrate removal from 23% to 62% following the decrease in Al content, as well as the substantial adsorption capacity ranging from 18% to 38%. These results underlie the necessity to take into account the effects of the adsorption in all future investigations.

  17. Uptake and elimination kinetics of silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate by Raphidocelis subcapitata: The influence of silver behaviour in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabianne; Gallego-Urrea, Julián Alberto; Goodhead, Rhys M; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Moger, Julian; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Raphidocelis subcapitata is a freshwater algae species that constitutes the basis of many aquatic trophic chains. In this study, R. subcapitata was used as a model species to investigate the kinetics of uptake and elimination of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in comparison to silver nitrate (AgNO3) with particular focus on the Ag sized-fractions in solution. AgNP used in this study were provided in a suspension of 1 mg Ag/l, with an initial size of 3-8 nm and coated with an alkane material. Algae was exposed for 48 h to both AgNP and AgNO3 and sampled at different time points to determine their internal Ag concentration over time. Samples were collected and separated into different sized fractions: total (Agtot), water column Ag (Agwater), small particulate Ag (Agsmall.part.) and dissolved Ag (Agdis). At AgNO3 exposures algae reached higher bioconcentration factor (BCF) and lower elimination rate constants than at AgNP exposures, meaning that Ag is more readily taken up by algae in its dissolved form than in its small particulate form, however slowly eliminated. When modelling the kinetics based on the Agdis fraction, a higher BCF was found. This supports our hypothesis that Ag would be internalised by algae only in its dissolved form. In addition, algae images obtained by Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy demonstrated large aggregates of nanoparticles external to the algae cells with no evidence of its internalisation, thus providing a strong suggestion that these AgNP were not able to penetrate the cells and Ag accumulation happens through the uptake of Ag ions.

  18. 7 CFR 922.54 - Special purpose shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 922.54 Special purpose shipments. (a) Except... quantities, or types of shipments, or for such specified purposes (including shipments to facilitate...

  19. Determining Replenishment Lot Size and Shipment Policy for an EPQ Inventory Model with Delivery and Rework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Eduardo Cárdenas-Barrón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of production-shipment policies for a vendor-buyer system is dealt within this paper. The main objective is to derive the optimal replenishment lot size and shipment policy for an EPQ inventory model with multiple deliveries and rework. This inventory model contains two decision variables: the replenishment lot size and the number of deliveries. Previous researches solve this inventory model considering both variables to be continuous. However, the number of deliveries must be considered as a discrete variable. In this direction, this paper solves the inventory model considering two cases: Case 1: the replenishment lot size as a continuous variable and the number of shipments as a discrete variable and Case 2: the replenishment lot size and the number of shipments as discrete variables. The final results are two simple and easy-to-apply solution procedures to find the optimal values for the replenishment lot size and the number of deliveries for each case.

  20. Synergism between cerium nitrate and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate on corrosion of AA5052 aluminium alloy in 3 wt.% NaCl solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin; Zhang, Daquan

    2016-12-01

    The synergistic inhibition effect of rare earth cerium nitrate and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) on corrosion of AA5052 aluminium alloy in 3 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization curve, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results show that the single cerium nitrate or DBS has a limited inhibition effect against corrosion of AA5052 alloy. The combination cerium ions with DBS produced strong synergistic effect on corrosion inhibition for AA5052 alloy and rendered a negaitve shift of the corrosion potential. The formation of the complex of Al(DBS)3 and Ce(DBS)3 stabilized the passive film of Al2O3 and CeO2, retarding both the cathodic and anodic processes of AA5052 alloy corrosion reaction significantly.

  1. Extraction of uranyl nitrate, sulphate and chloride with tri-n-octyl amine (TOA from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJORDJE M. PETKOVIC

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of uranyl nitrate, chloride and sulphate with tri-n-octyl amine (TOA in benzene as a function of the TOA concentration has been studied. The concentration based extraction equilibrium constants were calculated from the distribution data of the uranyl salts, fitting the parameters of a chemical model to the experimentally obtained extraction isotherms. The calculated equilibrium constants are 46.5, 89.4 and 4.2·104 for uranyl nitrate, chloride and sulphate, respectively. These values are in good agreement with the previously reported extraction equilibrium constants calculated by the inflection point method.

  2. Comparing and Optimizing Nitrate Adsorption from Aqueous Solution Using Fe/Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Anion Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out for the removal of nitrate from raw water for a drinking water supply. Nitrate is a widespread ground water contaminant. Methodology employed in this study included adsorption on metal based nanoparticles and ion exchange using anionic resins. Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared in the laboratory, by the reduction of their respective salts using sodium borohydride. Scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray florescence techniques were utilized for characterization of bimetallic Fe/Pt nanoparticles. Optimum dose, pH, temperature, and contact time were determined for NO3- removal through batch tests, both for metal based nanoparticles and anionic exchange resin. Adsorption data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm and conformed to the pseudofirst-order kinetic model. Results indicated 97% reduction in nitrate by 0.25 mg/L of Fe/Pt nanoparticles at pH 7 and 83% reduction in nitrate was observed using 0.50 mg/L anionic exchange resins at pH 4 and contact time of one hour. Overall, Fe/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles demonstrated greater NO3- removal efficiency due to the small particle size, extremely large surface area (627 m2/g, and high adsorption capacity.

  3. A First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study of the Solvation Shell Structure, Vibrational Spectra, Polarity, and Dynamics around a Nitrate Ion in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sushma; Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-09-15

    A first-principles molecular dynamics study is presented for the structural, dynamical, vibrational, and dipolar properties of the solvation shell of a nitrate ion in deuterated water. A detailed description of the anisotropic structure of the solvation shell is presented through calculations of various structural distributions in different conical shells around the perpendicular axis of the ion. The nitrate ion-water dimer potential energies are also calculated for many different orientations of water. The average vibrational stretch frequency of OD modes in the solvation shell is found to be higher than that of other OD modes in the bulk, which signifies a weakening of hydrogen bonds in the hydration shell. A splitting of the NO stretch frequencies and an associated fast spectral diffusion of the solute are also observed in the current study. The dynamics of rotation and hydrogen bond relaxation are found to be faster in the hydration shell than that in the bulk water. The residence time of water in the hydration shell is, however, found to be rather long. The nitrate ion is found to have a dipole moment of 0.9 D in water which can be attributed to its fluctuating interactions with the surrounding water.

  4. Nitrate absorption through hydrotalcite reformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Musumeci, Anthony W

    2006-10-01

    Thermally activated hydrotalcite based upon a Zn/Al hydrotalcite with carbonate in the interlayer has been used to remove nitrate anions from an aqueous solution resulting in the reformation of a hydrotalcite with a mixture of nitrate and carbonate in the interlayer. X-ray diffraction of the reformed hydrotalcites with a d(003) spacing of 7.60 A shows that the nitrate anion is removed within a 30 min period. Raman spectroscopy shows that two types of nitrate anions exist in the reformed hydrotalcite (a) nitrate bonded to the 'brucite-like' hydrotalcite surface and (b) aquated nitrate anion in the interlayer. Kinetically the nitrate is replaced by the carbonate anion over a 21 h period. Two types of carbonate anions are observed. This research shows that the reformation of a thermally activated hydrotalcite can be used to remove anions such as nitrate from aqueous systems.

  5. Annual report of STACY operation in F.Y. 1997. 280mm thickness slab core {center_dot} 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-06-01

    Fifty-three times critical experiments (run number R0104 to R0156) with STACY in NUCEF, were performed in F.Y. 1997. During these experiments, 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution was used as fuel, and core configuration was 280mm thickness and 1.5m height slab core tank with various rectangular solid reflectors; ordinary or borated concrete, polyethylene and so on, to measure mainly reactivity worth by changes of reflecting material and its thickness. Operation data of STACY in F.Y. 1997 are summarized in this report. (author)

  6. Influence of the surface structure of β-cyclodexrin-containing silica on the adsorption of mercury nitrate from dilute solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakova, L. A.; Lyashenko, D. Yu.; Shvets, A. N.

    2010-04-01

    The construction of adsorption sites for mercury(II) by chemical immobilization of β-cyclodextrin and its functional derivatives on a surface of macroporous amorphous silica is proposed. It is shown that the adsorption of mercury(II) is adequately described by the Langmuir isotherm equation for monolayer adsorption on localized sites of energetically homogeneous surfaces. It is established that the considerably increased sorption of mercury nitrate on silica modified by different β-cyclodextrins is due to the formation of 1: 1 β-cyclodextrin-nitrate ion inclusion complexes on the surface and the participation of side functional groups of the upper edge of immobilized β-cyclodextrin molecules in the formation of mixed-ligand mercury(II) complexes.

  7. 78 FR 57261 - Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment and Grain-Shipment Assist Vessels, Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment and Grain-Shipment Assist...: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone around all inbound and outbound grain-shipment and grain-shipment assist vessels involved in commerce with the Columbia Grain facility on the...

  8. 78 FR 33224 - Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment and Grain-Shipment Assist Vessels, Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment and Grain-Shipment Assist... and outbound grain-shipment and grain-shipment assist vessels involved in commerce with the Columbia Grain facility on the Willamette River in Portland, OR, the United Grain Corporation facility on the...

  9. Fixation and separation of the elements thorium and uranium using anion exchange resins in nitrate solution; Fixation et separation des elements thorium et uranium par les resines echangeuses d'anions en milieu nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korgaonkar, V. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-01

    The exchange of thorium and uranium between a strong base anion resin and a mixed water + ethanol solvent containing nitrate ions is studied. It is assumed that in the resin the thorium and uranium are fixed in the form of the complexes Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2-} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2-} in solution these elements are present in the form of complexes having the general formula: Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6-n}{sup n-2} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4-n}{sup n-2} It has been possible to deduce a law for the changes in the partition functions of thorium and uranium as a function of the concentrations of the various species in solution and of the complexing ion NO{sub 3}. From this has been deduced the optimum operational conditions for separating a mixture of these two elements. Finally, in these conditions, the influence of a few interfering ions has been studied: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. The method proposed can be used either as a preparation, or for the dosage of thorium by a quantitative separation. (author) [French] On etudie l'echange du thorium et de l'uranium entre une resine anion base forte et un solvant mixte eau + ethanol charge en ions nitrates. On a suppose que, dans la resine, le thorium et l'uranium sont fixes sous forme de complexes Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2-} et UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2-} en solution, ces elements sont engages dans des complexes de formule generale: Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6-n}{sup n-2} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4-n}{sup n-2} On a pu degager une loi de variation des coefficients de partage du thorium et de l'uranium en fonction des concentrations des diverses especes en solution et de l'anion complexant NO{sub 3}{sup -}. On en a deduit les conditions operatoires optimales necessaires pour separer les deux elements a partir de leurs melanges. Enfin, dans ces conditions, on a etudie l'influence de quelques elements genants: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. La methode preconisee peut etre

  10. Evaluation of layered zinc hydroxide nitrate and zinc/nickel double hydroxide salts in the removal of chromate ions from solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Henrique Bortolaz; Wypych, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZnHN) and Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts were synthesized and used to remove chromate ions from solutions at pH 8.0. The materials were characterized by many instrumental techniques before and after chromate ion removal. ZnHN decomposed after contact with the chromate solution, whereas the layered structure of Zn/Ni hydroxide nitrate (Zn/NiHN) and Zn/Ni hydroxide acetate (Zn/NiHA) remained their layers intact after the topotactic anionic exchange reaction, only changing the basal distances. ZnHN, Zn/NiHN, and Zn/NiHA removed 210.1, 144.8, and 170.1 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively. Although the removal values obtained for Zn/NiHN and Zn/NiHA were smaller than the values predicted for the ideal formulas of the solids (194.3 and 192.4 mg of CrO42-/g of material, respectively), the measured capacities were higher than the values achieved with many materials reported in the literature. Kinetic experiments showed the removal reaction was fast. To facilitate the solid/liquid separation process after chromium removal, Zn/Ni layered double hydroxide salts with magnetic supports were also synthesized, and their ability to remove chromate was evaluated.

  11. Preparation of CuAlO2 Thin Films by Sol-Gel Method Using Nitrate Solution Dip-Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehara Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CuAlO2 thin films are prepared by sol-gel dip-coating followed by annealing in nitrogen atmosphere using copper nitrate and aluminum nitrate as metal source materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns show (003, (006 and (009 oriented peaks of CuAlO2 at annealing temperature of 800 – 1000°C. This result indicates that the CuAlO2 films prepared in the present work are c-axis oriented. XRD peak intensity increase with annealing temperature and becomes maximum at 850°C. The CuAlO2 XRD peak decreased at annealing temperature of 900°C with appearance of a peak of CuO, and then increased again with annealing temperature until 1000 °C. The films have bandgap of 3.4 eV at annealing temperature of 850°C in which the transparency becomes the highest. At the annealing temperature of 850°C, scanning electron microscope (SEM observation reveals that the films are consist of amorphous fraction and microcrystalline CuAlO2 fraction.

  12. Apparent molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of caffeine in aqueous thorium nitrate solutions at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Biswajit, E-mail: biswachem@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Roy, Pran Kumar; Sarkar, Bipul Kumar; Brahman, Dhiraj [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Roy, Mahendra Nath, E-mail: mahendraroy2002@yahoo.co.i [Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Apparent molar volumes phi{sub V} and viscosity B-coefficients for caffeine in (0.00, 0.03, 0.05, and 0.07) mol . dm{sup -3} aqueous thorium nitrate, Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, solutions were determined from solution density and viscosity measurements over the temperature range (298.15 to 318.15) K as function of concentration of caffeine and the relation: phi{sub V}{sup 0}=a{sub 0}+a{sub 1}T+a{sub 2}T{sup 2}, have been used to describe the temperature dependence of the standard partial molar volumes phi{sub V}{sup 0}. These results have been used to deduce the standard volumes of transfer DELTAphi{sub V}{sup 0} and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer DELTAB for caffeine from water to aqueous Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solutions for rationalizing various interactions in the ternary solutions. The structure-making or breaking ability of caffeine has been discussed in terms of the sign of (delta{sup 2}phi{sub V}{sup 0}/deltaT{sup 2}){sub P}. The Friedman-Krishnan co-sphere model was used to explain the transfer volume of caffeine with increasing Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} molarity. The activation parameters of viscous flow for the ternary solutions were also discussed in terms of transition state theory.

  13. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions; Tratamiento de soluciones que contienen nitrato de uranilo y fluoruros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Rodrigo Vilaseca, F.; Morales Calvo, G.

    1977-07-01

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs.

  14. Lot sizing and unequal-sized shipment policy for an integrated production-inventory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, B. C.; Sharma, S.

    2014-05-01

    This article develops a single-manufacturer single-retailer production-inventory model in which the manufacturer delivers the retailer's ordered quantity in unequal shipments. The manufacturer's production process is imperfect and it may produce some defective items during a production run. The retailer performs a screening process immediately after receiving the order from the manufacturer. The expected average total cost of the integrated production-inventory system is derived using renewal theory and a solution procedure is suggested to determine the optimal production and shipment policy. An extensive numerical study based on different sets of parameter values is conducted and the optimal results so obtained are analysed to examine the relative performance of the models under equal and unequal shipment policies.

  15. 7 CFR 916.54 - Special purpose shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 916.54 Special purpose shipments. (a) Except as otherwise... State of California; or (2) for such specified purposes (including shipments to facilitate the...

  16. 7 CFR 917.43 - Special purpose shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 917.43 Special purpose shipments. (a) Except as otherwise... continental United States; (2) for such specified purposes (including shipments to facilitate the conduct...

  17. 7 CFR 946.54 - Shipments for specified purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Regulation § 946.54 Shipments for specified purposes... part in order to facilitate shipments of potatoes for the following purposes: (1) Livestock feed;...

  18. 7 CFR 923.54 - Special purpose shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 923.54 Special purpose shipments... grading or packing to specified locations outside the production area and shipments to facilitate...

  19. Overseas shipments of 48Y cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, R.T.; Furlan, A.S. [Cameco Corp., Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes experiences with two incidents of overseas shipments of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The first incident involved nine empty UF{sub 6} cylinders in enclosed sea containers. Three UF{sub 6} cylinders broke free from their tie-downs and damaged and contaminated several sea containers. This paper describes briefly how decontamination was carried out. The second incident involved a shipment of 14 full UF{sub 6} cylinders. Although the incident did not cause an accident, the potential hazard was significant. The investigation of the cause of the near accident is recounted. Recommendations to alleviate future similar incidents for both cases are presented.

  20. 10 CFR 71.63 - Special requirement for plutonium shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirement for plutonium shipments. 71.63 Section... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.63 Special requirement for plutonium shipments. Shipments containing plutonium must be made with the contents in solid form, if the contents contain greater than...

  1. 19 CFR 145.43 - Unaccompanied tourist shipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unaccompanied tourist shipments 145.43 Section 145.43 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... tourist shipments Unaccompanied tourist shipments for which entry is claimed under subheading...

  2. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... storage in the leaf vacuole cells to be released later and reduced in the cytosol ... pathway dependent on nitrate ion concentration, and (2) potassium and ..... converted to starch in storage organs (Li et al., 2009;. Amtmann and ...

  3. 19 CFR 132.25 - Undeliverable shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Undeliverable shipment. 132.25 Section 132.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... reasonable time, but not to exceed 30 days, the addressee fails to indicate to the port director an...

  4. 7 CFR 35.6 - Shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipment. 35.6 Section 35.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT...

  5. LABELING OPTIONS FOR POSTAL SHIPMENTS BY PASSIVE RFID TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Maslák

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the topic of labeling postal shipments by passive radio frequency identification (RFID tags. Every delivery company needs to have all necessary information for every single postal shipment package it carries. Shipment package labeling is essential for processing and tracking the postal shipments along its delivery process. Using RFID technology for the process brings advantages in more efficient delivery and data collection along with regular information updates of shipment status across complete delivery chain.In this article, we focused on the problem of logical log of key shipment package information into EPC memory of the RFID smart label. We have taken into account the National postal administrator and its current system of shipment labeling. In the end, we presented a design for conversion of contemporary labeling using bar codes into labeling using RFID tags.

  6. ROW METHOD OF SUGAR BEET (BETA VULGARIS L. FERTILIZATION WITH MULTICOMPONENT FERTILIZER BASED ON UREA-AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION AS A WAY TO INCREASE NITROGEN EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław BARŁÓG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugar beet is the main crop commonly cultivated for sugar production in temperate regions of the World. Actual yields in main Central Europe producing countries are much lower, due to many limiting factors. Among them, nutrients supply is of great value, especially referring to efficiency of nitrogen, which is generally low. In the conducted study two methods of nitrogen application were compared (i broadcast of calcium saltpeter and (ii row application of the multicomponent fertilizer based on urea-ammonium-nitrate (UAN solution. The basic amount of the applied N was 75 kg ha-1. The highest yields of both taproots and refined sugar were harvested on the plot receiving 75 kg N-1 as UAN liquid multicomponent fertilizer and 50% of the recommended P and K rates. The positive effects of row application of liquid N fertilizer on taproot and sugar yields were also corroborated by high values of indices of agronomic efficiency for both N as well as P and K. However this method of sugar beets fertilization has some possibilities, as indicated by still high contents of melassogenic substances.

  7. Automatic Titrator Calibration Standard Solution of Silver Nitrate%自动电位滴定仪标定硝酸银标准溶液

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉芬

    2012-01-01

      Using the configuration DM141-SC-type silver electrode DL58 automatic titrator calibration standard solution of silver nitrate, accuracy and precision compared with manual titration with a large degree of increase, and simple operation, equipment maintenance, more accurate titration results .Titration process signal acquisition is 0.1mV, minimum feed rate can be titrated to achieve 0.001ml, is the recommended method.%  采用配置DM141-SC型银电极的DL58型自动电位滴定仪标定硝酸银标准溶液,准确度及精密度均较手动滴定有很大程度的提高,且操作简单,仪器维护方便,滴定结果更准确,滴定过程采集信号为0.1mV,滴定最小进给量可达到0.001mL,是目前值得推荐的方法.

  8. Denial of shipments - myth or reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrette, M.A.; McInnes, D. [MDS Nordion, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The global healthcare community depends on shipments of radioisotopes. MDS Nordion manufactures and distributes radioisotopes used in the medical, research and sterilization industries throughout the world. With a growing demand for radiation and radiation technology to prevent, diagnose and treat disease, it is important that the global health care industry have a secure and reliable supply of such important materials. Despite this ever increasing need, shipments of radioisotopes are being increasingly delayed and outright denied. This paper outlines the importance of radioisotopes to global healthcare. It also details examples of shipment denials and how this evolving situation has impeded the efficient transport of radioactive material which risks preventing the delivery of essential radioisotopes to many member states. Denial of shipments was identified as a key issue at the 2003 International Conference on the Safety of Transport of Radioactive Material, the 2003 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference and at an IAEA Technical Meeting in January 2004. The outcome is that the IAEA is focused on better documenting the problem and is starting to develop ideas to address it. Moreover, governments, associations and modal organizations are becoming more aware of the matter. As a responsible partner in a unique industry, MDS Nordion encourages all IAEA Member States, commercial carriers, airports and ports to be engaged in this matter and accept the transport of radioactive material without additional requirements. In this respect, the collaboration of all organizations involved in this highly interactive global system of transport is vital to assure the effective transport of radioactive material for global health care.

  9. Process for the preparation of pulverulent metallic oxides from aqueous solutions or solid mixtures of metallic nitrates. [UO/sub 3/, ThO/sub 2/, CeO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/]. Procede de preparation d'oxydes metalliques pulverulents a partir de solutions aqueuses ou de melanges solides de nitrates metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelard, R.; Joubert, P.

    1985-05-31

    Oxides of predetermined reactivity adjusted by specific surface for subsequent transformations and/or sintering are prepared by thermal treatment of hydrated uranyl nitrate only or mixed with thorium, cerium and/or plutonium nitrates. In a first step the uranyl nitrate is dehydrated and then calcined in a second step under a controled pressure of water vapor.

  10. Sea shipment of Japanese plutonium under international law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dyke, J.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The Japanese government`s shipment of plutonium from France to Japan raises a number of significant questions under international law. The first shipment, which began in November 1992 on the Akatsuki Maru, violated international law in several respects. This article analyzes the international law that governs these shipments, focusing on the rules that govern navigation on the high seas and exclusive economic zones, territorial seas, and international straits, and also addresses the question of liability for damage. 281 refs.

  11. Characterization of the deviation of the ideality of concentrated electrolytic solutions: plutonium 4 and uranium 4 nitrate salts study; Contribution a la caracterisation de l'ecart a l'idealite des solutions concentrees d'electrolytes: application aux cas de nitrates de plutonium (4) et d'uranium (4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrin, N

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish a new binary data base by compiling the activity coefficients of plutonium and uranium at oxidation state +IV to better account for media effects in the liquid-liquid extraction operations implemented to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. Chapter 1: first reviews the basic thermodynamic concepts before describing the issues involved in acquiring binary data for the tetravalent actinides. The difficulties arise from two characteristics of this type of electrolyte: its radioactive properties (high specific activity requiring nuclearization of the experimental instrumentation) and its physicochemical properties (strong hydrolysis). After defining the notion of fictive binary data, an approach based on the thermodynamic concept of simple solutions is described in which the activity coefficient of an aqueous phase constituent is dependent on two parameters: the water activity of the system and the total concentration of dissolved constituents. The method of acquiring fictive binary electrolyte data is based on water activity measurements for ternary or quaternary actinide mixtures in nitric acid media, and binary data for nitric acid. The experimental value is then correlated with the characteristics of the fictive binary solution of the relevant electrolyte. Chapter 2: proposes more reliable binary data for nitric acid than the published equivalents, the disparities of which are discussed. The validation of the method described in Chapter 1 for acquiring fictive binary data is then addressed. The test electrolyte, for which binary data are available in the literature, is thorium(IV) nitrate. The method is validated by comparing the published binary data obtained experimentally for binary solutions with the data determined for the ternary Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O system investigated in this study. The very encouraging results of this comparison led us to undertake further research in this area. Chapter 3 discusses

  12. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha KY; Wong, May CM; Lo, Edward CM

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at...

  13. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha KY; Wong, May CM; Lo, Edward CM.

    2015-01-01

    Background The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at...

  14. Ammonia volatilization from surface-applied nitrogen solution of urea and ammonium nitrate; Volatizacao de amonia do solo associada a aplicacao superficial de solucao nitrogenada com ureia e nitrato de amonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivellin, Paulo Cezar Ocheuze; Stefanutti, Ronaldo; Lima Filho, Oscar Fontvo de; Tziboy, Edgar Alfredo Tzi; Oliveira Junior, Jovo Alberto de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    1996-08-01

    The urea is one of the fertilizers more utilized in modern agriculture. One of the problems in the urea utilization is the ammonium volatilization, resulting in low utilization of N-fertilizers by the plants.The objective of this study it was to evaluate and to compare in laboratories conditions , utilizing the {sup 15} N technic the soil`s ammonium lost by volatilization associated a superficial application of nitrogen corresponding doses like urea solution and urea and ammonium nitrates solution 2 figs.

  15. 24 CFR 3286.9 - Manufacturer shipment responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacturer shipment... Requirements § 3286.9 Manufacturer shipment responsibilities. (a) Providing information to HUD. At or before the time that each manufactured home is shipped by a manufacturer, the manufacturer must provide...

  16. 48 CFR 452.247-73 - Packing for Overseas Shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing for Overseas Shipment. 452.247-73 Section 452.247-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Packing for Overseas Shipment. As prescribed in 447.305-10(c), insert the following clause: Packing...

  17. 48 CFR 452.247-72 - Packing for Domestic Shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing for Domestic Shipment. 452.247-72 Section 452.247-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Packing for Domestic Shipment. As prescribed in 447.305-10(b), insert the following clause: Packing...

  18. 27 CFR 28.244 - Shipment to manufacturing bonded warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bonded warehouse. 28.244 Section 28.244 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... Export Consignment § 28.244 Shipment to manufacturing bonded warehouse. Distilled spirits and wines withdrawn for shipment to a manufacturing bonded warehouse shall be consigned to the proprietor of...

  19. 9 CFR 104.6 - Products for transit shipment only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PERMITS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 104.6 Products for transit shipment only. An application for a permit for Transit Shipment Only shall be required when a biological product is being shipped from one foreign country...

  20. 19 CFR 148.114 - Shipment of unaccompanied articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shipment of unaccompanied articles. 148.114 Section 148.114 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... States § 148.114 Shipment of unaccompanied articles. One copy of the validated Customs Form 255 shall...

  1. 77 FR 74777 - Safety Zones; Grain-Shipment Assistance Vessels; Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Grain-Shipment Assistance Vessels... transferring persons to or from grain-shipment vessels, and/or assisting grain-shipment vessel movements. These.... To do otherwise would be impracticable since the arrival of grain-shipment vessels cannot be delayed...

  2. 327 to 324 Pin tube shipment quality management process plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAM, J.E.

    1998-11-05

    The B and W Hanford Company's (BWHC) 327 Facility, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, is preparing to ship five Pin Tubes to the 324 Facility for storage and eventual disposition. The Pin Tubes consist of legacy fuel pin pieces and drillings. They will be over-packed in new Pin Tubes and transported to 324 in three shipments. Once received at 324, two of the shipments will be combined for storage as a fissionable material batch, and the other shipment will be added to an existing batch.

  3. Frequent Questions on International Agreements on Transboundary Shipments of Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Answers FAQs such as How does the OECD control the shipment of hazardous waste between Member countries? Where do I find the green and amber lists of waste? Why hasn't the United States ratified the Basel Convention?

  4. Avian influenza surveillance sample collection and shipment protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Instructions for mortality collection and shipment of avian influenza (AI) live bird surveillance sample collections. AI sample collections will include...

  5. 7 CFR 947.54 - Shipments for specified purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Order Regulating Handling Regulation § 947.54 Shipments for specified purposes. (a) Whenever the... modify, suspend, or terminate any or all regulations issued pursuant to this part, in order to facilitate...

  6. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments - FY 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.C. (comp.)

    1979-05-01

    This compilation is divided into four sections: alphabetical lists of customers, of isotopes (cross-referenced to customer numbers), and of states and countries (cross-referenced to customer numbers), and a tabulation of the shipments of each isotope. (DLC)

  7. Case histories of West Valley spent fuel shipments: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, NRC/FC initiated a study on institutional issues related to spent fuel shipments originating at the former spent fuel processing facility in West Valley, New York. FC staff viewed the shipment campaigns as a one-time opportunity to document the institutional issues that may arise with a substantial increase in spent fuel shipping activity. NRC subsequently contracted with the Aerospace Corporation for the West Valley Study. This report contains a detailed description of the events which took place prior to and during the spent fuel shipments. The report also contains a discussion of the shipment issues that arose, and presents general findings. Most of the institutional issues discussed in the report do not fall under NRC's transportation authority. The case histories provide a reference to agencies and other institutions that may be involved in future spent fuel shipping campaigns. 130 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. 7 CFR 920.54 - Special purpose shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA... (including shipments to facilitate the conduct of marketing research and development projects); or, (3)...

  9. 7 CFR 906.42 - Shipments for special purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Regulation § 906.42 Shipments for special... combination thereof, in order to facilitate the handling of fruit: (a) For relief or for charity; (b)...

  10. 7 CFR 924.54 - Special purpose shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 924.54... shipments to facilitate the conduct of marketing research and development projects established pursuant...

  11. 7 CFR 945.53 - Shipments for specified purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating... order to facilitate shipments of potatoes for the following purposes: (a) Export; (b) Relief or...

  12. 7 CFR 966.54 - Shipments for special purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulating Handling Regulation § 966.54 Shipments for special purposes. Upon the basis of recommendations and... facilitate handling of tomatoes for the following purposes: (a) For export; (b) For relief or for charity;...

  13. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  14. Optimal scheduling of logistical support for medical resources order and shipment in community health service centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims to propose an optimal scheduling for medical resources order and shipment in community health service centers (CHSCs.Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents two logistical support models for scheduling medical resources in CHSCs. The first model is a deterministic planning model (DM, which systematically considers the demands for various kinds of medical resources, the lead time of supplier, the storage capacity and other constraints, as well as the integrated shipment planning in the dimensions of time and space. The problem is a multi-commodities flow problem and is formulated as a mixed 0-1 integer programming model. Considering the demand for medical resources is always stochastic in practice, the second model is constructed as a stochastic programming model (SM. A solution procedure is developed to solve the proposed two models and a simulation-based evaluation method is proposed to compare the performances of the proposed models. Findings andFindings: The main contributions of this paper includes the following two aspects: (1 While most research on medical resources optimization studies a static problem taking no consideration of the time evolution and especially the dynamic demand for such resources, the proposed models in our paper integrate time-space network technique, which can find the optimal scheduling of logistical support for medical resources order and shipment in CHSCs effectively. (2 The logistics plans in response to the deterministic demand and the time-varying demand are constructed as 0-1 mixed integer programming model and stochastic integer programming model, respectively. The optimal solutions not only minimize the operation cost of the logistics system, but also can improve the order and shipment operation in practice.Originality/value: Currently, medical resources in CHSCs are purchased by telephone or e-mail. The important parameters in decision making, i.e. order/shipment frequency

  15. Nitrate concentration in lettuce leaves depending on photosynthetic photon flux and nitrate concentration in the nutrient solution Teores de nitrato em alface sob fluxo de fótons fotossintéticos e concentração de nitrato na solução nutritiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Nélio Cometti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The nitrate accumulation in plant tissues can occur due to low light availability. However, published studies have not linked nitrate accumulation to photosynthetic photon flux (PPF measured during the growing period. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the reduction of photosynthetic photon flux and the concentration of nitrate in the nutrient solution on agronomic characteristics and accumulation of nitrate in lettuce grown in hydroponics. The trial design was entirely randomized in a factorial scheme (4 x 2 with three repetitions, and four shading levels: 0, 30, 50, and 80% and two nitrate levels in nutrient solution: 5 and 10 mmol L-1. The dry matter production decreased directly and linearly with the reduction of light. The lowest level in nitrate solution also led to reduction in dry mass yield. The maximum accumulation of nitrate reached 966.3 mg kg-1 fresh mass, with PPF of 118 μmol/m²/s and 140 mg L-1 of N-NO3-1 (below the maximum levels recommended by the European Union, and the minimum of 200 mg kg-1 with PPF of 455 μmol/m²/s and 70 mg L-1 of N-NO3-1 in the nutrient solution. The reduction of nitrate in the nutrient solution from 140 to 70 mg L-1 led to the reduction of nitrate accumulation in shoots, but also caused a decrease in the production of phytomass of shoots, as well as reduced leaf area significantly.O acúmulo de nitrato nos tecidos vegetais pode ocorrer em função da baixa disponibilidade luminosa. Entretanto, trabalhos publicados não têm relacionado acúmulo de nitrato com o fluxo de fótons fotossintéticos (PPF medidos durante o período de cultivo. Neste trabalho objetivou-se avaliar características agronômicas e acúmulo de nitrato em plantas de alface cultivadas em hidroponia em função da redução no fluxo de fótons fotossintéticos e da concentração de nitrato na solução nutritiva. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente ao acaso, em esquema fatorial 4 x 2, com três repetições, sendo

  16. Electrochemical Studies of Nitrate-Induced Pitting in Carbon Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1998-12-07

    The phenomenon of pitting in carbon steel exposed to alkaline solutions of nitrate and chloride was studied with the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization technique. Open-circuit and pitting potentials were measured on specimens of ASTM A537 carbon steel in pH 9.73 salt solutions at 40 degrees Celsius, with and without the inhibiting nitrite ion present. Nitrate is not so aggressive a pitting agent as is chloride. Both nitrate and chloride did induce passive breakdown and pitting in nitrite-free solutions, but the carbon steel retained passivity in solutions with 0.11-M nitrite even at a nitrate concentration of 2.2 M.

