WorldWideScience

Sample records for next-generation reactor neutrino

  1. Study on the Neutrino Oscillation with a Next Generation Medium-Baseline Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Kyung Kwang; Shin, Chang Dong

    2014-01-01

    For over fifty years, reactor experiments have played an important role in neutrino physics, in both discoveries and precision measurements. One of the methods to verify the existence of neutrino is the observation of neutrino oscillation phenomena. Electron antineutrinos emitted from a reactor provide the measurement of the small mixing angle θ 13 , providing rich programs of neutrino properties, detector development, nuclear monitoring, and application. Using reactor neutrinos, future reactor neutrino experiments, more precise measurements of θ 12 ,Δm 12 2 , and mass hierarchy will be explored. The precise measurement of θ 13 would be crucial for measuring the CP violation parameters at accelerators. Therefore, reactor neutrino physics will assist in the complete understanding of the fundamental nature and implications of neutrino masses and mixing. In this paper, we investigated several characteristics of RENO-50, which is a future medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment, by using the GloBES simulation package

  2. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  3. Next Generation Reactors in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yongshick; Choi, Youngsang; Park, Keecheol

    1990-01-01

    In Korea, nuclear power will be continuously needed to meet the trend of steady increase in electricity demand. But in relation to the further development of nuclear energy, there are still many uncertainties to be solved such as power demand forecast, site availability, thermal energy utilization and technology enhancement for economic and safety. To cope with those uncertainties effectively and to proceed the nuclear projects uninterruptedly, KEPCO decided to initiate two research project. i. e., one is 'the outlook and developmental strategy of nuclear energy for the early 21st century in the R. O. K' and the other is 'the feasibility study on the advanced reactors in Korea. Prospects of nuclear energy in Korea was overviewed and recommendations from the industry were introduced. It is strong opinion of Korea nuclear industry that nuclear policy should be changed from the support policy to the target management policy. In the point of reactor strategy, the life of light water reactor technology might be longer than expected before in Korea and it is emphasized that good maintenance of light water reactor technology and smooth transition program to the advanced technologies should be carefully considered. There are differences in the opinions between preferences to the evolutionary and/or passive, inherently safe reactors but, in the long-term point of view, it is judged to be desirable to have alternatives

  4. Development of technology for next generation reactor - Development of next generation reactor in Korea -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    1993-09-01

    The project, development of next generation reactor, aims overall related technology development and obtainment of related license in 2001. The development direction is to determine the reactor type and to build up the design concept in 1994. For development trend analysis of foreign next generation reactor, level-1 PSA, fuel cycle analysis and computer code development are performed on System 80+ and AP 600. Especially for design characteristics analysis and volume upgrade of AP 600, nuclear fuel and reactor core design analysis, coolant circuit design analysis, mechanical structure design analysis and safety analysis etc. are performed. (Author).

  5. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  6. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-01-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock

  7. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-01-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical

  8. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  9. Safety of next generation power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Future needs of utilities regulators, government, and other energy users, PRA and reliability, LMR concepts, LWR design, Advanced reactor technology, What the industry can deliver: advanced LWRs, High temperature gas-cooled reactors, LMR whole-core experiments, Advanced LWR concepts, LWR technology, Forum: public perceptions, What the industry can deliver: LMRs and HTGRs, Criteria and licensing, LMR modeling, Light water reactor thermal-hydraulics, LMR technology, Working together to revitalize nuclear power, Appendix A, luncheon address, Appendix B, banquet address

  10. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs

  11. Next generation of nucleon decay and neutrino detectors. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogli, G.L.; Covi, L.; Shiozawa, M.; Dighe, A.; Ando, S.A.; Schwetz, Th.; Nakamura, K.; Nakahata, T.; Kajita, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Jung, C.K.; Bouchez, J.; Rubbia, A.; Vagins, M.; Mondal, L.N.; Oberauer, L.; Giomataris, I.; Ianni, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Bishai, M.; Bishai, M.; Ray, R.; Lindroos, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Palladino, V.; Andreopoulos, C.; Dunmore, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Aihara, H.; Ferenc, D.; Pouthas, J.; Birkel, M.A.; Marmonier, C.; Mosca, L.; Gerbier, G.; Jung, C.K.; Nakagawa, T.; Levy, M.; Duffaut, P.; Nakamura, K.

    2005-01-01

    This document gathers the transparencies presented at the workshop, they are divided into 5 topics: 1) physics motivation, 2) underground projects, 3) present and future neutrino beams, 4) background studies and photo-detection, and 5) large cavities and vessels. The neutrino oscillation picture is still missing 3 fundamental ingredients: the mixing angle θ 13 , the mass pattern and the CP phase δ. Future neutrino beams of conventional and novel design aimed at megaton type detector could give access to these parameters

  12. Next generation of nucleon decay and neutrino detectors. Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogli, G L; Covi, L; Shiozawa, M; Dighe, A; Ando, S A; Schwetz, Th; Nakamura, K; Nakahata, T; Kajita, T; Sadoulet, B; Jung, C K; Bouchez, J; Rubbia, A; Vagins, M; Mondal, L N; Oberauer, L; Giomataris, I; Ianni, A; Duchesneau, D; Kobayashi, T; Bishai, M; Bishai, M; Ray, R; Lindroos, M; Mezzetto, M; Palladino, V; Andreopoulos, C; Dunmore, J; Yanagisawa, C; Aihara, H; Ferenc, D; Pouthas, J; Birkel, M A; Marmonier, C; Mosca, L; Gerbier, G; Jung, C K; Nakagawa, T; Levy, M; Duffaut, P; Nakamura, K

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the transparencies presented at the workshop, they are divided into 5 topics: 1) physics motivation, 2) underground projects, 3) present and future neutrino beams, 4) background studies and photo-detection, and 5) large cavities and vessels. The neutrino oscillation picture is still missing 3 fundamental ingredients: the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, the mass pattern and the CP phase {delta}. Future neutrino beams of conventional and novel design aimed at megaton type detector could give access to these parameters.

  13. Safety reviews of next-generation light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudrick, J.A.; Wilson, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is reviewing three applications for design certification under its new licensing process. The U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and System 80+ designs have received final design approvals. The AP600 design review is continuing. The goals of design certification are to achieve early resolution of safety issues and to provide a more stable and predictable licensing process. NRC also reviewed the Utility Requirements Document (URD) of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and determined that its guidance does not conflict with NRC requirements. This review led to the identification and resolution of many generic safety issues. The NRC determined that next-generation reactor designs should achieve a higher level of safety for selected technical and severe accident issues. Accordingly, NRC developed new review standards for these designs based on (1) operating experience, including the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2; (2) the results of probabilistic risk assessments of current and next-generation reactor designs; (3) early efforts on severe accident rulemaking; and (4) research conducted to address previously identified generic safety issues. The additional standards were used during the individual design reviews and the resolutions are documented in the design certification rules. 12 refs

  14. Metrology/viewing system for next generation fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M.; Dagher, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Next generation fusion reactors require accurate measuring systems to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is being integrated with a remotely operated deployment system to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor metrology and viewing system, and describes a remotely operated precision ranging and surface mapping system

  15. Development of next-generation light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Fumihiko; Yasuoka, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The Next-Generation Light Water Reactor Development Program, a national project in Japan, was inaugurated in April 2008. The primary objective of this program is to meet the need for the replacement of existing nuclear power plants in Japan after 2030. With the aim of setting a global standard design, the reactor to be developed offers greatly improved safety, reliability, and economic efficiency through several innovative technologies, including a reactor core system with uranium enrichment of 5 to 10%, a seismic isolation system, long-life materials, advanced water chemistry, innovative construction techniques, optimized passive and active safety systems, innovative digital technologies, and so on. In the first three years, a plant design concept with these innovative features is to be established and the effectiveness of the program will be reevaluated. The major part of the program will be completed in 2015. Toshiba is actively engaged in both design studies and technology development as a founding member of this program. (author)

  16. Safety criteria for the next generation of European reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Bautista, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    For the next generation of reactors, European companies operating in the electricity sector have drawn up a document called European Utilities Requirement (EUR), which sets out the requirements to be met by the designers of future reactors. The main objective of these new requirements is to increase the safety in existing reactors, making good use of operating experience available and the technological developments of the last decade. This paper offers an in-depth analysis of the most significant characteristics, describing how the EUR requirements have been prepared and how they are being implemented by the designers. Areas covered are: - Combining deterministic and probabilistic criteria - Automation of control systems - Design extension for severe accidents - Containment design - Emergency plans - Autonomy versus manual operation

  17. Major NSSS design features of the Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Insk; Kim, Dong-Su

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet national needs for increasing electric power generation in the Republic of Korea in the 2000s, the Korean nuclear development group (KNDG) is developing a standardized evolutionary advanced light water reactor (ALWR), the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It is an advanced version of the successful Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) design, which meets utility needs for safety enhancement, performance improvement and ease of operation and maintenance. The KNGR design starts fro the proven design concept of the currently operating KSNPs with uprated power and advanced design features required by the utility. The KNGR design is currently in the final stage of the basic design, and the paper describes the major nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design features of the KNGR together with introduction of the KNGR development program. (author)

  18. Methodology on the sparger development for Korean next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Yeol; Hwang, Y.D.; Kang, H.S.; Cho, B.H.; Park, J.K

    1999-06-01

    In case of an accident, the safety depressurization system of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) efficiently depressurize the reactor pressure by directly discharge steam of high pressure and temperature from the pressurizer into the in-containment refuelling water storage tank (IRWST) through spargers. This report was generated for the purpose of developing the sparger of KNGR. This report presents the methodology on application of ABB-Atom. Many thermal hydraulic parameters affecting the maximum bubble could pressure were obtained and the maximum bubble cloud pressure transient curve so called forcing function of KNGR was suggested and design inputs for IRWST (bubble cloud radius vs. time, bubble cloud velocity vs. time, bubble cloudacceleration vs. time, etc.) were generated by the analytic using Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (author). 17 refs., 6 tabs., 27 figs.

  19. Methodology on the sparger development for Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwan Yeol; Hwang, Y.D.; Kang, H.S.; Cho, B.H.; Park, J.K.

    1999-06-01

    In case of an accident, the safety depressurization system of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) efficiently depressurize the reactor pressure by directly discharge steam of high pressure and temperature from the pressurizer into the in-containment refuelling water storage tank (IRWST) through spargers. This report was generated for the purpose of developing the sparger of KNGR. This report presents the methodology on application of ABB-Atom. Many thermal hydraulic parameters affecting the maximum bubble could pressure were obtained and the maximum bubble cloud pressure transient curve so called forcing function of KNGR was suggested and design inputs for IRWST (bubble cloud radius vs. time, bubble cloud velocity vs. time, bubble cloud acceleration vs. time, etc.) were generated by the analytic using Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (author). 17 refs., 6 tabs., 27 figs

  20. IceCube Gen2. The next-generation neutrino observatory for the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santen, Jakob van [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a cubic-kilometer Cherenkov telescope buried in the ice sheet at the South Pole that detects neutrinos of all flavors with energies from tens of GeV to several PeV. The instrument provided the first measurement of the flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, opening a new window to the TeV universe. At the other end of its sensitivity range, IceCube has provided precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters that are competitive with dedicated accelerator-based experiments. Here we present design studies for IceCube Gen2, the next-generation neutrino observatory for the South Pole. Instrumenting a volume of more that 5 km{sup 3} with over 100 new strings, IceCube Gen2 will have substantially greater sensitivity to high-energy neutrinos than current-generation instruments. PINGU, a dense infill array, will lower the energy threshold of the inner detector region to 4 GeV, allowing a determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy. On the surface, a large air shower detector will veto high-energy atmospheric muons and neutrinos from the southern hemisphere, enhancing the reach of astrophysical neutrino searches. With its versatile instrumentation, the IceCube Gen2 facility will allow us to explore the neutrino sky with unprecedented sensitivity, providing new constraints on the sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and yield precision data on the mixing and mass ordering of neutrinos.

  1. Design optimization of general arrangement in Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Jung, D. W.; Choi, Y. B.; Cho, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to optimize the general arrangement(GA) of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), field opinions in domestic nuclear power plants have been collected, and the bench marking on UCN No.1,2 which were estimated to be the most excellent in view of operability and maintenance has been accomplished. Through this work, design optimization items for GA were reviewed. Major items to be selected for optimization are summarized as follows; 'Expanding the compound building function and the mezzanine floor concept in the auxiliary building', 'Including the diesel generator building to the auxiliary building', 'Change of the equipment removal method in the auxiliary building'. With these GA design optimization, the auxiliary building boundary will be improved as a complete rectangular type. The power block volume except the changing effect to the single containment structure will be reduced to about 10% in comparison with that of in KNGR phase II

  2. Development of the next generation reactor analysis code system, MARBLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Hazama, Taira; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Chiba, Go; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Tatsumi, Masahiro; Hirai, Yasushi; Hyoudou, Hideaki; Numata, Kazuyuki; Iwai, Takehiko; Jin, Tomoyuki

    2011-03-01

    A next generation reactor analysis code system, MARBLE, has been developed. MARBLE is a successor of the fast reactor neutronics analysis code systems, JOINT-FR and SAGEP-FR (conventional systems), which were developed for so-called JUPITER standard analysis methods. MARBLE has the equivalent analysis capability to the conventional system because MARBLE can utilize sub-codes included in the conventional system without any change. On the other hand, burnup analysis functionality for power reactors is improved compared with the conventional system by introducing models on fuel exchange treatment and control rod operation and so on. In addition, MARBLE has newly developed solvers and some new features of burnup calculation by the Krylov sub-space method and nuclear design accuracy evaluation by the extended bias factor method. In the development of MARBLE, the object oriented technology was adopted from the view-point of improvement of the software quality such as flexibility, expansibility, facilitation of the verification by the modularization and assistance of co-development. And, software structure called the two-layer system consisting of scripting language and system development language was applied. As a result, MARBLE is not an independent analysis code system which simply receives input and returns output, but an assembly of components for building an analysis code system (i.e. framework). Furthermore, MARBLE provides some pre-built analysis code systems such as the fast reactor neutronics analysis code system. SCHEME, which corresponds to the conventional code and the fast reactor burnup analysis code system, ORPHEUS. (author)

  3. Next generation reactor development activity at Hitachi, Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    Developments of innovative nuclear systems in Japan have been highly requested to cope with uncertain future nuclear power generation and fuel cycle situation. Next generation reactor system shall be surely deployed earlier to be capable to provide with several options such as plutonium multi-recycle, intermediate storage of spent fuels, simplified reprocessing of spent fuels and separated storage of 'Pu+FP' and 'U', spent fuels storage after Pu LWR recycle and their combinations, while future reactor system will be targeted at ideal fuel recycle system of higher breeding gain and transmutation of radioactive wastes. Modified designs of the ABWR at large size and medium and small size have been investigated as well as a BWR based RMWR and a supercritical-pressure LWR to ensure safety and improve economics. Advanced fuel cycle technologies of a combination of fluoride volatility process and PUREX process with high decontamination (FLUOREX process) and a modified fluoride volatility process with low decontamination have been developed. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Status of advanced containment systems for next generation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The present IAEA status report is intended to provide information on the current status and development of containment systems of the next generation reactors for electricity production and, particularly, to highlight features which may be considered advanced, i.e. which present improved performance with evolutionary or innovative design solutions or new design approaches. The objectives of the present status report are: To present, on a concise and consistent basis, selected containment designs currently being developed in the world; to review and compare new approaches to the design bases for the containments, in order to identify common trends, that may eventually lead to greater worldwide consensus, to identify, list and compare existing design objectives for advanced containments, related to safety, availability, maintainability, plant life, decommissioning, economics, etc.; to describe the general approaches adopted in different advanced containments to cope with various identified challenges, both those included in the current design bases and those related to new events considered in the design; to briefly identify recent achievements and future needs for new or improved computer codes, standards, experimental research, prototype testing, etc. related to containment systems; to describe the outstanding features of some containments or specific solutions proposed by different parties and which are generally interesting to the international scientific community. 36 refs, 27 figs, 1 tab

  5. Design reliability assurance program for Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Beom-Su; Han, Jin-Kyu; Na, Jang Hwan; Yoo, Kyung Yeong

    1997-01-01

    The Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) project is to develop standardized nuclear power plant design for the construction of future nuclear power plants in Korea. The main purpose of the KNGR project is to develop the advanced nuclear power plants, which enhance safety and economics significantly through the incorporation of design concepts for severe accident prevention and mitigation, supplementary passive safety concept, simplification and application of modularization and so on. For those, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and availability study will be performed at the early stage of the design, and the Design Reliability Assurance Program (D-RAP) is applied in the development of the KNGR to ensure that the safety and availability evaluated in the PSA and availability study at the early phase of the design is maintained through the detailed design, construction, procurement and operation of the plants. This paper presents the D-RAP concept that could be applied at the stage of the basic design of the nuclear power plants, based on the models for the reference plants and/or similar plants. 4 refs., 1 fig

  6. EDF view on next generation reactor safety and operability issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serviere, G.

    2002-01-01

    is involved at various degrees in the evaluation of next generation: - Light-water reactors; - Gas-cooled reactors; - Liquid-metal reactors. Available information is not the same for all concepts, but nevertheless adequate for identifying areas where confirmation of assumptions would be needed. After discussing some crosscut issues, this paper outlines which areas would have to be clarified for each type of reactor before they could be considered proven by the company. Issues for which R and D programs could be needed are also be identified. (author)

  7. Development of technology for next generation reactor - Research of evaluation technology for nuclear power plant -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1993-09-01

    For development of next generation reactor, a project for evaluation technology for nuclear power plant is performed. Evaluation technology is essential to next generation reactor for reactor safety and system analysis. For design concept, detailed evaluation technologies are studied as follows: evaluation of safety margin, evaluation of safety facilities, evaluation of measurement and control technology; man-machine interface. Especially for thermal efficiency, thermal properties and chemical composition of inconel 690 tube, instead of inconel 600 tube, are measured for steam generator. (Author).

  8. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory - Contributions to ICRC 2017 Part VI: IceCube-Gen2, the Next Generation Neutrino Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Collaboration, IceCube-Gen2; :; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Argüelles, C.

    2017-01-01

    Papers on research & development towards IceCube-Gen2, the next generation neutrino observatory at South Pole, submitted to the 35th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2017, Busan, South Korea) by the IceCube-Gen2 Collaboration.

  9. Research and development on next generation reactor (phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Kyoon; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong

    1994-10-01

    The objective of the study is to improve the volume of nuclear power plant which adopts passive safety system concept. The passive safety system reactor is characterized by excellent safety and reliability. But the volume of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) of the passive safety system reactor is so small that it should be upgraded for commercial operation. For volume upgrade, detailed analyses are performed as follows; core design, hydraulics, design and mechnical structures, and safety analysis. In addition to above analysis, some investigations must be supplied as follows: power density vs. DNB margin decrease, outlet temperature vs. EPRI-URD, additional tests for upgraded reactor, dynamic analysis of mechanical vibration according to expanded reactor vessel and expanded in-core structures, and Merit loss of passive safety system reactor according to design margin decrease. (Author)

  10. Research and development on next generation reactor (phase I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyoon; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    1994-10-01

    The objective of the study is to improve the volume of nuclear power plant which adopts passive safety system concept. The passive safety system reactor is characterized by excellent safety and reliability. But the volume of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) of the passive safety system reactor is so small that it should be upgraded for commercial operation. For volume upgrade, detailed analyses are performed as follows; core design, hydraulics, design and mechnical structures, and safety analysis. In addition to above analysis, some investigations must be supplied as follows: power density vs. DNB margin decrease, outlet temperature vs. EPRI-URD, additional tests for upgraded reactor, dynamic analysis of mechanical vibration according to expanded reactor vessel and expanded in-core structures, and Merit loss of passive safety system reactor according to design margin decrease. (Author).

  11. Next-generation reactors in the national energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGoff, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    In February 1991, the Bush Administration released the National Energy Strategy designed to provide an adequate and balanced energy supply. The strategy provides for major increases in energy efficiency and conservation. Even with these savings, however, there will be a need for substantial increases in base-load electrical generating capacity to sustain economic growth. The strategy identifies the actions required to allow nuclear power to cleanly and safely meet a substantial portion of this needed additional base-load capacity after the turn of the century. On June 27, 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE) transmitted to Congress the Strategic Plan for Civilian Reactor Development, which reflects the initiative identified in the National Energy Strategy. The strategic plan identifies the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) as the basis for expanded use of nuclear power. The second advanced reactor concept that is being pursued is the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

  12. Structural materials issues for the next generation fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, I.; Murty, K. L.

    2010-09-01

    Generation-IV reactor design concepts envisioned thus far cater to a common goal of providing safer, longer lasting, proliferation-resistant, and economically viable nuclear power plants. The foremost consideration in the successful development and deployment of Gen-W reactor systems is the performance and reliability issues involving structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core applications. The structural materials need to endure much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses, and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. Materials under active consideration for use in different reactor components include various ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, ceramics, composites, etc. This article addresses the material requirements for these advanced fission reactor types, specifically addressing structural materials issues depending on the specific application areas.

  13. Meeting the next generation PWR safety requirements: The EPR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salhi, Othman

    2008-01-01

    The development process pursued the harmonization of technical solutions and the integration of all the lessons learned from earlier nuclear plants built by both vendors. As far as safety more specifically is concerned, the basic choice for the EPR was to adopt an evolutionary approach based on experience feedback from the reactors built by Areva, which at the time already amounted to nearly 100. This philosophy makes today's Areva EPR the natural descendant of the most advanced French N4 and German Konvoi power reactors currently in operation. EPR design choices affecting safety were motivated by a continuous quest for higher levels of safety. A two-fold approach was followed: 1. improvement of the measures aimed at further reducing the already very low probability of core melt 2. incorporation of measures aimed at further limiting the consequences of a severe accident, in the knowledge that its probability of occurrence has been considerably reduced. Through its filiations with French N4 and German Konvoi power reactors, the EPR benefits from the uninterrupted, evolutionary innovation process that has supported the development of PWRs since their introduction into the market place. This is especially true for safety where the EPR brings a unique combination of both tried and tested and innovative features that further improve the prevention of severe accidents and their mitigation

  14. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-01

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and economic assessment. The investigation was conducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperature. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasibility issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density

  15. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO 2 emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  16. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  17. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  18. Implementation of defence in depth for next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The publication of this IAEA technical document represents the conclusion of a task, initiated in 1995, devoted to defence in depth in future reactors. It focuses mainly on the next generation of LWRs, although many general considerations may also apply to other types of reactors

  19. Structural materials for the next generation nuclear reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charit, I.; Murty, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Generation-IV reactors need to withstand much higher temperatures, greater neutron doses, severe corrosive environment and above all, a substantially higher life time (60 years or more). Hence for their successful deployment, a significant research in structural materials is needed. Various potential candidate materials, such as austenitic stainless steels, oxide-dispersion strengthened steels, nickel-base superalloys, refractory alloys etc. are considered. Both baseline and irradiated mechanical, thermophysical and chemical properties are important. However, due to the longer high temperature exposure involved in most designs, creep and corrosion/oxidation will become the major performance limiting factors. In this study we did not cover fabricability and weldability of the candidate materials. Pros and cons of each candidate can be summarized as following: -) for austenitic stainless steel: lower thermal creep resistance at higher temperatures but poor swelling resistance at high temperatures; -) for ferritic-martensitic steels: excellent swelling resistance at higher burnups but thermal creep strength is limited at higher temperatures and radiation embrittlement at low temperature; -) for Ni-base alloys: excellent thermal creep resistance at higher temperatures but radiation embrittlement even at moderate doses and helium embrittlement at higher temperatures; and -) for refractory alloys: adequate swelling resistance up to high burnups but fabrication difficulties, low temperature radiation hardening and poor oxidation resistance

  20. Research and development activity at ENEL for next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaciari, P.

    1992-01-01

    Italy, a world leader in nuclear electricity production in the mid sixties, became the only large industrialized country which renounced nuclear energy; a fact hardly understandable for a country that, in addition has a worrisome dependence on imported foreign energy. The paper reports the political events that brought Italy to a condition not easy to be sustained in the long run, citing in particular: the so-called 'reconversion' of the Alto Lazio nuclear plant into a fossil fuelled plant, the closure of the Caorso plant after the encouraging outcome of an IAEA inspection, and finally, the contrasting resolutions voted on the matter by the two Parliament chambers. The paper then deals with the issues which need to be solved to allow a nuclear renaissance in Italy. The research program on future reactor designs has been carried out by ENEL (the Italian National Electricity Board) in the framework of a wide international co-operation with the ambitious goal to demonstrate that, even in the case of a severe accident, no population evacuation, nor any long term limitation as to ground utilization is to be planned. On this important issue a large international consensus is growing worldwide. The willingness of ENEL to remain part of the nuclear community has been also proved by its adhesion to the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), created to enhance the operational safety of nuclear plants worldwide

  1. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  2. Development of source term evaluation method for Korean Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keon Jae; Cheong, Jae Hak; Park, Jin Baek; Kim, Guk Gee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-15

    This project had investigate several design features of radioactive waste processing system and method to predict nuclide concentration at primary coolant basic concept of next generation reactor and safety goals at the former phase. In this project several prediction methods of source term are evaluated conglomerately and detailed contents of this project are : model evaluation of nuclide concentration at Reactor Coolant System, evaluation of primary and secondary coolant concentration of reference Nuclear Power Plant(NPP), investigation of prediction parameter of source term evaluation, basic parameter of PWR, operational parameter, respectively, radionuclide removal system and adjustment values of reference NPP, suggestion of source term prediction method of next generation NPP.

  3. Assessment of the Capability of Molten Salt Reactors as a Next Generation High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsheikh, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactor according to Aircraft Reactor Experiment (ARE) and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) programs, was designed to be the first full-scale, commercial nuclear power plant utilizing molten salt liquid fuels that can be used for producing electricity, and producing fissile fuels (breeding)burning actinides. The high temperature in the primary cycle enables the realization of efficient thermal conversion cycles with net thermal efficiencies reach in some of the designs of nuclear reactors greater than 45%. Molten salts and liquid salt because of their low vapor pressure are excellent candidates for meeting most of the requirements of these high temperature reactors. There is renewed interest in MSRs because of changing goals and new technologies in the use of high-temperature reactors. Molten Salt Reactors for high temperature create substantial technical challenges to have high effectiveness intermediate heat transfer loop components. This paper will discuss and investigate the capability and compatibility of molten salt reactors, toward next generation high temperature energy system and its technical challenges

  4. PARISROC, an autonomous front-end ASIC for triggerless acquisition in next generation neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.; Campagne, J.E.; Drouet, S.; Dulucq, F.; El Berni, M.; Genolini, B.; La Taille, C. de; Martin-Chassard, G.; Seguin Moreau, N.; Wanlin, E.; Xiangbo, Y.

    2012-01-01

    PARISROC (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is a complete readout chip in AustriaMicroSystems (AMS) SiGe 0.35 μm technology designed to read array of 16 Photomultipliers (PMTs). The ASIC is realized in the context of the PMm2 (square meter PhotoMultiplier) project that has proposed a new system of “smart photo-detectors” composed by sensor and read-out electronics dedicated to next generation neutrino experiments. The future water Cherenkov detectors will take place in megaton size water tanks then with a large surface of photo-detection. We propose to segment the large surface in arrays with a single front-end electronics and only the useful data send in surface to be stocked and analyzed. This paper describes the second version of the ASIC and illustrates the chip principle of operation and the main characteristics thank to a series of measurements. It is a 16-channel ASIC with channels that work independently, in triggerless mode and all managed by a common digital part. Then main innovation is that all the channels are handled independently by the digital part so that only channels that have triggered are digitized. Then the data are transferred to the internal memory and sent out in a data driven way. The ASIC allows charge and time measurement. We measured a charge measurement range starting from 160 fC (1 photoelectron-p.e., at PMT gain of 10 6 ) to 100 pC (around 600 p.e.) at 1% of linearity; time tagging at 1 ns thanks to a 24-bit counter at 10 MHz and a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) on a 100 ns ramp.

  5. PARISROC, an autonomous front-end ASIC for triggerless acquisition in next generation neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.; Campagne, J. E.; Drouet, S.; Dulucq, F.; El Berni, M.; Genolini, B.; de La Taille, C.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Seguin Moreau, N.; Wanlin, E.; Xiangbo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    PARISROC (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is a complete readout chip in AustriaMicroSystems (AMS) SiGe 0.35 μm technology designed to read array of 16 Photomultipliers (PMTs). The ASIC is realized in the context of the PMm2 (square meter PhotoMultiplier) project that has proposed a new system of “smart photo-detectors” composed by sensor and read-out electronics dedicated to next generation neutrino experiments. The future water Cherenkov detectors will take place in megaton size water tanks then with a large surface of photo-detection. We propose to segment the large surface in arrays with a single front-end electronics and only the useful data send in surface to be stocked and analyzed. This paper describes the second version of the ASIC and illustrates the chip principle of operation and the main characteristics thank to a series of measurements. It is a 16-channel ASIC with channels that work independently, in triggerless mode and all managed by a common digital part. Then main innovation is that all the channels are handled independently by the digital part so that only channels that have triggered are digitized. Then the data are transferred to the internal memory and sent out in a data driven way. The ASIC allows charge and time measurement. We measured a charge measurement range starting from 160 fC (1 photoelectron-p.e., at PMT gain of 106) to 100 pC (around 600 p.e.) at 1% of linearity; time tagging at 1 ns thanks to a 24-bit counter at 10 MHz and a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) on a 100 ns ramp.

  6. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.

    2011-01-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  7. Perspectives on the development of next generation reactor systems safety analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    'Full text:' Existing reactor system analysis codes, such as RELAP5-3D and TRAC, have gained worldwide success in supporting reactor safety analyses, as well as design and licensing of new reactors. These codes are important assets to the nuclear engineering research community, as well as to the nuclear industry. However, most of these codes were originally developed during the 1970s', and it becomes necessary to develop next-generation reactor system analysis codes for several reasons. Firstly, as new reactor designs emerge, there are new challenges emerging in numerical simulations of reactor systems such as long lasting transients and multi-physics phenomena. These new requirements are beyond the range of applicability of the existing system analysis codes. Advanced modeling and numerical methods must be taken into consideration to improve the existing capabilities. Secondly, by developing next-generation reactor system analysis codes, the knowledge (know how) in two phase flow modeling and the highly complex constitutive models will be transferred to the young generation of nuclear engineers. And thirdly, all computer codes have limited shelf life. It becomes less and less cost-effective to maintain a legacy code, due to the fast change of computer hardware and software environment. There are several critical perspectives in terms of developing next-generation reactor system analysis codes: 1) The success of the next-generation codes must be built upon the success of the existing codes. The knowledge of the existing codes, not just simply the manuals and codes, but knowing why and how, must be transferred to the next-generation codes. The next-generation codes should encompass the capability of the existing codes. The shortcomings of existing codes should be identified, understood, and properly categorized, for example into model deficiencies or numerical method deficiencies. 2) State-of-the-art models and numerical methods must be considered to

  8. Perspectives on the development of next generation reactor systems safety analysis codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H., E-mail: Hongbin.Zhang@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    'Full text:' Existing reactor system analysis codes, such as RELAP5-3D and TRAC, have gained worldwide success in supporting reactor safety analyses, as well as design and licensing of new reactors. These codes are important assets to the nuclear engineering research community, as well as to the nuclear industry. However, most of these codes were originally developed during the 1970s', and it becomes necessary to develop next-generation reactor system analysis codes for several reasons. Firstly, as new reactor designs emerge, there are new challenges emerging in numerical simulations of reactor systems such as long lasting transients and multi-physics phenomena. These new requirements are beyond the range of applicability of the existing system analysis codes. Advanced modeling and numerical methods must be taken into consideration to improve the existing capabilities. Secondly, by developing next-generation reactor system analysis codes, the knowledge (know how) in two phase flow modeling and the highly complex constitutive models will be transferred to the young generation of nuclear engineers. And thirdly, all computer codes have limited shelf life. It becomes less and less cost-effective to maintain a legacy code, due to the fast change of computer hardware and software environment. There are several critical perspectives in terms of developing next-generation reactor system analysis codes: 1) The success of the next-generation codes must be built upon the success of the existing codes. The knowledge of the existing codes, not just simply the manuals and codes, but knowing why and how, must be transferred to the next-generation codes. The next-generation codes should encompass the capability of the existing codes. The shortcomings of existing codes should be identified, understood, and properly categorized, for example into model deficiencies or numerical method deficiencies. 2) State-of-the-art models and numerical methods must be considered to

  9. Benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Ikehara, Tadashi; Ito, Takuya; Saji, Etsuro

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a benchmark problem suite for studying the physics of next-generation fuels of light water reactors. The target discharge burnup of the next-generation fuel was set to 70 GWd/t considering the increasing trend in discharge burnup of light water reactor fuels. The UO 2 and MOX fuels are included in the benchmark specifications. The benchmark problem consists of three different geometries: fuel pin cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly. In the pin cell problem, detailed nuclear characteristics such as burnup dependence of nuclide-wise reactivity were included in the required calculation results to facilitate the study of reactor physics. In the assembly benchmark problems, important parameters for in-core fuel management such as local peaking factors and reactivity coefficients were included in the required results. The benchmark problems provide comprehensive test problems for next-generation light water reactor fuels with extended high burnup. Furthermore, since the pin cell, the PWR assembly and the BWR assembly problems are independent, analyses of the entire benchmark suite is not necessary: e.g., the set of pin cell and PWR fuel assembly problems will be suitable for those in charge of PWR in-core fuel management, and the set of pin cell and BWR fuel assembly problems for those in charge of BWR in-core fuel management. (author)

  10. Feasibility and application on steam injector for next-generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Ishiyama, Takenori; Miyano, Hiroshi; Nei, Hiromichi; Shioiri, Akio

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted on steam injector for a next generation reactor. The steam injector is a simple, compact passive device for water injection, such as Passive Core Injection System (PCIS) of Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS), because of easy start-up without an AC power. An analysis model for a steam injector characteristics has been developed, and investigated with a visualized fundamental test for a two-stage Steam Injector System (SIS) for PCIS and a one-stage low pressure SIS for PCCS. The test results showed good agreement with the analysis results. The analysis and the test results showed the SIS could work over a very wide range of the steam pressure, and is applicable for PCIS or PCCS in the next generation reactors. (author)

  11. The importance of collaboration in the advancement of current and next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Kate; Goossen, John; Anness, Mike; Meston, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The sections of the contribution are as follows: Tradition of innovation. Growing demand for nuclear power; Collaboration drivers; Responses. Knowledge transfer and management is critical. What kind of focus? Equipment reliability. Advanced repair, replacement and construction approaches. Materials. Plant safety margins. Spent fuel management. Examples of European collaboration. Zorita materials examination. Collaboration in the development of next generation reactors; Westinghouse R and D priorities; A look to the future. (P.A.)

  12. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.M.; Collins, J.W.; Garcia, C.B.; Pincock, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) have been designed and operated throughout the world over the past five decades. These seven HTGRs are varied in size, outlet temperature, primary fluid, and purpose. However, there is much the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has learned and can learn from these experiences. This report captures these various experiences and documents the lessons learned according to the physical NGNP hardware (i.e., systems, subsystems, and components) affected thereby.

  13. Use of virtual environments to reduce the construction costs of the next generation nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The near term deployment of the next generation of reactors will only be successful if they are built on time and without the costly overruns experienced in the previous generation. One critical factor in achieving these goals is to ensure the design is optimized for constructability. In this work the authors explored the effectiveness of full-scale virtual reality simulation in the optimization of the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear reactors. The research tested the suitability of immersive virtual reality display technology in aiding engineers in evaluating potential cost reductions that can be realized by the optimization of design and installation and construction sequences. The intent of this research is to see if this type of technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups and desktop simulations. Using a fully-immersive five sided virtual reality system, known as a CAVE, the authors constructed a series of virtual mockups that represented two next generation nuclear power plants, the Westinghouse AP-1000 and the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). These virtual mockups were then tested as a design tool to help locate and correct problem areas, to optimize the construction sequence, and to assist with familiarizing trades people with the performance of maintenance activities. A series of experiments were performed to assess the usefulness of these virtual mockups in accomplishing these tasks. (authors)

  14. Tying the knot with next-generation reactors: Can the industry afford a second marriage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This article examines the future of nuclear power beyond the year 2000. The nuclear industry just celebrated 50 years of nuclear technology, but no new plants have been ordered in the US since 1978 and some European countries are giving up on the nuclear option. This article discusses the four US advanced light-water reactor design and safety features, specific design features and parameters for the advanced designs, advanced designs from Europe, features utilities look for in a reactor, evolutionary versus passive designs, gaining public acceptance for new designs, and what alternatives are there to installing next-generation nuclear systems?

  15. Results of the Nucifer reactor neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [MPIK Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear reactors are a strong and pure source of electron antineutrinos. With neutrino experiments close to compact reactor cores new insights into neutrino properties and reactor physics can be obtained. The Nucifer experiment is one of the pioneers in this class of very short baseline projects. Its detector to reactor distance is only about 7 m. The data obtained in the last years allowed to estimate the plutonium concentration in the reactor core by the neutrino flux measurement. This is of interest for safeguard applications and non proliferation efforts. The antineutrinos in Nucifer are detected via the inverse beta decay on free protons. Those Hydrogen nuclei are provided by 850 liters of organic liquid scintillator. For higher detection efficiency and background reduction the liquid is loaded with Gadolinium. Despite all shielding efforts and veto systems the background induced by the reactor activity and cosmogenic particles is still the main challenge in the experiment. The principle of the Nucifer detector is similar to the needs of upcoming experiments searching for sterile neutrinos. Therefore, the Nucifer results are also valuable input for the understanding and optimization of those next generation projects. The observation of sterile neutrinos would imply new physics beyond the standard model.

  16. Development of Next-Generation LWR (Light Water Reactor) in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Kasai, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Next-Generation Light Water Reactor development program was launched in Japan in April 2008. The primary objective of the program is to cope with the need to replace existing nuclear power plants in Japan after 2030. The reactors to be developed are also expected to be a global standard design. Several innovative features are envisioned, including a reactor core system with uranium enrichment above 5%, a seismic isolation system, the use of long-life materials and innovative water chemistry, innovative construction techniques, safety systems with the best mix of passive and active concepts, and innovative digital technologies to further enhance reactor safety, reliability, economics, etc. In the first 3 years, a plant design concept with these innovative features is established and the effectiveness of the program is reevaluated. The major part of the program will be completed in 2015. (author)

  17. Estabilishing requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors--reducing the uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernock, W.P.; Corcoran, W.R.; Rasin, W.H.; Stahlkopf, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is managing a major effort to establish requirements for the next generation of U.S. light water reactors. This effort is the vital first step in preserving the viability of the nuclear option to contribute to meet U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century. Combustion Engineering, Inc. and Duke Power Company formed a team to participate in the EPRI program which is guided by a Utility Steering committee consisting of experienced utility technical executives. A major thrust of the program is to reduce the uncertainties which would be faced by the utility executives in choosing the nuclear option. The uncertainties to be reduced include those related to safety, economic, operational, and regulatory aspects of advanced light water reactors. This paper overviews the Requirements Document program as it relates to the U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) effort in reducing these uncertainties and reports the status of efforts to establish requirements for the next generation of pressurized water reactors. It concentrates on progress made in reducing the uncertainties which would deter selection of the nuclear option for contributing to U.S. national electric power capacity needs in the next century and updates previous reports in the same area. (author)

  18. On fire risk/methodology for the next generation of reactors and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, K.C.; Alesso, H.P.; Altenbach, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    Methodologies for including fire in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) have been evolving during the last ten years. Many of these studies show that fire risk constitutes a significant percentage of external events, as well as the total core damage frequency. This paper summarizes the methodologies used in the fire risk analysis of the next generation of reactors and existing DOE nuclear facilities. Methodologies used in other industries, as well as existing nuclear power plants, are also discussed. Results of fire risk studies for various nuclear plants and facilities are shown and compared

  19. Development of digital plant protection system for Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk-Joon Park

    1998-01-01

    A Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) for Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) is being developed using the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) technology. For the design verification, the development of the DPPS prototype is progressing at this time. The prototype hardware equipment is installed and software coding is started. DPPS software is being coded by strict software V and V activities and function block language that uses simple graphical symbols. By adopting the PLC technology, the design of DPPS is possible to take full advantages in areas such as automatic testing, simplified calibration, improved isolation between redundant channels, reduced internal and external wiring and increased plant availability. (author)

  20. Development of digital plant protection system for Korean Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Suk-Joon [NSSS Engineering and Development Division, Korea Power Engineering Company, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    A Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) for Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) is being developed using the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) technology. For the design verification, the development of the DPPS prototype is progressing at this time. The prototype hardware equipment is installed and software coding is started. DPPS software is being coded by strict software V and V activities and function block language that uses simple graphical symbols. By adopting the PLC technology, the design of DPPS is possible to take full advantages in areas such as automatic testing, simplified calibration, improved isolation between redundant channels, reduced internal and external wiring and increased plant availability. (author) 8 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Evaluation Metrics for Intermediate Heat Exchangers for Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Kim, Eung Soo; Anderson, Nolan

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the United States with abundant, clean, and secure energy as initiated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct; Public Law 109-58,2005). The NGNP Project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and/or high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications.

