WorldWideScience

Sample records for newly implemented radiation

  1. Assessment of natural radiation exposure inside a newly constructed building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, V.K.; Sadasivan, S.; Nambi, K.S.V.; Sundaram, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials are one of the sources of radiation exposure to the population. Several building materials used for a newly constructed building complex were analysed for 40 K, 238 U radioactivity by gamma ray spectrometry. The external gamma dose inside the complex was evaluated by using the computer code QAD-CGGP. External dose rate was also measured by using scintillation gamma monitor. Calculated and the measured dose rate values are discussed. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Implementation of radiation safety program in a medical institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanca, Elena D.

    1999-01-01

    A medical institution that utilizes radiation for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of malignancies develops and implements a radiation safety program to keep occupational exposures of radiation workers and exposures of non-radiation workers and the public to the achievable and a more achievable minimum, to optimize the use of radiation, and to prevent misadministration. The hospital radiation safety program is established by a core medical radiation committee composed of trained radiation safety officers and head of authorized users of radioactive materials and radiation machines from the different departments. The radiation safety program sets up procedural guidelines of the safe use of radioactive material and of radiation equipment. It offers regular training to radiation workers and radiation safety awareness courses to hospital staff. The program has a comprehensive radiation safety information system or radsis that circularizes the radiation safety program in the hospital. The radsis keeps the drafted and updated records of safety guides and policies, radioactive material and equipment inventory, personnel dosimetry reports, administrative, regulatory and licensing activity document, laboratory procedures, emergency procedures, quality assurance and quality control program process, physics and dosimetry procedures and reports, personnel and hospital staff training program. The medical radiation protection committee is tasked to oversee the actual implementation of the radiation safety guidelines in the different radiation facilities in the hospital, to review personnel exposures, incident reports and ALARA actions, operating procedures, facility inspections and audit reports, to evaluate the existing radiation safety procedures, to make necessary changes to these procedures, and make modifications of course content of the training program. The effective implementation of the radiation safety program provides increased confidence that the physician and

  3. Radiation protection measurement. Philosophy and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, P.; Lakey, J.R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A selection from the proceedings of the International Symposium held by the U.K. Society for radiological protection in June 1974 was presented. The central theme was the philosophy of radiation protection measurement and its interpretation although some specific areas of good health physics practice were included. The 28 papers selected were chosen to be either representative of the central theme or of wider interest. The papers have been grouped in 6 main sections: philosophy of measurements; interpretation of measurements; implementation by legislation and monitoring; radiation exposure and control; reactor safety and siting; accidents

  4. Implementation and testing of a multivariate inverse radiation transport solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean J.

    2012-01-01

    Detection, identification, and characterization of special nuclear materials (SNM) all face the same basic challenge: to varying degrees, each must infer the presence, composition, and configuration of the SNM by analyzing a set of measured radiation signatures. Solutions to this problem implement inverse radiation transport methods. Given a set of measured radiation signatures, inverse radiation transport estimates properties of the source terms and transport media that are consistent with those signatures. This paper describes one implementation of a multivariate inverse radiation transport solver. The solver simultaneously analyzes gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity measurements to fit a one-dimensional radiation transport model with variable layer thicknesses using nonlinear regression. The solver's essential components are described, and its performance is illustrated by application to benchmark experiments conducted with plutonium metal. - Highlights: ► Inverse problems, specifically applied to identifying and characterizing radiation sources . ► Radiation transport. ► Analysis of gamma spectroscopy and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. ► Experimental testing of the inverse solver against measurements of plutonium.

  5. Ambient radiation dose reduction within a newly remodeled Nuclear Medicine Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.C.; Chen, Y.W.; Huang, Y.F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ambient radiation levels at the patient waiting areas have been greatly reduced after remodeling of our Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) based on the ALARA consideration. Complete ambient radiation monitoring of our NMD before remodeling had been characterized and published earlier by the same authors elsewhere. The NMD outpatients, with an initial dose of up to 740 MBq (20 mCi) per case, may wait around and incidentally congest in one place that could cause an unexpected higher exposure level in public access areas. In this new surveillance study after remodeling, the ambient radiation time-profile, peak dose rates and daily doses have been re-evaluated by using high sensitivity, digital survey dosimeters. As a preliminary result, with our newly improved facility in operation, we have demonstrated the NMD waiting room average daily dose has dropped from about 3.0 μSv to 0.42 μSv during most of busy days in comparison. The hourly peak dose rate detected in patient waiting areas has also reduced to a factor of more than two, from maximum dose rate of 40.4 μSv/h to 15.4 μSv/h, during one worst case scenario. The great reduction of the environment dose was achieved mainly by using larger room space with thicker lead wall, from previous 2-mm to new 5-mm in lead thickness, and by increasing patient waiting rooms/areas with less chairs available in each seating location. Other NMD administrative control measure of our dose reduction program has also been emphasized in better patient routing, scheduling and less waiting time for the diagnostic patients. (author)

  6. Design and implementation of a virtual laboratory of radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez T, J. R.; Morales S, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    The work involves the implementation of a virtual laboratory, this project is conducted in the Faculty of Engineering of National Autonomous University of Mexico with the name of LANUVI. It is intended that the laboratory can be used by students who have interest in the nuclear radiation knowledge as well as in its detection and attenuation, in addition serve as and introduction to nuclear systems. In the first part of project will conduct a source that can simulate the particle radiation of Alfa, beta, neutrons and gamma rays. The project will take sources used in class laboratories and elements that are dangerous but are used in different practical applications. After taking the source analyzing the particles behaviour in different media like air, animal tissue, aluminium, lead, etc. The analysis is done in different ways in order to know with which material can stop or mitigate the different types of radiation. Finally shall be measure radioactivity with different types of detectors. At this point, has the behaviour of ionization chamber but in the future is expected to make the simulation of some other radiation detectors. The mathematical models we represent the behaviour of these cases were implemented in free software. The program will be used to implement the virtual laboratory with radiation sources, detectors and different types of shields will be Blender which is a free software that is used by many users for the embodiment of games but try to use as a tool to help visualize the different equipment that is widely used in a radioactive materials laboratory. (Author)

  7. Implementation of the Brazilian radiation metrology network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Manoel M.O.; Araujo, Margareth M. de

    1998-01-01

    The ever increasing need for calibration of survey, personal, and contamination meters in Brazil are not completely satisfied by the two operating laboratories. To overcome this deficiency a radiation metrology network is being implemented with the support of IAEA. In a near future this network will count other three calibration laboratories which are being installed in different regions of the country, and accredited through INMETRO. (author)

  8. Practicing on Newly Dead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jewel Abraham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A newly dead cadaver simulation is practiced on the physical remains of the dead before the onset of rigor mortis. This technique has potential benefits for providing real-life in-situ experience for novice providers in health care practices. Evolving ethical views in health care brings into question some of the ethical aspects associated with newly dead cadaver simulation in terms of justification for practice, autonomy, consent, and the need of disclosure. A clear statement of policies and procedures on newly dead cadaver simulation has yet to be implemented. Although there are benefits and disadvantages to an in-situ cadaver simulation, such practices should not be carried out in secrecy as there is no compelling evidence that suggests such training as imperative. Secrecy in these practices is a violation of honor code of nursing ethics. As health care providers, practitioners are obliged to be ethically honest and trustworthy to their patients. The author explores the ethical aspects of using newly dead cadaver simulation in training novice nursing providers to gain competency in various lifesaving skills, which otherwise cannot be practiced on a living individual. The author explores multiple views on cadaver simulation in relation to ethical theories and practices such as consent and disclosure to family.

  9. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  10. Implementation of organizational measures in radiation protection in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freerk Boersma, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Regulation Administrative and Organizational Measures in Radiation Protection is an important part of new legislation concerning radiation protection in the Netherlands. In this contribution we pay attention to the implementation of two obligations resulting from this regulation, being the creation of a radiation protection organization, and the realization of a system of internal permits. These obligations apply to holders of comprehensive licenses. Relevant aspects of the regulation will be explained in some detail. The first draft of a guideline, initiated by the Dutch Radiation Protection Society and meant to facilitate putting up a system for internal permits, is discussed. We also describe the radiation protection organization and the system of internal permits at Groningen University, and focus on the major successes and flaws of both. (Author) 7 refs

  11. Radiation protection optimization. Advances in practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Within the Community, protection against the dangers of ionizing radiation is regulated in conformity with the provisions of two Council Directives. One is of general application for all activities involving a hazard arising from ionizing radiation and lays down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation. The other is derived from the abovementioned one and lays down the basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. The Commission, in collaboration with the Spanish Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, organized on 12, 13 and 14 September 1988 in Madrid, the third scientific seminar on the optimization principle (Alara) which is a key element of the two abovementioned Council Directives. The seminar allowed an analysis of the progress made since the previous seminars of 1979 and 1983, in the practical implementation of the optimization principle, in relation to the design and operation of nuclear and industrial installations, natural radioactivity, medical practices and countermeasures. The report contains the 20 original contributions presented and some general considerations on the results of the seminar

  12. Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In execution of the new Atomic Energy Act the Ordinance on the Implementation of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection was put into force on 1 February 1985. It takes into account all forms of peaceful nuclear energy and ionizing radiation uses in nuclear installations, irradiation facilities and devices in research, industries, and health services, and in radioactive isotope production and laboratories. It covers all aspects of safety and protection and defines atomic safety as nuclear safety and nuclear safeguards and physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities, whereas radiation protection includes the total of requirements, measures, means and methods necessary to protect man and the environment from the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. It has been based on ICRP Recommendation No. 26 and the IAEA's Basic Safety Standards and supersedes the Radiation Protection Ordinance of 1969

  13. TU-FG-201-12: Designing a Risk-Based Quality Assurance Program for a Newly Implemented Y-90 Microspheres Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vile, D; Zhang, L; Cuttino, L; Kim, S; Palta, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create a quality assurance program based upon a risk-based assessment of a newly implemented SirSpheres Y-90 procedure. Methods: A process map was created for a newly implemented SirSpheres procedure at a community hospital. The process map documented each step of this collaborative procedure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of each member. From the process map, different potential failure modes were determined as well as any current controls in place. From this list, a full failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was performed by grading each failure mode’s likelihood of occurrence, likelihood of detection, and potential severity. These numbers were then multiplied to compute the risk priority number (RPN) for each potential failure mode. Failure modes were then ranked based on their RPN. Additional controls were then added, with failure modes corresponding to the highest RPNs taking priority. Results: A process map was created that succinctly outlined each step in the SirSpheres procedure in its current implementation. From this, 72 potential failure modes were identified and ranked according to their associated RPN. Quality assurance controls and safety barriers were then added for failure modes associated with the highest risk being addressed first. Conclusion: A quality assurance program was created from a risk-based assessment of the SirSpheres process. Process mapping and FMEA were effective in identifying potential high-risk failure modes for this new procedure, which were prioritized for new quality assurance controls. TG 100 recommends the fault tree analysis methodology to design a comprehensive and effective QC/QM program, yet we found that by simply introducing additional safety barriers to address high RPN failure modes makes the whole process simpler and safer.

  14. TU-FG-201-12: Designing a Risk-Based Quality Assurance Program for a Newly Implemented Y-90 Microspheres Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vile, D; Zhang, L; Cuttino, L; Kim, S; Palta, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create a quality assurance program based upon a risk-based assessment of a newly implemented SirSpheres Y-90 procedure. Methods: A process map was created for a newly implemented SirSpheres procedure at a community hospital. The process map documented each step of this collaborative procedure, as well as the roles and responsibilities of each member. From the process map, different potential failure modes were determined as well as any current controls in place. From this list, a full failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) was performed by grading each failure mode’s likelihood of occurrence, likelihood of detection, and potential severity. These numbers were then multiplied to compute the risk priority number (RPN) for each potential failure mode. Failure modes were then ranked based on their RPN. Additional controls were then added, with failure modes corresponding to the highest RPNs taking priority. Results: A process map was created that succinctly outlined each step in the SirSpheres procedure in its current implementation. From this, 72 potential failure modes were identified and ranked according to their associated RPN. Quality assurance controls and safety barriers were then added for failure modes associated with the highest risk being addressed first. Conclusion: A quality assurance program was created from a risk-based assessment of the SirSpheres process. Process mapping and FMEA were effective in identifying potential high-risk failure modes for this new procedure, which were prioritized for new quality assurance controls. TG 100 recommends the fault tree analysis methodology to design a comprehensive and effective QC/QM program, yet we found that by simply introducing additional safety barriers to address high RPN failure modes makes the whole process simpler and safer.

  15. Test beam evaluation of newly developed n-in-p planar pixel sensors for use in a high radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, K., E-mail: kimihiko@hep.phys.titech.ac.jp [Institute of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yamaguchi, D.; Motohashi, K. [Institute of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nakamura, K.; Unno, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Jinnouchi, O. [Institute of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Altenheiner, S. [Experimentelle Physik IV, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Blue, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bomben, M. [CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Laboratoire de physique nucléaire et de hautes energies (LPNHE), Univ. Paris-UMPC, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Univ. Paris Diderot (France); Butter, A. [LAL, University Paris-Sud (France); CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Cervelli, A. [Universität Bern, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Sidlerstrasse 55, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Crawley, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Ducourthial, A. [CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Laboratoire de physique nucléaire et de hautes energies (LPNHE), Univ. Paris-UMPC, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Univ. Paris Diderot (France); Gisen, A. [Experimentelle Physik IV, Technische Universität Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Hagihara, M. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8751 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-21

    Radiation-tolerant n-in-p planar pixel sensors have been under development in cooperation with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (HPK). This is geared towards applications in high-radiation environments, such as for the future Inner Tracker (ITk) placed in the innermost part of the ATLAS detector in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) experiment. Prototypes of those sensors have been produced, irradiated, and evaluated over the last few years. In the previous studies, it was reported that significant drops in the detection efficiency were observed after irradiation, especially under bias structures. The bias structures are made up of poly-Si or Al bias rails and poly-Si bias resistors. The structure is implemented on the sensors to allow quality checks to be performed before the bump-bonding process, and to ensure that charge generated in floating pixels due to non-contacting or missing bump-bonds is dumped in a controlled way in order to avoid noise. To minimize the efficiency drop, several new pixel structures have been designed with bias rails and bias resistors relocated. Several test beams have been carried out to evaluate the drops in the detection efficiency of the new sensor structures after irradiation. Newly developed sensor modules were irradiated with proton-beams at the Cyclotron and Radio-Isotope Center (CYRIC) in Tohoku University to see the effect of sensor-bulk damage and surface charge-up. An irradiation with γ-rays was also carried out at Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Center, with the goal of decoupling the effect of surface charge-up from that of bulk damage. Those irradiated sensors have been evaluated with particle beams at DESY and CERN. Comparison between different sensor structures confirmed significant improvements in minimizing efficiency loss under the bias structures after irradiation. The results from γ-irradiation also enabled cross-checking the results of a semiconductor technology simulation program (TCAD). - Highlights: • The

  16. Problems of radiation protection during SIP implementation on the Shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorad, V.I.; Litvinskaya, T.V.; Nikonov, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most urgent problems for today, during the SIP plans implementation of the Shelter transformation, is personnel radiation safety. The first of them assumes that a worker can be exposed to permitted annual dose during a short period of time with subsequent withdrawal of the person from radiation-hazardous activities. The second approach is based on the determination of derived dose limits that would provide for non-excess of the main limits on the assumption that a person is involved in radiation-hazardous work during the whole year. Radiation protection during practical activity should be formed on the basis of optimization principle. The optimization, in this case, implies that activities in the fields of ionizing radiation should be planned and performed in such way that, during their performance, the levels of individual doses and/or the quantity of exposed persons be as low as possible with taking into account the economic and social factors

  17. 1991 implementation of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) administrative radiation exposure levels: Experiences and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, T.L.; Baumann, B.L.

    1993-06-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) radiation exposure levels were implemented on January 1, 1991, by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a prime US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, located in Richland, Washington. This paper describes the radiation exposure levels which were implemented and the associated experiences and lessons learned. The issue of a report from the Committee on Biological Effectiveness of Ionizing Radiation in 1989 prompted DOE to re-evaluate its position on radiation exposure limits and the resulting doses received by occupational radiation workers. DOE requested that all it's contractors determine the impacts to operations from reduced radiation exposure levels

  18. Medical Physics Challenges for the Implementation of Quality Assurance Programmes in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    The importance of quality assurance in radiation therapy, as well as its positive consequences on patient treatment outcome, is well known to radiation therapy professionals. In low- and middle-income countries, the implementation of quality assurance in radiation therapy is especially challenging, due to a lack of staff training, a lack of national guidelines, a lack of quality assurance equipment and high patient daily throughput. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Directory of Radiotherapy Centres, the proportion of linear accelerators compared with Co-60 machines has increased significantly in recent years in low- and middle-income countries. However, this increase in the proportion of relatively more demanding technology is not always accompanied with the necessary investment in staff training and quality assurance. The IAEA provides supports to low- and middle-income countries to develop and strengthen quality assurance programmes at institutional and national level. It also provides guidance, through its publications, on quality assurance and supports implementation of comprehensive clinical audits to identify gaps and makes recommendations for quality improvement in radiation therapy. The new AAPM TG100 report suggests a new approach to quality management in radiation therapy. If implemented, it will lead to improved cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy in all income settings. Low- and middle-income countries could greatly benefit from this new approach as it will help direct their scarce resources to areas where they can produce the optimum impact on patient care, without compromising patient safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  20. Implementation of European Directive on Optical Radiation Safety takes place in May 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.

    2009-01-01

    At the latest by May 10th 2010, Directive 2006/25/EC regarding the exposure of workers to risks arising from artificial optical radiation must be implemented by all EU-member states, thus legally adopting ICNIRP limit values for ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiation. For IUVA-members the

  1. RTOG 0211: A Phase 1/2 Study of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Gefitinib for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Curran, Walter J.; Brachman, David G.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Choucair, Ali; Dolled-Filhart, Marisa; Christiansen, Jason; Gustavson, Mark; Molinaro, Annette; Mischel, Paul; Dicker, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with radiation for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Methods and Materials: Between March 21, 2002, and May 3, 2004, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0211 enrolled 31 and 147 GBM patients in the phase 1 and 2 arms, respectively. Treatment consisted of daily oral gefinitnib started at the time of conventional cranial radiation therapy (RT) and continued post RT for 18 months or until progression. Tissue microarrays from 68 cases were analyzed for EGFR expression. Results: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gefitinib was determined to be 500 mg in patients on non-enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drugs (non-EIAEDs). All patients in the phase 2 component were treated at a gefitinib dose of 500 mg; patients receiving EIADSs could be escalated to 750 mg. The most common side effects of gefitinib in combination with radiation were dermatologic and gastrointestinal. Median survival was 11.5 months for patients treated per protocol. There was no overall survival benefit for patients treated with gefitinib + RT when compared with a historical cohort of patients treated with RT alone, matched by RTOG recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class distribution. Younger age was significantly associated with better outcome. Per protocol stratification, EGFR expression was not found to be of prognostic value for gefitinib + RT-treated patients. Conclusions: The addition of gefitinib to RT is well tolerated. Median survival of RTOG 0211 patients treated with RT with concurrent and adjuvant gefitinib was similar to that in a historical control cohort treated with radiation alone

  2. Radiation Safety Analysis In The NFEC For Assessing Possible Implementation Of The ICRP-60 Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yowono, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation safety analysis of the 3 facilities in the nuclear fuel element center (NFEC) for assessing possible implementation of the ICRP-60 standard has been done. The analysis has covered the radiation dose received by workers, dose rate in the working area, surface contamination level, air contamination level and the level of radioactive gas release to the environment. The analysis has been based on BATAN regulation and ICRP-60 standard. The result of the analysis has showed that the highest radiation dose received has been found to be only around 15% of the set value in the ICRP-60 standard and only 6% of the set value in the BATAN regulation. Thus the ICRP-60 as radiation safety standard could be implemented without changing the laboratory design

  3. Modeling UV Radiation Feedback from Massive Stars. I. Implementation of Adaptive Ray-tracing Method and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2017-12-01

    We present an implementation of an adaptive ray-tracing (ART) module in the Athena hydrodynamics code that accurately and efficiently handles the radiative transfer involving multiple point sources on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. We adopt a recently proposed parallel algorithm that uses nonblocking, asynchronous MPI communications to accelerate transport of rays across the computational domain. We validate our implementation through several standard test problems, including the propagation of radiation in vacuum and the expansions of various types of H II regions. Additionally, scaling tests show that the cost of a full ray trace per source remains comparable to that of the hydrodynamics update on up to ∼ {10}3 processors. To demonstrate application of our ART implementation, we perform a simulation of star cluster formation in a marginally bound, turbulent cloud, finding that its star formation efficiency is 12% when both radiation pressure forces and photoionization by UV radiation are treated. We directly compare the radiation forces computed from the ART scheme with those from the M 1 closure relation. Although the ART and M 1 schemes yield similar results on large scales, the latter is unable to resolve the radiation field accurately near individual point sources.

  4. Organization of central database for implementation of ionizing radiation protection in the Republic of Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubelka, D.; Svilicic, N. [Croatian Radiation Protection Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2000-05-01

    The paper is intended to give an overview of the situation in the Republic of Croatia resulting from passing of the new ionizing radiation protection law. Data collecting organization and records keeping structure will be highlighted in particular, as well as data exchange between individual services involved in ionizing radiation protection. The Radiation Protection Act has been prepared in compliance with the international standards and Croatian regulations governing the ionizing radiation protection field. Its enforcement shall probably commence in October 1999, when the necessary bylaws regulating in detail numerous specific and technical issues of particular importance for ionizing radiation protection implementation are expected to be adopted. Within the Croatian Government, the Ministry of Health is charge of ionizing radiation protection. Such competence is traditional in our country and common throughout the world. This Ministry has authorized three institutions to carry out technical tasks related to the radiation protection, such as radiation sources inspections and personal dosimetry. Such distribution of work demands coordination of all involved institutions, control of their work and records keeping. The Croatian Radiation Protection Institute has been entrusted to coordinate work of these institutions, control their activities, and set up the central national registry of radiation sources and workers, as well as doses received by the staff during their work. Since the Croatian Radiation Protection Institute is a newly established institution, we could freely determine our operational framework. Due to its publicly accessible source code and wide base of users and developers, the best prospective for stability and long-term accessibility is offered by the Linux operating system. For the database development, Oracle RDBMS was used, partly because it is a leading manufacturer of database management systems, and partly because our staff is very familiar

  5. Organization of central database for implementation of ionizing radiation protection in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubelka, D.; Svilicic, N.

    2000-01-01

    The paper is intended to give an overview of the situation in the Republic of Croatia resulting from passing of the new ionizing radiation protection law. Data collecting organization and records keeping structure will be highlighted in particular, as well as data exchange between individual services involved in ionizing radiation protection. The Radiation Protection Act has been prepared in compliance with the international standards and Croatian regulations governing the ionizing radiation protection field. Its enforcement shall probably commence in October 1999, when the necessary bylaws regulating in detail numerous specific and technical issues of particular importance for ionizing radiation protection implementation are expected to be adopted. Within the Croatian Government, the Ministry of Health is charge of ionizing radiation protection. Such competence is traditional in our country and common throughout the world. This Ministry has authorized three institutions to carry out technical tasks related to the radiation protection, such as radiation sources inspections and personal dosimetry. Such distribution of work demands coordination of all involved institutions, control of their work and records keeping. The Croatian Radiation Protection Institute has been entrusted to coordinate work of these institutions, control their activities, and set up the central national registry of radiation sources and workers, as well as doses received by the staff during their work. Since the Croatian Radiation Protection Institute is a newly established institution, we could freely determine our operational framework. Due to its publicly accessible source code and wide base of users and developers, the best prospective for stability and long-term accessibility is offered by the Linux operating system. For the database development, Oracle RDBMS was used, partly because it is a leading manufacturer of database management systems, and partly because our staff is very familiar

  6. A newly introduced comprehensive consultation fee in the national health insurance system in Japan: a promotive effect of multidisciplinary medical care in the field of radiation oncology--results from a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaki, Hiroshi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Dokiya, Takushi; Nemoto, Kenji; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    The consultation fee for outpatient radiotherapy was newly introduced in the national health insurance system in Japan in April 2012. We conducted a survey on the use of this consultation fee and its effect on clinical practices. The health insurance committee of the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology conducted a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire form was mailed to 160 councilors of the Society, the target questionees. A total of 94 answers (58% of the target questionees) sent back were used for analyses. The analyses revealed that 75% of the hospitals charged most of the patients who receive radiotherapy in an outpatient setting a consultation fee. The introduction of the consultation fee led to some changes in radiation oncology clinics, as evidenced by the response of 'more careful observations by medical staff' in 37% of questionees and a 12% increase in the number of full-time radiation oncology nurses. It was also shown that the vast majority (92%) of radiation oncologists expected a positive influence of the consultation fee on radiation oncology clinics in Japan. Our questionnaire survey revealed the present status of the use of a newly introduced consultation fee for outpatient radiotherapy, and the results suggested its possible effect on promoting a multidisciplinary medical care system in radiation oncology departments in Japan.