  17. Summary Report of Laboratory Testing to Establish the Effectiveness of Proposed Treatment Methods for Unremediated and Remediated Nitrate Salt Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    The inadvertent creation of transuranic waste carrying hazardous waste codes D001 and D002 requires the treatment of the material to eliminate the hazardous characteristics and allow its eventual shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report documents the effectiveness of two treatment methods proposed to stabilize both the unremediated and remediated nitrate salt waste streams (UNS and RNS, respectively). The two technologies include the addition of zeolite (with and without the addition of water as a processing aid) and cementation. Surrogates were developed to evaluate both the solid and liquid fractions expected from parent waste containers, and both the solid and liquid fractions were tested. Both technologies are shown to be effective at eliminating the characteristic of ignitability (D001), and the addition of zeolite was determined to be effective at eliminating corrosivity (D002), with the preferred option1 of zeolite addition currently planned for implementation at the Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. During the course of this work, we established the need to evaluate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed remedy for debris material, if required. The evaluation determined that Wypalls absorbed with saturated nitrate salt solutions exhibit the ignitability characteristic (all other expected debris is not classified as ignitable). Follow-on studies will be developed to demonstrate the effectiveness of stabilization for ignitable Wypall debris. Finally, liquid surrogates containing saturated nitrate salts did not exhibit the characteristic of ignitability in their pure form (those neutralized with Kolorsafe and mixed with sWheat did exhibit D001). As a result, additional nitrate salt solutions (those exhibiting the oxidizer characteristic) will be tested to demonstrate the effectiveness of the remedy.

  18. Analysis of the dependence of lattice deformations in Cu sup II -Co sup II hydroxide nitrate solid solutions on their composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotov, N. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Applied Mineralogy); Petrov, K. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    The synthesized Cu{sub x}Co{sub 2-x}(OH){sub 3}NO{sub 3} hydroxide nitrate mixed crystals have a monoclinic pseudo-hexagonal lattice. The unit-cell parameters vary non-linearly with composition. In such cases the calculation of the tensor of compositional deformation and the finite Lagrangian strain tensor is a convenient method for the investigation of the structural anisotropy of lattice distortions. The lattice deformation when substituting copper for cobalt can be represented as a two-dimensional shear deformation in the ac plane and a one-dimensional deformation along the b axis. The directions of the largest and smallest deformations are determined by the arrangement of the longest Cu-O bonds in the distorted CuO{sub 6} octahedra. A change in the directions of the principal axes of the tensor of compositional deformation is observed for compositions x=0.8 and x=1.5. (orig.).

  19. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  20. Micromachined Amperometric Nitrate Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Dohyun Kim; Ira Goldberg; Jack Judy

    2003-01-01

    A nitrate-sensing system that consists of a micromachined sensor substrate, nitrate-permeable membrane, integrated microfluidic channels, and standard fluidic connectors has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested. Our microsensor was designed for in-situ monitoring of nitrate concentrations in ground water. A silver electrode was patterned for amperometric nitrate detection. An electrochemically oxidized silver electrode was used as a reference electrode. Microfluidic channels were ...

  1. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  2. Use of sodium chloride and zeolite during shipment of Ancistrus triradiatus under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson F. Ramírez-Duarte

    Full Text Available The use of sodium chloride (0.5 g/L and 1 g/L and zeolite (22.7 g/L during shipment (48 h of Ancistrus triradiatus at high temperatures (between 24.5 and 34ºC were evaluated. Several water quality parameters (dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, and total ammonia were measured before and after shipment. Glycemia was measured before shipment and at 24 and 48 h after shipment. After shipment, a resistance test was carried out in a high concentration of sodium chloride, and mortality was recorded after shipment, and 7 days post-shipment. While the two evaluated substances increased survival of A. triradiatus challenged by high temperatures during shipment, the best result was obtained with 1 g/L of sodium chloride.

  3. Air Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania to Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Alexander Buchelnikov

    2010-10-01

    Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without shipment license special exceptions when the last Romanian highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel was transported to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This air shipment required the design, fabrication, and licensing of special 20 foot freight containers and cask tiedown supports to transport the eighteen TUK 19 shipping casks on a Russian commercial cargo aircraft. The new equipment was certified for transport by road, rail, water, and air to provide multi modal transport capabilities for shipping research reactor spent fuel. The equipment design, safety analyses, and fabrication were performed in the Russian Federation and transport licenses were issued by both the Russian and Romanian regulatory authorities. The spent fuel was transported by truck from the VVR S research reactor to the Bucharest airport, flown by commercial cargo aircraft to the airport at Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to the final destination in a secure nuclear facility at Chelyabinsk, Russia. This shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in close cooperation with the Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation and the International Atomic Energy Agency, and was managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). This paper describes the planning, shipment preparations, equipment design, and license approvals that resulted in the safe and secure air shipment of this spent nuclear fuel.

  4. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitution...

  5. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Mapping of Porous Coatings Obtained on Titanium by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in a Solution Containing Concentrated Phosphoric Acid with Copper Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokosz K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The SEM and EDS study results of coatings obtained on titanium by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO in the electrolytes containing of 600 g copper nitrate in 1 liter of concentrated phosphoric acid at 450 V for 1 and 3 minutes, are presented. The obtained coatings are porous and consist mainly of phosphorus within titanium and copper. It was found that the time of PEO oxidation has impact on the chemical composition of the coatings. The longer time of PEO treatment, the higher amount of copper inside coating. The PEO oxidation of titanium for 1 minute has resulted in the creation of coating, on which 3 phases where found, which contained up to 13.4 wt% (9 at% of copper inside the phosphate structure. In case of 1 minute PEO treatment of titanium, the 2 phases were found, which contained up to 13 wt% (8 at% of copper inside the phosphate structure. The copper-to-phosphorus ratios after 1 minute processing belong to the range from 0.28 by wt% (0.14 by at% to 0.47 by wt% (0.23 by at%, while after 3 minutes the same ratios belong to the range from 0.27 by wt% (0.13 by at% to 0.35 by wt% (0.17 by at%. In summary, it should be stated that the higher amounts of phosphorus and copper were recorded on titanium after PEO oxidation for 3 minutes than these after 1 minute.

  6. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  7. 27 CFR 28.244a - Shipment to a customs bonded warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shipment to a customs... Export Consignment § 28.244a Shipment to a customs bonded warehouse. Distilled spirits and wine withdrawn for shipment to a customs bonded warehouse shall be consigned in care of the customs officer in...

  8. 19 CFR 10.462 - Packing materials and containers for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packing materials and containers for shipment. 10... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.462 Packing materials and containers for shipment. (a) Packing materials and containers for shipment, as defined in § 10.450(m), are to be disregarded...

  9. 19 CFR 10.602 - Packing materials and containers for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packing materials and containers for shipment. 10...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.602 Packing materials and containers for shipment. (a) Effect on tariff shift rule. Packing materials and containers for shipment,...

  10. 19 CFR 10.540 - Packing materials and containers for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packing materials and containers for shipment. 10...-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.540 Packing materials and containers for shipment. (a) Packing materials and containers for shipment, as defined in § 10.530(j) of this subpart, are to...

  11. 27 CFR 44.190 - Return of shipment to a manufacturer or customs warehouse proprietor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturer or customs warehouse proprietor. 44.190 Section 44.190 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms... of Shipments of Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and Tubes by Manufacturers and Export Warehouse Proprietors Consignment of Shipment § 44.190 Return of shipment to a manufacturer or customs...

  12. 10 CFR 71.64 - Special requirements for plutonium air shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. 71.64... MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.64 Special requirements for plutonium air shipments. (a) A package for the shipment of plutonium by air subject to § 71.88(a)(4), in addition to satisfying...

  13. New Data on Activity Coefficients of Potassium, Nitrate, and Chloride Ions in Aqueous Solutions of KNO3 and KCl by Ion Selective Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Debasmita Dash; Shekhar Kumar; C. Mallika; U. Kamachi Mudali

    2012-01-01

    Ion selective electrodes (ISEs) are used to measure the single-ion activity coefficients in aqueous solutions of KNO3 and KCl at 298.15 K against a double-junction reference electrode. The EMF responses of ISEs up to 0.01 m are plotted to obtain the slope and intercept values. The obtained slopes and intercepts are used in Nernst equation for higher concentrated solutions for calculation of individual ion activity coefficient. The mean ionic activity coefficients are estimated from single ion...

  14. 22 CFR 211.4 - Availability and shipment of commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... effectively because of natural or other disturbances, (C) Where carriers to a specific country are unavailable... USE IN DISASTER RELIEF, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND OTHER ASSISTANCE § 211.4 Availability and shipment of... port of entry, upon completion of discharge by the ocean carrier (non-landlocked countries), or at...

  15. 7 CFR 322.27 - Eligible ports for transit shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible ports for transit shipments. 322.27 Section 322.27 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT...

  16. 7 CFR 322.24 - Packaging of transit shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging of transit shipments. 322.24 Section 322.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Transit...

  17. 7 CFR 322.8 - Packaging of shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging of shipments. 322.8 Section 322.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation...

  18. 7 CFR 322.16 - Packaging of shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... vermiculite. (2) Other materials, such as host material for the organism, soil, or other types of packing... Restricted Organisms § 322.16 Packaging of shipments. (a) Restricted organisms must be packed in a container or combination of containers that will prevent the escape of the organisms and the leakage of...

  19. 41 CFR 101-26.311 - Frustrated shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Frustrated shipments. 101-26.311 Section 101-26.311 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES...

  20. pH dependence of the electroreduction of nitrate on Rh and Pt polycrystalline electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Sebastian, Paula; Duca, Matteo; Hoogenboom, Thijs; Koper, Marc T M

    2014-02-28

    From a study of the electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate on Pt and Rh electrodes over a wide pH range, HNO3 is suggested as the only reducible species in nitrate reduction on Pt, whereas both HNO3 and the nitrate anion are reducible on Rh. Rh is the more active catalyst of the two because it can activate nitrate even if no protons are available in solution. This is an important insight into the development of more effective nitrate reduction catalysts.

  1. XpertTrack: Precision Autonomous Measuring Device Developed for Real Time Shipments Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Viman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a software and hardware solution for real time condition monitoring applications. The proposed device, called XpertTrack, exchanges data through the GPRS protocol over a GSM network and monitories temperature and vibrations of critical merchandise during commercial shipments anywhere on the globe. Another feature of this real time tracker is to provide GPS and GSM positioning with a precision of 10 m or less. In order to interpret the condition of the merchandise, the data acquisition, analysis and visualization are done with 0.1 °C accuracy for the temperature sensor, and 10 levels of shock sensitivity for the acceleration sensor. In addition to this, the architecture allows increasing the number and the types of sensors, so that companies can use this flexible solution to monitor a large percentage of their fleet.

  2. Study of the changes in composition of ammonium diuranate with progress of precipitation, and study of the properties of ammonium diuranate and its subsequent products produced from both uranyl nitrate and uranyl fluoride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Subhankar; Kumar, Raj; Satpati, Santosh K.; Roy, Saswati B. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Uranium metal used for fabrication of fuel for research reactors in India is generally produced by magnesio-thermic reduction of UF{sub 4}. Performance of magnesio-thermic reaction and recovery and quality of uranium largely depends on properties of UF{sub 4}. As ammonium diuranate (ADU) is first product in powder form in the process flow-sheet, properties of UF{sub 4} depend on properties of ADU. ADU is generally produced from uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) for natural uranium metal production and from uranyl fluoride solution (UFS) for low enriched uranium metal production. In present paper, ADU has been produced via both the routes. Variation of uranium recovery and crystal structure and composition of ADU with progress in precipitation reaction has been studied with special attention on first appearance of the precipitate Further, ADU produced by two routes have been calcined to UO{sub 3}, then reduced to UO{sub 2} and hydroflorinated to UF{sub 4}. Effect of two different process routes of ADU precipitation on the characteristics of ADU, UO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2} and UF{sub 4} were studied here.

  3. 48 CFR 52.247-52 - Clearance and Documentation Requirements-Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Documentation Requirements-Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points. 52.247-52 Section 52.247... and Documentation Requirements—Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points. As... Requirements—Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points (FEB 2006) All shipments to water...

  4. Nitration of pollen aeroallergens by nitrate ion in conditions simulating the liquid water phase of atmospheric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Bruschi, Maurizio; Citterio, Sandra; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Ferrero, Luca; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Asero, Riccardo; Perrone, Maria Grazia

    2016-12-15

    Pollen aeroallergens are present in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) where they can be found in coarse biological particles such as pollen grains (aerodynamic diameter dae>10μm), as well as fragments in the finest respirable particles (PM2.5; daeNitration of tyrosine residues in pollen allergenic proteins can occur in polluted air, and inhalation and deposition of these nitrated proteins in the human respiratory tract may lead to adverse health effects by enhancing the allergic response in population. Previous studies investigated protein nitration by atmospheric gaseous pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide and ozone. In this work we report, for the first time, a study on protein nitration by nitrate ion in aqueous solution, at nitrate concentrations and pH conditions simulating those occurring in the atmospheric aerosol liquid water phase. Experiments have been carried out on the Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and the recombinant Phleum pratense allergen (Phl p 2) both in the dark and under UV-A irradiation (range 4-90Wm(-2)) to take into account thermal and/or photochemical nitration processes. For the latter protein, modifications in the allergic response after treatment with nitrate solutions have been evaluated by immunoblot analyses using sera from grass-allergic patients. Experimental results in bulk solutions showed that protein nitration in the dark occurs only in dilute nitrate solutions and under very acidic conditions (pHnitration is always observed (at pH0.5-5) under UV-A irradiation, both in dilute and concentrated nitrate solutions, being significantly enhanced at the lowest pH values. In some cases, protein nitration resulted in an increase of the allergic response. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The Effect of Nitrate Levels and Harvest Times on Fe, Zn, Cu, and K, Concentrations and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Lettuce and Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gheshlaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leafy vegetables are considered as the main sources of nitrate in the human diet. In order to investigate the effect of nitrate levels and harvest times on nitrate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu and K in Lettuce and Spinach and their relation to nitrate accumulation in these leafy vegetables, two harvest times (29 and 46 days after transplanting, two vegetable species of lettuce and spinach and two concentrations of nitrate (10 and 20 mM were used in a hydroponics greenhouse experiment with a completely randomized design and 3 replications. Modified Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solutions were used for the experiment. The results indicated that by increasing nitrate concentration of solution, nitrate accumulation in roots and shoots of lettuce and spinach increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05, and the same trend was observed for the nitrate reductase activity in the shoots of the two species. Increasing the nitrate concentrations of solution, reduced the shoot dry weight and the concentration of Fe and Cu in both species, where as it increased the K and Zn concentrations in the shoots of the two species in each both harvest times, the nitrate accumulation increased, but the nitrate reductase activity decreased in the shoots of the two species over the course of the growth. The Concentration of Fe, Cu and K decreased in the shoots of lettuce and the spinach with the time, despite the increase in Zn concentration in the shoots. The results also indicated that increasing nitrate concentrations of solution to the levels greater than the plant capacity for reduction and net uptake of nitrate, leads to the nitrate accumulation in the plants. Nitrate accumulation in plant tissue led to decreases in fresh shoot yield and Fe and Cu concentrations and nitrate reductase activities in both lettuce and spinach.

  6. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.

  7. The effectiveness of the biannual application of silver nitrate solution followed by sodium fluoride varnish in arresting early childhood caries in preschool children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Gao, Sherry Shiqian; Li, Samantha Ky; Wong, May Cm; Lo, Edward Cm

    2015-09-25

    The application of 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be effective in arresting early childhood caries (ECC). Since SDF is not available in certain countries, some dentists use adjunctive application of 25 % silver nitrate (AgNO3) and 5 % sodium fluoride (NaF) to arrest ECC. This randomised controlled trial will systematically compare the efficacy of a 25 % AgNO3 solution followed by 5 % NaF varnish with that of a 38 % SDF solution in arresting ECC when applied at half-yearly intervals over a 30-month period. This study is a randomised, double-blinded, non-inferiority clinical trial. The hypothesis tested is that adjunctive application of 25 % AgNO3 followed by 5 % NaF is at least not appreciably worse than a 38 % SDF in arresting ECC. Approximately 3100 kindergarten children aged 3-4 years will be screened and at least 1070 children with caries will be recruited. This sample size is sufficient for an appropriate statistical analysis (power at 90 % (β = 0.10) with a 2-sided type-I error of α = 0.05), allowing for an overall 20 % drop-out rate. The children will be randomly allocated into 2 groups to treat their caries over a 30-month period: Group A - biannual adjunctive application of a 25 % AgNO3 solution and a 5 % NaF varnish, and Group B - biannual adjunctive application of a 38 % SDF solution followed by a placebo varnish. Clinical examinations will be conducted at 6-month intervals. Primary outcome measured is the number of active caries surfaces which are arrested. Information on confounding factors such as oral hygiene habits will be collected through a parental questionnaire. We expect that adjunctive application of 25 % AgNO3 solution and 5 % NaF varnish and of 38 % SDF solution can both effectively arrest ECC. Lower concentrations of silver and fluoride are contained in 25 % AgNO3 and 5 % NaF, respectively, than in 38 % SDF; therefore, AgNO3/NaF are more favourable for use in young children. Because its use for caries management is

  8. Influence of nitrate solution concentration on the memory effect of Mg-Al hydrotalcite%硝酸盐溶液浓度对镁铝水滑石结构记忆效应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晓丹; 徐爱菊; 王奖; 贾美林; 照日格图

    2012-01-01

    Mg-Al hydrotalcite was prepared by coprecipitation method and characterized by XRD, N2-adsorption-desorption,TG-DTA and FT-IR. The results showed that the as-prepared Mg-Al hydrotalcite with 121 m2·g-1 specific surface area possessed hexagonal phase. The influence of nitrate solution concentration on the memory effect of Mg-Al hydrotalcite was investigated. It was found that Mg-Al mixed oxides formed after being calcined at 400℃ for 5 h was dipped in different concentration of Cu (NO3) 2 and Fe ( NO3) 3 aqueous solution. The hydrotalcite structure could be recovered and the memory effect of hydrotalcite was influenced by salt solution concentration. Furthermore, the lower concentration was more advantageous to the recovery of hydrotalcite structure. The results of FT-IR demonstrated that the insertion of NO3- in the layer of hydrotalcite could be observed,which might form a new type application function material.%用共沉淀法制备了镁铝水滑石,并进行XRD、N2吸附-脱附、TG-DTA和FT-IR等表征.结果表明,制备的镁铝水滑石呈六方晶型,比表面积为121 m2·g-1.研究了硝酸盐溶液浓度对水滑石结构记忆性的影响,发现400℃焙烧5h的镁铝水滑石在硝酸铜和硝酸铁溶液中浸泡可以恢复水滑石结构,溶液浓度越低越容易恢复,同时NO3-插入水滑石的层间可以形成一种新型应用功能材料.

  9. Quantidades de solução de nitrato de potássio e a germinação de sementes de Panicum maximum Jacq. Quantities of potassium nitrate solution and the germination of Panicum maximum Jacq. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.F. de Toledo

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se o presente trabalho com o objetivo de estudar a germinação de sementes de cultivares de Panicum maximum Jacq. (Colonião, Tobiatã, Centenário, Centauro e Tanzânia, em testes sobre substratos umedecidos com três quantidades de solução de nitrato de potássio a 0,2%, quais sejam: 12, 16 e 20 ml. Depois de semeados, os gerboxes foram fechados com fita crepe e levados para germinador. As contagens de germinação foram realizadas de 7 em 7 dias, sem se acrescentar água, e os gerboxes mantidos vedados. Os resultados permitiram concluir que houve diferença entre os testes, dependendo da quantidade de solução utilizada, tendo a germinação com 12ml superado a das demais.This work was carried out to study the germination of Panicum maximum Jacq. seeds, Colonião, Tobiatã, Centenário, Centauro and Tanzânia varieties, on substrata moistened with three different volumes of 0.2% potassium nitrate solution: 12, 16 and 20ml. After sowing, the gerbox covers were tied with tape and no water was added. Germination counts were done each 7 days. The germination test results pointed out that there were differences among them, depending on the amount of solution applied. The germination percentage with 12 ml of solution applied to the substrata was greater than for the others.

  10. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  11. Nitrate Leaching Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  12. APPLICATION OF INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY TO THE ANALYSIS OF INORGANIC NITRATES. PHASE 1. SPECTRA OF INORGANIC NITRATES IN ACETONE AND THE USE OF SUCH SPECTRA IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was made of the spectra of soluble inorganic nitrates in acetone solution and the use of such spectra in analytical chemistry . The spectra of...solubilities of anhydrous inorganic nitrates in acetone. The applications of the spectra of inorganic nitrates in acetone to analytical chemistry is

  13. Facilitation of the USHPRR Program MP-1 Shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, Eric C.

    2017-04-11

    This report describes the activities necessary to support the numerous transportation tasks involved with the successful completion of the mini-plate MP-1 and future MP experiments for the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor HEU to LEU conversion program. It includes information about the general activities necessary to implement equipment, operational processes, and safety basis changes required at the shipping facility and receipt facilities to support the shipments.

  14. Process development for the direct solvent extraction of nickel and cobalt from nitrate solution: aluminum, cobalt, and nickel separation using Cyanex 272

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichlas, Zela T.; Ibana, Don C.

    2017-01-01

    A direct solvent extraction (DSX) process for purifying nickel and cobalt from the nitric acid leach solution of nickel laterite ores was conceived and experimentally probed. The proposed process consists of two solvent extraction (SX) steps but with only one extractant — bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid (Cyanex® 272) — used in both steps. The first extraction step involved the removal of aluminum and zinc, whereas the second extraction step involved the separation of cobalt along with manganese from nickel. The experimental results showed essentially quantitative removal of aluminum (>97%) and zinc (>99%) in a single extraction stage using 20vol% Cyanex 272 at pH 2.1. Some cobalt (32%) and manganese (55%) were co-extracted but were easily scrubbed out completely from the loaded organic phase using dilute sulfuric acid at pH ≤ 1.38. Cobalt and manganese in the first extraction raffinate were extracted completely in four extraction stages at staggered pH values of 4.0, 4.4, 4.5, and 4.0 in the first, second, third, and fourth stages, respectively, using also 20vol% Cyanex 272. A small amount of nickel (up to 6.6%) was co-extracted but was easily scrubbed out completely with dilute sulfuric acid at pH 2.0. A flow diagram showing the input and output conditions and the metals separated under the deduced optimum conditions is presented.

  15. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  16. AIR SHIPMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM THE BUDAPEST RESEARCH REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewes, J.

    2014-02-24

    The shipment of spent nuclear fuel is usually done by a combination of rail, road or sea, as the high activity of the SNF needs heavy shielding. Air shipment has advantages, e.g. it is much faster than any other shipment and therefore minimizes the transit time as well as attention of the public. Up to now only very few and very special SNF shipments were done by air, as the available container (TUK6) had a very limited capacity. Recently Sosny developed a Type C overpack, the TUK-145/C, compliant with IAEA Standard TS-R-1 for the VPVR/M type Skoda container. The TUK-145/C was first used in Vietnam in July 2013 for a single cask. In October and November 2013 a total of six casks were successfully shipped from Hungary in three air shipments using the TUK-145/C. The present paper describes the details of these shipments and formulates the lessons learned.

  17. Bioactivation of organic nitrates and the mechanism of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenska, Emila; Beresewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin, are commonly used in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Long-term therapy with these drugs, however, results in the rapid development of nitrate tolerance, limiting their hemodynamic and anti-ischemic efficacy. In addition, nitrate tolerance is associated with the expression of potentially deleterious modifications such as increased oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic activation. In this review we discuss current concepts regarding the mechanisms of organic nitrate bioactivation, nitrate tolerance, and nitrate-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. We also examine how hydralazine may prevent nitrate tolerance and related endothelial dysfunction.

  18. VT Nitrate Leaching Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Nitrate Leaching Index data for the state of Vermont. This is a derivative product based on the SSURGO soils data for all counties except Essex...

  19. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...... in nitrogen leaching since the mid-80s. Nevertheless, further effort is needed, particularly in ecologically sensitive areas. This article discusses different regulatory approaches – and in particular the need for a differentiated nitrate regulation tailored to meet site-specific ecological demands – from...... of the mandatory specification standards of the Nitrates Directive combined with additional instruments to address the need for severe restrictions on fertiliser use or cultivation practices in the most ecologically vulnerable areas....

  20. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate....... A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings...

  1. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  2. Protein tyrosine nitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  3. A Convenient Method for Preparation of Pure Standards of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate for Atmospheric Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben; Hansen, A. M.; Lund Thomsen, E.

    1982-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is synthesized by nitration of peracetic acid (1.2 M), extracted by n- heptane, and purified with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified PAN solution is free of acetyl nitrate. The content of PAN is determined by means of hydrolysis of PAN int...

  4. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David L.; Cornell, John H.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative. PMID:16345917

  5. Biodegradation of glycidol and glycidyl nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D L; Cornell, J H; Kaplan, A M

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative.

  6. Wzrost pomidorów na pożywce azotanowej lub amonowej w obecności różnych form i zróżnicowanych ilości żelaza [The development of tomato plants growing on nutrient solutions containing either nitrates or ammonium salts, in presence of various forms and doses of iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stabrowsk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In all the experiments the tomato plants seemed to grow better both in aerated and nonaerated cultures in the solutions containing nitrates, than in those with ammonium salts. The best development of plants was observed in aerated cultures containing a full dose of ferric citrate. The positive effect of ferric versenate was manifested rather in the nonaerated cultures containing lower doses of this compound.

  7. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  8. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  9. Whole Quenching in Solution of Tri-nitrate in Water for Butt Welded High Speed Steel Tap%对焊高速钢丝锥的三硝水溶液整体淬火

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付桂琴; 夏俊生

    2009-01-01

    由HSP15超硬高速钢刃部和45钢柄部堆焊的手工丝锥可在硬度高达48~52 HRC的超高强度钢零件上攻螺纹.这种对焊丝锥的传统热处理工艺是刃部、柄部分别处理.后采用在三硝水溶液中整体淬火的工艺处理,从而简化了工艺过程,节省了能耗,消除了淬火油烟,而且丝锥的硬度和耐磨性比按传统工艺热处理的丝锥更好.改进后的热处理工艺已成功地应用于对焊丝锥的生产.%A kind of manual taps,butt welded by edge of HSP15 superhard high speed steel with handle of 45 steel, can tap in ultra-high strength steel parts with the hardness as high as 48~52 HRC. For such butt welded taps, their edges and handles were respectively heat treated in conventional practice. Afterwards, the taps were integrally quenched into a solution of tri-nitrate in water, in this way simplifying the heat treatment process, decreasing the energy consumption and eliminating the mist during oil-quenching, with the taps providing higher hardness and wea-rability compared with the conventional heat treatment process. The improved heat treatment process has now been successfully adopted in the production of butt welded taps.

  10. Soybean nitrate reductase activity influenced by manganese nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Damien P., Heenan; Lindsay C., Campbell; Department of Agronomy and Horticultural Science, University of Sydney

    1980-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation by soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill cvv. Lee and Bragg] was investigated in plants grown in solution culture at manganese concentrations of 0, 1.8 and 275 μM and at day-night temperatures of 33-28℃ and 22-17℃. Manganese deficiency occurred in plants of both cultivars grown at 0 μM Mn; under these conditions, leaf nitrate concentration increased in both cultivars and nitrate reductase activity in vivo but not in vitro was reduced. High solution Mn (275 μM) produced sympt...

  11. EFFECT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1957; Ball 1967) but the effects of these salts on marine animals is less well known. .... The first clear result of the experiments is that concentrations of ammonium ... study it is useful to know the tolerance of different stages in the life history.

  12. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen.

  13. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments - FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.C. (comp.)

    1983-12-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope.

  14. Stable Isotope Customer List and Summary of Shipments. FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, J. G. [comp.

    1985-11-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope.

  15. 75 FR 1235 - Revisions to the Requirements for: Transboundary Shipments of Hazardous Wastes Between OECD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Between OECD Member Countries, Export Shipments of Spent Lead- Acid Batteries, Submitting Exception... OECD Member Countries, Export Shipments of Spent Lead-Acid Batteries, Submitting Exception Reports for... belonging to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), establish notice and consent...

  16. 76 FR 24713 - Cooperative Inspection Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ..., and 381 Cooperative Inspection Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Product; Final Rule... Cooperative Inspection Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products AGENCY: Food Safety and... amending the Federal meat and poultry products inspection regulations to establish a new...

  17. 22 CFR 201.46 - Compensation to supplier if shipment is prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation to supplier if shipment is... Commodities and Commodity-Related Services § 201.46 Compensation to supplier if shipment is prohibited. (a) Payment to supplier. USAID shall make appropriate payment to a supplier for the value of...

  18. 76 FR 81360 - Cooperative Inspection Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products; Correction AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection... small State-inspected establishments will be eligible to ship meat and poultry products in interstate..., ``Cooperative Inspection Programs; Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products'' (76 FR 24714). The final...

  19. 78 FR 6209 - Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment Vessels, Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment Vessels, Columbia and...: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone around all inbound and outbound grain-shipment vessels involved in commerce with the Columbia Grain facility on the Willamette River in Portland, OR, the...

  20. 22 CFR 123.13 - Domestic aircraft shipments via a foreign country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic aircraft shipments via a foreign... REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.13 Domestic aircraft shipments via a foreign... United States to another location in the United States via a foreign country. The pilot of the...

  1. 41 CFR 50-204.26 - Exemptions for radioactive materials packaged for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... radioactive materials packaged for shipment. 50-204.26 Section 50-204.26 Public Contracts and Property... HEALTH STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Radiation Standards § 50-204.26 Exemptions for radioactive materials packaged for shipment. Radioactive materials packaged and labeled in accordance with...

  2. 77 FR 14445 - Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment of Radioactive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment of Radioactive Material AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Standard N14.5-1997, ``Radioactive Materials--Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment'' approved February... receiving radioactive material. II. Further Information Revision 1 of Regulatory Guide 7.4 was issued with...

  3. The selective use of emergency shipments for service-contract differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, E.M.; Heijden, van der M.C.; Zijm, W.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Suppliers of capital goods increasingly offer performance-based service contracts with customer-specific service levels. We use selective emergency shipments of spare parts to differentiate logistic performance: We apply emergency shipments in out-of-stock situations for combinations of parts and cu

  4. The selective use of emergency shipments for service-contract differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, Elisa; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Suppliers of capital goods increasingly offer performance-based service contracts with customer-specific service levels. We use selective emergency shipments of spare parts to differentiate logistic performance: We apply emergency shipments in out-of-stock situations for combinations of parts and

  5. 77 FR 18871 - Administrative Guide for Verifying Compliance With Packaging Requirements for Shipment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... COMMISSION Administrative Guide for Verifying Compliance With Packaging Requirements for Shipment and Receipt... Guide 7.7, ``Administrative Guide for Verifying Compliance with Packaging Requirements for Shipment and... administrative requirements for transporting licensed material under 10 CFR part 71, ``Packaging and...

  6. 76 FR 4001 - Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Mandatory Automated Export System Filing for All Shipments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... Commerce Census Bureau 15 CFR Part 30 Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Mandatory Automated Export System... Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Mandatory Automated Export System Filing for All Shipments Requiring... Automated Export System (AES) or through AESDirect for all shipments of used self-propelled...

  7. First shipment of magnets from CERN to SESAME

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, 19 October, CERN will bid a fond farewell to two containers of magnets. Their destination: SESAME, the synchrotron light source under construction in Jordan.   The SESAME magnets, ready for transport. The containers hold 31 sextupoles, produced in Cyprus and France, and 32 quadrupoles, produced in Spain and Turkey. The magnets will rejoin 8 dipoles (from the UK) that are already at SESAME. The quadrupoles and sextupoles were checked and measured at CERN before this shipment, while the dipoles went via the ALBA synchrotron, near Barcelona, where magnetic measurements were carried out. With this shipment, around 50% of the magnets for the SESAME storage ring will have been delivered. The containers are expected to arrive just in time for the upcoming SESAME Council meeting at the end of November. The rest of the magnets – as well as all the power supplies and related control modules – have been produced and will be delivered to SESAME at th...