  2. Design requirements of instrumentation and control systems for next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, In Soo; Lee, Byung Sun; Park, Kwang Hyun; Park, Heu Yoon; Lee, Dong Young; Kim, Jung Taek; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chul Hwan; Hur, Seop; Kim, Chang Hoi; Na, Nan Ju

    1994-03-01

    In this report, the basic design requirements of Instrumentation and Control systems for next generation reactor are described, which are top-tier level, to support the advanced I and C systems. It contains the requirements in accordance with the plant reliability, the plant performance, the operator's aid functions, the features for maintenance and testing, licensing issues for I and C systems. Advanced I and C systems are characterized such as the application of the digital and the human engineering technologies. To development of this requirements, the I and C systems for the foreign passive and the evolutionary types of reactor and the domestic conventional reators were reviewed and anlysed. At the detail design stage, these requirements will be used for top-tier requirements. To develop the detail design requirements in the future, more quantitive and qualitive analyses are need to be added. (Author) 44 refs

  3. Design requirements of instrumentation and control systems for next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, In Soo; Lee, Byung Sun; Park, Kwang Hyun; Park, Heu Yoon; Lee, Dong Young; Kim, Jung Taek; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chul Hwan; Hur, Seop; Kim, Chang Hoi; Na, Nan Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-01

    In this report, the basic design requirements of Instrumentation and Control systems for next generation reactor are described, which are top-tier level, to support the advanced I and C systems. It contains the requirements in accordance with the plant reliability, the plant performance, the operator`s aid functions, the features for maintenance and testing, licensing issues for I and C systems. Advanced I and C systems are characterized such as the application of the digital and the human engineering technologies. To development of this requirements, the I and C systems for the foreign passive and the evolutionary types of reactor and the domestic conventional reators were reviewed and anlysed. At the detail design stage, these requirements will be used for top-tier requirements. To develop the detail design requirements in the future, more quantitive and qualitive analyses are need to be added. (Author) 44 refs.

  4. The search for sterile neutrinos at reactors and underground laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    From the initial discovery of neutrinos to the observation of neutrino oscillations, unexpected results have lead to deeper understanding of physics. However, as experiments and theoretical predictions have improved, new anomalies have surfaced that could point to beyond the Standard Model physics. Leading hypotheses invoke a new form of matter, sterile neutrinos, as a possible resolution of these outstanding questions. New experimental efforts are underway to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations with reactors and radioactive sources. This talk will highlight developments in current and next generation experiments and present possible outcomes for the next few years.

  5. Study on dual plant concept for the next generation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Oikawa, Hirohide

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the study results on the basic concept of dual BWRs. For the convenience, we call the concept here as Trial Study on BWR dual concept (TSBWR dual). The concept is general and applicable to all BWRs which have internal recirculation pumps (RIP). The TSBWR dual is a plant concept of dual BWRs contained in a same secondary containment building. The plant output is from 2 x l,350 MWe up to 2 x 1,700 MWe. This concept is mainly aiming at safety improvement and cost savings of the next generation BWRs. The TSBWR dual has two RPVs and two dry wells (DW). It has, however, only one wet well (WW) and only one R/B. The WW and the R/B are shared by the dual reactors. The operating floor is also shared by the two reactors. The TSBWR dual has both passive safety systems and active safety systems. They are also shared between the two reactors. A lot of sharing between the dual reactors enables significant cost savings accompanied by the power increase up to 3,400 MWe. Although the TSBWR dual consists of two reactors, the simplified cylindrical configuration of the key structures and reduction of the R/B height can minimize the plant construction period. The TSBWR dual provides a concept with which we can challenge to construct a dual BWR plant in the near future. (author)

  6. Efforts of development on the next generation nuclear reactor in the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    At present, the Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (MHI) enters to development on APWR+ for a large-scale reactor, AP1000 and pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) for middle- and small-scale one, and innovative one, under cooperation of power industries, manufacturers and institutes in and out of Japan. On APWR+, MHI occupies the most advanced position of conventional large-scale route, intends to carry out further upgrading of large capacity on a base of already developed 1500 MWe class APWR, and aims at further upgrading of economical efficiency. On the other reactor, as it becomes possible to perform value addition specific to the small-scale reactor with smaller output, it is planned to overcome its scale demerit by introducing more innovative techniques. And, on AP1000, it is intended to remove dynamic safety system by introducing a static one, to upgrade simplification of apparatus and reliability of safety system and to reduce its human factors. In addition, here was described on the next generation nuclear reactors under development. (G.K.)

  7. Thermal hydrodynamic modeling and simulation of hot-gas duct for next-generation nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Injun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungdeok; Kim, Chansoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Bai, Cheolho; Hong, Sungyull [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jaesool, E-mail: jshim@ynu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydrodynamic nonlinear model is presented to examine a hot gas duct (HGD) used in a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor. • Experiments and simulation were compared to validate the nonlinear porous model. • Natural convection and radiation are considered to study the effect on the surface temperature of the HGD. • Local Nusselt number is obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD. - Abstract: A very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor that requires an intermediate loop that consists of a hot-gas duct (HGD), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), and a process heat exchanger for massive hydrogen production. In this study, a mathematical model and simulation were developed for the HGD in a small-scale nitrogen gas loop that was designed and manufactured by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. These were used to investigate the effect of various important factors on the surface of the HGD. In the modeling, a porous model was considered for a Kaowool insulator inside the HGD. The natural convection and radiation are included in the model. For validation, the modeled external surface temperatures are compared with experimental results obtained while changing the inlet temperatures of the nitrogen working fluid. The simulation results show very good agreement with the experiments. The external surface temperatures of the HGD are obtained with respect to the porosity of insulator, emissivity of radiation, and pressure of the working fluid. The local Nusselt number is also obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD.

  8. Regulatory Concerns on the In-Containment Water Storage System of the Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Jae-Hun; Bang, Young-Seok; Kim, Hho-Jung

    2002-01-01

    The in-containment water storage system (IWSS) is a newly adopted system in the design of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It consists of the in-containment refueling water storage tank, holdup volume tank, and cavity flooding system (CFS). The IWSS has the function of steam condensation and heat sink for the steam release from the pressurizer and provides cooling water to the safety injection system and containment spray system in an accident condition and to the CFS in a severe accident condition. With the progress of the KNGR design, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has been developing Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidances for safety review of the KNGR. In this paper, regarding the IWSS of the KNGR, the major contents of the General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements, Safety Regulatory Guides, and Safety Review Procedures were introduced, and the safety review items that have to be reviewed in-depth from the regulatory viewpoint were also identified

  9. Development of ceramic humidity sensor for the Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Na Young; Hwang, Il Soon; Yoo, Han Ill; Song, Chang Rock; Park, Sang Duk; Yang, Jun Seog

    1997-01-01

    For the Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) development, LBB is considered for the Main Steam Line(MSL) piping inside its containment to achieve cost and safety improvement. To apply LBB concept to MSL, leak sensors highly sensitive to humidity is required. In this paper, a ceramic material, MgCr 2 O 4 -TiO 2 has been developed as a humidity sensor for MSL applications. Experiments performed to characterize the electrical conductivity shows that the conductivity of MgCr 2 O 4 -TiO 2 responds sensitively to both temperature and humidity changes. At a constant temperature below 100 .deg. C, the conductivity increases as the relative humidity increases, which makes the sensor favorable for application to the outside of MSL insulation layer. But as temperature increases beyond 100 .deg. C, the sensor composition should be adjusted for the application to KNGR is to be made at temperature above 100 .deg. C

  10. Experimental and computational studies of thermal mixing in next generation nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Douglas Tyler

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a proposed next generation nuclear power plant. The VHTR utilizes helium as a coolant in the primary loop of the reactor. Helium traveling through the reactor mixes below the reactor in a region known as the lower plenum. In this region there exists large temperature and velocity gradients due to non-uniform heat generation in the reactor core. Due to these large gradients, concern should be given to reducing thermal striping in the lower plenum. Thermal striping is the phenomena by which temperature fluctuations in the fluid and transferred to and attenuated by surrounding structures. Thermal striping is a known cause of long term material failure. To better understand and predict thermal striping in the lower plenum two separate bodies of work have been conducted. First, an experimental facility capable of predictably recreating some aspects of flow in the lower plenum is designed according to scaling analysis of the VHTR. Namely the facility reproduces jets issuing into a crossflow past a tube bundle. Secondly, extensive studies investigate the mixing of a non-isothermal parallel round triple-jet at two jet-to-jet spacings was conducted. Experimental results were validation with an open source computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAMRTM. Additional care is given to understanding the implementation of the realizable k-a and Launder Gibson RSM turbulence Models in OpenFOAMRTM. In order to measure velocity and temperature in the triple-jet experiment a detailed investigation of temperature compensated hotwire anemometry is carried out with special concern being given to quantify the error with the measurements. Finally qualitative comparisons of trends in the experimental results and the computational results is conducted. A new and unexpected physical behavior was observed in the center jet as it appeared to spread unexpectedly for close spacings (S/Djet = 1.41).

  11. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  12. Scoping analyses for the safety injection system configuration for Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Jong Kyoon

    1996-01-01

    Scoping analyses for the Safety Injection System (SIS) configuration for Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) are performed in this study. The KNGR SIS consists of four mechanically separated hydraulic trains. Each hydraulic train consisting of a High Pressure Safety Injection (HPSI) pump and a Safety Injection Tank (SIT) is connected to the Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) nozzle located above the elevation of cold leg and thus injects water into the upper portion of reactor vessel annulus. Also, the KNGR is going to adopt the advanced design feature of passive fluidic device which will be installed in the discharge line of SIT to allow more effective use of borated water during the transient of large break LOCA. To determine the feasible configuration and capacity of SIT and HPSl pump with the elimination of the Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI) pump for KNGR, licensing design basis evaluations are performed for the limiting large break LOCA. The study shows that the DVI injection with the fluidic device SlT enhances the SIS performance by allowing more effective use of borated water for an extended period of time during the large break LOCA

  13. Transition period fuel cycle from current to next generation reactors for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junichi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi; Kawamura, Fumio; Shiina, Kouji; Sasahira, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Long-term energy security and global warming prevention can be achieved by a sustainable electricity supply with next generation fast breeder reactors (FBRs). Current light water reactors (LWRs) will be replaced by FBRs and FBR cycle will be established in the future considering the limited amount of uranium (U) resource. The introduction of FBRs requires plutonium (Pu) recovered from LWR spent fuel. The authors propose advanced system named Flexible Fuel Cycle Initiative (FFCI)' which can supply enough Pu and hold no surplus Pu, can respond flexibly the future technical and social uncertainties, and can achieve an economical FBR cycle. FFCI can simplify the 2nd LWR reprocessing facility for Japan (after Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant) which only carries out U removal from LWR spent fuel. Residual 'Recycle Material' is, according to FBRs introduction status, immediately treated in the FBR reprocessing to fabricate FBR fuel or temporarily stored for the utilization in FBRs at necessary timing. FFCI has high flexibility by having several options for future uncertainties by the introduction of Recycle Material as a buffer material between LWR and FBR cycles. (author)

  14. An assessment the severe accident equipment survivability for the Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Moon, Y. T.; Park, J. W.; Kho, H. J.; Lee, S. W.

    1999-01-01

    One of the prominent design approaches to cope with the severe accident challenges in the Korean Next Generation Reactor is an assessment of equipment survivability in the severe accident environment at early design stage. In compliance with 10CFR50.34(f) and SECY-93-087, this work addresses that a reasonable level of assurance be provided to demonstrate that sufficient instrumentation and equipment will survive the consequences of a severe accident and will be available so that the operator may recover from and trend severe core damage sequences, including those scenarios which result in 100 percent oxidation of the active fuel cladding. An analytical and systematic approach was used to identify the equipment and instrumentation of safety-function and define severe accident environments including temperature, pressure, humidity, and radiation before and after the reactor vessel breach. As a result, it was concluded that with minor exceptions, existing design basis equipment qualification methods are sufficient to provide a reasonable level of assurance that this equipment will function during a severe accident. Furthermore, supplemental severe accident equipment and instrument procurement requirements were identified. (author)

  15. Considerations of severe accidents in the design of Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wook Jerng; Choong Sup Byun

    1998-01-01

    The severe accident is one of the key issues in the design of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) which is an evolutionary type of pressurized water reactor. As IAEA recommends in TECDOC-801, the design objective of KNGR with regard to safety is provide a sound technical basis by which an imminent off-site emergency response to any circumstance could be practically unnecessary. To implement this design objective, probabilistic safety goals were established and design requirements were developed for systems to mitigate severe accidents. The basic approach of KNGR to address severe accidents is firstly prevent severe accidents by reinforcing its capability to cope with the design basis accidents (DBA) and further with some accidents beyond DBAs caused by multiple failures, and secondly mitigate severe accidents to ensure the retention of radioactive materials in the containment by providing mean to maintain the containment integrity. For severe accident mitigation, KNGR principally takes the concept of ex-vessel corium cooling. To implement this concept, KNGR is equipped with a large cavity and cavity flooding system connected to the in-containment refueling water storage tank. Other major systems incorporated in KNGR are hydrogen igniters and safety depressurization systems. In addition, the KNGR containment is designed to withstand the pressure and temperature conditions expected during the course of severe accidents. In this paper, the design features and status of system designs related with severe accidents will be presented. Also, R and D activities related to severe accident mitigation system design will be briefly described

  16. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing

  17. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  18. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  19. Design features in Korean next generation reactor focused on performance and economic viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.S.; Chung, M.S.; Na, J.H.; Kim, M.C.; Choi, Y.S.

    2001-01-01

    As of the end of Dec. 1999, Korea's total nuclear power capacity reached 13,716 MWe with 16 units in operation and 4 units under construction. In addition, as part of the national long-term R and D programme launched in 1992, the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) is being developed to meet the electricity demands in the years to come and is expected to be safer and more economically competitive than any other conventional electric power sources in Korea. The KNGR project has successfully completed its second phase and is now on the third phase. In Phase III of the KNGR design development project, KNGR aims at reinforcing the economic competitiveness while maintaining safety goals. To achieve these objectives, the design options studied and the design requirements set up in the first phase are pursued while the second phase are being reviewed. This paper summarizes such efforts for design improvement in terms of performance and economic viability along with the status of nuclear power generation in Korea, focusing on KNGR currently. (author)

  20. A single-stage high pressure steam injector for next generation reactors: test results and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattadori, G.; Galbiati, L.; Mazzocchi, L.; Vanini, P.

    1995-01-01

    Steam injectors can be used in advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for high pressure makeup water supply; this solution seems to be very attractive because of the ''passive'' features of steam injectors, that would take advantage of the available energy from primary steam without the introduction of any rotating machinery. The reference application considered in this work is a high pressure safety injection system for a BWR; a water flow rate of about 60 kg/s to be delivered against primary pressures covering a quite wide range up to 9 MPa is required. Nevertheless, steam driven water injectors with similar characteristics could be used to satisfy the high pressure core coolant makeup requirements of next generation PWRs. With regard to BWR application, an instrumented steam injector prototype with a flow rate scaling factor of about 1:6 has been built and tested. The tested steam injector operates at a constant inlet water pressure (about 0.2 MPa) and inlet water temperature ranging from 15 to 37 o C, with steam pressure ranging from 2.5 to 8.7 MPa, always fulfilling the discharge pressure target (10% higher than steam pressure). To achieve these results an original double-overflow flow rate-control/startup system has been developed. (Author)

  1. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Y. C. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage.

  2. Information Management system of the safety regulatory requirements and guidance for the Korea next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, H. C.; Lee, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    In order to achieve the safety of the Korea Next Generation Reactors (KNGR), the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has carried out the Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidance (SRRG) development program from 1992 such as establishment of the SRRG hierarchy, development of technical requirements and guidance, and consideration of new licensing system. The SRRG hierarchy for the KNGR was consisted of five tiers; Safety Objectives, Safety Principles, General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements and Safety Regulatory Guides. The developed SRRG have been compared the criteria in 10CFR and Reg. Guide in the U.S.A and the IAEA documents for assuring internationally acceptable level of the SRRG. To improve the efficiency and accuracy of SRRG development, the construction of database system was required in the course of development. Therefore, the Information Management System of SRRG for the KNGR has been developed which enables developers to quickly and accurately seek and systematically manage whole contexts of the SRRG, reference requirements, and current atomic energy regulation rules. Moreover, through homepage whose URL is 'http://kngr.kins.re.kr', the concerned persons and public can acquire the information related with SRRG and KNGR project, and post his/her thought to the opinion forum in the homepage

  3. A survey on the human reliability analysis methods for the design of Korean next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, J. W.; Park, J. C.; Kwack, H. Y.; Lee, K. Y.; Park, J. K.; Kim, I. S.; Jung, K. W

    2000-03-01

    Enhanced features through applying recent domestic technologies may characterize the safety and efficiency of KNGR(Korea Next Generation Reactor). Human engineered interface and control room environment are expected to be beneficial to the human aspects of KNGR design. However, since the current method for human reliability analysis is not up to date after THERP/SHARP, it becomes hard to assess the potential of human errors due to both of the positive and negative effect of the design changes in KNGR. This is a state of the art report on the human reliability analysis methods that are potentially available for the application to the KNGR design. We surveyed every technical aspects of existing HRA methods, and compared them in order to obtain the requirements for the assessment of human error potentials within KNGR design. We categorized the more than 10 methods into the first and the second generation according to the suggestion of Dr. Hollnagel. THERP was revisited in detail. ATHEANA proposed by US NRC for an advanced design and CREAM proposed by Dr. Hollnagel were reviewed and compared. We conclude that the key requirements might include the enhancement in the early steps for human error identification and the quantification steps with considerations of more extended error shaping factors over PSFs(performance shaping factors). The utilization of the steps and approaches of ATHEANA and CREAM will be beneficial to the attainment of an appropriate HRA method for KNGR. However, the steps and data from THERP will be still maintained because of the continuity with previous PSA activities in KNGR design.

  4. A survey on the human reliability analysis methods for the design of Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, J. W.; Park, J. C.; Kwack, H. Y.; Lee, K. Y.; Park, J. K.; Kim, I. S.; Jung, K. W.

    2000-03-01

    Enhanced features through applying recent domestic technologies may characterize the safety and efficiency of KNGR(Korea Next Generation Reactor). Human engineered interface and control room environment are expected to be beneficial to the human aspects of KNGR design. However, since the current method for human reliability analysis is not up to date after THERP/SHARP, it becomes hard to assess the potential of human errors due to both of the positive and negative effect of the design changes in KNGR. This is a state of the art report on the human reliability analysis methods that are potentially available for the application to the KNGR design. We surveyed every technical aspects of existing HRA methods, and compared them in order to obtain the requirements for the assessment of human error potentials within KNGR design. We categorized the more than 10 methods into the first and the second generation according to the suggestion of Dr. Hollnagel. THERP was revisited in detail. ATHEANA proposed by US NRC for an advanced design and CREAM proposed by Dr. Hollnagel were reviewed and compared. We conclude that the key requirements might include the enhancement in the early steps for human error identification and the quantification steps with considerations of more extended error shaping factors over PSFs(performance shaping factors). The utilization of the steps and approaches of ATHEANA and CREAM will be beneficial to the attainment of an appropriate HRA method for KNGR. However, the steps and data from THERP will be still maintained because of the continuity with previous PSA activities in KNGR design

  5. Flexible fuel cycle initiative for the transition period from current reactors to next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junichi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi; Kawamura, Fumio; Shiina, Kouji; Sasahira, Akira

    2005-01-01

    A sustainable electricity supply by fast breeder reactors (FBRs) is essential to ensure energy security and prevent global warming. Transition from light water reactors (LWRs) to FBRs and establishment of an FBR cycle are indispensable, which requires plutonium (Pu) for the introduction of FBRs. The authors propose advanced system called 'Flexible Fuel Cycle Initiative (FFCI)' which can respond flexibly the future expected technical and social uncertainties, can hold no surplus Pu, and can achieve an economical FBR cycle. In the new concept of FFCI, 2nd LWR reprocessing which would succeed Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant is a simple facility to carry out only uranium (U) removal and residual 'recycle material' is stored or utilized. According to FBRs introduction status, recycle material is immediately treated in an FBR reprocessing to fabricate FBR fuel or temporarily stored for the utilization in FBRs at necessary timing. FFCI has high flexibility by having several options for future uncertainties by the introduction of recycle material as a buffer material between LWR and FBR cycles. (author)

  6. Areva's water chemistry guidebook with chemistry guidelines for next generation plants (AREVA EPRTM reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryckelynck, N.; Chahma, F.; Caris, N.; Guillermier, P.; Brun, C.; Caron-Charles, M.; Lamanna, L.; Fandrich, J.; Jaeggy, M.; Stellwag, B.

    2012-09-01

    Over the years, AREVA globally has maintained a strong expertise in LWR water chemistry and has been focused on minimizing short-term and long-term detrimental effects of chemistry for startup, operation and shutdown chemistry for all key plant components (material integrity and reliability, promote optimal thermal performances, etc.) and fuel. Also AREVA is focused on minimizing contamination and equipment/plant dose rates. Current Industry Guidelines (EPRI, VGB, etc.) provide utilities with selected chemistry guidance for the current operating fleet. With the next generation of PWR plants (e.g. AREVA's EPR TM reactor), materials of construction and design have been optimized based on industry lessons learned over the last 50+ years. To support the next generation design, AREVA water chemistry experts, have subsequently developed a Chemistry Guidebook with chemistry guidelines based on an analysis of the current international practices, plant operating experience, R and D data and calculation codes now available and/or developed by AREVA. The AREVA LWR chemistry Guidebook can be used to help resolve utility and safety authority questions and addresses regulation requirement questions/issues for next generation plants. The Chemistry Guidebook provides water chemistry guidelines for primary coolant, secondary side circuit and auxiliary systems during startup, normal operation and shutdown conditions. It also includes conditioning and impurity limits, along with monitoring locations and frequency requirements. The Chemistry Guidebook Guidelines will be used as a design reference for AREVA's next generation plants (e.g. EPR TM reactor). (authors)

  7. Neutrino oscillation measurements with reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, R.D. [W. K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided important information on the neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  8. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  9. Neutrino scattering and the reactor antineutrino anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Estela; Cañas, Blanca; Miranda, Omar; Parada, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Low energy threshold reactor experiments have the potential to give insight into the light sterile neutrino signal provided by the reactor antineutrino anomaly and the gallium anomaly. In this work we analyze short baseline reactor experiments that detect by elastic neutrino electron scattering in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We also analyze the sensitivity of experimental proposals of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering (CENNS) detectors in order to exclude or confirm the sterile neutrino signal with reactor antineutrinos.

  10. Proposal and analysis of the benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    In order to investigate the calculation accuracy of the nuclear characteristics of LWR next generation fuels, the Research Committee on Reactor Physics organized by JAERI has established the Working Party on Reactor Physics for LWR Next Generation Fuels. The next generation fuels mean the ones aiming for further extended burn-up such as 70 GWd/t over the current design. The Working Party has proposed six benchmark problems, which consists of pin-cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly geometries loaded with uranium and MOX fuels, respectively. The specifications of the benchmark problem neglect some of the current limitations such as 5 wt% {sup 235}U to achieve the above-mentioned target. Eleven organizations in the Working Party have carried out the analyses of the benchmark problems. As a result, status of accuracy with the current data and method and some problems to be solved in the future were clarified. In this report, details of the benchmark problems, result by each organization, and their comparisons are presented. (author)

  11. Constraining neutrino magnetic moment with solar and reactor neutrino data

    OpenAIRE

    Tortola, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    We use solar neutrino data to derive stringent bounds on Majorana neutrino transition moments (TMs). Such moments, if present, would contribute to the neutrino-electron scattering cross section and hence alter the signal observed in Super-Kamiokande. Using the latest solar neutrino data, combined with the results of the reactor experiment KamLAND, we perform a simultaneous fit of the oscillation parameters and TMs. Furthermore, we include data from the reactor experiments Rovno, TEXONO and MU...

  12. Daya bay reactor neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jun

    2010-01-01

    Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment is a large international collaboration experiment under construction. The experiment aims to precisely determine the neutrino mixing angle θ 13 by detecting the neutrinos produced by the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. θ 13 is one of two unknown fundamental parameters in neutrino mixing. Its magnitude is a roadmap of the future neutrino physics, and very likely related to the puzzle of missing antimatter in our universe. The precise measurement has very important physics significance. The detectors of Daya Bay is under construction now. The full operation is expected in 2011. Three years' data taking will reach the designed the precision, to determine sin 2 2θ 13 to better than 0.01. Daya Bay neutrino detector is an underground large nuclear detector of low background, low energy, and high precision. In this paper, the layout of the experiment, the design and fabrication progress of the detectors, and some highlighted nuclear detecting techniques developed in the detector R and D are introduced. (author)

  13. Neutrino Oscillations at Reactors: What Next?

    OpenAIRE

    Mikaelyan, L. A.; Sinev, V. V.

    1999-01-01

    We shortly review past and future experiments at reactors aimed at searches for neutrino masses and mixing. We also consider new idea to search at Krasnoyarsk for small mixing angle oscillations in the atmosheric neutrino mass parameter region.

  14. Some technical constraints on possible Tokamak machines from next generation to reactor size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.

    1975-11-01

    A simplified consistent scaling of possible Tokamak reactors is set up in the power range of 0.1 - 10 GW. The influence of some important parameters on the scaling is shown and the role of some technical constraints is discussed. The scaling is evaluated for the two cases of a circular and a strongly elongated plasma section. (orig.) [de

  15. Fast flux fluid fuel reactor: A concept for the next generation of nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.; Feldman, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has not become the preferred method of electrical energy production largely because of economic, safety, and proliferation concerns and challenges posed by nuclear waste disposal. Economies is the most important factor. To reduce the capital costs, the authors propose a compact configuration with a very high power density and correspondingly reduced reactor component sizes. Enhanced efficiency made possible by higher operating temperatures will also improve the economics of the design, and design simplicity will keep capital, operational, and maintenance costs down. The most direct solution to the nuclear waste problem is to eliminate waste production or, at least, minimize its amount and long-term radiotoxicity. This can be achieved by very high burnups, ideally 100%, and by the eventual transmutation of the long-lived fission products in situ. Very high burnups also improve the economics by optimal exploitation of the fuel. Safety concerns can be addressed by an inherently safe reactor design. Because of the intrinsic nature of nuclear materials, there probably is no definitive answer to proliferation concerns for systems that generate neutrons; however, it is important to minimize proliferation risks. The thorium cycle is a promising option because (a) plutonium is produced only in very small quantities, (b) the presence of 232 U makes handling the fuel very difficult and therefore proliferation resistant, and (c) 233 U is a fissile isotope that is less suitable than 239 Pu for making weapons and can be diluted with other uranium isotopes. An additional benefit of the thorium cycle is that it increases nuclear fuel resources by one order of magnitude. A fast flux fluid fuel reactor is a concept that can satisfy all the foregoing requirements. The fluid fuel systems have a very simple structure. Because integrity of the fuel is not an issue, these systems can operate at very high temperatures, can have high power densities, and can achieve very

  16. Design concepts and status of the Korean next generation reactor (KNGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Jae; Kim, Han Gon

    1999-01-01

    The national project to develop KNGR, a 4000 MWth evolutionary advanced light water reactor (ALWR), has been organized in three phases according to the development status in 1992. During the first phase, the top-tier design requirements and the design concepts to meet the requirements had been established. The project is currently in the second phase of which the major objective is to complete the basic design sufficient to confirm the plant safety. This paper describes the overall design concepts and status of the KNGR briefly which developed and/or being developed through the project. (author)

  17. Development of source term evaluation method for Korean Next Generation Reactor(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Park, Jin Baek; Lee, Yeong Il; Song, Min Cheonl; Lee, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institue of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-15

    This project had investigated irradiation characteristics of MOX fuel method to predict nuclide concentration at primary and secondary coolant using a core containing 100% of all MOX fuel and development of source term evaluation tool. In this study, several prediction methods of source term are evaluated. Detailed contents of this project are : an evaluation of model for nuclear concentration at Reactor Coolant System, evaluation of primary and secondary coolant concentration of reference Nuclear Power Plant using purely MOX fuel, suggestion of source term prediction method of NPP with a core using MOX fuel.

  18. Technical committee on reactor physics of next generation. Examination of MA recycling by using PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    It is an important subject to be examined that during the period till full scale nuclear fuel recycling including the adoption of FBRs will be realized, we never have excess Pu. As the realistic examination considering the nuclear fuel recycling for the time being, the MOX fuel for PWRs of actinide recycling, ultralong life, placing emphasis on the concentrated charging of Pu and the confinement of MA in nuclear fuel cycling was examined. The change of the infinite multiplication rate of actinide recycling fuel is small throughout the burning, and there is the possibility of attaining the high burnup about twice of that of UO 2 fuel. The merit of the case of adding MA in small amount by recycling MA together with Pu at the proportion in spent fuel is shown. The amount of MA accumulation in Japan until 2050 was evaluated by the survey of the electric power generation of every reactor type using the long term reactor type strategy evaluation code LSER. By comparing the amount of MA accumulation in four MA recycling cases with the basic case without MA recycling, the amount of MA annihilation was evaluated. It was found that the MA recycling using PWRs only is not inferior to the multi-recycling of MA using FBRs. (K.I.)

  19. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

  20. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Neutron cross-sections for next generation reactors: New data from n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Tain, J L; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Abbondanno, U; Vannini, G; Konovalov, V; Marques, L; Wiescher, M; de Albornoz, A Carrillo; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Duran, I; Rauscher, T; Ketlerov, V; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Pigni, M T; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Kaeppeler, F; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Voss, F; Pretel, C; Berthoumieux, E; Dolfini, R; Vaz, P; Griesmayer, E; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Wendler, H; Milazzo, P M; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; O'Brien, S; Gunsing, F; Reifarth, R; Perrot, L; Lindote, A; Neves, F; Poch, A; Gramegna, F; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Koehler, P; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Fujii, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Dillman, I; Assimakopoulos, P; Ferrant, L; Lozano, M; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Kadi, Y; Baumann, P; Moreau, C; Oshima, M; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Paradela, C; Vicente, M C; Tassan-Got, L; Cano-Ott, D; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Alvarez, H; Haight, R; Goverdovski, A; Chepel, V; Rosetti, M; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Frais-Koelbl, H; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, an innovative neutron time-of-flight facility started operation at CERN: n\\_TOF. The main characteristics that make the new facility unique are the high instantaneous neutron flux, high resolution and wide energy range. Combined with state-of-the-art detectors and data acquisition system, these features have allowed to collect high accuracy neutron cross-section data on a variety of isotopes, many of which radioactive, of interest for Nuclear Astrophysics and for applications to advanced reactor technologies. A review of the most important results on capture and fission reactions obtained so far at n\\_TOF is presented, together with plans for new measurements related to nuclear industry. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SWR 1000: A Next-Generation Boiling Water Reactor Ready for Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brettschuh, W.

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in nuclear power generation technology mainly concern large-capacity plants in the 1550 -1600 MW range, or very small plants (100 - 350 MW). The SWR 1000 boiling water reactor (BWR), by contrast, offers all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation costs, in the medium-capacity range (1000 - 1250 MW). The SWR 1000 design is particularly suitable for countries whose power systems do not include any large power plants. The economic efficiency of this medium-sized plant in comparison with large-capacity designs is achieved by deploying very simple passive safety equipment, simplified systems for plant operation, and a very simple plant configuration in which systems engineering is optimized and dependence on electrical and instrumentation and control (IandC) systems is reduced. In addition, systems and components that require protection against natural and external man-made hazards are accommodated in such a way that as few buildings as possible have to be designed to withstand the loads from such events. The fuel assemblies to be deployed in the SWR 1000 core, meanwhile, have been enlarged from a 10x10 rod array to a 12x12 array. This reduces the total number of fuel assemblies in the core and thus also the number of control rods and control rod drives, as well as in-core neutron flux monitors. The design owes its competitiveness to the fact that investment costs, maintenance costs and fuel cycle costs are all lower. In addition, refueling outages are shorter, thanks to the reduced scope of outage activities. The larger fuel assemblies have been extensively and successfully tested, as have all of the other new components and systems incorporated into the plant design. As in existing plants, the forced coolant circulation method is deployed, ensuring problem-free start-up, and enabling plant operators to adjust power rapidly in the high power range (70%-100%) without moving

  3. Comparison of nuclear reactor types of the next generation; Komparativni prikaz novih tipova reaktorskih komercijalnih postrojenja slijedece generacije

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovic, Z; Kastelan, M [NPP Krsko (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    The paper presents a comparison for a selected relevant set of parameters for different commercial nuclear reactor types at the next generation. This parameters overview could serve as the base for the semi-quantitative decision bases for the selection of the future nuclear strategy. The number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR, HWR, GCR and LMR type are presented. Even currently many of them are still on the drawing boards, the concepts and designs should be assessed in the sense of sensible approach for planning the possible future nuclear strategy. (author) Clanek predstavlja usporedbu odabranih bitnih parametara karakteristicnih za razlicite tipove energetskih nuklearnih postrojenja slijedece generacije. Prikazani pregled parametara omogucava osnov za polu kvantitativnu osnovu za odlucivanje u svrhu donosenja odluke oko odrednica buduce strategije uporabe nuklearne energije. Brojni koncepti naprednih nuklearnih reaktora tipa LWR, HWR, GCR i LMR su prezentirani. S obzirom na cinjenicu da se mnogi of prezentiranih nalaze jos uvijek na crtacim daskama projektanata, koncepti i projekti koji su iz njih proizasli zahtijevaju analizu u smislu kvalitativnog pristupa planiranja moguce buduce nuklearne startegije. (author)

  4. Measurement of theta13 with reactor neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeger, Karsten M.; Freedman, Stuart J.; Kadel, Richard W.; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental results have provided unambiguous evidence that neutrinos have a small but finite mass and mix from one type into another. The phenomenon of neutrino mixing is characterized by the coupling between the neutrino flavor (nu e,mu,tau ) and mass eigenstates (nu 1,2,3 ) and the associated mixing angles. Previous neutrino oscillation experiments have determined two of the three mixing angles in the neutrino mixing matrix, U MNSP . Using multiple neutrino detectors placed at different distances from a nuclear power plant, a future reactor neutrino experiment has the potential to discover and measure the coupling of the electron neutrino flavor to the third mass eigenstate, U e3 , the last undetermined element of the neutrino mixing matrix

  5. Application of Reactor Antineutrinos: Neutrinos for Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suekane, F.

    2013-02-01

    In nuclear reactors, 239Pu are produced along with burn-up of nuclear fuel. 239Pu is subject of safeguard controls since it is an explosive component of nuclear weapon. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is watching undeclared operation of reactors to prevent illegal production and removal of 239Pu. In operating reactors, a huge numbers of anti electron neutrinos (ν) are produced. Neutrino flux is approximately proportional to the operating power of reactor in short term and long term decrease of the neutrino flux per thermal power is proportional to the amount of 239Pu produced. Thus rector ν's carry direct and real time information useful for the safeguard purposes. Since ν can not be hidden, it could be an ideal medium to monitor the reactor operation. IAEA seeks for novel technologies which enhance their ability and reactor neutrino monitoring is listed as one of such candidates. Currently neutrino physicists are performing R&D of small reactor neutrino detectors to use specifically for the safeguard use in response to the IAEA interest. In this proceedings of the neutrino2012 conference, possibilities of such reactor neutrinos application and current world-wide R&D status are described.

  6. Calculation of low-energy reactor neutrino spectra reactor for reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyana, Eka Sapta; Suda, Shoya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Matsuura, Hideaki [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Katakura, Junichi [Dept. of Nuclear System Safety Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear reactors produce a great number of antielectron neutrinos mainly from beta-decay chains of fission products. Such neutrinos have energies mostly in MeV range. We are interested in neutrinos in a region of keV, since they may take part in special weak interactions. We calculate reactor antineutrino spectra especially in the low energy region. In this work we present neutrino spectrum from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor core. To calculate neutrino spectra, we need information about all generated nuclides that emit neutrinos. They are mainly fission fragments, reaction products and trans-uranium nuclides that undergo negative beta decay. Information in relation to trans-uranium nuclide compositions and its evolution in time (burn-up process) were provided by a reactor code MVP-BURN. We used typical PWR parameter input for MVP-BURN code and assumed the reactor to be operated continuously for 1 year (12 months) in a steady thermal power (3.4 GWth). The PWR has three fuel compositions of 2.0, 3.5 and 4.1 wt% {sup 235}U contents. For preliminary calculation we adopted a standard burn-up chain model provided by MVP-BURN. The chain model treated 21 heavy nuclides and 50 fission products. The MVB-BURN code utilized JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. We confirm that the antielectron neutrino flux in the low energy region increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel. The antielectron-neutrino spectrum in low energy region is influenced by beta emitter nuclides with low Q value in beta decay (e.g. {sup 241}Pu) which is influenced by burp-up level: Low energy antielectron-neutrino spectra or emission rates increase when beta emitters with low Q value in beta decay accumulate. Our result shows the flux of low energy reactor neutrinos increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel.

  7. High temperature structural integrity evaluation method and application studies by ASME-NH for the next generation reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, Jae Han

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to establish the high temperature structural integrity evaluating procedures for the next generation reactors, which are to be operated at over 500 .deg. C and for 60 years. To do this, comparison studies of the high temperature structural design codes and assessment procedures such as the ASME-NH (USA), RCC-MR (France), DDS (Japan), and R5 (UK) are carried out in view of the accumulated inelastic strain and the creep-fatigue damage evaluations. Also the application procedures of the ASME-NH rules with the actual thermal and structural analysis results are described in detail. To overcome the complexity and the engineering costs arising from a real application of the ASME-NH rules by hand, all the procedures established in this study such as the time-dependent primary stress limits, total accumulated creep ratcheting strain limits, and the creep-fatigue damage limits are computerized and implemented into the SIE ASME-NH program. Using this program, the selected high temperature structures subjected to two cycle types are evaluated and the parametric studies for the effects of the time step size, primary load, number of cycles, normal temperature for the creep damage evaluations and the effects of the load history on the creep ratcheting strain calculations are investigated

  8. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H.; Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I.

    2001-01-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security

  9. Management and share of regulatory information through web; development of regulatory information management system for Korea next generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, J. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, S. H. [KINS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Y. C.; Park, M. I. [LG-EDS Systems, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    The Regulatory Information Management System developed by the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety supports researchers who are in charge of developing SRRG for the Korea Next Generation Reactors, manage the developed SRRG and development process, and make it possible to share the SRRG information and background knowledge through the internet with the nuclear-related personnel and the public. From the experience of the system operation, the search engine is repalced to manage the native SRRG files directly. This change eliminates the inconsistency between native files and database files and improve the search exactness by automatic indexing function. The user interface of the internet homepage (http://kngr.kins.re.kr) is completely rebuilded and allows SRRG developers to manage the search system and the atomic energy regulations database on the Web without the help of the client programs. General users are also able to utilize more convenient search function and additional information by the improved interface. The system is running under the backup system and firewall system for the data protection and security.

  10. Safety design criteria for the next generation Sodium-cooled fast reactors based on lessons learned from the Fukushima NPS accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takaaki

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation, architecture of the safety design criteria as requirements for SFR system and the activities on safety research works to establish safety evaluation methods for the next generation SFRs are summarized with the basis on lessons learned from the Fukushima NPS accident. Nuclear safety is a grovel issue which should be achieved by the international cooperation. In respect of the development for the next generation reactor, it is necessary to build the harmonized safety criteria and evaluation methods to establish the next level of safety

  11. JUNO. Determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy using reactor neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonsak, Bjoern [Hamburg University, Inst. Exp. Phys., Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiment located in China. Its aim is to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at more than 3 sigma significance after six years of data taking by using a 20kt liquid scintillator detector. To achieve this goal, an energy resolution of less than 3%/√(E) is necessary, creating strict requirements on the detector design and the liquid scintillator. Moreover, JUNO will be the only experiment in the near future able to measure the solar mixing parameters with a precision of better than 1%. This is at the same level as our current knowledge on flavour mixing in the quark sector, marking an important milestone of neutrino physics. In addition, supernova neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, sterile neutrinos as well as solar and atmospheric neutrinos can be studied. JUNO was approved in 2013 and the construction of the underground facility started early this year. In this talk the status of the experiment and its prospects is discussed.