  7. Hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy for metastatic spinal cord compression from newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, So; Hozumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Kiyofumi; Higashikawa, Akiro; Goto, Takahiro; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Kondo, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    Although hormonal therapy is effective for treatment of prostate cancer, its effect in the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) has not been established. The objective of this study was to clarify the efficacy of conservative treatment of MSCC-induced paralysis resulting from prostate cancer for patients without a previous treatment history. We reviewed data from 38 patients with MSCC-induced paralysis from newly diagnosed prostate cancer who presented to our service between 1984 and 2010. Conservative treatment consisted of hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy (ERT). Patient demographic data, treatment details, involved spine MRI images, complications, and the course of neurologic recovery were investigated. Twenty-five patients were treated conservatively. Mean follow-up period was 36.8 months. Sixteen patients (two with Frankel B, 14 with Frankel C) were unable to walk at initial presentation. After initiating conservative treatment, 75% (12 of 16) of these patients regained the ability to walk within 1 month, 88% (14 in 16) did so within 3 months, and all non-ambulatory patients did so within 6 months. No one had morbid complications. Four patients who did not regain the ability to walk at 1 month were found to have progressed to paraplegia rapidly, and tended to have severe compression as visualized on MRI, with a delay in the start of treatment in comparison with those who did so within 1 month (21.0 vs. 7.8 days). Hormonal therapy associated with ERT is an important option for treatment of MSCC resulting from newly diagnosed prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Implementation of a post graduated course in radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papa, A.R.R.; Rodrigues, L.N.; Godoy, J.M.O.; Fonseca, E.S. da; Pereira, W.W.; Dantas, B.M.; Goncalves, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The main motivations and followed lines in the implementation of a postgraduate course in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry are exposed. The principal research areas as well as the academic program are described. A prevision on the future and perspectives of the program is done. (author)

  9. The effectiveness and implementation of mentoring program for newly graduated nurses: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yan; Wu, Juemin; Wen, Fule; Zhang, Yaqing

    2016-02-01

    Newly graduated nurses suffer from occupational stress during the transition from school to employment as a result of inadequacy, interpersonal relationships, and the overwhelming workload. Mentoring programs have proved effective in facilitating this transition. To evaluate the effectiveness of a mentoring program on the mentor, mentee, and organization. The Cochrane Library, Medline, Ovid, Elsevier, Embase, CINAHL, CBM, CNKI, and WanFang Data databases were searched to identify relevant publications in English or Chinese up to October 2014. This is a systematic review. This review identified nine potentially eligible studies, and the methodological quality levels of the included studies were all ranked as level B. These studies revealed that the turnover rate can be decreased through a mentoring program. Additionally, mentoring can enhance nursing competency and establish a supportive workforce environment, resulting in positive outcomes. This review reveals that a mentoring program has positive effects on the mentors, mentees, and organizations. A successful mentorship program should include rigorous mentor selection and adequate training. Additionally, potential barriers such as time constraints and scheduling limitations should be taken into consideration during implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency

  11. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Spektor, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  12. Development, Implementation and Compliance of Treatment Pathways in Radiation Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis ePotters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While much emphasis on safety in the radiation oncology clinic is placed on process, there remains considerable opportunity to increase safety, enhance outcomes and avoid ad-hoc care by instituting detailed treatment pathways. The purpose of this study was to review the process of developing evidence and consensus-based, outcomes-oriented treatment pathways that standardize treatment and patient management in a large multicenter radiation oncology practice. Further, we reviewed our compliance in incorporating these directives into our day-to-day clinical practice. METHODS: Using the Institute of Medicine guideline for developing treatment pathways, 87 disease specific pathways were developed and incorporated into the electronic medical system in our multi-facility radiation oncology department. Compliance in incorporating treatment pathways was assessed by mining our EMR data from January 1, 2010 through February 2012 for patients with breast and prostate cancer. RESULTS: This retrospective analysis of data from electronic medical records found overall compliance to breast and prostate cancer treatment pathways to be 97% and 99%, respectively. The reason for non-compliance proved to be either a failure to complete the prescribed care based on grade II or III toxicity (n=1 breast, 3 prostate or patient elected discontinuance of care (n=1 prostate or the physician chose a higher dose for positive/close margins (n=3 breast. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that consensus and evidence-based treatment pathways can be developed and implemented in a multi-center department of radiation oncology. And that for prostate and breast cancer there was a high degree of compliance using these directives. The development and implementation of these pathways serve as a key component of our safety program, most notably in our effort to facilitate consistent decision-making and reducing variation between physicians.

  13. MO-F-16A-06: Implementation of a Radiation Exposure Monitoring System for Surveillance of Multi-Modality Radiation Dose Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, B; Kanal, K; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We have implemented a commercially available Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) to enhance the processes of radiation dose data collection, analysis and alerting developed over the past decade at our sites of practice. REMS allows for consolidation of multiple radiation dose information sources and quicker alerting than previously developed processes. Methods: Thirty-nine x-ray producing imaging modalities were interfaced with the REMS: thirteen computed tomography scanners, sixteen angiography/interventional systems, nine digital radiography systems and one mammography system. A number of methodologies were used to provide dose data to the REMS: Modality Performed Procedure Step (MPPS) messages, DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR), and DICOM header information. Once interfaced, the dosimetry information from each device underwent validation (first 15–20 exams) before release for viewing by end-users: physicians, medical physicists, technologists and administrators. Results: Before REMS, our diagnostic physics group pulled dosimetry data from seven disparate databases throughout the radiology, radiation oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, anesthesiology/pain management and vascular surgery departments at two major medical centers and four associated outpatient clinics. With the REMS implementation, we now have one authoritative source of dose information for alerting, longitudinal analysis, dashboard/graphics generation and benchmarking. REMS provides immediate automatic dose alerts utilizing thresholds calculated through daily statistical analysis. This has streamlined our Closing the Loop process for estimated skin exposures in excess of our institutional specific substantial radiation dose level which relied on technologist notification of the diagnostic physics group and daily report from the radiology information system (RIS). REMS also automatically calculates the CT size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) as well as provides

  14. MO-F-16A-06: Implementation of a Radiation Exposure Monitoring System for Surveillance of Multi-Modality Radiation Dose Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, B; Kanal, K; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D [University Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have implemented a commercially available Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) to enhance the processes of radiation dose data collection, analysis and alerting developed over the past decade at our sites of practice. REMS allows for consolidation of multiple radiation dose information sources and quicker alerting than previously developed processes. Methods: Thirty-nine x-ray producing imaging modalities were interfaced with the REMS: thirteen computed tomography scanners, sixteen angiography/interventional systems, nine digital radiography systems and one mammography system. A number of methodologies were used to provide dose data to the REMS: Modality Performed Procedure Step (MPPS) messages, DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR), and DICOM header information. Once interfaced, the dosimetry information from each device underwent validation (first 15–20 exams) before release for viewing by end-users: physicians, medical physicists, technologists and administrators. Results: Before REMS, our diagnostic physics group pulled dosimetry data from seven disparate databases throughout the radiology, radiation oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, anesthesiology/pain management and vascular surgery departments at two major medical centers and four associated outpatient clinics. With the REMS implementation, we now have one authoritative source of dose information for alerting, longitudinal analysis, dashboard/graphics generation and benchmarking. REMS provides immediate automatic dose alerts utilizing thresholds calculated through daily statistical analysis. This has streamlined our Closing the Loop process for estimated skin exposures in excess of our institutional specific substantial radiation dose level which relied on technologist notification of the diagnostic physics group and daily report from the radiology information system (RIS). REMS also automatically calculates the CT size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) as well as provides

  15. Validation of mentorship model for newly qualified professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Newly qualified professional nurses (NQPNs) allocated to community health care services require the use of validated model to practice independently. Validation was done to adapt and assess if the model is understood and could be implemented by NQPNs and mentors employed in community health care services.

  16. A newly introduced comprehensive consultation fee in the national health insurance system in Japan. A promotive effect of multidisciplinary medical care in the field of radiation oncology. Results from a questionnaire survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igaki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The consultation fee for outpatient radiotherapy was newly introduced in the national health insurance system in Japan in April 2012. We conducted a survey on the use of this consultation fee and its effect on clinical practices. The health insurance committee of the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology conducted a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire form was mailed to 160 councilors of the Society, the target questionees. A total of 94 answers (58% of the target questionees) sent back were used for analyses. The analyses revealed that 75% of the hospitals charged most of the patients who receive radiotherapy in an outpatient setting a consultation fee. The introduction of the consultation fee led to some changes in radiation oncology clinics, as evidenced by the response of 'more careful observations by medical staff' in 37% of questionees and a 12% increase in the number of full-time radiation oncology nurses. It was also shown that the vast majority (92%) of radiation oncologists expected a positive influence of the consultation fee on radiation oncology clinics in Japan. Our questionnaire survey revealed the present status of the use of a newly introduced consultation fee for outpatient radiotherapy, and the results suggested its possible effect on promoting a multidisciplinary medical care system in radiation oncology departments in Japan. (author)

  17. Organization and implementation of a national regulatory infrastructure governing protection against ionizing radiation and the safety of radiation sources. Interim report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    A number of IAEA Member States are undertaking to strengthen their radiation protection and safety infrastructures in order to facilitate the adoption of the requirements established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Standards). In this connection, the IAEA has developed a technical co-operation programme (Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure) to improve radiation protection and safety infrastructures in 51 Member States, taking into account national profiles and needs of the individual participating, countries. The present report deals with the elements of a regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection and safety and intends to facilitate the, implementation of the Basic Safety Standards in practice. It takes into account the proposals in an earlier report, IAEA-TECDOC-663, but it has been expanded to include enabling legislation and modified to be more attuned to infrastructure issues related to implementation of the Standards. The orientation is toward infrastructures concerned with protection and safety for radiation sources used in medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education rather than infrastructures for protection and safety for complex nuclear facilities. It also discusses options for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of the infrastructure in accordance with the size and scope of radiation practices and available regulatory resources within a country

  18. Radiation Monitoring in a Newly Established Nuclear Medicine Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afroj, Kamila; Anwar-Ul-Azim, Md.; Nath, Khokon Kumar; Khan, Md. Rezaul Karim

    2010-05-01

    A study of area monitoring in a nuclear medicine department's new physical facility was performed for 3 months to ascertain the level of radiation protection of the staff working in nuclear medicine and that of the patients and patient's attendants. Exposure to nuclear medicine personnel is considered as occupational exposure, while exposure to patients is considered medical exposure and exposure to patients' attendants is considered public exposure. The areas for the sources of radiation considered were the hot laboratory, where unsealed isotopes, radionuclides, generators are stored and dosages are prepared, the patients' waiting room, where the radioactive nuclides are administered orally and intravenously for diagnosis and treatment and the SPECT rooms, where the patients' acquisition are taken. The monitoring process was performed using the TLD supplied and measured by the Health Physics Division of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission. The result shows no over-exposure of radiation from any of the working areas. The environment of the department is safe for work and free from unnecessary radiation exposure risk. (author)

  19. Design and implementation of a programming circuit in radiation-hardened FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lihua; Han Xiaowei; Zhao Yan; Liu Zhongli; Yu Fang; Chen, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel programming circuit used in our radiation-hardened field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip. This circuit provides the ability to write user-defined configuration data into an FPGA and then read it back. The proposed circuit adopts the direct-access programming point scheme instead of the typical long token shift register chain. It not only saves area but also provides more flexible configuration operations. By configuring the proposed partial configuration control register, our smallest configuration section can be conveniently configured as a single data and a flexible partial configuration can be easily implemented. The hierarchical simulation scheme, optimization of the critical path and the elaborate layout plan make this circuit work well. Also, the radiation hardened by design programming point is introduced. This circuit has been implemented in a static random access memory (SRAM)-based FPGA fabricated by a 0.5 μm partial-depletion silicon-on-insulator CMOS process. The function test results of the fabricated chip indicate that this programming circuit successfully realizes the desired functions in the configuration and read-back. Moreover, the radiation test results indicate that the programming circuit has total dose tolerance of 1 x 10 5 rad(Si), dose rate survivability of 1.5 x 10 11 rad(Si)/s and neutron fluence immunity of 1 x 10 14 n/cm 2 .

  20. Design and implementation of a programming circuit in radiation-hardened FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Wu; Xiaowei, Han; Yan, Zhao; Zhongli, Liu; Fang, Yu; Chen, Stanley L.

    2011-08-01

    We present a novel programming circuit used in our radiation-hardened field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip. This circuit provides the ability to write user-defined configuration data into an FPGA and then read it back. The proposed circuit adopts the direct-access programming point scheme instead of the typical long token shift register chain. It not only saves area but also provides more flexible configuration operations. By configuring the proposed partial configuration control register, our smallest configuration section can be conveniently configured as a single data and a flexible partial configuration can be easily implemented. The hierarchical simulation scheme, optimization of the critical path and the elaborate layout plan make this circuit work well. Also, the radiation hardened by design programming point is introduced. This circuit has been implemented in a static random access memory (SRAM)-based FPGA fabricated by a 0.5 μm partial-depletion silicon-on-insulator CMOS process. The function test results of the fabricated chip indicate that this programming circuit successfully realizes the desired functions in the configuration and read-back. Moreover, the radiation test results indicate that the programming circuit has total dose tolerance of 1 × 105 rad(Si), dose rate survivability of 1.5 × 1011 rad(Si)/s and neutron fluence immunity of 1 × 1014 n/cm2.

  1. Planning and implementing an implanted fiducial programme for prostate cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.; Owen, R.; Laferlita, M.; Fox, C.; Foroudi, F.; Tai, K. H.; Styles, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Using implanted gold seeds as fiducial markers to verify the position of the prostate in radiation therapy is well accepted and is becoming the standard of practice and requirement for international multicentre trials. In 2006 the decision was made at the Peter MacCallum Caner Centre (Peter Mac) to plan for and implement this process as standard clinical practice for radical dose prostate treatments (74-78 Gy). Before this, programme verification of field placement for prostate cancer radiation treatment was routinely carried out using regular off-line electronic portal imaging with matching of bony anatomy. A small multidisciplinary team investigated and assisted in the implementation of this new practice across the Peter Mac sites at East Melbourne and our three satellite centres. Issues considered included seed size, number and position in the prostate, implant equipment, imaging equipment and procedure and consent and information forms. The use of a custom made fiducial pack, comprehensive patient information and a daily on-line imaging process was implemented. The experience of the first 28 patients at Peter Mac from January 2007 to May 2007 inclusive is reported on.

  2. Implementation of radiation protection programme in industrial radiography centers in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevband, M. [Radiation Protection Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghiassi Negad, M. [Radiation Protection Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Borhan Azad, S. [Radiation Protection Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tavakoli, M. [Esfahan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Industrial radiography is one of the essential methods in the modern technology to guarantee the quality control of many types of devices, pieces and machines operation, and usually involves intense radiation sources, which can expose people at work to significant amounts of radiation. According to the reports of United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR 2000), the average occupational effective dose in this field is 3.37 mSv/y. The level of dose received by industrial radiographers was assessed in more than 1300 radiation workers in 120 industrial radiography companies. The level of radiation safety regulations and radiation protection programme implemented in Iranian industries was also studied. The results indicated that the average effective dose to the radiographers and collective effective dose are 1.65 mSv/y and 2.43 Man.Sv respectively. The results also showed that 88% of radiographers have received less than 5 mSv/y and only 1% received the annual dose more than 20 mSv. The lack of emergency instruction was found in 47% of companies and in 35% of companies there was not found any compatible emergency instrument. Suitable temporary storage and transportation facility was no also found in 30% of companies. Based on the results found in this study, the enforcement of the radiation protection low and industrial radiography code of practice for responsible persons and health physics officers are recommended. (authors)

  3. Implementation of radiation protection programme in industrial radiography centers in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deevband, M.; Ghiassi Negad, M.; Borhan Azad, S.; Tavakoli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Industrial radiography is one of the essential methods in the modern technology to guarantee the quality control of many types of devices, pieces and machines operation, and usually involves intense radiation sources, which can expose people at work to significant amounts of radiation. According to the reports of United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR 2000), the average occupational effective dose in this field is 3.37 mSv/y. The level of dose received by industrial radiographers was assessed in more than 1300 radiation workers in 120 industrial radiography companies. The level of radiation safety regulations and radiation protection programme implemented in Iranian industries was also studied. The results indicated that the average effective dose to the radiographers and collective effective dose are 1.65 mSv/y and 2.43 Man.Sv respectively. The results also showed that 88% of radiographers have received less than 5 mSv/y and only 1% received the annual dose more than 20 mSv. The lack of emergency instruction was found in 47% of companies and in 35% of companies there was not found any compatible emergency instrument. Suitable temporary storage and transportation facility was no also found in 30% of companies. Based on the results found in this study, the enforcement of the radiation protection low and industrial radiography code of practice for responsible persons and health physics officers are recommended. (authors)

  4. R/D and implement of temper bead welding as newly developed maintenance technique in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Shinro; Sera, Takehiko; Chigusa, Naoki; Okimura, Koji; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Japanese government has recently addressed a policy to increase capacity factor of existing nuclear PPs to achieve the goal to decrease the emission of CO 2 . Numerous preventive measures have taken in nuclear power plants to minimize the risk of unexpected long shutdown. Newly developed mitigation measures or repair methods need to be qualified to satisfy regulatory standards, before it is implemented to nuclear power plants. The qualification process needs to comply regulatory standards though it may consume time to go through each of the required steps. This paper describes such cases namely ambient temper-bead welding and clarifies the issues that need to be resolved regarding qualification process. The qualification process for new methods that has not been prescribed in regulatory standards temporarily completed by go through confirm testing by JAPEIC, RNP and issuance of no action letter in rush. Currently, the qualification process can only be applied on limited area so generalized qualification process needs to be established. (author)

  5. Development and implementation of a new radiation exposure record system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Berndt, V.L.; Trevino, G.W.; Oakley, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Radiological Records Program (HRRP) maintains all available radiation exposure records created since the 1940s for employees of and visitors to the Hanford Site. The program provides exposure status reports to the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and the Hanford contractors, annual exposure reports to individual employees and visitors, and exposure reports to terminated employees. Program staff respond to offsite requests for exposure data on former employees and supply data and reports for epidemiological and research projects as well as for annual reports required by DOE Orders. Historical files, documenting radiation protection and dosimetry policies, procedures, and practices, and radiological incidents, are also maintained under this program. The program is operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for DOE-RL. This paper describes how the record-keeping requirements supported by the HRRP's computerized radiation exposure database were analyzed so that the system could be redeveloped and implemented to (1) accommodate a change in mainframe computer units, and (2) to enhance its automated record-keeping, retrieval, and reporting capabilities in support of the HRRP

  6. Ionizing chamber smoke detectors in implementation of radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    In 1977 the NEA Steering Committee adopted a series of Recommendations for Ionizing Chamber Smoke Detectors (ICSDs) in Implementation of Radiation Protection Standards. The purpose of these recommendations is to permit adoption of a harmonized policy by the competent national authorities concerning the issue of licenses for the manufacture, import, use and disposal of ICSDs while insuring that individual and collective exposure doses are kept as low as is reasonably achievable [fr

  7. Distinguishing Newly Born Strange Stars from Neutron Stars with g-Mode Oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Weijie; Wei Haiqing; Liu Yuxin

    2008-01-01

    The gravity-mode (g-mode) eigenfrequencies of newly born strange quark stars (SQSs) and neutron stars (NSs) are studied. It is found that the eigenfrequencies in SQSs are much lower than those in NSs by almost 1 order of magnitude, since the components of a SQS are all extremely relativistic particles while nucleons in a NS are nonrelativistic. We therefore propose that newly born SQSs can be distinguished from the NSs by detecting the eigenfrequencies of the g-mode pulsations of supernovae cores through gravitational radiation by LIGO-class detectors

  8. The role of the international radiation protection association in development and implementation of radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, P.; Lochard, J.; Webb, G.

    2002-01-01

    The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) is an affiliation of national and regional professional societies. Its individual membership is approaching some 20 000 professionals from 42 societies and covering 50 countries. Its primary objective is to provide a platform for collaboration between members of its affiliate societies to further radiation protection and safety. The IRPA is mandated to promote and facilitate the establishment of radiation protection societies, support international meetings and to encourage international publications, research and education and the establishment and review of standards. Through its membership base and its observer status on bodies such as the ICRP and the safety standards committees of the IAEA, the IRPA is in a position to provide valuable input to the safety standards development process. This factor has been increasingly recognised more recently within the IRPA and the various organisations involved in the development of safety standards. This paper addresses the mechanisms that have been established to enhance the input of the IRPA into the safety standards development process and for their subsequent implementation. (author)

  9. Implementation of the learning problems of physics-based medical and radiation protection in a medical school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz Montplet, C.; Casas Curto, J. D.; Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Vilanova Busquets, J. C.; Balliu Collgros, E.; Barcelo Obregon, J.; Fuentes Raspall, R.; Guirao Marin, S.; Maroto Genover, A.; Pont Valles, J.; Agramunt Chaler, S.; Jurado Bruggeman, D.

    2013-01-01

    The learning objectives related to medical physics and radiation protection work mostly in the module of Radiology and physical medicine of the second year of the curriculum, complemented by a visit to medical physics and radiation protection and radiation oncology at the Hospital services University of reference during the third course. In this paper we present our experience in the design and implementation during the period 2009-2012 of the module focusing in these disciplines. (Author)

  10. Implementation of three dimensional conformal radiation therapy: prospects, opportunities, and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, George T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To briefly review scientific rationale of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and discuss the prospects, opportunities, and challenges in the implementation of 3DCRT. Some of these ideas were discussed during a workshop on 'Implementation of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy' in April 1994 at Bethesda, MD, and others have been discussed elsewhere in the literature. Methods and Materials: Local-regional control of cancer is an important component in the overall treatment strategy in any patient with cancer. It has been shown that failure to achieve local-regional control can lead to (a) an increase in chances of distant metastases, and (b) a decrease in the survival. In many disease sites, the doses delivered currently are inadequate to achieve satisfactory local tumor control rates; this is because in many sites, only limited doses of radiotherapy can be delivered due to the proximity of cancer to radiosensitive normal tissues. By conforming the radiotherapy beams to the tumor, doses to the tumors can be enhanced and doses to the normal tissues can be reduced. With the advances in 3DCRT, such conformation is possible now and is the rationale for using 3DCRT. However, a number of questions do remain that are not limited to the following: (a) What are the implications in terms of target volume definitions when implementing 3DCRT? (b) Are there some sites where research efforts can be focused to document the efficacy and cost effectiveness of 3DCRT? (c) How do we implement day-to-day 3DCRT treatment efficiently? (d) How do we transfer the technology from the university centers to the community without compromising quality? (e) What are all the quality assurance/quality improvement questions that need to be addressed and how do we ascertain quality assurance of 3DCRT? (f) Have we looked at cost-benefit ratios and quality of life (QOL) issues closely? Results: There is a need for defining multiple target volumes: gross tumor volume, clinical

  11. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Price, R.; McNeeley, S.; Chen, L.; Li, J.S.; Wang, L.; Ding, M.; Fourkal, E.; Qin, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on the experience at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA. We will review our procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. We will discuss the dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT. We will examine the details of model-based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms. We will discuss the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patients and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. We will investigate the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT

  12. A strategy to develop and implement Canadian standards for quality assurance in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    In Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) regulates the limits of radiation exposure to the public and to workers in industry. In 1993, it discussed the fact that the safety of radiation therapy patients who receive medical exposures is not regulated [AE93]. The Group of Medical Advisors (GMA) to the AECB initiated a research contract to review quality assurance in Canadian radiation oncology centres and nuclear medicine departments. The review [MA95] revealed that the level of quality assurance in radiation therapy facilities varied across the country. As a result, the GMA undertook its own review of quality assurance in radiation therapy centres and made recommendations on how to achieve a uniform national system [MA98]. In response to the GMA report, the President of the AECB formed a Joint Working Group (JWG-11) to propose how Canadian Standards for Quality Assurance in Radiation Therapy could be developed and implemented. These national standards for quality assurance will serve as a common basis for establishing and evaluating quality assurance programs at individual radiation therapy centres. These standards should address the structure of quality assurance programs and quality assurance for radiation therapy equipment, personnel, and procedures. (author)

  13. High acceptability of a newly developed urological practical skills training program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.H. de; Luijk, S.J. van; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.; Schout, B.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benefits of simulation training are widely recognized, but its structural implementation into urological curricula remains challenging. This study aims to gain insight into current and ideal urological practical skills training and presents the outline of a newly developed skills

  14. High acceptability of a newly developed urological practical skills training program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.H.; van Luijk, S.J.; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.; Schout, B.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benefits of simulation training are widely recognized, but its structural implementation into urological curricula remains challenging. This study aims to gain insight into current and ideal urological practical skills training and presents the outline of a newly developed skills

  15. Guide for the assessment of the implementation of radiation protection in an electricity production nuclear centre. Report nr 292

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.

    2006-01-01

    The approach proposed for the assessment of the implementation of radiation protection comprises six main themes: radiation protection organisation, radiation protection steering quality, profession and subcontractor commitment, expertise and efficiency of the Risk Prevention Department, operational management of radiation protection, and robustness of the radioactive material transport system. Each theme is divided into sub-themes which are marked according to defined criteria

  16. SCIATRAN 3.1: A new radiative transfer model and retrieval package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Rozanov, Vladimir; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Burrows, John P.