  8. Composição e manejo da solução nutritiva visando a diminuição do teor de nitrato nas folhas de alface hidropônica Nutrient solution control in order to decrease nitrate content in leaves of hydroponic lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki W Takahashi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available As hortaliças folhosas têm elevada capacidade de acumular nitrato nas folhas e pecíolos, mas o consumo excessivo de nitrato pode ser prejudicial à saúde humana. Determinou-se a melhor combinação de doses e fontes de N e época de fornecimento na solução nutritiva para obter diminuição do teor de nitrato em folhas de alface, cv. Vera. Os tratamentos foram (T1 210 mg L-1 de N como nitrato (N-NO3- do transplante à colheita; (T2 189 mg L-1 (90% de N-NO3- associado com 21 mg L-1 (10% de N como amônio (N-NH4+; (T3 210 mg L-1 de N-NO3- até 24 dias após transplante e substituição por 189 mg L-1 de N-NO3- e 21 mg L-1 de N-NH4- até o final do ciclo; (T4 210 mg L-1 de N-NO3- até o 24º dia e redução para105 mg L-1 de N-NO3- no final do ciclo e (T5 210 mg L-1 de N-NO3- até o 24º dia do transplante e redução para 52,5 mg L-1 de N-NO3- no final do ciclo. Os melhores resultados foram obtidos com os tratamentos 2 e 3, obtendo teores de nitrato na parte aérea de 1.756 a 1.920 mg kg-1 na matéria fresca e produtividade equivalente ao tratamento 1. A redução de nitrato em solução nutritiva no final do ciclo não reduziu o teor de nitrato em folhas.The edible vegetables have a high capacity to accumulate nitrate in the leaves and stem. The excessive consumption of nitrate can be harmful to human health. The best combination of doses and sources of N and supply time were determined in the nutritious solution to reduce the nitrate concentration in cv. Vera leaves of lettuce. The treatments were (T1 210 mg L-1 of N as nitrate (N-NO3- from transplantation to harvest; (T2 189 mg L-1 (90% of N as nitrate (N-NO3- associated with 21 mg L-1 (10% of N as ammonium (N-NH4+; (T3 210 mg L-1 of nitrate until the 24th day and substitution for 189 mg L-1 of nitrate and 21 mg L-1 N-NH4+ until the end of the cycle; (T4 210 mg L-1 of N-NO3- until the 24th day of the transplant and reduction to 105 mg L-1 of N-NO3- until the end of the cycle; (T5 210 mg L

  9. 49 CFR 375.511 - May I use an alternative method for shipments weighing 3,000 pounds or less?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... weighing 3,000 pounds or less? 375.511 Section 375.511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... alternative method for shipments weighing 3,000 pounds or less? For shipments weighing 3,000 pounds or less (1,362 kilograms or less), you may weigh the shipment upon a platform or warehouse certified scale...

  10. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  11. Groundwater head controls nitrate export from an agricultural lowland catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian; Rode, Michael; Lischeid, Gunnar; Weise, Stephan M.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2016-10-01

    Solute concentration variability is of fundamental importance for the chemical and ecological state of streams. It is often closely related to discharge variability and can be characterized in terms of a solute export regime. Previous studies, especially in lowland catchments, report that nitrate is often exported with an accretion pattern of increasing concentrations with increasing discharge. Several modeling approaches exist to predict the export regime of solutes from the spatial relationship of discharge generating zones with solute availability in the catchment. For a small agriculturally managed lowland catchment in central Germany, we show that this relationship is controlled by the depth to groundwater table and its temporal dynamics. Principal component analysis of groundwater level time series from wells distributed throughout the catchment allowed derivation of a representative groundwater level time series that explained most of the discharge variability. Groundwater sampling revealed consistently decreasing nitrate concentrations with an increasing thickness of the unsaturated zone. The relationships of depth to groundwater table to discharge and to nitrate concentration were parameterized and integrated to successfully model catchment discharge and nitrate export on the basis of groundwater level variations alone. This study shows that intensive and uniform agricultural land use likely results in a clear and consistent concentration-depth relationship of nitrate, which can be utilized in simple approaches to predict stream nitrate export dynamics at the catchment scale.

  12. More answers to the still unresolved question of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas; Gori, Tommaso

    2013-09-01

    Organic nitrates are traditionally felt to be a safe adjuvant in the chronic therapy of patients with coronary artery disease. Despite their long use, progress in the understanding of the pharmacology and mechanism of action of these drugs has been achieved only in the last two decades, with the identification of the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of nitrate tolerance, with, the discovery of the ancillary effects of nitrates, and with the demonstration that nitrate therapy has important chronic side effects that might modify patients' prognosis. These advances are however mostly confined to the molecular level or to studies in healthy volunteers, and the true impact of organic nitrates on clinical outcome remains unknown. Complicating this issue, evidence supports the existence of important differences among the different drugs belonging to the group, and there are reasons to believe that the nitrates should not be treated as a homogeneous class. As well, the understanding of the effects of alternative nitric oxide (NO) donors is currently being developed, and future studies will need to test whether the properties of these new medications may compensate and prevent the abnormalities imposed by chronic nitrate therapy. Intermittent therapy with nitroglycerin and isosorbide mononitrate is now established in clinical practice, but they should neither be considered a definitive solution to the problem of nitrate tolerance. Both these strategies are not deprived of complications, and should currently be seen as a compromise rather than a way fully to exploit the benefits of NO donor therapy.

  13. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-10-16

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

  14. AIR SHIPMENT OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM ROMANIA AND LIBYA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Landers; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Stanley Moses

    2010-07-01

    In June 2009 Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. Special 20-foot ISO shipping containers and cask tiedown supports were designed to transport Russian TUK 19 shipping casks for the Romanian air shipment and the equipment was certified for all modes of transport, including road, rail, water, and air. In December 2009 Libya successfully used this same equipment for a second air shipment of HEU spent nuclear fuel. Both spent fuel shipments were transported by truck from the originating nuclear facilities to nearby commercial airports, were flown by commercial cargo aircraft to a commercial airport in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to their final destinations at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both air shipments were performed under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Romania air shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU spent fuel from the VVR S research reactor was the last of three HEU fresh and spent fuel shipments under RRRFR that resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. Libya had previously completed two RRRFR shipments of HEU fresh fuel so the 5.2 kg of HEU spent fuel air shipped from the IRT 1 research reactor in December made Libya the 4th RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. This paper describes the equipment, preparations, and license approvals required to safely and securely complete these two air shipments of spent nuclear fuel.

  15. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate; general provisions. 126.28 Section 126...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING OF DANGEROUS CARGO AT WATERFRONT FACILITIES § 126.28 Ammonium...

  16. Quantitative estimation of sampling uncertainties for mycotoxins in cereal shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, F S; Lyman, G J

    2012-01-01

    Many countries receive shipments of bulk cereals from primary producers. There is a volume of work that is on-going that seeks to arrive at appropriate standards for the quality of the shipments and the means to assess the shipments as they are out-loaded. Of concern are mycotoxin and heavy metal levels, pesticide and herbicide residue levels, and contamination by genetically modified organisms (GMOs). As the ability to quantify these contaminants improves through improved analytical techniques, the sampling methodologies applied to the shipments must also keep pace to ensure that the uncertainties attached to the sampling procedures do not overwhelm the analytical uncertainties. There is a need to understand and quantify sampling uncertainties under varying conditions of contamination. The analysis required is statistical and is challenging as the nature of the distribution of contaminants within a shipment is not well understood; very limited data exist. Limited work has been undertaken to quantify the variability of the contaminant concentrations in the flow of grain coming from a ship and the impact that this has on the variance of sampling. Relatively recent work by Paoletti et al. in 2006 [Paoletti C, Heissenberger A, Mazzara M, Larcher S, Grazioli E, Corbisier P, Hess N, Berben G, Lübeck PS, De Loose M, et al. 2006. Kernel lot distribution assessment (KeLDA): a study on the distribution of GMO in large soybean shipments. Eur Food Res Tech. 224:129-139] provides some insight into the variation in GMO concentrations in soybeans on cargo out-turn. Paoletti et al. analysed the data using correlogram analysis with the objective of quantifying the sampling uncertainty (variance) that attaches to the final cargo analysis, but this is only one possible means of quantifying sampling uncertainty. It is possible that in many cases the levels of contamination passing the sampler on out-loading are essentially random, negating the value of variographic quantitation of

  17. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  18. The system uranyl nitrate-dietyl ether-water. Extraction by water in spray and packed columns from uranyl nitrate-either solutions; El sistema nitrato de uranilo-eter dietilico-agua, extraccion de nitrato de uranilo con agua a partir de disoluciones etereas en columnas de pulverizacion y de relleno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Luina, A.; Gutierrez Jodra, L.

    1960-07-01

    This paper is a continuation of the one published in Chemical Engineering Progress. Symposium Series, 50, n. 12, 127 (1954). New runs for spray columns, are given and other concentrations in uranyl nitrate for the packed columns. New correlations for the overall H.T.U. are also given. The individual H.T.U. have been grapycally calculated and show that the film resistances have similar values, being independent of the concentration of the ether phase. (Author) 24 refs.

  19. Quantification of naphazoline nitrate by UV-spectrophoto-metry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Panasenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main tasks of pharmaceutical chemistry – medical drugs study. Spectrophotometry is widely used in studying of the structure and composition (complexes, dyes, analytical reagents, etc. of various compounds. It widely used for qualitative and quantitative determination of substances (determination of elements traces in metals, alloys, technical facilities. The dependence between substance structure and its electronic spectrum is being studied by many researchers till nowadays. The aim of this work was to highlight the issues of naphazoline quantify definition techniques by the UV-spectrophotometry. According to the existing methods of quality control (MQC, naphazoline nitrate is a substance quantitatively determined by acid-base titration among a mixture of anhydrous acetic acid and acetic anhydride. Titration is carried out with a solution of 0,1 M perchloric acid (indicator - crystal violet. To check the quality of nasal drops nafazoline nitrate MQC is recommended UV-spectrophotometry: drug is dissolved in boric acid solution (20 g/l as the reference solution used solution pharmacopoeia standard sample substance nafazoline nitrate. The character of UV-spectra of the nafazoline nitrate in solvents of different polarity (water, 95% ethanol, 0,1 M NaOH, 0,1 M HCl, 5M H2SO4, was defined and studied. Standard sample of nafazoline nitrate was obtained from the State Enterprise "Scientific and Expert Pharmacopoeia Centre Ukraine". In order to study UV-spectra nafazoline nitrate spectrophotometer SPECORD 200-222U214 (Germany was used. UV-spectrum of nafazoline nitrate in water and 95% ethanol are characterized by two maxima at 270 and 280 nm. Absorption band of nafazoline nitrate in 0, 1 M sodium hydroxide has two maxima at 271 and 280 nm, and in 0, 1 M solution of hydrochloric acid and 5 M solution of sulfuric acid maxima coincide with the maxima spectrum of the drug in water, 95% ethanol. In order to avoid errors associated with

  20. Performance of Orius insidiosus after storage, exposure to dispersal material, handling and shipment processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueno, V.H.P.; Carvalho, L.M.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Storage, handling and shipment procedures are important factors influencing the quality of biological control agents. This study aimed to evaluate biological parameters and performance of Orius insidiosus (Say) after different storage periods at low temperatures, after exposure to different

  1. Shipment Consolidation Policy under Uncertainty of Customer Order for Sustainable Supply Chain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghoon Kang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With increasing concern over the environment, shipment consolidation has become one of a main initiative to reduce CO2 emissions and transportation cost among the logistics service providers. Increased delivery time caused by shipment consolidation may lead to customer’s order cancellation. Thus, order cancellation should be considered as a factor in order uncertainty to determine the optimal shipment consolidation policy. We develop mathematical models for quantity-based and time-based policies and obtain optimality properties for the models. Efficient algorithms using optimal properties are provided to compute the optimal parameters for ordering and shipment decisions. To compare the performances of the quantity-based policy with the time-based policy, extensive numerical experiments are conducted, and the total cost is compared.

  2. Storage and shipment system for beer and beverage; Beer inryo hokan shukka system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-20

    This storage and shipment system for beer and beverage was delivered to Suita factory of Asahi Breweries, Ltd. for reducing the shipment lead time essential for the total fresh management activity promoted by the whole company. Main specifications: (1) Warehouse capacity: 26,880 pallets, (2) Stacker crane: 24 units (twin shuttle system), (3) Conveyer: 1 unit, (4) Truck loader: 3 units, (5) Handling capacity: 760 pallet/h for storage, 670 pallet/h for shipment. Features: (1) Storage system directly connected with a plant by immediate automatic storage after palletizing, (2) One-point loading by a package loading berth with an alignment function, (3) High-speed mass storage and shipment handling by distributing system, (4) High reliability by block distributing system. (translated by NEDO)

  3. Stability of urinary fractionated metanephrines and catecholamines during collection, shipment, and storage of samples.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, J.J.; Ross, H.A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurements of 24-h fractionated urinary metanephrines and catecholamines are used for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma, but adequate information is needed regarding collection, storage, and shipment conditions. METHODS: Spot urine samples were collected from 8 healthy volunteers. Aliq

  4. Two-stage removal of nitrate from groundwater using biological and chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyasamy, Pudukadu Munusamy; Shanthi, Kuppusamy; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, Perumalsamy; Lee, Soon-Jae; Choi, Nag-Choul; Kim, Dong-Ju

    2007-08-01

    In this study, we attempted to treat groundwater contaminated with nitrate using a two-stage removal system: one is biological treatment using the nitrate-degrading bacteria Pseudomonas sp. RS-7 and the other is chemical treatment using a coagulant. For the biological system, the effect of carbon sources on nitrate removal was first investigated using mineral salt medium (MSM) containing 500 mg l(-1) nitrate to select the most effective carbon source. Among three carbon sources, namely, glucose, starch and cellulose, starch at 1% was found to be the most effective. Thus, starch was used as a representative carbon source for the remaining part of the biological treatment where nitrate removal was carried out for MSM solution and groundwater samples containing 500 mg l(-1) and 460 mg l(-1) nitrate, respectively. About 86% and 89% of nitrate were removed from the MSM solution and groundwater samples, respectively at 72 h. Chemical coagulants such as alum, lime and poly aluminium chloride were tested for the removal of nitrate remaining in the samples. Among the coagulants, lime at 150 mg l(-1) exhibited the highest nitrate removal efficiency with complete disappearance for the MSM solutions. Thus, a combined system of biological and chemical treatments was found to be more effective for the complete removal of nitrate from groundwater.

  5. Use of sodium chloride and zeolite during shipment of Ancistrus triradiatus under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson F. Ramírez-Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sodium chloride (0.5 g/L and 1 g/L and zeolite (22.7 g/L during shipment (48 h of Ancistrus triradiatus at high temperatures (between 24.5 and 34ºC were evaluated. Several water quality parameters (dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, and total ammonia were measured before and after shipment. Glycemia was measured before shipment and at 24 and 48 h after shipment. After shipment, a resistance test was carried out in a high concentration of sodium chloride, and mortality was recorded after shipment, and 7 days post-shipment. While the two evaluated substances increased survival of A. triradiatus challenged by high temperatures during shipment, the best result was obtained with 1 g/L of sodium chloride.O uso de cloreto de sódio (0,5 g/L e 1 g/L e zeolita (22,7 g/L foram avaliados durante o transporte (48 h de Ancistrus triradiatus em altas temperaturas (entre 24,5 e 34ºC. Os seguintes parâmetros foram monitorados: pH, oxigênio dissolvido, condutividade e amônia antes e depois do transporte. Também foi mensurada a concentração de glicose no sangue antes do transporte e 0, 24 e 48 h após o transporte. Foi realizado um teste de resistência a altas concentrações de cloreto de sódio após o transporte, sendo registrada a mortalidade no final do transporte e após 7 dias. As duas substâncias testadas aumentam a sobrevivência de A. triradiatus a altas temperaturas durante o transporte, porém o melhor resultado foi obtido com o uso de 1 g/L cloreto de sódio.

  6. Effects of Amino Acids Replacing Nitrate on Growth, Nitrate Accumulation, and Macroelement Concentrations in Pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to determine the influence of replacing 20% of nitrate-N in nutrient solutions with 20 individual amino acids on growth, nitrate accumulation, and concentrations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in pak-choi (Brassica chinensis L.) shoots. When 20% of nitrate-N was replaced with arginine (Arg)compared to the full nitrate treatment, pak-choi shoot fresh and dry weights increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05), but when 20% of nitrate-N was replaced with alanine (Ala), valine (Val), leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), proline (Pro), phenylalanine (Phe), methionine (Met), aspartic acid (Asp), glutamic acid (Glu), lysine (Lys), glycine (Gly), serine (Ser), threonine(Thr), cysteine (Cys), and tyrosine (Tyr), shoot fresh and dry weights decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05). After replacing 20% of nitrate-N with asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln), shoot fresh and dry weights were unaffected. Compared to the full nitrate treatment, amino acid replacement treatments, except for Cys, Gly, histidine (His), and Arg, significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) nitrate concentrations in plant shoots. Except for Cys, Leu, Pro, and Met, total N concentrations in plant tissues of the other amino acid treatments significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05). Amino acids also affected total P and K concentrations, but the effects differed depending on individual amino acids. To improve pak-choi shoot quality, Gln and Asn, due to their insignificant effects on pak-choi growth, their significant reduction in nitrate concentrations, and their increase in macroelement content in plants, may be used to partially replace nitrate-N.

  7. The Nitrate App: Enhancing nutrient best management practice adoption and targeting via instantaneous, on-farm nitrate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemeijer, J.; De Geus, D.; Ekkelenkamp, R.

    2016-12-01

    Sociological surveys suggest that farmers understand that agriculture contributes to nutrient pollution but the same surveys also indicate that in the absence of on-farm nitrate data, farmers assume someone else is causing the problem. This tendency to overestimate our own abilities is common to all of us and often described as "Lake Wobegon Syndrome" after the mythical town where "where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." We developed the Nitrate App for smartphones to enable farmers and citizens to collect and share nitrate concentration measurements. The app accurately reads and interprets nitrate test strips, directly displays the measured concentration, and gives the option to share the result. The shared results are immediately visualised in the online Delta Data Viewer. Within this viewer, user group specific combinations of background maps, monitoring data, and study area characteristics can be configured. Through the Nitrate App's mapping function project managers can more accurately target conservation practices to areas with the highest nitrate concentrations and loads. Furthermore, we expect that the actual on-farm data helps to overcome the "Lake Wobegon Effect" and will encourage farmers to talk to specialists about the right nutrient best management practices (BMP's) for their farm. After implementing these BMP's, the farmers can keep monitoring to evaluate the reduction in nitrate losses. In this presentation, we explain the Nitrate App technology and present the results of the first field applications in The Netherlands. We expect this free to download app to have wide transferability across watershed projects worldwide focusing on nitrate contamination of groundwater or surface water. Its simple design requires no special equipment outside of the nitrate test strips, a reference card, and a smartphone. The technology is also transferable to other relevant solutes for which test strips

  8. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  9. Assimilation of nitrate by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverio, José M

    2002-08-01

    Nitrate assimilation has received much attention in filamentous fungi and plants but not so much in yeasts. Recently the availability of classical genetic and molecular biology tools for the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has allowed the advance of the study of this metabolic pathway in yeasts. The genes YNT1, YNR1 and YNI1, encoding respectively nitrate transport, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, have been cloned, as well as two other genes encoding transcriptional regulatory factors. All these genes lie closely together in a cluster. Transcriptional regulation is the main regulatory mechanism that controls the levels of the enzymes involved in nitrate metabolism although other mechanisms may also be operative. The process involved in the sensing and signalling of the presence of nitrate in the medium is not well understood. In this article the current state of the studies of nitrate assimilation in yeasts as well as possible venues for future research are reviewed.

  10. Circuit Design for Sensor Detection Signal Conditioner Nitrate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robeth Manurung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is one of macro nutrients very important for agriculture. The availability of nitrate in soil is limited because it is very easy to leaching by rain, therefore nitrate could be contaminated ground water by  over-process of fertilizer. This process could also produce inefficiency in agriculture if it happened continuesly without pre-analysis of farm field. The answer those problems, it is need to develop the ion sensor system to measure concentrations of nitrat in soil. The system is consist of nitrate ion sensor device, signal conditioning and data acquisition circuit. The design and fabrications of signal conditioning circuit which integrated into ion nitrate sensor system and will apply for agriculture. This sensor has been used amperometric with three electrodes configuration: working, reference  and auxiliarry; the ion senstive membrane has use conductive polymer. The screen printing technique has been choosen to fabricate electrodes and deposition technique for ion sensitive membrane is electropolymerization. The characterization of sensor has been conducted using nitrate standard solution with range of concentration between 1 µM–1 mM. The characterization has shown that sensor has a good response with cureent output between 2.8–4.71 µA, liniearity factor is 99.65% and time response 250 second.

  11. Survey of radioactive material shipments in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, J.L.; Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, B.M.; Medford, A.E.

    1976-04-01

    The survey period was from March 1, 1974, through February 28, 1975. Of over 15,000 NRC and Agreement States licensees, and ERDA prime contractors, 2275 received questionnaire packets. Approximately 59 percent of those recipients responded to the survey; of these respondents, 35 percent reported shipping activities. Based on the number of packages shipped annually, the major nuclides were /sup 131/I, /sup 125/I, /sup 99m/Tc, /sup 99/Mo, and /sup 238/U, while those shipped in the greatest amounts (grams or curies) were /sup 60/Co, /sup 192/Ir, and /sup 238/U. The majority of package types shipped were Types A and LS (low specific activity), while the most common modes of transport were rail and truck. The shipping activities of approximately 14,600 minor shippers were estimated to be on the order of 200,000 radioactive packages/year. The combined annual shipping activities of 761 major shippers, SNM licensees, and ERDA contractors who responded were estimated to be approximately 300,000 packages of SNM and Source Material plus 800,000 packages containing nuclides other than SNM or Source Material. There were also about 800,000 packages (mostly exempt) shipped by 21 apparent major shippers who responded to a part of the survey intended for minor shippers. Also, classified data containing information regarding nonweapons shipments indicated 850 packages. The possibility of using the survey data for projection use was briefly investigated.

  12. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  13. Keeping Nitrate in the Roots: An Unexpected Requirement for Cadmium Tolerance in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alain Gojon; Frédéric Gaymard

    2010-01-01

    @@ The nitrate ion (NO-3) is a major nitrogen source for higher plants. Following uptake from the soil solution into the plant, nitrate can be either stored in the vacuoles or assimilated to supply the nitrogen atom for amino acid biosynthesis. In many herbaceous species, nitrate assimilation occurs redominantly in the leaves (Andrews, 1986), where a large part of the reducing power needed for this process directLy originates from the photosystems.

  14. Effect of Nitrite/Nitrate concentrations on Corrosivity of Washed Precipitate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-03-28

    Cyclic polarization scans were performed using A-537 carbon steel in simulated washed precipitate solutions of various nitrite and nitrate concentrations. The results of this study indicate that nitrate is an aggressive anion in washed precipitate. Furthermore, a quantitative linear log-log relationship between the minimum effective nitrite concentration and the nitrate concentration was established for washed precipitate with other ions at their average compositions.

  15. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  16. Filtration Device for On-Site Collection, Storage and Shipment of Cells from Urine and Its Application to DNA-Based Detection of Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Elin; Dahmcke, Christina M; Steven, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    degradation of cellular content, and low sensitivity due to a high background of normal cells. We present a filtration device, designed for home or point-of-care use, which enables collection, storage and shipment of urinary cells. A special feature of this device is a removable cartridge housing a membrane...... filter, which after filtration of urine can be transferred to a storage unit containing an appropriate preserving solution. In spiking experiments, the use of this device provided efficient recovery of bladder cancer cells with elimination of >99% of excess smaller-sized cells. The performance...

  17. 4th Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Louis [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-12-02

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. There was one shipment of two drums sent for offsite treatment and disposal. This report summarizes the 4th quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014.

  18. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  19. Characterization of nitrate ions adsorption and diffusion in P(DMAEMA/HEMA) hydrogels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Tian

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the adsorption and diffusion behavior of nitrate ions into polycationic P(DMAEMA/HEMA) hydrogels is analyzed. Experimental results indicated that nitrate ions can be removed efficiently from aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherm of gels was well according to the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich models. At the same time, the diffusion behavior of nitrate ions from P(DMAEMA/HEMA) hydrogels was investigated. The diffusion coefficients are strongly influenced by the changes of temperature and pH value of solutions. At the same time, D does not depend on the gels cross-linking ratio and initial solute concentration.

  20. Nitration of Polystyrene-Part II Effect of Nitrating Medium on Nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bajaj

    1968-04-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene has been nitrated in mixtures of anhydrous nitric and sulphuric acid (70 : 30 and 80 : 20 by volume. Degree of substitution of nitro group per benzene ring varies from 1 to 2 depending on the time, temperature and composition of the nitrating media. Effect of polar and non polar solvents on nitration has been studied by nitrating the polymer in (i fuming nitric acid and (iimixture of nitric and sulphuric acid in presence of dimethyl formamide (DMF and carbon tetrachloride (CCI/Sub4. MF increase the rate of nitration in fuming nitric acid whereas the rate of nitration is lowered in the presence of DMF in the nitrating mixtures. In the case of CCI/Sub4, however, the effect is just the opposite to that observed in DMF. The results have been explained from the mechanism of the formation of 'nitroniumion,NO/Sub2+ in various nitrating media. Degradation of the polymer has been found to be comparatively less in the presence of the organic solvents used in the study.

  1. Conformer of the peroxynitrite ion formed under photolysis of crystalline alkali nitrates – cis or trans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, V. Kh; Anan’ev, V. A.; Dyagileva, E. P.; Lyrshchikov, S. Yu; Miklin, M. B.; Rezvova, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    The optical and infrared reflectance spectra of the crystalline powders prepared by co-crystallization of caesium nitrate, nitrite, and peroxynitrite from alkali solution have been studied. We find that the trans conformer forms under photolysis of crystalline pure caesium nitrate. Under its dissolution the trans conformer transforms to the cis conformer.

  2. Global modeling of nitrate and ammonium aerosols using EQSAM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, particles suspending in air, are important as they affect human health, air quality, and visibility as well as climate. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium are among the most important inorganic aerosol species in the atmosphere. These compounds are hygroscopic and absorb water under almost all ambient environmental conditions. The uptake of water alters the aerosol size, and causes water to become the constituent with the largest atmospheric aerosol mass, especially when the aerosols grow into fog, haze or clouds. Furthermore, several global model studies have demonstrated that rapid increases in nitrogen emissions could produce enough nitrate in aerosols to offset the expected decline in sulfate forcing by 2100 for the extreme IPCC A2 scenario (Bauer et al., 2007). Although nitrate and ammonium were identified as significant anthropogenic sources of aerosols by a number of modeling studies, most global aerosol models still exclude ammonium-nitrate when the direct aerosol forcing is studied. In this study, the computationally efficient equilibrium model, EQSAM3, is incorporated into the UMICH-IMPACT-nitrate model using the hybrid dynamical solution method (Feng and Penner, 2007). The partitioning of nitrate and ammonium along with the corresponding water uptake is evaluated by comparing the model to the EQUISOLVE II method used in Feng and Penner (2007). The model is also evaluated by comparison with the AERONET data base and satellite-based aerosol optical depths.

  3. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2009-02-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada Operations Office (now known as the Nevada Site Office) issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the “Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada” (DOE/EIS 0243). The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at Area 5 and Area 3. No shipments were disposed of at Area 3 in fiscal year (FY) 2008. This document satisfies requirements regarding low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to or from the NTS during FY 2008. No transuranic (TRU) waste shipments were made from or to the NTS during FY 2008.

  4. Distribution and Diversity of Salmonella Strains in Shipments of Hatchling Poultry, United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habing, G G; Kessler, S E; Mollenkopf, D F; Wittum, T E; Anderson, T C; Barton Behravesh, C; Joseph, L A; Erdman, M M

    2015-08-01

    Multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with live poultry contact have been occurring with increasing frequency. In 2013, multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis were traced back to exposure to live poultry, some of which were purchased at a national chain of farm stores (Farm store chain Y). This study was conducted at 36 stores of Farm store chain Y and was concurrent with the timing of exposure for the human outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. We used environmental swabs of arriving shipment boxes of hatchling poultry and shipment tracking information to examine the distribution, diversity and anti-microbial resistance of non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) across farm stores and hatcheries. Isolates recovered from shipment boxes underwent serotyping, anti-microbial resistance (AMR) testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Postal service tracking codes from the shipment boxes were used to determine the hatchery of origin. The PFGE patterns were compared with the PFGE patterns of NTS causing outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. A total of 219 hatchling boxes from 36 stores in 13 states were swabbed between 15 March 2013 and 18 April 2013. NTS were recovered from 59 (27%) of 219 hatchling boxes. Recovery was not significantly associated with species of hatchlings, number of birds in the shipment box, or the presence of dead, injured or sick birds. Four of the 23 PFGE patterns and 23 of 50 isolates were indistinguishable from strains causing human outbreaks in 2013. For serotypes associated with human illnesses, PFGE patterns most frequently recovered from shipment boxes were also more frequent causes of human illness. Boxes positive for the same PFGE pattern most frequently originated from the same mail-order hatchery. Only one of 59 isolates was resistant to anti-microbials used to treat Salmonella infections in people. This study provides critical information to address recurrent human outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with mail-order hatchling

  5. 49 CFR 173.475 - Quality control requirements prior to each shipment of Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality control requirements prior to each... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.475 Quality control requirements prior to each shipment of Class 7 (radioactive...

  6. 49 CFR 375.407 - Under what circumstances must I relinquish possession of a collect-on-delivery shipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... possession of the shipment at the time of delivery. If there are either charges for any additional services... delivery. You must accept the form of payment agreed to at the time of estimate, unless the shipper agrees... possession of a collect-on-delivery shipment transported under a non-binding estimate? 375.407 Section 375...

  7. 49 CFR 375.709 - If a shipment is totally lost or destroyed, what charges may I collect at delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS IN INTERSTATE COMMERCE; CONSUMER PROTECTION REGULATIONS Delivery of Shipments § 375.709 If a shipment is totally lost or destroyed, what... shipper's rights are in addition to, and not in lieu of, any other rights the individual shipper may have...

  8. 49 CFR 375.707 - If a shipment is partially lost or destroyed, what charges may I collect at delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS TRANSPORTATION OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS IN INTERSTATE COMMERCE; CONSUMER PROTECTION REGULATIONS Delivery of Shipments § 375.707 If a shipment is partially lost or destroyed, what... the individual shipper. (d) The individual shipper's rights are in addition to, and not in lieu of...

  9. 9 CFR 73.6 - Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed to scabies. 73.6 Section 73.6... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.6 Placarding means of conveyance and marking billing of shipments of treated scabby cattle or cattle exposed...

  10. 31 CFR 358.9 - Who is responsible for the cost and risks associated with the shipment of securities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 358.9 Who is responsible for the cost and risks associated with the shipment of securities? The... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is responsible for the cost and risks associated with the shipment of securities? 358.9 Section 358.9 Money and Finance: Treasury...

  11. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source.

    Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater.

    Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the variability in soil texture and volumetric water content (VWC at field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high VWC at FC and VWC near 100 % FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol l−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11 % to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  12. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  13. Preparation of nitrate-selective porous magnetic resin and assessment of its performance in removing nitrate from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhu, Lifei; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Nitrate-selective, porous magnetic anion-exchange resin (NS-PMAER) with enhanced affinity and higher selectivity for nitrate was synthesized, characterized and its performance in nitrate removal was investigated. The results show that NS-PMAER consists of spherical particles with an average size of 200 μm. It has mean pore diameter, total pore volume, and BET specific surface area of 21.38 nm, 0.3605 cm(3)/g, and 67.455 m(2)/g, respectively. The specific saturation magnetization of NS-PMAER was about 10.79 emu/g. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that NS-PMAER has selectivity for nitrate higher than that of MIEX® resin; its coefficients of selectivity toward nitrate for nitrate and sulfate are 20.978 and 6.769, respectively, higher than those of MIEX® resin (1.256 and 4.342, respectively). Its working exchange capacity was 72.41 mg/mL. Column-exchange experiments' results suggest that it could be easily regenerated using 1.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution for a contact time of 30 min. Its recovery rate stayed at > 95% even after five rounds of recycling. Results of the pilot test indicate that NS-PMAER could effectively remove nitrate in groundwater, and ensure that nitrate concentrations of effluent to meet the guideline limit for drinking water by the World Health Organization.

  14. Comparison of plasma generated nitrogen fertilizer to conventional fertilizers ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate for pre-emergent and seedling growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andhavarapu, A.; King, W.; Lindsay, A.; Byrns, B.; Knappe, D.; Fonteno, W.; Shannon, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma source generated nitrogen fertilizer is compared to conventional nitrogen fertilizers in water for plant growth. Root, shoot sizes, and weights are used to examine differences between plant treatment groups. With a simple coaxial structure creating a large-volume atmospheric glow discharge, a 162 MHz generator drives the air plasma. The VHF plasma source emits a steady state glow; the high drive frequency is believed to inhibit the glow-to-arc transition for non-thermal discharge generation. To create the plasma activated water (PAW) solutions used for plant treatment, the discharge is held over distilled water until a 100 ppm nitrate aqueous concentration is achieved. The discharge is used to incorporate nitrogen species into aqueous solution, which is used to fertilize radishes, marigolds, and tomatoes. In a four week experiment, these plants are watered with four different solutions: tap water, dissolved ammonium nitrate DI water, dissolved sodium nitrate DI water, and PAW. Ammonium nitrate solution has the same amount of total nitrogen as PAW; sodium nitrate solution has the same amount of nitrate as PAW. T-tests are used to determine statistical significance in plant group growth differences. PAW fertilization chemical mechanisms are presented.

  15. The Single-Vendor-Single-Buyer Integrated Production-Shipment Model with Stock Dependent Demand Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the integrated production-shipment models for the single-vendor-single-buyer system presented hitherto, thedemand rate of items is treated as a constant. However, many researchers have observed that the presence of morequantities of the same product tends to attract more customers. This suggests that the demand rate should depend on thestock level. This paper presents a single-vendor-single-buyer production-shipment model with the stock dependentdemand rate, based on the demand rate linearly depending upon the stock level at any instant of time.