  12. technical guidelines for the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    These technical guidelines present the opinion of the French 'Groupe Permanent charge des Reacteurs nucleaires' (GPR) concerning the safety philosophy and approach as well as the general safety requirements to be applied for the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear power plants of the PWR (pressurized water reactor) type, assuming the construction of the first units of this generation would start at the beginning of the 21. century. These technical guidelines are based on common work of the French Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN) and of the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). Moreover, these technical guidelines were extensively discussed with members of the German Reaktor Sicherheitskommission (RSK) until the end of 1998 and further with German experts. The context of these technical guidelines must be clearly understood. Faced with the current situation of nuclear energy in the world, the various nuclear steam supply system designers are developing new products, all of them claiming their intention of obtaining a higher safety level, by various ways. GPR believes that, for the operation of a new series of nuclear power plants at the beginning of the next century, the adequate way is to derive the design of these plants in an 'evolutionary' way from the design of existing plants, taking into account the operating experience and the in-depth studies conducted for such plants. Nevertheless, introduction of innovative features must also be considered in the frame of the design of the new generation of plants, especially in preventing and mitigating severe accidents. GPR underlines here that a significant improvement of the safety of the next generation of nuclear power plants at the design stage is necessary, compared to existing plants. If the search for improvement is a permanent concern in the field of safety, the necessity of a significant step at the design stage clearly derives from better

  13. Next generation CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, K.R.; Yu, S.K.W.

    1998-01-01

    Future CANDU designs will continue to meet the emerging design and performance requirements expected by the operating utilities. The next generation CANDU products will integrate new technologies into both the product features as well as into the engineering and construction work processes associated with delivering the products. The timely incorporation of advanced design features is the approach adopted for the development of the next generation of CANDU. AECL's current products consist of 700MW Class CANDU 6 and 900 MW Class CANDU 9. Evolutionary improvements are continuing with our CANDU products to enhance their adaptability to meet customers ever increasing need for higher output. Our key product drivers are for improved safety, environmental protection and improved cost effectiveness. Towards these goals we have made excellent progress in Research and Development and our investments are continuing in areas such as fuel channels and passive safety. Our long term focus is utilizing the fuel cycle flexibility of CANDU reactors as part of the long term energy mix

  14. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  15. Next generation toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one`s view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  16. Next generation PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Usui, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Development of LWR for power generation in Japan has been intended to upgrade its reliability, safety, operability, maintenance and economy as well as to increase its capacity in order, since nuclear power generation for commercial use was begun on 1970, to steadily increase its generation power. And, in Japan, ABWR (advanced BWR) of the most promising LWR in the world, was already used actually and APWR (advanced PWR) with the largest output in the world is also at a step of its actual use. And, development of the APWR in Japan was begun on 1980s, and is at a step of plan on construction of its first machine at early of this century. However, by large change of social affairs, economy of nuclear power generation is extremely required, to be positioned at an APWR improved development reactor promoted by collaboration of five PWR generation companies and the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. Therefore, on its development, investigation on effect of change in social affairs on nuclear power stations was at first carried out, to establish a design requirement for the next generation PWR. Here were described on outline, reactor core design, safety concept, and safety evaluation of APWR+ and development of an innovative PWR. (G.K.)

  17. Shut-down margin study for the next generation VVER-1000 reactor including 13 x 13 hexagonal annular assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, Farshad; Mirvakili, S. Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 x 13 assemblies are calculated. → The MCNP-5 code is run for many cases with different core burn up at various core temperatures. → There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. → SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated for specific average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC. - Abstract: Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 x 13 assemblies are calculated as the main aim of the present research. We have applied the MCNP-5 code for many cases with different values of core burn up at various core temperatures, and therefore their corresponding coolant densities and boric acid concentrations. There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. Specifically, SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated when the average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC are 0.531, 11.5, and 43 MW-days/kg-U, respectively.

  18. Development of PARA-ID Code to Simulate Inelastic Constitutive Equations and Their Parameter Identifications for the Next Generation Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, J. H.

    2006-03-01

    The establishment of the inelastic analysis technology is essential issue for a development of the next generation reactors subjected to elevated temperature operations. In this report, the peer investigation of constitutive equations in points of a ratcheting and creep-fatigue analysis is carried out and the methods extracting the constitutive parameters from experimental data are established. To perform simulations for each constitutive model, the PARA-ID (PARAmeter-IDentification) computer program is developed. By using this code, various simulations related with the parameter identification of the constitutive models are carried out

  19. The International conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: next generation nuclear systems for sustainable development. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The materials of the International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles (June 26-29, 2017, Yekaterinburg) are presented. The forum was organized by the IAEA with the assistance of Rosatom State Corporation. The theme of the conference: “The New Generation of Nuclear Systems for Sustainable Development”. About 700 specialists from more than 30 countries took part in the conference. The state and prospects for the development of the direction of fast reactors in countries dealing with this topic were discussed. A wide range of scientific issues covered the concepts of prospective reactors, reactor cores, fuel and fuel cycles, operation and decommissioning, safety, licensing, structural materials, industrial implementation [ru

  20. Neutrino-4 experiment on the search for a sterile neutrino at the SM-3 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A. P., E-mail: serebrov@pnpi.spb.ru; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Martemyanov, V. P.; Tsinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” (Russian Federation); Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K. [State Scientific Centre Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-10-15

    In view of the possibility of the existence of a sterile neutrino, test measurements of the dependence of the reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from the reactor core has been performed on SM-2 reactor with the Neutrino-2 detector model in the range of 6–11 m. Prospects of the search for reactor antineutrinos at short distances have been discussed.

  1. Next generation initiation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Tom; Derber, John; Zupanski, Milija; Cohn, Steve; Verlinde, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Four-dimensional data assimilation strategies can generally be classified as either current or next generation, depending upon whether they are used operationally or not. Current-generation data-assimilation techniques are those that are presently used routinely in operational-forecasting or research applications. They can be classified into the following categories: intermittent assimilation, Newtonian relaxation, and physical initialization. It should be noted that these techniques are the subject of continued research, and their improvement will parallel the development of next generation techniques described by the other speakers. Next generation assimilation techniques are those that are under development but are not yet used operationally. Most of these procedures are derived from control theory or variational methods and primarily represent continuous assimilation approaches, in which the data and model dynamics are 'fitted' to each other in an optimal way. Another 'next generation' category is the initialization of convective-scale models. Intermittent assimilation systems use an objective analysis to combine all observations within a time window that is centered on the analysis time. Continuous first-generation assimilation systems are usually based on the Newtonian-relaxation or 'nudging' techniques. Physical initialization procedures generally involve the use of standard or nonstandard data to force some physical process in the model during an assimilation period. Under the topic of next-generation assimilation techniques, variational approaches are currently being actively developed. Variational approaches seek to minimize a cost or penalty function which measures a model's fit to observations, background fields and other imposed constraints. Alternatively, the Kalman filter technique, which is also under investigation as a data assimilation procedure for numerical weather prediction, can yield acceptable initial conditions for mesoscale models. The

  2. Detecting Dark Photons with Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. K.

    2017-08-01

    We propose to search for light U (1 ) dark photons, A', produced via kinetically mixing with ordinary photons via the Compton-like process, γ e-→A'e-, in a nuclear reactor and detected by their interactions with the material in the active volumes of reactor neutrino experiments. We derive 95% confidence-level upper limits on ɛ , the A'-γ mixing parameter, ɛ , for dark-photon masses below 1 MeV of ɛ reactors as potential sources of intense fluxes of low-mass dark photons.

  3. Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ohadi, Michael; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Cetegen, Edvin

    2013-01-01

    In Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers, the authors’ focus on the new generation highly efficient heat exchangers and presentation of novel data and technical expertise not available in the open literature.  Next generation micro channels offer record high heat transfer coefficients with pressure drops much less than conventional micro channel heat exchangers. These inherent features promise fast penetration into many mew markets, including high heat flux cooling of electronics, waste heat recovery and energy efficiency enhancement applications, alternative energy systems, as well as applications in mass exchangers and chemical reactor systems. The combination of up to the minute research findings and technical know-how make this book very timely as the search for high performance heat and mass exchangers that can cut costs in materials consumption intensifies.

  4. Next-generation phylogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Cheong Xin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thanks to advances in next-generation technologies, genome sequences are now being generated at breadth (e.g. across environments and depth (thousands of closely related strains, individuals or samples unimaginable only a few years ago. Phylogenomics – the study of evolutionary relationships based on comparative analysis of genome-scale data – has so far been developed as industrial-scale molecular phylogenetics, proceeding in the two classical steps: multiple alignment of homologous sequences, followed by inference of a tree (or multiple trees. However, the algorithms typically employed for these steps scale poorly with number of sequences, such that for an increasing number of problems, high-quality phylogenomic analysis is (or soon will be computationally infeasible. Moreover, next-generation data are often incomplete and error-prone, and analysis may be further complicated by genome rearrangement, gene fusion and deletion, lateral genetic transfer, and transcript variation. Here we argue that next-generation data require next-generation phylogenomics, including so-called alignment-free approaches. Reviewers Reviewed by Mr Alexander Panchin (nominated by Dr Mikhail Gelfand, Dr Eugene Koonin and Prof Peter Gogarten. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers’ comments section.

  5. Next Generation Inverter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zilai [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States); Gough, Charles [General Motors LLC, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-04-22

    The goal of this Cooperative Agreement was the development of a Next Generation Inverter for General Motors’ electrified vehicles, including battery electric vehicles, range extended electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. The inverter is a critical electronics component that converts battery power (DC) to and from the electric power for the motor (AC).

  6. Next generation of accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1979-01-01

    Existing high-energy accelerators are reviewed, along with those under construction or being designed. Finally, some of the physics issues which go into setting machine parameters, and some of the features of the design of next generation electron and proton machines are discussed

  7. Dynalight Next Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The project aims to develop the next generation of energy cost-efficient artificial lighting control that enables greenhouse growers to adapt their use of artificial lighting dynamically to fluctuations in the price of electricity. This is a necessity as fluctuations in the price of electricity c...

  8. Next Generation Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2008-01-01

    different online networks for communities of people who share interests or individuals who presents themselves through user produced content is what makes up the social networking of today. The purpose of this paper is to discuss perceived user requirements to the next generation social networks. The paper...

  9. A New Class of Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Mohit; Skandan, Ganesh; Khose, Gordon E.; Maro, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 C. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  10. "A New Class od Functionally Graded Cearamic-Metal Composites for Next Generation Very High Temperature Reactors"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohit Jain; Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Gordon E. Khose; Mrs. Judith Maro, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT

    2008-05-01

    Generation IV Very High Temperature power generating nuclear reactors will operate at temperatures greater than 900 oC. At these temperatures, the components operating in these reactors need to be fabricated from materials with excellent thermo-mechanical properties. Conventional pure or composite materials have fallen short in delivering the desired performance. New materials, or conventional materials with new microstructures, and associated processing technologies are needed to meet these materials challenges. Using the concept of functionally graded materials, we have fabricated a composite material which has taken advantages of the mechanical and thermal properties of ceramic and metals. Functionally-graded composite samples with various microstructures were fabricated. It was demonstrated that the composition and spatial variation in the composition of the composite can be controlled. Some of the samples were tested for irradiation resistance to neutrons. The samples did not degrade during initial neutron irradiation testing.

  11. The dynomak: An advanced spheromak reactor concept with imposed-dynamo current drive and next-generation nuclear power technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, D.A., E-mail: das1990@uw.edu; Jarboe, T.R.; Morgan, K.D.; Pfaff, M.; Lavine, E.S.; Kamikawa, Y.; Hughes, M.; Andrist, P.; Marklin, G.; Nelson, B.A.

    2014-04-15

    A high-β spheromak reactor concept has been formulated with an estimated overnight capital cost that is competitive with conventional power sources. This reactor concept utilizes recently discovered imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) and a molten salt (FLiBe) blanket system for first wall cooling, neutron moderation and tritium breeding. Currently available materials and ITER-developed cryogenic pumping systems were implemented in this concept from the basis of technological feasibility. A tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of greater than 1.1 has been calculated using a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) neutron transport simulation. High temperature superconducting tapes (YBCO) were used for the equilibrium coil set, substantially reducing the recirculating power fraction when compared to previous spheromak reactor studies. Using zirconium hydride for neutron shielding, a limiting equilibrium coil lifetime of at least thirty full-power years has been achieved. The primary FLiBe loop was coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle due to attractive economics and high thermal efficiencies. With these advancements, an electrical output of 1000 MW from a thermal output of 2486 MW was achieved, yielding an overall plant efficiency of approximately 40%.

  12. Reactor Neutrino Oscillations: KamLAND and KASKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suekane, F.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactors generate a huge number of low energy ν-bar e 's. The reactor neutrinos have been used to study properties of neutrinos since its discovery a half century ago. Recently, KamLAND group finally discovered reactor neutrino oscillation with average baseline 180 km. According to the 3 flavor scheme of standard theory and measured oscillation parameters so far, the reactor neutrino is expected to perform another type of small oscillation at a baseline 1.8 km. KASKA experiment is a project to detect this small oscillation and to measure the last neutrino mixing angle θ 13 by using the world most powerful reactor complex, Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. In this proceedings, phenomena of neutrino oscillation and the two reactor oscillation experiments, KamLAND and KASKA, are introduced

  13. Neutrinos oscillations researches near a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiman, M.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis deals with the research of neutrinos oscillations near the Chooz B nuclear power plant in the Ardennes. The first part presents the framework of the researches and the chosen detector. The second part details the antineutrinos flux calculus from the reactors and the calculus of the expected events. The analysis procedure is detailed in the last part from the calibration to the events selection. (A.L.B.)

  14. Puzzle of "lost" reactor neutrinos solved by scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration of Chinese, Japanese and American scientists have announced that electron antineutrinos from nuclear reactors escape detection by oscillating into another type of neutrino. The experiment confirms solar neutrino oscillation and determines the key parameters of neutrino oscillation (1/2 page).

  15. Hacking the next generation

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanjani, Nitesh; Hardin, Brett

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of rich Internet applications, the explosion of social media, and the increased use of powerful cloud computing infrastructures, a new generation of attackers has added cunning new techniques to its arsenal. For anyone involved in defending an application or a network of systems, Hacking: The Next Generation is one of the few books to identify a variety of emerging attack vectors. You'll not only find valuable information on new hacks that attempt to exploit technical flaws, you'll also learn how attackers take advantage of individuals via social networking sites, and abuse

  16. Applying Bayesian neural networks to separate neutrino events from backgrounds in reactor neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Meng, Y X; Xu, W W

    2008-01-01

    A toy detector has been designed to simulate central detectors in reactor neutrino experiments in the paper. The samples of neutrino events and three major backgrounds from the Monte-Carlo simulation of the toy detector are generated in the signal region. The Bayesian Neural Networks (BNN) are applied to separate neutrino events from backgrounds in reactor neutrino experiments. As a result, the most neutrino events and uncorrelated background events in the signal region can be identified with BNN, and the part events each of the fast neutron and 8 He/ 9 Li backgrounds in the signal region can be identified with BNN. Then, the signal to noise ratio in the signal region is enhanced with BNN. The neutrino discrimination increases with the increase of the neutrino rate in the training sample. However, the background discriminations decrease with the decrease of the background rate in the training sample

  17. Next generation breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabaschi, Delfina; Tondelli, Alessandro; Desiderio, Francesca; Volante, Andrea; Vaccino, Patrizia; Valè, Giampiero; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The genomic revolution of the past decade has greatly improved our understanding of the genetic make-up of living organisms. The sequencing of crop genomes has completely changed our vision and interpretation of genome organization and evolution. Re-sequencing allows the identification of an unlimited number of markers as well as the analysis of germplasm allelic diversity based on allele mining approaches. High throughput marker technologies coupled with advanced phenotyping platforms provide new opportunities for discovering marker-trait associations which can sustain genomic-assisted breeding. The availability of genome sequencing information is enabling genome editing (site-specific mutagenesis), to obtain gene sequences desired by breeders. This review illustrates how next generation sequencing-derived information can be used to tailor genomic tools for different breeders' needs to revolutionize crop improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Next generation vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines.

  19. The double chooz reactor neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella, I Gil [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es

    2008-05-15

    The Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment will be the next detector to search for a non vanishing {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle with unprecedented sensitivity, which might open the way to unveiling CP violation in the leptonic sector. The measurement of this angle will be based in a precise comparison of the antineutrino spectrum at two identical detectors located at different distances from the Chooz nuclear reactor cores in France. Double Chooz is particularly attractive because of its capability to measure sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) to 3{sigma} if sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) > 0.05 or to exclude sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) down to 0.03 at 90% C.L. for {delta}m{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} in three years of data taking with both detectors. The construction of the far detector starts in 2008 and the first neutrino results are expected in 2009. The current status of the experiment, its physics potential and design and expected performance of the detector are reviewed.

  20. Experiment for search for sterile neutrino at SM-3 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Cherniy, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Zinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanasiev, V. V.; Matrosov, L. N.; Matrosova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In connection with the question of possible existence of sterile neutrino the laboratory on the basis of SM-3 reactor was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. A prototype of a neutrino detector with scintillator volume of 400 l can be moved at the distance of 6-11 m from the reactor core. The measurements of background conditions have been made. It is shown that the main experimental problem is associated with cosmic radiation background. Test measurements of dependence of a reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from a reactor core have been made. The prospects of search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino at short distances are discussed.

  1. Next Generation Science Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, J.

    2016-02-01

    I will provide an overview of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and demonstrate how scientists and educators can use these standards to strengthen and enhance their collaborations. The NGSS are rich in content and practice and provide all students with an internationally-benchmarked science education. Using these state-led standards to guide outreach efforts can help develop and sustain effective and mutually beneficial teacher-researcher partnerships. Aligning outreach with the three dimensions of the standards can help make research relevant for target audiences by intentionally addressing the science practices, cross-cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas of the K-12 science curriculum that drives instruction and assessment. Collaborations between researchers and educators that are based on this science framework are more sustainable because they address the needs of both scientists and educators. Educators are better able to utilize science content that aligns with their curriculum. Scientists who learn about the NGSS can better understand the frameworks under which educators work, which can lead to more extensive and focused outreach with teachers as partners. Based on this model, the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) develops its education materials in conjunction with scientists and educators to produce accurate, standards-aligned activities and curriculum-based interactions with researchers. I will highlight examples of IODP's current, successful teacher-researcher collaborations that are intentionally aligned with the NGSS.

  2. Next-Generation Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  3. Neutrinos

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The Standard Model predicts that the neutrinos are massless and do not mix. Generic extensions of the Standard Model predict that neutrinos are massive (but, very likely, much lighter than the charged fermions). Therefore, the search for neutrino masses and mixing tests the Standard Model and probes new phasics. Measurements of various features of the fluxes of atmospheric, solar and, more recently, reactor neutrinos have provided evidence for neutrino oscillations and therefore for neutrino masses and mixing. These results have significant theoretical implications: new physics exists, and its scale can be estimated. There are interesting lessons for grand unified theories and for models of extra dimensions. The measured neutrino flavor parameters pose a challenge to flavor models.

  4. Next Generation Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  5. Next Generation Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheraghi, S. Hossein [Western New England Univ., Springfield, MA (United States); Madden, Frank [FloDesign Wind Turbine Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this collaborative effort between Western New England University's College of Engineering and FloDesign Wind Turbine (FDWT) Corporation to wok on a novel areodynamic concept that could potentially lead to the next generation of wind turbines. Analytical studies and early scale model tests of FDWT's Mixer/Ejector Wind Turbine (MEWT) concept, which exploits jet-age advanced fluid dynamics, indicate that the concept has the potential to significantly reduce the cost of electricity over conventional Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines while reducing land usage. This project involved the design, fabrication, and wind tunnel testing of components of MEWT to provide the research and engineering data necessary to validate the design iterations and optimize system performance. Based on these tests, a scale model prototype called Briza was designed, fabricated, installed and tested on a portable tower to investigate and improve the design system in real world conditions. The results of these scale prototype efforts were very promising and have contributed significantly to FDWT's ongoing development of a product scale wind turbine for deployment in multiple locations around the U.S. This research was mutually beneficial to Western New England University, FDWT, and the DOE by utilizing over 30 student interns and a number of faculty in all efforts. It brought real-world wind turbine experience into the classroom to further enhance the Green Engineering Program at WNEU. It also provided on-the-job training to many students, improving their future employment opportunities, while also providing valuable information to further advance FDWT's mixer-ejector wind turbine technology, creating opportunities for future project innovation and job creation.

  6. Next generation information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limback, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Medina, Melanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silva, Michelle E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  7. Neutrino Mass Models: impact of non-zero reactor angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    In this talk neutrino mass models are reviewed and the impact of a non-zero reactor angle and other deviations from tri-bi maximal mixing are discussed. We propose some benchmark models, where the only way to discriminate between them is by high precision neutrino oscillation experiments.

  8. The next generation CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    AECL's product line of CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 nuclear power plants are adapted to respond to changing market conditions, experience feedback and technological development by a continuous improvement process of design evolution. The CANDU 6 Nuclear Power Plant design is a successful family of nuclear units, with the first four units entering service in 1983, and the most recent entering service this year. A further four CANDU 6 units are under construction. Starting in 1996, a focused forward-looking development program is under way at AECL to incorporate a series of individual improvements and integrate them into the CANDU 6, leading to the evolutionary development of the next-generation enhanced CANDU 6. The CANDU 6 improvements program includes all aspects of an NPP project, including engineering tools improvements, design for improved constructability, scheduling for faster, more streamlined commissioning, and improved operating performance. This enhanced CANDU 6 product will combine the benefits of design provenness (drawing on the more than 70 reactor-years experience of the seven operating CANDU 6 units), with the advantages of an evolutionary next-generation design. Features of the enhanced CANDU 6 design include: Advanced Human Machine Interface - built around the Advanced CANDU Control Centre; Advanced fuel design - using the newly demonstrated CANFLEX fuel bundle; Improved Efficiency based on improved utilization of waste heat; Streamlined System Design - including simplifications to improve performance and safety system reliability; Advanced Engineering Tools, -- featuring linked electronic databases from 3D CADDS, equipment specification and material management; Advanced Construction Techniques - based on open top equipment installation and the use of small skid mounted modules; Options defined for Passive Heat Sink capability and low-enrichment core optimization. (author)

  9. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized

  10. The Next Generation Photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Dennis Thomas; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2005-09-12

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a

  11. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which

  12. Latest Results from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Among all the fundamental particles that have been experimentally observed, neutrinos remain one of the least understood. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment in China consists of eight identical detectors placed underground at different baselines from three groups of nuclear reactors, a configuration that is ideally suited for studying the properties of these elusive particles. This talk will present three sets of results that have just recently been released by the Daya Bay Collaboration: (i) a precision measurement of the oscillation parameters that drive the disappearance of electron antineutrinos at short baselines, (ii) a search for sterile neutrino mixing, and (iii) a high-statistics determination of the absolute flux and spectrum of reactor-produced electron antineutrinos. All of these results extend the limits of our knowledge in their respective areas and thus shed new light on neutrinos and the physics that surround them.

  13. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurcic, Zelimir; Detwiler, Jason A.; Piepke, Andreas; Foster Jr., Vince R.; Miller, Lester; Gratta, Giorgio

    2008-08-06

    Anti-neutrino emission rates from nuclear reactors are determined from thermal power measurements and fission rate calculations. The uncertainties in these quantities for commercial power plants and their impact on the calculated interaction rates in {bar {nu}}{sub e} detectors is examined. We discuss reactor-to-reactor correlations between the leading uncertainties, and their relevance to reactor {bar {nu}}{sub e} experiments.

  14. Reactor neutrinos study: integration and characterization of the Nucifer detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiot, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The major advances done in the understanding of neutrinos properties and in detector technology have opened the door to a new discipline: the Applied Antineutrino Physics. Indeed, this particle has the great advantage to carry information from its emission place without perturbation. Because neutrinos are inextricably linked to nuclear processes, new applications are in nuclear safeguards. In this context, the Nucifer project aims to test a small electron-antineutrino detector to be installed a few 10 meters from a reactor core for monitoring its thermal power and for testing the sensitivity to the plutonium content. Moreover, recent re-analysis of previous short-distance reactor-neutrino experiments shows a significant discrepancy between measured and expected neutrino count rates. Among the various hypotheses a new phenomenon as the existence of a fourth sterile neutrino can explain this anomaly. To be able to count neutrinos and get the corresponding energy spectrum, the detection is based on the inverse beta decay in about 850 kg of doped liquid scintillator. The experimental challenge is to operate such a small detector in a high background place, due to the closeness with the surface and the reactor radiations. The detector is now finished and data taking has begun at the Osiris research reactor in Saclay since April 2012. Sadly, unexpected low liquid attenuation length and high gamma background level prevented us to highlight neutrinos. We are now waiting for a liquid change and a new lead wall to study reactor monitoring and to test the sterile neutrino hypothesis. (author) [fr

  15. The reactor antineutrino anomaly and low energy threshold neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, B. C.; Garcés, E. A.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.

    2018-01-01

    Short distance reactor antineutrino experiments measure an antineutrino spectrum a few percent lower than expected from theoretical predictions. In this work we study the potential of low energy threshold reactor experiments in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We discuss the perspectives of the recently detected coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering in future reactor antineutrino experiments. We find that the expectations to improve the current constraints on the mixing with sterile neutrinos are promising. We also analyze the measurements of antineutrino scattering off electrons from short distance reactor experiments. In this case, the statistics is not competitive with inverse beta decay experiments, although future experiments might play a role when compare it with the Gallium anomaly.

  16. Next Generation Microshutter Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the next generation MicroShutter Array (MSA) as a multi-object field selector for missions anticipated in the next two decades. For many...

  17. Wave-packet treatment of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Yat-Long; Chu, M.C.; Xu, Jianyi [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Physics, Shatin (China); Tsui, Ka Ming [University of Tokyo, RCCN, ICRR, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Wong, Chan Fai [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-06-15

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 σ confidence level. (orig.)

  18. Reactor Neutrino Detection for Non Proliferation with the NUCIFER Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvet, L. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Bouvier, S.; Bui, V. M. [Laboratoire Subatech, Ecole des Mines, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); others, and

    2012-06-15

    Neutrinos are the most abundant matter particles in the Universe. Thoroughly investigated in basic science, the neutrino field is now delivering first applications to the monitoring of nuclear reactors. The neutrinos are emitted in the decay chain of the fission products; therefore measuring their flux provides real-time information, directly related to the fission process occurring in the reactor core. Because of the very weak interaction of neutrinos with matter a neutrino detector can stand outside the core containment vessel and provide a non-intrusive and inherently tamper resistant measurement. After a brief review of the existing data and worldwide projects, we present the NUCIFER experiment. The active part of the detector is a tank filled up with one ton of Gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator. Sixteen photomultiplier tubes, isolated from the liquid by an acrylic buffer, read out the light produced by the interaction of a neutrino with the protons of the liquid. The tank is surrounded by plastic scintillator plates to veto the cosmic rays. Then polyethylene and lead shielding suppress the background coming from external neutrons and gamma rays respectively. The NUCIFER detector has been designed for an optimal compromise between the detection performances and the specifications of operation in a safeguards regime. Its global footprint is 2.8 m x 2.8 m and it can monitor remotely the nuclear power plant thermal power and Plutonium content with very little maintenance on years scale. The experiment is currently installed near the OSIRIS research reactor (70 MWth) at CEA, in Saclay, France. First data are expected by May 2012. This work is done in contact with the IAEA/SGTN division that is currently investigating the potentiality of neutrinos as a novel safeguards tool. A dedicated working group has been created in 2010 to coordinate the simulation effort of various reactor types as well as the development of dedicated detectors and define and eventually

  19. Non-standard interaction effects at reactor neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang, He

    2009-01-01

    We study non-standard interactions (NSIs) at reactor neutrino experiments, and in particular, the mimicking effects on θ 13 . We present generic formulas for oscillation probabilities including NSIs from sources and detectors. Instructive mappings between the fundamental leptonic mixing parameters and the effective leptonic mixing parameters are established. In addition, NSI corrections to the mixing angles θ 13 and θ 12 are discussed in detailed. Finally, we show that, even for a vanishing θ 13 , an oscillation phenomenon may still be observed in future short baseline reactor neutrino experiments, such as Double Chooz and Daya Bay, due to the existences of NSIs

  20. Conceptual design of next generation MTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Yamaura, Takayuki; Naka, Michihiro; Kawamata, Kazuo; Izumo, Hironobu; Hori, Naohiko; Nagao, Yoshiharu; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kaminaga, Masanori; Komori, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahide; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Mine, M [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamazaki, S [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Ishikawa, S [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Miura, K [Sukegawa Electric Co., Ltd., Takahagi, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakashima, S [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, K [Chiyoda Technol Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost next generation materials testing reactor (MTR) which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  1. Next generation of energy production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouault, J.; Garnier, J.C.; Carre, F.

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the slides that have been presented at the Gedepeon conference. Gedepeon is a research group involving scientists from Cea (French atomic energy commission), CNRS (national center of scientific research), EDF (electricity of France) and Framatome that is devoted to the study of new energy sources and particularly to the study of the future generations of nuclear systems. The contributions have been classed into 9 topics: 1) gas cooled reactors, 2) molten salt reactors (MSBR), 3) the recycling of plutonium and americium, 4) reprocessing of molten salt reactor fuels, 5) behavior of graphite under radiation, 6) metallic materials for molten salt reactors, 7) refractory fuels of gas cooled reactors, 8) the nuclear cycle for the next generations of nuclear systems, and 9) organization of research programs on the new energy sources

  2. Project control - the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorii, V.F.; McKinnon, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) second largest Major System Acquisition Project. We have developed an integrated planning and control system (called PACS) that we believe represents the 'Next Generation' in project control. PACS integrates technical scope, cost, and schedule information for over 50 participating organizations and produces performances measurement reports for science and engineering managers at all levels. Our 'Next Generation' project control too, PACS, has been found to be in compliance with the new DOE Project Control System Guidelines. Additionally, the nuclear utility oversight group of the Edison Electric Institute has suggested PACS be used as a model for other civilian radioactive waste management projects. A 'Next Generation' project control tool will be necessary to do science in the 21st century

  3. Technical presentation: Next Generation Oscilloscopes

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

      Rohde & Schwarz "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" - Introduction and Presentation Agenda: Wednesday 23 March  -  09:30 to 11:30 (open end) Bldg. 13-2-005 Language: English 09.30 Presentation "Next Generation Oscilloscopes" from Rohde & Schwarz RTO / RTM in theory and practice Gerard Walker 10.15 Technical design details from R&D Dr. Markus Freidhof 10.45 Scope and Probe Roadmap (confidential) Guido Schulze 11.00 Open Discussion Feedback, first impression, wishes, needs and requirements from CERN All 11.30 Expert Talks, Hands on All Mr. Dr. Markus Freidhof, Head of R&D Oscilloscopes, Rohde & Schwarz, Germany; Mr. Guido Schulze, ...

  4. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle θ 13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin 2 (2*θ 13 ) to better than 0.01 at 90% CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  5. The next generation safeguards initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobey, William

    2008-01-01

    NGSI or the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is designed to revitalize the U.S. safeguards technical base, as well as invest in human resources, and to mobilize our primary asset - the U.S. National Laboratories - as well as industry and academia to restore capabilities. While NGSI is a U.S. effort it is intended to serve as a catalyst for a much broader commitment to international safeguards in partnership with the IAEA and other countries. Initiatives over the last years include such as the Proliferation Security Initiative, UN Security Council Resolution 1540, the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, and initiatives of the G-8 and NSG to discourage the spread of enrichment and reprocessing. NGSI augments this agenda by providing a means to strengthen the technical and political underpinnings of IAEA safeguards. Priorities and envisioned activities under NGSI are the following. (1) Cooperation with IAEA and others to promote universal adoption of safeguards agreements and the Additional Protocol including greater information sharing between member states and the IAEA, investigation of weaponization and procurement activities, and options to strengthen the state-level approach to safeguards. (2) NGSI anticipates the deployment of new types of reactors and fuel cycle facilities, as well as the need to use limited safeguards resources effectively and efficiently, especially in plants that pose the largest burden specifically complex, bulk-handling facilities. (3) NGSI will encourage a generational improvement in current safeguards technologies including improvement of precision and speed of nuclear measurements, performance of real-time process monitoring and surveillance in unattended mode, enabling in-field, pre-screening and analysis of nuclear and environmental samples, and collection, integration, analysis and archiving safeguards-relevant information from all available sources.(4) NGSI will address human capital management. Training and

  6. The Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States 2013) were released almost two years ago. Work tied to the NGSS, their adoption, and implementation continues to move forward around the country. Stephen L. Pruitt, senior vice president, science, at Achieve, an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit education reform organization that was a lead…

  7. Towards Next Generation BI Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Jovan; Romero, Oscar; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    Next generation Business Intelligence (BI) systems require integration of heterogeneous data sources and a strong user-centric orientation. Both needs entail machine-processable metadata to enable automation and allow end users to gain access to relevant data for their decision making processes....... This framework is based on the findings of a survey of current user-centric approaches mainly focusing on query recommendation assistance. Finally, we discuss the benefits of the framework and present the plans for future work....

  8. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Beck, R.; Carroll, T.J.; Cesar, J.; Cushman, P.; Dent, J.B.; De Rijck, S.; Dutta, B.; Flanagan, W.; Fritts, M.; Gao, Y.; Harris, H.R.; Hays, C.C.; Iyer, V.

    2017-01-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5–20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  9. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Barker, D. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Beck, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Carroll, T.J.; Cesar, J. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cushman, P. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dent, J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504 (United States); De Rijck, S. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Dutta, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Flanagan, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fritts, M. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gao, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics & Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit 48201 (United States); Harris, H.R.; Hays, C.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Iyer, V. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni - 752050 (India); and others

    2017-05-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5–20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  10. Next Generation Biopharmaceuticals: Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2018-04-11

    Therapeutic proteins show a rapid market growth. The relatively young biotech industry already represents 20 % of the total global pharma market. The biotech industry environment has traditionally been fast-pasted and intellectually stimulated. Nowadays the top ten best selling drugs are dominated by monoclonal antibodies (mABs).Despite mABs being the biggest medical breakthrough in the last 25 years, technical innovation does not stand still.The goal remains to preserve the benefits of a conventional mAB (serum half-life and specificity) whilst further improving efficacy and safety and to open new and better avenues for treating patients, e.g., improving the potency of molecules, target binding, tissue penetration, tailored pharmacokinetics, and reduced adverse effects or immunogenicity.The next generation of biopharmaceuticals can pose specific chemistry, manufacturing, and control (CMC) challenges. In contrast to conventional proteins, next-generation biopharmaceuticals often require lyophilization of the final drug product to ensure storage stability over shelf-life time. In addition, next-generation biopharmaceuticals require analytical methods that cover different ways of possible degradation patterns and pathways, and product development is a long way from being straight forward. The element of "prior knowledge" does not exist equally for most novel formats compared to antibodies, and thus the assessment of critical quality attributes (CQAs) and the definition of CQA assessment criteria and specifications is difficult, especially in early-stage development.

  11. Development of Advanced Monitoring System with Reactor Neutrino Detection Technique for Verification of Reactor Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, H.; Tadokoro, H.; Imura, A.; Furuta, Y.; Suekane, F.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, technique of Gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) for reactor neutrino oscillation experiments has attracted attention as a monitor of reactor operation and ''nuclear Gain (GA)'' for IAEA safeguards. When the thermal operation power is known, it is, in principle, possible to non-destructively measure the ratio of Pu/U in reactor fuel under operation from the reactor neutrino flux. An experimental program led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories in USA has already demonstrated feasibility of the reactor monitoring by neutrinos at San Onofre Nuclear Power Station, and the Pu monitoring by neutrino detection is recognized as a candidate of novel technology to detect undeclared operation of reactor. However, further R and D studies of detector design and materials are still necessary to realize compact and mobile detector for practical use of neutrino detector. Considering the neutrino interaction cross-section and compact detector size, the detector must be set at a short distance (a few tens of meters) from reactor core to accumulate enough statistics for monitoring. In addition, although previous reactor neutrino experiments were performed at underground to reduce cosmic ray muon background, feasibility of the measurement at ground level is required for the monitor considering limited access to the reactor site. Therefore, the detector must be designed to be able to reduce external backgrounds extremely without huge shields at ground level, eg. cosmic ray muons and fast neutrons. We constructed a 0.76 ton Gd-LS detector, and carried out a reactor neutrino measurement at the experimental fast reactor JOYO in 2007. The neutrino detector was set up at 24.3m away from the reactor core at the ground level, and we understood the property of the main background; the cosmic-ray induced fast neutron, well. Based on the experience, we are constructing a new detector for the next experiment. The detector is a Gd

  12. Next generation sensors and systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Written by experts in their area of research, this book has outlined the current status of the fundamentals and analytical concepts, modelling and design issues, technical details and practical applications of different types of sensors and discussed about the trends of next generation of sensors and systems happening in the area of Sensing technology. This book will be useful as a reference book for engineers and scientist especially the post-graduate students find will this book as reference book for their research on wearable sensors, devices and technologies.  .

  13. Next generation surveillance system (NGSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Development of 'functional requirements' for transparency systems may offer a near-term mode of regional cooperation. New requirements under development at the IAEA may provide a foundation for this potential activity. The Next Generation Surveillance System (NGSS) will become the new IAEA remote monitoring system Under new requirements the NGSS would attempt to use more commercial components to reduce cost, increase radiation survivability and further increase reliability. The NGSS must be available in two years due to rapidly approaching obsolescence in the existing DCM family. (author)

  14. Next-Generation Tools For Next-Generation Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. G.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of large-scale galaxy surveys, across the electromagnetic spectrum, loom on the horizon as explosively game-changing datasets, in terms of our understanding of cosmology and structure formation. We are on the brink of a torrent of data that is set to both confirm and constrain current theories to an unprecedented level, and potentially overturn many of our conceptions. One of the great challenges of this forthcoming deluge is to extract maximal scientific content from the vast array of raw data. This challenge requires not only well-understood and robust physical models, but a commensurate network of software implementations with which to efficiently apply them. The halo model, a semi-analytic treatment of cosmological spatial statistics down to nonlinear scales, provides an excellent mathematical framework for exploring the nature of dark matter. This thesis presents a next-generation toolkit based on the halo model formalism, intended to fulfil the requirements of next-generation surveys. Our toolkit comprises three tools: (i) hmf, a comprehensive and flexible calculator for halo mass functions (HMFs) within extended Press-Schechter theory, (ii) the MRP distribution for extremely efficient analytic characterisation of HMFs, and (iii) halomod, an extension of hmf which provides support for the full range of halo model components. In addition to the development and technical presentation of these tools, we apply each to the task of physical modelling. With hmf, we determine the precision of our knowledge of the HMF, due to uncertainty in our knowledge of the cosmological parameters, over the past decade of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We place rule-of-thumb uncertainties on the predicted HMF for the Planck cosmology, and find that current limits on the precision are driven by modeling uncertainties rather than those from cosmological parameters. With the MRP, we create and test a method for robustly fitting the HMF to observed

  15. The radon monitoring system in Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.C.; Kwan, K.K.; Kwok, M.W.; Kwok, T.; Leung, J.K.C.; Leung, K.Y.; Lin, Y.C.; Luk, K.B.; Pun, C.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive, reliable and portable automatic system (H 3 ) to monitor the radon concentration of the underground experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. H 3 is able to measure radon concentration with a statistical error less than 10% in a 1-h measurement of dehumidified air (R.H. 5% at 25 °C) with radon concentration as low as 50 Bq/m 3 . This is achieved by using a large radon progeny collection chamber, semiconductor α-particle detector with high energy resolution, improved electronics and software. The integrated radon monitoring system is highly customizable to operate in different run modes at scheduled times and can be controlled remotely to sample radon in ambient air or in water from the water pools where the antineutrino detectors are being housed. The radon monitoring system has been running in the three experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment since November 2013.

  16. Chasing {theta}{sub 13} with new reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasserre, Th. [DSM/DAPNIA/SPP, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-12-15

    It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, free from any parameter degeneracies and correlations induced by matter effect and the unknown leptonic Dirac CP phase. The current best constraint on the third mixing angle comes from the Chooz reactor neutrino experiment sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13})<0.2 (90 % C.L., {delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2}=2.010{sup -3} eV{sup 2}). Several projects of experiment, with different timescales, have been proposed over the last two years all around the world. Their sensitivities range from sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13})<0.01 to 0.03, having thus an excellent discovery potential of the {nu}{sub e} fraction of {nu}{sub 3}.

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  18. Slow control systems of the Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.H.; Jang, H.I.; Choi, W.Q.; Choi, Y.; Jang, J.S.; Jeon, E.J.; Joo, K.K.; Kim, B.R.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.Y.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.D.; Ko, Y.J.; Lee, J.K.; Lim, I.T.; Pac, M.Y.; Park, I.G.; Park, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    The RENO experiment has been in operation since August 2011 to measure reactor antineutrino disappearance using identical near and far detectors. For accurate measurements of neutrino mixing parameters and efficient data taking, it is crucial to monitor and control the detector in real time. Environmental conditions also need to be monitored for stable operation of detectors as well as for safety reasons. In this paper, we report the design, hardware, operation, and performance of the slow control system.