    The SCIATRAN 3.1 package is a result of further development of the SCIATRAN 2.X software family which, similar to previous versions, comprises a radiative transfer model and a retrieval block. After an implementation of the vector radiative transfer model in SCIATRAN 3.0 the spectral range covered by the model has been extended into the thermal infrared ranging to approximately 40 micrometers. Another major improvement has been done accounting for the underlying surface effects. Among others, a sophisticated representation of the water surface with a bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) has been implemented accounting for the Fresnel reflection of the polarized light and for the effect of foam. A newly developed representation for a snow surface allows radiative transfer calculations to be performed within an unpolluted or soiled snow layer. Furthermore, a new approach has been implemented allowing radiative transfer calculations to be performed for a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. This means that, the underlying ocean is not considered as a purely reflecting surface any more. Instead, full radiative transfer calculations are performed within the water allowing the user to simulate the radiance within both the atmosphere and the ocean. Similar to previous versions, the simulations can be performed for any viewing geometry typi-cal for atmospheric observations in the UV-Vis-NIR-TIR spectral range (nadir, limb, off-axis, etc.) as well as for any observer location within or outside the Earth's atmosphere including underwater observations. Similar to the precursor version, the new model is freely available for non-commercial use via the web page of the University of Bremen. In this presentation a short description of the software package, especially of the new features of the radiative transfer model is given, including remarks on the availability for the scientific community. Furthermore, some application examples of the radiative transfer model are

  17. The design and implementation of the radiation therapy information management system (RTIMS) based on the workflow of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qinhong; Li Gaofeng; Zhong Qiuzi; Hou Xiuyu; Li Ming; Xu Yonggang; He Jingxue

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To meet the special needs of the department of radiation oncology, a radiation therapy information management system (RTIMS) has been developed as a secondary database system to supplement the Varian Varis/Aria since 2007. Methods: The RTIMS server was used to run a database and web service of Apache + PHP + MySQL. The RTIMS sever's web service could be visited with Internet Explorer (IE) to input, search, count, and print information from about 30 workstations and 20 personal computers. As some workstations were installed with Windows and IE in English only, some functions had English version. Results: In past five years, as the RTIMS was implemented in the department, some further needs were met and more practical functions were developed. And now the RTIMS almost covered the whole workflow of radiation therapy (RT). By September 2011 , recorded patients data in the RTIMS is as follows: 3900 patients, 2600 outpatient RT records, 6800 progress notes, 1900 RT summaries, 6700 charge records, 83000 workload records, 3900 plan application forms, 1600 ICRT records. etc. Conclusions: The RTIMS based on the workflow of RT has been successfully developed and clinically implemented. And it was demonstrated to be user-friendly and was proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the department. Since it is an in-house developed system, more functions can be added or modified to further enhance its potentials in research and clinical practice. (authors)

  18. Infrared Absorption Spectra, Radiative Efficiencies, and Global Warming Potentials of Newly-Detected Halogenated Compounds: CFC-113a, CFC-112 and HCFC-133a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Etminan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFC-113a (CF3CCl3, CFC-112 (CFCl2CFCl2 and HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl are three newly detected molecules in the atmosphere that are almost certainly emitted as a result of human activity. It is important to characterise the possible contribution of these gases to radiative forcing of climate change and also to provide information on the CO2-equivalence of their emissions. We report new laboratory measurements of absorption cross-sections of these three compounds at a resolution of 0.01 cm−1 for two temperatures 250 K and 295 K in the spectral range of 600–1730 cm−1. These spectra are then used to calculate the radiative efficiencies and global warming potentials (GWP. The radiative efficiencies are found to be between 0.15 and 0.3 W∙m−2∙ppbv−1. The GWP for a 100 year time horizon, relative to carbon dioxide, ranges from 340 for the relatively short-lived HCFC-133a to 3840 for the longer-lived CFC-112. At current (2012 concentrations, these gases make a trivial contribution to total radiative forcing; however, the concentrations of CFC-113a and HCFC-133a are continuing to increase. The 2012 CO2-equivalent emissions, using the GWP (100, are estimated to be about 4% of the current global CO2-equivalent emissions of HFC-134a.

  19. Development and implementation of an automated system for antiquated of the process of gamma radiation monitors calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, Iremar Alves

    2012-01-01

    In this study it was carried out the development and implementation of a system for the appropriate process of gamma radiation monitors calibration, constituted by a pneumatic dispositive to exchange the attenuators and a positioning table, both actuated through a control panel. We also implemented a System of Caesa-Gammatron Irradiator, which increased the range of the air kerma rates, due to its higher activity comparing with the current system of gamma radiation in use in the calibration laboratory of gamma irradiation. Hence, it was necessary the installation of an attenuator dispositive remotely controlled in this irradiator system. Lastly, it was carried out an evaluation of the reduction in the rates of the occupational dose. This dissertation was developed with the aim of improving the quality of the services of calibration and tests of gamma radiation monitors - provided by the IPEN Laboratory of Instrument Calibration - as well as decreasing the occupational dose of the technicians involved in the process of calibration, following thus the principles of radiation protection. (author)

  20. Design and implementation of a system for controlling emission of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Alfaro, Luis Diego

    2012-01-01

    The Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares of the Universidad de Costa Rica has seen the need to automate the process of changing filters, so that no person has to be exposed to the radiation emitted by the source, which can be very harmful to health. A graphical interface and a controller is implemented using the LabView software, to manipulate and detect the position of a rotating disk to a radiation source. The rotary disk is used in the Center by means of a microcontroller Arduino UNO and a stepper motor. An actuator and a stepper motor, controlled through signals sent by an Arduino UNO, have been defined and implemented in a first stage, by an integrated module of bridges H and an optical system to locate the position of the filters. The second stage has been the creation in parallel of a virtual instrument in LabView, with routines able to move the stepper motor shaft to a desired position, along with its graphical interface, adaptable to any stepper motor bipolar or unipolar, and simple to use. The program has been validated to verify proper operation, by a routine in which filters are chosen randomly and persons handling the program. The stages have been documented along with the user manual for proper use of virtual instrument and system assembly. (author) [es

  1. The micro-processor controlled process radiation monitoring system for reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, K.; Noguchi, A.; Kumagami, S.; Gotoh, Y.; Kumahara, T.; Arita, S.

    1986-01-01

    Digital computers are soon expected to be applied to various real-time safety and safety-related systems in nuclear power plants. Hitachi is now engaged in the development of a micro-processor controlled process radiation monitoring system, which operates on digital processing methods employed with a log ratemeter. A newly defined methodology of design and test procedures is being applied as a means of software program verification for these safety systems. Recently implemented micro-processor technology will help to achieve an advanced man-machine interface and highly reliable performance. (author)

  2. Radiation Emergency Preparedness Tools: Psychological First Aid

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Practical Tools for Radiation Emergency Preparedness. A specialist working with CDC's Radiation Studies Branch describes Psychological First Aid and a newly developed multimedia training program, entitled "Psychological First Aid in Radiation Disasters."

  3. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sweta [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Desouches, Stephane L. [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-07-24

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  4. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Sweta; Desouches, Stephane L.; Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  5. TH-A-16A-01: Image Quality for the Radiation Oncology Physicist: Review of the Fundamentals and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J; Imbergamo, P

    2014-01-01

    The expansion and integration of diagnostic imaging technologies such as On Board Imaging (OBI) and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) into radiation oncology has required radiation oncology physicists to be responsible for and become familiar with assessing image quality. Unfortunately many radiation oncology physicists have had little or no training or experience in measuring and assessing image quality. Many physicists have turned to automated QA analysis software without having a fundamental understanding of image quality measures. This session will review the basic image quality measures of imaging technologies used in the radiation oncology clinic, such as low contrast resolution, high contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, and contrast scale, and how to measure and assess them in a meaningful way. Additionally a discussion of the implementation of an image quality assurance program in compliance with Task Group recommendations will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of automated analysis methods. Learning Objectives: Review and understanding of the fundamentals of image quality. Review and understanding of the basic image quality measures of imaging modalities used in the radiation oncology clinic. Understand how to implement an image quality assurance program and to assess basic image quality measures in a meaningful way

  6. European dimension of the implementation of the IAEA TC model project 'Upgrading radiation protection infrastructure'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, J.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation carried out by the IAEA during the period 1984-1995 showed that eleven countries in Europe -- Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cyprus, Estonia, Georgia, Latvia, Lithuania, the Republic of Moldova, The Former Yugoslav Republic (TFYR) of Macedonia -- did not have a satisfactory system for radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources in accordance with the recommended international requirements. During the past four years, these countries have been participating in a Model Project aimed at upgrading radiation protection infrastructure in the Europe region with special emphasis on the establishment of an effective legal framework for adequate regulatory control of radiation sources and facilities. This paper analyses the results accomplished in the implementation of this project. It presents the main objectives, based on the present achievements for a follow-up programme to be carried out in participating and also in some other Member States with insufficient national infrastructures for assuring adequate safety in nuclear and radiation technologies. (author)

  7. Radiation doses of employees of a nuclear medicine department after implementation of more rigorous radiation protection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwowarska-Bilska, H.; Supinska, A.; Listewnik, M. H.; Zorga, P.; Birkenfeld, B.

    2013-01-01

    The appropriate radiation protection measures applied in departments of nuclear medicine should lead to a reduction in doses received by the employees. During 1991-2007, at the Department of Nuclear Medicine of Pomeranian Medical University (Szczecin, Poland), nurses received on average two-times higher (4.6 mSv) annual doses to the whole body than those received by radiopharmacy technicians. The purpose of this work was to examine whether implementation of changes in the radiation protection protocol will considerably influence the reduction in whole-body doses received by the staff that are the most exposed. A reduction in nurses' exposure by ∼63% took place in 2008-11, whereas the exposure of radiopharmacy technicians grew by no more than 22% in comparison with that in the period 1991-2007. Proper reorganisation of the work in departments of nuclear medicine can considerably affect dose reduction and bring about equal distribution of the exposure. (authors)

  8. Importance of establishing radiation protection culture in Radiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploussi, Agapi; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P

    2016-02-28

    The increased use of ionization radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the rapid advances in computed tomography as well as the high radiation doses delivered by interventional procedures have raised serious safety and health concerns for both patients and medical staff and have necessitated the establishment of a radiation protection culture (RPC) in every Radiology Department. RPC is a newly introduced concept. The term culture describes the combination of attitudes, beliefs, practices and rules among the professionals, staff and patients regarding to radiation protection. Most of the time, the challenge is to improve rather than to build a RPC. The establishment of a RPC requires continuing education of the staff and professional, effective communication among stakeholders of all levels and implementation of quality assurance programs. The RPC creation is being driven from the highest level. Leadership, professionals and associate societies are recognized to play a vital role in the embedding and promotion of RPC in a Medical Unit. The establishment of a RPC enables the reduction of the radiation dose, enhances radiation risk awareness, minimizes unsafe practices, and improves the quality of a radiation protection program. The purpose of this review paper is to describe the role and highlight the importance of establishing a strong RPC in Radiology Departments with an emphasis on promoting RPC in the Interventional Radiology environment.

  9. Motion-Compensated Estimation of Delivered Dose during External BeamRadiation Therapy: Implementation in Philips’ Pinnacle3 Treatment Planning System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharat, S.; Parikh, P.; Noel, C.; Meltsner, M.; Bzdusek, K.; Kaus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent research efforts investigating dose escalation techniques for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) andintensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have demonstrated great benefit when high-dose hypofractionated treatment schemes are implemented16,21. The use of

  10. Competence of newly qualified registered nurses from a nursing college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BG Morolong

    2005-09-01

    :2.2.1 ethical standards of research. A descriptive statistical method of data analysis was used in this study. Findings revealed that newly qualified registered nurses were not competent. The highest score obtained was 51 % and the lowest score was 22% with an average score of 34.05%. The results concerning the implementation of the phases of the nursing process indicated that participants were fairly competent in terms of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values of assessment. Participants had very little knowledge of nursing diagnosis and were not competent on the skills of diagnosis. Participants lacked basic knowledge, skills, attitudes and values of the nursing process. They lacked critical thinking skills in their approach to providing quality patient care. The recommendations of the study relate to improving the system of clinical accompaniment, reviewing the clinical facilities where learners are allocated, reviewing the implementation of the curriculum, the methods of teaching and the quality assurance mechanisms that are in place. Further research is recommended on competence of newly qualified registered nurses at other nursing colleges or similar context.

  11. Evaluation of the implementation of radiation protection measures for aircrew in EU member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, S.; Haider, C.; Hans, P.; Kaleve, M.; Neuenfeldt, F.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of the implementation of radiation protection measures for aircrew in EU Member States has recently been performed in a study sponsored by the European Commission. A comprehensive database has been gathered using questionnaires for civil aviation authorities, aircraft operators and radiation protection authorities in each country. The study has revealed the following results: all countries within the scope of this study where aircrew might receive annual doses >1 mSv have implemented appropriate legislation. The treatment of limits or constraints (action levels) for annual doses of 1, 6, 20 mSv could be an area where clear guidance by the European Commission might be needed. The way in which doses are determined might also be treated in a more harmonised way in the EU, including the transfer of dose data of freelancers or crew members working for other airlines. The establishment of the European Aviation Safety Agency leads to a gradual shift in responsibilities from the national civil aviation authorities towards this centralised European agency. Currently, however, tracking of doses for aircrew still lies with national bodies. (authors)

  12. GARLIC — A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code — GARLIC — is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus. - Highlights: • High resolution infrared-microwave radiative transfer model. • Discussion of algorithmic and computational aspects. • Jacobians by automatic/algorithmic differentiation. • Performance evaluation by intercomparisons, verification, validation

  13. Improvement of the radiation protection in medicine by implementation of the Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milu, C.; Dumitrescu, A.

    2005-01-01

    The European Council Directive No. 97/43/EURATOM was approved on 30 June 1997 and refers to health protection of individuals against the damages of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure, superseding the Directive 84/466/EURATOM. As in most European countries, medical exposure is the main man-made radiation exposure of population. Of particular concern in radiation protection in medicine is the use of X-rays for diagnostic purposes, involving potential radiation exposure of young population and of pregnant women. The 97/43/EURATOM Directive is now fully adopted into Romanian legislation and a plan for its implementation has been established. Several practical issues have already arisen and they are related to (1) justification of individual medical exposure (patient selection) due to unclear distribution of responsibilities between the prescriber and the practitioner; (2) justification of medical exposures with no direct health benefit for the exposed person (reconsideration of health screening programmes, exposure of individuals as part of medico-legal procedures); (3) patient dosimetry and the use of Diagnostic Reference Levels (need of procedures and equipment); (4) QA/QC (procedure, training and test facilities); (5) examination of biomedical and medical research by an ethics committee; (6) application of Dose Constraints and Clinical Audit concepts; (7) prohibition of fluoroscopy examinations without an image intensification. An intensive training programme of the personnel involved (practitioners, inspection) was started and special efforts for the acquisition of appropriate equipment are made with the aim to improve radiation protection in medicine, through the implementation of the EU Directive.(author)

  14. Effectiveness of the implementation of a simple radiation reduction protocol in the catheterization laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado-Román, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonsojuradoroman@gmail.com [Unidad de Hemodinámica, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real (Spain); Sánchez-Pérez, Ignacio; Lozano Ruíz-Poveda, Fernando; López-Lluva, María T.; Pinilla-Echeverri, Natalia; Moreno Arciniegas, Andrea [Unidad de Hemodinámica, Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real (Spain); Agudo-Quilez, Pilar [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Gil Agudo, Antonio [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Background and purpose: A reduction in radiation doses at the catheterization laboratory, maintaining the quality of procedures is essential. Our objective was to analyze the results of a simple radiation reduction protocol at a high-volume interventional cardiology unit. Methods: We analyzed 1160 consecutive procedures: 580 performed before the implementation of the protocol and 580 after it. The protocol consisted in: the reduction of the number of ventriculographies and aortographies, the optimization of the collimation and the geometry of the X ray tube-patient-receptor, the use of low dose-rate fluoroscopy and the reduction of the number of cine sequences using the software “last fluoroscopy hold”. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical baseline features or in the procedural characteristics with the exception of a higher percentage of radial approach (30.7% vs 69.6%; p < 0.001) and of percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions after the implementation of the protocol (2.1% vs 6.7%; p = 0,001). Angiographic success was similar during both periods (98.3% vs 99.2%; p = 0.2). There were no significant differences between both periods regarding the overall duration of the procedures (26.9 vs 29.6 min; p = 0.14), or the fluoroscopy time (13.3 vs 13.2 min; p = 0.8). We observed a reduction in the percentage of procedures with ventriculography (80.9% vs 7.1%; p < 0.0001) or aortography (15.4% vs 4.4%; p < 0.0001), the cine runs (21.8 vs 6.9; p < 0.0001) and the dose–area product (165 vs 71 Gyxcm{sup 2}; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: With the implementation of a simple radiation reduction protocol, a 57% reduction of dose–area product was observed without a reduction in the quality or the complexity of procedures. - Highlights: • This simple protocol can achieve a reduction in dose–area product of 57%. • It does not interfere with the quality or complexity of the procedures. • Full advantage of “Last Fluoroscopy

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  16. Exercise recommendations in patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brad; Spencer, Horace; Kortebein, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate exercise recommendations in patients newly diagnosed with fibromyalgia. A retrospective chart review. A public university rheumatology clinic. Patients newly diagnosed with fibromyalgia (N = 122). Frequency and type of exercise recommendations. The mean (standard deviation) age of these patients with fibromyalgia was 45 ± 12 years; 91% were women. Exercise was recommended as part of the documented treatment plan in 47% of these patients (57/122); only 3 patients had a documented contraindication for exercise. Aquatic exercise was most frequently recommended (56% [32/57]), followed by combined aquatic-aerobic exercise (26% [15/57]), and, infrequently, aerobic exercise only (5% [3/57]); only 7% of these patients (4/57) were referred for physical therapy. The primary method of communication was verbal discussion (94% [54/57]). Although there is well-documented evidence that exercise is beneficial for patients with fibromyalgia, we found that less than half of patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia in our study were provided recommendations to initiate an exercise program as part of their treatment plan. Further investigation of these findings are warranted, including evaluation of other university and community rheumatology practices as well as that of other physicians caring for patients with fibromyalgia. However, our findings indicate that there appears to be an opportunity to provide more specific and practical education regarding the implementation of an exercise regimen for patients with newly diagnosed fibromyalgia. Physiatrists may be particularly well suited to manage the exercise component of patients with fibromyalgia because of their specialized training in exercise prescription. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  18. GARLIC - A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code - GARLIC - is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus.

  19. Implementation of nanoparticles in therapeutic radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Erik; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V.

    2017-05-01

    Development and progress of cancer is a very complex disease process to comprehend because of the multiple changes in cellular physiology, pathology, and pathophysiology resulting from the numerous genetic changes from which cancer originates. As a result, most common treatments are not directed at the molecular level but rather at the tissue level. While personalized care is becoming an increasingly aim, the most common cancer treatments are restricted to chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, each of which has a high likelihood of resulting in rather severe adverse side effects. For example, currently used radiation therapy does not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and greatly relies on the external targeting of the radiation beams to specific cells and organs. Because of this, there is an immediate need for the development of new and innovative technologies that help to differentiate tumor cells and micrometastases from normal cells and facilitate the complete destruction of those cells. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have paved a way for the development of nanoparticles (NPs) as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery, and improve the therapeutic index of radiation and tumor response to the treatment. The application of NPs in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing therapeutic effect in tumors and reducing toxicity on normal tissues. Because NPs possess unique properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors and minimal uptake in normal tissues, it makes them ideal for the delivery of radiotherapy. This review provides an overview of the recent development of NPs for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment for a variety of cancers in radiation oncology.

  20. Sec. 46 of the radiation protection ordinance - waiting for implementing regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maushart, R.

    1977-01-01

    There is much uncertainty among the users of radioactive substances in research and medicine about the practical consequences stemming from Sec. 46 of the new Radiation Protection Ordinance with respect to releases of radionuclides with the air and water. On the one hand, the 30 mrem concept has drastically curbed permissible release concentrations. In addition, balancing for each specific nuclide has become compulsory. Both conditions would demand a revision and extension of present measuring techniques. However, the responsible supervisory authorities are unable to issue any rules or regulations as long as there are no uniform standards. The consequence is a complete lack of knowledge, both on the part of users and the supplying industries, about the future expenditure necessary for liquid and gaseous effluent control and the technical performance criteria to be met by radiation measuring equipment. It is to be hoped that these implementing regulations, which are so urgently needed, will soon be published so as to allow users to engage in meaningful and binding planning again, both technically and financially. (orig.) [de

  1. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  2. Q-PYTHIA: a medium-modified implementation of final state radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armesto, Néstor; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a Monte Carlo implementation, within PYTHIA, of medium-induced gluon radiation in the final state branching process. Medium effects are introduced through an additive term in the splitting functions computed in the multiple-soft scattering approximation. The observable effects of this modification are studied for different quantities as fragmentation functions and the hump-backed plateau, and transverse momentum and angular distributions. The anticipated increase of intra-jet multiplicities, energy loss of the leading particle and jet broadening are observed as well as modifications of naive expectations based solely on analytical calculations. This shows the adequacy of a Monte Carlo simulator for jet analyses. Effects of hadronization are found to wash out medium effects in the soft region, while the main features remain. To show the performance of the implementation and the feasibility of our approach in realistic experimental situations we provide some examples: fragmentation functions, nuclear suppression factors, jet shapes and jet multiplicities. The package containing the modified routines is available for public use. This code, which is not an official PYTHIA release, is called Q-PYTHIA. We also include a short manual to perform the simulations of jet quenching.

  3. From idea to implementation: creation of an educational picture book for radiation therapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmar, Kari; Webb, Deborah

    2015-03-01

    Patient education is an integral part of the cancer patient's journey. Radiation therapists strive to provide timely, effective, and evidence-based information on care processes, side effects, and side effect management treatment strategies. Patient satisfaction surveys in health-care settings can guide new interventions and strategies to provide the right education to patients at the right time. Courses offered in adult education and patient education to practicing health-care providers allow for a unique opportunity to look at the current provision of health-care education to patients. This paper explores the development and implementation of a new visual aid for radiation therapy patients in an acute health-care setting with a diversity of languages spoken using principles of adult education.

  4. Radiation protection at urological fluoroscopy working stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, D.; Mohr, H.

    1979-01-01

    Two newly developed radiation protection devices for urological working stations are presented. The local dose to which doctor and assisting personnel are exposed during fluoroscopy and radiography was measured and the radiation burden with and without radiation protection determined. The studies show that without these devices organs such as the eyes are exposed, at a normal working distance from the table, to such an amount of scattered radiation as to reduce the permitted number of examinations per week. (Auth.)

  5. Implementation and display of Computer Aided Design (CAD) models in Monte Carlo radiation transport and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An Xwindow application capable of importing geometric information directly from two Computer Aided Design (CAD) based formats for use in radiation transport and shielding analyses is being developed at ORNL. The application permits the user to graphically view the geometric models imported from the two formats for verification and debugging. Previous models, specifically formatted for the radiation transport and shielding codes can also be imported. Required extensions to the existing combinatorial geometry analysis routines are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options and features which will be implemented in the application are presented. The use of the application as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is also discussed

  6. Newly graduated nurses use of knowledge sources in clinical decison-making - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri

    of clinical decisions, based on transparent, articulate and reflective use of knowledge sources. Furthermore, it is implied that nurses are able to retrieve, asses, implement and evaluate research evidence. To meet these requirements, nursing educations around the world have organised curricula to educate...... graduated nurses do not work within a framework of evidence-based practice. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses’ use in their clinical decision-making and why they use them in order to understand why newly graduated nurses use research and components...... within evidence-based practice to a limited extent. The thesis is based on a synthesis of findings from two studies. The aim of the first study was to explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses use in clinical decision making as reported within international qualitative research. The purpose...

  7. RTOG 0913: A Phase 1 Study of Daily Everolimus (RAD001) in Combination With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinnaiyan, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.chinnaiyan@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Experimental Therapeutics and Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Won, Minhee [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wen, Patrick Y. [Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rojiani, Amyn M. [Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Wendland, Merideth [Radiation Oncology, US Oncology-Willamette Valley Cancer Institute, Eugene, Oregon (United States); Dipetrillo, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Corn, Benjamin W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Mehta, Minesh P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (RAD001) administered daily with concurrent radiation and temozolomide in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. Methods and Materials: Everolimus was administered daily with concurrent radiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions) and temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2} per day). Everolimus was escalated from 2.5 mg/d (dose level 1) to 5 mg/d (dose level 2) to 10 mg/d (dose level 3). Adjuvant temozolomide was delivered at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1 to 5, every 28 days, for up to 12 cycles, with concurrent everolimus at the previously established daily dose of 10 mg/d. Dose escalation continued if a dose level produced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) in fewer than 3 of the first 6 evaluable patients. Results: Between October 28, 2010, and July 2, 2012, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0913 protocol initially registered a total of 35 patients, with 25 patients successfully meeting enrollment criteria receiving the drug and evaluable for toxicity. Everolimus was successfully escalated to the predetermined maximum tolerated dose of 10 mg/d. Two of the first 6 eligible patients had a DLT at each dose level. DLTs included gait disturbance, febrile neutropenia, rash, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, hypoxia, ear pain, headache, and mucositis. Other common toxicities were grade 1 or 2 hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. At the time of analysis, there was 1 death reported, which was attributed to tumor progression. Conclusions: Daily oral everolimus (10 mg) combined with both concurrent radiation and temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide is well tolerated, with an acceptable toxicity profile. A randomized phase 2 clinical trial with mandatory correlative biomarker analysis is currently under way, designed to both determine the efficacy of this regimen and identify molecular determinants of response.