  16. Determination of production-shipment policy using a two-phase algebraic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Hsin Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The optimal production-shipment policy for end products using mathematicalmodeling and a two-phase algebraic approach is investigated. A manufacturing systemwith a random defective rate, a rework process, and multiple deliveries is studied with thepurpose of deriving the optimal replenishment lot size and shipment policy that minimisestotal production-delivery costs. The conventional method uses differential calculus on thesystem cost function to determine the economic lot size and optimal number of shipmentsfor such an integrated vendor-buyer system, whereas the proposed two-phase algebraicapproach is a straightforward method that enables practitioners who may not havesufficient knowledge of calculus to manage real-world systems more effectively.

  17. Monitoring of nitrate content of vegetable crops in Uzhgorod district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Mykaylo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to conduct a monitoring study of nitrate content in plant products of Uzhgorod district and to accomplish comparative analysis of the survey results in different periods of crop ripening. Selection of vegetable samples was carried out in Uzhgorod district in the early spring and summer periods. Determination of the nitrate content was performed using an ion-selective method at the Chemical and Toxicological Department of the Regional State Veterinary Medicine Laboratory in the Transcarpathian region of Ukraine. Vegetables were tested for nitrate content using the ion-selective method with the laboratory ion meter AI-123. Core investigation samples were crushed and homogenized. A 10.0 g weight of the investigated product, which was prepared according to MIR № 5048-89, was placed in a flat-bottomed or a conical flask, which was then filled with 50 cm3 potassium alumens solution and shaken in a shaking-machine for 5 minutes and then transferred into a measuring glass. The nitrate weight fraction in milligrams per kilogram was obtained together with the weight concentration value of nitrate ions in solution. For our study we selected vegetables grown in both public and private gardens of Uzhgorod district, namely: common onions, radishes, garden parsley, cucumbers, tomatoes, bell peppers, white cabbages, carrots and table beets. 25 samples were selected for each type of vegetable. Nitrate content was determined in the early spring growing period (from February 9 to May 27, 2011 and in the summer growing period (from June 3 to September 28, 2011, because in these particular periods we recorded the most frequent cases of food poisoning from nitrates among the population of the region. A clear trend has been traced towards increasing the nitrate content in food plant production, at levels which exceed the maximum permissible concentration (MPC. The results of our research demonstrate that the nitrate content exceeded the

  18. Variability of nitrate and phosphate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Sundar, D.

    Nitrate and phosphate are important elements of the biogeochemical system of an estuary. Observations carried out during the dry season April-May 2002, and March 2003 and wet season September 2002, show temporal and spatial variability of these two...

  19. Nitrate Reductase: Properties and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate Reductase (NR) is a rating-limit and key enzyme of nitrate assimilation in plants ,so ,NR activity is important for growth,development and the dry matter accumulation of plants. The regulation of NR activity appears to be rather complex and many studies have been devoted to the description of regulation and properties,but in this paper we focus on the properties and regulation of NR in higher plants.

  20. Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6110--17-9709 Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate January 25, 2017 Approved for public...TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate G...isobutane reagent ion from analysis of ammonia desorbed from packed tungsten oxide sampling tube .................. 18 E-1 Executive Summary The

  1. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  2. ANODIC BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 22 IN HIGH NITRATE BRINES AT TEMPERATURES HIGHER THAN 100C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. LLEVBARE; J.C. ESTILL; A. YILMAZ; R.A. ETIEN; G.A. HUST M.L. STUART

    2006-04-20

    Alloy 22 (N06022) may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Nitrate acts as an inhibitor to crevice corrosion. Several papers have been published regarding the effect of nitrate on the corrosion resistance of Alloy 22 at temperatures 100 C and lower. However, very little is known about the behavior of this alloy in highly concentrated brines at temperatures above 100 C. In the current work, electrochemical tests have been carried out to explore the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in high chloride high nitrate electrolytes at temperatures as high as 160 C at ambient atmospheres. Even though Alloy 22 may adopt corrosion potentials in the order of +0.5 V (in the saturated silver chloride scale), it does not suffer crevice corrosion if there is high nitrate in the solution. That is, the inhibitive effect of nitrate on crevice corrosion is active for temperatures higher than 100 C.

  3. 49 CFR 375.805 - If I am forced to relinquish a collect-on-delivery shipment before the payment of ALL charges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... shipment before the payment of ALL charges, how do I collect the balance? 375.805 Section 375.805... forced to relinquish a collect-on-delivery shipment before the payment of ALL charges, how do I collect the balance? On “collect-on-delivery” shipments, you must present your freight bill for all...

  4. Synthesis and Characterisation of Penta-Bismuth Hepta-Oxide Nitrate, Bi5O7NO3, as a New Adsorbent for Methyl Orange Removal from an Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshraq Ahmed Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the synthesis of penta-bismuth hepta-oxide nitrate, Bi5O7NO3, via the chemical precipitation method. After calcination, the precipitate was characterised by several methods, which included X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, BET surface area and pH drift method to determine the pH of point of zero charge (pHpzc. The study results revealed that Bi5O7NO3 had an orthorhombic crystal structure, a surface area of 1.6 m2 g-1 and a point of zero charge at pH 9.7. The chemical state of Bi5O7NO3 indicated the presence of three oxidation states of bismuth centre. Furthermore, the decolourization ability of Bi5O7NO3 to remove the azo dye was also evaluated. Although it had lower surface area, the removal efficiency was extremely good. This finding suggests that Bi5O7NO3 could be used as a promising adsorbent for azo dye removal. The XPS spectra showed that the accumulation of dye onto Bi5O7NO3 could be due to the anion exchange process, suggesting the birth of a new anion exchanger for azo dye removal.

  5. Nitrate transport and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Orsel, Mathilde; Smith, Susan J; Wells, Darren M

    2007-01-01

    Physiological measurements of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake by roots have defined two systems of high and low affinity uptake. In Arabidopsis, genes encoding both of these two uptake systems have been identified. Most is known about the high affinity transport system (HATS) and its regulation and yet measurements of soil NO(3)(-) show that it is more often available in the low affinity range above 1 mM concentration. Several different regulatory mechanisms have been identified for AtNRT2.1, one of the membrane transporters encoding HATS; these include feedback regulation of expression, a second component protein requirement for membrane targeting and phosphorylation, possibly leading to degradation of the protein. These various changes in the protein may be important for a second function in sensing NO(3)(-) availability at the surface of the root. Another transporter protein, AtNRT1.1 also has a role in NO(3)(-) sensing that, like AtNRT2.1, is independent of their transport function. From the range of concentrations present in the soil it is proposed that the NO(3)(-)-inducible part of HATS functions chiefly as a sensor for root NO(3)(-) availability. Two other key NO(3)(-) transport steps for efficient nitrogen use by crops, efflux across membranes and vacuolar storage and remobilization, are discussed. Genes encoding vacuolar transporters have been isolated and these are important for manipulating storage pools in crops, but the efflux system is yet to be identified. Consideration is given to how well our molecular and physiological knowledge can be integrated as well to some key questions and opportunities for the future.

  6. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables.

  7. Effect of surface property of activated carbon on adsorption of nitrate ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Tatsuya; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the removal of acidic functional groups and introduction of basic groups/sites on activated carbons (ACs) by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment were respectively carried out to enhance the nitrate ion adsorption in aqueous solution. Then, the relationships between nitrate ion adsorption and solution pH as well as surface charge of AC were investigated to understand the basic mechanisms of nitrate ion adsorption by AC. The result showed that the nitrate ion adsorption depended on the equilibrium solution pH (pHe) and the adsorption amount was promoted with decreasing pHe. The ACs treated by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment showed larger amount of nitrate ion adsorption than that by untreated AC. These results indicated that, since basic groups/sites could adsorb protons in the solution, the AC surface would be charged positively, and that the nitrate ion would be electrically interacted with positively charged carbon surface. Accordingly, it was concluded that basic groups/sites on the surface of AC could promote nitrate ion adsorption.

  8. Efeito da disponibilidade de nitrato em solução nutritiva sobre a absorção de nitrogênio e atividade enzimática de duas cultivares de arroz Effect of nitrate availability in nutrient solution on nitrogen uptake and enzimatic activity of two rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Marques dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Duas cultivares de arroz, Piauí (tradicional e IAC-47 (melhorada, foram colocadas em solução nutritiva contendo 20 mg de N-NO3- L-1 até 32 dias após a germinação (DAG. Depois disso, um grupo de plantas passou a receber 200 mg de N-NO3- L-1, enquanto o outro continuou recebendo 20 mg de N-NO3- L-1 até os 42 DAG. De 42 até os 56 DAG, todas as plantas receberam 5 mg de N-NO3- L-1 até o fim do ciclo. Esses tratamentos foram empregados visando simular o fluxo sazonal de nitrato existente nos solos de regiões tropicais. As plantas foram coletadas aos 133 DAG e separadas em folha bandeira, folha 2, colmos e raízes. Foram determinados os teores de N na forma de aminoácidos, nitrato e amônio, açúcares solúveis, atividades da nitrato redutase (NR e glutamina sintetase (GS. O fluxo sazonal de nitrato influenciou significativamente a absorção e o uso de N. As variedades estudadas foram responsivas de maneira diferenciada em relação ao acúmulo e à translocação de N, quando submetidas ao fluxo sazonal de nitrato. A cultivar Piauí parece acumular mais NO3- em seus tecidos na fase inicial do seu ciclo, podendo permitir sua posterior translocação. A folha bandeira e folha 2 parecem atuar como local preferencial de acúmulo de N, sendo este acúmulo mais intenso na cultivar Piauí.Two rice cultivars, Piaui (a landrace and IAC-47 (an improved variety, were grown in nutrient solution containing 20 mg nitrate (N-NO3- L-1 up to 32 days after germination (DAG. After this, a group of plants received 200 mg N-NO3- L-1, while the other was kept at 20 mg N-NO3- L-1 up to 42 DAG. From 42 until 56 DAG, all plants received 5 mg N-NO3- L-1 until the end of the cycle. These treatments were applied with the objective to simulate nitrate flush in tropical regions. Plants were collected at 133 DAG and separated in to leaf flag, leaf 2, stem and roots. N contents in amino acids, nitrate and ammonium forms, soluble sugars, nitrate reductase (NR and

  9. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel and nuclear waste. 71.97 Section 71.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a) As specified in paragraphs (b), (c... advance notification of transportation of nuclear waste was published in the Federal Register on June...

  10. 19 CFR 122.79 - Shipments to U.S. possessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shipments to U.S. possessions. 122.79 Section 122.79 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard...

  11. 15 CFR 743.2 - High performance computers: Post shipment verification reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High performance computers: Post... ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL REPORTING § 743.2 High performance computers: Post shipment verification... certain computers to destinations in Computer Tier 3, see § 740.7(d) for a list of these destinations...

  12. 21 CFR 1271.265 - Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distribution of an HCT/P. 1271.265 Section 1271.265 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Practice § 1271.265 Receipt, predistribution shipment, and distribution of an HCT/P. (a) Receipt. You must evaluate each incoming HCT/P for the presence and significance of microorganisms and inspect for damage...

  13. 49 CFR 173.301b - Additional general requirements for shipment of UN pressure receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Group I performance level. (d) Non-refillable UN pressure receptacles. Non-refillable UN pressure... pressure receptacles. 173.301b Section 173.301b Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation....301b Additional general requirements for shipment of UN pressure receptacles. (a) General....

  14. 7 CFR 932.60 - Reports of acquisitions, sales, uses, shipments and creditable brand advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... creditable brand advertising. 932.60 Section 932.60 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... Reports of acquisitions, sales, uses, shipments and creditable brand advertising. (a) Each handler shall... shall file such reports of creditable brand advertising as recommended by the committee and approved...

  15. 27 CFR 44.210 - Return of shipment to factory or export warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... factory or export warehouse. 44.210 Section 44.210 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Proprietors Miscellaneous Provisions § 44.210 Return of shipment to factory or export warehouse. A manufacturer or export warehouse proprietor may return to his factory or export warehouse, without...

  16. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. 73.5 Section 73.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted. Cattle of any herd in any quarantined area, which herd is...

  17. 16 CFR 1610.39 - Shipments under section 11(c) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Rules and Regulations § 1610.39 Shipments under... in commerce of articles of wearing apparel or textile fabrics for the purpose of finishing or... a statement disclosing such purpose. (b) An article of wearing apparel or textile fabric shall...

  18. EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3 ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT. SC Jeffay1, R Morris Buus1, LF Strader1, AF Olshan2, DP Evenson3, SD Perreault1. 1US EPA/ORD, RTP, NC;2UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC;3SDSU, Brookings, SD.Semen collection kits that allow ...

  19. 77 FR 74587 - Safety Zone; Grain-Shipment Vessels, Columbia and Willamette Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide... categorically excluded from further review under paragraph 34(g) of Figure 2-1 of the Commandant Instruction. An... a maximum 200-yard radius of grain-shipment vessels when anchored, at any berth, moored, or in...

  20. Routing of radioactive shipments in networks with time-varying costs and curfews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowler, L.A.; Mahmassani, H.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-09-01

    This research examines routing of radioactive shipments in highway networks with time-dependent travel times and population densities. A time-dependent least-cost path (TDLCP) algorithm that uses a label-correcting approach is adapted to include curfews and waiting at nodes. A method is developed to estimate time-dependent population densities, which are required to estimate risk associated with the use of a particular highway link at a particular time. The TDLCP algorithm is implemented for example networks and used to examine policy questions related to radioactive shipments. It is observed that when only Interstate highway facilities are used to transport these materials, a shipment must go through many cities and has difficulty avoiding all of them during their rush hour periods. Decreases in risk, increased departure time flexibility, and modest increases in travel times are observed when primary and/or secondary roads are included in the network. Based on the results of the example implementation, the suitability of the TDLCP algorithm for strategic nuclear material and general radioactive material shipments is demonstrated.

  1. 7 CFR 318.47-4 - Shipments by the Department of Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipments by the Department of Agriculture. 318.47-4 Section 318.47-4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATE OF HAWAII AND TERRITORIES QUARANTINE NOTICES...

  2. 78 FR 31821 - Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ...: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: NUREG; issuance. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Revision 2 of NUREG-0561, ``Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor... individuals granted unescorted access to SNF during transportation. DATES: Revision 2 of NUREG-0561...

  3. 78 FR 67927 - Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR): Mandatory Automated Export System Filing for All Shipments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... Export System Filing for All Shipments Requiring Shipper's Export Declaration Information: Substantive... the Automated Export System (AES) under control number 0607-0152. DATES: The effective date of the... instrument used for collecting export trade data, which is used by the Census Bureau for statistical...

  4. 15 CFR 30.35 - Procedure for shipments exempt from filing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for shipments exempt from filing requirements. 30.35 Section 30.35 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Exemptions From...

  5. 15 CFR 30.39 - Special exemptions for shipments to the U.S. Armed Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special exemptions for shipments to the U.S. Armed Services. 30.39 Section 30.39 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE...

  6. 15 CFR 30.36 - Exemption for shipments destined to Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemption for shipments destined to Canada. 30.36 Section 30.36 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Exemptions From the...

  7. 75 FR 31288 - Plant-Verified Drop Shipment (PVDS)-Nonpostal Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... 111 Plant-Verified Drop Shipment (PVDS)--Nonpostal Documentation AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION...; and to require segregation of documentation presented at the time of induction. DATES: Effective Date... other documentation presented at the time of mailing. This measure ensures that postal personnel will...

  8. Processing Discrepancy Reports Against Foreign Military Sales Shipments (Supplementation is Permitted at all Levels)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    invoice should be attached to SF 364. Item 6 Transportation Document. The type of transportation document, Government Bill of Lading ( GBL ), Commercial...identifying number assigned to such document. This is a mandatory entry when shipment received was made via traceable means, e.g., GBL or CBL. The following

  9. 10 CFR 40.66 - Requirements for advance notice of export shipments of natural uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for advance notice of export shipments of natural uranium. 40.66 Section 40.66 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE... natural uranium. (a) Each licensee authorized to export natural uranium, other than in the form of ore...

  10. 49 CFR 173.302a - Additional requirements for shipment of nonliquefied (permanent) compressed gases in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., 3AX, 3AA, 3AAX, and 3T cylinder may be filled with a compressed gas, other than a liquefied, dissolved... nonliquefied (permanent) compressed gases in specification cylinders. 173.302a Section 173.302a Transportation... PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.302a Additional requirements for shipment of nonliquefied...

  11. 9 CFR 351.16 - Certificate required for shipments of technical animal fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... technical animal fat. 351.16 Section 351.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF TECHNICAL ANIMAL FATS FOR EXPORT Transportation and Exportation of Certified Technical Animal Fat § 351.16 Certificate required for shipments...

  12. 19 CFR 18.24 - Retention of goods on dock; splitting of shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention of goods on dock; splitting of shipments... Transit Through the United States to Foreign Countries § 18.24 Retention of goods on dock; splitting of... dock, the port director, in his discretion, may allow in-transit merchandise, including merchandise...

  13. DROUGHT-INDUCED EFFECTS AND RECOVERY OF NITRATE ASSIMILATION AND NODULE ACTIVITY IN COWPEA PLANTS INOCULATED WITH BRADYRHIZOBIUM SPP. UNDER MODERATE NITRATE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silveira Joaquim Albenísio Gomes da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to establish comparative effects of drought and recovery on the nitrate assimilation and nodule activity related to N2 fixation in cowpea plants [Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp.] previously inoculated with Bradyrhizobium spp. BR-3256 (CB-756 strain in the presence of 5 mol m-3 NO-3. Twenty-eight-day-old nodulated plants were submitted to water deprivation during 4 consecutive days and afterwards resupplied with nutrient solution during 2 days. The water deprivation caused a rapid increase in the nitrate content in root and a marked reduction in leaf nitrate reductase (NR activity. In contrast nodule NR activity was slightly increased by water deprivation. Concomitantly, in nodules of water stressed plants, leghemoglobin and glutamine synthetase (GS activity declined and a progressive reduction in ureide-N concentration in xylem sap was observed. Leaf-NR activity increased rapidly after rehydration while leaf nitrate content declined. In contrast both GS activity and soluble protein content in the nodule continued to decline in rewatered plants. In addition the concentration of leghemoglobin recovered well, while the xylem ureide-N content experienced a slight increase after rehydration. Despite the nitrate assimilation in leaves and the nodule activity had been both severely affected by water stress, the rapid recovery of nitrate reductase activity suggests that the nitrate assimilation process is less sensitive to drought/rehydration cycle when cowpea plants are nodulated in presence of moderate nitrate level.

  14. Nitrate removal from groundwater driven by electricity generation and heterotrophic denitrification in a bioelectrochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yiran; He, Zhen

    2013-11-15

    This research aims to develop a new approach for in situ nitrate removal from groundwater by using a bioelectrochemical system (BES). The BES employs bioelectricity generated from organic compounds to drive nitrate moving from groundwater into the anode and reduces nitrate to nitrogen gas by heterotrophic denitrification. This laboratory study of a bench-scale BES demonstrated effective nitrate removal from both synthetic and actual groundwater. It was found that applying an electrical potential improved the nitrate removal and the highest nitrate removal rate of 208.2 ± 13.3g NO3(-)-Nm(-3) d(-1) was achieved at 0.8 V. Although the open circuit condition (no electricity generation) still resulted in a nitrate removal rate of 158.5 ± 4.2 gm(-3) d(-1) due to ion exchange, electricity production could inhibit ion exchange and prevent introducing other undesired ions into groundwater. The nitrate removal rate exhibited a linear relationship with the initial nitrate concentration in groundwater. The BES produced a higher current density of 33.4 Am(-3) and a higher total coulomb of 244.7 ± 9.1C from the actual groundwater than the synthetic groundwater, likely because other ions in the actual groundwater promoted ion movement to assist electricity generation. Further development of this BES will need to address several key challenges in anode feeding solution, ion competition, and long-term stability.

  15. 1st Quarter Transportation Report FY 2015: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Louis [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-02-20

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 1st quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report include minor volumes of non-radioactive classified waste/material that were approved for disposal (non-radioactive classified or nonradioactive classified hazardous). Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to rounding conventions for volumetric conversions from cubic meters to cubic feet.

  16. 3rd Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Louis [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-09-20

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 3rd quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014 in Tables 4 and 5. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report do not include minor volumes of non-radioactive materials that were approved for disposal. Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to differing rounding conventions.

  17. NITRATE TOXICITY IN GROUNDWATER: ITS CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, PREVENTIVE MEASURES AND MITIGATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raaz K. Maheshwari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater pollution has become a drastic problem principally because of nature and wide spread use of modern chemicals viz. pesticides and fertilizers. Excessive application of fertilizers as well as organic wastes and sewage has been implicated in the nitrogen pollution of groundwater. Therefore, the issue of rising nitrate concentration in groundwater has become a subject of extensive research in India and Rajasthan in particular. In natural water, nitrate ((NO3- N is usually 100ppm and in organic matters (amine and /or amides resulting in the production of nitrosamines (carcinogens. Number of cases (human and livestock, suffering from gastric cancer have been observed. Reverse osmosis (RO process has great potential in the mitigation of nitrate ion containing waters. Generally, the presence of particular substances may affect the removal of specific ions. The presence of di-hydrogen phosphate ions (DHP-ions in the feed solution enhances the nitrate removal efficiency of the polyamide RO membrane. In this present research work, a Flmtec TW30, polyamide thin-film composite, RO membrane was used for nitrate removal through RO set up. The rejection of individual nitrate was found to be around 76%. After addition of KH2¬PO4 to the feed containing nitrate ions the rejection was improved up to 84. This high level of increment in rejection of nitrate ion indicates the possible usage of KH2¬PO4 in RO for nitrate removal. This fact of removal is due to the K+ ions binding to the electronic lone-pairs of polyamide membrane holding di-hydrogen phosphate ions. This establishes a negative layer on the surface of the membrane. The diffusion of nitrate through the membrane is diminished by the formed layer. Present manuscript delineates clinical manifestations of nitrate toxicity and mitigation of nitrate ion by means of state-of-the-art reverse osmosis technology.

  18. The effect of nitrate on ethylene biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Hun, E-mail: lee323@alumni.purdue.edu [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University St., West Lafayette, 47907-2093 IN (United States); Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J. [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University St., West Lafayette, 47907-2093 IN (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethylene biofiltration strongly depends on nitrate concentrations and media types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine reduced N supply can increase ethylene removals in biofilters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perlite medium is better for ethylene biofiltration than activated carbon medium. - Abstract: This study investigated the effects of filter media types and nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations in nutrient solutions on C{sub 2}H{sub 4} biofiltration. A new nutrient solution with zero NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration was supplied to two perlite-bed biotrickling filters, two perlite-bed biofilters, and two GAC (Granular Activated Carbon)-bed biofilters, while the other with 2 g L{sup -1} of NO{sub 3}{sup -} was used for the other two GAC biofilters. All reactors underwent a total test duration of over 175 days with an EBRT (Empty Bed Residence Time) of 30 s, inlet gas flow rate of 7 L min{sup -1}, and inlet C{sub 2}H{sub 4} concentrations of 20-30 mg m{sup -3}. NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and media type significantly affected the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies in all types of biofiltration. The perlite media with no NO{sub 3}{sup -} achieved C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies 10-50% higher than the others. A NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration as high as 2 g L{sup -1} in the original nutrient solution may act as an inhibitor that suppresses the growth or activity of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} degraders. In addition, the perlite media resulted in higher C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies than GAC media, because the hydrophilic surface of the perlite leads to a higher moisture content and thus to favorable microbial growth.

  19. Mechanisms of nitrate capture in biochar: Are they related to biochar properties, post-treatment and soil environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimo, Giulia; Haller, Andreas; Spokas, Kurt; Novak, Jeff; Ippolito, Jim; Löhnertz, Otmar; Kammann, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Biochar use in soils is assumed to increase soil fertility and the efficiency of nutrient use, particularly nitrogen. It was demonstrated recently that biochar is able to capture considerable amounts of the mobile anion nitrate which was observed in co-composted as well as field aged biochar1,2. Moreover the nitrate was not sufficiently extractable with standard methods from biochar particles; extractions had to be repeated to effectively remove the nitrate1. Subsequently the co-composted nitrate-enriched biochar stimulated plant growth due to N supply to the plants2. However, in a field study in sandy soil in Germany, a different biochar also captured nitrate, increasing the topsoil nitrate concentration and likely reducing nitrate leaching to subsoils1. This was particularly seen after a dry year in the re-picked and analysed particles. However, in the field experiment this aged, nitrate-enriched biochar did not improve crop yields3. To better understand the way biochar interacts with nitrate we undertook several laboratory experiments with 13 well characterized biochars produced from cypress, pine and grapewood at 350, 500, 700 and 900 °C including one Kon-Tiki produced grapewood biochar (600-700°C). Our results showed that (1) pure, pristine (not post-treated) biochar captured more nitrate when they were air-moist and not totally dry; that (2) letting biochar particles dry in nitrate solution forces more nitrate into biochar particles than incubating them in the solution, but (3) that shaking during drying nevertheless caused a higher nitrate uptake into biochar particles; that(4) the counter ion K+ in nitrate solution was more effective than Na+ for N-loading of biochar; (5)that drying a soil-biochar mix in nitrate solution produced a higher nitrate loading of the mixture (i.e. the biochar) than drying both components separately in the same solution; (6)that a higher biochar production temperature caused higher nitrate capture up to 700-900°C. Furthermore

  20. 3rd Quarter Transportation Report FY2015: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Louis B. [National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 3rd quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments.

  1. Thermal decomposition of supported lithium nitrate catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Maria Lucia [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Lick, Ileana Daniela [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, Marta Isabel [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Castellon, Enrique Rodriguez; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ponzi, Esther Natalia, E-mail: eponzi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-20

    New catalysts for soot combustion were prepared by impregnation of different supports (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) with a LiNO{sub 3} solution and then characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, TGA and UV-vis spectroscopy, whereby the presence of lithium nitrate in the prepared catalysts was identified and quantified. The soot combustion rate using this series of catalysts (LiNO{sub 3}/support) was compared with the activity of a series of impregnated catalysts prepared using LiOH (Li{sub 2}O/supports). Catalysts prepared using LiNO{sub 3} are found to be more active than those prepared using LiOH. The catalytic performance was also studied with a NO/O{sub 2} mixture in the feed, demonstrating that NO increases the combustion rate of soot, probably as a consequence of lithium oxide forming an 'in situ' nitrate ion.

  2. Identifying Efficient Nitrate Reduction Strategies in the Upper Danube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Udias

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen losses in the form of Nitrate (N-NO3 from point and diffuse sources of pollution are recognized to be the leading cause of water body impairment throughout Europe. Implementation of conservation programs is perceived as being crucial for restoring and protecting the good ecological status of freshwater bodies. The success of conservation programs depends on the efficient identification of management solutions with respect to the envisaged environmental and economic objectives. This is a complex task, especially considering that costs and effectiveness of conservation strategies depend on their locations. We applied a multi-objective, spatially explicit analysis tool, the R-SWAT-DM framework, to search for efficient, spatially-targeted solution of Nitrate abatement in the Upper Danube Basin. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model served as the nonpoint source pollution estimator for current conditions as well as for scenarios with modified agricultural practices and waste water treatment upgrading. A spatially explicit optimization analysis that considered point and diffuse sources of Nitrate was performed to search for strategies that could achieve largest pollution abatement at minimum cost. The set of optimal spatial conservation strategies identified in the Basin indicated that it could be possible to reduce Nitrate loads by more than 50% while simultaneously provide a higher income.

  3. Short-term effects of a high nitrate diet on nitrate metabolism in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Ward, Natalie C; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-03-12

    Dietary nitrate, through the enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, can improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness. How long systemic nitrate and nitrite remain elevated following cessation of high nitrate intake is unknown. In 19 healthy men and women, the time for salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite to return to baseline after 7 days increased nitrate intake from green leafy vegetables was determined. Salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite was measured at baseline [D0], end of high nitrate diet [D7], day 9 [+2D], day 14 [+7D] and day 21 [+14D]. Urinary nitrite and nitrate was assessed at D7 and +14D. Increased dietary nitrate for 7 days resulted in a more than fourfold increase in saliva and plasma nitrate and nitrite (p nitrate had returned to baseline while saliva nitrate and nitrite were more than 1.5 times higher than at baseline levels. By [+7D] all metabolites had returned to baseline levels. The pattern of response was similar between men and women. Urinary nitrate and nitrate was sevenfold higher at D7 compared to +14D. These results suggest that daily ingestion of nitrate may be required to maintain the physiological changes associated with high nitrate intake.

  4. Efficiency of nitrate uptake in spinach : impact of external nitrate concentration and relative growth rate on nitrate influx and efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Steege, MW; Stulen, [No Value; Wiersema, PK; Posthumus, F; Vaalburg, W

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of nitrate influx and efflux in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Subito), was studied in short-term label experiments with N-13- and N-15-nitrate. Nitrate fluxes were examined in relation to the N demand for growth, defined as relative growth rate (RGR) times plant N concentration. Plan

  5. Metal nitrate conversion method, patent application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A method for converting a supported metal nitrate into the corresponding supported metal comprises heating the metal nitrate to effect its decomposition under a gas mixture that contains nitric oxide and has an oxygen content of

  6. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... to best notify agents (AN Agents) when ammonium nitrate purchasers (AN Purchasers) submit those AN... directly to ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the...

  7. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

  8. Hydrogels made from chitosan and silver nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozicki, Marek; Kołodziejczyk, Marek; Szynkowska, Małgorzata; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Leśniewska, Ewa; Matusiak, Aleksandra; Adamus, Agnieszka; Karolczak, Aleksandra

    2016-04-20

    This work describes a gelation of chitosan solution with silver nitrate. Above the critical concentration of chitosan (c*), continuous hydrogels of chitosan-silver can be formed. At lower concentrations, the formation of nano- and micro-hydrogels is discussed. The sol-gel analysis was performed to characterise the hydrogels' swelling properties. Moreover, the following were employed: (i) mechanical testing of hydrogels, (ii) inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for the measurement of silver concentration, (iii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the morphology of products obtained, and (iv) dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectrophotometry to examine products formed at low concentration of chitosan (chydrogels were used for modification of cotton fabric in order to give it antimicrobial properties. The products obtained acted against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis apart from the chitosan used that showed no such activity.

  9. Nitrate Removal from Ground Water: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Archna *; Surinder K. Sharma; Ranbir Chander Sobti

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of ground water resources has increased in Asia, Europe, United States, and various other parts of the world. This trend has raised concern as nitrates cause methemoglobinemia and cancer. Several treatment processes can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that biological denitrification is more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis and ion ex...

  10. Improvement of resource efficiency by efficient waste shipment inspections; Steigerung der Ressourceneffizienz durch effiziente Kontrollen von Abfallverbringungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, Stephanie [Institut fuer Oekologie und Politik GmbH (OEKOPOL), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Illegal shipment of waste as well as enforcement related to waste shipment have been regularly the centre of attention of public and professional debates and are also a topic of cross-national relations. In addition, the fear persists that by illegal waste shipments waste is treated in plants neither adapted to protect the environment and health nor having sufficient recuperation capabilities for precious raw materials. This project therefore intends to clarify the status quo of waste shipment inspections in the 16 federal states of Germany (Bundeslaender, in the following cited as states or federal states) to identify potential for development regarding the organisation and execution of inspections and to elaborate recommendations to optimise enforcement activities and further development of European and German legislative regulations. In order to optimise the enforcement of the European Waste Shipment Regulation (WSR) and the German Waste Shipment Act (AbfVerbrG), an adequate number of qualified personnel is necessary within all bodies involved into waste shipment inspections. Those bodies are namely the competent waste authorities, customs, police, the Federal Office for Transport of Goods (BAG), the Federal Railway Authority (EBA) and the prosecution offices. An adequate number of qualified personnel is not provided for in all states/authorities. This is also reflected in the number of transport and plant inspections which deviate between zero to a fixed number per year as well as being continuously performed and based occasion-/cause oriented inspections. Tangible means like access to IT-systems and the Internet should be provided for on-site inspections. Besides qualified and experienced personnel also IT-Systems have a relevant impact on the preselection of the entity to be inspected as well as for on-the-spot investigations. Therefore IT-System can increase the efficiency of inspections (inspections per time unit resp. exposure of illegal shipments per time

  11. Improvement of resource efficiency by efficient waste shipment inspections; Steigerung der Ressourceneffizienz durch effiziente Kontrollen von Abfallverbringungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, Stephanie [Institut fuer Oekologie und Politik GmbH (OEKOPOL), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Illegal shipment of waste as well as enforcement related to waste shipment have been regularly the centre of attention of public and professional debates and are also a topic of cross-national relations. In addition, the fear persists that by illegal waste shipments waste is treated in plants neither adapted to protect the environment and health nor having sufficient recuperation capabilities for precious raw materials. This project therefore intends to clarify the status quo of waste shipment inspections in the 16 federal states of Germany (Bundeslaender, in the following cited as states or federal states) to identify potential for development regarding the organisation and execution of inspections and to elaborate recommendations to optimise enforcement activities and further development of European and German legislative regulations. In order to optimise the enforcement of the European Waste Shipment Regulation (WSR) and the German Waste Shipment Act (AbfVerbrG), an adequate number of qualified personnel is necessary within all bodies involved into waste shipment inspections. Those bodies are namely the competent waste authorities, customs, police, the Federal Office for Transport of Goods (BAG), the Federal Railway Authority (EBA) and the prosecution offices. An adequate number of qualified personnel is not provided for in all states/authorities. This is also reflected in the number of transport and plant inspections which deviate between zero to a fixed number per year as well as being continuously performed and based occasion-/cause oriented inspections. Tangible means like access to IT-systems and the Internet should be provided for on-site inspections. Besides qualified and experienced personnel also IT-Systems have a relevant impact on the preselection of the entity to be inspected as well as for on-the-spot investigations. Therefore IT-System can increase the efficiency of inspections (inspections per time unit resp. exposure of illegal shipments per time

  12. Removal of nitrate by modified pine sawdust: effects of temperature and co-existing anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keränen, Anni; Leiviskä, Tiina; Hormi, Osmo; Tanskanen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    The effect of temperature, sulphate and phosphate, and the initial nitrate concentration on nitrate removal was studied with synthetic solutions. Chemically modified pine sawdust (Pinus sylvestris) anion exchange resin (MPSD) was used in the sorption studies. The resin was synthesized by reacting pine sawdust with epichlorohydrin, ethylenediamine and triethylamine in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide. Nitrate removal was successful at 5-70 °C. Higher temperatures caused nitrate removal to decrease moderately, but sorption capacities of 22.2-32.8 mg/g for NO3-N were achieved. The removal of nitrate in the presence of sulphate or phosphate was studied at concentrations of 30 mg N/l, 10-500 mg S/l and 1-50 mg P/l. A significant decrease in nitrate reduction was observed at sulphate and phosphate concentrations of 100 mg S/l and 50 mg P/l, respectively. The effect of initial nitrate concentration was studied in column. Nitrate sorption was clearly dependent on the initial concentration. Desorption of nitrate in column was completed using about 80 bed volumes of 0.1 M NaCl solution. The sorption data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson adsorption models. The Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir models gave the best fit, which suggests monolayer sorption. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of nitrate was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The results imply that modified pine sawdust could be a feasible alternative in the treatment of real industrial wastewaters.