  19. Feasibility of a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector: UNO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chang Kee

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector is examined and a conceptual design (UNO) is presented. The design has a linear detector configuration with a total volume of 650 kton which is 13 times the total volume of the Super-Kamiokande detector. It corresponds to a 20 times increase in fiducial volume for physics analysis. The physics goals of UNO are to increase the sensitivity of the search for nucleon decay by a factor of ten and to make precision measurements of the solar and atmospheric neutrino properties. In addition, the detection sensitivity for supernova neutrinos will reach as far as the Andromeda galaxy

  20. Neutrino oscillations in Gallium and reactor experiments and cosmological effects of a light sterile neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero-Ortega, Mario Andres

    2009-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations is a very well studied phenomenon and the observations from Solar, very-long-baseline Reactor, Atmospheric and Accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments give very robust evidence of three-neutrino mixing. On the other hand, some experimental data have shown anomalies that could be interpreted as indication of exotic neutrino physics beyond three-neutrino mixing. Furthermore, from a cosmological point of view, the possibility of extra light species contributing as a subdominant hot (or warm) component of the Universe is still interesting. In the first part of this Thesis, we focused on the anomaly observed in the Gallium radioactive source experiments. These experiments were done to test the Gallium solar neutrino detectors GALLEX and SAGE, by measuring the electron neutrino flux produced by intense artificial radioactive sources placed inside the detectors. The measured number of events was smaller than the expected one. We interpreted this anomaly as a possible indication of the disappearance of electron neutrinos and, in the effective framework of two-neutrino mixing, we obtained sin 2 2θ ≥ 0.03 and Δm 2 ≥ 0.1 eV 2 . We also studied the compatibility of this result with the data of the Bugey and Chooz reactor antineutrino disappearance experiments. We found that the Bugey data present a hint of neutrino oscillations with 0.02 ≤ sin 2 2θ ≤ 0.07 and Δm 2 ≅ 1.95 eV 2 , which is compatible with the Gallium allowed region of the mixing parameters. Then, combining the data of Bugey and Chooz, the data of Gallium and Bugey, and the data of Gallium, Bugey and Chooz, we found that this hint persists, with an acceptable compatibility of the experimental data. Furthermore, we analyzed the experimental data of the I.L.L., S.R.S, and Gosgen nuclear Reactor experiments. We obtained a good fit of the I.L.L. data, showing 1 and 2σ allowed regions in the oscillation parameters space. However, the combination of I.L.L. data with the Bugey

  1. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  2. Designing Next Generation Telecom Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Samarajiva, Rohan

    – ICT convergence regulation and multisector utility regulation. Whatever structure of next generation telecom regulation is adopted, all countries will need to pay much greater attention to the need for increased coordination of policy directions and regulatory activities both across the industries......Continuously expanding applications of information and communication technologies (ICT) are transforming local, national, regional and international economies into network economies, the foundation for information societies. They are being built upon expanded and upgraded national telecom networks...... to creating an environment to foster a massive expansion in the coverage and capabilities of the information infrastructure networks, with national telecom regulators as the key implementers of the policies of reform. The first phase of reform has focused on industry specific telecom policy and regulation...

  3. Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Elaine R.

    2013-06-01

    Automated DNA sequencing instruments embody an elegant interplay among chemistry, engineering, software, and molecular biology and have built upon Sanger's founding discovery of dideoxynucleotide sequencing to perform once-unfathomable tasks. Combined with innovative physical mapping approaches that helped to establish long-range relationships between cloned stretches of genomic DNA, fluorescent DNA sequencers produced reference genome sequences for model organisms and for the reference human genome. New types of sequencing instruments that permit amazing acceleration of data-collection rates for DNA sequencing have been developed. The ability to generate genome-scale data sets is now transforming the nature of biological inquiry. Here, I provide an historical perspective of the field, focusing on the fundamental developments that predated the advent of next-generation sequencing instruments and providing information about how these instruments work, their application to biological research, and the newest types of sequencers that can extract data from single DNA molecules.

  4. Feasibility study of an optical resonator for applications in neutral-beam injection systems for the next generation of nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This work is part of a larger project called SIPHORE (Single gap Photo-neutralizer energy Recovery injector), which aims to enhance the overall efficiency of one of the mechanisms through which the plasma is heated, in a nuclear fusion reactor, i.e. the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system. An important component of a NBI system is the neutralizer of high energetic ion beams. SIPHORE proposes to substitute the gas cell neutralizer, used in the current NBI systems, with a photo-neutralizer exploiting the photo-detachment process within Fabry Perot cavities. This mechanism should allow a relevant NBI global efficiency of η≥ 60%, significantly higher than the one currently possible (η≤25% for ITER). The present work concerns the feasibility study of an optical cavity with suitable properties for applications in NBI systems. Within this context, the issue of the determination of an appropriated optical cavity design has been firstly considered and the theoretical and experimental analysis of a particular optical resonator has been carried on. The problems associated with the high levels of intracavity optical power (∼3 MW) required for an adequate photo-neutralization rate have then been faced. In this respect, we addressed both the problem of the thermal effects on the cavity mirrors due to their absorption of intra-cavity optical power (∼1 W) and the one associated to the necessity of a high powerful input laser beam (∼1 kW) to feed the optical resonator. (author)

  5. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine

  6. Next generation HOM-damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhauser, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Research and development for superconducting radio-frequency cavities has made enormous progress over the last decades from the understanding of theoretical limitations to the industrial mass fabrication of cavities for large-scale particle accelerators. Key technologies remain hot topics due to continuously growing demands on cavity performance, particularly when in pursuit of high quality beams at higher beam currents or higher luminosities than currently achievable. This relates to higher order mode (HOM) damping requirements. Meeting the desired beam properties implies avoiding coupled multi-bunch or beam break-up instabilities depending on the machine and beam parameters that will set the acceptable cavity impedance thresholds. The use of cavity HOM-dampers is crucial to absorb the wakefields, comprised by all beam-induced cavity Eigenmodes, to beam-dynamically safe levels and to reduce the heat load at cryogenic temperature. Cavity damping concepts may vary, but are principally based on coaxial and waveguide couplers as well as beam line absorbers or any combination. Next generation energy recovery linacs and circular colliders call for cavities with strong HOM-damping that can exceed the state-of-the-art, while the operating mode efficiency shall not be significantly compromised concurrently. This imposes major challenges given the rather limited damping concepts. A detailed survey of established cavities is provided scrutinizing the achieved damping performance, shortcomings, and potential improvements. The scaling of the highest passband mode impedances is numerically evaluated in dependence on the number of cells for a single-cell up to a nine-cell cavity, which reveals the increased probability of trapped modes. This is followed by simulations for single-cell and five-cell cavities, which incorporate multiple damping schemes to assess the most efficient concepts. The usage and viability of on-cell dampers is elucidated for the single-cell cavity since it

  7. Uso de detectores de neutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares Uso de detectores de neutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Moreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia la factibilidad del uso de los detectores de antineutrinos para el monitoreo de reactores nucleares. Usando un modelo sencillo de cascada de fisión a dos componentes, se ilustra la dependencia del número de antineutrinos detectados a una distancia L del reactor según la composición nuclear del combustible. Se explica el principio de detección de neutrinos de reactores en base al decaimiento beta inverso y se describe como los detectores de neutrinos pueden emplearse para el monitoreo de la producción de materiales fisibles en el reactor. Se comenta como generalizar este análisis al caso real de un reactor nuclear in situ y uno de los principales experimentos internacionales dedicados a este propósito. We study the feasibility to use antineutrinos detectors for monitoring of nuclear reactors. Using a simple model of fission shower with two components, we illustrate how the numbers of antineutrinos detected at a distance L from the reactor depend on the composition of the nuclear combustible. We explain the principles of reactor neutrino detection using inverse beta decays and we describe how neutrinos detectors can be used for monitoring the production of fissile materials within the reactors. We comment how to generalize this analysis to the realistic case of a nuclear reactor in situ and one of the main international experiments dedicated to study the use of neutrinos detectors as nuclear safeguards.

  8. Next-generation Digital Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Michael F; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-07-10

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of "big data" has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public's access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.

  9. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D.M.; Burns, K.; Campbell, L.W.; Greenfield, B.; Kos, M.S., E-mail: markskos@gmail.com; Orrell, J.L.; Schram, M.; VanDevender, B.; Wood, L.S.; Wootan, D.W.

    2015-03-11

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant System Requirements Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Not Listed

    2008-01-01

    System Requirements Manual for the NGNP Project. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (H.R. 6; EPAct), which was signed into law by President George W. Bush in August 2005, required the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a project to be known as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. According to the EPAct, the NGNP Project shall consist of the research, development, design, construction, and operation of a prototype plant (to be referred to herein as the NGNP) that (1) includes a nuclear reactor based on the research and development (R and D) activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems initiative, and (2) shall be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen, or to both generate electricity and produce hydrogen. The NGNP Project supports both the national need to develop safe, clean, economical nuclear energy and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), which has the goal of establishing greenhouse-gas-free technologies for the production of hydrogen. The DOE has selected the helium-cooled High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) as the reactor concept to be used for the NGNP because it is the only near-term Generation IV concept that has the capability to provide process heat at high-enough temperatures for highly efficient production of hydrogen. The EPAct also names the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the DOE's lead national laboratory for nuclear energy research, as the site for the prototype NGNP

  11. Lithium converter of reactor neutrinos in antineutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutostanskij, Yu.S.; Lyashuk, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    The questions of developing lithium converter of the reactor neutrons in antineutrino operating at dynamic regime in the scheme with the cycle circulation of the high-purified lithium (by 7 Li isotope) through the converter are considered. The scheme allows to localize the 8 Li β-decay (T 1/2 =0.84 s) in the reservoir near the detector and so to design the hard-spectrum lithium ν-tilde e -source (E max ≅13 MeV) at the distance from the active zone being the soft-spectrum ν-tilde e -source. The expressions for the lithium ν-tilde e flux from the converter, reservoir and conveyance channel are obtained. 9 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  12. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  13. Candu technology: the next generation now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Duffey, R.B.; Torgerson, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the development philosophy, direction and concepts that are being utilized by AECL to refine the CANDU reactor to meet the needs of current and future competitive energy markets. The technology development path for CANDU reactors is based on the optimization of the pressure tube concept. Because of the inherent modularity and flexibility of this basis for the core design, it is possible to provide a seamless and continuous evolution of the reactor design and performance. There is no need for a drastic shift in concept, in technology or in fuel. By continual refinement of the flow and materials conditions in the channels, the basic reactor can be thermally and operationally efficient, highly competitive and economic, and highly flexible in application. Thus, the design can build on the successful construction and operating experience of the existing plants, and no step changes in development direction are needed. This approach minimizes investor, operator and development risk but still provides technological, safety and performance advances. In today's world energy markets, major drivers for the technology development are: (a) reduced capital cost; (b) improved operation; (c) enhanced safety; and (d) fuel cycle flexibility. The drivers provide specific numerical targets. Meeting these drivers ensures that the concept meets and exceeds the customer economic, performance, safety and resource use goals and requirements, including the suitable national and international standards. This logical development of the CANDU concept leads naturally to the 'Next Generation' of CANDU reactors. The major features under development include an optimized lattice for SEU (slightly enriched uranium) fuel, light water cooling coupled with heavy water moderation, advanced fuel channels and CANFLEX fuel, optimization of plant performance, enhanced thermal and BOP (balance of plant) efficiency, and the adoption of layout and construction technology adapted from successful on

  14. Neutrino remote diagnostics of in-reactor processes

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V D; Shaaban, I

    2002-01-01

    The correlation passive location of spontaneous chain reaction inside reactor sources algorithm structures are obtained. The considered algorithm structures could be the base for practical realisation of neutrino sources passive location system. The automatics distance system of continues control for energy-generation and radiation creep of reactor fuel are considered. The model of a radiation creep is explained within the framework of the mechanism of gliding and climbing dislocations based on the conception of a dislocation as not ideal sink for point radiation defects (PRD). The used model is efficient for installed PRD concentration,considerably exceeding thermally steady state concentration. The gliding of dislocation are describing as due to moving dislocation kinks in Peierls relief. The climbing of dislocation are describing as due to moving dislocation jogs. The complex of the computer programs simulating the radiation creep needed the same output parameters: PRD concentration, which calculated by ne...

  15. A study of reactor neutrino monitoring at the experimental fast reactor JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Hara, T.; Haruna, T.; Ishihara, N.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ito, C.; Katsumata, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Konno, T.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Matsubara, T.; Miyata, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nitta, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Suekane, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, H.

    2012-01-01

    We carried out a study of neutrino detection at the experimental fast reactor JOYO using a 0.76 tons gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detector. The detector was set up on the ground level at 24.3 m from the JOYO reactor core of 140 MW thermal power. The measured neutrino event rate from reactor on-off comparison was 1.11±1.24(stat.)±0.46(syst.) events/day. Although the statistical significance of the measurement was not enough, backgrounds in such a compact detector at the ground level were studied in detail and MC simulations were found to describe the data well. A study for improvement of the detector for future such experiments is also shown.

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

  18. Search for neutrino oscillations at the palo verde nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm; Busenitz; Cook; Gratta; Henrikson; Kornis; Lawrence; Lee; McKinny; Miller; Novikov; Piepke; Ritchie; Tracy; Vogel; Wang; Wolf

    2000-04-24

    We report on the initial results from a measurement of the antineutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the antineutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations excluding at 90% C.L. nu;(e)-nu;(x) oscillations with Deltam(2)>1.12x10(-3) eV(2) for maximal mixing and sin (2)2straight theta>0.21 for large Deltam(2). Our results support the conclusion that the atmospheric neutrino oscillations observed by Super-Kamiokande do not involve nu(e).

  19. Preparation of next generation set of group cross sections. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunio

    2002-03-01

    This fiscal year, based on the examination result about the evaluation energy range of heavy element unresolved resonance cross sections, the upper energy limit of the energy range, where ultra-fine group cross sections are produced, was raised to 50 keV, and an improvement of the group cross section processing system was promoted. At the same time, reflecting the result of studies carried out till now, a function producing delayed neutron data was added to the general-purpose group cross section processing system , thus the preparation of general purpose group cross section processing system has been completed. On the other hand, the energy structure, data constitution and data contents of next generation group cross section set were determined, and the specification of a 151 groups next generation group cross section set was defined. Based on the above specification, a concrete library format of the next generation cross section set has been determined. After having carried out the above-described work, using the general-purpose group cross section processing system , which was complete in this study, with use of the JENDL-3. 2 evaluated nuclear data, the 151 groups next generation group cross section of 92 nuclides and the ultra fine group resonance cross section library for 29 nuclides have been prepared. Utilizing the 151 groups next generation group cross section set and the ultra-fine group resonance cross-section library, a bench mark test calculation of fast reactors has been performed by using an advanced lattice calculation code. It was confirmed, by comparing the calculation result with a calculation result of continuous energy Monte Carlo code, that the 151 groups next generation cross section set has sufficient accuracy. (author)

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  1. NOAA NEXt-Generation RADar (NEXRAD) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  2. Galaxy LIMS for next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtalbers, J.; Rossler, J.; Sorn, P.; Graaf, J. de; Boisguerin, V.; Castle, J.; Sahin, U.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY: We have developed a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory within the existing Galaxy platform. The system provides lab technicians standard and customizable sample information forms, barcoded submission forms, tracking of input

  3. A Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials.......We are developing a Next Generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials....

  4. Optical Subsystems for Next Generation Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaro, J.A; Polo, V.; Schrenk, B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent optical technologies are providing higher flexibility to next generation access networks: on the one hand, providing progressive FTTx and specifically FTTH deployment, progressively shortening the copper access network; on the other hand, also opening fixed-mobile convergence solutions...... in next generation PON architectures. It is provided an overview of the optical subsystems developed for the implementation of the proposed NG-Access Networks....

  5. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

  6. Project in fiscal 1988 for research and development of basic technologies in next generation industries. Achievement report on research and development of bio-reactors; 1988 nendo bio reactor no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-03-01

    Research and development has been performed on bio-reactors to substitute the oxidizing reaction process, and on reduction reacting bio-reactors to fix the coenzyme regeneration system. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1988. In the research of a bio-reactor using bacteria that produce muconic acid from benzoic acid, stable productivity of 60 g/L/day or more was obtained. In the research of a multi-phase based bio-reactor composed of air, oil, water and biomass, discussions were given on the phase inverting film permeation type reactor. In the research of a bio-reactor to produce acetic acid from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, productivity of 149 g/L/day as maximum was achieved by enhancing the production speed by means of pressurization. In the research of a bio-reactor to produce hydroquinone from phenol, up-keeping the duration for 100 hours or longer has become possible at the hydroquinone production speed of 3 g/L/h. In the research of a reduction-based bio-reactor incorporating the regeneration system of coenzyme NAD(P)H, discussions were given on optimizing the continuous enzymatic reaction in the production of sorbitol. (NEDO)

  7. Measurement of neutrinos released in nuclear reactors through the Borexino experiment; Mesure des neutrinos de reacteurs nucleaires dans l'experience Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadoun, O

    2003-06-01

    The main goal of the Borexino experiment is to measure in real time the solar neutrino flux from the beryllium (Be{sup 7}) line at 862 keV. Beyond this pioneer low energy neutrino detection, Borexino will be able to measure solar neutrinos above the MeV, (B{sup 8} neutrinos and pep neutrinos), nuclear reactor neutrinos (with an average energy of 3 MeV) and the supernova neutrinos (their spectrum goes up to some ten MeV). In this work I mainly focus on the study of the nuclear reactors neutrinos. This field has recently been enriched by the results of the KamLAND experiment, which have greatly improved the determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters. In order to measure these events which are above the MeV, the Borexino collaboration entrusted the PCC group at College de France, with the tasks of developing a fast digit system running at 400 MHz: the FADC cards. The PCC group designed the FADC cards and completed them at the beginning of 2002. The first cards which were introduced in the main electronic acquisition unit allowed us to control their functioning and that of the acquisition software. FADC cards were also installed in the Borexino prototype, CTF. The data are analysed in order to determine a limit to the expected background noise of Borexino in measuring the nuclear reactor neutrinos. (author)

  8. Search for eV sterile neutrinos at a nuclear reactor — the Stereo project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haser, J.; Stereo Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The re-analyses of the reference spectra of reactor antineutrinos together with a revised neutrino interaction cross section enlarged the absolute normalization of the predicted neutrino flux. The tension between previous reactor measurements and the new prediction is significant at 2.7 σ and is known as “reactor antineutrino anomaly”. In combination with other anomalies encountered in neutrino oscillation measurements, this observation revived speculations about the existence of a sterile neutrino in the eV mass range. Mixing of this light sterile neutrino with the active flavours would lead to a modification of the detected antineutrino flux. An oscillation pattern in energy and space could be resolved by a detector at a distance of few meters from a reactor core: the neutrino detector of the Stereo project will be located at about 10 m distance from the ILL research reactor in Grenoble, France. Lengthwise separated in six target cells filled with 2 m3 Gd-loaded liquid scintillator in total, the experiment will search for a position-dependent distortion in the energy spectrum.

  9. Reactor anti-neutrinos: measurement of the θ13 leptonic mixing angle and search for potential sterile neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to measure the θ 13 mixing angle through the disappearance -induced by the oscillation phenomenon - of anti-neutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear reactors. In order to reduce systematic uncertainties, the experiment relies on the relative comparison of detected signals in two identical liquid scintillator detectors. The near one, giving the normalization of the emitted flux, is currently being built and will be delivered in spring 2014. The far detector, sensitive to θ 13 , is located at about one kilometer and is taking data since 2011. In this first phase of the experiment, the far detector data are compared to a prediction of the emitted neutrino flux to estimate θ 13 . In this thesis, the Double Chooz experiment and its analysis are presented, especially the background studies and the rejection of parasitic signals due to light emitted by photo-multipliers. Neutron fluxes between the different detector volumes impact the definition of the fiducial volume of neutrino interactions and the efficiency of detection. Detailed studies of these effects are presented. As part of the Double Chooz experiment, studies were performed to improve the prediction of neutrino flux emitted by reactors. This work revealed a deficit of observed neutrino rates in the short baseline experiments of last decades. This deficit could be explained by an oscillation to a sterile state. The Stereo project aims to observe a typical signature of oscillations: the distortion of neutrino spectra both in energy and baseline. This thesis presents the detector concept and simulations as well as sensitivity studies. Background sources and the foreseen shielding are also discussed. (author) [fr

  10. The neutrino in all its states - Seminar dedicated to Jacques Bouchez - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, M.; Pessard, H.; Rubbia, A.; Petcov, S.; Cousins, B.; Fechner, M.; Mezetto, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present scientific seminar, organized in the memory of Jacques Bouchez is centered on neutrino physics and presents the state of the art on experiments, on future projects and on the theory of neutrinos (oscillations and MSW effect). This document is made up of the slides of 7 presentations: 1) The achievements of J.Bouchez; 2) Reactor neutrino experiments from Bugey to double-Chooz (via RENO and Daya-Bay); 3) Neutrinos and accelerators: on the way toward the third flavor (NOMA, OPERA and T2K experiments); 4) Neutrino oscillations and MSW effect; 5) Some statistical questions in neutrino physics; 6) Long baseline oscillations: towards Japan future neutrino oscillation experiments; and 7) Next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. (A.C.)

  11. Progress on next generation linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, I focus on reviewing the issues and progress on a next generation linear collider with the general parameters of energy, luminosity, length, power, technology. The energy range is dictated by physics with a mass reach well beyond LEP, although somewhat short of SSC. The luminosity is that required to obtain 10 3 /minus/ 10 4 units of R 0 per year. The length is consistent with a site on Stanford land with collisions occurring on the SLAC site. The power was determined by economic considerations. Finally, the technology was limited by the desire to have a next generation linear collider before the next century. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Attila [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States); Charles, Ruth [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2014-07-31

    The intent of “Next Generation Solar Collectors for CSP” program was to develop key technology elements for collectors in Phase 1 (Budget Period 1), design these elements in Phase 2 (Budget Period 2) and to deploy and test the final collector in Phase 3 (Budget Period 3). 3M and DOE mutually agreed to terminate the program at the end of Budget Period 1, primarily due to timeline issues. However, significant advancements were achieved in developing a next generation reflective material and panel that has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of CSP systems.

  13. Coherent neutrino scattering with low temperature bolometers at Chooz reactor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, J; Gascon, J; Jesus, M De; Carr, R; Formaggio, J A; Heine, S T; Johnston, J; Leder, A; Sibille, V; Winslow, L; Dawson, J; Lasserre, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Palladino, K J; Vivier, M

    2017-01-01

    We present the potential sensitivity of a future recoil detector for a first detection of the process of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering (CE ν NS). We use the Chooz reactor complex in France as our luminous source of reactor neutrinos. Leveraging the ability to cleanly separate the rate correlated with the reactor thermal power against (uncorrelated) backgrounds, we show that a 10 kg cryogenic bolometric array with 100 eV threshold should be able to extract a CE ν NS signal within one year of running. (paper)

  14. Data Analysis and Next Generation Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    For the last decade, much of the work of California school administrators has been shaped by the accountability of the No Child Left Behind Act. Now as they stand at the precipice of Common Core Standards and next generation assessments, it is important to reflect on the proficiency educators have attained in using data to improve instruction and…

  15. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  16. Educating the next generation of nature entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judith C. Jobse; Loes Witteveen; Judith Santegoets; Daan van der Linde

    2015-01-01

    With this paper, it is illustrated that a focus on entrepreneurship training in the nature and wilderness sector is relevant for diverse organisations and situations. The first curricula on nature entrepreneurship are currently being developed. In this paper the authors describe a project that focusses on educating the next generation of nature entrepreneurs, reflect...

  17. Optimizing the next generation optical access networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya Fernández, Ferney Orlando; Soto, Ana Cardenas; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    Several issues in the design and optimization of the next generation optical access network (NG-OAN) are presented. The noise, the distortion and the fiber optic nonlinearities are considered to optimize the video distribution link in a passive optical network (PON). A discussion of the effect...

  18. Achieving universal access to next generation networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    The paper examines investment dimensions of next generation networks in a universal service perspective in a European context. The question is how new network infrastructures for getting access to communication, information and entertainment services in the present and future information society...

  19. Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Harris, Christopher J.; DeBarger, Angela Haydel

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards embody a new vision for science education grounded in the idea that science is both a body of knowledge and a set of linked practices for developing knowledge. The authors describe strategies that they suggest school and district leaders consider when designing strategies to support NGSS implementation.

  20. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol - IPv4 and its Shortcomings. Harsha Srinath. General Article Volume 8 Issue 3 March 2003 pp 33-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 4. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol - New Features in IPv6. Harsha Srinath. General Article Volume 8 Issue 4 April 2003 pp 8-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Cluster cosmology with next-generation surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaso, B.

    2017-03-01

    The advent of next-generation surveys will provide a large number of cluster detections that will serve the basis for constraining cos mological parameters using cluster counts. The main two observational ingredients needed are the cluster selection function and the calibration of the mass-observable relation. In this talk, we present the methodology designed to obtain robust predictions of both ingredients based on realistic cosmological simulations mimicking the following next-generation surveys: J-PAS, LSST and Euclid. We display recent results on the selection functions for these mentioned surveys together with others coming from other next-generation surveys such as eROSITA, ACTpol and SPTpol. We notice that the optical and IR surveys will reach the lowest masses between 0.3next-generation surveys and introduce very preliminary results.

  3. IPv6: The Next Generation Internet Protocol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    addressing, new generation internet. 2. ... required the creation of the next generation of Internet ... IPv6 standards have defined the following Extension headers ..... addresses are represented as x:x:x:x:x:x:x:x, where each x is the hexadecimal ...

  4. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hillard, L. M.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for the ITRF have increased dramatically since the 1980s. The most stringent requirement comes from critical sea level monitoring programs: a global accuracy of 1.0 mm, and 0.1mm/yr stability, a factor of 10 to 20 beyond current capability. Other requirements for the ITRF coming from ice mass change, ground motion, and mass transport studies are similar. Current and future satellite missions will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of these and other changes in the Earth system. Ground space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting the ITRF requirements and properly interpreting the satellite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation of the observed geophysical signals. NASA has embarked on a Space Geodesy Program with a long-range goal to build, deploy and operate a next generation NASA Space Geodetic Network (SGN). The plan is to build integrated, multi-technique next-generation space geodetic observing systems as the core contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Phase 1 of this project has been funded to (1) Establish and demonstrate a next-generation prototype integrated Space Geodetic Station at Goddard's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO), including next-generation SLR and VLBI systems along with modern GNSS and DORIS; (2) Complete ongoing Network Design Studies that describe the appropriate number and distribution of next-generation Space Geodetic Stations for an improved global network; (3) Upgrade analysis capability to handle the next-generation data; (4) Implement a modern

  5. First results with the experimental set-up at a Bugey reactor: neutrino oscillations, search of axions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoummada, A.

    1982-07-01

    This work presents an experimental set-up at the Bugey PWR reactor to put into evidence neutrino oscillations. The first part describes a neutrino detector specially designed for the investigation of neutrino oscillations at two distances (13.50 m and 19 m) under the core of the reactor. Preliminary analysis are presented. The second part reports a search for axions, using the neutrino detector well-shielded volume. Created in competition with electro magnetic transitions, axion should be produced in abondance in the reactor core. This experiment excludes the existence of the axion of the standard model [fr

  6. Experimental conditions for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy with reactor antineutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Youl Pac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the optimized experimental requirements to determine neutrino mass hierarchy using electron antineutrinos (ν¯e generated in a nuclear reactor. The features of the neutrino mass hierarchy can be extracted from the |Δm312| and |Δm322| oscillations by applying the Fourier sine and cosine transforms to the L/E spectrum. To determine the neutrino mass hierarchy above 90% probability, the requirements on the energy resolution as a function of the baseline are studied at sin2⁡2θ13=0.1. If the energy resolution of the neutrino detector is less than 0.04/Eν and the determination probability obtained from Bayes' theorem is above 90%, the detector needs to be located around 48–53 km from the reactor(s to measure the energy spectrum of ν¯e. These results will be helpful for setting up an experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, which is an important problem in neutrino physics.

  7. Modelling of the anti-neutrino production and spectra from a Magnox reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robert W.; Mountford, David J.; Coleman, Jonathon P.; Metelko, Carl; Murdoch, Matthew; Schnellbach, Yan-Jie

    2018-01-01

    The anti-neutrino source properties of a fission reactor are governed by the production and beta decay of the radionuclides present and the summation of their individual anti-neutrino spectra. The fission product radionuclide production changes during reactor operation and different fissioning species give rise to different product distributions. It is thus possible to determine some details of reactor operation, such as power, from the anti-neutrino emission to confirm safeguards records. Also according to some published calculations, it may be feasible to observe different anti-neutrino spectra depending on the fissile contents of the reactor fuel and thus determine the reactor's fissile material inventory during operation which could considerable improve safeguards. In mid-2014 the University of Liverpool deployed a prototype anti-neutrino detector at the Wylfa R1 station in Anglesey, United Kingdom based upon plastic scintillator technology developed for the T2K project. The deployment was used to develop the detector electronics and software until the reactor was finally shutdown in December 2015. To support the development of this detector technology for reactor monitoring and to understand its capabilities, the National Nuclear Laboratory modelled this graphite moderated and natural uranium fuelled reactor with existing codes used to support Magnox reactor operations and waste management. The 3D multi-physics code PANTHER was used to determine the individual powers of each fuel element (8×6152) during the year and a half period of monitoring based upon reactor records. The WIMS/TRAIL/FISPIN code route was then used to determine the radionuclide inventory of each nuclide on a daily basis in each element. These nuclide inventories were then used with the BTSPEC code to determine the anti-neutrino spectra and source strength using JEFF-3.1.1 data. Finally the anti-neutrino source from the reactor for each day during the year and a half of monitored reactor

  8. Modelling of the anti-neutrino production and spectra from a Magnox reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Robert W

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-neutrino source properties of a fission reactor are governed by the production and beta decay of the radionuclides present and the summation of their individual anti-neutrino spectra. The fission product radionuclide production changes during reactor operation and different fissioning species give rise to different product distributions. It is thus possible to determine some details of reactor operation, such as power, from the anti-neutrino emission to confirm safeguards records. Also according to some published calculations, it may be feasible to observe different anti-neutrino spectra depending on the fissile contents of the reactor fuel and thus determine the reactor's fissile material inventory during operation which could considerable improve safeguards. In mid-2014 the University of Liverpool deployed a prototype anti-neutrino detector at the Wylfa R1 station in Anglesey, United Kingdom based upon plastic scintillator technology developed for the T2K project. The deployment was used to develop the detector electronics and software until the reactor was finally shutdown in December 2015. To support the development of this detector technology for reactor monitoring and to understand its capabilities, the National Nuclear Laboratory modelled this graphite moderated and natural uranium fuelled reactor with existing codes used to support Magnox reactor operations and waste management. The 3D multi-physics code PANTHER was used to determine the individual powers of each fuel element (8×6152 during the year and a half period of monitoring based upon reactor records. The WIMS/TRAIL/FISPIN code route was then used to determine the radionuclide inventory of each nuclide on a daily basis in each element. These nuclide inventories were then used with the BTSPEC code to determine the anti-neutrino spectra and source strength using JEFF-3.1.1 data. Finally the anti-neutrino source from the reactor for each day during the year and a half of

  9. The KASKA project - a Japanese medium-baseline reactor-neutrino oscillation experiment to measure the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ -

    OpenAIRE

    Kuze, Masahiro; Collaboration, for the KASKA

    2005-01-01

    A new reactor-neutrino oscillation experiment, KASKA, is proposed to measure the unknown neutrino-mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ using the world's most powerful Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. It will measure a very small deficit of reactor-neutrino flux using three identical detectors, two placed just close to the sources and one at a distance of about 1.8km. Its conceptual design and physics reach are discussed.

  10. Neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil-Botella, I.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac), of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end. (author)

  11. Next Generation of Photovoltaics New Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Vega, Antonio; López, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This book presents new concepts for a next generation of PV. Among these concepts are: Multijunction solar cells, multiple excitation solar cells (or how to take benefit of high energy photons for the creation of more than one electron hole-pair), intermediate band solar cells (or how to take advantage of below band-gap energy photons) and related technologies (for quantum dots, nitrides, thin films), advanced light management approaches (plasmonics). Written by world-class experts in next generation photovoltaics this book is an essential reference guide accessible to both beginners and experts working with solar cell technology. The book deeply analyzes the current state-of-the-art of the new photovoltaic approaches and outlines the implementation paths of these advanced devices. Topics addressed range from the fundamentals to the description of state-of-the-art of the new types of solar cells.

  12. Next generation biofuel engineering in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronenberg, Luisa S.; Marcheschi, Ryan J.; Liao, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation biofuels must be compatible with current transportation infrastructure and be derived from environmentally sustainable resources that do not compete with food crops. Many bacterial species have unique properties advantageous to the production of such next-generation fuels. However, no single species possesses all characteristics necessary to make high quantities of fuels from plant waste or CO2. Species containing a subset of the desired characteristics are used as starting points for engineering organisms with all desired attributes. Metabolic engineering of model organisms has yielded high titer production of advanced fuels, including alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives. Technical developments now allow engineering of native fuel producers, as well as lignocellulolytic and autotrophic bacteria, for the production of biofuels. Continued research on multiple fronts is required to engineer organisms for truly sustainable and economical biofuel production. PMID:23623045

  13. Next generation of photovoltaics. New concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristobal Lopez, Ana Belen; Marti Vega, Antonio; Luque Lopez, Antonio (eds.) [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Energia Solar E.T.S.I. Telecomunicacion

    2012-07-01

    This book presents new concepts for a next generation of PV. Among these concepts are: Multijunction solar cells, multiple excitation solar cells (or how to take benefit of high energy photons for the creation of more than one electron hole-pair), intermediate band solar cells (or how to take advantage of below band-gap energy photons) and related technologies (for quantum dots, nitrides, thin films), advanced light management approaches (plasmonics). Written by world-class experts in next generation photovoltaics this book is an essential reference guide accessible to both beginners and experts working with solar cell technology. The book deeply analyzes the current state-of-the-art of the new photovoltaic approaches and outlines the implementation paths of these advanced devices. Topics addressed range from the fundamentals to the description of state-of-the-art of the new types of solar cells. (orig.)

  14. Special Issue: Next Generation DNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Richardson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Next Generation Sequencing (NGS refers to technologies that do not rely on traditional dideoxy-nucleotide (Sanger sequencing where labeled DNA fragments are physically resolved by electrophoresis. These new technologies rely on different strategies, but essentially all of them make use of real-time data collection of a base level incorporation event across a massive number of reactions (on the order of millions versus 96 for capillary electrophoresis for instance. The major commercial NGS platforms available to researchers are the 454 Genome Sequencer (Roche, Illumina (formerly Solexa Genome analyzer, the SOLiD system (Applied Biosystems/Life Technologies and the Heliscope (Helicos Corporation. The techniques and different strategies utilized by these platforms are reviewed in a number of the papers in this special issue. These technologies are enabling new applications that take advantage of the massive data produced by this next generation of sequencing instruments. [...

  15. Neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lella, L

    2000-01-01

    These lectures review direct measurements of neutrino masses and the status of neutrino oscillation searches using both natural neutrino sources (the Sun and cosmic rays interacting in the Earth atmosphere) and artificial neutrinos (produced by nuclear reactors and accelerators). Finally, future experiments and plans are presented. (68 refs).

  16. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN). Each of the sites in this planned network co-locate current state-of-the-art stations from all four space geodetic observing systems, GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS, with the goal of achieving modern requirements for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In particular, the driving ITRF requirements for this network are 1.0 mm in accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr in stability, a factor of 10-20 beyond current capabilities. Development of the prototype core site, located at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, started in 2011 and will be completed by the end of 2013. In January 2012, two operational GNSS stations, GODS and GOON, were established at the prototype site within 100 m of each other. Both stations are being proposed for inclusion into the IGS network. In addition, work is underway for the inclusion of next generation SLR and VLBI stations along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vectorties, and network design studies are being performed to define the appropriate number and distribution of these next generation space geodetic core sites that are required to achieve the driving ITRF requirements. We present the status of this prototype next generation space geodetic core site, results from the analysis of data from the established geodetic stations, and results from the ongoing network design studies.

  17. Fiber to the home: next generation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengxin; Guo, Baoping

    2006-07-01

    Next generation networks capable of carrying converged telephone, television (TV), very high-speed internet, and very high-speed bi-directional data services (like video-on-demand (VOD), Game etc.) strategy for Fiber To The Home (FTTH) is presented. The potential market is analyzed. The barriers and some proper strategy are also discussed. Several technical problems like various powering methods, optical fiber cables, and different network architecture are discussed too.

  18. Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M.

    2002-01-01

    AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu R reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and

  19. Determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and θ13 with a remote detector of reactor antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learned, John G.; Pakvasa, Sandip; Dye, Stephen T.; Svoboda, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the hierarchy of the neutrino mass spectrum and θ 13 through remote detection of electron antineutrinos from a nuclear reactor. This method utilizing a single, 10-kiloton scintillating liquid detector at a distance of 49-63 kilometers from the reactor complex measures mass-squared differences involving ν 3 with a one(ten)-year exposure provided sin 2 (2θ 13 )>0.05(0.02). Our technique applies the Fourier transform to the event rate as a function of neutrino flight distance over neutrino energy. Sweeping a relevant range of δm 2 resolves separate spectral peaks for δm 2 31 and δm 2 32 . For normal (inverted) hierarchy |δm 2 31 | is greater (lesser) than |δm 2 32 |. This robust determination requires a detector energy resolution of 3.5%/√(E).

  20. A pilot experiment with reactor neutrinos in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Henry T.; Li Jin

    1999-01-01

    A Collaboration comprising scientists from Taiwan, mainland China and the United States has been built up since 1996 to pursue an experimental program in neutrino and astro-particle physics in Taiwan. A pilot experiment to be performed at the Nuclear Power Station II in Taiwan is now under intense preparation. It will make use of a 500 kg CsI(Tl) crystal calorimeter to study various neutrino interactions. Various possible future directions will also be explored. The conceptual design and the physics to be addressed by the pilot experiment are discussed

  1. Next Generation NASA Initiative for Space Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Space geodesy measurement requirements have become more and more stringent as our understanding of the physical processes and our modeling techniques have improved. In addition, current and future spacecraft will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of changes in the Earth system. Ground-based space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting these oncoming requirements and properly interpreting the sate1!ite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation ofthe observed geophysical signals. These requirements have been articulated by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The NASA Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site as the basis for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN) that would be NASA's contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Each of the sites in the SGN would include co-located, state of-the-art systems from all four space geodetic observing techniques (GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS). The prototype core site is being developed at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project commenced in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in late 2013. In January 2012, two multiconstellation GNSS receivers, GODS and GODN, were established at the prototype site as part of the local geodetic network. Development and testing are also underway on the next generation SLR and VLBI systems along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vector ties, and network design studies are being

  2. Cloud Sourcing – Next Generation Outsourcing?

    OpenAIRE

    Muhic, Mirella; Johansson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Although Cloud Sourcing has been around for some time it could be questioned what actually is known about it. This paper presents a literature review on the specific question if Cloud Sourcing could be seen as the next generation of outsourcing. The reason for doing this is that from an initial sourcing study we found that the sourcing decisions seems to go in the direction of outsourcing as a service which could be described as Cloud Sourcing. Whereas some are convinced that Cloud Sourcing r...

  3. Thermonuclear ignition in the next generation tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johner, J.

    1989-04-01

    The extrapolation of experimental rules describing energy confinement and magnetohydrodynamic - stability limits, in known tokamaks, allow to show that stable thermonuclear ignition equilibria should exist in this configuration, if the product aB t x of the dimensions by a magnetic-field power is large enough. Quantitative application of this result to several next-generation tokamak projects show that those kinds of equilibria could exist in such devices, which would also have enough additional heating power to promote an effective accessible ignition

  4. Next generation of relativistic heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.; Leemann, C.; Selph, F.

    1978-06-01

    Results are presented of exploratory and preliminary studies of a next generation of heavy ion accelerators. The conclusion is reached that useful luminosities are feasible in a colliding beam facility for relativistic heavy ions. Such an accelerator complex may be laid out in such a way as to provide extractebeams for fixed target operation, therefore allowing experimentation in an energy region overlapping with that presently available. These dual goals seem achievable without undue complications, or penalties with respect to cost and/or performance

  5. Next generation science standards available for comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Pranoti

    2012-05-01

    The first public draft of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) is now available for public comment. Feedback on the standards is sought from people who have a stake in science education, including individuals in the K-12, higher education, business, and research communities. Development of NGSS is a state-led effort to define the content and practices students need to learn from kindergarten through high school. NGSS will be based on the U.S. National Research Council's reportFramework for K-12 Science Education.