  8. Developing and implementing safety culture in the uses of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to develop and implement safety culture in the uses of radiation sources in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and teaching, and makes reference to the experience gained by the industries where that culture has been developed and improved, i.e. the nuclear industry. Suggestions to assist progress toward safety culture are here described for regulators, organisations using those sources, and professional associations. Even though emphasis is given to small organisations or teams of workers, this approach may be also useful to greater organisations like industrial irradiation companies or governmental research laboratories. In each case, parties being the principal focus of the learning process toward a progressive safety culture should be identified. (author)

  9. Estonian experience in establishing the national radiation protection infrastructure in the newly independent State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalam, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Estonian Radiation Protection Centre (ERPC) was established on 4 January 1996 as the regulatory authority for radiation protection and safety of radiation sources. The report explains the ERPC's structure and its main functions and activities, and provides information on the regulations that have been approved or are planned to be adopted. Reference is made to radiological emergency preparedness and, in particular, to the status of development of the system of regulatory control by authorization and inspection of radiation practices in the country. (author)

  10. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Milardi, Demetrio; Mormina, Enricomaria; Rania, Laura; Postorino, Elisa; Marino, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Anastasi, Giuseppe Pio; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Aragona, Pasquale; Quartarone, Angelo; Gaeta, Michele

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To assess intracranial visual system changes of newly diagnosed Parkinson disease in drug-naïve patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson disease and 20 age-matched control subjects were recruited. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging) was performed with a 3-T MR imager. White matter changes were assessed by exploring a white matter diffusion profile by means of diffusion-tensor imaging-based parameters and constrained spherical deconvolution-based connectivity analysis and by means of white matter voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Alterations in occipital gray matter were investigated by means of gray matter VBM. Morphologic analysis of the optic chiasm was based on manual measurement of regions of interest. Statistical testing included analysis of variance, t tests, and permutation tests. Results In the patients with Parkinson disease, significant alterations were found in optic radiation connectivity distribution, with decreased lateral geniculate nucleus V2 density (F, -8.28; P Parkinson disease and that the entire intracranial visual system can be involved. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. Technical Equivalency Documentation for a Newly Acquired Alpha Spectroscopy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, D P; Fisher, S K; Hann, P R; Hume, R

    2007-01-01

    The response of a recently acquired Canberra(trademark) Alpha Analyst 'Blue' system (Chamber Number's 173-208) used by the Hazards Control, Radiation Safety Section, WBC/Spectroscopy Team has been studied with respect to an existing Canberra system. The existing Canberra system consists of thirty Alpha Analyst dual chambers Model XXXX comprising a total of sixty detectors (Chambers Number's 101-124 and 137-172). The existing chambers were previously compared to an older system consisting of thirty-six Model 7401 alpha spectrometry chambers (Chamber Number's 1-36) Chambers 101-124 and 137-172 are DOELAP accredited. The older system was previously DOELAP accredited for the routine Alpha Spectroscopy program used in LLNL's in vitro bioassay program. The newly acquired Alpha Analyst system operates on a network with software that controls and performs analysis of the current Alpha Analyst system (Chamber Number's 101-124 and 137-172). This exact same software is used for the current system and the newly acquired system and is DOELAP accredited. This document compares results from the existing Alpha System with the newer Alpha Analyst system

  12. Design and implementation of a virtual laboratory of radiation measurement; Diseno e implementacion de un laboratorio virtual de medicion de radiaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez T, J. R.; Morales S, J. B. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: jms0620@yahoo.com.mx

    2009-10-15

    The work involves the implementation of a virtual laboratory, this project is conducted in the Faculty of Engineering of National Autonomous University of Mexico with the name of LANUVI. It is intended that the laboratory can be used by students who have interest in the nuclear radiation knowledge as well as in its detection and attenuation, in addition serve as and introduction to nuclear systems. In the first part of project will conduct a source that can simulate the particle radiation of Alfa, beta, neutrons and gamma rays. The project will take sources used in class laboratories and elements that are dangerous but are used in different practical applications. After taking the source analyzing the particles behaviour in different media like air, animal tissue, aluminium, lead, etc. The analysis is done in different ways in order to know with which material can stop or mitigate the different types of radiation. Finally shall be measure radioactivity with different types of detectors. At this point, has the behaviour of ionization chamber but in the future is expected to make the simulation of some other radiation detectors. The mathematical models we represent the behaviour of these cases were implemented in free software. The program will be used to implement the virtual laboratory with radiation sources, detectors and different types of shields will be Blender which is a free software that is used by many users for the embodiment of games but try to use as a tool to help visualize the different equipment that is widely used in a radioactive materials laboratory. (Author)

  13. Promoting safety culture in radiation industry through radiation audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates the Malaysian experience in implementing and promoting effective radiation safety program. Current management practice demands that an organization inculcate culture of safety in preventing radiation hazard. The aforementioned objectives of radiation protection can only be met when it is implemented and evaluated continuously. Commitment from the workforce to treat safety as a priority and the ability to turn a requirement into a practical language is also important to implement radiation safety policy efficiently. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. This program is known as radiation safety audit and is able to reveal where and when action is needed to make improvements to the systems of controls. A structured and proper radiation self-auditing system is seen as the sole requirement to meet the current and future needs in sustainability of radiation safety. As a result safety culture, which has been a vital element on safety in many industries can be improved and promote changes, leading to good safety performance and excellence. (author)

  14. How should we discuss genetic testing with women newly diagnosed with breast cancer? Design and implementation of a randomized controlled trial of two models of delivering education about treatment-focused genetic testing to younger women newly diagnosed with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watts Kaaren J

    2012-07-01

    making; and decision regret. A process-oriented retrospective online survey will examine health professionals’ attitudes toward TFGT; a health economic analysis will determine the cost effectiveness of the intervention. Discussion This trial will provide crucial information about the impact, efficiency and cost effectiveness of an educational pamphlet designed to inform younger women newly diagnosed with breast cancer about genetic testing. Issues regarding implementation of the trial are discussed. Trial registration The study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Group (Registration no: ACTRN12610000502033

  15. Radiation Emergency Preparedness Tools: Psychological First Aid

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-30

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Practical Tools for Radiation Emergency Preparedness. A specialist working with CDC's Radiation Studies Branch describes Psychological First Aid and a newly developed multimedia training program, entitled "Psychological First Aid in Radiation Disasters.".  Created: 12/30/2010 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Radiation Studies Branch and Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/13/2011.

  16. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  17. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000 ® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results

  18. Los Alamos Plutonium Facility newly generated TRU waste certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.; Sinkule, B.; Maez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities being planned and implemented to certify newly generated contact handled transuranic (TRU) waste produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Plutonium Facility. Certifying waste at the point of generation is the most important cost and labor saving step in the WIPP certification process. The pedigree of a waste item is best known by the originator of the waste and frees a site from expensive characterization activities such as those associated with legacy waste. Through a cooperative agreement with LANLs Waste Management Facility and under the umbrella of LANLs WIPP-related certification and quality assurance documents, the Plutonium Facility will be certifying its own newly generated waste. Some of the challenges faced by the Plutonium Facility in preparing to certify TRU waste include the modification and addition of procedures to meet WIPP requirements, standardizing packaging for TRU waste, collecting processing documentation from operations which produce TRU waste, and developing ways to modify waste streams which are not certifiable in their present form

  19. Radiation curing technology progress and its industrial applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukachi, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Optics, electronics and display industries are now the driving forces for the Japanese radiation curing technology. The purpose of this paper is to overview the newly developed radiation curing technology in Japan, in particular, its industrial applications, and to present the market figures in radiation curing applications, which were surveyed by RadTech Japan in 2002 afresh. (author)

  20. Design and implementation of a device for measuring radiation energy of an electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salhi, Heythem; Selmi, Samir

    2010-01-01

    Our work is part of a graduation project at the School of Technology and Computing, to obtain a master's degree in electrical engineering specialty industrial computer. Throughout the four-month internship at the National Center for Nuclear Science and Technology (CNSTN), we have learned to practice the knowledge acquired during the formative years and to manage our working time. Our job was to design and implementation of a device for measuring the energy of radiation. Our project meets the needs of users in the radio treatment Unit, which amount to automate measurement of radiation energy from the electron accelerator. This project has been beneficial on several levels: it was an opportunity to achieve better control of printed circuits, especially when they are dual layer and learning a new programming language that is actually BASIC. In human terms, this work has given us the opportunity to learn to manage our time, and learn teamwork. However, we are convinced that this project can be enhanced on various levels. It can be considered as a starting point of a contribution to the real-time measurement of the energy of radiation.

  1. Design and implementation of a radiotherapy programme: Clinical, medical physics, radiation protection and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the clinical aspects (diagnosis, decision, indication for treatment, follow-up) as well as the procedures related to the physical and technical aspects of patient treatment must be subjected to careful control and planning in order to ensure safe, high quality radiotherapy. Whilst it has long been recognized that the physical aspects of quality assurance in radiotherapy are vital to achieve and effective and safe treatment, it has been increasingly acknowledged only recently that a systematic approach is absolutely necessary to all steps within clinical and technical aspects of a radiotherapy programme as well. The need to establish general guidelines at the IAEA, taking into account clinical medical physics, radiation protection and safety considerations, for designing and implementing radiotherapy programmes in Member States has been identified through the Member States' increased interest in the efficient and safe application of radiation in health care. Several consultants and advisory group meetings were convened to prepare a report providing a basis for establishing a programme in radiotherapy. The present TECDOC is addressed to all professionals and administrators involved in the development, implementation and management of a radiotherapy programme in order to establish a common and consistent framework where all steps and procedures in radiotherapy are taken into account

  2. Accelerator and radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  3. RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF TARGET PROGRAMS ON RADIATION ACCIDENT REMEDIATION FOR THE PERIOD TO 2010 AND PROSPECTS OF FURTHER ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Marchenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The report contains information about measures undertaken by the Ministry of Civil Defense and Emergencies of the Russian Federation in the framework of implementation of the state policy in the field of radiation accidents remediation. Results of works realized in the framework of target programs on remediation of radiation accidents at Chernobyl NPP and Production Association MAYAK, and on problems caused by nuclear weapon tests at Seminalatinsk test site are presented.

  4. Radiation geophysics Implementation of the theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The gamma spectrometry allows to measure directly a source from the surface of the ground without penetration at great deepness. The fact that it collects data in surface allows to establish links between contrasts measured for the radioelements and the cartography of the geology of the rocky substratum or formations in, surface and the modifications associated to the ore deposits. Each rock or materials contents radioactive elements. the gamma spectrometer is conceived to detect the gamma radiation emitted by these radioactive elements and allows to class precisely the detected radiations according to the energy they emit. It is this function of classification that distinguishes the spectrometer from the others instruments used to measure only the whole radioactivity. (N.C.)

  5. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  6. Pediatric CT: implementation of ASIR for substantial radiation dose reduction while maintaining pre-ASIR image noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Samuel L; Moore, Bria M; Yee, Brian S; Kaufman, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current-modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose reduction tool only; no net change to the magnitude

  7. A computer simulation model to compute the radiation transfer of mountainous regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuguang; Zhao, Feng; Song, Rui

    2011-11-01

    In mountainous regions, the radiometric signal recorded at the sensor depends on a number of factors such as sun angle, atmospheric conditions, surface cover type, and topography. In this paper, a computer simulation model of radiation transfer is designed and evaluated. This model implements the Monte Carlo ray-tracing techniques and is specifically dedicated to the study of light propagation in mountainous regions. The radiative processes between sun light and the objects within the mountainous region are realized by using forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing methods. The performance of the model is evaluated through detailed comparisons with the well-established 3D computer simulation model: RGM (Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) based on the same scenes and identical spectral parameters, which shows good agreements between these two models' results. By using the newly developed computer model, series of typical mountainous scenes are generated to analyze the physical mechanism of mountainous radiation transfer. The results show that the effects of the adjacent slopes are important for deep valleys and they particularly affect shadowed pixels, and the topographic effect needs to be considered in mountainous terrain before accurate inferences from remotely sensed data can be made.

  8. WE-DE-209-00: Practical Implementation of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques for Breast Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  9. WE-DE-209-00: Practical Implementation of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques for Breast Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  10. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To advance evidence on newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources. BACKGROUND: Clinical decisions need to be evidence-based and understanding the knowledge sources that newly graduated nurses use will inform both education and practice. Qualitative studies on newly graduated nurses' use...... underscoring progression in knowledge use and perception of competence and confidence among newly graduated nurses. CONCLUSION: The transition phase, feeling of confidence and ability to use critical thinking and reflection, has a great impact on knowledge sources incorporated in clinical decisions....... The synthesis accentuates that for use of newly graduated nurses' qualifications and skills in evidence-based practice, clinical practice needs to provide a supportive environment which nurtures critical thinking and questions and articulates use of multiple knowledge sources....

  11. Phase II Pilot Study of Bevacizumab in Combination with Temozolomide and Regional Radiation Therapy for Up-Front Treatment of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme: Interim Analysis of Safety and Tolerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Albert; Filka, Emese; McGibbon, Bruce; Nghiemphu, Phioanh Leia; Graham, Carrie; Yong, William H.; Mischel, Paul; Liau, Linda M.; Bergsneider, Marvin; Pope, Whitney; Selch, Michael; Cloughesy, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess interim safety and tolerability of a 10-patient, Phase II pilot study using bevacizumab (BV) in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) and regional radiation therapy (RT) in the up-front treatment of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: All patients received standard external beam regional RT of 60.0 Gy in 30 fractions started within 3 to 5 weeks after surgery. Concurrently TMZ was given daily at 75 mg/m 2 for 42 days during RT, and BV was given every 2 weeks at 10 mg/kg starting with the first day of RT/TMZ. After a 2-week interval upon completion of RT, the post-RT phase commenced with resumption of TMZ at 150 to 200 mg/m 2 for 5 days every 4 weeks and continuation of BV every 2 weeks. Results: For these 10 patients, toxicities were compiled until study discontinuation or up to ∼40 weeks from initial study treatment for those remaining on-study. In terms of serious immediate or delayed neurotoxicity, 1 patient developed presumed radiation-induced optic neuropathy. Among the toxicities that could be potentially treatment related, relatively high incidences of fatigue, myelotoxicity, wound breakdown, and deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism were observed. Conclusion: The observed toxicities were acceptable to continue enrollment toward the overall target group of 70 patients. Preliminary efficacy analysis shows encouraging mean progression-free survival. At this time data are not sufficient to encourage routine off-label use of BV combined with TMZ/RT in the setting of newly diagnosed glioblastoma without longer follow-up, enrollment of additional patients, and thorough efficacy assessment

  12. Implementation of a system for external audits beam radiation therapy in terms of reference no

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Dominguez, Lourdes; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo; Garcia Yip, Fernando; Rodriguez Machado, Jorge; Morales Lopez, Jorge Luis; Silvestre Patallo, Ileana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents our experience in implementing a external audit system for radiotherapy beam in no reference conditions with the use of CIRS and a summary of the measurements with him made.This paper presents our experience in implementing a external audit system for radiotherapy beam in no reference conditions with the use of CIRS and a summary of the measurements with him made. Centers were audited with external beam high-energy Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV and were considered 4 treatment planning systems (TPS): AMEPLAN, Theraplan Plus, Precise Plan and MIRS to calculate doses prescribed in each test case. All measurements were acquired by the audit team using the anthropomorphic phantom CIRS, Semiflex chamber PTW 31010 and PTW electrometer STATES. The implementation and development of the external audits of beams radiotherapy in terms of 'no reference' has brought an improvement in both clinical aspects of treatment and the radiation safety and the quality control, has given us greater confidence and for this reason we believe has become essential. (Author)

  13. Implementation of immobilization accessories for positioning of small animals for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettorato, M.C.; Girotto, C.H.; Fogaça, J.L.; Vulcano, L.C.; Fernandes, M.A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a modality that is presenting great advances in veterinary medicine worldwide. In Brazil, this therapeutic option is underachieved. The success of this method depends on several factors, including the use of appropriate accessories for protection and immobilization of patients. For the immobilization of small animals during treatment, in addition to sedation and anesthesia, immobilizing accessories, similar to those used in human radiotherapy, are used. This study aimed to present proposals for immobilizing accessories adapted to the positioning of small animals in order to be used in radiotherapy planning. In order to achieve results, accessories were made and tested in a living animal simulating a radiotherapy planning, which proved to be favorable to use in positioning small animals undergoing radiotherapy and for implementation processes. (author)

  14. Implementation of immobilization accessories for positioning of small animals for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vettorato, M.C.; Girotto, C.H.; Fogaça, J.L.; Vulcano, L.C.; Fernandes, M.A.R., E-mail: m_vettorato@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Radiation therapy is a modality that is presenting great advances in veterinary medicine worldwide. In Brazil, this therapeutic option is underachieved. The success of this method depends on several factors, including the use of appropriate accessories for protection and immobilization of patients. For the immobilization of small animals during treatment, in addition to sedation and anesthesia, immobilizing accessories, similar to those used in human radiotherapy, are used. This study aimed to present proposals for immobilizing accessories adapted to the positioning of small animals in order to be used in radiotherapy planning. In order to achieve results, accessories were made and tested in a living animal simulating a radiotherapy planning, which proved to be favorable to use in positioning small animals undergoing radiotherapy and for implementation processes. (author)

  15. Radiation repair models for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Roger G

    2018-02-28

    A number of newly emerging clinical techniques involve non-conventional patterns of radiation delivery which require an appreciation of the role played by radiation repair phenomena. This review outlines the main models of radiation repair, focussing on those which are of greatest clinical usefulness and which may be incorporated into biologically effective dose assessments. The need to account for the apparent "slowing-down" of repair rates observed in some normal tissues is also examined, along with a comparison of the relative merits of the formulations which can be used to account for such phenomena. Jack Fowler brought valuable insight to the understanding of radiation repair processes and this article includes reference to his important contributions in this area.

  16. The radiation performance standard (SPN) in the Netherlands; De stralingsprestatienorm (SPN) nader toegelicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aernsbergen, L.M.; Klomberg, T.; Van Luijk, P. [Ministerie van VROM, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    The radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) is a measure for the maximum level of radiation in newly built houses (radon and external radiation). A brief overview is given of the principle of the SPN, the planned legal implementation as part of the Dutch Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit'), and the calculation method (NEN 1781) [Dutch] Vanaf 1 januari 2003 wordt het stralingsniveau in nieuwbouwwoningen aan een maximum gebonden. Het gaat daarbij om de totale dosis door radon en externe straling. Vergeleken met het buitenland is het stralingsniveau in de woning laag in ons land. Desalniettemin loopt de gemiddelde Nederlander de helft van de totale stralingsdosis binnenshuis op. Volgens de Gezondheidsraad leidt blootstelling aan radon binnenshuis in Nederland tot naar schatting tussen 100 en 1200 extra gevallen van longkanker (centrale schatting is 800). Verder blijkt uit onderzoek dat in Nederlandse nieuwbouwwoningen de gemiddelde radonconcentratie in de twee decennia na 1970 met circa 50% is toegenomen. De Nederlandse overheid vindt een gezond binnenklimaat belangrijk, daarom is een zogenaamde Stralings Prestatie Norm (SPN) ontwikkeld. Het beleid is om te vermijden dat de straling in de woning verder toeneemt. De SPN richt zich op nog te bouwen woningen.

  17. Study on time properties of newly type inorganic scintillator cerium fluoride (CeF3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mengchun; Zhou Dianzhong; Guo Cun; Ye Wenying

    2003-01-01

    CeF 3 is a newly fast time response inorganic scintillator, the time characteristics of which, developed in recent country in nearly year were studied in our works. The time characteristics are rise time, FWHM time and fall time for fast pulse radiation source. As the same time, authors have calculated and used the formula of pulse method gain to the decay time constant of crystal shining, the decay time constant measured is the same to the results of foreign references

  18. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Aizer, Ayal A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Christianson, Laura W.; Horvath, Margaret C.; Dunn, Ian F.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Ligon, Keith L.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  19. Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Older Glioblastoma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvold, Nils D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tanguturi, Shyam K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Aizer, Ayal A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Nayak, Lakshmi [Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Christianson, Laura W.; Horvath, Margaret C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Dunn, Ian F.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Johnson, Mark D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Claus, Elizabeth B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Chiocca, E. Antonio [Department of Neurosurgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ligon, Keith L. [Department of Pathology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Alexander, Brian M., E-mail: bmalexander@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma have poor outcomes, and optimal treatment is controversial. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HRT) is frequently used but has not been compared to patients receiving standard fractionated radiation therapy (SRT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients ≥65 years of age who received radiation for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma from 1994 to 2013. The distribution of clinical covariates across various radiation regimens was analyzed for possible selection bias. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison of hypofractionated radiation (typically, 40 Gy/15 fractions) versus standard fractionation (typically, 60 Gy/30 fractions) in the setting of temozolomide was conducted using Cox regression and propensity score analysis. Results: Patients received SRT + TMZ (n=57), SRT (n=35), HRT + TMZ (n=34), or HRT (n=9). Patients receiving HRT were significantly older (median: 79 vs 69 years of age; P<.001) and had worse baseline performance status (P<.001) than those receiving SRT. On multivariate analysis, older age (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.10, P=.01), lower Karnofsky performance status (AHR: 1.02; 95% CI: 1.01-1.03; P=.01), multifocal disease (AHR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.23-3.61, P=.007), and radiation alone (vs SRT + TMZ; SRT: AHR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.06-2.79; P=.03; HRT: AHR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.44-10.60, P=.007) were associated with decreased overall survival. After propensity score adjustment, patients receiving HRT with TMZ had similar overall survival compared with those receiving SRT with TMZ (AHR: 1.10, 95% CI: 0.50-2.4, P=.82). Conclusions: With no randomized data demonstrating equivalence between HRT and SRT in the setting of TMZ for glioblastoma, significant selection bias exists in the implementation of HRT. Controlling for this bias, we observed similar overall

  20. A treatment of the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism and its implementation in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the practical theory that was used to implement the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). ARTS now treats the Zeeman effect in a general manner for several gas species for all polarizations and takes into account variations in both magnetic and atmospheric fields along a full 3D geometry. We present how Zeeman splitting affects polarization in radiative transfer simulations and find that the effect may be large in Earth settings for polarized receivers in limb observing geometry. We find that not taking a spatially varying magnetic field into account can result in absolute errors in the measurement vector of at least 10 K in Earth magnetic field settings. The paper also presents qualitative tests for O 2 lines against previous models (61.15 GHz line) and satellite data from Odin-SMR (487.25 GHz line), and the overall consistency between previous models, satellite data, and the new ARTS Zeeman module seems encouraging. -- Highlights: • We implement the Zeeman effect with Stokes formalism in ARTS. • We give a practical theory for the implementation. • Examples of how the Zeeman effect change RT are presented. • Qualitative Odin-SMR O 2 limb sounding model indicates the Zeeman effect is necessary

  1. Newly graduated nurses use of knowledge sources in clinical decison-making - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri

    Evidence-based practice has been introduced internationally as a standard for healthcare delivery to improve the quality of care, thus ensuring safe care and treatment. Evidence-based practice calls for a decision-making that specifically requires nurses to place the patient at the centre...... of clinical decisions, based on transparent, articulate and reflective use of knowledge sources. Furthermore, it is implied that nurses are able to retrieve, asses, implement and evaluate research evidence. To meet these requirements, nursing educations around the world have organised curricula to educate...... and support future nurses, enabling them to work within a framework of evidence-based practice. Recent studies underline that despite curricula interventions, newly graduated nurses’ use of research evidence and components within evidence-based practice is limited. However, it is unclear why the newly...