  13. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  14. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  15. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  16. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  17. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from...

  18. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  19. Request for One-Time Shipment of 32 Watt PU-328 Source in 9968 Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, W.M.

    1998-11-25

    The 9968 package is designed for surface shipment of fissile and other radioactive materials where a high degree of double containment is required. The use of the 9968 radioactive material package for a one time shipment of a 32 watt heat source versus the SARP approved maximum 30 watt heat source is addressed in this report. The analyses show that the small increase in heat load from 30 watts to 32 watts does not substantially increase internal temperatures or pressures that would approach limits for the package. Also, the weight of the content is within the current 9968 package limits. It is concluded that the 32-watt heat source can be safely shipped in the 9968 package and therefore a waiver to ship the source is justified.

  20. APPLICATION OF IMPREGNATED ALMOND SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON BY ZINC AND ZINC SULFATE FOR NITRATE REMOVAL FROM WATER

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rezaee, H. Godini, S. Dehestani, A. Khavanin

    2008-01-01

    In this study impregnated almond shell activated carbon by Zn° and ZnSO4 were used as adsorbent with a particle size of 10-20 mesh. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of impregnated activated carbon in nitrate removal. The modified activated carbon had 1mm effective size, with a uniformity coefficient of 1.18. Potassium nitrate solution was used in batch adsorption experiments for nitrate removal from water. The effects of nitrate concentration, activated carbon dosag...

  1. A new method to produce nanoscale iron for nitrate removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.-S., E-mail: f10919@ntut.edu.tw; Hsu, H.-D.; Li, C.-W. [Institute of Environmental Planning and Management, National Taipei University of Technology (China)

    2004-12-15

    This article proposes a novel technology combining electrochemical and ultrasonic methods to produce nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI). With platinum placed in the cathode and the presence of the dispersion agent, 0.2g/l cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cation surfactant, in the solution, the nanoscale iron particle was successfully produced with diameter of 1-20 nm and specific surface area of 25.4m{sup 2}/g. The produced NZVI was tested in batch experiments for nitrate removal. The results showed that the nitrate reduction was affected by pH. Al low pH, nitrate was shown faster decline and more reduction in term of g NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N/g NZVI. The reaction was first order and kinetic coefficients for the four pHs were directly related to pH with R {sup 2} >0.95. Comparing with microscale zero-valent iron (45{mu}m, 0.183m{sup 2}/g), microscale zero-valent iron converted nitrate to ammonia completely, but NZVI converted nitrate to ammonia partially from 36.2 to 45.3% dependent on pH. For mass balance of iron species, since the dissolved iron in the solution was very low (<1mg/l), Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) was used for identification of oxidation state of the surface species on the NZVI and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was recognized. Thus the reaction mechanisms can be determined.

  2. A rationale for maintaining the double containment requirement for plutonium shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Channell, James K. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (US); Anastas, George [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (US)

    2003-12-31

    Current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) transportation regulations (10 CFR 71.63 (b)) require that all shipments containing more than 20 curies of plutonium must be transported in packages that provide double containment. On April 30, 2002 the NRC issued a proposed rule that would eliminate §71.63(b) and the double containment requirement. NRC’s reasons for proposing elimination of §71.63(b) are: (1) compatibility with International Atomic Energy Agency Transportation Safety Standards (which do not have the requirement); (2) the current rule is inconsistent with the A1/A2 system since it applies only to plutonium; (3) double containment causes a heavier package and results in higher transportation costs; (4) the separate inner containment results in additional radiation exposure; and (5) while there would be additional protection from a separate inner container in an accident; this type of approach is not “risk informed nor performance based.” The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has been a proponent of the double containment requirement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) shipments for twenty years. This requirement affects shipments to WIPP much more than any other current or planned shipping campaign because reactor fuel elements, metal or metal alloy, and vitrified high-level waste are exempt from §71.63(b). EEG submitted comments on the Proposed Rule on July 26, 2002 (Appendix C). This report is an update and expansion of the July 26, 2002 comments. Actual WIPP experience with shipments in the double contained TRUPACT-II package is used to respond to NRC arguments for deletion of §71.63(b) and offers a rationale for maintaining the current requirement.

  3. Combining Diffusion and Grey Models Based on Evolutionary Optimization Algorithms to Forecast Motherboard Shipments

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Kwun Wang; Yu-Yao Hsiao; Ku-Kuang Chang

    2012-01-01

    It is important for executives to predict the future trends. Otherwise, their companies cannot make profitable decisions and investments. The Bass diffusion model can describe the empirical adoption curve for new products and technological innovations. The Grey model provides short-term forecasts using four data points. This study develops a combined model based on the rolling Grey model (RGM) and the Bass diffusion model to forecast motherboard shipments. In addition, we investigate evolutio...

  4. Combining Diffusion and Grey Models Based on Evolutionary Optimization Algorithms to Forecast Motherboard Shipments

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Kwun Wang; Yu-Yao Hsiao; Ku-Kuang Chang

    2012-01-01

    It is important for executives to predict the future trends. Otherwise, their companies cannot make profitable decisions and investments. The Bass diffusion model can describe the empirical adoption curve for new products and technological innovations. The Grey model provides short-term forecasts using four data points. This study develops a combined model based on the rolling Grey model (RGM) and the Bass diffusion model to forecast motherboard shipments. In addition, we investigate evolutio...

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters requested this report to verify that Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) properly categorized hazardous waste shipped offsite from 1984 to 1991. LLNL categorized the waste shipments by the new guidelines provided on the definition of radioactive waste. For this validation, waste that has had no radioactivity added by DOE operations is nonradioactive. Waste to which DOE operations has added or concentrated any radioactivity is radioactive. This report documents findings from the review of available LLNL hazardous waste shipment information and summarizes the data validation strategy. The report discusses administrative and radiological control procedures in place at LLNL during the data validation period. It also describes sampling and analysis and surface survey procedures used in determining radionuclide concentrations for offsite release of hazardous waste shipments. The evaluation team reviewed individual items on offsite hazardous waste shipments and classified them, using the DOE-HQ waste category definitions. LLNL relied primarily on generator knowledge to classify wastes. Very little radioanalytical information exists on hazardous wastes shipped from LLNL. Slightly greater than one-half of those hazardous waste items for which the documentation included radioanalytical data showed concentrations of radioactivity higher than the LLNL release criteria used from 1989 to 1991. Based on this small amount of available radioanalytical data, very little (less than one percent) of the hazardous waste generated at the LLNL main site can be shown to contain DOE added radioactivity. LLNL based the criteria on the limit of analytical sensitivity for gross alpha and gross beta measurements and the background levels of tritium. Findings in this report are based on information and documentation on the waste handling procedures in place before the start of the hazardous waste shipping moratorium in May 1991.

  6. Properties of aqueous nitrate and nitrite from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Saykally, Richard J., E-mail: saykally@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Shih, Orion [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Rizzuto, Anthony M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Prendergast, David [The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Nitrate and nitrite ions are of considerable interest, both for their widespread use in commercial and research contexts and because of their central role in the global nitrogen cycle. The chemistry of atmospheric aerosols, wherein nitrate is abundant, has been found to depend on the interfacial behavior of ionic species. The interfacial behavior of ions is determined largely by their hydration properties; consequently, the study of the hydration and interfacial behavior of nitrate and nitrite comprises a significant field of study. In this work, we describe the study of aqueous solutions of sodium nitrate and nitrite via X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted in light of first-principles density functional theory electronic structure calculations. Experimental and calculated spectra of the nitrogen K-edge XA spectra of bulk solutions exhibit a large 3.7 eV shift between the XA spectra of nitrate and nitrite resulting from greater stabilization of the nitrogen 1s energy level in nitrate. A similar shift is not observed in the oxygen K-edge XA spectra of NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}. The hydration properties of nitrate and nitrite are found to be similar, with both anions exhibiting a similar propensity towards ion pairing.

  7. Surfactant-assisted synthesis of conducting polymers. Application to the removal of nitrates from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, M Jesús; Sancho-Querol, Sara; Pastor-Blas, M Mercedes; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio

    2017-05-15

    Three different conducting polymers, polythiophene (PT), polypirrol (PPY) and polyaniline (PANI) have been synthesized via oxidative chemical polymerization in aqueous media, in such a way that the synthesis protocol did not involve any toxic solvents. They have been tested in the abatement of nitrates from an aqueous solution without the need of any metal catalyst. The N-containing polymers (PANI and PPy) were able to remove nitrates to a level that accomplishes the European legislation requirements; however, the nature of each polymer greatly influenced the process mechanism. Whereas ion exchange between Cl(-) and SO4(2)(-) counter-ions in the polymer and NO3(-) from water is the main responsible for the effective nitrate removal in PANI, as assessed by FTIR and XPS analyses, the nitrate removal mechanism on PPy is based in an electron transfer from the polymer to nitrate through N sites located in the pyrrolic ring. On the other hand, PT was not able to exchange nitrate unless it was synthesized with FeCl3 as oxidant/dopant and an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate -SDS-) is used. In that case, the electrostatic attraction between sulfate (OSO3(-)) groups from the surfactant and Fe(3+) ions from FeCl3 produced the anchoring of Cl(-) to the oxidized PT growing chain, this favoring ion exchange with nitrate in the aqueous solution, followed by a redox process.

  8. Negative feedback loops leading to nitrate homeostasis and oscillatory nitrate assimilation in plants and fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yongshun

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient for plants and fungi. For plants it has been shown that cytosolic nitrate levels are under homeostatic control. Here we describe two networks that can obtain robust, i.e. perturbation independent, homeostatic behavior in cytosolic nitrate concentration. One of the networks, a member in the family of outflow controllers, is based on a negative feedback loop containing a nitrate-induced activation of a controller molecule which removes nitrate. In plants this co...

  9. Industry Self-Regulation to Improve Student Health: Quantifying Changes in Beverage Shipments to Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Brendan M.; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We developed a data collection and monitoring system to independently evaluate the self-regulatory effort to reduce the number of beverage calories available to children during the regular and extended school day. We have described the data collection procedures used to verify data supplied by the beverage industry and quantified changes in school beverage shipments. Methods. Using a proprietary industry data set collected in 2005 and semiannually in 2007 through 2010, we measured the total volume of beverage shipments to elementary, middle, and high schools to monitor intertemporal changes in beverage volumes, the composition of products delivered to schools, and portion sizes. We compared data with findings from existing research of the school beverage landscape and a separate data set based on contracts between schools and beverage bottling companies. Results. Between 2004 and the 2009–2010 school year, the beverage industry reduced calories shipped to schools by 90%. On a total ounces basis, shipments of full-calorie soft drinks to schools decreased by 97%. Conclusions. Industry self-regulation, with the assistance of a transparent and independent monitoring process, can be a valuable tool in improving public health outcomes. PMID:22897528

  10. Regulation of the High-Affinity Nitrate Transport System in Wheat Roots by Exogenous Abscisic Acid and Glutamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Cai; Xue-Qiang Zhao; Yong-Guan Zhu; Bin Li; Yi-Ping Tong; Zhen-Sheng Li

    2007-01-01

    Nitrate is a major nitrogen (N) source for most crops.Nitrate uptake by root cells is a key step of nitrogen metabolism and has been widely studied at the physiological and molecular levels.Understanding how nitrate uptake is regulated will help us engineer crops with improved nitrate uptake efficiency.The present study investigated the regulation of the high-affinity nitrate transport system (HATS) by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and glutamine (Gin) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.Wheat seedlings grown in nutrient solution containing 2 mmollL nitrate as the only nitrogen source for 2 weeks were deprived of N for 4d and were then transferred to nutrient solution containing 50 μmol/L ABA, and 1 mmol/L Gin in the presence or absence of 2 mmol/L nitrate for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 h.Treated wheat plants were then divided into two groups.One group of plants was used to investigate the mRNA levels of the HATS components NRT2 and NAR2 genes in roots through semi-quantitative RT-PCR approach, and the other set of plants were used to measure high-affinity nitrate influx rates in a nutrient solution containing 0.2 mmol/L 15 N-labeled nitrate.The results showed that exogenous ABA induced the expression of the TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, TaNRT2.3, TaNAR2.1, and TaNAR2.2 genes in roots when nitrate was not present in the nutrient solution, but did not further enhance the induction of these genes by nitrate.Glutamine, which has been shown to inhibit the expression of NRT2 genes when nitrate is present in the growth media, did not inhibit this induction.When Gin was supplied to a nitrate-free nutrient solution, the expression of these five genes in roots was induced.These results imply that the inhibition by Gin of NRT2 expression occurs only when nitrate is present in the growth media.Although exogenous ABA and Gin induced HATS genes in the roots of wheat, they did not induce nitrate influx.

  11. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Amol A

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed.

  12. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol A. Kulkarni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed.

  13. Flood survey of nitrate behaviour using nitrogen isotope tracing in the critical zone of a French agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Alexia; Moussa, Issam; Payre, Virginie; Probst, Anne; Probst, Jean-Luc

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of δ15N-NO3- were taken in a highly flood-responsive agricultural catchment in the southwest of France to trace the sources and transfer pathways of nitrates during flood events. From January to March 2013, surface water samples were collected every week at the outlet, and four floods were sampled with a high resolution. Sampling was also performed in surface waters and sand lenses from the rest of the basin to trace nitrate sources and processes spatially. Nitrate extractions were performed using a method based on the solubility difference between inorganic salts and organic solutions. The δ15N values were in the range of surface water contaminated by N-fertilisers. Depending on the hydroclimatic event, nitrates resulted from a combination of sources and processes. At the start of the floods, the values of δ15N-NO3- and nitrate concentrations were low, demonstrating the dilution of water with rainwater. During a second phase, the nitrate concentration and the δ15N were higher. Deeper waters and soil solutions were the second source of nitrates. When the water level was low, both nitrate concentration and isotopic composition were high. These values reflected the denitrification processes that occurred in the soil under anaerobic conditions. An analysis of δ15N-NO3- in stream water in a small agricultural catchment was efficient at determining the origin of nitrates during flood events using a simple method.

  14. Enhanced removal of nitrate from water using nZVI@MWCNTs composite: synthesis, kinetics and mechanism of reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Ali Akbar; Azari, Ali; Kalantary, Roshanak Rezaei; Kakavandi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Herein, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the carrier of nano-zero valent iron (nZVI) particles to fabricate a composite known as nZVI@MWCNTs. The composite was then characterized and applied in the nitrate removal process in a batch system under anoxic conditions. The influential parameters such as pH, various concentrations of nitrate and composite were investigated within 240 min of the reaction. The mechanism, kinetics and end-products of nitrate reduction were also evaluated. Results revealed that the removal nitrate percentage for nZVI@MWCNTs composite was higher than that of nZVI and MWCNTs alone. Experimental data from nitrate reduction were fitted to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. The values of observed rate constant (kobs) decreased with increasing the initial concentration of nitrate. Our experiments proved that the nitrate removal efficiency was favorable once both high amounts of nZVI@MWCNTs and low concentrations of nitrate were applied. The predominant end-products of the nitrate reduction were ammonium (84%) and nitrogen gas (15%). Our findings also revealed that ZVI@MWCNTs is potentially a good composite for removal/reduction of nitrate from aqueous solutions.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan-Humic Acid-Zerovalent Iron Nanocomposite for Nitrate Reduction in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Avosuahi Akinremi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new zerovalent iron chitosan-humic acid nanocomposite was prepared and tested for nitrate ion reduction in water. Humic acid was used for intramolecular cross-linking of the chitosan linear chains to increase the active sites on the chitosan biopolymer and then further used as a stabilizer to synthesize zerovalent iron nanoparticles by the reduction of iron (II chloride with sodium borohydride. Characterization of the products was carried out using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffractometer. Batch experiments were conducted for the reduction of nitrate in water using different concentrations of the products in different concentrations of nitrate ion and at different contact time. The adsorption equilibrium data for the nitrate solution gave a favorable adsorption according to the Langmuir equation. Varying the nanocomposite-to-nitrate ion ratio generally led to faster nitrate reduction, with the pseudofirst-order rate constant for the adsorption increasing with increase in nanocomposite-to-nitrate ion ratio. Nitrate removal efficiency of zerovalent iron chitosan-humic acid nanocomposite was further confirmed using real water samples obtained from drainage waste and river with an initial nitrate concentration of 18.00±0.01 and 12.00±0.12 ppm, respectively. The reduction of nitrate in water using the nanocomposite was concluded to be highly effective.

  16. Nitrate metabolism in the gromiid microbial universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Cedhagen, Tomas

    Eukaryotic nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storages contributes substantially to the nitrogen cycle. Research focus is currently directed towards two phyla: Foraminifera and diatoms, but the widespread Gromia in the Rhizaria may be another key organism. These giant protists...... enclose and regulate a small biogeochemical universe within their cell. Their transparent proteinaceous cell wall surrounds a complex matrix consisting of sediment, bacteria and nitrate which is concentrated to hundreds of mM in the gromiid cell. The nitrate is respired to dinitrogen, but in contrast...... to the findings of eukaryotic mediated nitrate reduction in some foraminifera and diatoms, nitrate respiration in gromiids seems to be mediated by bacterial endosymbionts. The role of endobionts in nitrate accumulating eukaryotes is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolutionary path...

  17. Study of the solubility of plutonyl nitrate with a view to its extraction by a solvent; Etude de la solubilite du nitrate de plutonyle en vue de son extraction par solvant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergnaud, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-09-01

    The research covers the determination of the partition coefficient of plutonyl nitrate and their application to the industrial treatment of plutonium. The solvent used is a tri-n-butyl phosphate solution diluted to 30 per cent in dodecane. The parameters which have been studied and which can affect the extraction of the plutonyl nitrate are: the plutonyl nitrate concentration; the nitric acid concentration; the uranyl nitrate concentration; the tetravalent plutonium nitrate concentration. The industrial application has been studied using a battery of mixer-separators. The operational conditions are defined in the case of a conventional plutonium separation plant. The results obtained, for a higher plutonyl nitrate concentration than that actually planned, are satisfactory and encouraging as far as the operation is concerned. Only the presence of polymerized tetravalent plutonium can adversely affect the satisfactory extraction of the plutonium. (author) [French] L'etude porte sur les coefficients de partage du nitrate de plutonyle et leur application a l'elaboration industrielle du plutonium. Le solvant utilise est une solution de phosphate de tri-n-butyle, dilue a 30 pour cent dans le dodecane. Les parametres etudies et pouvant influencer l'extraction du nitrate de plutonyle, par ce solvant, sont: concentration du nitrate de plutonyle; concentration de l'acide nitrique; concentration du nitrate d'uranyle; concentration au nitrate de plutonium tetravalent. L'application industrielle est etudiee au moyen d'une batterie de melangeurs-decanteurs. Les conditions operatoires sont definies d'apres un schema classique d'usine de separation de plutonium. Les resultats obtenus, pour une concentration du nitrate de plutonyle superieure a celle reellement prevue, sont satisfaisants et encourageants pour l'exploitation. Seule, la presence de plutonium tetraralent polymerise, peut nuire a une bonne extraction du plutonium

  18. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  19. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  20. Nitrate Uptake into Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Plants 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane-Drummond, Celia E.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence is presented that chlorate is an extremely good analog for nitrate during nitrate uptake by intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Fergus) roots. The depletion of ClO3− or NO3− from uptake media over 2 to 6 hours by seedlings was found to be dependent on combined NO3− plus ClO3− concentrations, and total anion uptake was equivalent at different NO3−/ClO3− ratios. After loading barley seedlings with 36ClO3− for 6 hours, kinetic parameters were derived from the analysis of efflux of [36Cl] chlorate into unlabeled solution. On the basis of this analysis, the half times for exchange for the cytoplasmic and vacuolar phases were 17 minutes and 20 hours, respectively. Data pooled from a number of different experiments were used to calculate kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) for 36ClO3− influx into barley roots at different external ClO3−/NO3− ratios, using short (10 minutes) influx times. There appeared to be no discrimination by the root cells between ClO3− and NO3−. Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the interaction between nitrate and chlorate were characteristic of competitive inhibition at low nitrate concentrations (0-0.5 mm). At higher concentrations, in the range of >1 mm, similar interactions between these ions were evident. PMID:16662478

  1. 2-Amino-5-chloropyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Zaouali Zgolli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C5H6ClN2+·NO3−, is held together by extensive hydrogen bonding between the NO3− ions and 2-amino-5-chloropyridinium H atoms. The cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the ions into a zigzag- chain which develops parallel to the b axis. The structure may be compared with that of the related 2-amino-5-cyanopyridinium nitrate.

  2. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (2 (−40 % and ammonia (+38 % from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  3. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  4. REMOVAL OF CADMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been identified as the best products [4]. Though little work has ... synthesized products for the removal of cadmium ion from aqueous solution. ... absence of suspect anions such as nitrate and chloride from the reagents used, which could be.

  5. Physicochemical characterization and adsorption behavior of Ca/Al chloride hydrotalcite-like compound towards removal of nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mahamudur; Patel, Rajkishore

    2011-06-15

    The objective of the present research was to synthesize, characterize and to investigate adsorption of nitrate from synthetic nitrate solution by Ca-Al-Cl HTlc. In the present study Ca-Al-Cl HTlc was synthesized by co-precipitation method and was characterized using SEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA-DSC. To assess the practical usefulness, a detailed removal study of nitrate was carried out. The removal of nitrate was 84.6% under neutral condition using 0.35 g of adsorbent in 100mL of nitrate solution having initial concentration of 10mg/L. Adsorption kinetic study revealed that the adsorption process followed first order kinetics. Adsorption data were fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir adsorption isotherm with R(2) (correlation coefficient)>0.99. Thermodynamic parameters were also calculated to study the effect of temperature on the removal process. In order to understand the adsorption type, equilibrium data were tested with Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm.

  6. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

  7. Removal of Selenium and Nitrate in Groundwater Using Organic Carbon-Based Reactive Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyeonsil; Jeen, Sung-Wook

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of selenium and nitrate in groundwater was evaluated through column experiments. Four columns consisting of reactive mixtures, either organic carbon-limestone (OC-LS) or organic carbon-zero valent iron (OC-ZVI), were used to determine the removal efficiency of selenium with different concentrations of nitrate. The source waters were collected from a mine site in Korea or were prepared artificially based on the mine drainage water or deionized water, followed by spiking of elevated concentrations of Se (40 mg/L) and nitrate (100 or 10 mg/L as NO3-N). The results for the aqueous chemistry showed that selenium and nitrate were effectively removed both in the mine drainage water and deionized water-based artificial input solution. However, the removal of selenium was delayed when selenium and nitrate coexisted in the OC-LS columns. The removal of selenium was not significant when the influent nitrate concentration was 100 mg/L as NO3-N, while most of nitrate was gradually removed within the columns. In contrast, 94% of selenium was removed when the influent nitrate concentration was reduced to 10 mg/L as NO3-N. In the OC-ZVI column, selenium and nitrate was removed almost simultaneously and completely even with the high nitrate concentration; however, a high concentration of ammonia was produced as a by-product of abiotic reaction between ZVI and nitrate. The elemental analysis for the solid samples after the termination of the experiments showed that selenium was accumulated in the reactive materials where removal of aqueous-phase selenium mostly occurred. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) study indicated that selenium existed in the forms of SeS2 and Se(0) in the OC-LS column, while selenium was present in the forms of FeSe, SeS2 and absorbed Se(IV) in the OC-ZVI column. This study shows that OC-based reactive mixtures have an ability to remove selenium and nitrate in groundwater. However, the removal of selenium was influenced by the high

  8. Hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalyst for nitrate adsorption and reduction from water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; QU Jiuhui; LIU Huijuan; WU Rongcheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalyst for nitrate adsorption and catalytic reduction from water is prepared by co-impregnation method and characterized by surface area (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). The performance of adsorption and hydrogenation of nitrate was evaluated and compared with Al2O3, TiO2, and HZSM-supported Pd-Cu catalysts. The experimental results demonstrated that hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalyst exhibited a high surface area (185.3 m2/g) and mesopore structure (average pore diameter of 52.2 (A)). The active metal clusters were homogeneously dispersed on the support, and the size of the most was less than 10 nm. Excellent adsorption for nitrate resulted from that nitrate ions were forced to enter the interlayer space when the calcined hydrotalcite regenerated layer structure in nitrate solution. The adsorption isotherm could be well described by the Langmuir model. The comparison between the adsorption and catalytic hydrogenation for nitrate using hydrogen indicated that nitrate reduction on hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalysts was a consecutive and dynamic adsorption and catalytic hydrogenation process. Compared with the Al2O3, TiO2, and HZSM- supported catalysts, hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalyst possessed higher catalytic activity and selectivity. The analysis on the dissolving of metals in the solution demonstrated that there was hydrolyzation on the surface of the hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalyst. However, the concentrations of dissolved metals in the solution were lower than the standard executed in China. The activity of the hydrotalcite-supported Pd-Cu catalyst for nitrate reduction kept steady after repeated use.

  9. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  10. Use of continuous monitoring to assess stream nitrate flux and transformation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher; Kim, Sea-Won; Schilling, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Delivery of nitrogen from farmed fields to the stream network is an ongoing water quality issue in central North America and other parts of the world. Although fertilization and other farming practices have been refined to produce environmental improvements, stemming loss of nitrogen, especially in the soluble nitrate form, is a problem that has seemingly defied solution. The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy is a policy initiative designed to implement conservation and other farm management practices to produce reductions in nitrate loading. The strategy does not focus on how the streams themselves may or may not be processing nitrogen and reducing downstream loading. We used continuous high-frequency nitrate and discharge monitoring over 3 years at two sites separated by 18 km in a low-order, agricultural stream in eastern Iowa to estimate how nitrogen is processed, and whether or not these processes are reducing downstream loading. We conclude that the upstream to downstream nitrate concentration decline between the two sites was not driven by denitrification. These data also show that nitrate concentrations are closely coupled to discharge during periods of adequate moisture, but decoupling of concentration from discharge occurs during dry periods. This decoupling is a possible indicator of in-stream nitrate processing. Finally, nitrate concentrations are likely diluted by water sourced from non-row crop land covers in the lower reaches of the watershed.

  11. Interaction of neodymium nitrate with rubidium and cesium nitrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodkin, A.K.; Odinets, Z.K.; S' ' edina, T.V.; Ivanova, T.N. (Universitet Druzhby Narodov, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-12-01

    The Rb/sub 2/Nd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/xH/sub 2/O (1) and Cs/sub 2/Nd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/xH/sub 2/O (2) new complexes are prepared. The crystals 1 are isotropic, of cubic crystal system, Ng=1.570+-0.002; 2 - Ng=1.582+-0.002; Csub(Np)=0-9 degrees, of low crystal system (syngony). The bands of coordinated nitrate group, the ..delta nu..=..nu../sub 4/(B/sub 2/)-..nu../sub 1/(A/sub 1/) splitting value is respectively equal to 225 and 230 cm/sup -1/ are present in the infrared absorption spectra of the compounds. The interplane distances and corresponding intensities for the 1, 2 and hexahydrate of neodymium nitrate are determined. Derivatograms of the compounds are recorded, the final products of the thermolysis are correspondingly RbNdO/sub 2/ and Nd/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  12. KINETICS STUDY ON NITRATION OF METHYL RICINOLEATE

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Abdullah; Triyono, Triyono; Trisunaryanti, Wega; Haryadi, Winarto

    2012-01-01

    Kinetics parameter values of methyl ricinoleate nitration (rate constant, reaction order and the rate of reaction) have been determined. Nitration was carried out with both concentrations of HNO3 and acetic anhydride in excess to the concentration of methyl ricinoleate. Thus, the kinetics parameter value was only affected by the concentration of methyl ricinoleate. Based on kinetic study conducted, it could be concluded that the nitration follows pseudo first-order, and the reaction rate for ...

  13. Effect of Partial Replacement of Nitrate by Amino Acid and Urea on Nitrate Content of Non-heading Chinese Cabbage and Lettuce in Hydroponic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gui-lin; GAO Xiu-rui; ZHANG Xian-bin

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the authors studied the effect of different mixtures of glyeine (Gly), isoleucine (Iso), proline (Pro), and urea solutions used as a partial (20%) replacment of nitrate in the nitrate content and quality of non-heading Chinese cabbage and lettuce in hydroponice. Five treatments were done 12 d before harvest. Compared to the control group, Gly had the best effect in reducing the nitrate content of both vegetable leaves and petioles; the mixture of Giy, Iso and Pro ranked second and urea the least. Treatments with amino acid could also increase soluble sugar and protein contents and enhance total-N in leaves significantly.In contrast, amino acid enhanced NRA in non-heading Chinese cabbage, while they decreased it slightly in lettuce. The results showed that amino acids and urea could reduce the nitrate content of both vegetables, but they had almost the same effect on non-heading Chinese cabbage. Moreover, amino acids were more effective than urea in lettuce. As a result, it was concluded that partial replacement of nitrate with amino acids not only reduced the nitrate content but also improved the quality of vegetables.

  14. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  15. Surface chemistry of electrospun cellulose nitrate nanofiber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartker, Steven; Askeland, Per; Wiederoder, Sara; Drzal, Lawrence T

    2011-02-01

    Electrospinning is a rapidly developing technology that provides a unique way to produce novel polymer nanofibers with controllable diameters. Cellulose nitrate non-woven mats of submicron-sized fibers with diameters of 100-1200 nm were prepared. The effects of processing equipment collector design void gap, and steel drum coated with polyvinylidene dichloride (PVDC) were investigated. The PVDC layer applied to the rotating drum aided in fiber harvesting. Electron microscopy (FESEM and ESEM) studies of as-spun fibers revealed that the morphology of cellulose nitrate fibers depended on the collector type and solution viscosity. When a rotating steel drum was employed a random morphology was observed, while the void gap collector produced aligned fiber mats. Increases in viscosity lead to larger diameter fibers. The fibers collected were free from all residual solvents and could undergo oxygen plasma treatment to increase the hydropholicity.

  16. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Wei, Chunyang; Guo, Yuyan; Rogers, William J; Sam Mannan, M

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified.

  17. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  18. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  19. Nitration of Phenol Catalyzed by Horseradish Peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Rong-ji; HUANG Hui; TONG Bin; XIAO Sheng-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase, an acidic peroxidase from the horseradish, is one of the most important enzymes as analytical reagent.The enzymatic nitration of phenol by oxidation of nitrite was studied using horseradish peroxidase in the presence of H2O2.The results showed that nitration occur at 2- and 4- positions of phenol.There were also minor products of hydroquinone and catechol.The influence of various reaction parameters, including pH, organic solvent, and concentration of H2O2, on nitration products were discussed.The best nitration pH was 7.0, and H2O2 should be added to the reaction mixture slowly.

  20. Aluminium tolerance in rice is antagonistic with nitrate preference and synergistic with ammonium preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue Qiang; Guo, Shi Wei; Shinmachi, Fumie; Sunairi, Michio; Noguchi, Akira; Hasegawa, Isao; Shen, Ren Fang

    2013-01-01

    Acidic soils are dominated chemically by more ammonium and more available, so more potentially toxic, aluminium compared with neutral to calcareous soils, which are characterized by more nitrate and less available, so less toxic, aluminium. However, it is not known whether aluminium tolerance and nitrogen source preference are linked in plants. This question was investigated by comparing the responses of 30 rice (Oryza sativa) varieties (15 subsp. japonica cultivars and 15 subsp. indica cultivars) to aluminium, various ammonium/nitrate ratios and their combinations under acidic solution conditions. indica rice plants were generally found to be aluminium-sensitive and nitrate-preferring, while japonica cultivars were aluminium-tolerant and relatively ammonium-preferring. Aluminium tolerance of different rice varieties was significantly negatively correlated with their nitrate preference. Furthermore, aluminium enhanced ammonium-fed rice growth but inhibited nitrate-fed rice growth. The results suggest that aluminium tolerance in rice is antagonistic with nitrate preference and synergistic with ammonium preference under acidic solution conditions. A schematic diagram summarizing the interactions of aluminium and nitrogen in soil-plant ecosystems is presented and provides a new basis for the integrated management of acidic soils.