  6. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kozanecki, W. (DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France))

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  7. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton [MagiQ Technologies, Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  8. The application of MVC design pattern in Daya bay reactor neutrino experiments online safety training system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guanchuan; Chu Yuanping

    2011-01-01

    The article made an introduction to MVC, which is an architectural pattern used in software engineering. It specified the advantages and disadvantages of MVC and also the application of MVC in Daya Bay nuclear reactor neutrino experiment online safety training system. (authors)

  9. Investigation of neutrino properties in experiments at nuclear reactors: Present status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelyan, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    The present status of experiments that are being performed at nuclear reactors in order to seek the neutrino masses, mixing, and magnetic moments, whose discovery would be a signal of the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model, is considered, along with their future prospects

  10. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Human Capital Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.; Irola, G.; Glynn, K.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008, the Human Capital Development (HCD) subprogramme of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has supported the recruitment, education, training, and retention of the next generation of international safeguards professionals to meet the needs of both the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the United States. Specifically, HCD's efforts respond to data indicating that 82% of safeguards experts at U.S. Laboratories will have left the workforce within 15 years. This paper provides an update on the status of the subprogramme since its last presentation at the IAEA Safeguards Symposium in 2010. It highlights strengthened, integrated efforts in the areas of graduate and post-doctoral fellowships, young and midcareer professional support, short safeguards courses, and university engagement. It also discusses lessons learned from the U.S. experience in safeguards education and training as well as the importance of long-range strategies to develop a cohesive, effective, and efficient human capital development approach. (author)

  11. Neutrino mass models and the implications of a non-zero reactor angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this talk we survey some of the recent promising developments in the search for the theory behind neutrino mass and mixing, and indeed all fermion masses and mixing. The talk is organized in terms of a neutrino mass models decision tree according to which the answers to experimental questions provide sign posts to guide through the maze of theoretical models eventually towards a complete theory of flavour and unification. It is also discussed the theoretical implications of the measurement of non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

  12. Tablet—next generation sequence assembly visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Iain; Bayer, Micha; Cardle, Linda; Shaw, Paul; Stephen, Gordon; Wright, Frank; Marshall, David

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Tablet is a lightweight, high-performance graphical viewer for next-generation sequence assemblies and alignments. Supporting a range of input assembly formats, Tablet provides high-quality visualizations showing data in packed or stacked views, allowing instant access and navigation to any region of interest, and whole contig overviews and data summaries. Tablet is both multi-core aware and memory efficient, allowing it to handle assemblies containing millions of reads, even on a 32-bit desktop machine. Availability: Tablet is freely available for Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS X, Linux and Solaris. Fully bundled installers can be downloaded from http://bioinf.scri.ac.uk/tablet in 32- and 64-bit versions. Contact: tablet@scri.ac.uk PMID:19965881

  13. Bioinformatics for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Magi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms imposes increasing demands on statistical methods and bioinformatic tools for the analysis and the management of the huge amounts of data generated by these technologies. Even at the early stages of their commercial availability, a large number of softwares already exist for analyzing NGS data. These tools can be fit into many general categories including alignment of sequence reads to a reference, base-calling and/or polymorphism detection, de novo assembly from paired or unpaired reads, structural variant detection and genome browsing. This manuscript aims to guide readers in the choice of the available computational tools that can be used to face the several steps of the data analysis workflow.

  14. Traffic Management for Next Generation Transport Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Hao

    required by the next generation transport network to provide Quality-of-Service (QoS) guaranteed video services. Augmenting network capacity and upgrading network nodes indicate long deployment period, replacement of equipment and thus significant cost to the network service providers. This challenge may...... slacken the steps of some network operators towards providing IPTV services. In this dissertation, the topology-based hierarchical scheduling scheme is proposed to tackle the problem addressed. The scheme simplifies the deployment process by placing an intelligent switch with centralized traffic...... management functions at the edge of the network, scheduling traffic on behalf of the other nodes. The topology-based hierarchical scheduling scheme is able to provide outstanding flow isolation due to its centralized scheduling ability, which is essential for providing IPTV services. In order to reduce...

  15. Middleware for the next generation Grid infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Laure, E; Prelz, F; Beco, S; Fisher, S; Livny, M; Guy, L; Barroso, M; Buncic, P; Kunszt, Peter Z; Di Meglio, A; Aimar, A; Edlund, A; Groep, D; Pacini, F; Sgaravatto, M; Mulmo, O

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the EGEE (Enabling Grids for E-Science in Europe) project is to create a reliable and dependable European Grid infrastructure for e-Science. The objective of the EGEE Middleware Re-engineering and Integration Research Activity is to provide robust middleware components, deployable on several platforms and operating systems, corresponding to the core Grid services for resource access, data management, information collection, authentication & authorization, resource matchmaking and brokering, and monitoring and accounting. For achieving this objective, we developed an architecture and design of the next generation Grid middleware leveraging experiences and existing components essentially from AliEn, EDG, and VDT. The architecture follows the service breakdown developed by the LCG ARDA group. Our strategy is to do as little original development as possible but rather re-engineer and harden existing Grid services. The evolution of these middleware components towards a Service Oriented Architecture ...

  16. Integrated control of next generation power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-28

    The multi-agent system (MAS) approach has been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future as developed by Southern California Edison. These next generation power system results include better ability to reconfigure the circuit as well as the increased capability to improve the protection and enhance the reliability of the circuit. There were four main tasks in this project. The specific results for each of these four tasks and their related topics are presented in main sections of this report. Also, there were seven deliverables for this project. The main conclusions for these deliverables are summarized in the identified subtask section of this report. The specific details for each of these deliverables are included in the “Project Deliverables” section at the end of this Final Report.

  17. Statistical analysis of next generation sequencing data

    CERN Document Server

    Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the latest high throughput technology to revolutionize genomic research. NGS generates massive genomic datasets that play a key role in the big data phenomenon that surrounds us today. To extract signals from high-dimensional NGS data and make valid statistical inferences and predictions, novel data analytic and statistical techniques are needed. This book contains 20 chapters written by prominent statisticians working with NGS data. The topics range from basic preprocessing and analysis with NGS data to more complex genomic applications such as copy number variation and isoform expression detection. Research statisticians who want to learn about this growing and exciting area will find this book useful. In addition, many chapters from this book could be included in graduate-level classes in statistical bioinformatics for training future biostatisticians who will be expected to deal with genomic data in basic biomedical research, genomic clinical trials and personalized med...

  18. Fetal Kidney Anomalies: Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Nielsen, Marlene Louise

    Aim and Introduction Identification of abnormal kidneys in the fetus may lead to termination of the pregnancy and raises questions about the underlying cause and recurrence risk in future pregnancies. In this study, we investigate the effectiveness of targeted next generation sequencing in fetuses...... with prenatally detected kidney anomalies in order to uncover genetic explanations and assess recurrence risk. Also, we aim to study the relation between genetic findings and post mortem kidney histology. Methods The study comprises fetuses diagnosed prenatally with bilateral kidney anomalies that have undergone...... postmortem examination. The approximately 110 genes included in the targeted panel were chosen on the basis of their potential involvement in embryonic kidney development, cystic kidney disease, or the renin-angiotensin system. DNA was extracted from fetal tissue samples or cultured chorion villus cells...

  19. Astro Data Science: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzel, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Astronomers have been at the forefront of data-driven discovery since before the days of Kepler. Using data in the scientific inquiry into the workings of the the universe is the lifeblood of the field. This said, data science is considered a new thing, and researchers from every discipline are rushing to learn data science techniques, train themselves on data science tools, and even leaving academia to become data scientists. It is undeniable that our ability to harness new computational and statistical methods to make sense of today’s unprecedented size, complexity, and fast streaming data is helping scientists make new discoveries. The question now is how to ensure that researchers can employ these tools and use them appropriately. This talk will cover the state of data science as it relates to scientific research and the role astronomers play in its development, use, and training the next generation of astro-data scientists.

  20. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy with INO, T2K, NOvA and reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Anushree; Choubey, Sandhya; Thakore, Tarak

    2013-01-01

    The relatively large measured value of θ 13 has opened up the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy through earth matter effects. Amongst the current accelerator experiments only NOvA has a long enough baseline to observe earth matter effects. However, even NOvA is plagued with uncertainty on the knowledge of the true value of Δ CP which drastically reduces its sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy. Earth matter effects in atmospheric neutrinos on the other hand is almost independent of δ CP . The 50 kton magnetized Iron CALorimeter at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (ICAL at the rate lNO) will be observing atmospheric neutrinos. The charge identification capability of this detector gives it an edge over others for mass hierarchy determination through observation of earth matter effects. We study in detail the neutrino mass hierarchy sensitivity of the data from this experiment simulated using the Nuance based generator developed for ICAL at the rate lNO and folded with the detector resolution and efficiencies obtained by the INO collaboration from a full detector Geant based simulation. The data from ICAL at the rate lNO is then combined with simulated of T2K, NOvA Double Chooz, RENO and Daya Bay experiments and a combined sensitivity study to the mass hierarchy performed. With 10 years of ICAL at the rate lNO data combined with T2K, NOvA and reactor data, one could get 2.8σ - 5σ discovery for the neutrino mass hierarchy depending on the true value of (θ23, θ13 and δ CP . (author)

  1. Studies of neutrino properties at nuclear reactors. Present status and future

    CERN Document Server

    Mikaehlyan, L A

    2002-01-01

    The state and prospects of the experiments at nuclear reactors on the search for the neutrino mass, mixing and magnetic moments, identification whereof would prove the existence of events behind the standard model limits, are considered. The CHOOZ experiment established with complete determination, that the nu sub e -> nu sub x channel is not predominant in the atmospheric neutrino oscillations. The KamLAND may become the first among the experiments with the neutrino earth sources, wherein the oscillation effect will be determined; the contributions of the m sub 1 and m sub 2 masses to the electron neutrino is established and solution of the solar neutrino problem is found. The Kr2Det experiment with its high sensitivity to the small mixing angles may identify the contribution of the m sub 3 mass to the nu sub e or establish a new more exact limit on its value. These studies rest upon the unprecedented improvement of the reverse beta-decay registration methods

  2. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  3. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, John M. II; Heydt, Harold J.; Opare, Emmanuel O.; Oswald, Kyle B.

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  4. Next Generation Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Vrugt, J. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen is a key regulator of vegetation dynamics, soil carbon release, and terrestrial carbon cycles. Thus, to assess energy impacts on the global carbon cycle and future climates, it is critical that we have a mechanism-based and data-calibrated nitrogen model that simulates nitrogen limitation upon both above and belowground carbon dynamics. In this study, we developed a next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model within the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). This next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model utilized 1) a mechanistic model of nitrogen limitation on photosynthesis with nitrogen trade-offs among light absorption, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage; 2) an optimal leaf nitrogen model that links soil nitrogen availability and leaf nitrogen content; and 3) an ecosystem demography (ED) model that simulates the growth and light competition of tree cohorts and is currently coupled to CLM. Our three test cases with changes in CO2 concentration, growing temperature and radiation demonstrate the model's ability to predict the impact of altered environmental conditions on nitrogen allocations. Currently, we are testing the model against different datasets including soil fertilization and Free Air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments across different forest types. We expect that our calibrated model will considerably improve our understanding and predictability of vegetation-climate interactions.itrogen allocation model evaluations. The figure shows the scatter plots of predicted and measured Vc,max and Jmax scaled to 25 oC (i.e.,Vc,max25 and Jmax25) at elevated CO2 (570 ppm, test case one), reduced radiation in canopy (0.1-0.9 of the radiation at the top of canopy, test case two) and reduced growing temperature (15oC, test case three). The model is first calibrated using control data under ambient CO2 (370 ppm), radiation at the top of the canopy (621 μmol photon/m2/s), the normal growing temperature (30oC). The fitted model

  5. Nuclear Knowledge to the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, Thomas; Kossilov, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    The safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) requires that personnel possess and maintain the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes to do their jobs properly. Such knowledge includes not only the technical competencies required by the nature of the technology and particular engineering designs, but also the softer competencies associated with effective management, communication and teamwork. Recent studies have shown that there has been a loss of corporate knowledge and memory. Both explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge must be passed on to the next generation of workers in the industry to ensure a quality workforce. New and different techniques may be required to ensure timely and effective knowledge retention and transfer. The IAEA prepared a report on this subject. The main conclusions from the report regarding strategies for managing the aging workforce are included. Also included are main conclusions from the report regarding the capture an d preservation of mission critical knowledge, and the effective transfer of this knowledge to the next generation of NPP personnel. The nuclear industry due to its need for well-documented procedures, specifications, design basis, safety analyses, etc., has a greater fraction of its mission critical knowledge as explicit knowledge than do many other industries. This facilitates the task of knowledge transfer. For older plants in particular, there may be a need for additional efforts to transfer tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge to support major strategic initiatives such as plant license extensions/renewals, periodic safety reviews, major plant upgrades, and plant specific control room simulator development. The challenge in disseminating explicit knowledge is to make employees aware that it is available and provide easy access in formats and forms that are usable. Tacit knowledge is more difficult to identify and disseminate. The challenge is to identify what can be converted to

  6. Digital Earth reloaded - Beyond the next generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, M.; Woodgate, P.; Annoni, A.; Schade, S.

    2014-02-01

    Digital replicas (or 'mirror worlds') of complex entities and systems are now routine in many fields such as aerospace engineering; archaeology; medicine; or even fashion design. The Digital Earth (DE) concept as a digital replica of the entire planet occurs in Al Gore's 1992 book Earth in the Balance and was popularized in his speech at the California Science Center in January 1998. It played a pivotal role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth that achieved many elements of this vision. Almost 15 years after Al Gore's speech, the concept of DE needs to be re-evaluated in the light of the many scientific and technical developments in the fields of information technology, data infrastructures, citizen?s participation, and earth observation that have taken place since. This paper intends to look beyond the next generation predominantly based on the developments of fields outside the spatial sciences, where concepts, software, and hardware with strong relationships to DE are being developed without referring to this term. It also presents a number of guiding criteria for future DE developments.

  7. Next Generation Germanium Systems for Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, J.; Burks, M.; Hull, E.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing the latest generation of highly portable, mechanically cooled germanium systems for safeguard applications. In collaboration with our industrial partner, Ph.D.s Co, we have developed the Germanium Gamma Ray Imager (GeGI), an imager with a 2π field of view. This instrument has been thoroughly field tested in a wide range of environments and have performed reliably even in the harshest conditions. The imaging capability of GeGI complements existing safeguards techniques by allowing for the spatial detection, identification, and characterization of nuclear material. Additionally, imaging can be used in design information verification activities to address potential material diversions. Measurements conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant highlight the advantages this instrument offers in the identification and localization of LEU, HEU and Pu holdup. GeGI has also been deployed to the Savannah River Site for the measurement of radioactive waste canisters, providing information valuable for waste characterization and inventory accountancy. Measuring 30 x 15 x 23 cm and weighing approximately 15 kg, this instrument is the first portable germanium-based imager. GeGI offers high reliability with the convenience of mechanical cooling, making this instrument ideal for the next generation of safeguards instrumentation. (author)

  8. Next Generation Sequencing of Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Andrew S.; Stall, Jennifer N.; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Cani, Andi K.; Liu, Chia-Jen; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cho, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most prevalent and lethal form of ovarian cancer. HGSCs frequently arise in the distal fallopian tubes rather than the ovary, developing from small precursor lesions called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (TICs or more specifically STICs). While STICs have been reported to harbor TP53 mutations, detailed molecular characterizations of these lesions are lacking. Observations We performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) on formalin-fixed, paraffin- embedded tissue from four women, two with HGSC and two with uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) who were diagnosed with synchronous STICs. We detected concordant mutations in both HGSCs with synchronous STICs, including TP53 mutations as well as assumed germline BRCA1/2 alterations, confirming a clonal relationship between these lesions. NGS confirmed the presence of a STIC clonally unrelated to one case of UEC. NGS of the other tubal lesion diagnosed as a STIC unexpectedly supported the lesion as a micrometastasis from the associated UEC. Conclusions and Relevance We demonstrate that targeted NGS can identify genetic lesions in minute lesions such as TICs, and confirm TP53 mutations as early driving events for HGSC. NGS also demonstrated unexpected relationships between presumed STICs and synchronous carcinomas, suggesting potential diagnostic and translational research applications. PMID:26181193

  9. Next Generation Life Support Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Chullen, Cinda; Vega, Leticia; Cox, Marlon R.; Aitchison, Lindsay T.; Lange, Kevin E.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Meyer, Caitlin E.; Flynn, Michael; Jackson, W. Andrew; hide

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Life Support (NGLS) is one of over twenty technology development projects sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program. The NGLS Project develops selected life support technologies needed for humans to live and work productively in space, with focus on technologies for future use in spacecraft cabin and space suit applications. Over the last three years, NGLS had five main project elements: Variable Oxygen Regulator (VOR), Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing bed, High Performance (HP) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Glove, Alternative Water Processor (AWP) and Series-Bosch Carbon Dioxide Reduction. The RCA swing bed, VOR and HP EVA Glove tasks are directed at key technology needs for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and pressure garment for an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Focus is on prototyping and integrated testing in cooperation with the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Advanced EVA Project. The HP EVA Glove Element, new this fiscal year, includes the generation of requirements and standards to guide development and evaluation of new glove designs. The AWP and Bosch efforts focus on regenerative technologies to further close spacecraft cabin atmosphere revitalization and water recovery loops and to meet technology maturation milestones defined in NASA's Space Technology Roadmaps. These activities are aimed at increasing affordability, reliability, and vehicle self-sufficiency while decreasing mass and mission cost, supporting a capability-driven architecture for extending human presence beyond low-Earth orbit, along a human path toward Mars. This paper provides a status of current technology development activities with a brief overview of future plans.

  10. Next Generation Life Support Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Chullen, Cinda; Pickering, Karen D.; Cox, Marlon; Towsend, Neil; Campbell, Colin; Flynn, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Next Generation Life Support (NGLS) is one of several technology development projects sponsored by NASA s Game Changing Development Program. The NGLS Project is developing life support technologies (including water recovery and space suit life support technologies) needed for humans to live and work productively in space. NGLS has three project tasks: Variable Oxygen Regulator (VOR), Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swing bed, and Alternative Water Processor (AWP). The RCA swing bed and VOR tasks are directed at key technology needs for the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit, with focus on test article development and integrated testing in an Advanced PLSS in cooperation with the Advanced Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Project. An RCA swing-bed provides integrated carbon dioxide removal and humidity control that can be regenerated in real time during an EVA. The VOR technology will significantly increase the number of pressure settings available to the space suit. Current space suit pressure regulators are limited to only two settings whereas the adjustability of the advanced regulator will be nearly continuous. The AWP effort, based on natural biological processes and membrane-based secondary treatment, will result in the development of a system capable of recycling wastewater from sources expected in future exploration missions, including hygiene and laundry water. This paper will provide a status of technology development activities and future plans.

  11. Implementing Elementary School Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Katheryn B.

    Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards requires developing elementary teacher content and pedagogical content knowledge of science and engineering concepts. Teacher preparation for this undertaking appears inadequate with little known about how in-service Mid-Atlantic urban elementary science teachers approach this task. The purpose of this basic qualitative interview study was to explore the research questions related to perceived learning needs of 8 elementary science teachers and 5 of their administrators serving as instructional leaders. Strategies needed for professional growth to support learning and barriers that hamper it at both building and district levels were included. These questions were considered through the lens of Schon's reflective learning and Weick's sensemaking theories. Analysis with provisional and open coding strategies identified informal and formal supports and barriers to teachers' learning. Results indicated that informal supports, primarily internet usage, emerged as most valuable to the teachers' learning. Formal structures, including professional learning communities and grade level meetings, arose as both supportive and restrictive at the building and district levels. Existing formal supports emerged as the least useful because of the dominance of other priorities competing for time and resources. Addressing weaknesses within formal supports through more effective planning in professional development can promote positive change. Improvement to professional development approaches using the internet and increased hands on activities can be integrated into formal supports. Explicit attention to these strategies can strengthen teacher effectiveness bringing positive social change.

  12. Next generation environment for collaborative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collados, D.; Denis, G.; Galvez, P.; Newman, H.

    2001-01-01

    Collaborative environments supporting point to point and multipoint video-conferencing, document and application sharing across both local and wide area networks, video on demand (broadcast and playback) and interactive text facilities will be a crucial element for the development of the next generation of HEP experiments by geographically dispersed collaborations. The 'Virtual Room Video conferencing System' (VRVS) has been developed since 1995, in order to provide a low cost, bandwidth-efficient, extensible means for video conferencing and remote collaboration over networks within the High Energy and Nuclear Physics communities. The VRVS provides worldwide videoconferencing service and collaborative environment to the research and education communities. VRVS uses the Internet2 and ESnet high-performance networks infrastructure to deploy its Web-based system, which now includes more than 5790 registered hosts running VRVS software in more than 50 different countries. VRVS hosts an average of 100-multipoint videoconference and collaborative sessions worldwide every month. There are around 35 reflectors that manage the traffic flow, at HENP labs and universities in the US and Europe. So far, there are 7 Virtual Rooms for World Wide Conferences (involving more than one continent), and 4 Virtual Rooms each for intra-continental conferences in the US, Europe and Asia. VRVS continues to expand and implement new digital video technologies, including H.323 ITU standard integration, MPEG-2 videoconferencing integration, shared environments, and Quality of Service

  13. (U) Ristra Next Generation Code Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungerford, Aimee L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Daniel, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-22

    LANL’s Weapons Physics management (ADX) and ASC program office have defined a strategy for exascale-class application codes that follows two supportive, and mutually risk-mitigating paths: evolution for established codes (with a strong pedigree within the user community) based upon existing programming paradigms (MPI+X); and Ristra (formerly known as NGC), a high-risk/high-reward push for a next-generation multi-physics, multi-scale simulation toolkit based on emerging advanced programming systems (with an initial focus on data-flow task-based models exemplified by Legion [5]). Development along these paths is supported by the ATDM, IC, and CSSE elements of the ASC program, with the resulting codes forming a common ecosystem, and with algorithm and code exchange between them anticipated. Furthermore, solution of some of the more challenging problems of the future will require a federation of codes working together, using established-pedigree codes in partnership with new capabilities as they come on line. The role of Ristra as the high-risk/high-reward path for LANL’s codes is fully consistent with its role in the Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation (ATDM) sub-program of ASC (see Appendix C), in particular its emphasis on evolving ASC capabilities through novel programming models and data management technologies.

  14. From double Chooz to triple Chooz - neutrino physics at the Chooz reactor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim; Lindner, Manfred; Rolinec, Mark; Winter, Walter

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the potential of the proposed Double Chooz reactor experiment to measure the neutrino mixing angle sin 2 2θ 13 . We especially consider systematical uncertainties and their partial cancellation in a near and far detector operation, and we discuss implications of a delayed near detector startup. Furthermore, we introduce Triple Chooz, which is a possible upgrade scenario assuming a second, larger far detector, which could start data taking in an existing cavern five years after the first far detector. We review the role of the Chooz reactor experiments in the global context of future neutrino beam experiments. We find that both Double Chooz and Triple Chooz can play a leading role in the search for a finite value of sin 2 2θ 13 . Double Chooz could achieve a sensitivity limit of ∼ 2.10 -2 at the 90% confidence level after 5 years while the Triple Chooz setup could give a sensitivity below 10 -2

  15. Monitoring nuclear reactors with anti-neutrino detectors: the ANGRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimenti, Pietro; Leigui, Marcelo Augusto [UFABC - Universidade Federal do ABC. Rua Santa Adelia, 166. Bairro Bangu. Santo Andre - SP (Brazil); Anjos, Joao; Azzi, Gabriel; Rafael, Gama; Ademarlaudo, Barbosa; Lima, Herman; VAZ, Mario; Villar, Arthur [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 22290-180 (Brazil); Gonzales, Luis Fernando; Bezerra, Thiago; Kemp, Ernesto [Unicamp, State University of Campinas, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , Barao Geraldo - Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Pontifical Catholic University - PUC, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22451-900 Gavea - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Guedes, Germano; Faria, Paulo Cesar [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Avenida Transnordestina, Novo Horizonte (Brazil); Pepe, Iuri [Universidade Federal da Bahia - UFBA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    We describe the status of the ANGRA Project, aimed at developing an anti-neutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactors. Indeed the detection of anti-neutrinos provides a unique handle for non-invasive measurements of the nuclear fuel. This kind of measurements are of deep interest for developing new safeguards tools which may help in nuclear non-proliferation programs. The ANGRA experiment, placed at about 30 m from the core of the 4 GW Brazilian nuclear power reactor ANGRA II, is based on a water Cherenkov detector with about one ton target mass. A few thousand antineutrino interactions per day are expected. The latest results from simulations and the status of the construction are presented. (authors)

  16. Meeting the future of coherent neutrino scattering. A feasibility study for upcoming reactor experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salathe, Marco; Rink, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Due to ongoing progress in detector development and background suppression techniques first evidence of neutrino coherent scattering seems reachable in future experiments. In recent years efforts have been enhanced to detect this effect with germanium detectors. This work aims at summarizing and improving past studies on the potential of an experiment at a reactor site to a new level of accuracy by using the most recent neutrino spectra, knowledge gained in recent detector developments and in contrast to prior studies an energy-dependent quenching factor. The influence of the main parameters (background suppression, detector resolution and threshold, reactor spectra, different isotopes) of a germanium detector experiment is presented and the sensitivities regarding the main reaction channels are calculated. The results were obtained through two independent methods; an algebraic computation and a numerical simulation. Both methods reveal the most important experimental parameters and clarify the state of the art challenges that research has to meet in such an experiment.

  17. Tailoring next-generation biofuels and their combustion in next-generation engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wu, Weihua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Taatjes, Craig A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scheer, Adam Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, Kevin M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yu, Eizadora T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); O' Bryan, Greg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Powell, Amy Jo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gao, Connie W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Increasing energy costs, the dependence on foreign oil supplies, and environmental concerns have emphasized the need to produce sustainable renewable fuels and chemicals. The strategy for producing next-generation biofuels must include efficient processes for biomass conversion to liquid fuels and the fuels must be compatible with current and future engines. Unfortunately, biofuel development generally takes place without any consideration of combustion characteristics, and combustion scientists typically measure biofuels properties without any feedback to the production design. We seek to optimize the fuel/engine system by bringing combustion performance, specifically for advanced next-generation engines, into the development of novel biosynthetic fuel pathways. Here we report an innovative coupling of combustion chemistry, from fundamentals to engine measurements, to the optimization of fuel production using metabolic engineering. We have established the necessary connections among the fundamental chemistry, engine science, and synthetic biology for fuel production, building a powerful framework for co-development of engines and biofuels.

  18. Future neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lella, L

    2001-01-01

    Future experiments to search for neutrino oscillations using neutrinos from the Sun, from reactors and accelerators are reviewed. Possible long-term developments based on neutrino factories are also described. (29 refs).

  19. Laser peening applications for next generation of nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, J.; Truong, C.; Walter, M.; Chen, H.-L.; Hackel, L.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of electricity by nuclear power can assist in achieving goals of reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Increased safety and reliability are necessary attributes of any new nuclear power plants. High pressure, hot water and radiation contribute to operating environments where Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement can lead to potential component failures. Desire for improved steam conversion efficiency pushes the fatigue stress limits of turbine blades and other rotating equipment. For nuclear reactor facilities now being designed and built and for the next generations of designs, laser peening could be incorporated to provide significant performance life to critical subsystems and components making them less susceptible to fatigue, SCC and radiation induced embrittlement. These types of components include steam turbine blades, hubs and bearings as well as reactor components including cladding material, housings, welded assemblies, fittings, pipes, flanges, vessel penetrations, nuclear waste storage canisters. Laser peening has proven to be a commercial success in aerospace applications and has recently been put into use for gas and steam turbine generators and light water reactors. An expanded role for this technology for the broader nuclear power industry would be a beneficial extension. (author)

  20. Mass hierarchy sensitivity of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xin Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH determination of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors, where the sensitivity of measuring the MH can be significantly improved by adding a near detector. Then the impact of the baseline and target mass of the near detector on the combined MH sensitivity has been studied thoroughly. The optimal selections of the baseline and target mass of the near detector are ∼12.5 km and ∼4 kton respectively for a far detector with the target mass of 20 kton and the baseline of 52.5 km. As typical examples of future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments, the optimal location and target mass of the near detector are selected for the specific configurations of JUNO and RENO-50. Finally, we discuss distinct effects of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum uncertainty for setups of a single detector and double detectors, which indicate that the spectrum uncertainty can be well constrained in the presence of the near detector.

  1. Mass hierarchy sensitivity of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Xin, E-mail: hxwang@iphy.me [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhan, Liang; Li, Yu-Feng; Cao, Guo-Fu [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Shen-Jian [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-05-15

    We report the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) determination of medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments with multiple detectors, where the sensitivity of measuring the MH can be significantly improved by adding a near detector. Then the impact of the baseline and target mass of the near detector on the combined MH sensitivity has been studied thoroughly. The optimal selections of the baseline and target mass of the near detector are ∼12.5 km and ∼4 kton respectively for a far detector with the target mass of 20 kton and the baseline of 52.5 km. As typical examples of future medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments, the optimal location and target mass of the near detector are selected for the specific configurations of JUNO and RENO-50. Finally, we discuss distinct effects of the reactor antineutrino energy spectrum uncertainty for setups of a single detector and double detectors, which indicate that the spectrum uncertainty can be well constrained in the presence of the near detector.

  2. Online monitoring of the Osiris reactor with the Nucifer neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, G.; Bouvet, L.; Collin, A. P.; Coulloux, G.; Cribier, M.; Deschamp, H.; Durand, V.; Fechner, M.; Fischer, V.; Gaffiot, J.; Gérard Castaing, N.; Granelli, R.; Kato, Y.; Lasserre, T.; Latron, L.; Legou, P.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Mention, G.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nghiem, T.-A.; Pedrol, N.; Pelzer, J.; Pequignot, M.; Piret, Y.; Prono, G.; Scola, L.; Starzinski, P.; Vivier, M.; Dumonteil, E.; Mancusi, D.; Varignon, C.; Buck, C.; Lindner, M.; Bazoma, J.; Bouvier, S.; Bui, V. M.; Communeau, V.; Cucoanes, A.; Fallot, M.; Gautier, M.; Giot, L.; Guilloux, G.; Lenoir, M.; Martino, J.; Mercier, G.; Milleto, T.; Peuvrel, N.; Porta, A.; Le Quéré, N.; Renard, C.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Roy, D.; Vilajosana, T.; Yermia, F.; Nucifer Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Originally designed as a new nuclear reactor monitoring device, the Nucifer detector has successfully detected its first neutrinos. We provide the second-shortest baseline measurement of the reactor neutrino flux. The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products, combined with reactor core simulations, provides a new tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core and could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy to enhance the safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. Deployed at only 7.2 m away from the compact Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, the experiment also exhibits a well-suited configuration to search for a new short baseline oscillation. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment, describing the performances of the ˜0.85 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to ˜12 m of water and under intense background radiation conditions. Based on 145 (106) days of data with the reactor on (off), leading to the detection of an estimated 40760 ν¯ e , the mean number of detected antineutrinos is 281 ±7 (stat )±18 (syst )ν¯ e/day , in agreement with the prediction of 277 ±23 ν¯ e/day . Because of the large background, no conclusive results on the existence of light sterile neutrinos could be derived, however. As a first societal application we quantify how antineutrinos could be used for the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.

  3. Phenomenological analysis of reactor data for neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, D.; Soni, A.

    1981-01-01

    Reactor data from experiments performed at different distances is analyzed. We find that no distance independent reactor anti nu/sub e/ spectrum, irrespective of its shape, can account for all the data with a CL greater than or equal to .0028. Oscillation with 3(2)nu's yield fits to all the 4 experiments with CL approx. = .06 (.03) and to the two high statistics experiments with CL greater than or equal to .31

  4. The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Peter J.; West, Richard G.; Goad, Michael R.; Jenkins, James S.; Pollacco, Don L.; Queloz, Didier; Rauer, Heike; Udry, Stéphane; Watson, Christopher A.; Chazelas, Bruno; Eigmüller, Philipp; Lambert, Gregory; Genolet, Ludovic; McCormac, James; Walker, Simon; Armstrong, David J.; Bayliss, Daniel; Bento, Joao; Bouchy, François; Burleigh, Matthew R.; Cabrera, Juan; Casewell, Sarah L.; Chaushev, Alexander; Chote, Paul; Csizmadia, Szilárd; Erikson, Anders; Faedi, Francesca; Foxell, Emma; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Gillen, Edward; Grange, Andrew; Günther, Maximilian N.; Hodgkin, Simon T.; Jackman, James; Jordán, Andrés; Louden, Tom; Metrailler, Lionel; Moyano, Maximiliano; Nielsen, Louise D.; Osborn, Hugh P.; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Raddi, Roberto; Raynard, Liam; Smith, Alexis M. S.; Soto, Maritza; Titz-Weider, Ruth

    2018-04-01

    We describe the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS), which is a ground-based project searching for transiting exoplanets orbiting bright stars. NGTS builds on the legacy of previous surveys, most notably WASP, and is designed to achieve higher photometric precision and hence find smaller planets than have previously been detected from the ground. It also operates in red light, maximizing sensitivity to late K and early M dwarf stars. The survey specifications call for photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in red light over an instantaneous field of view of 100 deg2, enabling the detection of Neptune-sized exoplanets around Sun-like stars and super-Earths around M dwarfs. The survey is carried out with a purpose-built facility at Cerro Paranal, Chile, which is the premier site of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). An array of twelve 20 cm f/2.8 telescopes fitted with back-illuminated deep-depletion CCD cameras is used to survey fields intensively at intermediate Galactic latitudes. The instrument is also ideally suited to ground-based photometric follow-up of exoplanet candidates from space telescopes such as TESS, Gaia and PLATO. We present observations that combine precise autoguiding and the superb observing conditions at Paranal to provide routine photometric precision of 0.1 per cent in 1 h for stars with I-band magnitudes brighter than 13. We describe the instrument and data analysis methods as well as the status of the survey, which achieved first light in 2015 and began full-survey operations in 2016. NGTS data will be made publicly available through the ESO archive.

  5. OLEDs : Technology's next generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-10-01

    Major advances in organic light emitting device (OLED) technology are bringing some science fiction concepts to the brink of reality. At the moment. OLED technology is being developed for the flat panel display industry. Liquid crystal display dominates the market for wristwatches and cellular phones for example, while the cathode ray tube plays the same role for television sets and desktop computers. Both have limitations when it comes to meeting the needs of the next generation of smart products. The attributes required include high brightness, low power consumption, high definition, full colour, wide preview angle, fast response time and portability, and low cost. OLED has the potential to meet all those requirements. Universal Display Corporation (UDC) was founded, and specializes in the development and commercialization of OLED technology. A partnership was established early with Princeton University professors, and no fewer than 20 researchers are working on OLED technology projects at both Princeton University and the University of Southern California. To date, 35 patents have been issued, and 60 others are pending. A joint development agreement was reached with Sony Corporation this year for high efficiency active matrix OLEDs to be used in large area monitor applications. OLED technology is based on vacuum-deposited organic small molecule materials that emit very bright light when electrically stimulated. Three advances in the technology were briefly discussed: TOLED{sup TM} for Transparent OLED, SOLED{sup TM} for Stacked OLED, and FOLED{sup TM} for Flexible OLED. A list detailing the various potential uses for the technology was also included in this paper. 3 figs.

  6. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  7. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: 2010 and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, J.M.; LaMontagne, S.; Sunshine, A.; Lockwood, D.; Peranteau, D.; Dupuy, G.

    2010-01-01

    Strengthening the international safeguards system is a key element of the U.S. non-proliferation policy agenda as evidenced by President Obama's call for more 'resources and authority to strengthen international inspections' in his April 2009 Prague speech. Through programs such as the recently-launched Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the long standing U.S. Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, the United States is working to implement this vision. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration launched NGSI in 2008 to develop the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and international safeguards infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to meet new challenges. Following a successful 2009, NGSI has made significant progress toward these goals in 2010. NGSI has recently completed a number of policy studies on advanced safeguards concepts and sponsored several workshops, including a second international meeting on Harmonization of International Safeguards Infrastructure Development in Vienna. The program is also continuing multi-year projects to investigate advanced non-destructive assay techniques, enhance recruitment and training efforts, and strengthen international cooperation on safeguards. In December 2010, NGSI will host the Third Annual International Meeting on International Safeguards in Washington, DC, which will draw together key stakeholders from government, the nuclear industry, and the IAEA to further develop and promote a common understanding of Safeguards by Design principles and goals, and to identify opportunities for practical application of the concept. This paper presents a review of NGSI program activities in 2010 and previews plans for upcoming activities. (author)

  8. Next-generation healthcare: a strategic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Successful next-generation healthcare must deliver timely access and quality for an aging population, while simultaneously promoting disease prevention and managing costs. The key factors for sustained success are a culture with aligned goals and values; coordinated team care that especially engages with physicians and patients; practical information that is collected and communicated reliably; and education in the theory and methods of collaboration, measurement and leadership. Currently, optimal population health is challenged by a high prevalence of chronic disease, with large gaps between best and usual care, a scarcity of health human resources - particularly with the skills, attitudes and training for coordinated team care - and the absence of flexible, reliable clinical measurement systems. However, to make things better, institutional models and supporting technologies are available. In the short term, a first step is to enhance the awareness of the practical opportunities to improve, including the expansion of proven community-based disease management programs that communicate knowledge, competencies and clinical measurements among professional and patient partners, leading to reduced care gaps and improved clinical and economic outcomes. Longer-term success requires two additional steps. One is formal inter-professional training to provide, on an ongoing basis, the polyvalent human resource skills and foster the culture of working with others to improve the care of whole populations. The other is the adoption of reliable information systems, including electronic health records, to allow useful and timely measurement and effective communication of clinical information in real-world settings. A better health future can commence immediately, within existing resources, and be sustained with feasible innovations in provider and patient education and information systems. The future is now.

  9. Next Generation Melter Optioneering Study - Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, M.F.; Calmus, R.B.; Ramsey, G.; Lomax, J.; Allen, H.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D 2 0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  10. Development of a framework for the neutronics analysis system for next generation (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Hirai, Yasushi; Hyoudou, Hideaki; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2010-02-01

    Development of innovative analysis methods and models in fundamental studies for next-generation nuclear reactor systems is in progress. In order to efficiently and effectively reflect the latest analysis methods and models to primary design of commercial reactor and/or in-core fuel management for power reactors, a next-generation analysis system MARBLE has been developed. The next-generation analysis system provides solutions to the following requirements: (1) flexibility, extensibility and user-friendliness that can apply new methods and models rapidly and effectively for fundamental studies, (2) quantitative proof of solution accuracy and adaptive scoping range for design studies, (3) coupling analysis among different study domains for the purpose of rationalization of plant systems and improvement of reliability, (4) maintainability and reusability for system extensions for the purpose of total quality management and development efficiency. The next-generation analysis system supports many fields, such as thermal-hydraulic analysis, structure analysis, reactor physics etc., and now we are studying reactor physics analysis system for fast reactor in advance. As for reactor physics analysis methods for fast reactor, we have established the JUPITER standard analysis methods based on the past study. But, there has been a problem of extreme inefficiency due to lack of functionality in the conventional analysis system when changing analysis targets and/or modeling levels. That is why, we have developed the next-generation analysis system for reactor physics which reproduces the JUPITER standard analysis method that has been developed so far and newly realizes burnup and design analysis for fast reactor and functions for cross section adjustment. In the present study, we examined in detail the existing design and implementation of ZPPR critical experiment analysis database followed by unification of models within the framework of the next-generation analysis system by

  11. Economic factors for the next generation NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengt, I.; Matzie, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper has summarized the major economic factors that will impact the economic viability of the next generation of nuclear power plants. To make these plants competitive with other sources of electric power, they must have a large plant output (1000 - 1400 M We), be constructed over a short time period (on the order of four years or less), be standardized designs which are pre-licensed, and achieve high availability through the use of long operating cycles and short refueling outages. Many features in the design of these plants can promote these attributes. This is the task of the designer in concert with the plant constructor and equipment supplier to work in a concurrent manner to obtain an integrated design that achieves these goals. It is important from the beginning that all interested parties recognize that there must be a balance between the desire for improved safety and the cost to achieve this safety. Similarly, there must be a recognition that the economics of nuclear power plants are based on power generation costs over a sixty year period, not on the initial capital cost of the plant. The initial capital cost of the plant is only about one-third of the total cost of running the plant for its life time. Thus, focusing on the initial capital costs may drive the designers to incorporate features that adversely affect its future operation. Features such as compact plant designs that have restricted access to components, and the use of highly interconnected systems that perform multiple functions, result in increased difficulty of operating and maintaining the plant. Exhaustive planning in all phases of the plant life cycle will reap dramatic dividends in the reduction of power generation costs. The planning done in the design phase by utilizing designers, constructors, and operators will result in a plant that has lower power generation costs. Planning during the construction phase can result in a shorter schedule, by eliminating essentially all rework

  12. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  13. Next-generation mid-infrared sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, D.; Bank, S.; Lee, M. L.; Wasserman, D.

    2017-12-01

    to provide a survey of the current state of the art for mid-IR sources, but instead looks primarily to provide a picture of potential next-generation optical and optoelectronic materials systems for mid-IR light generation.

  14. Raytheon's next generation compact inline cryocooler architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, Raytheon has developed, built, tested and integrated high performance cryocoolers. Our versatile designs for single and multi-stage cryocoolers provide reliable operation for temperatures from 10 to 200 Kelvin with power levels ranging from 50 W to nearly 600 W. These advanced cryocoolers incorporate clearance seals, flexure suspensions, hermetic housings and dynamic balancing to provide long service life and reliable operation in all relevant environments. Today, sensors face a multitude of cryocooler integration challenges such as exported disturbance, efficiency, scalability, maturity, and cost. As a result, cryocooler selection is application dependent, oftentimes requiring extensive trade studies to determine the most suitable architecture. To optimally meet the needs of next generation passive IR sensors, the Compact Inline Raytheon Stirling 1-Stage (CI-RS1), Compact Inline Raytheon Single Stage Pulse Tube (CI-RP1) and Compact Inline Raytheon Hybrid Stirling/Pulse Tube 2-Stage (CI-RSP2) cryocoolers are being developed to satisfy this suite of requirements. This lightweight, compact, efficient, low vibration cryocooler combines proven 1-stage (RS1 or RP1) and 2-stage (RSP2) cold-head architectures with an inventive set of warm-end mechanisms into a single cooler module, allowing the moving mechanisms for the compressor and the Stirling displacer to be consolidated onto a common axis and in a common working volume. The CI cryocooler is a significant departure from the current Stirling cryocoolers in which the compressor mechanisms are remote from the Stirling displacer mechanism. Placing all of the mechanisms in a single volume and on a single axis provides benefits in terms of package size (30% reduction), mass (30% reduction), thermodynamic efficiency (>20% improvement) and exported vibration performance (≤25 mN peak in all three orthogonal axes at frequencies from 1 to 500 Hz). The main benefit of axial symmetry is that proven balancing

  15. Next-Generation Multifunctional Electrochromic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guofa; Wang, Jiangxin; Lee, Pooi See

    2016-08-16

    during the daytime. Energy can also be stored in the smart windows during the daytime simultaneously and be discharged for use in the evening. These results reveal that the electrochromic devices have potential applications in a wide range of areas. We hope that this Account will promote further efforts toward fundamental research on electrochromic materials and the development of new multifunctional electrochromic devices to meet the growing demands for next-generation electronic systems.