  2. Photonuclear Physics in Radiation Transport - II: Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.C.; Little, R.C.; Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers. The first paper describes model calculations and nuclear data evaluations of photonuclear reactions on isotopes of C, O, Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Cu, Ta, W, and Pb for incident photon energies up to 150 MeV. This paper describes the steps taken to process these files into transport libraries and to update the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) and MCNPX radiation transport codes to use tabular photonuclear reaction data. The evaluated photonuclear data files are created in the standard evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) format. These files must be processed by the NJOY data processing system into A Compact ENDF (ACE) files suitable for radiation transport calculations. MCNP and MCNPX have been modified to use these new data in a self-consistent and fully integrated manner. Verification problems were used at each step along the path to check the integrity of the methodology. The resulting methodology and tools provide a comprehensive system for using photonuclear data in radiation transport calculations. Also described are initial validation simulations used to benchmark several of the photonuclear transport tables

  3. Training program in radiation protection: implantation in a radiation oncology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, Mario; Morrier, Janelle; Cote, Carl; Lavallee, Marie C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To introduce the radiation protection training program implemented in the radiation oncology department of the Hotel-Dieu de Quebec. This program seeks to provide an adequate training for all the clinic workers and to fulfill Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) legislations. Materials and Methods: The radiation protection training program implemented is based on the use of five different education modalities: 1) Oral presentations, when the objective of the formation is to inform a large number of persons about general topics; 2) Periodic journals are published bimonthly and distributed to members of the department. They aim to answer frequently asked questions on the radiation safety domain. Each journal contains one main subject which is vulgarized and short notices, these later added to inform the readers about the departmental news and developments in radiation safety; 3) Electronic self-training presentations are divided into several units. Topics, durations, complexity and evaluations are adapted for different worker groups; 4) Posters are strategically displayed in the department in order to be read by all the radiation oncology employees, even those who are not specialized in the radiation protection area; 5) Simulations are organized for specialised workers to practice and to develop their skills in radiation protection situations as emergencies. A registration method was developed to record all training performed by each member of the department. Results: The training program implemented follows the CNSC recommendations. It allows about 150 members of the department to receive proper radiation safety training. The oral presentations allow an interaction between the trainer and the workers. The periodic journals are simple to write while ensuring continuous training. They are also easy to read and to understand. The e-learning units and their associated evaluations can be done at any time and everywhere in the department. The

  4. Some problems in the acceptability of implementing radiation protection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The three fundamentals that radiation protection programs are based upon are; 1) establishing a quantitative correlation between radiation exposure and biological effects in people; 2) determining a level of acceptable risk of exposure; and 3) establishing systems to measure the radiation dose to insure compliance with the regulations or criteria. The paper discusses the interrelationship of these fundamentals, difficulties in obtaining a consensus of acceptable risk and gives some examples of problems in identifying the most critical population-at-risk and in measuring dose. Despite such problems, it is recommended that we proceed with the existing conservative structure of radiation protection programs based upon a linear no threshold model for low radiation doses to insure public acceptability of various potential radiation risks. Voluntary compliance as well as regulatory requirements should continue to be pursued to maintain minimal exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. Measurement and modeling of external radiation during 1985 from LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility] emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, B.M.; Olsen, W.A.; Chen, Ili; Van Etten, D.M.

    1987-11-01

    An array of three portable, pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) continued to measure external radiation levels during 1985 caused by radionuclides emitted from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). A Gaussian-type atmospheric dispersion model, using onsite meteorological and stack release data, was tested during this study. A more complex finite model, which takes into account the contribution of radiation at a receptor from different locations of the passing plume, was also tested. Monitoring results indicate that, as in 1984, a persistent wind up the Rio Grande Valley during the evening and early morning hours is largely responsible for causing the highest external radiation levels to occur to the northeast and north-northeast of LAMPF. However, because of increased turbulent mixing during the day, external radiation levels are generally much less during the day than at night. External radiation levels during 1985 show approximately a 75% reduction over 1984 levels. This resulted from a similar percentage reduction in LAMPF emissions caused by newly implemented emission controls. Comparison of predicted and measured daily external radiation levels indicates a high degree of correlation. The model also gives accurate estimates of measured concentrations over longer time periods. Comparison of predicted and measured hourly values indicates that the model generally tends to overpredict during the day and underpredict at night. 9 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  6. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Bridget F; Lee, W Robert

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective treatment for newly diagnosed prostate cancer, salvage treatment, or for palliation of advanced disease. Herein we briefly discuss the indications, results, and complications associated with brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy, when used as monotherapy and in combination with each other or androgen deprivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation hazards underestimated. Or?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckow, J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation protection claims that its regulations, policies and approaches are based on scientific evidence. If due to progress in science and technology new knowledge is added, it must be given to whether or not the existing radiation protection implementing is still appropriate or whether or not modifications need to be made. However, radiation protection is not just a matter of science. Continuity, consensus, accountability, public perception, communication and social acceptance play an important role in radiation protection as well. Thus, as new scientific evidence should be taken into account, not only the adequate implementation of radiation protection has to be discussed, but also their impact on the public perception and acceptance. It is one major challenge for all who are involved in radiation protection, to find an appropriate balance between these two aspects. (orig.)

  8. Radiation Protection Of Outside Workers: Implementation Of The EC Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannsens, A.; Schnuer, K.; Naegele, J.; Lefaure, C.; Vaillant, L.

    2006-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980's, the problem of radiological protection of workers belonging to contracted companies (undertakings) within nuclear facilities was raised. In most of the nuclear facilities, the so-called outside workers received 80% (and even more) of the collective dose, and quite often higher individual doses than workers permanently employed by the nuclear operators. Since the outside workers radiation protection issue was not explicitly taken into account by the 1980 European Basic Safety Standards Directive, there was a need for an additional piece of European radiation protection legislation. In this context, the European Union adopted in 1990 the Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM on the radiological protection of outside workers. This Directive shall ensure at European Union level that the radiological protection situation for the outside workers is equivalent to that offered to those workers permanently employed by the operators of nuclear facilities. Since the adoption of the Directive in 1990 the geographical situation of the European Union has changed significantly. At the same time, an evolution took place in the industrial structures of the nuclear industry followed by changes of employment conditions. Furthermore, new European radiation protection requirements were issued considering scientific and technical developments in the radiological protection field and laid down in the new radiation Protection Basic Safety Standards Directive 96/29/EURATOM. Taking into account these aspects the Radiation Protection Unit of the European Commission Directorate General for Energy and Transport decided to investigate the current situation and the future status of the Outside Workers Directive 90/641/EURATOM. The European Commission Radiation Protection Unit thus awarded the CEPN with a contract in order to evaluate through a survey the level of regulatory, administrative and operational implementation of Directive 90/641/EURATOM into Member States

  9. Radiation Protection Of Outside Workers: Implementation Of The EC Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannsens, A.; Schnuer, K.; Naegele, J. [European Commission, DG Energy and Transport B. EUROFORUM, 4455, L-2920 (Luxembourg); Lefaure, C.; Vaillant, L. [Nuclear Protection Evaluation Centre (CEPN) Batiment Expansion 10000, 28 rue de la Redoute, 92263 Fontenay-aux- Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    In the beginning of the 1980's, the problem of radiological protection of workers belonging to contracted companies (undertakings) within nuclear facilities was raised. In most of the nuclear facilities, the so-called outside workers received 80% (and even more) of the collective dose, and quite often higher individual doses than workers permanently employed by the nuclear operators. Since the outside workers radiation protection issue was not explicitly taken into account by the 1980 European Basic Safety Standards Directive, there was a need for an additional piece of European radiation protection legislation. In this context, the European Union adopted in 1990 the Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM on the radiological protection of outside workers. This Directive shall ensure at European Union level that the radiological protection situation for the outside workers is equivalent to that offered to those workers permanently employed by the operators of nuclear facilities. Since the adoption of the Directive in 1990 the geographical situation of the European Union has changed significantly. At the same time, an evolution took place in the industrial structures of the nuclear industry followed by changes of employment conditions. Furthermore, new European radiation protection requirements were issued considering scientific and technical developments in the radiological protection field and laid down in the new radiation Protection Basic Safety Standards Directive 96/29/EURATOM. Taking into account these aspects the Radiation Protection Unit of the European Commission Directorate General for Energy and Transport decided to investigate the current situation and the future status of the Outside Workers Directive 90/641/EURATOM. The European Commission Radiation Protection Unit thus awarded the CEPN with a contract in order to evaluate through a survey the level of regulatory, administrative and operational implementation of Directive 90/641/EURATOM into Member

  10. Implementation of an inclusive radiation monitoring system in the Bragin district in Belarus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouail, P.; Bataille, C. [Centre d' etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Katlabai, T. [Sprout of Life, Krasnoye (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents results from one of the projects developed within the general framework of the international Programme 'CORE' (Cooperation for Rehabilitation in Belarus). The overall objective of the programme is to make sustainable improvements to the living conditions of the inhabitants of the territories affected by the Chernobyl disaster. The CORE Programme is currently developed in four contaminated districts of Belarus (Bragin, Cherchersk, Slavgorod and Stolyn) in the following four areas: economic and social development; health care and surveillance; education and culture; and radiological quality. The project that is presented here refers specifically to the field of 'radiological quality' and will last until the end of 2008. The project named 'implementation of an inclusive radiation monitoring system' was launched in April 2004 in the Bragin district, which is one of the most contaminated areas in Belarus. It is located in the very South East of the country and is adjacent to the 30 km exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (zone with caesium 137 soil contamination above 1480 kBq/m{sup 2}). Since the accident, the number of people living in the district has declined by 56%. Today, 17000 persons, including 3000 children, live there in mostly rural areas where {sup 137}Cs levels in soil are between 185 and 555 kBq/m{sup 2}. The project aims at diffusing a practical radiation protection culture, among the population, and especially among children, through the development of a radiation monitoring system handled by the local professionals and the population. The adopted approach is mainly based on the experience of the ETHOS Project implemented in Belarus between 1996 and 2001. Indeed the ETHOS Project revealed that an efficient monitoring system and the involvement of the local population and professionals in the day-to-day management of the radioactive contamination of their environment are key elements in

  11. Implementation of an inclusive radiation monitoring system in the Bragin district in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouail, P.; Bataille, C.; Katlabai, T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results from one of the projects developed within the general framework of the international Programme 'CORE' (Cooperation for Rehabilitation in Belarus). The overall objective of the programme is to make sustainable improvements to the living conditions of the inhabitants of the territories affected by the Chernobyl disaster. The CORE Programme is currently developed in four contaminated districts of Belarus (Bragin, Cherchersk, Slavgorod and Stolyn) in the following four areas: economic and social development; health care and surveillance; education and culture; and radiological quality. The project that is presented here refers specifically to the field of 'radiological quality' and will last until the end of 2008. The project named 'implementation of an inclusive radiation monitoring system' was launched in April 2004 in the Bragin district, which is one of the most contaminated areas in Belarus. It is located in the very South East of the country and is adjacent to the 30 km exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (zone with caesium 137 soil contamination above 1480 kBq/m 2 ). Since the accident, the number of people living in the district has declined by 56%. Today, 17000 persons, including 3000 children, live there in mostly rural areas where 137 Cs levels in soil are between 185 and 555 kBq/m 2 . The project aims at diffusing a practical radiation protection culture, among the population, and especially among children, through the development of a radiation monitoring system handled by the local professionals and the population. The adopted approach is mainly based on the experience of the ETHOS Project implemented in Belarus between 1996 and 2001. Indeed the ETHOS Project revealed that an efficient monitoring system and the involvement of the local population and professionals in the day-to-day management of the radioactive contamination of their environment are key elements in the process of rehabilitation of living

  12. The Role of IAEA in Coordinating Research and Transferring Technology in Radiation Chemistry and Processing of Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haji Saeid, M.

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through Technical Cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The CRP brings together typically 10 - 15 groups of participants to share and complement core competencies and work on specific areas of development needed to benefit from an emerging radiation technique and its applications. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. TC builds national capacities through training, expert advice and delivery of equipment. The impact of the IAEA's efforts is visible by the progress noticeable in adoption of radiation technology and/or growth in the range of activities in several MS in different regions. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. A number of technical cooperation projects have been implemented in this field to strengthen the capability of developing Member States and to create awareness in the industries about the technical

  13. Shared decision making in the management of children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Carolyn E; Boydell, Katherine M; Stasiulis, Elaine; Blanchette, Victor S; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Birken, Catherine S; Breakey, Vicky R; Parkin, Patricia C

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the treatment decision-making process for children hospitalized with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Using focus groups, we studied children with ITP, parents of children with ITP, and health care professionals, inquiring about participants' experience with decision support and decision making in newly diagnosed ITP. Data were examined using thematic analysis. Themes that emerged from children were feelings of "anxiety, fear, and confusion"; the need to "understand information"; and "treatment choice," the experience of which was age dependent. For parents, "anxiety, fear, and confusion" was a dominant theme; "treatment choice" revealed that participants felt directed toward intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) for initial treatment. For health care professionals, "comfort level" highlighted factors contributing to professionals' comfort with offering options; "assumptions" were made about parental desire for participation in shared decision making (SDM) and parental acceptance of treatment options; "providing information" was informative regarding modes of facilitating SDM; and "treatment choice" revealed a discrepancy between current practice (directed toward IVIG) and the ideal of SDM. At our center, families of children with newly diagnosed ITP are not experiencing SDM. Our findings support the implementation of SDM to facilitate patient-centered care for the management of pediatric ITP.

  14. Content and implementation of new legislation governing atomic safety and radiation protection in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifflaender, G.

    1987-01-01

    In the regulatory framework of the GDR all measures aiming to ensure the safe use of atomic energy are defined by the term Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection, where atomic safety includes nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear material control. In 1984, a new Atomic Energy Act went into effect followed, in 1985, by the new Ordinance on the Assurance of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection and the pertaining Executory Provision. Section 2 of the Ordinance defines the following goals for the safe use of atomic energy: (1) the protection of life and health of man, and, from the genetic point of view, also of future generations from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation; (2) the protection of the environment from radioactive contamination, in particular by the careful handling of radioactive materials and safe disposal of radioactive wastes; (3) the protection of workers in nuclear facilities and of members of the public in their surroundings, and of material assets by strict observance and implementation of nuclear safety and radiation protection measures; (4) the protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities from any criminal attacks and unauthorized interference; and (5) the fulfilment of the Safeguards Agreement concluded between the Government of the GDR and the IAEA by accounting for the use of nuclear material exclusively for peaceful purposes. Under Section 6 of the Atomic Energy Act, the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection (SAAS) is the competent authority for the state control in the field of protection against the risks from the use of atomic energy, which is exercised by licensing and surveillance as described in this report. Other topics also dealt with in more detail are the in-plant organization of atomic safety and radiation protection and the powers of the regulatory body to impose enforcement measures and sanctions in the event of non-compliance with the pertinent provisions. (author)

  15. A new graduate education program in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Milinkovic, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The evaluation of the Radiation Oncology Network's (RON) in house professional development year (PDY) support program was implemented to determine the appropriate teaching, learning and transfer of learning strategies that assist the newly practicing radiation therapists' transition into the busy working environment. As the AIR program saw little clinical support offered to participating new graduates and thus a need for further educational support was felt. The RON support program was initially introduced as the clinical education support component of the NSW PDY program that was introduced in 1995 by the Australian Institute of Radiography. Method: Following the facilitation of the RON PDY program over a twelve month period, qualitative feedback was obtained using a focus group consisting of new graduates from the program. Two moderators facilitated the focus group: one moderator facilitated the discussion while the second moderator transcribed it. The graduate practitioners were asked a number of questions related to the teaching and learning strategies employed by the program as well as the structure of the program. Results/discussion: The responses were analysed into the following themes: teaching and learning strategies, transfer of learning, facilitation and future learning needs. Overall the graduate practitioners found the program nurtured their skill, knowledge and attitudes appropriately at such a critical stage in their career

  16. Boron filled siloxane polymers for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouriau, Andrea; Robison, Tom; Shonrock, Clinton; Simmonds, Steve; Cox, Brad; Pacheco, Adam; Cady, Carl

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present work was to evaluate changes to structure-property relationships of 10B filled siloxane-based polymers when exposed to nuclear reactor radiation. Highly filled polysiloxanes were synthesized with the intent of fabricating materials that could shield high neutron fluences. The newly formulated materials consisted of cross-linked poly-diphenyl-methylsiloxane filled with natural boron and carbon nanofibers. This polymer was chosen because of its good thermal and chemical stabilities, as well as resistance to ionizing radiation thanks to the presence of aromatic groups in the siloxane backbone. Highly isotopically enriched 10B filler was used to provide an efficient neutron radiation shield, and carbon nanofibers were added to improve mechanical strength. This novel polymeric material was exposed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Labs to five different neutron/gamma fluxes consisting of very high neutron fluences within very short time periods. Thermocouples placed on the specimens recorded in-situ temperature changes during radiation exposure, which agreed well with those obtained from our MCNP simulations. Changes in the microstructural, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties were evaluated by SEM, DSC, TGA, FT-IR NMR, solvent swelling, and uniaxial compressive load measurements. Our results demonstrate that these newly formulated materials are well-suitable to be used in applications that require exposure to different types of ionizing conditions that take place simultaneously.

  17. Cross-Linking Mast Cell Specific Gangliosides Stimulates the Release of Newly Formed Lipid Mediators and Newly Synthesized Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edismauro Garcia Freitas Filho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are immunoregulatory cells that participate in inflammatory processes. Cross-linking mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides by mAbAA4 results in partial activation of mast cells without the release of preformed mediators. The present study examines the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators following ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking the gangliosides with mAbAA4 released the newly formed lipid mediators, prostaglandins D2 and E2, without release of leukotrienes B4 and C4. The effect of cross-linking these gangliosides on the activation of enzymes in the arachidonate cascade was then investigated. Ganglioside cross-linking resulted in phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytosol to the nucleus was not induced by ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking of GD1b derived gangliosides also resulted in the release of the newly synthesized mediators, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, and TNF-α. The effect of cross-linking the gangliosides on the MAP kinase pathway was then investigated. Cross-linking the gangliosides induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 as well as activating both NFκB and NFAT in a Syk-dependent manner. Therefore, cross-linking the mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides results in the activation of signaling pathways that culminate with the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators.

  18. About the principles of radiation level normalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosovskij, A.V.

    2000-01-01

    The paper highlights the impact being made by the radiation level normalization principles upon the social and economic indicators. The newly introduced radiation safety standards - 97 are taken as an example. It is emphasized that it is necessary to use a sound approach while defining radiation protection standards, taking into consideration economic and social factors existing in Ukraine at the moment. Based on the concept of the natural radiation background and available results of the epidemiological surveys, the dose limits are proposed for the radiation protection standards. The paper gives a description of the dose limitation system recommended by the International Committee for Radiation Protection. The paper highlights a negative impact of the line non threshold concept, lack of special knowledge in the medical service and mass media to make decisions to protect people who suffered from the Chernobyl accident

  19. Citizen-based environmental radiation monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alemayehu, B.; Mckinzie, M.; Cochran, T.; Sythe, D.; Randrup, R.; Lafargue, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses a Citizen Radiation Monitoring project designed and implemented by the Natural Resources Defense Council . The goal of the project was to implement a radiation monitoring system that provides radiation data accessible to the public. The monitoring system consisted of usage of a radiation detector integrated with near real-time data collection and visualization. The monitoring systems were installed at five different locations and background radiation measurements were taken. The developed monitoring system demonstrated that citizen-based monitoring system could provide accessible radiation data to the general public and relevant to the area where they live. (author)

  20. Newly Homeless Youth Typically Return Home

    OpenAIRE

    Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rosenthal, Doreen; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Mallett, Shelley; Batterham, Philip; Rice, Eric; Solorio, Rosa

    2007-01-01

    165 newly homeless adolescents from Melbourne, Australia and 261 from Los Angeles, United States were surveyed and followed for two years. Most newly homeless adolescents returned home (70% U.S., 47% Australia) for significant amounts of time (39% U.S., 17% Australia more than 12 months) within two years of becoming homeless.

  1. Systematic Review of Decision Aids for Newly Diagnosed Patients with Prostate Cancer Making Treatment Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsul, Prajakta; Wray, Ricardo; Spradling, Kyle; Darwish, Oussama; Weaver, Nancy; Siddiqui, Sameer

    2015-11-01

    Despite established evidence for using patient decision aids, use with newly diagnosed patients with prostate cancer remains limited partly due to variability in aid characteristics. We systematically reviewed decision aids for newly diagnosed patients with prostate cancer. Published peer reviewed journal articles, unpublished literature on the Internet and the Ottawa decision aids web repository were searched to identify decision aids designed for patients with prostate cancer facing treatment decisions. A total of 14 aids were included in study. Supplementary materials on aid development and published studies evaluating the aids were also included. We studied aids designed to help patients make specific choices among options and outcomes relevant to health status that were specific to prostate cancer treatment and in English only. Aids were reviewed for IPDAS (International Patient Decision Aid Standards) and additional standards deemed relevant to prostate cancer treatment decisions. They were also reviewed for novel criteria on the potential for implementation. Acceptable interrater reliability was achieved at Krippendorff α = 0.82. Eight of the 14 decision aids (57.1%) were developed in the United States, 6 (42.8%) were print based, 5 (35.7%) were web or print based and only 4 (28.5%) had been updated since 2013. Ten aids (71.4%) were targeted to prostate cancer stage. All discussed radiation and surgery, 10 (71.4%) discussed active surveillance and/or watchful waiting and 8 (57.1%) discussed hormonal therapy. Of the aids 64.2% presented balanced perspectives on treatment benefits and risks, and/or outcome probabilities associated with each option. Ten aids (71.4%) presented value clarification prompts for patients and steps to make treatment decisions. No aid was tested with physicians and only 4 (28.6%) were tested with patients. Nine aids (64.2%) provided details on data appraisal and 4 (28.6%) commented on the quality of evidence used. Seven of the 8

  2. Heat loads to divertor nearby components from secondary radiation evolved during plasma instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizyuk, V., E-mail: vsizyuk@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A., E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental issue in tokamak operation related to power exhaust during plasma instabilities is the understanding of heat and particle transport from the core plasma into the scrape-off layer and to plasma-facing materials. During abnormal and disruptive operation in tokamaks, radiation transport processes play a critical role in divertor/edge-generated plasma dynamics and are very important in determining overall lifetimes of the divertor and nearby components. This is equivalent to or greater than the effect of the direct impact of escaped core plasma on the divertor plate. We have developed and implemented comprehensive enhanced physical and numerical models in the upgraded HEIGHTS package for simulating detailed photon and particle transport in the evolved edge plasma during various instabilities. The paper describes details of a newly developed 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport model, including optimization methods of generated plasma opacities in the full range of expected photon spectra. Response of the ITER divertor's nearby surfaces due to radiation from the divertor-developed plasma was simulated by using actual full 3D reactor design and magnetic configurations. We analyzed in detail the radiation emission spectra and compared the emission of both carbon and tungsten as divertor plate materials. The integrated 3D simulation predicted unexpectedly high damage risk to the open stainless steel legs of the dome structure in the current ITER design from the intense radiation during a disruption on the tungsten divertor plate.

  3. Comparative Survival in Patients With Postresection Recurrent Versus Newly Diagnosed Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xuwei; Xu Luying; Wang Li; Hayman, James A.; Chang, Andrew C.; Pickens, Allan; Cease, Kemp B.; Orringer, Mark B.; Kong, F.-M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the survival of postresection recurrent vs. newly diagnosed non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 661 consecutive patients with NSCLC registered in the radiation oncology databases at two medical centers in the United States between 1992 and 2004. Of the 661 patients, 54 had postresection recurrent NSCLC and 607 had newly diagnosed NSCLC. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used for the survival analyses. Results: The distribution of relevant clinical factors between these two groups was similar. The median survival time and 5-year overall survival rates were 19.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.9-25.7) and 14.8% (95% confidence interval, 5.4-24.2%) vs. 12.2 months (95% CI, 10.8-13.6) and 11.0% (95% CI, 8.5-13.5%) for recurrent vs. newly diagnosed patients, respectively (p = .037). For Stage I-III patients, no significant difference was observed in the 5-year overall survival (p = .297) or progression-free survival (p = .935) between recurrent and newly diagnosed patients. For the 46 patients with Stage I-III recurrent disease, multivariate analysis showed that chemotherapy was a significant prognostic factor for 5-year progression-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.224-0.914; p = .027). Conclusion: Our institutional data have shown that patients with postresection recurrent NSCLC achieved survival comparable to that of newly diagnosed NSCLC patients when they were both treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. These findings suggest that patients with postresection recurrent NSCLC should be treated as aggressively as those with newly diagnosed disease.

  4. MGMT inactivation and clinical response in newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with Gliadel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Burger, Peter; Soudry, Ethan; Tyler, Betty; Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Weingart, Jon; Olivi, Alessandro; Gallia, Gary L; Sidransky, David; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Ye, Xiaobu; Brem, Henry

    2015-12-01

    We examined the relationship between the O(6)-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status and clinical outcomes in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who were treated with Gliadel wafers (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan). MGMT promoter methylation has been associated with increased survival among patients with GBM who are treated with various alkylating agents. MGMT promoter methylation, in DNA from 122 of 160 newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with Gliadel, was determined by a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, and was correlated with overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The MGMT promoter was methylated in 40 (32.7%) of 122 patients. The median OS was 13.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.0-14.5) and RFS was 9.4 months (95% CI 7.8-10.2). After adjusting for age, Karnofsky performance score, extent of resection, temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), the newly diagnosed GBM patients with MGMT methylation had a 15% reduced mortality risk, compared to patients with unmethylated MGMT (hazard ratio 0.85; 95% CI 0.56-1.31; p=0.46). The patients aged over 70 years with MGMT methylation had a significantly longer median OS of 13.5 months, compared to 7.6 months in patients with unmethylated MGMT (p=0.027). A significant difference was also found in older patients, with a median RFS of 13.1 versus 7.6 months for methylated and unmethylated MGMT groups, respectively (p=0.01). Methylation of the MGMT promoter in newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with Gliadel, RT and TMZ, was associated with significantly improved OS compared to the unmethylated population. In elderly patients, methylation of the MGMT promoter was associated with significantly better OS and RFS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prototypes of Newly Conceived Inorganic and Biological Sensors for Health and Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Spera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the optimal implementation of three newly conceived sensors for both health and environmental applications, utilizing a wide range of detection methods and complex nanocomposites. The first one is inorganic and based on matrices of calcium oxide, the second is based on protein arrays and a third one is based on Langmuir-Blodgett laccase multi-layers. Special attention was paid to detecting substances significant to the environment (such as carbon dioxide and medicine (drug administration, cancer diagnosis and prognosis by means of amperometric, quartz crystal microbalance with frequency (QCM_F and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM_D technologies. The resulting three implemented nanosensors are described here along with proofs of principle and their corresponding applications.