  1. Nitrate sorption on activated carbon modified with CaCl2: Equilibrium, isotherms and kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanella Odivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nitrate (NO3- removal from aqueous solutions was investigated using granular activated carbon (GAC modified with CaCl2. Batch sorption studies were performed as a function of sorbent dose, initial nitrate concentration and pH. Sorption was maximized between pH 3 and 9. Studies on the effect of pH showed that the ion exchange mechanism might be involved in the sorption process. The percentage of nitrate removed increased with increasing sorbent concentration, and the ideal sorbent dose was found to be 20 g•L-1. Four isotherm models-Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Sips-were used to fit the experimental data. The Redlich-Peterson isotherm model explained the sorption process well and showed the best coefficient of determination (0.9979 and Chi-square test statistic (0.0079. Using the Sips isotherm model, the sorption capacity (qe was found to be 1.93 mg nitrate per g of sorbent. Kinetic experiments indicated that sorption was a fast process, reaching equilibrium within 120 min. The nitrate sorption kinetic data were successfully fitted to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The overall results demonstrated potential applications of modified GAC for nitrate removal from aqueous solutions.

  2. Studies on some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenhua; YanGuiping; 等

    1994-01-01

    Some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves shown in this paper were as follows:The nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves required NADH as an electron donor.Accordingly,the nitrate reductase was classified as NADH-dependent(E.C.1.6.61).The Km value of the nitrate reductase for NADH and NO3- were 0.86m mol and 0.18μ mol respectively.The optimum pH in reaction mixture solution for nitrate reduction activity was 7.5.The effect of variable concentrations of inorganic phosphorus in the reaction buffer on nitrate reductase activity was investigated.When the inorganic phosphorus concentration was below 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was increased with increase of inorganic phosphorus concentration.Conversely,when the inorganic phosphorus concentration was over 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was inhibited.The nitrate reductase activity assayed in vitro was 3.2 and 5.6times of that assayed in vivo under the condition of exogenous and endogenous ground substance respectively.

  3. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment.

  4. Overweight truck shipments to nuclear waste repositories: legal, political, administrative and operational considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-03-01

    This report, prepared for the Chicago Operations Office and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), identifies and analyzes legal, political, administrative, and operational issues that could affect an OCRWM decision to develop an overweight truck cask fleet for the commercial nuclear waste repository program. It also provides information required by DOE on vehicle size-and-weight administration and regulation, pertinent to nuclear waste shipments. Current legal-weight truck casks have a payload of one pressurized-water reactor spent fuel element or two boiling-water reactor spent fuel elements (1 PWR/2 BWR). For the requirements of the 1960s and 1970s, casks were designed with massive shielding to accommodate 6-month-old spent fuel; the gross vehicle weight was limited to 73,280 pounds. Spent fuel to be moved in the 1990s will have aged five years or more. Gross vehicle weight limitation for the Interstate highway system has been increased to 80,000 pounds. These changes allow the design of 25-ton legal-weight truck casks with payloads of 2 PWR/5 BWR. These changes may also allow the development of a 40-ton overweight truck cask with a payload of 4 PWR/10 BWR. Such overweight casks will result in significantly fewer highway shipments compared with legal-weight casks, with potential reductions in transport-related repository risks and costs. These advantages must be weighed against a number of institutional issues surrounding such overweight shipments before a substantial commitment is made to develop an overweight truck cask fleet. This report discusses these issues in detail and provides recommended actions to DOE.

  5. NITRIFICATION OF UREA AND ASSIMILATION OF NITRATE IN SATURATED SOILS UNDER AEROBIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Ghaly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate nitrification activity of urea and the assimilation of nitrate in a well aerated soil using perfusion technique with addition of glucose as an energy and carbon source. In this study, urea was rapidly nitrified by the bacteria in the saturated soil but its course of transformation to NO3 was not linear. There was an initial increase in the concentration of nitrite during the nitrification experiment which indicated that the conversion of nitrite to nitrate was appreciably slower than the rate of conversion of urea to nitrite. The rate of conversion of NH4+ to NO2- was faster than the rate of conversion of NO2- to NO3- in the first 12 days and as a result the nitrate concentration reached 2.72 µg/ml on the 12th day. After day 12, the concentration of NH4+ in solution declined significantly and the rate of conversion of NO2- to NO3- became faster than the rate of conversion of NH4+ to NO2-. The concentration of NO2-N in the solution reached zero on the 23rd day. The nitrification curve has the character of a sigmoid curve whose midpoint, which representing the most rapid rate of nitrification, fell at the point of half conversion of urea to nitrite. The curve asymptotically approaches a nitrate value that represents 98% conversion of urea into nitrate. The rest of the urea (NH4 has presumably been synthesized into bacterial cells. The initial pH of the soil was 7.7 due to the presence of NH4 which decreased gradually due to the production of NO3 reaching 6.9 by day 23. A nitrate reduction was observed under aerobic conditions. Denitrification did not proceed according to the known fact that O2 prevents the denitrifying organisms from producing the enzyme responsible for the process. The alternative pathway for nitrate reduction could be by assimilatory reduction where nitrate was converted to ammonium and then to cells. The removal of nitrate and production of ammonium caused a rise in the pH. The

  6. Nitration of the birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101: efficiency and site-selectivity of liquid and gaseous nitrating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Ackaert, Chloé; Kampf, Christopher J; Samonig, Martin; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Kofler, Stefan; Yang, Hong; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Brandstetter, Hans; Huber, Christian G; Duschl, Albert; Oostingh, Gertie J; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-03-07

    Nitration of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 alters the immune responses toward this protein, but the underlying chemical mechanisms are not yet understood. Here we address the efficiency and site-selectivity of the nitration reaction of recombinant protein samples of Bet v 1.0101 with different nitrating agents relevant for laboratory investigations (tetranitromethane, TNM), for physiological processes (peroxynitrite, ONOO(-)), and for the health effects of environmental pollutants (nitrogen dioxide and ozone, O₃/NO₂). We determined the total tyrosine nitration degrees (ND) and the NDs of individual tyrosine residues (NDY). High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and HPLC coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis of intact proteins, HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic peptides, and amino acid analysis of hydrolyzed samples were performed. The preferred reaction sites were tyrosine residues at the following positions in the polypeptide chain: Y83 and Y81 for TNM, Y150 for ONOO(-), and Y83 and Y158 for O₃/NO₂. The tyrosine residues Y83 and Y81 are located in a hydrophobic cavity, while Y150 and Y158 are located in solvent-accessible and flexible structures of the C-terminal region. The heterogeneous reaction with O₃/NO₂ was found to be strongly dependent on the phase state of the protein. Nitration rates were about one order of magnitude higher for aqueous protein solutions (∼20% per day) than for protein filter samples (∼2% per day). Overall, our findings show that the kinetics and site-selectivity of nitration strongly depend on the nitrating agent and reaction conditions, which may also affect the biological function and adverse health effects of the nitrated protein.

  7. Combining Diffusion and Grey Models Based on Evolutionary Optimization Algorithms to Forecast Motherboard Shipments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Kwun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important for executives to predict the future trends. Otherwise, their companies cannot make profitable decisions and investments. The Bass diffusion model can describe the empirical adoption curve for new products and technological innovations. The Grey model provides short-term forecasts using four data points. This study develops a combined model based on the rolling Grey model (RGM and the Bass diffusion model to forecast motherboard shipments. In addition, we investigate evolutionary optimization algorithms to determine the optimal parameters. Our results indicate that the combined model using a hybrid algorithm outperforms other methods for the fitting and forecasting processes in terms of mean absolute percentage error.

  8. Stable isotope customer list and summary of shipments, FY 1985. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, J.G. (comp.)

    1986-01-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The information is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope.

  9. Stable-isotope customer list and summary of shipments, FY 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.C. (comp.)

    1983-04-01

    This compilation is published as an aid to those concerned with the separation and sale of stable isotopes. The inforamtion is divided into four sections: (1) alphabetical list of domestic and foreign customers, showing the stable isotopes purchased during the fiscal year; (2) alphabetical list of isotopes, cross-referenced to customer numbers and divided into domestic and foreign categories; (3) alphabetical list of states and countries, cross-referenced to customer numbers and indicating geographical concentrations of isotope users; and (4) tabulation of the shipments, quantities, and dollars for domestic, foreign, and project categories for each isotope.

  10. APPLICATION OF IMPREGNATED ALMOND SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON BY ZINC AND ZINC SULFATE FOR NITRATE REMOVAL FROM WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rezaee, H. Godini, S. Dehestani, A. Khavanin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study impregnated almond shell activated carbon by Zn° and ZnSO4 were used as adsorbent with a particle size of 10-20 mesh. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of impregnated activated carbon in nitrate removal. The modified activated carbon had 1mm effective size, with a uniformity coefficient of 1.18. Potassium nitrate solution was used in batch adsorption experiments for nitrate removal from water. The effects of nitrate concentration, activated carbon dosage and time of contact were studied. Experimental data showed that modified activated carbon by Zn° and ZnSO4 was more effective than virgin almond activated carbon for nitrate removal. The maximum nitrate removal was 64%-80% and 5%-42% for modified activated carbon and virgin activated carbon, respectively. While virgin activated carbon used, nitrate-N decreased from 20 to 15mg/L in 30min reaction. The final nitrate concentration was not in the standard range of WHO recommendations for water quality; while impregnated activated carbons were used, nitrate drcreased to <10mg/L. Maximum removal was over 16-17mg nitrate-N per 1g activated carbon for impregnated activated carbon. The experiments were conducted at pH=6.2, 20ºC and initial concentrations of 20mg/L nitrate-N. Increase in modified activated carbon dosage increased the nitrate removal efficiency. The equilibrium time was found to be 45min for modified activated carbon.

  11. Development of a nitrate ion-selective electrode based on an Urushi matrix membrane and its application to the direct measurement of nitrate-nitrogen in upland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S; Baba, K; Asano, Y; Takesako, H; Wada, H

    1996-11-01

    A solid-state nitrate ion-selective electrode based on an Urushi matrix membrane was developed. Urushi, a natural oriental lacquer, has excellent mechanical strength and binding affinity for metal electrodes. Using the same technique for a dip-coating ion-selective electrode, an electrode was prepared by coating and hardening a sensing membrane on the metal base. The effects of the metal electrode on the electrode potential stability, the liquid-membrane components and the oven temperature for hardening of membrane were studied. The sensing membrane, consisting of 27.5 wt.% of o-nitrophenyl octyl ether. 27.5 wt.% of tri-n-octylmethylammonium nitrate and 45 wt.% of raw Urushi latex, was coated with a thickness of 0.5 mm on a silver disc which was plated with Ag/AgCl, then plated with copper and hardened in the oven at 80 degrees C for 50 h. A semi-logarithmic calibration curve of potential versus nitrate ion concentration was obtained over the range 6-60 000 mg l(-1) NO(3)(poststaggered-). The slope of the linear part of the curve was -56 mV per decade change in NO(3)(poststaggered-) concentration. Compared with a PVC matrix nitrate ion-selective electrode, the Urushi matrix nitrate ion-selective electrode was superior in terms of hardness and mechanical strength of the membrane, short response time and long life. The combination of an Urushi matrix nitrate ion-selective electrode with a porous PTFE junction reference electrode, air-tight structured KCl solution chamber and a temperature sensor was applied to field measurements of nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in upland soils. The values obtained for upland soils containing 30-50% of water were good agreement with those for soil solution.

  12. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions below Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per;

    1999-01-01

    had higher concentrations than forest-type 'other woodland'), (3) soil-type (humus soils showed above average concentrations, and fine textured soils had higher concentrations than coarse textured soils), and (4) sampling time. Unlike other investigations, there was no significant effect of tree...

  13. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in Glacial Acetic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHABUL A MONDAL; DBASHIS MANDAL; KANCHAN MITRA

    2017-01-01

    Rapid nitration of electron rich phenols using Y(NO₃)₃.6H₂O in glacial acetic acid at room temperature was observed with good yield. The method allows nitration of phenols without oxidation, and isolation of nitration product in a rapid and simple way. The described method is selective for phenols.

  14. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  15. Arabidopsis nitrate transporter NRT1.9 is important in phloem nitrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-05-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport.

  16. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  17. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

    1988-06-01

    This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

  18. Nitrate removal by Fe0/Pd/Cu nano-composite in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyuan; Guo, Min; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater shows a great threat to the safety of drinking water. Chemical reduction by zero-valent iron is being considered as a promising technique for nitrate removal from contaminated groundwater. In this paper, Fe0/Pd/Cu nano-composites were prepared by the liquid-phase reduction method, and batch experiments of nitrate reduction by the prepared Fe0/Pd/Cu nano-composites under various operating conditions were carried out. It has been found that nano-Fe0/Pd/Cu composites processed dual functions: catalytic reduction and chemical reduction. The introduction of Pd and Cu not only improved nitrate removal rate, but also reduced the generation of ammonia. Nitrate removal rate was affected by the amount of Fe0/Pd/Cu, initial nitrate concentration, solution pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), reaction temperature, the presence of anions, and organic pollutant. Moreover, nitrate reduction by Fe0/Pd/Cu composites followed the pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The removal rate of nitrate and total nitrogen were about 85% and 40.8%, respectively, under the reaction condition of Fe-6.0%Pd-3.0%Cu amount of 0.25 g/L, pH value of 7.1, DO of 0.42 mg/L, and initial nitrate concentration of 100 mg/L. Compared with the previous studies with Fe0 alone or Fe-Cu, nano-Fe-6%Pd-3%Cu composites showed a better selectivity to N2.

  19. Evaluation of nitrates in albanian wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariola Morina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are important compounds in nature but not desirable if they are present in wine at increased amount. The high level of nitrate is attributed to the use of nitrogen fertilizers in the vineyards. Method of the reactive Gries I and Gries II was used for the determination of nitrates in wine. There were analyzed 45 white wines and 55 red wines produced in 2008 – 2010, as well as wines produced from Albanian grape varieties Shesh i Bardhë and Shesh i Zi in 2009 and 2010, as an authentic wines evidence with denominated origin. From the results of analyses was observed that, in 51 % of white wines was found that the content of nitrates were less than 5 mg/l, in 46% of them the nitrates level goes up to 10 mg/l and only in 3 % of them the amount of nitrates is up to 12 mg/l. None of white wine samples have the content of nitrates over 20 mg/l. In this case there is no doubt for water addition during wine preparation. In regards of red wines, in 34% of them the amount of nitrates is up to 5 mg/l, in 30% of them up to 10 mg/l, while in 26% of them the amount of nitrates is 20 mg/l. Only 10 % of red wines have nitrates content over 20 mg/l which raise dubiety for falsified wines where water and sugar is added in the red marc. The level of nitrates in wines with denominated origin was under 20 mg/L.

  20. Regulation of nitrate assimilation in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yoshitake; Shi, Wei; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2011-02-01

    Nitrate assimilation by cyanobacteria is inhibited by the presence of ammonium in the growth medium. Both nitrate uptake and transcription of the nitrate assimilatory genes are regulated. The major intracellular signal for the regulation is, however, not ammonium or glutamine, but 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), whose concentration changes according to the change in cellular C/N balance. When nitrogen is limiting growth, accumulation of 2-OG activates the transcription factor NtcA to induce transcription of the nitrate assimilation genes. Ammonium inhibits transcription by quickly depleting the 2-OG pool through its metabolism via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle. The P(II) protein inhibits the ABC-type nitrate transporter, and also nitrate reductase in some strains, by an unknown mechanism(s) when the cellular 2-OG level is low. Upon nitrogen limitation, 2-OG binds to P(II) to prevent the protein from inhibiting nitrate assimilation. A pathway-specific transcriptional regulator NtcB activates the nitrate assimilation genes in response to nitrite, either added to the medium or generated intracellularly by nitrate reduction. It plays an important role in selective activation of the nitrate assimilation pathway during growth under a limited supply of nitrate. P(II) was recently shown to regulate the activity of NtcA negatively by binding to PipX, a small coactivator protein of NtcA. On the basis of accumulating genome information from a variety of cyanobacteria and the molecular genetic data obtained from the representative strains, common features and group- or species-specific characteristics of the response of cyanobacteria to nitrogen is summarized and discussed in terms of ecophysiological significance.

  1. 19 CFR 7.1 - Puerto Rico; spirits and wines withdrawn from warehouse for shipment to; duty on foreign-grown...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... warehouse for shipment to; duty on foreign-grown coffee. 7.1 Section 7.1 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... warehouse for shipment to; duty on foreign-grown coffee. (a) When spirits and wines are withdrawn from a..., part 18 of this chapter. (c) A regular entry shall be made for all foreign-grown coffee shipped...

  2. 49 CFR 375.705 - If a shipment is transported on more than one vehicle, what charges may I collect at delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vehicle, what charges may I collect at delivery? 375.705 Section 375.705 Transportation Other Regulations...; CONSUMER PROTECTION REGULATIONS Delivery of Shipments § 375.705 If a shipment is transported on more than one vehicle, what charges may I collect at delivery? (a) At your discretion, you may do one of...

  3. 49 CFR 375.521 - What must I do if an individual shipper wants to know the actual weight or charges for a shipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... required at time of delivery is 110 percent of the estimated charges, but only if the individual shipper... know the actual weight or charges for a shipment before I tender delivery? 375.521 Section 375.521... GOODS IN INTERSTATE COMMERCE; CONSUMER PROTECTION REGULATIONS Pick Up of Shipments of Household Goods...

  4. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  5. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  6. Computational insight into nitration of human myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Wu; Shu, Xiao-Gang; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Wen, Ge-Bo

    2014-10-01

    Protein nitration is an important post-translational modification regulating protein structure and function, especially for heme proteins. Myoglobin (Mb) is an ideal protein model for investigating the structure and function relationship of heme proteins. With limited structural information available for nitrated heme proteins from experiments, we herein performed a molecular dynamics study of human Mb with successive nitration of Tyr103, Tyr146, Trp7 and Trp14. We made a detailed comparison of protein motions, intramolecular contacts and internal cavities of nitrated Mbs with that of native Mb. It showed that although nitration of both Tyr103 and Tyr146 slightly alters the local conformation of heme active site, further nitration of both Trp7 and Trp14 shifts helix A apart from the rest of protein, which results in altered internal cavities and forms a water channel, representing an initial stage of Mb unfolding. The computational study provides an insight into the nitration of heme proteins at an atomic level, which is valuable for understanding the structure and function relationship of heme proteins in non-native states by nitration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial nitrate assimilation: gene distribution and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Gates, Andrew J; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Ferguson, Stuart J; Richardson, David J; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the global nitrogen cycle, the importance of inorganic nitrate for the nutrition and growth of marine and freshwater autotrophic phytoplankton has long been recognized. In contrast, the utilization of nitrate by heterotrophic bacteria has historically received less attention because the primary role of these organisms has classically been considered to be the decomposition and mineralization of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen. In the pre-genome sequence era, it was known that some, but not all, heterotrophic bacteria were capable of growth on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. However, examination of currently available prokaryotic genome sequences suggests that assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) systems are widespread phylogenetically in bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs. Until now, regulation of nitrate assimilation has been mainly studied in cyanobacteria. In contrast, in heterotrophic bacterial strains, the study of nitrate assimilation regulation has been limited to Rhodobacter capsulatus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis. In Gram-negative bacteria, the nas genes are subjected to dual control: ammonia repression by the general nitrogen regulatory (Ntr) system and specific nitrate or nitrite induction. The Ntr system is widely distributed in bacteria, whereas the nitrate/nitrite-specific control is variable depending on the organism.

  8. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-09

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  9. 4-Methoxy-N,N′-diphenylbenzamidinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata S. Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium nitrate, C20H19N2O+·NO3−, comprises two independent N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium cations and two nitrate anions. The crystal structure features N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...O contacts responsible for the packing.

  10. Reaction of lanthanide nitrates with macrocyclic amidoacylhydrazones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinka, E.V.; Bondarev, M.L.; Bel' tyukova, S.V.; Poleuktov, N.S.; Nazarenko, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper deals with a study of the reaction of neodymium and europium nitrates with 3,5,14,16-tetraazasubstituted dibenzo (d,j) (1,2,6,9,13,14) hexaazahexadeca-2,4,10,12-tetraene-7,8,15,16-tetraones. The authors carried out the investigations by means of conductimetry, UV luminescence, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Conductimetric titrations of the neodymium complexes were carried out on an OK-102/1 conductimeter. The luminescence spectra of the europium ion in the region of the /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 1/ and /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 2/ transitions (550-620 nm) were recorded on an ISP-51 spectrograph with an FEP-1 photoelectric attachment, using excitation by an SVD-120A mercury quartz lamp. The UV spectra of solutions of the compounds and the IR spectra of the solid substances in KBr disks were recorded on SpecordUViS and UR-20 spectrophotometers, respectively, and the mass spectra on a Varian Mat-112 spectrometer.

  11. Selective removal of nitrate ion using a novel composite carbon electrode in capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2012-11-15

    We fabricated nitrate-selective composite carbon electrodes (NSCCEs) for use in capacitive deionization to remove nitrate ions selectively from a solution containing a mixture of anions. The NSCCE was fabricated by coating the surface of a carbon electrode with the anion exchange resin, BHP55, after grinding the resin into fine powder. BHP55 is known to be selective for nitrate ions. We performed desalination experiments on a solution containing 5.0 mM NaCl and 2.0 mM NaNO(3) using the NSCCE system constructed with the fabricated electrode. The selective removal of nitrate in the NSCCE system was compared to a membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) system constructed with ion exchange membranes and carbon electrodes. The total quantity of chloride and nitrate ions adsorbed onto the unit area of the electrode in the MCDI system was 25 mmol/m(2) at a cell potential of 1.0 V. The adsorption of nitrate ions was 8.3 mmol/m(2), accounting for 33% of the total. In contrast, the total anion adsorption in the NSCCE system was 34 mmol/m(2), 36% greater than the total anion adsorption of the MCDI system. The adsorption of nitrate ions was 19 mmol/m(2), 2.3-times greater than the adsorption in the MCDI system. These results showed that the ions were initially adsorbed by an electrostatic force, and the ion exchange reactions then occurred between the resin powder in the coated layer and the solution containing mixed anions.

  12. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  13. Nitrate and Nitrogen Oxides: Sources, Health Effects and Their Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Khalid Rehman; Sabir, Muhammad; Ozturk, Munir; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Ibrahim, Faridah Hanum; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Sajid Aqeel

    Increased use of nitrogenous (N) fertilizers in agriculture has significantly altered the global N-cycle because they release nitrogenous gases of environmental concerns. The emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes to the global greenhouse gas accumulation and the stratospheric ozone depletion. In addition, it causes nitrate leaching problem deteriorating ground water quality. The nitrate toxicity has been reported in a number of studies showing the health hazards like methemoglobinemia in infants and is a potent cause of cancer. Despite these evident negative environmental as well as health impacts, consumption of N fertilizer cannot be reduced in view of the food security for the teeming growing world population. Various agronomic and genetic modifications have been practiced to tackle this problem. Some agronomic techniques adopted include split application of N, use of slow-release fertilizers, nitrification inhibitors and encouraging the use of organic manure over chemical fertilizers. As a matter of fact, the use of chemical means to remediate nitrate from the environment is very difficult and costly. Particularly, removal of nitrate from water is difficult task because it is chemically non-reactive in dilute aqueous solutions. Hence, the use of biological means for nitrate remediation offers a promising strategy to minimize the ill effects of nitrates and nitrites. One of the important goals to reduce N-fertilizer application can be effectively achieved by choosing N-efficient genotypes. This will ensure the optimum uptake of applied N in a balanced manner and exploring the molecular mechanisms for their uptake as well as metabolism in assimilatory pathways. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the interrelations which exist in the terrestrial ecosystems between the plant type and characteristics of nutrient uptake and analyze the global consumption and demand for fertilizer nitrogen in relation to cereal production, evaluate the various methods

  14. Studies on catalytic reduction of nitrate in groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Bing; ZHU Yanfang; JIN Zhaohui; LI Tielong; KANG Haiyan; WANG Shuaima

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of nitrate in groundwater by sodium formate over the catalyst was investigated.Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by impregnation and characterized by brunauer-emmett-teller (BET),inductive coupled plasma (ICP),X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX).It was found that total nitrogen was effectively removed from the nitrate solution (100 mg/L) and the removal efficiency was 87%.The catalytic activity was affected by pH,catalyst amount used,concentration of sodium formate,and initial concentration of nitrate.As sodium formate was used as reductant,precise control in the initial pH was needed.Excessively high or low initial pH (7.0 or 3.0) reduced catalytic activity.At initial pH of 4.5,catalytic activity was enhanced by reducing the amount of catalyst,while concentrations of sodium formate increased with a considerable decrease in N2 selectivity.In which case,catalytic reduction followed the first order kinetics.

  15. Neurobehavioral Assessment of Rats Exposed to Yttrium Nitrate during Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chen Xi; MA Chuan; FANG Hai Qin; ZHI Yuan; YU Zhou; XU Hai Bin; JIA Xu Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the effects of yttrium nitrate on neurobehavioral development in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Dams were orally exposed to 0, 5, 15, or 45 mg/kg daily of yttrium nitrate from gestation day (GD) 6 to postnatal day (PND) 21. Body weight and food consumption were monitored weekly. Neurobehavior was assessed by developmental landmarks and reflexes, motor activity, hot plate, Rota-rod and cognitive tests. Additionally, brain weights were measured on PND 21 and 70. Results No significant difference was noted among all groups for maternal body weight and food consumption. All yttrium-exposed offspring showed an increase in body weight on PND 21;however, no significant difference in body weight for exposed pups versus controls was observed 2 weeks or more after the yttrium solution was discontinued. The groups given 5 mg/kg daily decreased significantly in the duration of female forelime grip strength and ambulation on PND 13. There was no significant difference between yttrium-exposed offspring and controls with respect to other behavioral ontogeny parameters and postnatal behavioral test results. Conclusion Exposure of rats to yttrium nitrate in concentrations up to 45 mg/kg daily had no adverse effects on their neurobehavioral development.

  16. Sedimentary nitrate reduction and its effect on the N-isotopic composition of oceanic nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Sigman, D. M.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    A prerequisite for assessing denitrification fluxes in a specific environment using water column nitrate N isotope ratios is the knowledge of the expressed N isotope effects of water column and/or benthic denitrification in this environment. Here, we aim at assessing the effects of benthic nitrogen cycling on the N isotopic composition of the oceanic nitrate pool in deep-sea sediments, which are believed to harbour a large portion of the global benthic denitrification. We report 15N/14N ratios of pore water nitrate in pelagic sediments from the deep Bering Sea, where benthic nitrate reduction has previously been identified as a significant sink of fixed nitrogen. Porewater profiles from multicores indicate strong 15N enrichment in porewater nitrate at all stations, as one goes deeper in the sediments and nitrate concentrations decrease (δ15N generally reached 25-35‰). Our data are consistent with variable biological isotope effect (ɛ) for dissimilatory nitrate reduction ranging between 13 to 30 ‰. A one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model including organic matter degradation, nitrification, and denitrification indicates that, although denitrification leads to a pore water nitrate pool that is enriched in 15N, N isotope fractionation is poorly expressed at the scale of sediment-water nitrate exchange, independent of whether sediments are a net sink or a net source of nitrate. The apparent nitrate isotope effect of sedimentary denitrification on nitrate in overlying waters is generally below 2‰, as a result of diffusive transport limitation into, and within, the sediments and/or the production of light nitrate during nitrification. Thus, our data suggest that the low expressed isotope effect of benthic denitrification observed previously in reactive shelf sediments also applies to deep-sea sediments. However, where ammonium fluxes out of the sediments, it is enriched in 15-N, and may ultimately lead to an N-isotopic enrichment of the water-column nitrate

  17. Effects of Coating Materials and Mineral Additives on Nitrate Reduction by Zerovalent Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Jeong, H. Y.; Lee, S.; Kang, N.; Choi, H. J.; Park, M.

    2015-12-01

    In efforts to facilitate nitrate removal, a variety of coating materials and mineral additives were assessed for their effects on the nitrate reduction by zerovalent iron (ZVI). Coated ZVIs were prepared by reacting Fe particles with Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and S(-II) solutions under anoxic conditions, with the resultant materials named Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, Ni/Fe, Cu/Fe, and FeS/Fe, respectively. The mineral additives used, synthesized or purchased, included goethite, magnetite, and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Kinetic experiments were performed using air-tight serum vials containing 1.0 g Fe (uncoated or coated forms) in 15 mL of 100 mg NO3×N/L solutions with pH buffered at 7.0. To monitor the reaction progress, the solution phase was analyzed for NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ on an ion chromatography, while the headspace was analyzed for H2, N2, and O2 on a gas chromatography. By uncoated Fe, ca. 60% of nitrate was reductively transformed for 3.6 h, with NH4+ being the predominant product. Compared with uncoated one, Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, and Cu/Fe showed faster removal rates of nitrate. The observed reactivity enhancement was thought to result from additional reduction of nitrate by H atoms adsorbed on the surface of Cr, Co, or Cu metal. In contrast, both Ni/Fe and FeS/Fe showed slower removal of nitrate than uncoated Fe. In both cases, the coating, which highly disfavors the adsorption of nitrate, would form on the Fe surface. When goethite, HFO, and magnetite were amended, the nitrate reduction by Fe was significantly increased, with the effect being most evident with HFO. Although not capable of reducing nitrate, the mineral additives would serve as crystal nuclei for the corrosion products of Fe, thus making the development of passivation layers on the Fe surface less. In the future, we will perform a kinetic modeling of the experimental data to assess the relative contribution of multiple reaction paths in the nitrate reduction by Fe.

  18. Phosphine sampling and analysis using silver nitrate impregnated filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, M; Elcabache, J M; Grzebyk, M; Peltier, A; Proust, N; Thénot, D; Ducom, P; Fritsch, J

    2000-10-01

    In the field of industrial hygiene, besides the necessity of monitoring phosphine with direct reading apparatus to prevent accidents, there is a need for a method of sampling and analysing phosphine to control workers' exposure. The use of filters impregnated with silver nitrate to collect arsine, phosphine and stibine in workplace air has been described in the literature. Having previously chosen this type of filter to collect arsine, we studied its characteristics for phosphine capture. A filter impregnated with sodium carbonate was used both as a prefilter to collect the particles and to trap arsenic trioxide. After dissolving the silver compounds in nitric acid, ICP emission spectrometry was used to carry out the analysis. This article describes the comparative sampling we performed in a microelectronic laboratory and in a fumigation chamber (130 samples) to determine the concentration of AgNO3 impregnation solution to be used, the detection limit of the method and the retention capacity of the impregnated filters. Interference with other gases reacting with silver nitrate was studied and the storage time for sampled filters and analysis solutions was checked. The detection limit of the adopted method is better than 1 microg per filter, and the retention capacity exceeds 300 microg per filter. The problem of how to sample phosphine when H2S, NH3, or HCl is present has been solved, but the problem of sampling phosphine in atmospheres where acetylene evolves remains. Sampled filters and filter solutions are stable for more than three months at ambient temperature.

  19. Effects of NaCl salinity on N-15-nitrate fluxes and specific root length in the halophyte Plantago maritima L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinigg, M; Posthumus, F; Ferschke, M; Elzenga, JTM; Stulen, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    The effect of salinity on nitrate influx, efflux, nitrate net uptake rate and net nitrogen translocation to the shoot was assessed in a N-15 steady state labelling experiment in the halophyte Plantago maritima L. raised for 14 days on solution supplied with 50, 100 and 200 mol m(-3) sodium chloride

  20. Real-time monitoring of nitrate transport in the deep vadose zone under a crop field - implications for groundwater protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeltaub, Tuvia; Kurtzman, Daniel; Dahan, Ofer

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate is considered the most common non-point pollutant in groundwater. It is often attributed to agricultural management, when excess application of nitrogen fertilizer leaches below the root zone and is eventually transported as nitrate through the unsaturated zone to the water table. A lag time of years to decades between processes occurring in the root zone and their final imprint on groundwater quality prevents proper decision-making on land use and groundwater-resource management. This study implemented the vadose-zone monitoring system (VMS) under a commercial crop field. Data obtained by the VMS for 6 years allowed, for the first time known to us, a unique detailed tracking of water percolation and nitrate migration from the surface through the entire vadose zone to the water table at 18.5 m depth. A nitrate concentration time series, which varied with time and depth, revealed - in real time - a major pulse of nitrate mass propagating down through the vadose zone from the root zone toward the water table. Analysis of stable nitrate isotopes indicated that manure is the prevalent source of nitrate in the deep vadose zone and that nitrogen transformation processes have little effect on nitrate isotopic signature. The total nitrogen mass calculations emphasized the nitrate mass migration towards the water table. Furthermore, the simulated pore-water velocity through analytical solution of the convection-dispersion equation shows that nitrate migration time from land surface to groundwater is relatively rapid, approximately 5.9 years. Ultimately, agricultural land uses, which are constrained to high nitrogen application rates and coarse soil texture, are prone to inducing substantial nitrate leaching.