  16. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  17. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-12-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  19. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

    2010-09-01

    One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

  20. Updated fit to three neutrino mixing: exploring the accelerator-reactor complementarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, Ivan [Departament de Fisíca Quàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C. [Departament de Fisíca Quàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA),Pg. Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); Maltoni, Michele; Martinez-Soler, Ivan [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,Calle de Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Schwetz, Thomas [Institut für Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT),D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-01-20

    We perform a combined fit to global neutrino oscillation data available as of fall 2016 in the scenario of three-neutrino oscillations and present updated allowed ranges of the six oscillation parameters. We discuss the differences arising between the consistent combination of the data samples from accelerator and reactor experiments compared to partial combinations. We quantify the confidence in the determination of the less precisely known parameters θ{sub 23}, δ{sub CP}, and the neutrino mass ordering by performing a Monte Carlo study of the long baseline accelerator and reactor data. We find that the sensitivity to the mass ordering and the θ{sub 23} octant is below 1σ. Maximal θ{sub 23} mixing is allowed at slightly more than 90% CL. The best fit for the CP violating phase is around 270{sup ∘}, CP conservation is allowed at slightly above 1σ, and values of δ{sub CP}≃90{sup ∘} are disfavored at around 99% CL for normal ordering and higher CL for inverted ordering.

  1. Updated fit to three neutrino mixing: exploring the accelerator-reactor complementarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, Ivan; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Maltoni, Michele; Martinez-Soler, Ivan; Schwetz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We perform a combined fit to global neutrino oscillation data available as of fall 2016 in the scenario of three-neutrino oscillations and present updated allowed ranges of the six oscillation parameters. We discuss the differences arising between the consistent combination of the data samples from accelerator and reactor experiments compared to partial combinations. We quantify the confidence in the determination of the less precisely known parameters θ 23 , δ CP , and the neutrino mass ordering by performing a Monte Carlo study of the long baseline accelerator and reactor data. We find that the sensitivity to the mass ordering and the θ 23 octant is below 1σ. Maximal θ 23 mixing is allowed at slightly more than 90% CL. The best fit for the CP violating phase is around 270 ∘ , CP conservation is allowed at slightly above 1σ, and values of δ CP ≃90 ∘ are disfavored at around 99% CL for normal ordering and higher CL for inverted ordering.

  2. Educating the Next Generation of Lunar Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC), is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and outreach. In support of NASA’s and NLSI’s objective to train the next generation of scientists, CLSE’s High School Lunar Research Project is a conduit through which high school students can actively participate in lunar science and learn about pathways into scientific careers. The High School Lunar Research Project engages teams of high school students in authentic lunar research that envelopes them in the process of science and supports the science goals of the CLSE. Most high school students’ lack of scientific research experience leaves them without an understanding of science as a process. Because of this, each team is paired with a lunar scientist mentor responsible for guiding students through the process of conducting a scientific investigation. Before beginning their research, students undertake “Moon 101,” designed to familiarize them with lunar geology and exploration. Students read articles covering various lunar geology topics and analyze images from past and current lunar missions to become familiar with available lunar data sets. At the end of “Moon 101”, students present a characterization of the geology and chronology of features surrounding the Apollo 11 landing site. To begin their research, teams choose a research subject from a pool of topics compiled by the CLSE staff. After choosing a topic, student teams ask their own research questions, within the context of the larger question, and design their own research approach to direct their investigation. At the conclusion of their research, teams present their results and, after receiving feedback, create and present a conference style poster to a panel of

  3. Next Generation Flight Displays Using HTML5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The Human Integrated Vehicles and Environments (HIVE) lab at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is focused on bringing together inter-disciplinary talent to design and integrate innovative human interface technologies for next generation manned spacecraft. As part of this objective, my summer internship project centered on an ongoing investigation in to building flight displays using the HTML5 standard. Specifically, the goals of my project were to build and demo "flight-like" crew and wearable displays as well as create a webserver for live systems being developed by the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program. In parallel to my project, a LabVIEW application, called a display server, was created by the HIVE that uses an XTCE (XML (Extensible Markup Language) Telemetry and Command Exchange) parser and CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data System) space packet decoder to translate telemetry items sent by the CFS (Core Flight Software) over User Datagram Protocol (UDP). It was the webserver's job to receive these UDP messages and send them to the displays. To accomplish this functionality, I utilized Node.js and the accompanying Express framework. On the display side, I was responsible for creating the power system (AMPS) displays. I did this by using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript to create web pages that could update and change dynamically based on the data they received from the webserver. At this point, I have not started on the commanding, being able to send back to the CFS, portion of the displays but hope to have this functionality working by the completion of my internship. I also created a way to test the webserver's functionality without the display server by making a JavaScript application that read in a comma-separate values (CSV) file and converted it to XML which was then sent over UDP. One of the major requirements of my project was to build everything using as little preexisting code as possible, which I accomplished by only using a handful of Java

  4. Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Kittle, Joe

    The emission regions of many types of X-ray sources are small and cannot be spatially resolved without interferometry techniques that haven't yet been developed. In order to understand the emission mechanisms and emission geometry, alternate measurement techniques are required. Most microphysical processes that affect X-rays, including scattering and magnetic emission processes are imprinted as polarization signatures. X-ray polarization also reveals exotic physical processes occurring in regions of very strong gravitational and magnetic fields. Observations of X-ray polarization will provide a measurement of the geometrical distribution of gas and magnetic fields without foreground depolarization that affects longer wavelengths (e.g. Faraday rotation in the radio). Emission from accretion disks has an inclination-dependent polarization. The polarization signature is modified by extreme gravitational forces, which bend light, essentially changing the contribution of each part of the disk to the integrated total intensity seen by distant observers. Because gravity has the largest effect on the innermost parts of the disk (which are the hottest, and thus contributes to more high energy photons), the energy dependent polarization is diagnostic of disk inclination, black hole mass and spin. Increasing the sensitive energy band will make these measurements possible. X-ray polarimetry will also enable the study of the origin of cosmic rays in the universe, the nature of black holes, the role of black holes in the evolution of galaxies, and the interaction of matter with the highest physically possible magnetic fields. These objectives address NASA's strategic interest in the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe. We propose a two-year effort to develop the Next Generation X-ray Polarimeter (NGXP) that will have more than ten times the sensitivity of the current state of the art. NGXP will make possible game changing measurements of classes of astrophysical

  5. Next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiemer, S.

    2014-07-01

    novel automated method to investigate the significance of spatial b-value variations. The method incorporates an objective data-driven partitioning scheme, which is based on penalized likelihood estimates. These well-defined criteria avoid the difficult choice of commonly applied spatial mapping parameters, such as grid spacing or size of mapping radii. We construct a seismicity forecast that includes spatial b-value variations and demonstrate our model’s skill and reliability when applied to data from California. All proposed probabilistic seismicity forecasts were subjected to evaluation methods using state of the art algorithms provided by the 'Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability' infrastructure. First, we evaluated the statistical agreement between the forecasted and observed rates of target events in terms of number, space and magnitude. Secondly, we assessed the performance of one forecast relative to another. We find that the forecasts presented in this thesis are reliable and show significant skills with respect to established classical forecasts. These next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasts can thus provide hazard information that are potentially useful in reducing earthquake losses and enhancing community preparedness and resilience. (author)

  6. EIDA Next Generation: ongoing and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, Angelo; Quinteros, Javier; Sleeman, Reinoud; Trani, Luca; Clinton, John; Stammler, Klaus; Danecek, Peter; Pedersen, Helle; Ionescu, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA; http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/eida.html) is the distributed Data Centre system within ORFEUS, providing transparent access and services to high quality, seismic data across (currently) 9 large data archives in Europe. EIDA is growing, in terms of the number of participating data centres, the size of the archives, the variability of the data in the archives, the number of users, and the volume of downloads. The on-going success of EIDA is thus providing challenges that are the driving force behind the design of the next generation (NG) of EIDA, which is expected to be implemented within EPOS IP. EIDA ORFEUS must cope with further expansion of the system and more complex user requirements by developing new techniques and extended services. The EIDA NG is being designed to work on standard FDSN web services and two additional new web services: Routing Service and QC (quality controlled) service. This presentation highlights the challenges EIDA needs to address during the EPOS IP and focuses on these 2 new services. The Routing Service can be considered as the core of EIDA NG. It was designed to assist users and clients to locate data within a federated, decentralized data centre (e.g. EIDA). A detailed, FDSN-compliant specification of the service has been developed. Our implementation of this service will run at every EIDA node, but is also capable of running on a user's computer, allowing anyone to define virtual or integrate existing data centres. This (meta)service needs to be queried in order to locate the data. Some smart clients (in a beta status) have been also provided to offer the user an integrated view of the whole EIDA, hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication. The QC Service is developed to cope with user requirements to query for relevant data only. The web service provides detailed information on the

  7. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  8. Next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiemer, S.

    2014-01-01

    novel automated method to investigate the significance of spatial b-value variations. The method incorporates an objective data-driven partitioning scheme, which is based on penalized likelihood estimates. These well-defined criteria avoid the difficult choice of commonly applied spatial mapping parameters, such as grid spacing or size of mapping radii. We construct a seismicity forecast that includes spatial b-value variations and demonstrate our model’s skill and reliability when applied to data from California. All proposed probabilistic seismicity forecasts were subjected to evaluation methods using state of the art algorithms provided by the 'Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability' infrastructure. First, we evaluated the statistical agreement between the forecasted and observed rates of target events in terms of number, space and magnitude. Secondly, we assessed the performance of one forecast relative to another. We find that the forecasts presented in this thesis are reliable and show significant skills with respect to established classical forecasts. These next-generation probabilistic seismicity forecasts can thus provide hazard information that are potentially useful in reducing earthquake losses and enhancing community preparedness and resilience. (author)

  9. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  10. Architectural and Algorithmic Requirements for a Next-Generation System Analysis Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.A. Mousseau

    2010-05-01

    This document presents high-level architectural and system requirements for a next-generation system analysis code (NGSAC) to support reactor safety decision-making by plant operators and others, especially in the context of light water reactor plant life extension. The capabilities of NGSAC will be different from those of current-generation codes, not only because computers have evolved significantly in the generations since the current paradigm was first implemented, but because the decision-making processes that need the support of next-generation codes are very different from the decision-making processes that drove the licensing and design of the current fleet of commercial nuclear power reactors. The implications of these newer decision-making processes for NGSAC requirements are discussed, and resulting top-level goals for the NGSAC are formulated. From these goals, the general architectural and system requirements for the NGSAC are derived.

  11. Applying Bayesian neural networks to event reconstruction in reactor neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ye; Xu Weiwei; Meng Yixiong; Zhu Kaien; Xu Wei

    2008-01-01

    A toy detector has been designed to simulate central detectors in reactor neutrino experiments in the paper. The electron samples from the Monte-Carlo simulation of the toy detector have been reconstructed by the method of Bayesian neural networks (BNNs) and the standard algorithm, a maximum likelihood method (MLD), respectively. The result of the event reconstruction using BNN has been compared with the one using MLD. Compared to MLD, the uncertainties of the electron vertex are not improved, but the energy resolutions are significantly improved using BNN. And the improvement is more obvious for the high energy electrons than the low energy ones

  12. On-site underground background measurements for the KASKA reactor-neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, H.; Sakuma, K.; Aoki, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Funaki, Y.; Hara, T.; Haruna, T.; Ishihara, N.; Katsumata, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Matsubara, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Miyata, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Nakajima, N.; Nitta, K.; Sakai, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Suekane, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, H.; Tamura, N.; Tsuchiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    On-site underground background measurements were performed for the planned reactor-neutrino oscillation experiment KASKA at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station in Niigata, Japan. A small-diameter boring hole was excavated down to 70m underground level, and a detector unit for γ-ray and cosmic-muon measurements was placed at various depths to take data. The data were analyzed to obtain abundance of natural radioactive elements in the surrounding soil and rates of cosmic muons that penetrate the overburden. The results will be reflected in the design of the KASKA experiment

  13. The human factors issue in the next generation nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, L.; Bolognini, G.; Nobile, M.

    1992-01-01

    The national Energy Plan approved by the Italian Government in 1988, soon after the public referendum on nuclear issues held in the wake of the Chernobyl accident, requested the start of a research program to study next generation nuclear plants. These new reactors should feature some important and innovative characteristics to have a chance to be considered for future constructions, should the politicians decide the conditions for such a step are again re-established in Italy. The most important of these characteristics is certainly the fact that no evaluation nor land set a-side shall be required even in case of the most severe conceivable accident. This challenging objective should be reached through: a) the simplification of the nuclear plant as a whole b) the extensive use of passive components and/or inherent safety features in the design of the engineering safeguard systems c) a containment designed to cope with any conceivable accident sequence without releasing any major quantity of radioactive products into the environment. d) the upgrading of the man-machine interface and the introduction of computerized aids both for operational and maintenance activities. This paper deals in particular with the improvements, described in point d), that aim at greatly reducing the probability of human errors, widely recognized as one of the most important aspects to be pursued to increase nuclear plant safety. (author)

  14. Ed's Approach to The LWRs Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyens, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Objectives have not changed. Exploiting our installed nuclear generating capacity, comprising 60 plant units, as well as possible, i.e. with the most demanding safety, performance and economic criteria-controlling the aging of our nuclear plant units so as to get the most of their lifespan: these two objectives remain in the foreground of our preoccupations and all our efforts in this direction make up one of the essential factors in the preparing for the future. As far as the future is concerned, i.e. the nuclear power stations to be built between now and the end of the century, or after the year 2000, our perception of the future has become slightly modified. As a result, we have adapted our programs and it is these evolutions as well as the current state of our works that I am going to be presenting to you today. The theme of this conference is 'Global cooperation for nuclear power beyond the year 2000' EDF shares the point of view that the problem of energy in general, nuclear energy being an excellent example, has moved out of national frameworks to become a problem at planetary level. EDF intends to be present at this great debate and to play an active part in it, with the benefit of its knowledge and its experience as operator of 60 nuclear reactors. EDF wants to favor European cooperation between electricity boards first, which obviously does not rule out collaboration with the other American and Asian companies. The many LAN ks existing between our company and all the other electricity companies of the 5 continents show that no-one need be excluded when cooperation is at issue

  15. Plant availability design aspects of Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo Sang Lim; Ha Chung Beak

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the KNGR design concepts adopted for reducing forced outages and refueling outages, and current design changes, to assess their availability impacts compared to existing domestic nuclear power plants, and then to identify design directions for next design stage. (author)

  16. Safety objectives for next generation reactors: proving their achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Assuming that there is a consensus between regulatory bodies and nuclear operating organizations on safety objectives for future plants, how are we going to demonstrate that they have been achieved, with a reasonable certainty? Right from the beginning, I would like to underline the importance of convincing the public that high level safety objectives will be effectively achieved in future nuclear power plants. The mere fulfillment of administrative requirements might not be sufficient to obtain public acceptance. One has to take into account the changes that have occurred in the public preception of nuclear risks in the wake of the Chernobyl accident. Today public opinion rules out the possibility not only that such a catastrophic accident could recur, but also that any accident with detrimental health consequences off-site could occur. The nuclear industry has to reflect this concern in its safety demonstration, independently of proving the achievement of technical safety goals. The public opinion issue will be readdressed at the end of this paper. (orig.)

  17. Building next-generation converged networks theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib Khan

    2013-01-01

    Supplying a comprehensive introduction to next-generation networks, Building Next-Generation Converged Networks: Theory and Practice strikes a balance between how and why things work and how to make them work. It compiles recent advancements along with basic issues from the wide range of fields related to next generation networks. Containing the contributions of 56 industry experts and researchers from 16 different countries, the book presents relevant theoretical frameworks and the latest research. It investigates new technologies such as IPv6 over Low Power Wireless Personal Area Network (6L

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C to 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor, and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX).This component will be operated in flowing, impure helium on the primary and secondary side at temperatures up to 950°C. There are major high temperature design, materials availability, and fabrication issues that need to be addressed. The prospective materials are Alloys 617, 230, 800H and X, with Alloy 617 being the leading candidate for the use at 950°C. The material delivery schedule for these materials does not pose a problem for a 2018 start up as the vendors can quote reasonable delivery times at the moment. The product forms and amount needed must be finalized as soon as possible. An

  19. A Comparison Framework for Reactor Anti-Neutrino Detectors in Near-Field Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brodsky, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Electron anti-neutrino ( e) detectors can support nuclear safeguards, from reactor monitoring to spent fuel characterization. In recent years, the scientific community has developed multiple detector concepts, many of which have been prototyped or deployed for specific measurements by their respective collaborations. However, the diversity of technical approaches, deployment conditions, and analysis techniques complicates direct performance comparison between designs. We have begun development of a simulation framework to compare and evaluate existing and proposed detector designs for nonproliferation applications in a uniform manner. This report demonstrates the intent and capabilities of the framework by evaluating four detector design concepts, calculating generic reactor antineutrino counting sensitivity, and capabilities in a plutonium disposition application example.

  20. Neutrino mixing and future accelerator neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenky, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    No evidence for neutrino mixing has been obtained in experiments searching for oscillations with neutrinos from accelerators and reactors. The possible reason is that neutrino masses are too small to produce any sizable effects in the experiments with terrestrial neutrinos. We put forward here the point of view that the reason for that can be traced to the presence of a hierarchy of neutrino masses as well as strength of couplings between lepton families. (orig.)

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations for the next generation protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhaval K

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly sophisticated protein engineering efforts have been undertaken lately to generate protein therapeutics with desired properties. This has resulted in the discovery of the next generation of protein therapeutics, which include: engineered antibodies, immunoconjugates, bi/multi-specific proteins, antibody mimetic novel scaffolds, and engineered ligands/receptors. These novel protein therapeutics possess unique physicochemical properties and act via a unique mechanism-of-action, which collectively makes their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) different than other established biological molecules. Consequently, in order to support the discovery and development of these next generation molecules, it becomes important to understand the determinants controlling their PK/PD. This review discusses the determinants that a PK/PD scientist should consider during the design and development of next generation protein therapeutics. In addition, the role of systems PK/PD models in enabling rational development of the next generation protein therapeutics is emphasized.

  2. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level 2 Base Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level II weather radar data collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii,...

  3. RIPng- A next Generation Routing Protocal (IPv6) | Falaye | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Information Protocol Next Generation (RIPng) owing to the current depletion rate of IPv4. ... that support the Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6).addressing scheme. ... A brief history is given; its various versions are discussed, and detailed ...

  4. 75 FR 82387 - Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9246-7] Next Generation Risk Assessment Public Dialogue Conference AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Public Dialogue Conference... methods with the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences' National Toxicology Program, Center...

  5. NOAA Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) Level 3 Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level 3 weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  6. Next Generation Life Support (NGLS): Rapid Cycle Amine Swing Bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed has been identified as a technology with high potential to meet the stringent requirements for the next generation spacesuit's...

  7. New materials for next-generation commercial transports

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on New Materials for Advanced Civil Aircraft, Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems, National Research Council

    ... civil aircraft throughout their service life. The committee investigated the new materials and structural concepts that are likely to be incorporated into next generation commercial aircraft and the factors influencing application decisions...

  8. Novel nanostructures for next generation dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Té treault, Nicolas; Grä tzel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we review our latest advancements in nanostructured photoanodes for next generation photovoltaics in general and dye-sensitized solar cells in particular. Bottom-up self-assembly techniques are developed to fabricate large-area 3D

  9. Examination of concept of next generation computer. Progress report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Hirayama, Toshio

    2000-12-01

    The Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering has conducted R and D works on the technology of parallel processing and has started the examination of the next generation computer in 1999. This report describes the behavior analyses of quantum calculation codes. It also describes the consideration for the analyses and examination results for the method to reduce cash misses. Furthermore, it describes a performance simulator that is being developed to quantitatively examine the concept of the next generation computer. (author)

  10. Next-generation wireless technologies 4G and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Chilamkurti, Naveen; Chaouchi, Hakima

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive text/reference examines the various challenges to secure, efficient and cost-effective next-generation wireless networking. Topics and features: presents the latest advances, standards and technical challenges in a broad range of emerging wireless technologies; discusses cooperative and mesh networks, delay tolerant networks, and other next-generation networks such as LTE; examines real-world applications of vehicular communications, broadband wireless technologies, RFID technology, and energy-efficient wireless communications; introduces developments towards the 'Internet o

  11. The New Status of Argon-37 Artificial Neutrino Source Project

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurashitov, J N; Mirmov, I N; Veretenkin, E P; Yants, V E; Oshkanov, N N; Karpenko, A I; Maltsev, V V; Barsanov, V I; Trubin, K S; Zlokazov, S B; Khomyakov, Y S; Poplavsky, V M; Saraeva, T O; Vasiliev, B A; Mishin, O V; Bowles, T J; Teasdale, W A; Lande, K; Wildenhain, P S; Cleveland, B T; Elliott, S R; Haxton, W; Wilkerson, J F; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, Y; Nakahata, M

    2002-01-01

    Solution of the solar neutrino problem is significantly depends on the next generation of detectors that can measure the neutrino radiation from the Sun in intermediate energies. An intense (approx 1 MCi) sup 3 sup 7 Ar source would be an ideal tool for the calibration of new solar neutrino detectors. The technology of the production of such a source is based on the irradiation of a large mass of a Ca-containing target in a high-flux fast-neutron reactor. Produced sup 3 sup 7 Ar extracted from this target, will be purified and encapsulated in a source holder. A joint scientific collaboration of Russian, US and Japanese institutions are researching and developing the initial steps of this work and are funded by ISTC and CRDF.

  12. Oscillating neutrinos from the Galactic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, R.M.; Volkas, R.R.; Melia, F.

    1999-11-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the γ-ray emission spectrum of the EGRET-identified, central Galactic source 2EG J1746-2852 can be well fitted by positing that these photons are generated by the decay of π 0, s produced in p-p scattering at or near an energizing shock. Such scattering also produces charged pions which decay leptonically. The ratio of γ-rays to neutrinos generated by the central Galactic source may be accurately determined and a well-defined and potentially-measurable high energy neutrino flux at Earth is unavoidable. An opportunity, therefore, to detect neutrino oscillations over an unprecedented scale is offered by this source. In this paper we assess the prospects for such an observation with the generation of neutrino Cerenkov telescopes now in the planning stage. We determine that the next generation of detectors may find an oscillation signature in the Galactic Center (GC) signal, but that such an observation will probably not further constrain the oscillation parameter space mapped out by current atmospheric, solar, reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R and D) Program is responsible for performing R and D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R and D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management

  14. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

    2005-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for

  15. Studying neutrino properties in the future LENA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a next-generation neutrino detector based on 50 kt of liquid scintillator. The low detection threshold, the good energy resolution and the potent background discrimination inherent to liquid scintillator make LENA a versatile observatory for astrophysical and terrestrial neutrinos. The present contribution highlights LENA's capabilities for studying neutrino properties based on both natural and artificial sources

  16. Next Generation CANDU: Conceptual Design for a Short Construction Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, Jerry M.; Love, Ian J.W.; Elgohary, Medhat; Fairclough, Neville

    2002-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) has very successful experience in implementing new construction methods at the Qinshan (Phase III) twin unit CANDU 6 plant in China. This paper examines the construction method that must be implemented during the conceptual design phase of a project if short construction schedules are to be met. A project schedule of 48 months has been developed for the nth unit of NG (Next Generation) CANDU with a 42 month construction period from 1. Concrete to In-Service. An overall construction strategy has been developed involving paralleling project activities that are normally conducted in series. Many parts of the plant will be fabricated as modules and be installed using heavy lift cranes. The Reactor Building (RB), being on the critical path, has been the focus of considerable assessment, looking at alternative ways of applying the construction strategy to this building. A construction method has been chosen which will result in excess of 80% of internal work being completed as modules or as very streamlined traditional construction. This method is being further evaluated as the detailed layout proceeds. Other areas of the plant have been integrated into the schedule and new construction methods are being applied to these so that further modularization and even greater paralleling of activities will be achieved. It is concluded that the optimized construction method is a requirement, which must be implemented through all phases of design to make a 42 month construction schedule a reality. If the construction methods are appropriately chosen, the schedule reductions achieved will make nuclear more competitive. (authors)

  17. A National Demonstration Project Building the Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuter, Dan; Hughey, Kenneth; Melancon, Steve; Quinn, Edward 'Ted'

    2002-01-01

    energy situation, and in a way which supports U.S. environmental objectives. A key element of this effort will be the reestablishment and maintenance of an industrial base, which can be accessed in response to changing national energy needs. Right now, in a cooperative program through the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. and Russian dollars are paying for over 700 Russian nuclear scientists and engineers to complete design work on the Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), a next generation nuclear power plant that is melt-down proof, substantially more efficient that the existing generation of reactors, creates substantially less waste and is extremely proliferation resistant. To date, the Russians are providing world class engineering design work, resulting in the program being on track to begin construction of this first of a kind reactor by the end of 2005. Just as important in parallel with this effort, a number of key U.S. utilities are speaking with Congress and the Administration to 'piggy back' off this U.S./Russian effort to promote a joint private-public partnership to construct in parallel a similar first of a kind reactor in the U.S. (authors)

  18. Development of a framework for the neutorinics analysis system for next generation (2) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Yasushi; Hyoudou, Hideaki; Tatsumi, Masahiro; Jin, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency promotes development of innovative analysis methods and models in fundamental studies for next-generation nuclear reactor systems. In order to efficiently and effectively reflect the latest analysis methods and models to primary design of prototype reactor and/or in-core fuel management for power reactors, a next-generation analysis system MARBLE has been developed. The next-generation system provides solutions to the following requirements: (1) Flexibility, extensibility and user-friendliness that can apply new methods and models rapidly and effectively for fundamental studies, (2) quantitative assurance of solution accuracy and adaptive scoping range for design studies, (3) coupling analysis among different study domains for the purpose of rationalization of plant systems and improvement of reliability, (4) maintainability and reusability for system extensions for the purpose of total quality assurance and development efficiency. There has been a problem of extreme inefficiency due to lack of functionality in the conventional analysis system when changing analysis targets and/or modeling levels. In order to solve this problem, a policy of the hybrid system is adopted for the next-generation system, in which a controlling part is implemented in the scripting language with rich flexibility and maintainability and solution kernels that requires execution speed in the system language. In this study, detailed design of a framework, its implementation and tests are conducted so that a Python system layer can drive calculation codes written in C++ and/or Fortran. It is confirmed that various type of calculation codes such as diffusion, transport and burnup codes can be treated in the same manner on the platform for unified management system for calculation codes with a data exchange mechanism for abstracted data model between the Python and the calculation code layers. (author)

  19. Frontiers in neutrino physics - Transparencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.; Balantekin, B.; Conrad, J.; Engel, J.; Fogli, G.; Giunti, C.; Espinoza, C.; Lasserre, T.; Lazauskas, R.; Lhuiller, D.; Lindner, M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Martini, M.; McLaughlin, G.; Mirizzi, A.; Pehlivan, Y.; Petcov, S.; Qian, Y.; Serenelli, A.; Stancu, I.; Surman, R.; Vaananen, D.; Vissani, F.; Vogel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the presentations. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the last advances in neutrino physics. The presentations dealt with: -) the measurement of the neutrino velocity, -) neutrino oscillations, -) anomaly in solar models and neutrinos, -) double beta decay, -) self refraction of neutrinos, -) cosmic neutrinos, -) antineutrino spectra from reactors, and -) some aspects of neutrino physics with radioactive ion beams. (A.C.)

  20. A comparison of the performance of compact neutrino detector designs for nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyna, D. E.; McKeown, R. W.

    2006-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the monitoring of nuclear fuel for power reactors by detecting the anti-neutrinos produced during operation. Small liquid scintillator detectors have already demonstrated sensitivity to operational power levels, but more sensitive monitoring requires improvements in the efficiency and uniformity of these detectors. In this work, we use a montecarlo simulation to investigate the detector performance of four different detector configurations. Based on the analysis of neutron detection efficiency and positron energy response, we find that the optimal detector design will depend on the goals and restrictions of the specific installation or application. We have attempted to present the relevant information so that future detector development can proceed in a profitable direction

  1. Next generation of energy production systems; Lancement pour les systemes du futur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouault, J.; Garnier, J.C. [CEA Saclay Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Carre, F. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares - DDIN, 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the slides that have been presented at the Gedepeon conference. Gedepeon is a research group involving scientists from Cea (French atomic energy commission), CNRS (national center of scientific research), EDF (electricity of France) and Framatome that is devoted to the study of new energy sources and particularly to the study of the future generations of nuclear systems. The contributions have been classed into 9 topics: 1) gas cooled reactors, 2) molten salt reactors (MSBR), 3) the recycling of plutonium and americium, 4) reprocessing of molten salt reactor fuels, 5) behavior of graphite under radiation, 6) metallic materials for molten salt reactors, 7) refractory fuels of gas cooled reactors, 8) the nuclear cycle for the next generations of nuclear systems, and 9) organization of research programs on the new energy sources.

  2. Physical Configuration of the Next Generation Home Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Shohei; Kakishima, Yu; Hanawa, Dai; Oguchi, Kimio

    The number of broadband users is rapidly increasing worldwide. Japan already has over 10 million FTTH users. Another trend is the rapid digitalization of home electrical equipment e. g. digital cameras and hard disc recorders. These trends will encourage the emergence of the next generation home network. In this paper, we introduce the next generation home network image and describe the five domains into which home devices can be classified. We then clarify the optimum medium with which to configure the network given the requirements imposed by the home environment. Wiring cable lengths for three network topologies are calculated. The results gained from the next generation home network implemented on the first phase testbed are shown. Finally, our conclusions are given.

  3. Key thrusts in next generation CANDU. Annex 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, B.A.; Torgerson, D.F.; Duffey, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Current electricity markets and the competitiveness of other generation options such as CCGT have influenced the directions of future nuclear generation. The next generation CANDU has used its key characteristics as the basis to leap frog into a new design featuring improved economics, enhanced passive safety, enhanced operability and demonstrated fuel cycle flexibility. Many enabling technologies spinning of current CANDU design features are used in the next generation design. Some of these technologies have been developed in support of existing plants and near term designs while others will need to be developed and tested. This paper will discuss the key principles driving the next generation CANDU design and the fuel cycle flexibility of the CANDU system which provide synergism with the PWR fuel cycle. (author)

  4. Next Generation Sequencing of Ancient DNA: Requirements, Strategies and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knapp

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The invention of next-generation-sequencing has revolutionized almost all fields of genetics, but few have profited from it as much as the field of ancient DNA research. From its beginnings as an interesting but rather marginal discipline, ancient DNA research is now on its way into the centre of evolutionary biology. In less than a year from its invention next-generation-sequencing had increased the amount of DNA sequence data available from extinct organisms by several orders of magnitude. Ancient DNA  research is now not only adding a temporal aspect to evolutionary studies and allowing for the observation of evolution in real time, it also provides important data to help understand the origins of our own species. Here we review progress that has been made in next-generation-sequencing of ancient DNA over the past five years and evaluate sequencing strategies and future directions.

  5. Nuclear the next generation. 34th Annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference and 37th CNS/CNA student conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    The 34th Annual Canadian Nuclear Society Conference and 37th CNS/CNA Student Conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on June 10-13, 2013. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear the Next Generation{sup ,} the conference actively engaged 400 participants in the many facets of this well-rum event. The conference combined excellent plenary speakers, a full set of technical papers, challenging student poster competitions, and interesting exhibits. The plenary session focussed on the themes: 'Nuclear Power - a Business Driver for the Next Generation'; and, 'Designing - the Next Generation'. The technical session titles were: Reactor and Radiation Physics; Environment and Spent Fuel Management; Operations and Maintenance; Fusion Science and Technology; Advanced Reactors and Fuels; Plant Life Extension, Refurbishment and Aging; Safety and Licensing; Chemistry and Materials; and, Thermalhydraulics. The student conference session was well attended and completed the 4 day event.

  6. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role

  7. Workshop: Neutrino telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-05-15

    Despite being the most elusive of the known particles, neutrinos provide vital new physics insights. Most neutrino knowledge so far has come from studies using beams from reactors and accelerators, but in recent years important new contributions have resulted from investigation of natural neutrinos from cosmic rays, nearby stars (the sun), or distant sources, such as the 1987 supernova. The supernova observations marked the start of a new era in neutrino astronomy, but neutrino telescopes were anyway assured of an important ongoing role.

  8. THE TRAINING OF NEXT GENERATION DATA SCIENTISTS IN BIOMEDICINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmire, Lana X; Gliske, Stephen; Nguyen, Quynh C; Chen, Jonathan H; Nemati, Shamim; VAN Horn, John D; Moore, Jason H; Shreffler, Carol; Dunn, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    With the booming of new technologies, biomedical science has transformed into digitalized, data intensive science. Massive amount of data need to be analyzed and interpreted, demand a complete pipeline to train next generation data scientists. To meet this need, the transinstitutional Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Initiative has been implemented since 2014, complementing other NIH institutional efforts. In this report, we give an overview the BD2K K01 mentored scientist career awards, which have demonstrated early success. We address the specific trainings needed in representative data science areas, in order to make the next generation of data scientists in biomedicine.

  9. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  10. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  11. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  12. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, Bob [bmck@jlab.org

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  13. The contribution of next generation sequencing to epilepsy genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Dahl, Hans A.; Helbig, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, next generation sequencing technologies such as targeted gene panels, whole exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing have led to an explosion of gene identifications in monogenic epilepsies including both familial epilepsies and severe epilepsies, often referred to as ...

  14. Next Generation Science Standards: All Standards, All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee; Miller, Emily C.; Januszyk, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) offer a vision of science teaching and learning that presents both learning opportunities and demands for all students, particularly student groups that have traditionally been underserved in science classrooms. The NGSS have addressed issues of diversity and equity from their inception, and the NGSS…

  15. Addressing Three Common Myths about the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    Although the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS Lead States 2013) were released over two years ago, misconceptions about what they are--and are not--persist. The "NGSS" provide for consistent science education opportunities for all students--regardless of demographics--with a level of rigor expected in every location and…

  16. Answers to Teachers' Questions about the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workosky, Cindy; Willard, Ted

    2015-01-01

    K-12 teachers of science have been digging into the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS") (NGSS Lead States 2013) to begin creating plans and processes for translating them for classroom instruction. As teachers learn about the NGSS, they have asked about the general structure of the standards document and how to read…

  17. The Next Generation Science Standards: The Features and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in January of 2010, the Carnegie Corporation of New York funded a two-step process to develop a new set of state developed science standards intended to prepare students for college and career readiness in science. These new internationally benchmarked science standards, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were completed in…

  18. The Next Generation Science Standards: A Focus on Physical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcik, Joe

    2013-01-01

    This article describes ways to adapt U.S. science curriculum to the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) "Framework for K-12 Science Education" and "Next Generation of Science Standards" (NGSS), noting their focus on teaching the physical sciences. The overall goal of the Framework and NGSS is to help all learners develop the…

  19. Next Generation Science Standards: Adoption and Implementation Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzman, Alissa; Rodriguez, Nick

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) represent the culmination of years of collaboration and effort by states, science educators and experts from across the United States. Based on the National Research Council's "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" and developed in partnership with 26 lead states, the NGSS, when…

  20. Framework for Leading Next Generation Science Standards Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Katherine; Mundry, Susan; DiRanna, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    In response to the need to develop leaders to guide the implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Carnegie Corporation of New York provided funding to WestEd to develop a framework that defines the leadership knowledge and actions needed to effectively implement the NGSS. The development of the framework entailed…

  1. Prospects for next-generation e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review progress in the US towards a next generation linear collider. During 1988, there were three workshops held on linear colliders: ''Physics of Linear Colliders,'' in Capri, Italy, June 14--18, 1988; Snowmass 88 (Linear Collider subsection) June 27--July 15, 1988; and SLAC International Workshop on Next Generation Linear Colliders, November 28--December 9, 1988. In this paper, I focus on reviewing the issues and progress on a next generation linear collider. The energy range is dictated by physics with a mass reach well beyond LEP, although somewhat short of SSC. The luminosity is that required to obtain 10 3 --10 4 units of R 0 per year. The length is consistent with a site on Stanford land with collision occurring on the SLAC site; the power was determined by economic considerations. Finally, the technology as limited by the desire to have a next generation linear collider by the next century. 37 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  2. HLA typing: Conventional techniques v. next-generation sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The large number of population-specific polymorphisms present in the HLA complex in the South African (SA) population reduces the probability of finding an adequate HLA-matched donor for individuals in need of an unrelated haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Next-generation sequencing ...

  3. HLA typing: Conventional techniques v.next-generation sequencing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The existing techniques have contributed significantly to our current knowledge of allelic diversity. At present, sequence-based typing (SBT) methods, in particular next-generation sequencing. (NGS), provide the highest possible resolution. NGS platforms were initially only used for genomic sequencing, but also showed.

  4. Application of Next Generation Sequencing on Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jian

    The discovery of genetic factors behind increasing number of human diseases and the growth of education of genetic knowledge to the public make demands for genetic testing increase rapidly. However, traditional genetic testing methods cannot meet all kinds of the requirements. Next generation seq...

  5. Using Digital Watermarking for Securing Next Generation Media Broadcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Dominik; Gaines, Seán

    The Internet presents a problem for the protection of intellectual property. Those who create content must be adequately compensated for the use of their works. Rights agencies who monitor the use of these works exist in many jurisdictions. In the traditional broadcast environment this monitoring is a difficult task. With Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) and Next Generation Networks (NGN) this situation is further complicated.

  6. Next Generation UV Coronagraph Instrumentation for Solar Cycle-24

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... New concepts for next generation instrumentation include imaging ultraviolet spectrocoronagraphs and large aperture ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometers. An imaging instrument would be the first to obtain absolute spectral line intensities of the extended corona over a wide field of view. Such images ...

  7. The NASA Next Generation Stirling Technology Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J. G.; Shaltens, R. K.; Wong, W. A.

    2005-12-01

    NASAs Science Mission Directorate is developing the next generation Stirling technology for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for surface and deep space missions. The next generation Stirling convertor is one of two advanced power conversion technologies currently being developed for future NASA missions, and is capable of operating for both planetary atmospheres and deep space environments. The Stirling convertor (free-piston engine integrated with a linear alternator) produces about 90 We(ac) and has a specific power of about 90 We/kg. Operating conditions of Thot at 850 degree C and Trej at 90 degree C results in the Stirling convertor estimated efficiency of about 40 per cent. Using the next generation Stirling convertor in future RPS, the "system" specific power is estimated at 8 We/kg. The design lifetime is three years on the surface of Mars and fourteen years in deep space missions. Electrical power of about 160 We (BOM) is produced by two (2) free-piston Stirling convertors heated by two (2) General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. This development is being performed by Sunpower, Athens, OH with Pratt & Whitney, Rocketdyne, Canoga Park, CA under contract to Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio. GRC is guiding the independent testing and technology development for the next generation Stirling generator.

  8. Modelling of control system architecture for next-generation accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shi-Yao; Kurokawa, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Functional, hardware and software system architectures define the fundamental structure of control systems. Modelling is a protocol of system architecture used in system design. This paper reviews various modellings adopted in past ten years and suggests a new modelling for next generation accelerators. (author)

  9. Targeted enrichment strategies for next-generation plant biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Cronn; Brian J. Knaus; Aaron Liston; Peter J. Maughan; Matthew Parks; John V. Syring; Joshua. Udall

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic advances offered by modem DNA sequencers continue to redefine the limits of what can be accomplished in comparative plant biology. Even with recent achievements, however, plant genomes present obstacles that can make it difficult to execute large-scale population and phylogenetic studies on next-generation sequencing platforms. Factors like large genome...