  6. Ion cyclotron emission due to the newly-born fusion products induced fast Alfven wave radiative instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-08-01

    The velocity distribution functions of the newly born (t = 0) charged fusion products of tokamak discharges can be approximated by a monoenergetic ring distribution with a finite v parallel such that v perpendicular ∼ v parallel ∼ v j where (M j V j 2 /2) = E j , the directed birth energy of the charged fusion product species j of mass M j . As the time t progresses these distribution functions will evolve into a Gaussian in velocity with thermal spreadings given by the perpendicular and parallel temperatures T perpendicularj (t) = T parallelj (t) with T j (t) increasing as t increases and finally reaches an isotropic saturation value of T perpendicularj (t ∼ τ j ) = T parallelj (t ∼ τ j ) = T j (t ∼ τ j ) ∼ [M j T d E j /(M j + M)] 1/2 , where T d is the temperature of the background deuterium plasma ions, M is the mass of a triton or a neutron for j = protons and alpha particles, respectively, and τ j ∼ τ sj /4 is the thermalization time of the fusion product species j in the background deuterium plasma and τ sj is the slowing-down time. For times t of the order of τ j their distributions can be approximated by a Gaussian in their total energy. Then for times t ≥ τ sj the velocity distributions of these fusion products will relax towards their appropriate slowing-down distributions. Here the authors will examine the radiative stability of all these distributions. The ion cyclotron emission from energetic ion produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic tool

  7. Pediatric cT: Implementation of ASIR for Substantial Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Pre-ASIR Image Noise1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Moore, Bria M.; Yee, Brian S.; Kaufman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. Materials and Methods The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current–modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. Results With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Conclusion Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose

  8. Implementation of MRI gel dosimetry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeck, S.Aa.J.

    1998-12-01

    Gel dosimetry was used together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions in radiation therapy. Two different dosimeters were studied: ferrous- and monomer gel, based on the principles of radiation-induced oxidation and polymerisation, respectively. Single clinical electron and photon beams were evaluated and gel dose distributions were mainly within 2% of conventional detector results. The ferrous-gel was also used for clinical proton beams. A decrease in signal per absorbed dose was found close to the end of the range of the protons (15-20%). This effect was explained as a linear energy transfer dependence, further supported with Monte Carlo simulations. A method for analysing and comparing data from treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurements was developed. The method enables a new pixel by pixel evaluation, isodose comparison and dose volume histogram verification. Two standard clinical radiation therapy procedures were examined using the developed TPS verification method. The treatment regimes included several beams of different radiation qualities. The TPS calculated data were in very good agreement with the dose distribution measured by the ferrous-gel. However, in a beam abutment region, larger dose difference was found. Beam adjustment errors and a minor TPS underestimation of the lateral scatter contribution outside the primary electron beam may explain the discrepancy. The overall uncertainty in the ferrous-gel dose determination was considerably reduced using an optimised MRI acquisition protocol and a new MRI scanner. The relative dose uncertainty was found to be better than 3.3% for all dose levels (95% confidence level). Using the method developed for comparing measured gel data with calculated treatment plans, the gel dosimetry method was proven to be a useful tool for radiation treatment planning verification

  9. Implementation of MRI gel dosimetry in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeck, S.Aa.J

    1998-12-01

    Gel dosimetry was used together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions in radiation therapy. Two different dosimeters were studied: ferrous- and monomer gel, based on the principles of radiation-induced oxidation and polymerisation, respectively. Single clinical electron and photon beams were evaluated and gel dose distributions were mainly within 2% of conventional detector results. The ferrous-gel was also used for clinical proton beams. A decrease in signal per absorbed dose was found close to the end of the range of the protons (15-20%). This effect was explained as a linear energy transfer dependence, further supported with Monte Carlo simulations. A method for analysing and comparing data from treatment planning system (TPS) and gel measurements was developed. The method enables a new pixel by pixel evaluation, isodose comparison and dose volume histogram verification. Two standard clinical radiation therapy procedures were examined using the developed TPS verification method. The treatment regimes included several beams of different radiation qualities. The TPS calculated data were in very good agreement with the dose distribution measured by the ferrous-gel. However, in a beam abutment region, larger dose difference was found. Beam adjustment errors and a minor TPS underestimation of the lateral scatter contribution outside the primary electron beam may explain the discrepancy. The overall uncertainty in the ferrous-gel dose determination was considerably reduced using an optimised MRI acquisition protocol and a new MRI scanner. The relative dose uncertainty was found to be better than 3.3% for all dose levels (95% confidence level). Using the method developed for comparing measured gel data with calculated treatment plans, the gel dosimetry method was proven to be a useful tool for radiation treatment planning verification 103 refs, 20 figs, 6 tabs

  10. Large enhancement of highly energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its transport into the inner radiation belt inferred from MDS-1 satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined a large increase of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its penetration into the inner radiation belt over slot region using the MDS-1 satellite observations. Result of analyses demonstrates that a large increase took place in the spring and autumn seasons, and we have newly confirmed that the penetration of outer belt electrons to the inner radiation zone took place during the big magnetic storms by examining a pitch angle distribution of the penetrating electrons.

  11. Impact of a Newly Implemented Burn Protocol on Surgically Managed Partial Thickness Burns at a Specialized Burns Center in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Khwee-Soon Vincent; Chong, Si-Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a newly implemented protocol for superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns which involves early surgery and rapid coverage with biosynthetic dressing in a specialized national burns center in Singapore. Consecutive patients with 5% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns injury admitted to the Burns Centre at the Singapore General Hospital between August and December 2014 for surgery within 48 hours of injury were prospectively recruited into the study to form the protocol group. Comparable historical cases from the year 2013 retrieved from the burns center audit database were used to form the historical control group. Demographics (age, sex), type and depth of burns, %TBSA burnt, number of operative sessions, and length of stay were recorded for each patient of both cohorts. Thirty-nine burns patients managed under the new protocol were compared with historical control (n = 39) comparable in age and extensiveness of burns. A significantly shorter length of stay (P burns was observed in the new protocol group (0.74 day/%TBSA) versus historical control (1.55 day/%TBSA). Fewer operative sessions were needed under the new protocol for burns 10% or greater TBSA burns (P protocol for surgically managed burns patients which involves early surgery and appropriate use of biosynthetic dressing on superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns. Clinically, shorter lengths of stay, fewer operative sessions, and decreased need for skin grafting of burns patient were observed.

  12. Immunoparesis in newly diagnosed Multiple Myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrig, Rasmus; Klausen, Tobias W.; Salomo, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Immunoparesis (hypogammaglobulinemia) is associated to an unfavorable prognosis in newly diagnosed Multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, this finding has not been validated in an unselected population-based cohort. We analyzed 2558 newly diagnosed MM patients in the Danish Multiple Myeloma...

  13. The main steps on implementation of radiation processing technology - portuguese experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luisa Botelho, M.

    2010-11-01

    The development of applications of ionizing radiation for Industrial purposes in Portugal began near of 1982 with the support of IAEA under the program of Cooperation and Technical Assistance - project POR/8/002. The IAEA program of Cooperation and Technical Assistance permitted that POR/08/002 took place between 1983 up to 1988. The collaboration of the International Experts and the personnel of National Laboratory of Industrial Engineering and Technology, nowadays Nuclear and Technologic Institute (ITN), allowed the construction of a Co-60 irradiation plant, designed by Tecnabexport (Russia). This facility is located in the ITN campus in Sacavem, Portugal. The main parameters studied prior to the implementation (sitting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and foreseen decommission) were planned and executed according with the Portuguese legislation which is based on the International rules (IAEA Safety series) and Directive EURATOM 836/80, nowadays EURATOM 1493/93. A study of the geological stability of the site for future placement of the irradiation facility was done preceding the construction. The facility was constructed under Portuguese responsibility but designed and loaded with Co-60 by the Russian business rganization: Technabexport between 1987 and 1988. The whole process was supervised and approved by the ITN's Nuclear Protection and Safety Department. The Cobalt-60 irradiation facility was initially named GammaPi and later on Radiation Technologies Unit (UTR) and its management was under ITN's authority until 2003. Once established a quality system for the gamma facility, the following phase is to develop, validate and control the sterilization/disinfection process. In this step, a multidisciplinary approach and a continuous dialog with product managers and personnel must be taken into consideration in the experimental design for the correct and effective establishment of irradiation process. The knowledge of product's elements

  14. Implementation of multileaf collimator in a LINAC MCNP5 simulation coupled with the radiation treatment planing system PLUNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, Vicente; Miro, Rafael; Juste, Belen; Verdu, Gumersindo

    2010-01-01

    Multileaf collimators are used on linear accelerators to provide conformal shaping of radiotherapy treatment beams, being an important tool for radiation therapy dose delivery. In this work, a multileaf collimator has been designed and implemented in the MCNP model of an Elekta Precise Linear Accelerator and introduced in PLUNC, a set of software tools for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) which was coupled in previous works with MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code), with the purpose of comparing its effect on deterministic and Monte Carlo dose calculations. A 3D Shepp-Logan phantom was utilized as the patient model for validation purposes. Once the multileaf collimator model is implemented in the PLUNC LINAC model, a series of Matlab interfaces extract phantom and beam information created with PLUNC during the treatment plan and write it in MCNP5 input deck format. After the Monte Carlo simulation is performed, results are input back again in PLUNC in order to continue with the plan evaluation. The comparison is made via mapping of dose distribution inside the phantom with different field sizes, utilizing the MCNP5 tool EMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which allows registering the results over the problem geometry. This work follows a valid methodology for multileaf LINAC MC calculations during radiation treatment plans. (author)

  15. Bio deterioration management in implementing cultural resources ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritacco, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Insects can attack various organic products including those make cultural objects such as furniture, books, yarn, etc.. There are different procedures to disinfect, but the application of radiation ionizing radiation (60Co) has advantages over others because the low doses employed affecting this insects not produce undesirable changes in objects (author)

  16. Analysis of the selected optical parameters of filters protecting against hazardous infrared radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the selected optical parameters of protective optic filters used for protection of the eyes against hazardous radiation within the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum range. The indexes characterizing transmission and reflection of optic radiation incident on the filter are compared. As it follows from the completed analysis, the newly developed interference filters provide more effective blocking of infrared radiation in comparison with the currently used protec...

  17. Radiation-tolerant delta-sigma time-to-digital converters

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Ying; Steyaert, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the design of a Mega-Gray (a standard unit of total ionizing radiation) radiation-tolerant ps-resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) for a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system used in a gamma-radiation environment. Several radiation-hardened-by-design (RHBD) techniques are demonstrated throughout the design of the TDC and other circuit techniques to improve the TDC's resolution in a harsh environment are also investigated. Readers can learn from scratch how to design a radiation-tolerant IC. Information regarding radiation effects, radiation-hardened design techniques and  measurements are organized in such a way that readers can easily gain a thorough understanding of the topic. Readers will also learn the design theory behind the newly proposed delta-sigma TDC. Readers can quickly acquire knowledge about the design of radiation-hardened bandgap voltage references and low-jitter relaxation oscillators, which are introduced in the content from a designer's perspective.   · �...

  18. Using ecosystem science to improve protection of the environment from radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, C. [Stockholm University (Sweden); Brechignac, F. [IUR / IRSN (France); Barnthouse, L. [LWB Environmental Services Inc. (United States); Brown, J. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Forbes, V. [University of Lincoln (United Kingdom); Kapustka, L. [LC LK Consultancy (Canada); Kautsky, U. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB - SKB (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The ecosystem approach (EA) involves considering the impacts of an anthropogenic stressor at the ecosystem level because this is usually the ultimate goal of environmental protection. As such, EA includes population, community and ecosystem effects, structural and functional effects, indirect effects due to ecological interactions between species, dynamic interactions, positive or negative feedback loops, and potential synergistic or antagonistic effects of multiple stressors (both anthropogenic and natural). All such effects better reflect the reality of the impact of a contamination scenario than if assessments are restricted to considering effects to individual organisms or species. Such effects may be greater or lesser than expected from studies of individual organisms or species, so not considering them may result in under- or overestimation of risk, respectively. EA is a term that is widely used in environmental assessment, management and legislation in a number of regulatory fields (e.g., radiation protection, chemicals legislation, fisheries policy, international biodiversity conventions). However, although its justification is now well established in a wide range of environment protection contexts, its practical use is still unclear due to poorly defined protection goals and assessment endpoints, making its implementation difficult. This paper presents the initial findings of a newly formed follow-up task group of the International Union of Radioecology whose aims are to identify ways to put the EA into practice when considering protection of the environment from radiation. Drawing on knowledge and experience from a range of fields, we summarise the types of ecosystem processes, goods and services that might be included when using this approach, the science that supports the use of the EA, and the methodological challenges that need to be addressed when implementing the EA in the field of radiation protection. Document available in abstract form only

  19. A pediatric trial of radiation/cetuximab followed by irinotecan/cetuximab in newly diagnosed diffuse pontine gliomas and high-grade astrocytomas: A Pediatric Oncology Experimental Therapeutics Investigators' Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Margaret E; Kieran, Mark W; Chi, Susan N; Cohen, Kenneth J; MacDonald, Tobey J; Smith, Amy A; Etzl, Michael M; Kuei, Michele C; Donson, Andrew M; Gore, Lia; DiRenzo, Jennifer; Trippett, Tanya M; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Narendran, Aru; Foreman, Nicholas K; Dunkel, Ira J

    2017-11-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) and high-grade astrocytomas (HGA) continue to have dismal prognoses. The combination of cetuximab and irinotecan was demonstrated to be safe and tolerable in a previous pediatric phase 1 combination study. We developed this phase 2 trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of cetuximab given with radiation therapy followed by adjuvant cetuximab and irinotecan. Eligible patients of age 3-21 years had newly diagnosed DIPG or HGA. Patients received radiation therapy (5,940 cGy) with concurrent cetuximab. Following radiation, patients received cetuximab weekly and irinotecan daily for 5 days per week for 2 weeks every 21 days for 30 weeks. Correlative studies were performed. The regimen was considered to be promising if the number of patients with 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) for DIPG and HGA was at least six of 25 and 14 of 26, respectively. Forty-five evaluable patients were enrolled (25 DIPG and 20 HGA). Six patients with DIPG and five with HGA were progression free at 1 year from the start of therapy with 1-year PFS of 29.6% and 18%, respectively. Fatigue, gastrointestinal complaints, electrolyte abnormalities, and rash were the most common adverse events and generally of grade 1 and 2. Increased epidermal growth factor receptor copy number but no K-ras mutations were identified in available samples. The trial did not meet the predetermined endpoint to deem this regimen successful for HGA. While the trial met the predetermined endpoint for DIPG, overall survival was not markedly improved from historical controls, therefore does not merit further study in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Generational differences among newly licensed registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keepnews, David M; Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T; Shin, Juh Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Responses of 2369 newly licensed registered nurses from 3 generational cohorts-Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y-were studied to identify differences in their characteristics, work-related experiences, and attitudes. These responses revealed significant differences among generations in: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, work motivation, work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, distributive justice, promotional opportunities, supervisory support, mentor support, procedural justice, and perceptions of local job opportunities. Health organizations and their leaders need to anticipate intergenerational differences among newly licensed nurses and should provide for supportive working environments that recognize those differences. Orientation and residency programs for newly licensed nurses should be tailored to the varying needs of different generations. Future research should focus on evaluating the effectiveness of orientation and residency programs with regard to different generations so that these programs can be tailored to meet the varying needs of newly licensed nurses at the start of their careers. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic three-dimensional flow of viscoelastic nanofluid in the presence of nonlinear thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Muhammad, Taseer, E-mail: taseer_qau@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Alsaedi, A.; Alhuthali, M.S. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) three-dimensional flow of couple stress nanofluid in the presence of thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects is analyzed. Energy equation subject to nonlinear thermal radiation is taken into account. The flow is generated by a bidirectional stretching surface. Fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of a constant applied magnetic field. The induced magnetic field is neglected for a small magnetic Reynolds number. Mathematical formulation is performed using boundary layer analysis. Newly proposed boundary condition requiring zero nanoparticle mass flux is employed. The governing nonlinear mathematical problems are first converted into dimensionless expressions and then solved for the series solutions of velocities, temperature and nanoparticles concentration. Convergence of the constructed solutions is verified. Effects of emerging parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are plotted and discussed. Skin friction coefficients and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is found that the thermal boundary layer thickness is an increasing function of radiative effect. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluid is examined. • Nonlinear thermal radiation is analyzed. • Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects are present. • Recently developed condition requiring zero nanoparticle mass flux is implemented. • Construction of convergent solutions of nonlinear flow is possible.

  2. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  3. Improved outcomes with intensity modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Horsley, Patrick J; Silva, Thomaz; Wilcox, Shea; Amalaseelan, Julan; Dwyer, Patrick; Tahir, Abdul M R; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Hansen, Carmen; McLachlan, Craig S; Lee, Yvonne L; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy) and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months). We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  4. Paclitaxel poliglumex, temozolomide, and radiation for newly diagnosed high-grade glioma: a Brown University Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Suriya; Boxerman, Jerrold; Donahue, John; Goldman, Marc; Kinsella, Timothy; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Evans, Devon; Elinzano, Heinrich; Constantinou, Maria; Stopa, Edward; Puthawala, Yakub; Cielo, Deus; Santaniello, Alyson; Oyelese, Adetokunbo; Mantripragada, Kalyan; Rosati, Kayla; Isdale, Debora; Safran, Howard

    2014-10-01

    Paclitaxel poliglumex (PPX), a drug conjugate that links paclitaxel to poly-L-glutamic acid, is a potent radiation sensitizer. Prior studies in esophageal cancer have demonstrated that PPX (50 mg/m/wk) can be administered with concurrent radiation with acceptable toxicity. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of the combination of PPX with temozolomide and concurrent radiation for high-grade gliomas. Eligible patients were required to have WHO grade 3 or 4 gliomas. Patients received weekly PPX (50 mg/m/wk) combined with standard daily temozolomide (75 mg/m) for 6 weeks with concomitant radiation (2.0 Gy, 5 d/wk for a total dose of 60 Gy). Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 17 with glioblastoma and 8 with grade 3 gliomas. Seven of 25 patients had grade 4 myelosuppression. Hematologic toxicity lasted up to 5 months suggesting a drug interaction between PPX and temozolomide. For patients with glioblastoma, the median progression-free survival was 11.5 months and the median overall survival was 18 months. PPX could not be safely combined with temozolomide due to grade 4 hematologic toxicity. However, the favorable progression-free and overall survival suggest that PPX may enhance radiation for glioblastoma. A randomized study of single agent PPX/radiation versus temozolomide/radiation for glioblastoma without MGMT methylation is underway.

  5. Radiation quality and radiation risks - some current problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.; Hahn, K.

    1989-01-01

    The newly evaluated cancer mortality data of the atomic bomb survivors suggest substantially enhanced risk estimates, and the various factors that are involved in the change are considered. The enhanced risk estimates have already led to added restrictions in the dose limits for radiation workers, and there may be a further tightening of regulations in the future. The impending revision of the quality factors in radiation protection may, therefore, lead to practical difficulties, and a careful consideration of the various aspects involved in a revision is required. A liaison group of ICRU and ICRP has proposed a reformulation of the quality factor that is related not to the LET, but to the microdosimetric variably y. The relation leads to increased quality factors for neutrons, but also to a quality factor for γ rays of only 0.5. Alternatives are presented that relate the quality factor to LET and that retain γ- rays as the reference radiation. One option corresponds to different quality factors for γ rays and X-rays, the other option sets the quality factor for photons approximately equal to unity, irrespective of energy. (author)

  6. Development of radiation protection and measurement technology -A study on the radiation and environmental safety-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Si Young; Seo, Kyeong Won; Yoon, Seok Cheol; Lee, Tae Yeong; Kim, Bong Hwan; Chung, Deok Yeon; Lee, Ki Chang; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang; Kim, Jang Ryeol; Lee, Sang Yoon

    1994-07-01

    Reference radiation fields which can meet the national and international standard and criteria such as the ANSI N13.11 have been designed, produced and evaluated to maintain the national traceability and reliability of the radiation measurement and to provide precise calibration of the various radiation measuring instruments as well as standard irradiation of the personal dosimeters for the performance evaluation. Existing dose calculation algorithm has been improved to correctly evaluate the shallow dose from the β(Ti-204) + γ(Cs-137) mixed radiation exposure by applying the TLD response correction function newly derived in this study. A mathematical algorithm to calculate the internal dose from inhalation of the uranium isotopes has been developed on the basis of the ICRP-30 respiratory tract model. Detailed performance analysis of the KAERI lung counter has been carried out to participate in the intercomparison of lung dosimetry. A preliminary and basic study on the quantitative method of optimal dose reduction based on the ALARA concept has been performed to technically support and strengthen the national radiation protection infrastructure. (Author)

  7. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (1). Overview of the lens, radiogenic cataract, and equivalent dose limit for the lens newly recommended by the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Yamauchi, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2014-01-01

    In April 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued the statement on tissue reactions. This stimulated interest in many countries. The Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye was established in the Japanese Health Physics Society, and in April 2013, started discussion about the international developments and recent studies related to the dosimetry of the lens of the eye. This committee now publishes the interim report consisting of parts I-VI. Of these, this Part I overviews the structure of the eye and lens, cataract types and the scientific evidence of its new dose threshold and equivalent dose limit newly recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  8. Immunohistochemically determined total epidermal growth factor receptor levels not of prognostic value in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: Report from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Arnab; Seiferheld, Wendy; Tu Xiaoyu; Wang Huijun; Zhang Huazhong; Ang, K. Kian; Hammond, Elizabeth; Curran, Walter; Mehta, Minesh

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) performed an analysis of patterns of immunohistochemically detected total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression levels and their prognostic significance on archival tissue in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients from prior prospective RTOG clinical trials. Methods and materials: Patients in this study had been treated on previous RTOG GBM trials (RTOG 7401, 7918, 8302, 8409, 9006, 9305, 9602, and 9806). Tissue microarrays were prepared from 155 patients enrolled in these trials. These specimens were stained using a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the extracellular binding domain of EGFR to detect total EGFR (including both wild-type phosphorylated and wild-type unphosphorylated isoforms with some cross-reactivity with EGFRvIII). The intensity of total EGFR protein expression was measured by computerized quantitative image analysis using the SAMBA 4000 Cell Image Analysis System. The parameters measured were the mean optical densities over the labeled areas and the staining index, which represents the proportion of stained area relative to the mean stain concentration. Both parameters were correlated with the clinical outcome. Results: No differences in either overall or progression-free survival could be demonstrated by the mean optical density class or mean optical density quartile or the staining index of total EGFR immunostaining among the representative RTOG GBM cases. Conclusion: Total EGFR protein expression levels, as measured immunohistochemically, do not appear to be of prognostic value in newly diagnosed GBM patients. Given the accumulating clinical evidence of the activity of anti-EGFR agents in GBM and the preclinical data suggesting the important role of downstream mediators as effectors of EGFR signaling, the RTOG is conducting additional investigations into the prognostic value of activation patterns of EGFR signaling, both at the level of the receptor

  9. A new graduate education program in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beldham-Collins, Rachael [Radiation Oncology Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, PO Box 533, Wentworthville NSW 2145 (Australia); School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Milinkovic, Danielle [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: d.milinkovic@fhs.usyd.edu.au

    2009-02-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of the Radiation Oncology Network's (RON) in house professional development year (PDY) support program was implemented to determine the appropriate teaching, learning and transfer of learning strategies that assist the newly practicing radiation therapists' transition into the busy working environment. As the AIR program saw little clinical support offered to participating new graduates and thus a need for further educational support was felt. The RON support program was initially introduced as the clinical education support component of the NSW PDY program that was introduced in 1995 by the Australian Institute of Radiography. Method: Following the facilitation of the RON PDY program over a twelve month period, qualitative feedback was obtained using a focus group consisting of new graduates from the program. Two moderators facilitated the focus group: one moderator facilitated the discussion while the second moderator transcribed it. The graduate practitioners were asked a number of questions related to the teaching and learning strategies employed by the program as well as the structure of the program. Results/discussion: The responses were analysed into the following themes: teaching and learning strategies, transfer of learning, facilitation and future learning needs. Overall the graduate practitioners found the program nurtured their skill, knowledge and attitudes appropriately at such a critical stage in their career.