  1. Hydrolysis studies on bismuth nitrate: synthesis and crystallization of four novel polynuclear basic bismuth nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miersch, L; Rüffer, T; Schlesinger, M; Lang, H; Mehring, M

    2012-09-03

    Hydrolysis of Bi(NO(3))(3) in aqueous solution gave crystals of the novel compounds [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(NO(3))(5)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (1) and [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(NO(3))(6)(H(2)O)(2)]·H(2)O (2) among the series of hexanuclear bismuth oxido nitrates. Compounds 1 and 2 both crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n but show significant differences in their lattice parameters: 1, a = 9.2516(6) Å, b = 13.4298(9) Å, c = 17.8471(14) Å, β = 94.531(6)°, V = 2210.5(3) Å(3); 2, a = 9.0149(3) Å, b = 16.9298(4) Å, c = 15.6864(4) Å, β = 90.129(3)°, V = 2394.06(12) Å(3). Variation of the conditions for partial hydrolysis of Bi(NO(3))(3) gave bismuth oxido nitrates of even higher nuclearity, [{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(26)}·4DMSO][{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(24)}·4DMSO] (3) and [{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(26)}·2DMSO][{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(24)}·0.5DMSO] (5), upon crystallization from DMSO. Bismuth oxido clusters 3 and 5 crystallize in the triclinic space group P1 both with two crystallographically independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. The following lattice parameters are observed: 3, a = 20.3804(10) Å, b = 20.3871(9) Å, c = 34.9715(15) Å, α = 76.657(4)°, β = 73.479(4)°, γ = 60.228(5)°, V = 12021.7(9) Å(3); 5, a = 20.0329(4) Å, b = 20.0601(4) Å, c = 34.3532(6) Å, α = 90.196(1)°, β = 91.344(2)°, γ = 119.370(2)°, V = 12025.8(4) Å(3). Differences in the number of DMSO molecules (coordinated and noncoordinated) and ligand (nitrate, DMSO) coordination modes are observed.

  2. Use of the Time Domain Reflectometry to evaluate the nitrate distribution in fertirrigated soils columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Alves de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of spatial and temporal variation of the soil water content (θ, of the soil bulk electric conductivity (CEs, of the soil solution electric conductivity (CEss and of the ion concentration (Ci enables to estimate the water loss by deep percolation and evapotranspiration, to determine the areas of nutrients extraction by plants and the possible nutrients loss by leaching. The of objective this work was to evaluate, using the TDR technique, the nitrate distribution in Typic Quartzipsamment (RQ and Oxisol (LV soil columns fertirrigated with calcium nitrate. Nitrate fertirrigations were accomplished in the columns, and the soil water content (θ and the soil bulk electric conductivity (CEs obtained with TDR. The nitrate concentration was estimated using the values of θ and of CEs. In the RQ soil, the nitrate reached 30, 21 e 12 cm when the fertirrigations were done at the beginning, at the middle and at the end of the irrigation period, respectively. In the LV soil, independently of the moment of the fertirrigation, the nitrate was retained in the layer from 0 to 12 cm deep.

  3. Effect of biochar amendment on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Libutti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochar incorporation into agricultural soils has been proposed as a strategy to decrease nutrient leaching. The present study was designed to assess the effect of biochar on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil. Biochar obtained from the pyrogasification of fir wood chips was applied to soil and tested in a range of laboratory sorption experiments. Four soil treatments were considered: soil only (control, soil with 2, 4 and 8% of biochar by mass. The Freundlich sorption isotherm model was used to fit the adsorbed amount of nitrate in the soil-biochar mixtures. The model performed very well in interpreting the experimental data according to a general linear regression (analysis of co-variance statistical approach. Nitrate retention in the soilbiochar mixtures was always higher than control, regardless the NO3 – concentration in the range of 0-400 mg L–1. Different sorption capacities and intensities were detected depending on the biochar application rate. The highest adsorption capacity was observed in the soils added with 2 and 4% of biochar, respectively. From the results obtained is possible to infer that nitrate retention is higher at lower biochar addition rate to soil (2 and 4% and at lower nitrate concentration in the soil water solution. These preliminary laboratory results suggest that biochar addition to a typical Mediterranean agricultural soil could be an effective management option to mitigate nitrate leaching.

  4. Mathematical modelling and reactor design for multi-cycle bioregeneration of nitrate exhausted ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shelir; Roberts, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination is one of the largest issues facing communities worldwide. One of the most common methods for nitrate removal from water is ion exchange using nitrate selective resin. Although these resins have a great capacity for nitrate removal, they are considered non regenerable. The sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment processes can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin several times rather than replacing and incineration of exhausted resin. The use of multi-cycle exhaustion/bioregeneration of resin enclosed in a membrane has been shown to be an effective and innovative regeneration method. In this research, the mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin were studied and a mathematical model which incorporated physical desorption process with biological removal kinetics was developed. Regardless of the salt concentration of the solution, this specific resin is a pore-diffusion controlled process (XδD ¯CDr0(5+2α)3) shows that the bioregeneration process is controlled by reaction kinetics and is governed by biological removal of nitrate. The model was validated by comparison to experimental data; the average of R-squared values for cycle 1 to 5 of regeneration was 0.94 ± 0.06 which shows that the developed model predicted the experimental results very well. The model sensitivity for different parameters was evaluated and a model bioreactor design for bioregeneration of highly selective resins was also presented.

  5. The feasibility of applying immature yard-waste compost to remove nitrate from agricultural drainage effluents: A preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, L.; Krapac, I.G.; Roy, W.R.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrate is a major agricultural pollutant found in drainage waters. Immature yard-waste compost was selected as a filter media to study its feasibility for removing nitrate from drainage water. Different operation parameters were tested to examine the denitrification efficiency, including the amounts of compost packed in columns, the flow rate, and the compost storage periods. The experimental results suggested that hydraulic retention time was the major factor to determine the extent of nitrate removal, although the amount of compost packed could also contribute to the nitrate removal efficiency. The effluent nitrate concentration increased as the flow rate decreased, and the compost column reduced nitrate concentrations from 20 mg/L to less than 5 mg/L within 1.5 h. The solution pH increased at the onset of experiment because of denitrification, but stabilized at a pH of about 7.8, suggesting that the compost had a buffering capacity to maintain a suitable pH for denitrification. Storing compost under air-dried conditions may diminish the extent nitrate removed initially, but the effects were not apparent after longer applications. It appeared that immature yard-waste compost may be a suitable material to remove nitrate from tile drainage water because of its relatively large organic carbon content, high microbial activity, and buffering capacity. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of dissolved organic matter on nitrate-nitrogen removal by anion exchange resin and kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haiou; Yao, Zhijian; Wang, Mengqiao; Wang, Jinnan; Zhu, Zhaolian; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the removal of nitrate-nitrogen from the model contaminated water have been investigated utilizing the strong base anion exchange resins. With the increase of gallic acid concentration from 0 to 400 mg/L, the adsorption amount of nitrate-nitrogen on the commercial resins, including D201, Purolite A 300 (A300) and Purolite A 520E (A520E), would significantly decrease. However, the presence of tannin acid has little impact on nitrate-nitrogen adsorption on them.Compared to D201 and A300 resins, A520E resin exhibited more preferable adsorption ability toward nitrate-nitrogen in the presence of competing organic molecules, such as gallic acid and tannin acid at greater levels in aqueous solution. Attractively, the equilibrium data showed that the adsorption isotherm of nitrate-nitrogen on A520E resin was in good agreement with Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The rate parameters for the intra particle diffusion have been estimated for the different initial concentrations. In batch adsorption processes, nitrate-nitrogen diffuse in porous adsorbent and rate process usually depends on t1/2 rather than the contact time. The pseudo first- and the second-order kinetic models fit better for nitrate-nitrogen adsorption onto A520E resin. The observations reported herein illustrated that A520E resin will be an excellent adsorbent for enhanced removal of nitrate-nitrogen from contaminated groundwater.

  7. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality.

  8. 49 CFR 173.304b - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compressed gases in UN pressure receptacles. 173.304b Section 173.304b Transportation Other Regulations...; Preparation and Packaging § 173.304b Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in UN... UN pressure receptacles subject to the requirements in this section and § 173.304. In addition,...

  9. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. 72.19 Section 72.19 Animals... Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested pastures, ranges, or premises...

  10. 9 CFR 73.4 - Interstate shipment of exposed but not visibly diseased cattle from a quarantined or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... visibly diseased cattle from a quarantined or nonquarantined area; conditions under which permitted. 73.4... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.4 Interstate shipment of exposed but not visibly diseased cattle from a quarantined...

  11. 19 CFR 10.815 - Packaging and packing materials and containers for retail sale and for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging and packing materials and containers for... RATE, ETC. United States-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.815 Packaging and packing... good is packaged for retail sale and packing materials and containers for shipment are to...

  12. 19 CFR 10.775 - Packaging and packing materials and containers for retail sale and for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging and packing materials and containers for... RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.775 Packaging and packing... good is packaged for retail sale and packing materials and containers for shipment are to...

  13. 15 CFR 30.40 - Special exemptions for certain shipments to U.S. government agencies and employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special exemptions for certain shipments to U.S. government agencies and employees. 30.40 Section 30.40 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN...

  14. 41 CFR 102-118.130 - Must my agency use a GBL for express, courier, or small package shipments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my agency use a GBL for express, courier, or small package shipments? 102-118.130 Section 102-118.130 Public Contracts and... Transportation Services § 102-118.130 Must my agency use a GBL for express, courier, or small package...

  15. Groundwater Nitrate Contamination Risk Assessment: A Comparison of Parametric Systems and Simulation Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Sacco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater nitrate contamination is a source of rising concern that has been faced through the introduction of several regulations in different countries. However the methodologies used in the definition of Nitrate Vulnerable Zones are not included in the regulations. The aim of this work was to compare different methodologies, used to asses groundwater nitrate contamination risks, based on parametric systems or simulation modelling. The work was carried out in Piedmont, Italy, in an area characterised by intensive animal husbandry, high N load, a shallow water table and a coarse type of sub-soil sediments. Only N loads from agricultural non-point sources were considered. Different methodologies with different level of information have been compared to determine the groundwater nitrate contamination risk assessment: N load, IPNOA index, the intrinsic contamination risk from nitrates, leached N and N concentration of the soil solution estimated by the simulation model. The good correlation between the IPNOA index and the intrinsic nitrate contamination risk revealed that the parameters that describe the soil in this area did not lead to a different classification of the parcels. The intrinsic nitrate contamination risk was greatly influenced by N fertilisation, however the effect of the soils increased the variability in comparison to the IPNOA index. The leached N and N concentration in the leaching were closely correlated. The dilution effect of percolated water was almost negligible. Both methodologies were slightly correlated to the N fertilisation and the two indexes. The correlations related to the intrinsic nitrate contamination risk was higher than those related to IPNOA, and this means that the effect of taking into account soil parameters increases the correlation to the prediction of the simulation model.

  16. The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate: kinetics, products, reaction mechanisms, and atmospheric impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindelaub, Joel D.; Borca, Carlos H.; Hostetler, Matthew A.; Slade, Jonathan H.; Lipton, Mark A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2016-12-01

    The production of atmospheric organic nitrates (RONO2) has a large impact on air quality and climate due to their contribution to secondary organic aerosol and influence on tropospheric ozone concentrations. Since organic nitrates control the fate of gas phase NOx (NO + NO2), a byproduct of anthropogenic combustion processes, their atmospheric production and reactivity is of great interest. While the atmospheric reactivity of many relevant organic nitrates is still uncertain, one significant reactive pathway, condensed phase hydrolysis, has recently been identified as a potential sink for organic nitrate species. The partitioning of gas phase organic nitrates to aerosol particles and subsequent hydrolysis likely removes the oxidized nitrogen from further atmospheric processing, due to large organic nitrate uptake to aerosols and proposed hydrolysis lifetimes, which may impact long-range transport of NOx, a tropospheric ozone precursor. Despite the atmospheric importance, the hydrolysis rates and reaction mechanisms for atmospherically derived organic nitrates are almost completely unknown, including those derived from α-pinene, a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that is one of the most significant precursors to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). To better understand the chemistry that governs the fate of particle phase organic nitrates, the hydrolysis mechanism and rate constants were elucidated for several organic nitrates, including an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate (APN). A positive trend in hydrolysis rate constants was observed with increasing solution acidity for all organic nitrates studied, with the tertiary APN lifetime ranging from 8.3 min at acidic pH (0.25) to 8.8 h at neutral pH (6.9). Since ambient fine aerosol pH values are observed to be acidic, the reported lifetimes, which are much shorter than that of atmospheric fine aerosol, provide important insight into the fate of particle phase organic nitrates. Along with rate constant

  17. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2006-06-27

    Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of all aquatic food chains by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. The single most important nutrient for photosynthesis and growth is nitrate, which is severely limiting in many aquatic environments particularly the open ocean (1, 2). It is therefore not surprising that NrtA, the solute-binding component of the high-affinity nitrate ABC transporter, is the single-most abundant protein in the plasma membrane of these bacteria (3). Here we describe the first structure of a nitratespecific receptor, NrtA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, complexed with nitrate and determined to a resolution of 1.5Å. NrtA is significantly larger than other oxyanionbinding proteins, representing a new class of transport proteins. From sequence alignments, the only other solute-binding protein in this class is CmpA, a bicarbonatebinding protein. Therefore, these organisms created a novel solute-binding protein for two of the most important nutrients; inorganic nitrogen and carbon. The electrostatic charge distribution of NrtA appears to force the protein off of the membrane while the flexible tether facilitates the delivery of nitrate to the membrane pore. The structure not only details the determinants for nitrate selectivity in NrtA, but also the bicarbonate specificity in CmpA. Nitrate and bicarbonate transport are regulated by the cytoplasmic proteins NrtC and CmpC, respectively. Interestingly, the residues lining the ligand binding pockets suggest that they both bind nitrate. This implies that the nitrogen and carbon uptake pathways are synchronized by intracellular nitrate and nitrite.3 The nitrate ABC transporter of cyanobacteria is composed of four polypeptides (Figure 1): a high-affinity periplasmic solute-binding lipoprotein (NrtA), an integral membrane permease (NrtB), a cytoplasmic ATPase (NrtD), and a unique ATPase/solute-binding fusion protein (Nrt

  18. Scale and Seasonal Controls on Nitrate and Sediment Retention in Freshwater Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestegaard, K. L.; Seldomridge, E.; Statkiewicz, A.

    2013-12-01

    Channel networks in freshwater tidal wetlands convey water, sediment, and solutes into marsh interiors where sediment deposition and biogeochemical processes, such as denitrification and nitrogen uptake occur. Tidal inlets that connect these channel network systems to the main estuary define the initial solute or sediment load into these systems, but channel, soil, and vegetation characteristics influence nitrate and sediment retention. We used field measurements and remotely sensed images to determine marsh area, stream length, inlet morphology, and channel morphology for the 267 marshes in the freshwater tidal ecosystem. Discharge and water volume over high tidal cycles was measured at selected inlets representative of the range of inlet sizes in the ecosystem. Aquatic vegetation distribution and density was also measured at these inlets. These data were used to develop geomorphic-hydraulic relationships for the marshes for winter (no vegetation) and summer (vegetated) conditions. Nitrate and sediment retention were determined from field mass balance measurements based on water flux and concentration measurements taken over tidal cycle at inlets to selected marshes of varying size over a 3-year period. These mass balance data indicate that net nitrate retention is a simple function of tidal water volume for marshes of different sizes and for various vegetated conditions. These data suggest that nitrate retention is transport limited for the range of initial nitrate concentrations observed in this system. Although nitrate retention was a function of tidal water volume, it was also seasonally variable due to restrictions in water flow and volume caused by aquatic vegetation in summer months. Sediment retention is seasonally variable due to the strong controls exerted by emergent and submerged aquatic vegetation and decoupled from the water volume dependence observed for nitrate retention. Variations in sediment retention caused by vegetation resulted in channel

  19. Large scale reactive transport of nitrate across the surface water divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortunov, E.; Lu, C.; Amos, R.; Grathwohl, P.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater pollution caused by agricultural and atmospheric inputs is a pressing issue in environmental management worldwide. Various researchers have studied different aspects of nitrate contamination since the substantial increase of the agriculture pollution in the second half of the 20th century. This study addresses large scale reactive solute transport in a typical Germany hilly landscapes in a transect crossing 2 valleys: River Neckar and Ammer. The numerical model was constructed compromising a 2-D cross-section accounting for typical fractured mudstones and unconsolidated sediments. Flow modelling showed that the groundwater divide significantly deviates from the surface water divide providing conditions for inter-valley flow and transport. Reactive transport modelling of redox-sensitive solutes (e.g. agriculture nitrate and natural sulfate, DOC, ammonium) with MIN3P was used to elucidate source of nitrate in aquifers and rivers. Since both floodplains, in the Ammer and Neckar valley contain Holocene sediments relatively high in organic carbon, agricultural nitrate is reduced therein and does not reach the groundwater. However, nitrate applied in the hillslopes underlain by fractured oxidized mudrock is transported to the high yield sand and gravel aquifer in the Neckar valley. Therefore, the model predicts that nitrate in the Neckar valley comes, to a large extent, from the neighboring Ammer valley. Moreover, nitrate observed in the rivers and drains in the Ammer valley is very likely geogenic since frequent peat layers there release ammonium which is oxidized as it enters the surface water. Such findings are relevant for land and water quality management.

  20. Synthesis of nano-structured polypyrrole/copper electrodes for nitrate and nitrite electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Thoa Nguyen, Thi; Thinh Nguyen, Viet; Nguyen Bui, Nhat; Do, Duong Kim Bao; Pham, Anh Minh

    2010-09-01

    Nanostructured polypyrrole film was synthesized onto a copper electrode in solutions of oxalic and salicylic acids and their buffers. The electrooxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole film and the electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions at synthesized Ppy modified copper electrodes (Ppy/Cu) in potassium chloride aqueous solutions were studied using chronoamperometry. The nanoporous structure of the synthesized Ppy films was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nitrate and nitrite reduction were performed by an electrochemical method under potentiostatic conditions. The Ppy/Cu electrodes prepared in the oxalate buffer and salicylic acid solutions perform more stable catalytic activity for nitrate reduction; their service life is about ten times longer than that for the electrodes prepared in oxalic acid solution. After 20 h of electrolysis, the nitrite was reduced completely with 100% efficiency and the nitrate was reduced with 35% efficiency. Report submitted to the 5th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN, Hanoi, 9-12 November 2010.

  1. Nitrate sorption by thermally activated Mg/Al chloride hydrotalcite-like compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mahamudur; Patel, Rajkishore

    2009-09-30

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the ability of Mg-Al-Cl hydrotalcite-like compound for the removal of nitrate from synthetic nitrate solution. In the present study Mg-Al-Cl hydrotalcite was synthesized by co-precipitation method and was characterized using SEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA-DSC. To know the practical applicability, a detailed removal study of nitrate ion was carried out. The removal of nitrate was 87.6% under neutral condition, using 0.3g of adsorbent in 100mL of nitrate solution having initial concentration of 10mg/L. Adsorption kinetic study revealed that the adsorption process followed first-order kinetics. Adsorption data were fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherm with R(2) (correlation coefficient)>0.99. Thermodynamic parameters were also calculated to study the effect of temperature on the removal process. In order to understand the adsorption type, equilibrium data were tested with Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm. The percentage removal was found to decrease gradually with increase in pH and the optimum pH was found to be 6. The process was rapid and equilibrium was established within first 40 min.

  2. Upscaling of lysimeter measurements to regional groundwater nitrate distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann; Kupfersberger, Hans; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    For many European countries nitrate leaching from the soil zone into the aquifer due to surplus application of mineral fertilizer and animal manure by farmers constitutes the most important threat to groundwater quality. This is a diffuse pollution situation and measures to change agricultural production have to be investigated at the aquifer scale to safeguard drinking water supply from shallow groundwater resources Lysimeters are state-of-the-art measurements for water and solute fluxes through the unsaturated zone towards groundwater at the point scale, but due to regional heterogeneities (especially concerning soil conditions) lysimeters cannot provide aquifer-wide groundwater recharge and solute leaching. Thus, in this work the numerical simulation model SIMWASER/STOTRASIM (Stenitzer, 1988; Feichtinger, 1998) for quantifying groundwater recharge and nitrate leaching at aquifer scale is applied. Nevertheless, according to Groenendijk et al. (2014) a model calibration by means of lysimeter measurements is essential, since uncalibrated models are generally far from acceptable. Thus, a lysimeter provides the basis for the parameterization of numerical simulation models. To quantify also the impact on regional nitrate distribution in the groundwater, we couple the unsaturated zone model SIMWASER/STOTRASIM with the saturated groundwater flow and solute transport model FELOW (Diersch, 2009) sequentially. In principal, the problem could be solved by the 3 dimensional equation describing variable saturated groundwater flow and solute transport. However, this is computationally prohibitive due to the temporal and spatial scope of the task, particularly in the framework of running numerous simulations to compromise between conflicting interests (i.e. good groundwater status and high agricultural yield). To account for the unknown regional distribution of crops grown and amount, timing and kind of fertilizers used a stochastic tool (Klammler et al, 2011) is developed that

  3. 77 FR 65532 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice of Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice... the antidumping duty order on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (ammonium nitrate) from the... Administrative Review: Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate (Ammonium Nitrate) from the Russian...

  4. The cost and risk impacts of rerouting railroad shipments of hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Theodore S; Erkut, Erhan; Zschocke, Mark S

    2007-09-01

    Rail shipments of hazardous materials expose the population near the routes to the possibility of an accident resulting in a spill. Rail routes are determined by economic concerns such as route length and the revenue generated for the originating carrier. In this paper we consider an alternate routing strategy that takes accident risks into account. We employ a model to quantify rail transport risk and then use a weighted combination of cost and risk and generate alternate routes. In some cases the alternate routes achieve significantly lower risk values than the practical routes at a small incremental cost. While there are generally fewer rerouting alternatives for rail than for road transport, considering the possible consequences of a train derailment we argue that risk should be taken into account when selecting rail routes and that the cost-risk tradeoffs should be evaluated.

  5. Removal of Nitrate from Groundwater by Cyanobacteria: Quantitative Assessment of Factors Influencing Nitrate Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Qiang; Westerhoff, Paul; Vermaas, Wim

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of biologically removing nitrate from groundwater was tested by using cyanobacterial cultures in batch mode under laboratory conditions. Results demonstrated that nitrate-contaminated groundwater, when supplemented with phosphate and some trace elements, can be used as growth medium supporting vigorous growth of several strains of cyanobacteria. As cyanobacteria grew, nitrate was removed from the water. Of three species tested, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 displayed the h...

  6. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  7. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  8. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate and Phosphate Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-04-09

    Apr 9, 2013 ... Drinking Water Samples in The Vicinity of Irrigated Farmlands of Kura ... of Kura irrigated farmlands using polythene plastic containers and were analysed for the nitrate and ... polythene bottles, the bottles were covered with.

  9. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  10. Nitrate Waste Treatment Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Patrick Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Terrence Kerwin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-05

    This plan is designed to outline the collection and analysis of nitrate salt-bearing waste samples required by the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (Permit).

  11. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  12. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ...- accessible Internet access could obtain the access necessary to register online. 3. How to best notify... ammonium nitrate sellers (AN Sellers) when it is not possible for an AN Seller to verify the identity of...

  13. 1st Quarter Transportation Report FY2017: Waste Shipments To and From the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Louis [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of waste shipments to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. This report summarizes the 1st quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2017 low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) and classified non-radioactive (CNR) shipments. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment from a NNSS facility and returned to the NNSS this quarter of FY2017.

  14. The Arabidopsis ATNRT2.7 nitrate transporter controls nitrate content in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Franck; Orsel, Mathilde; Dorbe, Marie-France; Chardon, Fabien; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Miller, Anthony J; Krapp, Anne; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2007-05-01

    In higher plants, nitrate is taken up by root cells where Arabidopsis thaliana NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (ATNRT2.1) chiefly acts as the high-affinity nitrate uptake system. Nitrate taken up by the roots can then be translocated from the root to the leaves and the seeds. In this work, the function of the ATNRT2.7 gene, one of the seven members of the NRT2 family in Arabidopsis, was investigated. High expression of the gene was detected in reproductive organs and peaked in dry seeds. beta-Glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression driven by the ATNRT2.7 promoter confirmed this organ specificity. We assessed the capacity of ATNRT2.7 to transport nitrate in Xenopus laevis oocytes or when it is expressed ectopically in mutant plants deficient in nitrate transport. We measured the impact of an ATNRT2.7 mutation and found no difference from the wild type during vegetative development. By contrast, seed nitrate content was affected by overexpression of ATNRT2.7 or a mutation in the gene. Finally, we showed that this nitrate transporter protein was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Our results demonstrate that ATNRT2.7 plays a specific role in nitrate accumulation in the seed.

  15. Organic nitrates and nitrate tolerance--state of the art and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic and antiischemic effects of nitroglycerin (GTN) are lost upon chronic administration due to the rapid development of nitrate tolerance. The mechanism of this phenomenon has puzzled several generations of scientists, but recent findings have led to novel hypotheses. The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the mitochondria and the subsequent inhibition of the nitrate-bioactivating enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) appear to play a central role, at least for GTN, that is, bioactivated by ALDH-2. Importantly, these findings provide the opportunity to reconcile the two "traditional" hypotheses of nitrate tolerance, that is, the one postulating a decreased bioactivation and the concurrent one suggesting a role of oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent animal and human experimental studies suggest that the organic nitrates are not a homogeneous group but demonstrate a broad diversity with regard to induction of vascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and other side effects. In the past, attempts to avoid nitrate-induced side effects have focused on administration schedules that would allow a "nitrate-free interval"; in the future, the role of co-therapies with antioxidant compounds and of activation of endogeneous protective pathways such as the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) will need to be explored. However, the development of new nitrates, for example, tolerance-free aminoalkyl nitrates or combination of nitrate groups with established cardiovascular drugs like ACE inhibitors or AT(1)-receptor blockers (hybrid molecules) may be of great clinical interest.

  16. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  17. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT.

  18. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  19. [Influence of silver/silicon dioxide on infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-Ling; Yue, Li; Jia, Zhi-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Quickly detecting of ocean nutrient was one important task in marine pollution monitoring. We discovered the application of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy in the detection of ocean nutrient through researching the evaporation of sodium nitrate solution. The silicon dioxide (SiO2) with highly dispersion was prepared by Stober method, The silver/silica (Ag/SiO2) composite materials were prepared by mixing ammonia solution and silicon dioxide aqueous solution. Three kinds of composite materials with different surface morphology were fabricated through optimizing the experimental parameter and changing the experimental process. The surface morphology, crystal orientation and surface plasmon resonance were investigated by means of the scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Visible absorption spectrum and infrared ab- sorption spectroscopy. The SEM images showed that the sample A was purified SiO2, sample B and sample C were mixture of silver nanoparticle and silicon dioxide, while sample D was completed nanoshell structure. The absorption spectroscopy showed that there was surface plasmon resonance in the UV-visible region, while there was possibility of surface plasmon resonance in the Infrared absorption region. The effect of Ag/SiO2 composite material on the infrared absorption spectra of sodium nitrite solution was investigated through systematically analyzing the infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate solution during its evaporation, i. e. the peak integration area of nitrate and the peak integration area of water molecule. The experimental results show that the integration area of nitrate was enhanced greatly during the evaporation process while the integration area of water molecule decreased continuously. The integration area of nitrate comes from the anti-symmetric stretch vibration and the enhancement of the vibration is attributed to the interface effect of Ag/SiO2 which is consistent with Jensen T

  20. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  1. Assessment of the risk of transporting plutonium dioxide and liquid plutonium nitrate by train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D.K.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Johnson, J.F.; Peterson, P.L.

    1977-02-01

    The risk analysis model is applied to the assessment of the risk of Pu releases due to transportation accidents and package misclosure and degradation. The transport system and accident environment are described and release sequences postulated. Results are related to the early 1980s, when Pu shipments are expected to be more frequent (18 metric tons Pu shipped by rail per year, average shipment distance of 1530 miles, regulations and shipping systems same as in 1974, PuO/sub 2/ shipped in 6M containers and liquid Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ in L-10 containers, with 230 kg in a 90-container 6M shipment and 136 kg in a 68-container L-10 shipment). It is estimated that PuO/sub 2/ shipments will be involved in an accident every 6 years and Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ shipments every 3.5 years. Consequences are expressed as risk spectra. Loss of thermal insulation followed by exposure to a fire was found to be the most significant risk contributor for the liquid shipments. Risk in rail shipment of Pu was found to be similar to that in truck shipment, although for the liquid shipments, there is a difference in the importance of factors contributing to the risk. (DLC)

  2. METHOD FOR NITRATE DETERMINATION IN WATER IN THE PRESENCE OF NITRITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sandu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study relates to determination of nitrate in presence of nitrite in water and can be used in the quality monitoring of natural water (surface and groundwater, drinking water, water from fish farms and public aquaria where autonomous filters is used. The nature and quantity of reagents used have insignificant impact on natural waters and sewages. According to the investigation, the method includes the removal of nitrite from the solution/water with sulfaminic acid, the nitrate ion reduction to nitrite using a reducing mixture that contains Na2SO4 and zinc dust in ratio of 100:5 and determining the nitrite with the Griess reagent.

  3. Nitrate reduction over a Pd-Cu/MWCNT catalyst: application to a polluted groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Olivia Salomé G P; Orfão, José J M; Gallegos-Suarez, Esteban; Castillejos, Eva; Rodríguez-Ramos, Inmaculada; Pereira, Manuel Fernando R

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the presence of inorganic and organic matter during the catalytic reduction of nitrate in a local groundwater over a Pd-Cu catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes was investigated. It was observed that the catalyst performance was affected by the groundwater composition. The nitrate conversion attained was higher in the experiment using only deionized water as solvent than in the case of simulated or real groundwater. With exception of sulphate ions, all the other solutes evaluated (chloride and phosphate ions and natural organic matter) had a negative influence on the catalytic activity and selectivity to nitrogen.

  4. Heterogeneous chemical reaction of chlorine nitrate and water on sulfuric-acid surfaces at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of H2SO4 as a catalyst for aerosol production of chlorine compounds in the chemistry of the antarctic stratosphere was investigated in laboratory trials. The experiments involved the gas surface collision rate of a molecule on a given surface during its residence time in a Knudsen cell in molecular flow conditions. Chlorine nitrate gas was made to flow through a chamber exposed to a container holding a 95.6 pct H2SO4 solution. Gas leaving the cell was scanned with a mass spectrometer. A sticking coefficient of 0.00032 was found for the chlorine nitrate, a value five times that previously reported.

  5. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  6. Field Scale Groundwater Nitrate Loading Model for the Central Valley, California, 1945-Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.; Dzurella, K.; Bell, A.; Kourakos, G.

    2015-12-01

    nitrogen imbalance and is a significant threat to future groundwater quality in the Central Valley system. The model provides the basis for evaluating future planning scenarios to develop and assess long-term solutions for sustainable groundwater quality management.Anthropogenic groundwater nitrate contamination in the Central Valley aquifer system, California, is widespread, with over 40% of domestic wells in some counties exceeding drinking water standards. Sources of groundwater nitrate include leaky municipal wastewater systems, municipal wastewater recharge, onsite wastewater treatment (septic) systems, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, animal farming, application of organic waste materials (sludge, biosolids, animal manure) to agricultural lands, and synthetic fertilizer. At the site or field scale, nitrogen inputs to the landscape are balanced by plant nitrogen uptake and harvest, atmospheric nitrogen losses, surface runoff of nitrogen, soil nitrogen storage changes, and leaching to groundwater. Irrigated agriculture is a dominant player in the Central Valley nitrogen cycle: The largest nitrogen fluxes are synthetic fertilizer and animal manure applications to cropland, crop nitrogen uptake, and groundwater nitrogen losses. We construct a historic field/parcel scale groundwater nitrogen loading model distringuishing urban and residential areas, individual animal farming areas, leaky wastewater lagoons, and approximately 50 different categories of agricultural crops. For non-agricultural landuses, groundwater nitrate loading is based on reported leaching values, animal population, and human population. For cropland, groundwater nitrate loading is computed from mass balance, taking into account diverse and historically changing management practices between different crops. Groundwater nitrate loading is estimated for 1945 to current. Significant increases in groundwater nitrate loading are associated with the expansion of synthetic fertilizer use in the 1950s to 1970s

  7. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  8. Observations of Alkyl Nitrates during ARCTAS: Investigation of the low NOx Chemistry of Isoprene Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Min, K.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W. H.; Fried, A.; Ren, X.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Team, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    During numerous ground and airborne experiments alkyl and multifunctional nitrates, measured by Thermal Dissociation-Laser Induced Fluorescence, have been shown to represent a significant fraction of oxidized nitrogen. It is postulated that a large fraction of these nitrates, particularly in forested environments, are isoprene-derived nitrates. The formation of these nitrates is important in terminating photochemical ozone production. However, it is still highly uncertain if these nitrates serve as a permanent termination step or only as a temporary sink that upon further oxidation, releases NO2 back into the atmosphere. The summer portion of the NASA ARCTAS experiment allows us to investigate the role of alkyl nitrates in photochemical ozone production in a new regime: the low NOx of the summer boreal forest. This data set also represents the first time that vertical profiles of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein were obtained along with total alkyl nitrates. We use these measurements to investigate and constrain the low NOx chemistry of isoprene nitrates. We compare these measurements to past airborne and laboratory studies.