  10. Preparing the Next Generation of Educators for Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embry-Jenlink, Karen

    2018-01-01

    In the keynote address of the 42nd annual meeting of the Southeastern Regional Educators Association (SRATE), ATE President Karen Embry-Jenlink examines the critical role of teacher educators in preparing the next generation of citizens and leaders to sustain democracy. Drawing from historic and current events and personal experience,…

  11. The "Next Generation Science Standards" and the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2013-01-01

    Publication of the "Next Generation Science Standards" will be just short of two decades since publication of the "National Science Education Standards" (NRC 1996). In that time, biology and science education communities have advanced, and the new standards will reflect that progress (NRC 1999, 2007, 2009; Kress and Barrett…

  12. Design Principles of Next-Generation Digital Gaming for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Jenkins, Henry; Holland, Walter; Miller, Heather; O'Driscoll, Alice; Tan, Katie Philip; Todd, Katie.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of digital games, describes research at MIT that is exploring the potential of digital games for supporting learning, and offers hypotheses about the design of next-generation educational video and computer games. Highlights include simulations and games; and design principles, including context and using information to…

  13. Efficient Cryptography for the Next Generation Secure Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcu, Alptekin

    2010-01-01

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems, and client-server type storage and computation outsourcing constitute some of the major applications that the next generation cloud schemes will address. Since these applications are just emerging, it is the perfect time to design them with security and privacy in mind. Furthermore, considering the high-churn…

  14. Impact of ectopic pregnancy for reproductive prognosis in next generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line Lund; Egerup, Pia; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel

    2014-01-01

    The impact of an ectopic pregnancy in the next generation is unknown. Our aim was to compare reproductive outcomes in daughters of women with and without ectopic pregnancy. Designed as a historical prospective controlled cohort study with data collected in four Danish registries from 1977-2009, w...

  15. Mobile e-Learning for Next Generation Communication Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tin-Yu; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    This article develops an environment for mobile e-learning that includes an interactive course, virtual online labs, an interactive online test, and lab-exercise training platform on the fourth generation mobile communication system. The Next Generation Learning Environment (NeGL) promotes the term "knowledge economy." Inter-networking…

  16. Radio resource management for next generation mobile communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hua

    The key feature of next generation (4G) mobile communication system is the ability to deliver a variety of multimedia services with different Quality-of-Service (QoS) requirements. Compared to the third generation (3G) mobile communication systems, 4G mobile communication system introduces several...

  17. Next generation multi-material 3D food printer concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, D.J.; Anderson, P.D.

    2017-01-01

    3D food printing is a new rapidly developing technology capable of creating food structures that are impossible to create with normal processing techniques. Challenges in this field are creating texture and multi-material food products. To address these challenges a next generation food printer will

  18. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    This book presents recent studies on the power electronics used for the next generation wind turbine system. Some criteria and tools for evaluating and improving the critical performances of the wind power converters have been proposed and established. The book addresses some emerging problems...

  19. ERP II: Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2004-01-01

    ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: e...... impact on extended enterprise architecture.....

  20. ERP II - Next-generation Extended Enterprise Resource Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2003-01-01

    ERP II (ERP/2) systems is a new concept introduced by Gartner Group in 2000 in order to label the latest extensions of the ERP-systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the next-generation of ERP systems, the Extended Enterprise Resource Planning (EERP or as we prefer to use: e...... impact on extended enterprise architecture....

  1. NGSS and the Next Generation of Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2014-01-01

    This article centers on the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) and their implications for teacher development, particularly at the undergraduate level. After an introduction to NGSS and the influence of standards in the educational system, the article addresses specific educational shifts--interconnecting science and engineering…

  2. The Next Generation of Science Standards: Implications for Biology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2012-01-01

    The release of A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (NRC, 2012) provides the basis for the next generation of science standards. This article first describes that foundation for the life sciences; it then presents a draft standard for natural selection and evolution. Finally, there is a…

  3. Next-generation sequencing approaches to understanding the oral microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the focus in dental research has been on studying a small fraction of the oral microbiome—so-called opportunistic pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, researchers now have the tools that allow for profiling of the microbiomes and metagenomes at

  4. Promising Practices: Building the Next Generation of School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jennifer Edic; Escalante, Karen; Selva, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    This study applies transformational leadership theory practices to examine the purposeful ways in which principals work to build the next generation of teacher leaders in response to the shortage of K-12 principals. Given the impact principals have on student development and the shortage of those applying for the principalship, the purpose of this…

  5. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyberd, P.; et al.

    2012-06-01

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the neutrino-SM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or 'sterile.' Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this Letter of Intent, we describe a facility, nuSTORM, 'Neutrinos from STORed Muons,' and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. We present sensitivity plots that indicated that this experimental approach can provide over 10 sigma confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results. In addition we indicate how the facility can be used to make precision neutrino interaction cross section measurements important to the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  6. Software R&D for Next Generation of HEP Experiments, Inspired by Theano

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    In the next decade, the frontiers of High Energy Physics (HEP) will be explored by three machines: the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) in Europe, the Long Base Neutrino Facility (LBNF) in the US, and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in Japan. These next generation experiments must address two fundamental problems in the current generation of HEP experimental software: the inability to take advantage and adapt to the rapidly evolving processor landscape, and the difficulty in developing and maintaining increasingly complex software systems by physicists. I will propose a strategy, inspired by the automatic optimization and code generation in Theano, to simultaneously address both problems. I will describe three R&D projects with short-term physics deliverables aimed at developing this strategy. The first project is to develop maximally sensitive General Search for New Physics at the LHC by applying the Matrix Element Method running GPUs of HPCs. The second is to classify and reconstru...

  7. Development of the next generation code system as an engineering modeling language. (2). Study with prototyping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Uto, Nariaki; Kasahara, Naoto; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-04-01

    In the fast reactor development, numerical simulation using analytical codes plays an important role for complementing theory and experiment. It is necessary that the engineering models and analysis methods can be flexibly changed, because the phenomena to be investigated become more complicated due to the diversity of the needs for research. And, there are large problems in combining physical properties and engineering models in many different fields. Aiming to the realization of the next generation code system which can solve those problems, the authors adopted three methods, (1) Multi-language (SoftWIRE.NET, Visual Basic.NET and Fortran) (2) Fortran 90 and (3) Python to make a prototype of the next generation code system. As this result, the followings were confirmed. (1) It is possible to reuse a function of the existing codes written in Fortran as an object of the next generation code system by using Visual Basic.NET. (2) The maintainability of the existing code written by Fortran 77 can be improved by using the new features of Fortran 90. (3) The toolbox-type code system can be built by using Python. (author)

  8. Leakage Tests of the Stainless Steel Vessels of the Antineutrino Detectors in the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaohui; Luo, Xiaolan; Heng, Yuekun; Wang, Lingshu; Tang, Xiao; Ma, Xiaoyan; Zhuang, Honglin; Band, Henry; Cherwinka, Jeff; Xiao, Qiang; Heeger, Karsten M.

    2012-01-01

    The antineutrino detectors in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment are liquid scintillator detectors designed to detect low energy particles from antineutrino interactions with high efficiency and low backgrounds. Since the antineutrino detector will be installed in a water Cherenkov cosmic ray veto detector and will run for 3 to 5 years, ensuring water tightness is critical to the successful operation of the antineutrino detectors. We choose a special method to seal the detector. Three l...

  9. The ideal neutrino beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Mats

    2009-01-01

    The advance in neutrino oscillation physics is driven by the availability of well characterized and high flux neutrino beams. The three present options for the next generation neutrino oscillation facility are super beams, neutrino factories and beta-beams. A super-beam is a very high intensity classical neutrino beam generated by protons impinging on a target where the neutrinos are generated by the secondary particles decaying in a tunnel down streams of the target. In a neutrino factory the neutrinos are generated from muons decaying in a storage ring with long straight sections pointing towards the detectors. In a beta-beam the neutrinos are also originating from decay in a storage ring but the decaying particles are radioactive ions rather than muons. I will in this presentation review the three options and discuss the pros and cons of each. The present joint design effort for a future high intensity neutrino oscillation in Europe within a common EU supported design study, EURONU, will also be presented....

  10. The ideal neutrino beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Mats

    2009-06-01

    The advance in neutrino oscillation physics is driven by the availability of well characterized and high flux neutrino beams. The three present options for the next generation neutrino oscillation facility are super beams, neutrino factories and beta-beams. A super-beam is a very high intensity classical neutrino beam generated by protons impinging on a target where the neutrinos are generated by the secondary particles decaying in a tunnel down streams of the target. In a neutrino factory the neutrinos are generated from muons decaying in a storage ring with long straight sections pointing towards the detectors. In a beta-beam the neutrinos are also originating from decay in a storage ring but the decaying particles are radioactive ions rather than muons. I will in this presentation review the three options and discuss the pros and cons of each. The present joint design effort for a future high intensity neutrino oscillation in Europe within a common EU supported design study, EURONU, will also be presented. The design study will explore the physics reach, the detectors, the feasibility, the safety issues and the cost for each of the options so that the the community can take a decision on what to build when the facilities presently under exploitation and construction have to be replaced.

  11. Next-generation sequencing offers new insights into DNA degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Willerslev, Eske

    2012-01-01

    The processes underlying DNA degradation are central to various disciplines, including cancer research, forensics and archaeology. The sequencing of ancient DNA molecules on next-generation sequencing platforms provides direct measurements of cytosine deamination, depurination and fragmentation...... rates that previously were obtained only from extrapolations of results from in vitro kinetic experiments performed over short timescales. For example, recent next-generation sequencing of ancient DNA reveals purine bases as one of the main targets of postmortem hydrolytic damage, through base...... elimination and strand breakage. It also shows substantially increased rates of DNA base-loss at guanosine. In this review, we argue that the latter results from an electron resonance structure unique to guanosine rather than adenosine having an extra resonance structure over guanosine as previously suggested....

  12. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-01-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40–50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices. (topical review)

  13. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-08-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40-50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices.

  14. Big Data Perspective and Challenges in Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif Sultan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development towards the next generation cellular networks, i.e., 5G, the focus has shifted towards meeting the higher data rate requirements, potential of micro cells and millimeter wave spectrum. The goals for next generation networks are very high data rates, low latency and handling of big data. The achievement of these goals definitely require newer architecture designs, upgraded technologies with possible backward support, better security algorithms and intelligent decision making capability. In this survey, we identify the opportunities which can be provided by 5G networks and discuss the underlying challenges towards implementation and realization of the goals of 5G. This survey also provides a discussion on the recent developments made towards standardization, the architectures which may be potential candidates for deployment and the energy concerns in 5G networks. Finally, the paper presents a big data perspective and the potential of machine learning for optimization and decision making in 5G networks.

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eSuter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein-protein interactions (PPIs via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS, and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine.

  16. Next-Generation Sequencing: From Understanding Biology to Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Meder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within just a few years, the new methods for high-throughput next-generation sequencing have generated completely novel insights into the heritability and pathophysiology of human disease. In this review, we wish to highlight the benefits of the current state-of-the-art sequencing technologies for genetic and epigenetic research. We illustrate how these technologies help to constantly improve our understanding of genetic mechanisms in biological systems and summarize the progress made so far. This can be exemplified by the case of heritable heart muscle diseases, so-called cardiomyopathies. Here, next-generation sequencing is able to identify novel disease genes, and first clinical applications demonstrate the successful translation of this technology into personalized patient care.

  17. Precision medicine for cancer with next-generation functional diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam A; Letai, Anthony; Fisher, David E; Flaherty, Keith T

    2015-12-01

    Precision medicine is about matching the right drugs to the right patients. Although this approach is technology agnostic, in cancer there is a tendency to make precision medicine synonymous with genomics. However, genome-based cancer therapeutic matching is limited by incomplete biological understanding of the relationship between phenotype and cancer genotype. This limitation can be addressed by functional testing of live patient tumour cells exposed to potential therapies. Recently, several 'next-generation' functional diagnostic technologies have been reported, including novel methods for tumour manipulation, molecularly precise assays of tumour responses and device-based in situ approaches; these address the limitations of the older generation of chemosensitivity tests. The promise of these new technologies suggests a future diagnostic strategy that integrates functional testing with next-generation sequencing and immunoprofiling to precisely match combination therapies to individual cancer patients.

  18. Converged Wireless Networking and Optimization for Next Generation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Next Generation Network (NGN vision is tending towards the convergence of internet and mobile services providing the impetus for new market opportunities in combining the appealing services of internet with the roaming capability of mobile networks. However, this convergence does not go far enough, and with the emergence of new coexistence scenarios, there is a clear need to evolve the current architecture to provide cost-effective end-to-end communication. The LOOP project, a EUREKA-CELTIC driven initiative, is one piece in the jigsaw by helping European industry to sustain a leading role in telecommunications and manufacturing of high-value products and machinery by delivering pioneering converged wireless networking solutions that can be successfully demonstrated. This paper provides an overview of the LOOP project and the key achievements that have been tunneled into first prototypes for showcasing next generation services for operators and process manufacturers.

  19. Results of Analyses of the Next Generation Solvent for Parsons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of ∼150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

  20. Cycle layout studies of S-CO2 cycle for the next generation nuclear system application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yoonhan; Bae, Seong Jun; Kim, Minseok; Cho, Seong Kuk; Baik, Seungjoon; Lee, Jeong Ik; Cha, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    According to the second law of thermodynamics, the next generation nuclear reactor system efficiency can potentially be increased with higher operating temperature. Fig.1 shows several power conversion system efficiencies and heat sources with respect to the system top operating temperature. As shown in Fig.1, the steam Rankine and gas Brayton cycles have been considered as the major power conversion systems more than several decades. In the next generation reactor operating temperature region (450 - 900 .deg. C), the steam Rankine and gas Brayton cycles have limits due to material problems and low efficiency, respectively. Among the future power conversion systems, S-CO 2 cycle is receiving interests due to several benefits including high efficiency under the mild turbine inlet temperature range (450-650 .deg. C), compact turbomachinery and simple layout compared to the steam Rankine cycle. S-CO 2 cycle can show relatively high efficiency under the mild turbine inlet temperature range (450-600 .deg. C) compared to other power conversion systems. The recompression cycle shows the best efficiency among other layouts and it is suitable for the application to advanced nuclear reactor systems. As S-CO 2 cycle performance can vary depending on the layout configuration, further studies on the layouts are required to design a better performing cycle

  1. Reconstruction of GeV Neutrino Events in LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellenberg, R.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hellgartner, D.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.; Peltoniemi, J.

    2011-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a proposed next generation liquid-scintillator detector with about 50 kt target mass. Besides the detection of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, supernova neutrinos and the search for the proton decay, LENA could also be used as the far detector of a next generation neutrino beam. The present contribution outlines the status of the Monte Carlo studies towards the reconstruction of GeV neutrinos in LENA. Both the tracking capabilities at a few hundred MeV, most interesting for a beta beam, and above 1 GeV for a superbeam experiment are presented.

  2. Next Generation Campus Network Deployment Project Based on Softswitch

    OpenAIRE

    HU Feng; LIU Ziyan

    2011-01-01

    After analyzing the current networks of Guizhou University,we brought forward a scheme of next generation campus networks based on softswitch technology by choosing SoftX3000 switching system of HuaWei and provided the specific solution of accessing campus networks in this paper. It is proved that this scheme is feasible by using OPNET, which not only accomplished the integration of the PSTN and IP networks but also achieved the combining of voice services and data services.

  3. DARC: Next generation decentralized control framework for robot applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents DARC, a next generation control framework for robot applications. It is designed to be equally powerful in prototyping research projects and for building serious commercial robots running on low powered embedded hardware, thus closing the gab between research and industry....... It incorporates several new techniques such as a decentralized peer-to-peer architecture, transparent network distribution of the control system, and automatic run-time supervision to guarantee robustness....

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing of Antibody Display Repertoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Rouet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro selection technology has transformed the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Using methods such as phage, ribosome, and yeast display, high affinity binders can be selected from diverse repertoires. Here, we review strategies for the next-generation sequencing (NGS of phage- and other antibody-display libraries, as well as NGS platforms and analysis tools. Moreover, we discuss recent examples relating to the use of NGS to assess library diversity, clonal enrichment, and affinity maturation.

  5. Next Generation HeliMag UXO Mapping Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ancillary instrumentation records aircraft height above ground and attitude. A fluxgate magnetometer is used to allow for aeromagnetic compensation of... Magnetometer System WWII World War II WAA wide area assessment ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Next Generation HeliMag Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) Mapping...for deployment of seven total-field magnetometers on a Kevlar reinforced boom mounted on a Bell 206L helicopter. The objectives of this

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing in the Mycology Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Jan; Snelders, Eveline; Verweij, Paul E; Melchers, Willem J G

    New state-of-the-art techniques in sequencing offer valuable tools in both detection of mycobiota and in understanding of the molecular mechanisms of resistance against antifungal compounds and virulence. Introduction of new sequencing platform with enhanced capacity and a reduction in costs for sequence analysis provides a potential powerful tool in mycological diagnosis and research. In this review, we summarize the applications of next-generation sequencing techniques in mycology.

  7. Next-generation genome-scale models for metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Zachary A.; Lloyd, Colton J.; Feist, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) methods have become widely used tools for metabolic engineering in both academic and industrial laboratories. By employing a genome-scale in silico representation of the metabolic network of a host organism, COBRA methods can be used to predict...... examples of applying COBRA methods to strain optimization are presented and discussed. Then, an outlook is provided on the next generation of COBRA models and the new types of predictions they will enable for systems metabolic engineering....

  8. The Dynamic Pricing of Next Generation Consumer Durables

    OpenAIRE

    Barry L. Bayus

    1992-01-01

    Learning curve effects, aspects of consumer demand models (e.g., reservation price distributions, intertemporal utility maximizing behavior), and competitive activity are reasons which have been offered to explain why prices of new durables decline over time. This paper presents an alternative rationale based on the buying behavior for products with overlapping replacement cycles (i.e., next generation products). A model for consumer sales of a new durable is developed by incorporating the re...

  9. Next Generation Qualification: Nanometrics T120PH Seismometer Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Bion J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slad, George William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated three seismometers, the Trillium 120PH, manufactured by Nanometrics. These seismometers measure broadband ground velocity using a UVW configuration with feedback control in a mechanically levelled borehole package. The purpose of the seismometer evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, response, self- noise, dynamic range, and self-calibration ability. The Nanometrics Trillium 120PH seismometers are being evaluated for the U.S. Air Force as part of their Next Generation Qualification effort.

  10. Securing Networks from Modern Threats using Next Generation Firewalls

    OpenAIRE

    Delgiusto, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Classic firewalls have long been unable to cope with modern threats that ordinary Internet users are exposed to. This thesis discusses their successors - the next-generation firewalls. The first part of the thesis describes modern threats and attacks. We described in detail the DoS and APT attacks, which are among the most frequent and which may cause most damage to the system under attack. Then we explained the theoretical basics of firewalls and described the functionalities of next gen...

  11. Applying Next Generation Sequencing to Skeletal Development and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, Margot Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have dramatically increased the throughput and lowered the cost of DNA sequencing. In this thesis, I apply these technologies to unresolved questions in skeletal development and disease. Firstly, I use targeted re-sequencing of genomic DNA to identify the genetic cause of the cartilage tumor syndrome, metachondromatosis (MC). I show that the majority of MC patients carry heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the PTPN11 gene, which encodes a p...

  12. Statistical Approaches for Next-Generation Sequencing Data

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Dandi

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, genotyping technology has advanced rapidly, which enabled the tremendous success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the search of disease susceptibility loci (DSLs). However, only a small fraction of the overall predicted heritability can be explained by the DSLs discovered. One possible explanation for this ”missing heritability” phenomenon is that many causal variants are rare. The recent development of high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) ...

  13. NREL Next Generation Drivetrain: Mechanical Design and Test Plan (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Halse, C.

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy and industry partners are sponsoring a $3m project for design and testing of a 'Next Generation' wind turbine drivetrain at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This poster focuses on innovative aspects of the gearbox design, completed as part of an end-to-end systems engineering approach incorporating innovations that increase drivetrain reliability, efficiency, torque density and minimize capital cost.

  14. SMITH: a LIMS for handling next-generation sequencing workflows

    OpenAIRE

    Venco, Francesco; Vaskin, Yuriy; Ceol, Arnaud; Muller, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Life-science laboratories make increasing use of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) for studying bio-macromolecules and their interactions. Array-based methods for measuring gene expression or protein-DNA interactions are being replaced by RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq. Sequencing is generally performed by specialized facilities that have to keep track of sequencing requests, trace samples, ensure quality and make data available according to predefined privileges. An integrated tool helps to ...

  15. Developing the next generation of nuclear workers at OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, P.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation is about developing the next generation of nuclear workers at Ontario Power Generation (OPG). Industry developments are creating urgent need to hire, train and retain new staff. OPG has an aggressive hiring campaign. Training organization is challenged to accommodate influx of new staff. Collaborating with colleges and universities is increasing the supply of qualified recruits with an interest in nuclear. Program for functional and leadership training have been developed. Knowledge retention is urgently required

  16. Towards next-generation biodiversity assessment using DNA metabarcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric; Pompanon, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Virtually all empirical ecological studies require species identification during data collection. DNA metabarcoding refers to the automated identification of multiple species from a single bulk sample containing entire organisms or from a single environmental sample containing degraded DNA (soil......, water, faeces, etc.). It can be implemented for both modern and ancient environmental samples. The availability of next-generation sequencing platforms and the ecologists need for high-throughput taxon identification have facilitated the emergence of DNA metabarcoding. The potential power of DNA...

  17. Next-generation digital information storage in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M; Gao, Yuan; Kosuri, Sriram

    2012-09-28

    Digital information is accumulating at an astounding rate, straining our ability to store and archive it. DNA is among the most dense and stable information media known. The development of new technologies in both DNA synthesis and sequencing make DNA an increasingly feasible digital storage medium. We developed a strategy to encode arbitrary digital information in DNA, wrote a 5.27-megabit book using DNA microchips, and read the book by using next-generation DNA sequencing.

  18. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  19. Next-Generation Sequencing of Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Andrew S; Stall, Jennifer N; Hovelson, Daniel H; Cani, Andi K; Liu, Chia-Jen; Tomlins, Scott A; Cho, Kathleen R

    2015-11-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most prevalent and lethal form of ovarian cancer. HGSCs frequently arise in the distal fallopian tubes rather than the ovary, developing from small precursor lesions called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (TICs, or more specifically, STICs). While STICs have been reported to harbor TP53 mutations, detailed molecular characterizations of these lesions are lacking. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 4 women, 2 with HGSC and 2 with uterine endometrioid carcinoma (UEC) who were diagnosed as having synchronous STICs. We detected concordant mutations in both HGSCs with synchronous STICs, including TP53 mutations as well as assumed germline BRCA1/2 alterations, confirming a clonal association between these lesions. Next-generation sequencing confirmed the presence of a STIC clonally unrelated to 1 case of UEC, and NGS of the other tubal lesion diagnosed as a STIC unexpectedly supported the lesion as a micrometastasis from the associated UEC. We demonstrate that targeted NGS can identify genetic alterations in minute lesions, such as TICs, and confirm TP53 mutations as early driving events for HGSC. Next-generation sequencing also demonstrated unexpected associations between presumed STICs and synchronous carcinomas, providing evidence that some TICs are actually metastases rather than HGSC precursors.

  20. Mobility management techniques for the next-generation wireless networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junzhao; Howie, Douglas P.; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    2001-10-01

    The tremendous demands from social market are pushing the booming development of mobile communications faster than ever before, leading to plenty of new advanced techniques emerging. With the converging of mobile and wireless communications with Internet services, the boundary between mobile personal telecommunications and wireless computer networks is disappearing. Wireless networks of the next generation need the support of all the advances on new architectures, standards, and protocols. Mobility management is an important issue in the area of mobile communications, which can be best solved at the network layer. One of the key features of the next generation wireless networks is all-IP infrastructure. This paper discusses the mobility management schemes for the next generation mobile networks through extending IP's functions with mobility support. A global hierarchical framework model for the mobility management of wireless networks is presented, in which the mobility management is divided into two complementary tasks: macro mobility and micro mobility. As the macro mobility solution, a basic principle of Mobile IP is introduced, together with the optimal schemes and the advances in IPv6. The disadvantages of the Mobile IP on solving the micro mobility problem are analyzed, on the basis of which three main proposals are discussed as the micro mobility solutions for mobile communications, including Hierarchical Mobile IP (HMIP), Cellular IP, and Handoff-Aware Wireless Access Internet Infrastructure (HAWAII). A unified model is also described in which the different micro mobility solutions can coexist simultaneously in mobile networks.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Pre-Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larry Demick; Doug Vandel

    2007-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950 C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications. The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively1 safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to current and advanced light water reactors (LWRs). In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), the Department of Energy (DOE) was tasked with providing a demonstration of this HTGR technology to economically and reliably produce electricity and hydrogen by the year 2021. As the lead nuclear technology development laboratory of the DOE, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated the work necessary to complete this task. The EPAct also stipulated that the task should be undertaken in partnership with the industrial end users of the technology. To that end, a working group has been assembled consisting of suppliers of the technology, nuclear plant owner/operators, other supportive technology companies, and potential end users. The objective of the working group is to form an Alliance that would provide the private sector perspective and direction for completion of the NGNP in partnership with the DOE. The Alliance will support the selection of the specific operating conditions and configuration for NGNP to ensure it meets private sector expectations, commence

  2. Phenomenology of MaVaN’s Models in Reactor Neutrino Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass Varying Neutrinos (MaVaN’s mechanisms were proposed to link the neutrino mass scale with the dark energy density, addressing the coincidence problem. In some scenarios, this mass can present a dependence on the baryonic density felt by neutrinos, creating an effective neutrino mass that depends both on the neutrino and baryonic densities. In this work, we study the phenomenological consequence of MaVaN’s scenarios in which the matter density dependence is induced by Yukawa interactions of a light neutral scalar particle which couples to neutrinos and matter. Under the assumption of one mass scale dominance, we perform an analysis of KamLAND neutrino data which depends on 4 parameters: the two standard oscillation parameters, Δm0,212 and tan2θ12, and two new coefficients which parameterize the environment dependence of neutrino mass. We introduce an Earth’s crust model to compute precisely the density in each point along the neutrino trajectory. We show that this new description of density does not affect the analysis with the standard model case. With the MaVaN model, we observe a first order effect in lower density, which leads to an improvement on the data description.

  3. What can next generation sequencing do for you? Next generation sequencing as a valuable tool in plant research

    OpenAIRE

    Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have opened fascinating opportunities for the analysis of plants with and without a sequenced genome on a genomic scale. During the last few years, NGS methods have become widely available and cost effective. They can be applied to a wide variety of biological questions, from the sequencing of complete eukaryotic genomes and transcriptomes, to the genome-scale analysis of DNA-protein interactions. In this review, we focus on the use of NGS for pla...

  4. Safety design philosophy of the ABWR for the next generation LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Akinaga, Makoto; Kojima, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents safety design philosophy of the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) to be reflected in developing the next generation light water reactors (LWRs). The basic policy of the ABWR safety design was to improve safety and reduce cost simultaneously by reflecting lessons learned of precursors, incidents and accidents that were beyond the design basis such as the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI 2) accident. The ABWR is a fully active safety plant. The ABWR enhanced redundancy and diversity of active safety systems using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) insights. It adopted a complete three division active emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and attained a very low core damage frequency (CDF) value of less than 10 -7 /ry for internal events. Only very small residual risks, if any, rather exist in external events such as an extremely large earthquake beyond the design basis. This is because external events can constitute a common cause that disables all the redundant active safety systems. Therefore, it is useless to add one more ECCS train and make a four division active ECCS for external events. Nowadays, however, fully passive safety LWRs are already established. Incorporating some of these passive safety systems we can also establish the next generation LWRs that are truly strong against external events. We can establish a plant that can survive a giant earthquake at least three days without AC power source, SA proof safety design that enables no containment failure and no evacuation to eliminate the residual risks. The same basic policy as the ABWR to improve safety and reduce cost simultaneously is again effective for the next generation LWRs. (author)

  5. SoLid: An innovative anti-neutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Yamiel; SoLid Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline from the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite polyvinyl-toluene and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and SiPM. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, good neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a new generation of an anti-neutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalisation and energy calibration. The performance of the first 288 kg SoLid module (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 from February to September 2015, will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, which will start in 2016, and the future plans of the experiment.

  6. SoLid: An innovative anti-neutrino detector for searching oscillations at the SCK• CEN BR2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Yamiel, E-mail: yamiel.abreu@uantwerpen.be

    2017-02-11

    The SoLid experiment intends to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillations at a very short baseline from the SCK• CEN BR2 research reactor (Mol, Belgium). A novel detector approach to measure reactor anti-neutrinos was developed based on an innovative sandwich of composite polyvinyl-toluene and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillators. The system is highly segmented and read out by a network of wavelength shifting fibers and SiPM. High experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other standard technologies thanks to the combination of high granularity, good neutron–gamma discrimination using {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator and precise localisation of the Inverse Beta Decay products. This technology can be considered as a new generation of an anti-neutrino detector. This compact system requires limited passive shielding and relies on spatial topology to determine the different classes of backgrounds. We will describe the principle of detection and the detector design. Particular focus on the neutron discrimination will be made, as well as on the capability to use cosmic muons for channel equalisation and energy calibration. The performance of the first 288 kg SoLid module (SM1), based on the data taken at BR2 from February to September 2015, will be presented. We will conclude with the next phase, which will start in 2016, and the future plans of the experiment.

  7. Near-term and next-generation nuclear power plant concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Shigenori; Handa, Norihiko; Heki, Hideaki

    2002-01-01

    Near-term and next-generation nuclear reactors will be required to have high economic competitiveness in the deregulated electricity market, flexibility with respect to electricity demand and investment, and good public acceptability. For near-term reactors in the 2010s, Toshiba is developing an improved advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) based on the present ABWR with newly rationalized systems and components; a construction period of 36 months, one year shorter than the current period; and a power lineup ranging from 800 MWe to 1,600 MWe. For future reactors in the 2020s and beyond, Toshiba is developing the ABWR-II for large-scale, centralized power sources; a supercritical water-cooled power reactor with high thermal efficiency for medium-scale power sources; a modular reactor with siting flexibility for small-scale power sources; and a small, fast neutron reactor with inherent safety for independent power sources. From the viewpoint of efficient uranium resource utilization, a low-moderation BWR core with a high conversion factor is also being developed. (author)

  8. Neutrino GDR meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Camilleri, L.; Mention, G.; VanElewyck, V.; Verderi, M.; Blondel, A.; Augier, C.; Bellefon, A. de; Coc, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Favier, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Payet, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the neutrino GDR (research program coordination) is to federate the activities of French research teams devoted to studying the neutrino. The presentations have been organized on 2 days. A review of the present status of the theoretical and experimental knowledge on neutrinos on a worldwide basis has been made on the first day while the second day has been dedicated to reporting the activities of the 5 following working groups: 1) determination of neutrino parameters, 2) physics beyond the standard model, 3) neutrinos in the universe, 4) neutrino detection, and 5) common tools. During the first day the American neutrino research program has been presented through the description of the 2 neutrino detection systems: Nova and Minor. The following neutrino experiments involving nuclear reactors: Chooz (France), Daya-bay (China), Reno (Korea) and Angra (Brazil) have also been reviewed. This document is made up of the slides of the presentations

  9. Development of a framework for the neutronics analysis system for next generation (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Kenji

    2007-11-01

    In JAEA, authors has been promoting the development of an object-oriented next-generation neutronics analysis system in order to reflect the latest methods and models of reactor analysis to basic designs and operations of fast reactors in the efficient and effective way. A purpose of the developing system is to effectively realize requirements that has been difficult to manage in the conventional systems, such as change of analysis targets and change of analysis modeling levels. For the realization of the requirements, the authors adopted the two-layer model which consists of a control layer written in the Python as an object-oriented scripting language and a solver layer in the C++ as a system programming language. After having studied the principle on the two-layer model in the next-generation neutronics analysis system, the authors designed and implemented a library that enabled transparent transfer of data objects between the two layers. In each layer, appropriate numerical library was used for better performance. In the present library, a model proxy was implemented to exchange internal data that is represented in different ways in each layer. With this mechanism of the model proxy, it confirmed that data exchange between the layers can be performed easily and effectively. (author)

  10. Design of a fault diagnosis system for next generation nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, K.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Wood, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    A new design approach for fault diagnosis is developed for next generation nuclear power plants. In the nuclear reactor design phase, data reconciliation is used as an efficient tool to determine the measurement requirements to achieve the specified goal of fault diagnosis. In the reactor operation phase, the plant measurements are collected to estimate uncertain model parameters so that a high fidelity model can be obtained for fault diagnosis. The proposed algorithm of fault detection and isolation is able to combine the strength of first principle model based fault diagnosis and the historical data based fault diagnosis. Principal component analysis on the reconciled data is used to develop a statistical model for fault detection. The updating of the principal component model based on the most recent reconciled data is a locally linearized model around the current plant measurements, so that it is applicable to any generic nonlinear systems. The sensor fault diagnosis and process fault diagnosis are decoupled through considering the process fault diagnosis as a parameter estimation problem. The developed approach has been applied to the IRIS helical coil steam generator system to monitor the operational performance of individual steam generators. This approach is general enough to design fault diagnosis systems for the next generation nuclear power plants. (authors)

  11. Direct target NOTES: prospective applications for next generation robotic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, S; Hodges, A; Larach, S W

    2018-05-01

    A new era in surgical robotics has centered on alternative access to anatomic targets and next generation designs include flexible, single-port systems which follow circuitous rather than straight pathways. Such systems maintain a small footprint and could be utilized for specialized operations based on direct organ target natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), of which transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) is an important derivative. During two sessions, four direct target NOTES operations were conducted on a cadaveric model using a flexible robotic system to demonstrate proof-of-concept of the application of a next generation robotic system to specific types of NOTES operations, all of which required removal of a direct target organ through natural orifice access. These four operations were (a) robotic taTME, (b) robotic transvaginal hysterectomy in conjunction with (c) robotic transvaginal salpingo-oophorectomy, and in an ex vivo model, (d) trans-cecal appendectomy. Feasibility was demonstrated in all cases using the Flex ® Robotic System with Colorectal Drive. During taTME, the platform excursion was 17 cm along a non-linear path; operative time was 57 min for the transanal portion of the dissection. Robotic transvaginal hysterectomy was successfully completed in 78 min with transvaginal extraction of the uterus, although laparoscopic assistance was required. Robotic transvaginal unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with transvaginal extraction of the ovary and fallopian tube was performed without laparoscopic assistance in 13.5 min. In an ex vivo model, a robotic trans-cecal appendectomy was also successfully performed for the purpose of demonstrating proof-of-concept only; this was completed in 24 min. A flexible robotic system has the potential to access anatomy along circuitous paths, making it a suitable platform for direct target NOTES. The conceptual operations posed could be considered suitable for next generation robotics once

  12. Permanent magnet based dipole magnets for next generation light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Watanabe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed permanent magnet based dipole magnets for the next generation light sources. Permanent magnets are advantageous over electromagnets in that they consume less power, are physically more compact, and there is a less risk of power supply failure. However, experience with electromagnets and permanent magnets in the field of accelerators shows that there are still challenges to replacing main magnets of accelerators for light sources with permanent magnets. These include the adjustability of the magnetic field, the temperature dependence of permanent magnets, and the issue of demagnetization. In this paper, we present a design for magnets for future light sources, supported by experimental and numerical results.

  13. Droplet Digital™ PCR Next-Generation Sequencing Library QC Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Nicholas J

    2018-01-01

    Digital PCR is a valuable tool to quantify next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries precisely and accurately. Accurately quantifying NGS libraries enable accurate loading of the libraries on to the sequencer and thus improve sequencing performance by reducing under and overloading error. Accurate quantification also benefits users by enabling uniform loading of indexed/barcoded libraries which in turn greatly improves sequencing uniformity of the indexed/barcoded samples. The advantages gained by employing the Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR™) library QC assay includes the precise and accurate quantification in addition to size quality assessment, enabling users to QC their sequencing libraries with confidence.

  14. Mobile location services over the next generation IP core network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thongthammachart, Saowanee; Olesen, Henning

    2003-01-01

    network is changing from circuit-switched to packet-switched technology and evolving to an IP core network based on IPv6. The IP core network will allow all IP devices to be connected seamlessly. Due to the movement detection mechanism of Mobile IPv6, mobile terminals will periodically update....... The concept of mobile location services over the next generation IP networks is described. We also discuss the effectiveness of the short-range wireless network regarding a mobile user's position inside buildings and hotspot areas....

  15. Next-generation sequencing in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Matthew; Dorschner, Michael; Tsuang, Debby

    2013-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating lifelong illness that lacks a cure and poses a worldwide public health burden. The disease is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical and genetic presentation that complicates research efforts to identify causative genetic variations. This review examines the potential of current findings in schizophrenia and in other related neuropsychiatric disorders for application in next-generation technologies, particularly whole-exome sequencing (WES) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). These approaches may lead to the discovery of underlying genetic factors for schizophrenia and may thereby identify and target novel therapeutic targets for this devastating disorder. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Wireless next generation networks a virtue-based trust model

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief proposes a trust model motivated by virtue epistemology, addressing the need for a more efficient and flexible trust model for wireless next generation networks. This theory of trust simplifies the computation and communication overhead of strictly cognitive-computational models of trust. Both the advantages and the challenges of virtue-based trust models are discussed. This brief offers new research and a general theory of rationality that enables users to interpret trust and reason as complementary mechanisms that guide our rational conduct at two different epistemic level

  17. Next generation digital microfluidic technology: Electrophoresis of charged droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Do Jin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Contact charging of a conducting droplet in a dielectric medium is introduced as a novel and useful digital microfluidic technology as well as an interesting scientific phenomenon. The history of this phenomenon, starting from original observations to its interpretations and applications, is presented. The basic principle of the droplet contact charging is also presented. Several fundamental aspects of the droplet contact charging from view points of electrochemistry, surface science, electrocoalescence, and electrohydrodynamics are mentioned. Some promising results for future applications and potential features as a next generation digital microfluidic technology are discussed, especially for 3D organ printing. Finally, implications and significance of the proposed technology for chemical engineering community are discussed.

  18. Semantic e-Learning: Next Generation of e-Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinos, Markellos; Penelope, Markellou; Giannis, Koutsonikos; Aglaia, Liopa-Tsakalidi

    Semantic e-learning aspires to be the next generation of e-learning, since the understanding of learning materials and knowledge semantics allows their advanced representation, manipulation, sharing, exchange and reuse and ultimately promote efficient online experiences for users. In this context, the paper firstly explores some fundamental Semantic Web technologies and then discusses current and potential applications of these technologies in e-learning domain, namely, Semantic portals, Semantic search, personalization, recommendation systems, social software and Web 2.0 tools. Finally, it highlights future research directions and open issues of the field.

  19. Application of photonics in next generation telecommunication satellites payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalchi, J.; Inigo, P.; Roy, B.

    2017-11-01

    Next generation broadband telecommunication satellites are required to provide very high data throughput using complex multibeam architectures. These high throughput `Terabit/s' Satellites will incorporate payloads with very large quantity of conventional RF equipment, co-axial cables, waveguides, harnesses and ancillary equipment, making the Assembly, Integration and Test (AIT) very complex. Use of `RF over Fiber' and associated photonics equipment can make the process of AIT much simpler with the added benefit of significant reduction in number of payload equipment and inherent payload mass.

  20. Next Generation Qualification: Kinemetrics STS-5A Seismometer Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Bion John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slad, George William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated two seismometers, the STS-5A, manufactured by Kinemetrics. These seismometers measure three axes of broadband ground velocity using a UVW configuration with feedback control in a mechanically levelled borehole package. The purpose of the seismometer evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, response, self-noise, dynamic range, and self-calibration ability. The Kinemetrics STS-5A seismometers are being evaluated for the U.S. Air Force as part of their Next Generation Qualification effort.

  1. Next generation Zero-Code control system UI

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Developing ergonomic user interfaces for control systems is challenging, especially during machine upgrade and commissioning where several small changes may suddenly be required. Zero-code systems, such as *Inspector*, provide agile features for creating and maintaining control system interfaces. More so, these next generation Zero-code systems bring simplicity and uniformity and brake the boundaries between Users and Developers. In this talk we present *Inspector*, a CERN made Zero-code application development system, and we introduce the major differences and advantages of using Zero-code control systems to develop operational UI.

  2. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kozanecki, W. [DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France)

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  3. JVM: Java Visual Mapping tool for next generation sequencing read.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Liu, Juan

    2015-01-01

    We developed a program JVM (Java Visual Mapping) for mapping next generation sequencing read to reference sequence. The program is implemented in Java and is designed to deal with millions of short read generated by sequence alignment using the Illumina sequencing technology. It employs seed index strategy and octal encoding operations for sequence alignments. JVM is useful for DNA-Seq, RNA-Seq when dealing with single-end resequencing. JVM is a desktop application, which supports reads capacity from 1 MB to 10 GB.

  4. Technology Innovations from NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Morris, Charles E. K., Jr.; Tyson, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program has been on the cutting edge of technology, improving the safety, affordability, and reliability of future space-launch-transportation systems. The array of projects focused on propulsion, airframe, and other vehicle systems. Achievements range from building miniature fuel/oxygen sensors to hot-firings of major rocket-engine systems as well as extreme thermo-mechanical testing of large-scale structures. Results to date have significantly advanced technology readiness for future space-launch systems using either airbreathing or rocket propulsion.