  10. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1998-01-01

    When optical fibers are used in a strong radiation field, it is necessary to increase the radiation-resistant capacity. Aiming at the improvement of such property, the characteristics of recent optical fibers made from quartz-glass were reviewed and the newly developed techniques for radiation measurement using those fibers were summarized in this report. Since optical fibers became able to use in the levels near the core conditions, their applications have started in various fields of technologies related to radiation. By combining the optical fibers and a small sensor, it became possible to act as 'Key Component' for measuring wide range radioactivity from a trace activity to a strong radiation field in the reactor core. Presently, the fibers are utilized for investigation of the optical mechanisms related in radiation, evaluation of their validities so on. Further, the optical fibers are expected to utilize in a multi-parametric measuring system which allows to concomitantly determine the radiation, temperature, pressure, flow amount etc. as an incore monitor. (M.N.)

  11. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    When optical fibers are used in a strong radiation field, it is necessary to increase the radiation-resistant capacity. Aiming at the improvement of such property, the characteristics of recent optical fibers made from quartz-glass were reviewed and the newly developed techniques for radiation measurement using those fibers were summarized in this report. Since optical fibers became able to use in the levels near the core conditions, their applications have started in various fields of technologies related to radiation. By combining the optical fibers and a small sensor, it became possible to act as `Key Component` for measuring wide range radioactivity from a trace activity to a strong radiation field in the reactor core. Presently, the fibers are utilized for investigation of the optical mechanisms related in radiation, evaluation of their validities so on. Further, the optical fibers are expected to utilize in a multi-parametric measuring system which allows to concomitantly determine the radiation, temperature, pressure, flow amount etc. as an incore monitor. (M.N.)

  12. Newly blind persons using virtual environment system in a traditional orientation and mobility rehabilitation program: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Orly; Schloerb, David W; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a virtual reality system (the BlindAid) developed for orientation and mobility training of people who are newly blind. The BlindAid allows users to interact with different virtual structures and objects via auditory and haptic feedback. This case study aims to examine if and how the BlindAid, in conjunction with a traditional rehabilitation programme, can help people who are newly blind develop new orientation and mobility methods. Follow-up research based on this study, with a large experiment and control group, could contribute to the area of orientation and mobility rehabilitation training for the newly blind. The case study research focused on A., a woman who is newly blind, for 17 virtual sessions spanning ten weeks, during the 12 weeks of her traditional orientation and mobility rehabilitation programme. The research was implemented by using virtual environment (VE) exploration and orientation tasks in VE and physical spaces. The research methodology used both qualitative and quantitative methods, including interviews, questionnaire, videotape recording, and user computer logs. The results of this study helped elucidate several issues concerning the contribution of the BlindAid system to the exploration strategies and learning processes experienced by the participant in her encounters with familiar and unfamiliar physical surroundings. [Box: see text].

  13. Design, implementation and verification of software code for radiation dose assessment based on simple generic environmental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I Putu Susila; Arif Yuniarto

    2017-01-01

    Radiation dose assessment to determine the potential of radiological impacts of various installations within nuclear facility complex is necessary to ensure environmental and public safety. A simple generic model-based method for calculating radiation doses caused by the release of radioactive substances into the environment has been published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as the Safety Report Series No. 19 (SRS-19). In order to assist the application of the assessment method and a basis for the development of more complex assessment methods, an open-source based software code has been designed and implemented. The software comes with maps and is very easy to be used because assessment scenarios can be done through diagrams. Software verification was performed by comparing its result to SRS-19 and CROM software calculation results. Dose estimated by SRS-19 are higher compared to the result of developed software. However, these are still acceptable since dose estimation in SRS-19 is based on conservative approach. On the other hand, compared to CROM software, the same results for three scenarios and a non-significant difference of 2.25 % in another scenario were obtained. These results indicate the correctness of our implementation and implies that the developed software is ready for use in real scenario. In the future, the addition of various features and development of new model need to be done to improve the capability of software that has been developed. (author)

  14. Ethical climate and nurse competence - newly graduated nurses' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta

    2015-12-01

    Nursing practice takes place in a social framework, in which environmental elements and interpersonal relations interact. Ethical climate of the work unit is an important element affecting nurses' professional and ethical practice. Nevertheless, whatever the environmental circumstances, nurses are expected to be professionally competent providing high-quality care ethically and clinically. This study examined newly graduated nurses' perception of the ethical climate of their work environment and its association with their self-assessed professional competence, turnover intentions and job satisfaction. Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational research design was applied. Participants consisted of 318 newly graduated nurses. Data were collected electronically and analysed statistically. Ethical approval and permissions to use instruments and conduct the study were obtained according to required procedures. Data were rendered anonymous to protect participant confidentiality. Completing the questionnaire was interpreted as consent to participate. Nurses' overall perception of the ethical climate was positive. More positive perceptions related to peers, patients and physicians, and less positive to hospitals and managers. Strong associations were found between perceived ethical climate and self-assessed competence, turnover intentions in terms of changing job, and job satisfaction in terms of quality of care. Nurses at a higher competence level with positive views of job satisfaction and low turnover intentions perceived the climate significantly more positively. Nursing management responsible for and having the power to implement changes should understand their contribution in ethical leadership, as well as the multidimensional nature of nurses' work environment and the interaction between work-related factors in planning developmental measures. Future research should focus on issues in nurse managers' ethical leadership in creating ethical work environments. There

  15. Europe's contribution to implementation of a radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    What is commonly referred to as a radiation protection system is a range of scientific considerations, principles and rules, the aim of which is to contribute to an appropriate level of protection of individuals and the environment against the harmful effects of exposure to ionising radiation, without excessively limiting desirable human activities which can be associated with such exposure (see ICRP Publication 103). This system is essentially based on an international consensus. The European level only concerns the Member States of the Union but it is crucial that it constitute the final, legally binding step prior to the definition of national regulations. The European radiation protection system (the EURATOM Treaty and its derived legislation) is presented below, not from the legal perspective but from a contextual viewpoint. Research activities are not discussed here. (author)

  16. Establishment probability in newly founded populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusset Markus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishment success in newly founded populations relies on reaching the established phase, which is defined by characteristic fluctuations of the population’s state variables. Stochastic population models can be used to quantify the establishment probability of newly founded populations; however, so far no simple but robust method for doing so existed. To determine a critical initial number of individuals that need to be released to reach the established phase, we used a novel application of the “Wissel plot”, where –ln(1 – P0(t is plotted against time t. This plot is based on the equation P0t=1–c1e–ω1t, which relates the probability of extinction by time t, P0(t, to two constants: c1 describes the probability of a newly founded population to reach the established phase, whereas ω1 describes the population’s probability of extinction per short time interval once established. Results For illustration, we applied the method to a previously developed stochastic population model of the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus. A newly founded population reaches the established phase if the intercept of the (extrapolated linear parts of the “Wissel plot” with the y-axis, which is –ln(c1, is negative. For wild dogs in our model, this is the case if a critical initial number of four packs, consisting of eight individuals each, are released. Conclusions The method we present to quantify the establishment probability of newly founded populations is generic and inferences thus are transferable to other systems across the field of conservation biology. In contrast to other methods, our approach disaggregates the components of a population’s viability by distinguishing establishment from persistence.

  17. Ground-based spectral measurements of solar radiation, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Keizo; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Goto, Ryozo; Yamauchi, Toyotaro

    1979-01-01

    A newly designed spectro-pyranometer was used for the measurement of the global (direct + diffuse) and the diffuse sky radiation reaching the ground. By the subtraction of the diffuse component from the global radiation, we got the direct radiation component which leads to the spectral distribution of the optical thickness (extinction coefficient) of the turbid atmosphere. The measurement of the diffuse sky radiation reveals the scattering effect of aerosols and that of the global radiation allows the estimation of total attenuation caused by scattering and absorption of aerosols. The effects of the aerosols are represented by the deviation of the real atmosphere measured from the Rayleigh atmosphere. By the combination of the measured values with those obtained by theoretical calculation for the model atmosphere, we estimated the amount of absorption by the aerosols. Very strong absorption in the ultraviolet region was recognized. (author)

  18. Biological effects of ionizing radiation - changing worker attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.; Schenley, C.

    1989-01-01

    Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Radiation Protection Training Special Interest Group has taken an innovative approach to providing DOE contractors with radiation worker training material information. Newly-hired radiation workers may be afraid to work near radiation and long-term radiation workers may become indifferent to the biological hazard of radiation. Commercially available training material is often presented at an inappropriate technical level or in an uninteresting style. These training problems have been addressed in the DOE system through development of a training videotape and supporting material package entitled Understanding Ionizing Radiation and its Biological Effects. The training package, developed and distributed by TRADE specifically to meet the needs of DOE contractor facilities, contains the videotape and accompanying paper supporting materials designed to assist the instructor. Learning objectives, presentation suggestion for the instructor, trainee worksheets, guided discussion questions, and trainee self-evaluation sheets are included in the training package. DOE contractors have agreed that incorporating this training module into radiation worker training programs enhances the quality of the training and increase worker understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation

  19. Effects of the new radiation protection act on the radiation protection register and the monitoring of occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of DIRECTIVE 2013/59 / EURATOM (EURATOM Basic Safety Standards) is via the new radiation protection law and brings in the monitoring of occupational radiation among others two significant new features and changes: - Introduction of a unique personal identifier, - update of the occupational categories. Both require technical and organizational changes in the data transmission of the licensees to the dosimetry services and the radiation protection register.

  20. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  1. Role of FDG-PET in the Implementation of Involved-Node Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, Théodore; Aupérin, Anne; Ribrag, Vincent; Elleuch, Manel; Fermé, Christophe; Bonniaud, Guillaume; Ruelle, Claude; Alberini, Jean-Louis; Celebic, Aljosa; Edeline, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the role of 18 F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the implementation of involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) in patients treated for clinical stages (CS) I/II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Material: Patients with untreated CS I/II HL enrolled in the randomized EORTC/LYSA/FIL Intergroup H10 trial and participating in a real-time prospective quality assurance program were prospectively included in this study. Data were electronically obtained from 18 French cancer centers. All patients underwent APET-computed tomography (PET-CT) and a post-chemotherapy planning CT scanning. The pre-chemotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and the postchemotherapy clinical target volume (CTV) were first delineated on CT only by the radiation oncologist. The planning PET was then co-registered, and the delineated volumes were jointly analyzed by the radiation oncologist and the nuclear medicine physician. Lymph nodes undetected on CT but FDG-avid were recorded, and the previously determined GTV and CTV were modified according to FDG-PET results. Results: From March 2007 to February 2010, 135 patients were included in the study. PET-CT identified at least 1 additional FDG-avid lymph node in 95 of 135 patients (70.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 61.9%-77.9%) and 1 additional lymph node area in 55 of 135 patients (40.7%; 95% CI: 32.4%-49.5%). The mean increases in the GTV and CTV were 8.8% and 7.1%, respectively. The systematic addition of PET to CT led to a CTV increase in 60% of the patients. Conclusions: Pre-chemotherapy FDG-PET leads to significantly better INRT delineation without necessarily increasing radiation volumes

  2. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  3. Principles of Radiation Protection Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli

    2004-01-01

    The contents of this chapter are follows - Radiation Protection Concepts: justification, dose limitation, optimisation, potential exposures, situation requiring intervention; Special Considerations. Protection from Radiation Hazards, Remove the Hazard, Prevent the Hazard, Guard the Worker, Implementation of Radiation Protection and Safety Measures, Distance, Shielding, Time, Monitoring Programme, Safety System. Radiation Protection in Radiological Service: Specific Requirement in Diagnostic Radiological Service

  4. Order made in implementation of Section 23 of Decree no 75-306 of 28 April 1975 on the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations in large nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Order was made in implementation of Decree No 75-306 of 28 April 1975 on the Protection of Workers Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations in Large Nuclear Installations and approves the methods for controlling radiation sources and the atmosphere in large nuclear installations which are elaborated by the Central Service for Protection Against Ionizing Radiations. (NEA) [fr

  5. Modular remote radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Fabio; Farias, Marcos S.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2013-01-01

    The Modular Remote Radiation Monitor (MRRM) is a novel radiation monitor suitable for monitoring environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a portable compact-size low-power microprocessor-based electronic device which provides its monitoring data to other electronic systems, physically distant from it, by means of an electronic communication channel, which can be wired or wireless according to the requirements of each application. Besides its low-power highly-integrated circuit design, the Modular Remote Radiation Monitor is presented in a modular architecture, which promotes full compliance to the technical requirements of different applications while minimizing cost, size and power consumption. Its communication capability also supports the implementation of a network of multiple radiation monitors connected to a supervisory system, capable of remotely controlling each monitor independently as well as visualizing the radiation levels from all monitors. A prototype of the MRRM, functionally equivalent to the MRA-7027 radiation monitor, was implemented and connected to a wired MODBUS network of MRA-7027 monitors, responsible for monitoring ionizing radiation inside Argonauta reactor room at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. Based on the highly positive experimental results obtained, further design is currently underway in order to produce a consumer version of the MRRM. (author)

  6. Radiation Calibration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omondi, C.

    2017-01-01

    KEBS Radiation Dosimetry mandate are: Custodian of Kenya Standards on Ionizing radiation, Ensure traceability to International System (SI ) and Calibration radiation equipment. RAF 8/040 on Radioisotope applications for troubleshooting and optimizing industrial process established Radiotracer Laboratory objective is to introduce and implement radiotracer technique for problem solving of industrial challenges. Gamma ray scanning technique applied is to Locate blockages, Locate liquid in vapor lines, Locate areas of lost refractory or lining in a pipe and Measure flowing densities. Equipment used for diagnostic and radiation protection must be calibrated to ensure Accuracy and Traceability

  7. Evaluation of Shielding Performance for Newly Developed Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Beren Richard

    This work details an investigation into the contributing factors behind the success of newly developed composite neutron shield materials. Monte Carlo simulation methods were utilized to assess the neutron shielding capabilities and secondary radiation production characteristics of aluminum boron carbide, tungsten boron carbide, bismuth borosilicate glass, and Metathene within various neutron energy spectra. Shielding performance and secondary radiation data suggested that tungsten boron carbide was the most effective composite material. An analysis of the macroscopic cross-section contributions from constituent materials and interaction mechanisms was then performed in an attempt to determine the reasons for tungsten boron carbide's success over the other investigated materials. This analysis determined that there was a positive correlation between a non-elastic interaction contribution towards a material's total cross-section and shielding performance within the thermal and epi-thermal energy regimes. This finding was assumed to be a result of the boron-10 absorption reaction. The analysis also determined that within the faster energy regions, materials featuring higher non-elastic interaction contributions were comparable to those exhibiting primarily elastic scattering via low Z elements. This allowed for the conclusion that composite shield success within higher energy neutron spectra does not necessitate the use elastic scattering via low Z elements. These findings suggest that the inclusion of materials featuring high thermal absorption properties is more critical to composite neutron shield performance than the presence of constituent materials more inclined to maximize elastic scattering energy loss.

  8. Dosimetry challenges for implementing emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Fangfang; Oldham, Mark; Cai Jing; Wu Qiuwen, E-mail: Fangfang.yin@duke.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27516 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    During the last 10 years, radiation therapy technologies have gone through major changes, mainly related introduction of sophisticated delivery and imaging techniques to improve the target localization accuracy and dose conformity. While implementation of these emerging technologies such as image-guided SRS/SBRT, IMRT/IMAT, IGRT, 4D motion management, and special delivery technologies showed substantial clinical gains for patient care, many other factors, such as training/quality, efficiency/efficacy, and cost/effectiveness etc. remain to be challenging. This talk will address technical challenges for dosimetry verification of implementing these emerging technologies in radiation therapy.

  9. Depression among newly admitted Australian nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, K; O'Connor, D W

    2008-08-01

    This research concerns the prevalence and course of depression in newly admitted nursing home residents. We attempted to recruit consecutive admissions into the study, irrespective of cognitive status, enabling a comparison of the prevalence and course of depression experienced by cognitively intact residents and those exhibiting all levels of cognitive impairment. Depression was assessed at one month, three months and six months post-admission. The assessment of mood in this study entailed the conduct of a semi-structured clinical interview, which encompassed DSM-IV criteria and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) items. Recruitment difficulties resulted in a sample of 51 newly admitted residents, drawn from six nursing homes located in Victoria, Australia. Of particular interest, throughout the duration of the study, only the cognitively impaired were diagnosed with major depression (MD). One month post-admission, 24% of the sample were diagnosed with MD, and a further 20% evidenced a non-major depressive disorder. At the second and third assessments, MD was observed in 14% and 15% of residents, respectively. For residents who completed all three assessments, there was no appreciable change in the proportion diagnosed with a depressive disorder, nor was there a change in the levels of depressive symptomatology. Although subject to limitations, the current study indicated that clinical depression in nursing home facilities most often occurs in residents who also exhibit pronounced cognitive impairment. These depressions are unlikely to remit spontaneously. Accordingly, care staff and general practitioners must be trained in the identification of depression in dementia, and any interventions implemented in these facilities should be tailored to meet the unique needs of this group.

  10. Design and Implementation of an Extensible Learner-Adaptive Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Nakabayashi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and implementation of a flexible architecture that is capable of extending the functions of a learner-adaptive self-learning environment. A “courseware object”, which is a program module that is used to implement various educational functionalities, has been newly introduced to ensure both function extensibility as well as content reusability. A prototype system was designed and implemented to investigate the feasibility of the proposed architecture and to identify the core behavior and interaction schema of courseware objects. The results from this trial indicated that several learner-adaptive functionalities including the SCORM 2004 standard specifications will be able to be successfully implemented into the proposed architecture.

  11. Implementation of Extensive Cytoreduction Resulted in Improved Survival Outcomes for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Advanced-Stage Ovarian, Tubal, and Peritoneal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspagliesi, Francesco; Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Chiappa, Valentina; Borghi, Chiara; Scaffa, Cono; Morano, Federica; Maltese, Giuseppa; Lorusso, Domenica

    2017-10-01

    Residual disease (RD) after primary debulking surgery (PDS) is one of the main factors driving ovarian cancer prognosis. The primary end point of this study was assessment of the impact that surgery had on survival outcomes for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Data on the effect of newly diagnosed advanced-stage ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers were analyzed during two study periods (T1: 2001-2006 and T2: 2007-2012), in which the concepts of optimal and complete cytoreduction were introduced and implemented. In this study, 260 patients (36%) had surgery during T1 and 462 patients (64%) had surgery during T2. The rate of PDS increased, from 55.4% (144/260) during T1 to 85.5% (395/462) during T2 (p < 0.001). At the time of PDS, complete resection (RD0) was achieved for 45.1% of the patients during T1 and 76.7% of the patients during T2 (p < 0.001), whereas optimal resection (RD < 1 cm) was achieved for 60.4% of the patients during T1 and 85.3% of the patients during T2 (p < 0.001). Disease-free survival improved during the study periods (p = 0.006). Overall survival was similar in T1 and T2 (p = 0.18). The preoperative CA125 level, disease stage, and RD remained independently associated with disease-free survival (p ≤ 0.05). The performance of interval debulking surgery (IDS) instead of PDS correlated with worse survival outcomes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.92; p = 0.02), whereas achievement of RD0 and RD < 1 cm independently improved overall survival (HR 0.45; 95% CI 0.22-0.91; p = 0.02 for RD0 and HR 0.47; 95% CI 0.23-0.96; p = 0.03 for RD0). The implementation of extensive cytoreduction allows improvement of patient outcomes. Further studies are needed to assess the risk-to-benefit ratio between PDS and IDS and to identify patients who benefit much more from one treatment method than from another.

  12. Changes in the 'medical research' licensing procedure under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habeck, M.; Minkov, V.; Griebel, J.; Brix, G.; Epsch, R.; Langer, M.

    2012-01-01

    This publication outlines the 'medical research' licensing procedure as specified in the amendment of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance of November 1, 2011. The general licensing requirements for the use of radiation have not been changed by the amendment. Three so-called use restrictions (i.e., dose limits of 10 mSv and 20 mSv, age limit of 50 years) have been modified. They will only apply to healthy volunteers in the future. In addition, there are considerable simplifications with respect to applications and licensing procedures of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS) regarding the use of radiation in the newly introduced 'accompanying diagnostics' ('Begleitdiagnostik') case group. The newly established, independent panel of experts at the German Radiological Society (Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft, DRG) may provide essential support to principal investigators, qualified physicians and sponsors for differentiating between 'medical research' and 'health care', the latter not being subject to licensing. An expert statement will be issued by the DRG within four weeks of an inquiry. This consulting service is subject to confidentiality, and is free of charge for inquirers and without any commitment. (orig.)

  13. Dexamethasone administration during definitive radiation and temozolomide renders a poor prognosis in a retrospective analysis of newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, Lisa B. E.; Shelton, Brent J.; Shearer, Andrew J.; Chen, Li; Sun, David A.; Parsons, Sarah; Bourne, T. David; LaRocca, Renato; Spalding, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DXM) is commonly used in the management of cerebral edema in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Bevacizumab (BEV) is FDA-approved for the progression or recurrence of GBM but has not been shown to improve survival when given for newly diagnosed patients concurrently with radiation (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ). Both DXM and BEV reduce cerebral edema, however, DXM has been shown to induce cytokine cascades which could interfere with cytotoxic therapy. We investigated whether DXM would reduce survival of GBM patients in the setting of concurrent TMZ and BEV administration. We reviewed the treatment of all 73 patients with GBM who received definitive therapy at our institution from 2005 to 2013 with RT (60 Gy) delivered with concurrent daily TMZ (75 mg/m 2 ). Of these, 34 patients also were treated with concurrent BEV (10 mg/kg every two weeks). Patients received adjuvant therapy (TMZ or TMZ/Bev) until either progression, discontinuation due to toxicity, or 12 months after radiation completion. All patients who had GBM progression with TMZ were offered BEV for salvage therapy, with 19 (56 %) receiving BEV. With a median follow-up of 15.6 months, 67 (91.8 %) patients were deceased. The OS for the entire cohort was 15.9 months, while the PFS was 7.7 months. The extent of resection was a prognostic indicator for OS (p = .0044). The median survival following gross tumor resection (GTR) was 22.5 months, subtotal resection (STR) was 14.9 months, and biopsy was 12.1 months. The addition of BEV to TMZ with RT was borderline significantly associated with increased PFS (9.4 vs. 5.1 months, p = 0.0574) although was not significantly associated with OS (18.1 vs. 15.3 months respectively, p = 0.3064). In patients receiving TMZ, DXM use concurrent with RT was a poor prognostic indicator of both OS (12.7 vs. 22.6 months, p = 0.003) and PFS (3.6 vs. 8.4 months, p <0.0001). DXM did not reduce OS in patients who received TMZ and BEV concurrently with RT

  14. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Neuman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

  15. Development of Radiation Breeding Technology of Macroalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jongil; Park, J. H.; Song, B. S.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, H. J.; Yang, H. Y.

    2013-01-15

    Macroalgae has been utilized as food material from long time ago, and recently newly recognized as functional materials and the source of bio-fuel. But, the study on the macroalgae is just beginning and the study on radiation effect and radiation breeding technology was not reported. In this study, the effect of radiation on the macroalgae Porphyra was investigated for the development of new mutant strains. Prphyra was successively cultivated in the laboratory chamber with optimized growth condition. Also, the radiation sensitivity of Porphyra was determined. To develop the mutant strain, irradiated Porphyra strains were screened for better growth and higher resistance against oxidative stress. The selected Porphyra was further cultivated in ocean site. Also, several genes from mutant Porphyra was heterologous expressed and studied for its dunctionality. This results can provide mutation technology of macroalgae and further contribute in the activation of fishery industry and national health enhancement.

  16. Development of Radiation Breeding Technology of Macroalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jongil; Park, J. H.; Song, B. S.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, H. J.; Yang, H. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgae has been utilized as food material from long time ago, and recently newly recognized as functional materials and the source of bio-fuel. But, the study on the macroalgae is just beginning and the study on radiation effect and radiation breeding technology was not reported. In this study, the effect of radiation on the macroalgae Porphyra was investigated for the development of new mutant strains. Prphyra was successively cultivated in the laboratory chamber with optimized growth condition. Also, the radiation sensitivity of Porphyra was determined. To develop the mutant strain, irradiated Porphyra strains were screened for better growth and higher resistance against oxidative stress. The selected Porphyra was further cultivated in ocean site. Also, several genes from mutant Porphyra was heterologous expressed and studied for its dunctionality. This results can provide mutation technology of macroalgae and further contribute in the activation of fishery industry and national health enhancement

  17. Stability Performance Dilemma in Hydronic Radiators with TRV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahersima, Fatemeh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Rasmussen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    which results in a high gain and a large time constant for the radiator at low flows. If the TRV is tuned in order to dampen the oscillations at low heat loads, it will suffer from poor performance and lack of comfort, i.e. late settling, when full heating capacity is needed. Based on the newly designed...