  9. Nitrate removal from high strength nitrate-bearing wastes in granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, Tulasi Venkata; Renu, Kadali; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Satya Sai, Pedapati Murali; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2016-02-01

    A 6-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for development of granular sludge capable of denitrification of high strength nitrates. Complete and stable denitrification of up to 5420 mg L(-1) nitrate-N (2710 mg L(-1) nitrate-N in reactor) was achieved by feeding simulated nitrate waste at a C/N ratio of 3. Compact and dense denitrifying granular sludge with relatively stable microbial community was developed during reactor operation. Accumulation of large amounts of nitrite due to incomplete denitrification occurred when the SBR was fed with 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. Complete denitrification could not be achieved at this C/N ratio, even after one week of reactor operation as the nitrite levels continued to accumulate. In order to improve denitrification performance, the reactor was fed with nitrate concentrations of 1354 mg L(-1), while keeping C/N ratio at 2. Subsequently, nitrate concentration in the feed was increased in a step-wise manner to establish complete denitrification of 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. The results show that substrate concentration plays an important role in denitrification of high strength nitrate by influencing nitrite accumulation. Complete denitrification of high strength nitrates can be achieved at lower substrate concentrations, by an appropriate acclimatization strategy.

  10. The numerical simulation for coal gangue as roadbed material on groundwater nitrate concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DU Yongli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation was used to elaborate temporal and spatial distribution of nitrate concentration in groundwater under one highway,which was constructed with coal gangue based on experiment.Experimental results indicated that the contaminated area spread around over time,but more obviously in horizontal direction,especially in groundwater flow direction.In addition,nitrate concentration decreased gradually in two-axis direction,and contaminated degree decreased with the increasing of distance from the contaminated source caused leaching solution.Numerical simulation suggests that the nitrate concentration (N in the section will only meet the standard of class III (GB/T14848-93 for groundwater environmental quality after 10 years,although the concentration reaches the standard of class I currently.

  11. Comparison of nitrate attenuation characterization methods at the Uranium mill tailing site in Monument Valley, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kenneth C.; Jordan, Fiona L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Jody Waugh, W.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2009-11-01

    SummarySeveral methods for characterizing the occurrence and rate of nitrate attenuation were tested at a field site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Spatial and temporal nitrate concentration data collected from a transect of monitoring wells located along the plume centerline were analyzed to evaluate the overall rates of natural attenuation. The occurrence and rate of denitrification was evaluated through microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute-transport modeling. First-order denitrification-rate coefficients calculated with each method were comparable. In addition, the composite natural attenuation rate coefficient was similar to the denitrification-rate coefficients, which suggests that microbially induced decay primarily controls nitrate attenuation at the site. This

  12. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis highlights reciprocal interactions of urea and nitrate for nitrogen acquisition by maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Laura; Zamboni, Anita; Monte, Rossella; Tomasi, Nicola; Varanini, Zeno; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Even though urea and nitrate are the two major nitrogen (N) forms applied as fertilizers in agriculture and occur concomitantly in soils, the reciprocal influence of these two N sources on the mechanisms of their acquisition are poorly understood. Therefore, molecular and physiological aspects of urea and nitrate uptake were investigated in maize (Zea mays), a crop plant consuming high amounts of N. In roots, urea uptake was stimulated by the presence of urea in the external solution, indicating the presence of an inducible transport system. On the other hand, the presence of nitrate depressed the induction of urea uptake and, at the same time, the induction of nitrate uptake was depressed by the presence of urea. The expression of about 60,000 transcripts of maize in roots was monitored by microarray analyses and the transcriptional patterns of those genes involved in nitrogen acquisition were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). In comparison with the treatment without added N, the exposure of maize roots to urea modulated the expression of only very few genes, such as asparagine synthase. On the other hand, the concomitant presence of urea and nitrate enhanced the overexpression of genes involved in nitrate transport (NRT2) and assimilation (nitrate and nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase 2), and a specific response of 41 transcripts was determined, including glutamine synthetase 1-5, glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase, shikimate kinase and arogenate dehydrogenase. Also based on the real-time RT-PCR analysis, the transcriptional modulation induced by both sources might determine an increase in N metabolism promoting a more efficient assimilation of the N that is taken up.

  14. New organic nitrate-containing benzyloxy isonipecotanilide derivatives with vasodilatory and anti-platelet activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Candia, Modesto; Marini, Elisabetta; Zaetta, Giorgia; Cellamare, Saverio; Di Stilo, Antonella; Altomare, Cosimo D

    2015-05-25

    A number of new nitric oxide (NO)-precursors were synthesized by grafting nitrate-containing moieties on the structures of the benzyloxy isonipecotanilide derivatives 1 and 2 already reported as moderately potent antiplatelet agents. Various nitrooxy (ONO2)-alkyl side chains were covalently linked to the piperidine nitrogen of the parent compounds through carbamate and amide linkage, and the synthesis of a benzyl nitrate analog (15) of compound 1 was also achieved. The in vitro vasodilatory activities, as well as platelet anti-aggregatory effects, of the newly synthesized organic nitrates were assessed. The (ONO2)methyl carbamate-based derivative 5a and the benzyl nitrate analog 15, which on the other hand retain activity as inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, exhibited strong NO-mediated vasodilatory effects on pre-contracted rat aorta strips, with EC50 values in the low nanomolar range (13 and 29 nM, respectively). Experiments carried out with the selectively inhibited soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), which is the key enzyme of the NO-mediated pathway leading to vascular smooth muscle relaxation, confirmed the involvement of NO in the observed vasodilation. The nitrate derivatives proved to be stable in acidic aqueous solution and at pH 7.4. In human serum, unlike 5a, which showed not to undergo enzyme-catalyzed decomposition, the other tested (ONO2)-alkyl carbamate-based compounds (5b and 5e) and benzyl nitrate 15 underwent a faster degradation. However, their decomposition rates in serum were quite slow (t½>2.6 h), which suggests that nitrate moiety is poorly metabolized in blood plasma and that much of the in vitro anti-platelet activity has to be attributed to the intact (ONO2)-containing molecules.

  15. Bioremediation of residual fertilizer nitrate: I. Laboratory demonstration of an on-farm in situ pollution control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwuegbu, B U; Prasher, S O; Ahmad, D

    2001-01-01

    This exploratory laboratory study was undertaken to develop and test an in situ bioremediation system intended to point the way toward a possible field application. The proposed method uses a water table management (WTM) system to deliver nutrients or other amendments to subsoil microorganisms for biostimulation and subsequent biodegradation of pollutants in the saturated and unsaturated zones of the soil. The study was carried out on packed soil columns and bioremediation of residual fertilizer nitrate was attempted. Different levels of organic carbon supplement (glucose C) were introduced into these columns via subirrigation in order to supplement the readily available organic carbon levels in the soil. The study was carried out in two experimental setups. The first setup investigated (i) the effect of addition of a high (970 mg L(-1)) and a low (120 mg L(-1)) glucose C level and (ii) the efficacy of using the subirrigation system as a method for nutrient delivery in bioremediation of leached nitrate. This setup was monitored with time, depth, and with reference to the nitrate residue in the soil solution. Leached nitrate was denitrified to less than 10 mg L(-1) nitrate N at both glucose levels. The second setup investigated the effect of a range of low levels of glucose C on nitrate decontamination, soil pH, and total microbial count in order to find out an optimal glucose C level that reduced the most nitrate and maintained the pH homeostasis of soil.

  16. The δ15N of nitrate in the Southern Ocean: Consumption of nitrate in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Altabet, M. A.; McCorkle, D. C.; Francois, R.; Fischer, G.

    1999-12-01

    We report nitrogen isotope data for nitrate from transects of hydrocast and surface samples collected in the eastern Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean, focusing here on the data from the upper water column to study the effect of nitrate consumption by phytoplankton. The δ15N of nitrate increases by 1-2‰ from deep water into the Antarctic summertime surface layer, due to kinetic isotopic fractionation during nitrate uptake. Estimation of the nitrate uptake isotope effect from Antarctic depth profiles yields values in the range of 5-6‰ in east Indian sector and 4-5‰ in the east Pacific sector. Surface transect data from the Pacific sector also yield values of 4-5‰. The major uncertainty in the profile-based estimation of the isotope effect involves the δ15N of nitrate from the temperature minimum layer below the summertime Antarctic surface layer, which deviates significantly from the predictions of simple models of isotope fractionation. For the Subantarctic surface, it is possible to distinguish between nitrate supplied laterally from the surface Antarctic and nitrate supplied vertically from the Subantarctic thermocline because of the distinctive relationships between the δ15N and concentration of nitrate in these two potential sources. Our Subantarctic samples, collected during the summer and fall, indicate that nitrate is supplied to the Subantarctic surface largely by northward transport of Antarctic surface water. Isotopic data from the Pacific sector of the Subantarctic suggest an isotope effect of 4.5‰, indistinguishable from the Antarctic estimates in this sector.

  17. Microbial Reduction of Chromate in the presence of Nitrate by Three Nitrate Respiring Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eChovanec

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the bioremediation of toxic metals is the co-occurrence of nitrate, as it can inhibit metal transformation. Geobacter metallireducens, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, and Sulfurospirillum barnesii are three soil bacteria that can reduce chromate (Cr(VI and nitrate, and may be beneficial for developing bioremediation strategies. All three organisms respire through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA, employing different nitrate reductases but similar nitrite reductase (Nrf. G. metallireducens reduces nitrate to nitrite via the membrane bound nitrate reductase (Nar, while S. barnesii and D. desulfuricans strain 27774 have slightly different forms of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap. We investigated the effect of DNRA growth in the presence of Cr(VI in these three organisms and the ability of each to reduce Cr(VI to Cr(III, and each organisms responded differently. Growth of G. metallireducens on nitrate was completely inhibited by Cr(VI. Cultures of D. desulfuricans on nitrate media was initially delayed (48 h in the presence of Cr(VI, but ultimately reached comparable cell yields to the non-treated control. This prolonged lag phase accompanied the transformation of Cr(VI to Cr(III. Viable G. metallireducens cells could reduce Cr(VI, whereas Cr(VI reduction by D. desulfuricans during growth, was mediated by a filterable and heat stable extracellular metabolite. S. barnesii growth on nitrate was not affected by Cr(VI, and Cr(VI was reduced to Cr(III. However, Cr(VI reduction activity in S. barnesii, was detected in both the cell free spent medium and cells, indicating both extracellular and cell associated mechanisms. Taken together, these results have demonstrated that Cr(VI affects DNRA in the three organisms differently, and that each have a unique mechanism for Cr(VI reduction.

  18. Study on volatilization mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide from nitrosyl ruthenium nitrate by using mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi; Shibata, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In a cooling malfunction accident of a high-level liquid waste (HLLW) tank, behavior of ruthenium (Ru) attracts much attention, since Ru could be oxidized to a volatile chemical form in the boiling and drying of HLLW, and part of radioactive Ru can potentially be released to the environment. In this study, nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO3)3) dissolved in nitric acid (HNO3), which is commonly contained in a simulated HLLW, was dried and heated up to 723 K, and the evolved gas was introduced into a mass spectrometer. The well-known volatile species, ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) was detected in a temperature range between 390 K and 500 K with the peak top around 440 K. Various gases such as HNO3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO) also evolved due to evaporation of the nitric acid and decomposition of the nitrate ions. The ion current of RuO4 seems to increase with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO3 decreases. More volatilization of RuO4 was observed from the HNO3 solution containing not only Ru(NO)(NO3)3 but also cerium nitrate (Ce(NO3)3·6H2O) which was added for extra supply of nitrate ion, compared with that from the HNO3 solution containing only Ru(NO)(NO3)3. These experimental results suggest that Ru could be oxidized to form RuO4 by the nitrate ion as well as HNO3.

  19. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  20. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  1. Nitrate transceptor(s) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojon, Alain; Krouk, Gabriel; Perrine-Walker, Francine; Laugier, Edith

    2011-04-01

    The availability of mineral nutrients in the soil dramatically fluctuates in both time and space. In order to optimize their nutrition, plants need efficient sensing systems that rapidly signal the local external concentrations of the individual nutrients. Until recently, the most upstream actors of the nutrient signalling pathways, i.e. the sensors/receptors that perceive the extracellular nutrients, were unknown. In Arabidopsis, increasing evidence suggests that, for nitrate, the main nitrogen source for most plant species, a major sensor is the NRT1.1 nitrate transporter, also contributing to nitrate uptake by the roots. Membrane proteins that fulfil a dual nutrient transport/signalling function have been described in yeast and animals, and are called 'transceptors'. This review aims to illustrate the nutrient transceptor concept in plants by presenting the current evidence indicating that NRT1.1 is a representative of this class of protein. The various facets, as well as the mechanisms of nitrate sensing by NRT1.1 are considered, and the possible occurrence of other nitrate transceptors is discussed.

  2. Unraveling Pathways of Guaiacol Nitration in Atmospheric Waters: Nitrite, A Source of Reactive Nitronium Ion in the Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroflič, Ana; Grilc, Miha; Grgić, Irena

    2015-08-04

    The tropospheric aqueous-phase aging of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol, GUA), a lignocellulosic biomass burning pollutant, is addressed in this work. Pathways of GUA nitration in aqueous solution under atmospherically relevant conditions are proposed and critically discussed. The influence of NaNO2 and H2O2, hydroxyl radical scavenger, and sunlight was assessed by an experimental-modeling approach. In the presence of the urban pollutant, nitrite, GUA is preferentially nitrated to yield 4- and 6-nitroguaiacol. After a short lag-time, 4,6-dinitroguaiacol is also formed. Its production accelerates after guaiacol is completely consumed, which is nicely described by the model function accounting for NO2(•) and NO2(+) as nitrating agents. Although the estimated second-order kinetic rate constants of methoxyphenol nitration with NO2(•) are substantially higher than the corresponding rate constants of nitration with NO2(+), nitration rates are competitive under nighttime and liquid atmospheric aerosol-like conditions. In contrast to concentrations of radicals, which are governed by the interplay between diffusion-controlled reactions and are therefore mostly constant, concentrations of electrophiles are very much dependent on the ratio of NO2(-) to activated aromatics in solution. These results contribute substantially to the understanding of methoxyphenol aging in the atmospheric waters and underscore the importance of including electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions in atmospheric models.

  3. Reaction mechanism of lanthanum nitrate-doped Mo-La material during solid-liquid spray doping processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Fa Feng; Qin-Li Yang; Xiao-Ming Dang; Sha Xi; Ya-Qi Wang

    2015-01-01

    At three critical temperatures which were obtained by thermo-gravimetry-differential thermal analysis-differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DTG/DSC)curves of lanthanum nitrate crystal,the air thermal decomposition experiments and solid-liquid spray doping simulation procedures of lanthanum nitrate crystal were carried out,and their products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD).Meanwhile,the spray doping processing of MoO2-50 wt% La(NO3)3 composite powder was undergone with lanthanum nitrate solution as the dopant,and doped MoO2 powder was analyzed by XRD.The results demonstrate that during the traditional solid-liquid spray doping processing,lanthanum nitrate,in the form of either crystal or aqueous solution,would be converted into La(NO3)3·4H2O by the dehydration reaction,rather than be decomposed to La2O3 and NO or NO2.Therefore,it is inferred that the oxynitride gas produced from the process is attributed to the decomposition of residual HNO3 in lanthanum nitrate crystal.The source of HNO3 is supported by the chemical composition of lanthanum nitrate crystal.

  4. Disentangling the rhizosphere effect on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers: insight into the role of root exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Texier, S; Hallet, S; Bru, D; Dambreville, C; Chèneby, D; Bizouard, F; Germon, J C; Philippot, L

    2008-11-01

    To determine to which extent root-derived carbon contributes to the effects of plants on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers, four solutions containing different proportions of sugar, organic acids and amino acids mimicking maize root exudates were added daily to soil microcosms at a concentration of 150 microg C g(-1) of soil. Water-amended soils were used as controls. After 1 month, the size and structure of the nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities were analysed using the narG and napA, and the nirK, nirS and nosZ genes as molecular markers respectively. Addition of artificial root exudates (ARE) did not strongly affect the structure or the density of nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities whereas potential nitrate reductase and denitrification activities were stimulated by the addition of root exudates. An effect of ARE composition was also observed on N(2)O production with an N(2)O:(N(2)O + N(2)) ratio of 0.3 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 80% of sugar and of 1 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 40% of sugar. Our study indicated that ARE stimulated nitrate reduction or denitrification activity with increases in the range of those observed with the whole plant. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the composition of the ARE affected the nature of the end-product of denitrification and could thus have a putative impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. A novel quaternized chitosan-melamine-glutaraldehyde resin for the removal of nitrate and phosphate anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, Appunni; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2014-03-01

    A terpolymer of chitosan-melamine-glutaraldehyde was prepared for the first time and it was quaternized with glycidyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (GTMAC). The quaternized chitosan-melamine-glutaraldehyde resin (QCMGR) was found to be effective for the removal of nitrate and phosphate oxyanions. The resin was characterised with FTIR, SEM, EDAX, TGA, DTA, XRD and water regain property. Batch method was followed to optimise the conditions for the removal of nitrate and phosphate. Chemical kinetics of the adsorption was well fitted by pseudo-second order and particle diffusion models and the adsorption process followed the Freundlich isotherm model well. The nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacity of QCMGR from 1000 mg/L respective solutions were 97.5 and 112.5mg/g, respectively. Nitrate and phosphate anions adsorbed effectively on QCMGR by replacing Cl(-) ions at the quaternary ammonium group by exchange mechanism. Even after 10th regeneration cycle the adsorbent fully retained its adsorption efficiency. Nitrate and phosphate removal efficiency of QCMGR was also tested by column method.

  6. Formic acid as an alternative reducing agent for the catalytic nitrate reduction in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Kuy-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Bin; Cho, Misun; Ahn, Samyoung

    2013-08-01

    Formic acid was used for the nitrate reduction as a reductant in the presence of Pd:Cu/gamma-alumina catalysts. The surface characteristics of the bimetallic catalyst synthesized by wet impregnation were investigated by SEM, TEM-EDS. The metals were not distributed homogeneously on the surface of catalyst, although the total contents of both metals in particles agreed well with the theoretical values. Formic acid decomposition on the catalyst surface, its influence on solution pH and nitrate removal efficacy was investigated. The best removal of nitrate (50 ppm) was obtained under the condition of 0.75 g/L catalyst with Pd:Cu ratio (4:1) and two fold excess of formic acid. Formic acid decay patterns resembled those of nitrate removal, showing a linear relationship between k(f) (formic acid decay) and k (nitrate removal). Negligible amount of ammonia was detected, and no nitrite was detected, possibly due to buffering effect of bicarbonate that is in situ produced by the decomposition of formic acid, and due to the sustained release of H2 gas.

  7. Formic acid as an alternative reducing agent for the catalytic nitrate reduction in aqueous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun-kyoung Choi; Kuy-hyun Park; Ho-bin Lee; Misun Cho; Samyoung Ahn

    2013-01-01

    Formic acid was used for the nitrate reduction as a reductant in the presence of Pd∶Cu/γ-alumina catalysts.The surfatce characteristics of the bimetallic catalyst synthesized by wet impregnation were investigated by SEM,TEM-EDS.The metals were not distributed homogeneously on the surface of catalyst,although the total contents of both metals in particles agreed well with the theoretical values.Formic acid decomposition on the catalyst surface,its influence on solution pH and nitrate removal efficacy was investigated.The best removal of nitrate (50 ppm) was obtained under the condition of 0.75 g/L catalyst with Pd∶Cu ratio (4∶1) and two fold excess of formic acid.Formic acid decay patterns resembled those of nitrate removal,showing a linear relationship between kf (formic acid decay) and k (nitrate removal).Negligible amount of ammonia was detected,and no nitrite was detected,possibly due to buffering effect of bicarbonate that is in situ produced by the decomposition of formic acid,and due to the sustained release of H2 gas.

  8. Silver nitrate ingestion: report of a case with an uneventful course and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Sura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Silver nitrate is commonly recognized for the toxic effects followed by the direct contact with the skin and mucosa known as argyria, but there is surprisingly little information about the adverse effects of silver nitrate after ingestion. Since only a few cases were reported in the literature, the aim of this case is to enrich the little experience existent about the possible effects of silver nitrate ingestion. We describe the case of a 15-year-old female who intentionally ingested 15cc of silver nitrate solution in a suicidal attempt. The clinical picture included an excruciating burning sensation in her throat and nostrils followed by vomiting and poor oral intake. The presence of a whitish membrane on the oral and buccal mucosa without bleeding or erosions was the only remarkable finding at physical examination. Unlike the rest of the cases described in the literature the clinical and endoscopic follow up of the patient was benign and without sequela or signs of oesophageal damage. Even though very uncommon, it is very important for physicians to keep in mind the possible toxic effects and appropriate management of silver nitrate ingestion. The outcome is not always devastating as reported, and a good early approach and follow up is important in the anticipation of sequela.

  9. Network analysis of swine shipments in Ontario, Canada, to support disease spread modelling and risk-based disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorjee, S; Revie, C W; Poljak, Z; McNab, W B; Sanchez, J

    2013-10-01

    Understanding contact networks are important for modelling and managing the spread and control of communicable diseases in populations. This study characterizes the swine shipment network of a multi-site production system in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Data were extracted from a company's database listing swine shipments among 251 swine farms, including 20 sow, 69 nursery and 162 finishing farms, for the 2-year period of 2006 to 2007. Several network metrics were generated. The number of shipments per week between pairs of farms ranged from 1 to 6. The medians (and ranges) of out-degree were: sow 6 (1-21), nursery 8 (0-25), and finishing 0 (0-4), over the entire 2-year study period. Corresponding estimates for in-degree of nursery and finishing farms were 3 (0-9) and 3 (0-12) respectively. Outgoing and incoming infection chains (OIC and IIC), were also measured. The medians (ranges) of the monthly OIC and IIC were 0 (0-8) and 0 (0-6), respectively, with very similar measures observed for 2-week intervals. Nursery farms exhibited high measures of centrality. This indicates that they pose greater risks of disease spread in the network. Therefore, they should be given a high priority for disease prevention and control measures affecting all age groups alike. The network demonstrated scale-free and small-world topologies as observed in other livestock shipment studies. This heterogeneity in contacts among farm types and network topologies should be incorporated in simulation models to improve their validity. In conclusion, this study provided useful epidemiological information and parameters for the control and modelling of disease spread among swine farms, for the first time from Ontario, Canada. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision

  11. A National Tracking Center for Monitoring Shipments of HEU, MOX, and Spent Nuclear Fuel: How do we implement?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Schanfein

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear material safeguards specialists and instrument developers at US Department of Energy (USDOE) National Laboratories in the United States, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of NA-24, have been developing devices to monitor shipments of UF6 cylinders and other radioactive materials , . Tracking devices are being developed that are capable of monitoring shipments of valuable radioactive materials in real time, using the Global Positioning System (GPS). We envision that such devices will be extremely useful, if not essential, for monitoring the shipment of these important cargoes of nuclear material, including highly-enriched uranium (HEU), mixed plutonium/uranium oxide (MOX), spent nuclear fuel, and, potentially, other large radioactive sources. To ensure nuclear material security and safeguards, it is extremely important to track these materials because they contain so-called “direct-use material” which is material that if diverted and processed could potentially be used to develop clandestine nuclear weapons . Large sources could be used for a dirty bomb also known as a radioactive dispersal device (RDD). For that matter, any interdiction by an adversary regardless of intent demands a rapid response. To make the fullest use of such tracking devices, we propose a National Tracking Center. This paper describes what the attributes of such a center would be and how it could ultimately be the prototype for an International Tracking Center, possibly to be based in Vienna, at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  12. Insights on nitrate respiration by Shewanella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengping eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanellae are well known for their ability to utilize a number of electron acceptors and are therefore considered to have important roles in element cycling in the environment, such as nitrogen cycling through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA and denitrification. Possessing two periplasmic nitrate reductase systems (NAP-α and NAP-β is a special trait of the Shewanella genus, and both enzymes are likely to provide selective advantage to the host. This review relates the current knowledge and aspects of the nitrate respiration system of Shewanella. Specifically, the potential physiological functions and regulation mechanisms of the duo-NAP system are discussed in addition to the evolution of anaerobic respiration systems of Shewanella.

  13. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high-nitrate supplement but not by high-nitrate foods in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary D; Marsh, Anthony P; Dove, Robin W; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/nitric oxide cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs high-nitrate diet, with and without a high-nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics and blood pressure using a randomized 4-period crossover controlled design. We hypothesized that the high-nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and lower blood pressure compared with the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were 8 normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5 ± 4.7 years old) with no overt disease or medications that affect nitric oxide metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured before and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet + supplement (P < .001 and P = .017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high-nitrate diet + supplement (P = .001 and P = .002), but not for control diet (P = .713 and P = .741) or high-nitrate diet (P = .852 and P = .500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2-hour postmeal follow-up time points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high-nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction.

  14. Growth and Chlorophyll Content of Canola Plants Supplied with Urea and Ammonium Nitrate in Response to Various Nickel Levels

    OpenAIRE

    BYBORDI, Ahmad; Mohammad Nabi GHEIBI

    2009-01-01

    Both the beneficial and the adverse effects of various nickel level supplements on growth and chlorophyll content of canola plants were evaluated while either urea or ammonium nitrate was supplied as the sole N source in the nutrient solutions. This study was arranged in completely randomized with three replications. Treatments included nutrient solution cultures containing urea and ammonium nitrate at the rate of 84 mg N L-1 separately as nitrogen sources with four nickel levels as NiSO4.6H2...

  15. Influence of nitrate ions on the physicochemical behavior of neptunium; Etude de la complexation du neptunium+6 par les ions nitrate: approche chimiometrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochon, P.; Moisy, Ph.; Blanc, P. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SEMP), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work was to acquire data on Np(VI) nitrate-complexes, particularly concerning their stability in nitric acid media, to gain a closer understanding of neptunium behavior in the PUREX process used for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to their very poor stability and the importance of physico-chemical mechanisms in concentrated solutions (media effects), the published data concerning these complexes are subject to considerable debate. A visible and near-infrared spectrophotometric study of Np(VI) nitrate-complexes was therefore undertaken to observe and quantify the influence of nitrate ions on the physicochemical behavior of neptunium, and to estimate the magnitude of the media effects in order to propose a constant of complexation by nitrate ions that is independent of the composition of the reaction medium (i.e. a thermodynamic constant). In the absence of reliable spectra for neptunium in nitric acid media, the spectrophotometric data were processed by principal components analysis and factor analysis mathematical method. The ionic strength of the solutions was adjusted by adding perchlorate salts (perchlorate ions were considered to have little or no complexing properties). The influence of the type of cation (H{sup +}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}) and the perchlorate ion concentration was observed on the neptunium(VI) spectra in nitric and perchloric media. In the presence of nitrate ions, the spectrum modifications in case of substitution of one cation by another were comparable to those observed for major nitrate ion concentration variations. Similarly, the extent of the spectrum modifications for the same nitrate ion concentration variation depended on the proton concentration. Weak spectrum modifications were also observed when the perchlorate ion concentration varied. They were quantified by a 'perturbation constant' {beta}* calculated in the same way as a complexation constant ({beta}* = 0.023 in the molal

  16. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranibar, J. N.; Villagra, P. E.; Gomez, M. L.; JobbáGy, E.; Quiroga, M.; Wuilloud, R. G.; Monasterio, R. P.; Guevara, A.

    2011-12-01

    In arid ecosystems, vegetation controls water and nitrate movement in the soil, reducing solute transport to aquifers. Here we analyzed nitrate distribution and transport throughout the soil profile and to the groundwater under different ecologic (vegetation type) and topographic (upland/lowland) situations across sand dune ecosystems with shallow water tables, subject to domestic grazing in the Monte desert. Based on vertical nitrate distributions in deep soil profiles we found that dune uplands (deep groundwater, low productivity) lost relatively more nitrogen than lowlands (shallow groundwater, high productivity), likely reinforcing productivity contrasts along these topographic positions. The traditional practice of nighttime animal concentration in corrals may affect nitrogen transport, with poorly vegetated interdunes at livestock posts showing higher subsoil nitrate concentrations than a well-vegetated nonsettled interdune. Vegetation left its imprint on the vertical distribution of nitrate, as suggested by the presence of a depletion zone that matched the depth of maximum root densities, followed by an underlying zone of accumulation. To explore how nitrogen exports to groundwater could affect water quality and nutrient supply to phreatophyte plants, we characterized groundwater flow patterns based on a potentiometric map and sediment characteristics, and measured groundwater electric conductivity, nitrate and arsenic concentration, and stable isotopes across 29 wells (5.8-12 m deep). Under the present land use and climate conditions, nitrate leaching does not seem to have an important and widespread effect on water quality. Nitrate concentration exceeded established limits for human consumption (45 mg L-1) in only one well, while arsenic concentration exceeded the established limits (10 μg L-1) in all but one well, reaching extreme values of 629 μg L-1. Yet, our analysis suggests that nitrate exports from corrals can reach the aquifer in localized areas

  17. Stochastic Controls on Nitrate Transport and Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, G.; Settin, T.; Alessi Celegon, E.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, the impact of nutrient inputs on basin-scale nitrates losses is investigated in a probabilistic framework by means of a continuous, geomorphologically based, Montecarlo approach, which explicitly tackles the random character of the processes controlling nitrates generation, transformation and transport in river basins. This is obtained by coupling the stochastic generation of climatic and rainfall series with simplified hydrologic and biogeochemical models operating at the hillslope scale. Special attention is devoted to the spatial and temporal variability of nitrogen sources of agricultural origin and to the effect of temporally distributed rainfall fields on the ensuing nitrates leaching. The influence of random climatic variables on bio-geochemical processes affecting the nitrogen cycle in the soil-water system (e.g. plant uptake, nitrification and denitrification, mineralization), is also considered. The approach developed has been applied to a catchment located in North-Eastern Italy and is used to provide probabilistic estimates of the NO_3 load transferred downstream, which is received and accumulated in the Venice lagoon. We found that the nitrogen load introduced by fertilizations significantly affects the pdf of the nitrates content in the soil moisture, leading to prolonged risks of increased nitrates leaching from soil. The model allowed the estimation of the impact of different practices on the probabilistic structure of the basin-scale hydrologic and chemical response. As a result, the return period of the water volumes and of the nitrates loads released into the Venice lagoon has been linked directly to the ongoing climatic, pluviometric and agricultural regimes, with relevant implications for environmental planning activities aimed at achieving sustainable management practices.

  18. Nitrate sinks and sources as controls of spatio-temporal water quality dynamics in an agricultural headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Durand, Patrick; Weiler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Several controls are known to affect water quality of stream networks during flow recession periods, such as solute leaching processes, surface water-groundwater interactions as well as biogeochemical in-stream turnover processes. Throughout the stream network, combinations of specific water and solute export rates and local in-stream conditions overlay the biogeochemical signals from upstream sections. Therefore, upstream sections can be considered functional units which could be distinguished and ordered regarding their relative contribution to nutrient dynamics at the catchment outlet. Based on snapshot sampling of flow and nitrate concentrations along the stream in an agricultural headwater during the summer flow recession period, we determined spatial and temporal patterns of water quality for the whole stream. A data-driven, in-stream-mixing-and-removal model was developed and applied for analysing the spatio-temporal in-stream retention processes and their effect on the spatio-temporal fluxes of nitrate from subcatchments. Thereby, we have been able to distinguish quantitatively between nitrate sinks, sources per stream reaches, and subcatchments, and thus we could disentangle the overlay of nitrate sink and source signals. For nitrate sources, we determined their permanent and temporal impact on stream water quality and for nitrate sinks, we found increasing nitrate removal efficiencies from upstream to downstream. Our results highlight the importance of distinct nitrate source locations within the watershed for in-stream concentrations and in-stream removal processes, respectively. Thus, our findings contribute to the development of a more dynamic perception of water quality in streams and rivers concerning ecological and sustainable water resource management.

  19. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a ’halide for nitrate’ substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile ‘key building blocks’ (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, ’off the shelf’ materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an ‘allylic halide for allylic nitrate’ substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates (‘isoprene nitrates’) in 66–80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon–carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our ‘halide for nitrate’ substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate. PMID:27340495

  20. Nitrate removal and denitrification affected by soil characteristics in nitrate treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2007-03-01

    Several small-scale surface flow constructed wetlands unplanted and planted (monoculture) with various macrophytes (Phragmites australis, Typha orientalis, Pennisetum purpureum, Ipomoea aquatica, and Pistia stratiotes) were established to continuously receive nitrate-contaminated groundwater. Soil characteristics and their effects on nitrate removal and soil denitrification were investigated. The results showed that planted wetland cells exhibited significantly higher (P wetland cell (1%, 0.11 microg N2O-N/g/h). However, the unplanted uncovered wetland cell showed a nitrate removal efficiency (55%) lower than but a soil denitrification rate (9.12 microg N2O-N/g/h) comparable to the planted cells. The nitrate removal rate correlated closely and positively with the soil denitrification rate for the planted cells, indicating that soil denitrification is an important process for removing nitrate in constructed wetlands. The results of nitrogen budget revealed that around 68.9-90.7% of the overall nitrogen removal could be attributed to the total denitrification. The soil denitrification rate was found to correlate significantly (P wetland soil, which accordingly were concluded as suitable indicators of soil denitrification rate and nitrate removal rate in nitrate treatment wetlands.