  5. Novel nanostructures for next generation dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we review our latest advancements in nanostructured photoanodes for next generation photovoltaics in general and dye-sensitized solar cells in particular. Bottom-up self-assembly techniques are developed to fabricate large-area 3D nanostructures that enable enhanced charge extraction and light harvesting through optical scattering or photonic crystal effects to improve photocurrent, photovoltage and fill factor. Using generalized techniques to fabricate specialized nanostructures enables specific optoelectronic and physical characteristics like conduction, charge extraction, injection, recombination and light harvesting but also helps improve mechanical flexibility and long-term stability in low cost materials. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Use of next-generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    Background: Oral cavity cancer is a subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the world’s 6th most common cancer form. Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) constitute almost all oral cavity cancers, and OSCC are primarily attributed by excessive alcohol consumption and tobacco exposure...... of tumour cells exists. Conclusions: Use of next generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer can give valuable insight into the biology of the disease. By investigating intra tumour heterogeneity we see that the different tumour specimens in each patient are quite homogenous, but evidence of heterogeneous...

  7. Convergence of wireless, wireline, and photonics next generation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Filled with illustrations and practical examples from industry, this book provides a brief but comprehensive introduction to the next-generation wireless networks that will soon replace more traditional wired technologies. Written by a mixture of top industrial experts and key academic professors, it is the only book available that covers both wireless networks (such as wireless local area and personal area networks) and optical networks (such as long-haul and metropolitan networks) in one volume. It gives engineers and engineering students the necessary knowledge to meet challenges of next-ge

  8. Diagnostics of Primary Immunodeficiencies through Next Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Gallo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, a growing number of novel genetic defects underlying primary immunodeficiencies (PID have been identified, increasing the number of PID up to more than 250 well-defined forms. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies and proper filtering strategies greatly contributed to this rapid evolution, providing the possibility to rapidly and simultaneously analyze large numbers of genes or the whole exome. Objective: To evaluate the role of targeted next-generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in the diagnosis of a case series, characterized by complex or atypical clinical features suggesting a PID, difficult to diagnose using the current diagnostic procedures.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed genetic variants identified through targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing in 45 patients with complex PID of unknown etiology. Results: 40 variants were identified using targeted next-generation sequencing, while 5 were identified using whole exome sequencing. Newly identified genetic variants were classified into 4 groups: I variations associated with a well-defined PID; II variations associated with atypical features of a well-defined PID; III functionally relevant variations potentially involved in the immunological features; IV non-diagnostic genotype, in whom the link with phenotype is missing. We reached a conclusive genetic diagnosis in 7/45 patients (~16%. Among them, 4 patients presented with a typical well-defined PID. In the remaining 3 cases, mutations were associated with unexpected clinical features, expanding the phenotypic spectrum of typical PIDs. In addition, we identified 31 variants in 10 patients with complex phenotype, individually not causative per se of the disorder.Conclusion: NGS technologies represent a cost-effective and rapid first-line genetic approaches for the evaluation of complex PIDs. Whole exome sequencing, despite a moderate higher cost compared to targeted, is

  9. Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Rue

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

  10. Next Generation Luminaire (NGL) Downlight Demonstration Project, Hilton Columbus Downtown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Perrin, T. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code.

  11. A Survey on Next-generation Power Grid Data Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Shutang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhu, Dr. Lin [University of Tennessee (UT); Liu, Yong [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun (Arjun) [ORNL; Robertson, Russell [Grid Protection Alliance; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The operation and control of power grids will increasingly rely on data. A high-speed, reliable, flexible and secure data architecture is the prerequisite of the next-generation power grid. This paper summarizes the challenges in collecting and utilizing power grid data, and then provides reference data architecture for future power grids. Based on the data architecture deployment, related research on data architecture is reviewed and summarized in several categories including data measurement/actuation, data transmission, data service layer, data utilization, as well as two cross-cutting issues, interoperability and cyber security. Research gaps and future work are also presented.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurwein, John

    2011-07-15

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  13. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurwein, J.

    2011-01-01

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  14. The next generation of CANDU technologies: profiling the potential for hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the Next-generation CANDU Power Reactor technologies currently under development at AECL. The innovations introduced into proven CANDU technologies include a compact reactor core design, which reduces the size by a factor of one third for the same power output; improved thermal efficiency through higher-pressure steam turbines; reduced use of heavy water (one quarter of the heavy water required for existing plants), thus reducing the cost and eliminating many material handling concerns; use of slightly enriched uranium to extend fuel life to three times that of existing natural uranium fuel and additions to CANDU's inherent passive safety. With these advanced features, the capital cost of constructing the plant can be reduced by up to 40 per cent compared to existing designs. The clean, affordable CANDU-generated electricity can be used to produce hydrogen for fuel cells for the transportation sector, thereby reducing emissions from the transportation sector

  15. Neutrino Physics at Drexel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolinski, Michelle [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, Russell [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Our primary goal is to improve the understanding of the properties and interactions of neutrinos. We are pursuing this by means of the DUNE long-baseline and PROSPECT short-baseline neutrino experiments. For DUNE, a neutrino beam from Fermilab will be detected at the SURF facility in South Dakota, with the aim of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy (the mass ordering of neutrino flavors), and a measurement or limit on CP-violation via neutrinos. Our near-term experimental goal is to improve the characterization of the neutrino beam by measurements of muons produced as a byproduct of neutrino beam generation, to quantify the beam composition and flux. The short-range neutrino program has the aim of using the HFIR reactor at Oak Ridge as a neutrino source, with a detector placed nearby to find if there are short-distance oscillations to sterile neutrino flavors, and to resolve the 'reactor neutrino spectral anomaly' which has shown up as an unexplained 'bump' in the neutrino energy spectrum in recent experiments.

  16. Towards Next Generation Internet Management:CNGI-CERNET2EXPERIENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Hai Yang; Hui Zhang; Jin-Xiang Zhang; Chang-Qing An

    2009-01-01

    Manageability is an important feature of next generation Internet; management and monitoring of IPv6-based networks are proving a big challenge. While leveraging current IPv4-based SNMP management scheme to IPv6 networks'management need is necessary, it is more urgent to coin a new network management architecture to accommodate the scalability and extensibility requirements of next generation Internet management. The paper proposes a novel network management architecture, IMN (Internet Management Network), which creates an overlay network of management nodes.While each management node can perform management tasks autonomously and independently, it can finish more sophis-ticated management tasks by collaboratively invoking management operations or sharing information provided by other management nodes. P2P-based communication services are introduced in IMN to enable such collaboration. The paper presents a prototyping implementation based on the Web service related technology, as well as some of the key technologies,especially solutions to those issues arising from the management practice of CERNET2. Experiences of deployment of CERNET2 operation and lessons learned from the management practice are discussed.

  17. Next Generation Antibody Therapeutics Using Bispecific Antibody Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nearly fifty monoclonal antibodies have been approved to date, and the market for monoclonal antibodies is expected to continue to grow. Since global competition in the field of antibody therapeutics is intense, we need to establish novel antibody engineering technologies to provide true benefit for patients, with differentiated product values. Bispecific antibodies are among the next generation of antibody therapeutics that can bind to two different target antigens by the two arms of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule, and are thus believed to be applicable to various therapeutic needs. Until recently, large scale manufacturing of human IgG bispecific antibody was impossible. We have established a technology, named asymmetric re-engineering technology (ART)-Ig, to enable large scale manufacturing of bispecific antibodies. Three examples of next generation antibody therapeutics using ART-Ig technology are described. Recent updates on bispecific antibodies against factor IXa and factor X for the treatment of hemophilia A, bispecific antibodies against a tumor specific antigen and T cell surface marker CD3 for cancer immunotherapy, and bispecific antibodies against two different epitopes of soluble antigen with pH-dependent binding property for the elimination of soluble antigen from plasma are also described.

  18. Next-generation storm tracking for minimizing service interruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sznaider, R. [Meteorlogix, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2002-08-01

    Several technological changes have taken place in the field of weather radar since its discovery during World War II. A wide variety of industries have benefited over the years from conventional weather radar displays, providing assistance in forecasting and estimating the potential severity of storms. The characteristics of individual storm cells can now be derived from the next-generation of weather radar systems (NEXRAD). The determination of which storm cells possess distinct features such as large hail or developing tornadoes was made possible through the fusing of various pieces of information with radar pictures. To exactly determine when and where a storm will hit, this data can be combined and overlaid into a display that includes the geographical physical landmarks of a specific region. Combining Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and storm tracking provides a more complete, timely and accurate forecast, which clearly benefits the electric utilities industries. The generation and production of energy are dependent on how hot or cold it will be today and tomorrow. The author described each major feature of this next-generation weather radar system. 9 figs.

  19. Next-generation nozzle check valve significantly reduces operating costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roorda, O. [SMX International, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Check valves perform an important function in preventing reverse flow and protecting plant and mechanical equipment. However, the variety of different types of valves and extreme differences in performance even within one type can change maintenance requirements and life cycle costs, amounting to millions of dollars over the typical 15-year design life of piping components. A next-generation non-slam nozzle check valve which prevents return flow has greatly reduced operating costs by protecting the mechanical equipment in a piping system. This article described the check valve varieties such as the swing check valve, a dual-plate check valve, and nozzle check valves. Advancements in optimized design of a non-slam nozzle check valve were also discussed, with particular reference to computer flow modelling such as computational fluid dynamics; computer stress modelling such as finite element analysis; and flow testing (using rapid prototype development and flow loop testing), both to improve dynamic performance and reduce hydraulic losses. The benefits of maximized dynamic performance and minimized pressure loss from the new designed valve were also outlined. It was concluded that this latest non-slam nozzle check valve design has potential applications in natural gas, liquefied natural gas, and oil pipelines, including subsea applications, as well as refineries, and petrochemical plants among others, and is suitable for horizontal and vertical installation. The result of this next-generation nozzle check valve design is not only superior performance, and effective protection of mechanical equipment but also minimized life cycle costs. 1 fig.

  20. Engineering Micromechanical Systems for the Next Generation Wireless Capsule Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Woods

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE enables the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. However treatment of these pathologies can only be achieved through conventional means. This paper describes the next generation WCE with increased functionality to enable targeted drug delivery in the small intestinal tract. A prototype microrobot fabricated in Nylon 6 is presented which is capable of resisting peristaltic pressure through the deployment of an integrated holding mechanism and delivering targeted therapy. The holding action is achieved by extending an “anchor” spanning a 60.4 mm circumference, for an 11.0 mm diameter WCE. This function is achieved by a mechanism that occupies only 347.0 mm3 volume, including mechanics and actuator. A micropositioning mechanism is described which utilises a single micromotor to radially position and then deploy a needle 1.5 mm outside the microrobot’s body to deliver a 1 mL dose of medication to a targeted site. An analysis of the mechanics required to drive the holding mechanism is presented and an overview of microactuators and the state of the art in WCE is discussed. It is envisaged that this novel functionality will empower the next generation of WCE to help diagnose and treat pathologies of the GI tract.

  1. Engineering Micromechanical Systems for the Next Generation Wireless Capsule Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Constandinou, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) enables the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However treatment of these pathologies can only be achieved through conventional means. This paper describes the next generation WCE with increased functionality to enable targeted drug delivery in the small intestinal tract. A prototype microrobot fabricated in Nylon 6 is presented which is capable of resisting peristaltic pressure through the deployment of an integrated holding mechanism and delivering targeted therapy. The holding action is achieved by extending an “anchor” spanning a 60.4 mm circumference, for an 11.0 mm diameter WCE. This function is achieved by a mechanism that occupies only 347.0 mm3 volume, including mechanics and actuator. A micropositioning mechanism is described which utilises a single micromotor to radially position and then deploy a needle 1.5 mm outside the microrobot's body to deliver a 1 mL dose of medication to a targeted site. An analysis of the mechanics required to drive the holding mechanism is presented and an overview of microactuators and the state of the art in WCE is discussed. It is envisaged that this novel functionality will empower the next generation of WCE to help diagnose and treat pathologies of the GI tract. PMID:26258143

  2. Standardization and quality management in next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrullat, Christoph; Glökler, Jörn; Franke, Philipp; Frohme, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    DNA sequencing continues to evolve quickly even after > 30 years. Many new platforms suddenly appeared and former established systems have vanished in almost the same manner. Since establishment of next-generation sequencing devices, this progress gains momentum due to the continually growing demand for higher throughput, lower costs and better quality of data. In consequence of this rapid development, standardized procedures and data formats as well as comprehensive quality management considerations are still scarce. Here, we listed and summarized current standardization efforts and quality management initiatives from companies, organizations and societies in form of published studies and ongoing projects. These comprise on the one hand quality documentation issues like technical notes, accreditation checklists and guidelines for validation of sequencing workflows. On the other hand, general standard proposals and quality metrics are developed and applied to the sequencing workflow steps with the main focus on upstream processes. Finally, certain standard developments for downstream pipeline data handling, processing and storage are discussed in brief. These standardization approaches represent a first basis for continuing work in order to prospectively implement next-generation sequencing in important areas such as clinical diagnostics, where reliable results and fast processing is crucial. Additionally, these efforts will exert a decisive influence on traceability and reproducibility of sequence data.

  3. Engineered CRISPR Systems for Next Generation Gene Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Michael; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Ebrahimkhani, Mo R; Kiani, Samira

    2017-09-15

    An ideal in vivo gene therapy platform provides safe, reprogrammable, and precise strategies which modulate cell and tissue gene regulatory networks with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), a bacterial adoptive immune system, and its CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have gained attention for the ability to target and modify DNA sequences on demand with unprecedented flexibility and precision. The precision and programmability of Cas9 is derived from its complexation with a guide-RNA (gRNA) that is complementary to a desired genomic sequence. CRISPR systems open-up widespread applications including genetic disease modeling, functional screens, and synthetic gene regulation. The plausibility of in vivo genetic engineering using CRISPR has garnered significant traction as a next generation in vivo therapeutic. However, there are hurdles that need to be addressed before CRISPR-based strategies are fully implemented. Some key issues center on the controllability of the CRISPR platform, including minimizing genomic-off target effects and maximizing in vivo gene editing efficiency, in vivo cellular delivery, and spatial-temporal regulation. The modifiable components of CRISPR systems: Cas9 protein, gRNA, delivery platform, and the form of CRISPR system delivered (DNA, RNA, or ribonucleoprotein) have recently been engineered independently to design a better genome engineering toolbox. This review focuses on evaluating CRISPR potential as a next generation in vivo gene therapy platform and discusses bioengineering advancements that can address challenges associated with clinical translation of this emerging technology.

  4. Next-Generation Beneficial Microbes: The Case of Akkermansia muciniphila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice D. Cani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders associated with obesity and cardiometabolic disorders are worldwide epidemic. Among the different environmental factors, the gut microbiota is now considered as a key player interfering with energy metabolism and host susceptibility to several non-communicable diseases. Among the next-generation beneficial microbes that have been identified, Akkermansia muciniphila is a promising candidate. Indeed, A. muciniphila is inversely associated with obesity, diabetes, cardiometabolic diseases and low-grade inflammation. Besides the numerous correlations observed, a large body of evidence has demonstrated the causal beneficial impact of this bacterium in a variety of preclinical models. Translating these exciting observations to human would be the next logic step and it now appears that several obstacles that would prevent the use of A. muciniphila administration in humans have been overcome. Moreover, several lines of evidence indicate that pasteurization of A. muciniphila not only increases its stability but more importantly increases its efficacy. This strongly positions A. muciniphila in the forefront of next-generation candidates for developing novel food or pharma supplements with beneficial effects. Finally, a specific protein present on the outer membrane of A. muciniphila, termed Amuc_1100, could be strong candidate for future drug development. In conclusion, as plants and its related knowledge, known as pharmacognosy, have been the source for designing drugs over the last century, we propose that microbes and microbiomegnosy, or knowledge of our gut microbiome, can become a novel source of future therapies.

  5. Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Kaushik [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2017-04-24

    We report on the activities and accomplishments of a four-year project (a three-year grant followed by a one-year no cost extension) to develop a next generation workload management system for Big Data. The new system is based on the highly successful PanDA software developed for High Energy Physics (HEP) in 2005. PanDA is used by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and the AMS experiment at the space station. The program of work described here was carried out by two teams of developers working collaboratively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). These teams worked closely with the original PanDA team – for the sake of clarity the work of the next generation team will be referred to as the BigPanDA project. Their work has led to the adoption of BigPanDA by the COMPASS experiment at CERN, and many other experiments and science projects worldwide.

  6. Designing Next Generation Massively Multithreaded Architectures for Irregular Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumeo, Antonino; Secchi, Simone; Villa, Oreste

    2012-08-31

    Irregular applications, such as data mining or graph-based computations, show unpredictable memory/network access patterns and control structures. Massively multi-threaded architectures with large node count, like the Cray XMT, have been shown to address their requirements better than commodity clusters. In this paper we present the approaches that we are currently pursuing to design future generations of these architectures. First, we introduce the Cray XMT and compare it to other multithreaded architectures. We then propose an evolution of the architecture, integrating multiple cores per node and next generation network interconnect. We advocate the use of hardware support for remote memory reference aggregation to optimize network utilization. For this evaluation we developed a highly parallel, custom simulation infrastructure for multi-threaded systems. Our simulator executes unmodified XMT binaries with very large datasets, capturing effects due to contention and hot-spotting, while predicting execution times with greater than 90% accuracy. We also discuss the FPGA prototyping approach that we are employing to study efficient support for irregular applications in next generation manycore processors.

  7. Workshop on low energy neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The main topics of the workshop are: the determination of the neutrino mixing angle theta-13, the experiments concerning the monitoring of reactors based on the measurement of neutrino spectra, solar neutrinos, supernovae neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, neutrino properties, neutrinoless double beta decay and future low energy neutrino detectors. This document gathers together the program of the workshop, the slides of the presentations, some abstracts and some posters

  8. Next generation solar energy. From fundamentals to applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the International Conference between 12th and 14th December, 2011 in Erlangen (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were presented: (1) The opto-electronic physics required to approach the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit (E. Yablonovitch); (2) The Shockley-Queisser-limit and beyond (G.H. Bauer); (3) Designing composite nanomaterials for photovoltaic devices (B. Rech); (4) Light-Material interactions in energy conversion (H. Atwater); (5) Functional imaging of hybrid nanostructures - Visualizing mechanisms of solar energy utilization (L. Lauhon); (6) Are photosynthetic proteins suitable for PV applications (Y. Rosenwaks); (7) Detailed balance limit in photovoltaic systems (U. Rau); (8) Plasmonics and nanophotonics for next generation photovoltaics (E. Garnett); (9) Dispersion, wave propagation and efficiency analysis of nanowire solar cells (B. Witzigmann); (10) Application of nanostructures to next generation photovoltaics - Opportunities and challenges from an industrial research perspective (L. Tsakalakos); (11) Triplet states in organic and organometallic photovoltaic cells (K.S. Schanze); (12) New photoelectrode architectures (J.T. Hupp); (13) Dendrimers for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications (P. Ceroni); (14) Photon management with luminescent materials (J. Goldschmidt); (15) Economical aspects of next generation solar cell technologies (W. Hoffmann); (16) Scalability in solar energy conversion - First-row transition metal-based chromophores for dye-sensitized solar cells (J. McCusker); (17) Designing organic materials for photovoltaic devices (A. Harriman); (18) Molecular photovoltaics - What can we learn from model studies (B. Albinsson); (19) Porphyrin-sensitised titanium dioxide solar cells (D. Officer); (20) Light-harvesting: Charge separation, and charge-transportation properties of novel materials for organic photovoltaics (H. Imahori); (21) Phthalocyanines for molecular photovoltaics (T. Torres); (22) Photophysics of

  9. Reactor θ{sub 13} Results and Recent Results from FNAL Neutrino Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.A., E-mail: randy.johnson@uc.edu [Physics Department, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0011 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The past year has been very exciting for neutrino physics. The last mixing angle, θ{sub 13}, has been measured by a number of experiments and is quite large. These experiments will, hopefully, continue reducing systematic and statistical errors in anticipation of statistically significant CP violation experiments. At Fermilab, MiniBooNE has finished its data run and has new results for electron antineutrino excesses; MINOS has done a combined fit for their ν{sub μ} disappearance measurements for neutrinos and antineutrinos (which are now consistent) and presented results for a sterile neutrino search; and Minerνa has presented its first cross section results.

  10. The CERN Neutrino Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Bordoni, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    The long-baseline neutrino programme has been classified as one of the four highest-priority sci- entific objectives in 2013 by the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The Neutrino Platform is the CERN venture to foster and support the next generation of accelerator-based neutrino os- cillation experiments. Part of the present CERN Medium-Term Plan, the Neutrino Platform provide facilities to develop and prototype the next generation of neutrino detectors and contribute to unify the European neu- trino community towards the US and Japanese projects. A significative effort is made on R&D; for LAr TPC technologies: two big LAr TPC prototypes for the DUNE far detector are under con- struction at CERN. Those detectors will be exposed in 2018 to an entirely new and NP-dedicated beam-line from the SPS which will provide electron, muon and hadron beams with energies in the range of sub-GeV to a few GeV. Other projects are also presently under development: one can cite the refurbishing and shipping to the US ...

  11. An Operations Concept for the Next Generation VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepley, Amanda; McKinnon, Mark; Selina, Rob; Murphy, Eric Joseph; ngVLA project

    2018-01-01

    This poster presents an operations plan for the next generation VLA (ngVLA), which is a proposed 214 element interferometer operating from ~1-115GHz, located in the southwestern United States. The operations requirements for this instrument are driven by the large number of antennas spread out over a multi-state area and a cap on the operations budget of 3 times that of the current VLA. These constraints require that the maintenance is a continuous process and that individual antennas are self-sufficient, making flexible subarrays crucial. The ngVLA will produce science ready data products for its users, building on the pioneering work being currently done at ALMA and the JVLA. Finally, the ngVLA will adopt a user support model similar to those at other large facilities (ALMA, HST, JWST, etc).

  12. Next-Generation Navigational Infrastructure and the ATLAS Event Store

    CERN Document Server

    van Gemmeren, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Nowak, M

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS event store employs a persistence framework with extensive navigational capabilities. These include real-time back navigation to upstream processing stages, externalizable data object references, navigation from any data object to any other both within a single file and across files, and more. The 2013-2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider provides an opportunity to enhance this infrastructure in several ways that both extend these capabilities and allow the collaboration to better exploit emerging computing platforms. Enhancements include redesign with efficient file merging in mind, content-based indices in optimized reference types, and support for forward references. The latter provide the potential to construct valid references to data before those data are written, a capability that is useful in a variety of multithreading, multiprocessing, distributed processing, and deferred processing scenarios. This paper describes the architecture and design of the next generation of ATLAS navigation...

  13. Next-Generation Navigational Infrastructure and the ATLAS Event Store

    CERN Document Server

    van Gemmeren, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Nowak, M

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS event store employs a persistence framework with extensive navigational capabilities. These include real-time back navigation to upstream processing stages, externalizable data object references, navigation from any data object to any other both within a single file and across files, and more. The 2013-2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider provides an opportunity to enhance this infrastructure in several ways that both extend these capabilities and allow the collaboration to better exploit emerging computing platforms. Enhancements include redesign with efficient file merging in mind, content-based indices in optimized reference types, and support for forward references. The latter provide the potential to construct valid references to data before those data are written, a capability that is useful in a variety of multithreading, multiprocessing, distributed processing, and deferred processing scenarios. This paper describes the architecture and design of the next generation of ATLAS navigation...

  14. Advanced Material Strategies for Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinke; He, Jiankang; Zhou, Wenxing; Lei, Qi; Li, Xiao; Li, Dichen

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has drawn tremendous attention in various fields. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop novel additive manufacturing processes such as micro-/nano-scale 3D printing, bioprinting, and 4D printing for the fabrication of complex 3D structures with high resolution, living components, and multimaterials. The development of advanced functional materials is important for the implementation of these novel additive manufacturing processes. Here, a state-of-the-art review on advanced material strategies for novel additive manufacturing processes is provided, mainly including conductive materials, biomaterials, and smart materials. The advantages, limitations, and future perspectives of these materials for additive manufacturing are discussed. It is believed that the innovations of material strategies in parallel with the evolution of additive manufacturing processes will provide numerous possibilities for the fabrication of complex smart constructs with multiple functions, which will significantly widen the application fields of next-generation additive manufacturing. PMID:29361754

  15. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ∼2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  16. Implementation of Targeted Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Jakob; Burton, Mark; Thomassen, Mads

    Accurate mutation detection is essential in clinical genetic diagnostics of monogenic hereditary diseases. Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a promising and cost-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and MLPA analysis currently used in most diagnostic laboratories. One...... of mutation positive controls previously characterized by Sanger/MLPA analysis. Agilent SureSelect Target-Enrichment kits were used for capturing a set of genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and a compilation of genes involved in multiple rare single gene disorders......, respectively. For diagnostics, the sequencing coverage is essential, wherefore a minimum coverage of 30x per nucleotide in the coding regions was used as our primary quality criterion. For the majority of the included genes, we obtained adequate gene coverage, in which we were able to detect 100% of the known...

  17. Application of Next-generation Sequencing in Clinical Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Seifi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS is the catch all terms that used to explain several different modern sequencing technologies which let us to sequence nucleic acids much more rapidly and cheaply than the formerly used Sanger sequencing, and as such have revolutionized the study of molecular biology and genomics with excellent resolution and accuracy. Over the past years, many academic companies and institutions have continued technological advances to expand NGS applications from research to the clinic. In this review, the performance and technical features of current NGS platforms were described. Furthermore, advances in the applying of NGS technologies towards the progress of clinical molecular diagnostics were emphasized. General advantages and disadvantages of each sequencing system are summarized and compared to guide the selection of NGS platforms for specific research aims.

  18. Next generation platforms for high-throughput bio-dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repin, Mikhail; Turner, Helen C.; Garty, Guy; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Here the general concept of the combined use of plates and tubes in racks compatible with the American National Standards Institute/the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening microplate formats as the next generation platforms for increasing the throughput of bio-dosimetry assays was described. These platforms can be used at different stages of bio-dosimetry assays starting from blood collection into micro-tubes organised in standardised racks and ending with the cytogenetic analysis of samples in standardised multi-well and multichannel plates. Robotically friendly platforms can be used for different bio-dosimetry assays in minimally equipped laboratories and on cost-effective automated universal biotech systems. (authors)

  19. Requirements for the next generation of nuclear databases and services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, Vladimir; Zerkin, Viktor; Muir, Douglas [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Winchell, David; Arcilla, Ramon [Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Nuclear Data Center, Upton, NY (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The use of relational database technology and general requirements for the next generation of nuclear databases and services are discussed. These requirements take into account an increased number of co-operating data centres working on diverse hardware and software platforms and users with different data-access capabilities. It is argued that the introduction of programming standards will allow the development of nuclear databases and data retrieval tools in a heterogeneous hardware and software environment. The functionality of this approach was tested with full-scale nuclear databases installed on different platforms having different operating and database management systems. User access through local network, internet, or CD-ROM has been investigated. (author)

  20. Prioritizing Signaling Information Transmission in Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Baraković

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation transport network is characterized by the use of in-band signaling, where Internet Protocol (IP packets carrying signaling or media information are mixed in transmission. Since transport resources are limited, when any segment of access or core network is congested, IP packets carrying signaling information may be discarded. As a consequence, it may be impossible to implement reachability and quality of service (QoS. Since present approaches are insufficient to completely address this problem, a novel approach is proposed, which is based on prioritizing signaling information transmission. To proof the concept, a simulation study was performed using Network Simulator version 2 (ns-2 and independently developed Session Initiation Protocol (SIP module. The obtained results were statistically processed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 15.0. Summarizing our research results, several issues are identified for future work.

  1. Next generation sequencing and its applications in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2015-01-01

    articles and presentations at conferences with forensic aspects of NGS. These contributions have demonstrated that NGS offers new possibilities for forensic genetic case work. More information may be obtained from unique samples in a single experiment by analyzing combinations of markers (STRs, SNPs......It has been almost a decade since the first next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies emerged and quickly changed the way genetic research is conducted. Today, full genomes are mapped and published almost weekly and with ever increasing speed and decreasing costs. NGS methods and platforms have...... matured during the last 10 years, and the quality of the sequences has reached a level where NGS is used in clinical diagnostics of humans. Forensic genetic laboratories have also explored NGS technologies and especially in the last year, there has been a small explosion in the number of scientific...

  2. Next generation multi-particle event generators for the MSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J.; Kilian, W.; Hagiwara, K.; Krauss, F.; Schumann, S.; Rainwater, D.

    2005-12-01

    We present a next generation of multi-particle Monte Carlo (MC) Event generators for LHC and ILC for the MSSM, namely the three program packages Madgraph/MadEvent, WHiZard/O'Mega and Sherpa/Amegic++. The interesting but difficult phenomenology of supersymmetric models at the upcoming colliders demands a corresponding complexity and maturity from simulation tools. This includes multi-particle final states, reducible and irreducible backgrounds, spin correlations, real emission of photons and gluons, etc., which are incorporated in the programs presented here. The framework of a model with such a huge particle content and as complicated as the MSSM makes strenuous tests and comparison of codes inevitable. Various tests show agreement among the three different programs; the tables of cross sections produced in these tests may serve as a future reference for other codes. Furthermore, first MSSM physics analyses performed with these programs are presented here. (orig.)

  3. Next-generation navigational infrastructure and the ATLAS event store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmeren, P van; Malon, D; Nowak, M

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS event store employs a persistence framework with extensive navigational capabilities. These include real-time back navigation to upstream processing stages, externalizable data object references, navigation from any data object to any other both within a single file and across files, and more. The 2013-2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider provides an opportunity to enhance this infrastructure in several ways that both extend these capabilities and allow the collaboration to better exploit emerging computing platforms. Enhancements include redesign with efficient file merging in mind, content-based indices in optimized reference types, and support for forward references. The latter provide the potential to construct valid references to data before those data are written, a capability that is useful in a variety of multithreading, multiprocessing, distributed processing, and deferred processing scenarios. This paper describes the architecture and design of the next generation of ATLAS navigational infrastructure.

  4. The Next Generation ARC Middleware and ATLAS Computing Model

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Smirnova, O; Konstantinov, A; Karpenko, D

    2012-01-01

    The distributed NDGF Tier-1 and associated Nordugrid clusters are well integrated into the ATLAS computing model but follow a slightly different paradigm than other ATLAS resources. The current strategy does not divide the sites as in the commonly used hierarchical model, but rather treats them as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in development of the ATLAS computing model, such as pilot jobs with pre-cached input files, automatic job migration between the sites, integration of remote sites without connected storage elements, and automatic brokering for jobs with non-standard resource requirements. ARC's data transfer model provides an automatic way for the computing sites to participate in ATLAS' global task management system without requiring centralised brokering or data transfer services. The powerful API combined with Python and Java bindings can easily be used to build new ...

  5. Deep learning—Accelerating Next Generation Performance Analysis Systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Brock

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Deep neural network architectures show superior performance in recognition and prediction tasks of the image, speech and natural language domains. The success of such multi-layered networks encourages their implementation in further application scenarios as the retrieval of relevant motion information for performance enhancement in sports. However, to date deep learning is only seldom applied to activity recognition problems of the human motion domain. Therefore, its use for sports data analysis might remain abstract to many practitioners. This paper provides a survey on recent works in the field of high-performance motion data and examines relevant technologies for subsequent deployment in real training systems. In particular, it discusses aspects of data acquisition, processing and network modeling. Analysis suggests the advantage of deep neural networks under difficult and noisy data conditions. However, further research is necessary to confirm the benefit of deep learning for next generation performance analysis systems.

  6. Population genomics of marine fishes: next generation prospects and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Pujolar, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few years, technological advances have facilitated giant leaps forward in our ability to generate genome-wide molecular data, offering exciting opportunities for gaining new insights into the ecology and evolution of species where genomic information is still limited. Marine fishes...... time scales, identifying genomic signatures associated with population divergence under gene flow, and determining the genetic basis of phenotypic traits. We also consider future challenges pertaining to the implementation of genome-wide coverage through next-generation sequencing and genotyping...... methods in marine fishes. Complications associated with fast decay of linkage disequilibrium, as expected for species with large effective population sizes, and the possibility that adaptation is associated with both soft selective sweeps and polygenic selection, leaving complex genomic signatures...

  7. NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain Dynamometer Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Erdman, Bill [Cinch, Inc., Moraga, CA (United States); Blodgett, Douglas [DNV KEMA Renewables, Burlington, VT (United States); Halse, Christopher [Romax Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Advances in wind turbine drivetrain technologies are necessary to improve reliability and reduce the cost of energy for land-based and offshore wind turbines. The NREL-Prime Next-Generation Drivetrain team developed a geared, medium-speed drivetrain that is lighter, more reliable and more efficient than existing designs. One of the objectives of Phase II of the project was to complete the detailed design, fabrication, and dynamometer testing of a 750 kilowatt (kW) drivetrain that includes the key gearbox innovations designed by Romax Technology and power converter innovations designed by DNV Kema Renewables. The purpose of this document is to summarize these tests completed in NREL's National Wind Technology Center 2.5 megawatt (MW) dynamometer.

  8. Executing Medical Guidelines on the Web: Towards Next Generation Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, M.; Des, J.; Fernandez-Prieto, M. J.; Perez, R.; Paniagua, H.

    There is still a lack of full integration between current Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and medical guidelines that encapsulate evidence-based medicine. Thus, general practitioners (GPs) and specialised physicians still have to read document-based medical guidelines and decide among various options for managing common non-life-threatening conditions where the selection of the most appropriate therapeutic option for each individual patient can be a difficult task. This paper presents a simulation framework and computational test-bed, called V.A.F. Framework, for supporting simulations of clinical situations that boosted the integration between Health Level Seven (HL7) and Semantic Web technologies (OWL, SWRL, and OWL-S) to achieve content layer interoperability between online clinical cases and medical guidelines, and therefore, it proves that higher integration between EHRs and evidence-based medicine can be accomplished which could lead to a next generation of healthcare systems that provide more support to physicians and increase patients' safety.

  9. Advanced Material Strategies for Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinke; He, Jiankang; Mao, Mao; Zhou, Wenxing; Lei, Qi; Li, Xiao; Li, Dichen; Chua, Chee-Kai; Zhao, Xin

    2018-01-22

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has drawn tremendous attention in various fields. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop novel additive manufacturing processes such as micro-/nano-scale 3D printing, bioprinting, and 4D printing for the fabrication of complex 3D structures with high resolution, living components, and multimaterials. The development of advanced functional materials is important for the implementation of these novel additive manufacturing processes. Here, a state-of-the-art review on advanced material strategies for novel additive manufacturing processes is provided, mainly including conductive materials, biomaterials, and smart materials. The advantages, limitations, and future perspectives of these materials for additive manufacturing are discussed. It is believed that the innovations of material strategies in parallel with the evolution of additive manufacturing processes will provide numerous possibilities for the fabrication of complex smart constructs with multiple functions, which will significantly widen the application fields of next-generation additive manufacturing.

  10. Advanced Material Strategies for Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinke Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM has drawn tremendous attention in various fields. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop novel additive manufacturing processes such as micro-/nano-scale 3D printing, bioprinting, and 4D printing for the fabrication of complex 3D structures with high resolution, living components, and multimaterials. The development of advanced functional materials is important for the implementation of these novel additive manufacturing processes. Here, a state-of-the-art review on advanced material strategies for novel additive manufacturing processes is provided, mainly including conductive materials, biomaterials, and smart materials. The advantages, limitations, and future perspectives of these materials for additive manufacturing are discussed. It is believed that the innovations of material strategies in parallel with the evolution of additive manufacturing processes will provide numerous possibilities for the fabrication of complex smart constructs with multiple functions, which will significantly widen the application fields of next-generation additive manufacturing.

  11. Microbial production of next-generation stevia sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Kim; Carlsen, Simon; Semmler, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glucosyltransferase UGT76G1 from Stevia rebaudiana is a chameleon enzyme in the targeted biosynthesis of the next-generation premium stevia sweeteners, rebaudioside D (Reb D) and rebaudioside M (Reb M). These steviol glucosides carry five and six glucose units, respectively......, and have low sweetness thresholds, high maximum sweet intensities and exhibit a greatly reduced lingering bitter taste compared to stevioside and rebaudioside A, the most abundant steviol glucosides in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. RESULTS: In the metabolic glycosylation grid leading to production....... This screen made it possible to identify variants, such as UGT76G1Thr146Gly and UGT76G1His155Leu, which diminished accumulation of unwanted side-products and gave increased specific accumulation of the desired Reb D or Reb M sweeteners. This improvement in a key enzyme of the Stevia sweetener biosynthesis...

  12. Next Generation Agricultural System Data, Models and Knowledge Products: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, John M.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural system models have become important tools to provide predictive and assessment capability to a growing array of decision-makers in the private and public sectors. Despite ongoing research and model improvements, many of the agricultural models today are direct descendants of research investments initially made 30-40 years ago, and many of the major advances in data, information and communication technology (ICT) of the past decade have not been fully exploited. The purpose of this Special Issue of Agricultural Systems is to lay the foundation for the next generation of agricultural systems data, models and knowledge products. The Special Issue is based on a 'NextGen' study led by the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  13. Satellite communications for the next generation telecommunication services and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitre, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite communications can play an important role in provisioning the next-generation telecommunication services and networks, provided the protocols specifying these services and networks are satellite-compatible and the satellite subnetworks, consisting of earth stations interconnected by the processor and the switch on board the satellite, interwork effectively with the terrestrial networks. The specific parameters and procedures of frame relay and broadband integrated services digital network (B-ISDN) protocols which are impacted by a satellite delay. Congestion and resource management functions for frame relay and B-ISDN are discussed in detail, describing the division of these functions between earth stations and on board the satellite. Specific onboard and ground functions are identified as potential candidates for their implementation via neural network technology.

  14. Potential of OFDM for next generation optical access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Daniel; Weis, Erik; Breuer, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the requirements for next generation optical access (NGOA) networks and analyzes the potential of OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing) for the use in such network scenarios. First, we show the motivation for NGOA systems based on the future requirements on FTTH access systems and list the advantages of OFDM in such scenarios. In the next part, the basics of OFDM and different methods to generate and detect optical OFDM signals are explained and analyzed. At the transmitter side the options include intensity modulation and the more advanced field modulation of the optical OFDM signal. At the receiver there is the choice between direct detection and coherent detection. As the result of this discussion we show our vision of the future use of OFDM in optical access networks.

  15. Production of the next-generation library virtual tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, James M.; Roth, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    While many libraries offer overviews of their services through their Websites, only a small number of health sciences libraries provide Web-based virtual tours. These tours typically feature photographs of major service areas along with textual descriptions. This article describes the process for planning, producing, and implementing a next-generation virtual tour in which a variety of media elements are integrated: photographic images, 360-degree “virtual reality” views, textual descriptions, and contextual floor plans. Hardware and software tools used in the project are detailed, along with a production timeline and budget, tips for streamlining the process, and techniques for improving production. This paper is intended as a starting guide for other libraries considering an investment in such a project. PMID:11837254

  16. Next-generation TCAP hydrogen isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L. K.; Sessions, H. T.; Poore, A. S.; Jacobs, W. D.; Williams, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    A thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) for hydrogen isotope separation has been in operation at Savannah River Site since 1994. The process uses a hot/cold nitrogen system to cycle the temperature of the separation column. The hot/cold nitrogen system requires the use of large compressors, heat exchanges, valves and piping that is bulky and maintenance intensive. A new compact thermal cycling (CTC) design has recently been developed. This new design uses liquid nitrogen tubes and electric heaters to heat and cool the column directly so that the bulky hot/cold nitrogen system can be eliminated. This CTC design is simple and is easy to implement, and will be the next generation TCAP system at SRS. A twelve-meter column has been fabricated and installed in the laboratory to demonstrate its performance. The design of the system and its test results to date is discussed. (authors)

  17. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  18. Towards the Next Generation of Space Environment Prediction Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since its establishment more than 15 years ago, the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is serving as an assess point to expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and frameworks as well as a hub for collaborative development of next generation space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and international research and operational communities the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather impacts predictive systems, identifies week links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will highlight latest developments, progress in CCMC-led community-wide projects on testing, prototyping, and validation of models, forecasting techniques and procedures and outline ideas on accelerating implementation of new capabilities in space weather operations.

  19. Power Electronics for the Next Generation Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke

    generation unit, are becoming crucial in the wind turbine system. The objective of this project is to study the power electronics technology used for the next generation wind turbines. Some emerging challenges as well as potentials like the cost of energy and reliability are going to be addressed. First...... conversion is pushed to multi-MW level with high power density requirement. It has also been revealed that thermal stress in the power semiconductors is closely related to many determining factors in the wind power application like the reliability, cost, power density, etc. therefore it is an important......The wind power generation has been steadily growing both for the total installed capacity and for the individual turbine size. Due to much more significant impacts to the power grid, the power electronics, which can change the behavior of wind turbines from an unregulated power source to an active...

  20. Neurogenetics: advancing the "next-generation" of brain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Huda Y; Warren, Stephen T

    2010-10-21

    There can be little doubt that genetics has transformed our understanding of mechanisms mediating brain disorders. The last two decades have brought tremendous progress in terms of accurate molecular diagnoses and knowledge of the genes and pathways that are involved in a large number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Likewise, new methods and analytical approaches, including genome array studies and "next-generation" sequencing technologies, are bringing us deeper insights into the subtle complexities of the genetic architecture that determines our risks for these disorders. As we now seek to translate these discoveries back to clinical applications, a major challenge for the field will be in bridging the gap between genes and biology. In this Overview of Neuron's special review issue on neurogenetics, we reflect on progress made over the last two decades and highlight the challenges as well as the exciting opportunities for the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.