  18. Timing of entry to care by newly diagnosed HIV cases before and after the 2010 New York State HIV testing law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Daniel E; Bian, Fuqin; Anderson, Bridget J; Smith, Lou C

    2015-01-01

    Prompt entry to care after HIV diagnosis benefits the infected individual and reduces the likelihood of further transmission of the virus. The New York State HIV Testing Law of 2010 requires diagnosing providers to refer persons newly diagnosed with HIV to follow-up medical care. This study used routinely collected HIV-related laboratory data from the New York State HIV surveillance system to assess whether the fraction of newly diagnosed cases entering care within 90 days of diagnosis increased after the implementation of the law. Laboratory data on 23,302 newly diagnosed cases showed that entry to care within 90 days rose steadily from 72.0% in 2007 to 85.4% in 2012. The rise was observed across all race/ethnic groups, ages, transmission risk groups, sexes, and regions of residence. Logistic regression analyses of entry to care pre-law and post-law, controlling for demographic characteristics, transmission risk, and geographic area, indicate that percentage of newly diagnosed cases entering care within 90 days grew more rapidly in the post-law period. This is consistent with a positive effect of the law on entry to care.

  19. Effects of radiation therapy on neuropsychological functioning in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.W.H.; Hung, B.K.M.; Woo, E.K.W.; Tai, P.T.H.; Choi, D.T.K.

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients who had a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who were treated with radiation therapy were followed up after a median duration of 5.5 years and given a battery of neuropsychological tests. Results were compared with a comparable group of newly diagnosed NPC patients awaiting radiation therapy. The irradiated group was significantly poorer in overall IQ, non-verbal memory recall, and reported a substantially greater number of memory related complaints. These results contrast with the complacent general assumption that radiation therapy has a negligible effect on adult functioning. (author)

  20. Radiation level measured by a portable Geiger-Mueller counter at the altitude of commercial air routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    The background intensities of naturally occurring radiation were measured aboard scheduled commercial airplanes using a newly developed Geiger-Mueller counter with a pocket computer. The preliminary results show that the radiation at the cruising altitude of a commercial airplane on a transcontinental flight is 40 times higher than the ground-level. (author)

  1. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Wang

    Full Text Available To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs, and that is generalisable to other settings.The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005 as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel.Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills.This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  2. A multi-method approach to curriculum development for in-service training in China's newly established health emergency response offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Li, Xiangrui; Yuan, Yiwen; Patel, Mahomed S

    2014-01-01

    To describe an innovative approach for developing and implementing an in-service curriculum in China for staff of the newly established health emergency response offices (HEROs), and that is generalisable to other settings. The multi-method training needs assessment included reviews of the competency domains needed to implement the International Health Regulations (2005) as well as China's policies and emergency regulations. The review, iterative interviews and workshops with experts in government, academia, the military, and with HERO staff were reviewed critically by an expert technical advisory panel. Over 1600 participants contributed to curriculum development. Of the 18 competency domains identified as essential for HERO staff, nine were developed into priority in-service training modules to be conducted over 2.5 weeks. Experts from academia and experienced practitioners prepared and delivered each module through lectures followed by interactive problem-solving exercises and desktop simulations to help trainees apply, experiment with, and consolidate newly acquired knowledge and skills. This study adds to the emerging literature on China's enduring efforts to strengthen its emergency response capabilities since the outbreak of SARS in 2003. The multi-method approach to curriculum development in partnership with senior policy-makers, researchers, and experienced practitioners can be applied in other settings to ensure training is responsive and customized to local needs, resources and priorities. Ongoing curriculum development should reflect international standards and be coupled with the development of appropriate performance support systems at the workplace for motivating staff to apply their newly acquired knowledge and skills effectively and creatively.

  3. Survey and analysis of radiation safety management systems at medical institutions. Second report. Radiation measurement, calibration of radiation survey meters, and periodic check of installations, equipment, and protection instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Aburano, Tamio

    2006-01-01

    We carried out a questionnaire survey to determine the actual situation of radiation safety management measures in all medical institutions in Japan that had nuclear medicine facilities. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the evaluation of shielding capacity; radiation measurement; periodic checks of installations, equipment, and protection instruments; and the calibration of radiation survey meters. The analysis was undertaken according to region, type of establishment, and number of beds. The overall response rate was 60 percent. For the evaluation of shielding capacity, the outsourcing rate was 53 percent of the total. For the radiation measurements of ''leakage radiation dose and radioactive contamination'' and contamination of radioactive substances in the air'', the outsourcing rates were 28 percent and 35 percent of the total, respectively (p<0.001, according to region and establishment). For the periodic check of radiation protection instruments, the implementation rate was 98 percent, and the outsourcing rate was 32 percent for radiation survey meters and 47 percent for lead aprons. The non-implemented rate for calibration of radiation survey meters was 25 percent of the total (p<0.001, according to region and establishment). The outsourcing rate for calibration of radiation survey meters accounted for 87 percent of the total, and of these medical institutions, 72 percent undertook annual calibration. The implementation rate for patient exposure measurement was 20 percent of the total (p<0.001, according to number of beds), and of these medical institutions 46 percent recorded measurement outcome. (author)

  4. Implementation of quality assurance and quality control in the Nuclear Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeoep, T.; Jakobson, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre is in the process of implementing the system of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) in the framework of the IAEA TC Project RER/2/004/ 'QA/QC of Nuclear Analytical Techniques'. The draft Quality Manual with annexes has been prepared accordingly to the ISO 17025 Guide, documents and other printed material delivered on the seminars of the project. The laboratory supply has been supplemented with necessary equipment for guaranteeing of quality. Proficiency testing included in the project has been performed successfully. (author)

  5. Exposure to ionizing radiations having a medical origin. Propositions for the implementation and the development of epidemiology surveillance activities in general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    This report gives propositions relative to the implementation and the development of epidemiology surveillance activities in general population in relation with medical exposure to ionizing radiations. It is intended for the General Direction of Health and General Direction of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. These propositions have been elaborated by a work group coordinated and run by InVS and gathering the following organisms: French Agency of sanitary safety of health products (A.F.S.S.A.P.S.), Center of Quality Assurance of technological applications in the area of health (C.A.A.T.S.), Direction of Hospitals and Care organization (D.H.O.S.), General Direction of Health (D.G.S.), General Direction of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (D.G.S.N.R.), National Federation of radiologists physicists (F.N.M.R.), institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.), INSERM 'epidemiology of cancers', French Society of Biology and Nuclear Medicine (S.F.B.M.N.), French Society of Medical Physics (S.F.P.M.), French Society of Radiology (S.F.R.). (N.C.)

  6. Radiation hazards underestimated. Or?; Strahlenrisiko unterschaetzt. Oder?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2013-07-01

    Radiation protection claims that its regulations, policies and approaches are based on scientific evidence. If due to progress in science and technology new knowledge is added, it must be given to whether or not the existing radiation protection implementing is still appropriate or whether or not modifications need to be made. However, radiation protection is not just a matter of science. Continuity, consensus, accountability, public perception, communication and social acceptance play an important role in radiation protection as well. Thus, as new scientific evidence should be taken into account, not only the adequate implementation of radiation protection has to be discussed, but also their impact on the public perception and acceptance. It is one major challenge for all who are involved in radiation protection, to find an appropriate balance between these two aspects. (orig.)

  7. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  8. The Development and Numerical Analysis of the Conical Radiator Extrusion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalczyk J.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a newly developed method for single-operation extrusion of conical radiators. This is the author’s radiator manufacturing method being the subject of a patent application. The proposed method enables the manufacture of radiators either with or without an inner opening and with an integral plate. Selected results of numerical computations made within Forge®3D, a finite element method (FEM-based software program, were presented during the analysis of the process. A comparative analysis of the proposed manufacturing method using the double-sided extrusion method was also made.

  9. Implementation of a Low Frame-Rate Protocol and Noise-Reduction Technology to Minimize Radiation Dose in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccagni, Davide; Candilio, Luciano; Latib, Azeem; Godino, Cosmo; Chieffo, Alaide; Montorfano, Matteo; Colombo, Antonio; Azzalini, Lorenzo

    2018-05-01

    Limiting radiation exposure is necessary in radiological procedures. This study evaluates the impact of a radiological low frame-rate protocol in a standard angiographic system and the implementation of a noise-reduction technology (NRT) on patient radiation exposure during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Transfemoral TAVR procedures performed between February 2016 and February 2017 were analyzed according to two angiographic systems, Standard and NRT, and further divided in four subgroups: (1) Standard 15 frames per second (fps) with 15 fps for both fluoroscopy and cine acquisitions; (2) Standard 7.5 fps with 7.5 fps for both fluoroscopy and cine acquisitions; (3) NRT 15 fps with 15 fps for both fluoroscopy and cine acquisitions; and (4) NRT 7.5 fps with 15 fps for fluoroscopy and 7.5 fps for cine acquisitions. Study endpoints were kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma at interventional reference point (AK at IRP). Significant differences were found in KAP (153 Gy·cm² [IQR, 95-234 Gy·cm²] vs 78.3 Gy·cm² [IQR, 54.4-103.5 Gy·cm²]; Pfps and Standard 7.5 fps groups (184 Gy·cm² [IQR, 128-262 Gy·cm²] vs 106.8 Gy·cm² [IQR, 76.87-181 Gy·cm²] [P<.01] and 0.973 Gy [IQR, 0.642-1.786 Gy] vs 0.64 Gy [IQR, 0.489-0.933 Gy] [P<.01], respectively). The present study suggests that the low frame-rate protocol in Standard system and NRT implementation allows a marked reduction of patient radiation exposure in TAVR procedures.

  10. Intervention in emergency situations involving radiation exposure (1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document covers radiation protection aspects arising in emergency situations. It does not cover the measures necessary to reduce the health consequences of radiation exposure, i.e. the medical care of exposed individuals, nor does it cover psychological problems arising from the exposure of individuals or of a population. These problems may arise from anxiety about possible late effects of radiation exposure and from any actions implemented to reduce exposure. Even though radiation exposure levels may be low and insignificant, these problems must be taken into account in determining any action to be implemented to reduce radiation exposure. The primary concern of this document is with exposure in areas which are close to the source and in the period immediately after a source is out of control. It outlines the principles which can be used for planning and implementing countermeasures for protection of the public. 24 refs., 13 tabs

  11. Implementation of Adaptive Digital Controllers on Programmable Logic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David A.; King, Kenneth D.; Smith, Keary J.; Monenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much has been made of the capabilities of FPGA's (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the hardware implementation of fast digital signal processing. Such capability also makes an FPGA a suitable platform for the digital implementation of closed loop controllers. Other researchers have implemented a variety of closed-loop digital controllers on FPGA's. Some of these controllers include the widely used proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, state space controllers, neural network and fuzzy logic based controllers. There are myriad advantages to utilizing an FPGA for discrete-time control functions which include the capability for reconfiguration when SRAM-based FPGA's are employed, fast parallel implementation of multiple control loops and implementations that can meet space level radiation tolerance requirements in a compact form-factor. Generally, a software implementation on a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) or microcontroller is used to implement digital controllers. At Marshall Space Flight Center, the Control Electronics Group has been studying adaptive discrete-time control of motor driven actuator systems using digital signal processor (DSP) devices. While small form factor, commercial DSP devices are now available with event capture, data conversion, pulse width modulated (PWM) outputs and communication peripherals, these devices are not currently available in designs and packages which meet space level radiation requirements. In general, very few DSP devices are produced that are designed to meet any level of radiation tolerance or hardness. The goal of this effort is to create a fully digital, flight ready controller design that utilizes an FPGA for implementation of signal conditioning for control feedback signals, generation of commands to the controlled system, and hardware insertion of adaptive control algorithm approaches. An alternative is required for compact implementation of such functionality to withstand the harsh environment

  12. Knowledge in Radiation Protection: a Survey of Professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine Units in Yaounde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongolo-Zogo, P.; Nguehouo, M.B.; Yomi, J.; Nko'o Amven, S.

    2013-01-01

    Medical use of ionizing radiation is now the most common radiation source of the population at the global level. The knowledge and practices of health professionals working with X-rays determine the level and quality of implementation of internationally and nationally recommended measures for radiation protection of patients and workers. The level of implementation and enforcement of international recommendations in African countries is an issue of concern due to weak laws and regulations and regulatory bodies. We report the results of a cross-sectional survey of health professionals working with ionizing radiation in Yaounde, the capital city of Cameroon. More than 50% of these professionals have a moderate level of knowledge of the norms and principles of radiation protection and more than 80% have never attended a continuing professional development workshop on radiation protection. (authors)

  13. Radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Holmberg, O.; Perez, M. R.; Ortiz, P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic used of ionizing radiation are beneficial for hundreds of millions of people each year by improving health care and saving lives. In March 2001, the first International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients was held in Malaga, Spain, which led to an international action plan for the radiation protection of patients. Ten years after establishing the international action plan, the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held in Bonn, Germany, in December 2012. the main outcome of this conference was the so called Bonn Call for Action that identifies then priority actions to enhance radiation protection in medicine for the next decade. The IAEA and WHO are currently working in close cooperation to foster and support the implementation of these ten priority actions in Member States, but their implementation requires collaboration of national governments, international agencies, researchers, educators, institutions and professional associations. (Author)

  14. Radiation protection in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Holmberg, O.; Perez, M. R.; Ortiz, P.

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic used of ionizing radiation are beneficial for hundreds of millions of people each year by improving health care and saving lives. In March 2001, the first International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients was held in Malaga, Spain, which led to an international action plan for the radiation protection of patients. Ten years after establishing the international action plan, the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held in Bonn, Germany, in December 2012. the main outcome of this conference was the so called Bonn Call for Action that identifies then priority actions to enhance radiation protection in medicine for the next decade. The IAEA and WHO are currently working in close cooperation to foster and support the implementation of these ten priority actions in Member States, but their implementation requires collaboration of national governments, international agencies, researchers, educators, institutions and professional associations. (Author)

  15. A project proposal for the implementation of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for treatment of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Chon Rivas, Ivon; Ascension Ibarra, Yudy; Yanez Lopez, Yaima; Rodriguez Zayas, Michel; Diaz Moreno, Rogelio

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy, together with the surgery, one of the essential therapeutic tools in the treatment of CNS tumors. The use of radiation, can be severe sequelae affecting quality of life of the patient, organs at risk receiving high dose and advanced technique of IMRT treatment planning and allows treatments shaped fields, especially when the target of radiation is irregular, with fewer side effects by limiting the dose in the tumor tissues and organs at risk and to allow us to increase the doses in the tumor .. So we decided to develop a protocol for the implementation of IMRT, taking into account that we have the appropriate equipment, trained staff to develop this technique. The main objective of this proposal is to allow us to establish the parameters necessary to perform IMRT, and then escalate the dose of radiation to the tumor, with reduced toxicity to healthy tissues. Inclusion criteria. It included 6 patients with histological diagnosis of CNS tumors, specifically astrocytomas grade II, III and IV, glioblastoma multiforme, where radiation is the main treatment, or associated with surgery. It excludes patients who have previously received radiation therapy or are unable to receive treatment without having movements that do not suffer another debilitating disease and to sign informed consent. Be held position and will be used as masks thermo deformed stun, then planning CT performed in all cases. Be designed later volumes (GTV, CTV and PTV, and OR, as established by the ICRU reports 52 and 60, the IAEA), will define the dose, and restrictions on healthy tissue technique is defined treatment according proposed objectives in the planning system. Once approved, is made conventional simulation, verification of the treatment plan on your computer with web plates and implementation of treatment in 1220 of INOR LINAC. Be made patient-specific quality controls and verification of DRR plan once a week for each patient treated. Monitoring will be conducted weekly during

  16. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C.; Oh, B. H.; Hong, H. J.

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology

  17. Development of medical application methods using radiation. Radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E.H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lim, S. J.; Choi, T. H.; Hong, S. W.; Chung, H. Y.; No, W. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Oh, B. H. [Seoul National University. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [Antibody Engineering Research Unit, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. development of monoclonal antibodies and radiopharmaceuticals 2. clinical applications of radionuclide therapy 3. radioimmunoguided surgery 4. prevention of restenosis with intracoronary radiation. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial. (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research. (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology.

  18. SU-E-T-241: Design and Implement of An Information Management System for Radiation Workers in a Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q; Wu, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To meet the special needs of Medical Administration Division, an information management system for radiation workers in a hospital(IMSRWH) has been developed. Methods: There are about 200 radiation workers in 20 departments, such as department of radiology, department of radiation oncology, department of nuclear medicine, and so on. An IMSRWH server was used to run a database and web service of Apache+PHP+MySQL. The IMSRWH web service could be accessed with Internet Explorer(IE) to input, search, count, and print the radiation workers’ data. Every worker’s data information includes the following tables: registration, personal dose monitoring records, personnel certificate, training certificate, personnel license, medical examination, etc, and each table includes more optional detail information. Results: In the past year, the IMSRWH has been successfully developed and implemented in the hospital. According to the needs, the user rights are divided into: the system administrator, office manager, department manager and radiation worker. The different users have the different interfaces, and the appropriate authority permissions mean corresponding operations. The administrator and office manager could manage all personnel information, department manager could manage the staff information of his department, and the workers could view or modify their own information. Because information updates, involving hundreds of each entry and modification are complicated, each table information of all workers can be batch import from or export to a Microsoft Excel CSV format file, to update all together. However, it has only Chinese version now. Conclusion: It was demonstrated to be user-friendly and was proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the hospital management. Since it is an in-house developed system, more functions can be added or modified to further enhance its potentials in research and clinical practice

  19. SU-E-T-241: Design and Implement of An Information Management System for Radiation Workers in a Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q; Wu, M [Beijing Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To meet the special needs of Medical Administration Division, an information management system for radiation workers in a hospital(IMSRWH) has been developed. Methods: There are about 200 radiation workers in 20 departments, such as department of radiology, department of radiation oncology, department of nuclear medicine, and so on. An IMSRWH server was used to run a database and web service of Apache+PHP+MySQL. The IMSRWH web service could be accessed with Internet Explorer(IE) to input, search, count, and print the radiation workers’ data. Every worker’s data information includes the following tables: registration, personal dose monitoring records, personnel certificate, training certificate, personnel license, medical examination, etc, and each table includes more optional detail information. Results: In the past year, the IMSRWH has been successfully developed and implemented in the hospital. According to the needs, the user rights are divided into: the system administrator, office manager, department manager and radiation worker. The different users have the different interfaces, and the appropriate authority permissions mean corresponding operations. The administrator and office manager could manage all personnel information, department manager could manage the staff information of his department, and the workers could view or modify their own information. Because information updates, involving hundreds of each entry and modification are complicated, each table information of all workers can be batch import from or export to a Microsoft Excel CSV format file, to update all together. However, it has only Chinese version now. Conclusion: It was demonstrated to be user-friendly and was proven to significantly improve the efficiency of the hospital management. Since it is an in-house developed system, more functions can be added or modified to further enhance its potentials in research and clinical practice.

  20. Radiation protection in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elamin, O.I.; Hajmusa, E.A.; Shaddad, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    The regulatory framework as established by the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) Act, promulgated in 1996, is described in the report. Three levels of responsibility in meeting radiation protection requirements are established: the Board, the Radiation Protection Technical Committee as the competent authority in the field of radiation protection, and the SAEC Department of Radiation Protection and Environmental Monitoring as the implementing technical body. The report also refers to environmental activities, patient doses in diagnostic radiology, the management of disused sources, emergency preparedness and orphan sources, and the national training activities in the radiation protection field. (author)

  1. Low dose radiation induced protein and its experimental and ophthalmic clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Su Liaoyuan; Liu Fenju; Ding Jie; Li Longbiao; Pan Chengsi

    2001-01-01

    The protective effects of low dose radiation (LDR) induced protein on cellular impairments caused by some harmful chemical and physical factors were studied. Male Kunming mice were irradiated with LDR, then the spleen cells of the mice were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultracentrifugalized. The supernatant solution contained with LDR induced protein. The newly emerging protein was detected by gel filtration and its molecular weight was determined by gel electrophoresis. The content of newly emerging protein (LDR induced protein) was determined by Lowry's method. The method of isotope incorporation was used to observe the biological activity and its influence factors, the protective effects of LDR induced protein on the cells impaired by irradiating with ultraviolet (UV), high doses of 60 Co γ-rays and exposed to heat respectively, and the stimulative effects of LDR induced protein on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Newly emerging protein has been observed in the experiment. The molecular weight of the protein is in the region 76.9 KD+- - 110.0 KD+-, the yield of the protein was 613.33 +- 213.42 μg per 3 x 10 7 spleen cells. DPM values (isotope were incorporated) of normal and injured mice spleen cells increased significantly after stimulating with the solution contained LDR induced protein. It is concluded that LDR induced protein could be obtained from mice spleen cells exposed to 5 - 15 cGy radiation for 2 - 16 h. The protein had biological activity and was able to stimulate the transformation of the spleen cells in vitro. It had obvious protective effects on some impaired cells caused by high dose radiation, UV radiation, heat and so on. It also had stimulative effects on the transformation of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes of healthy individual and patients with eye diseases. It indicates that LDR induced protein increased immune function of human

  2. Radiation-induced mucositis pain in laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Atsuhito; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Iki, Takehiro; Mizuta, Masanobu; Matsubara, Mami

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy in those with head and neck malignancies often triggers painful mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To better understand how radiation-induced pain develops over time, we studied the numerical rating scale (NRS 0-5) pain scores from 32 persons undergoing radiation therapy of 60-72 Gy for newly diagnosed laryngeal cancer. The degree of mucositis was evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version3.0 (CTCAE v3.0). We divided the 32 into a conventional fractionation (CF) group of 14 and a hyperfractionation (HF) group of 18, and further divided laryngeal cancer into a small-field group of 23 and a large-field group of 9. The mucositis pain course was similar in CF and HF, but mucositis pain was severer in the HF group, which also required more NSAIDs. Those in the large-field group had severer pain and mucositis and required more NSAIDs than those in the small-field group. We therefore concluded that small/large-field radiation therapy, rather fractionation type, was related to the incidence of radiation-induced mucositis pain. (author)

  3. Personnel selection and training for radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    For proper implementation of the radiation protection programs in the work place, several persons with different qualifications and training are involved. Among these persons are regulatory personnel managers, operators, workers, health professional, health physics technicians, health physicists, qualified experts, and emergency personnel. The current status of education and training of these persons is discussed in order to build competence in radiation protection and the safe use of radiation sources

  4. "I sleep better at night:" How peer review of radiation treatment plans indirectly improves quality of care across radiation treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Michael D; Hart, Margaret; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Reddeman, Lindsay; Gutierrez, Eric; Foxcroft, Sophie; Warde, Padraig

    Peer review of radiation oncology treatment plans is increasingly recognized as an important component of quality assurance in radiation treatment planning and delivery. Peer review of treatment plans can directly improve the quality of those plans and can also have indirect effects on radiation treatment programs. We undertook a systematic, qualitative approach to describing the indirect benefits of peer review, factors that were seen to facilitate or act as barriers to the implementation of peer review, and strategies to address these barriers across a provincial jurisdiction of radiation oncology programs (ROPs). Semistructured qualitative interviews were held with radiation oncology department heads and radiation therapy managers (or delegates) in all 14 ROPs in Ontario, Canada. We used a theoretically guided phenomenological qualitative approach to design and analyze the interview content. Themes were recorded by 2 independent reviewers, and any discordance was resolved by consensus. A total of 28 interviews were completed with 32 interviewees. Twenty-two unique themes addressed perceived benefits of peer review, relating to either peer review structure (n = 3), process (n = 9), or outcome (n = 10). Of these 22 themes, 19 related to indirect benefits to ROPs. In addition, 18 themes related to factors that facilitated peer review activities and 30 themes related to key barriers to implementing peer review were identified. Findings were consistent with, and enhanced the understanding of, previous survey-based assessments of the benefits and challenges of implementing peer review programs. Although challenges and concerns regarding the implementation of peer review were evident, the indirect benefits to radiation programs are numerous, far outweigh the implementation challenges, and strongly complement the direct individual-patient benefits that result from peer review quality assurance of radiation treatment plans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Contribution of Rostechnadzor in Implementing the State Nuclear Safety Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferapontov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The report considers major areas of Rostechnadzor activities on implementation of the state policy in the area of nuclear safety, including actions to be implemented. Ensuring nuclear and radiation safety in the use of atomic energy is one of the most important components of the national security of the Russian Federation. On March 1, 2012, the President of the Russian Federation approved the Basics of State Policy in the Area of Nuclear and Radiation Safety aimed at consistent reduction of risks associated with man-made impact on the public and the environment in using atomic energy, as well as at prevention of emergencies and accidents in nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities. Rostechnadzor is an authorized body for state safety regulation in the use of atomic energy, which implements functions of regulatory and legal control, licensing of various types of activity and federal state supervision of the atomic energy facilities. The activity in the area of regulatory and legal control is implemented in compliance with the Concept of Enhancement of Regulatory and Legal Control of Safety and Standardization in the Area of the Use of Atomic Energy and the Plan of Implementation of this Concept, which envisages the completion of reviewing the regulatory and legal documents by 2023. Corresponding to the Basics of State Policy in the Area of Nuclear and Radiation Safety of the Russian Federation for the Period of 2025, Rostechnadzor successfully implemented the actions of the Federal Target Programme of Nuclear and Radiation Safety up to 2015, creating all conditions for phased reduction of the amounts of nuclear legacy and ensuring radical increase in their level of nuclear and radiation safety. In 2016, Rostechnadzor embarked on implementation of the Federal Target Programme of Nuclear and Radiation Safety up to 2030, with creation of infrastructure facilities for spent fuel and radioactive waste management and definitive response to the challenges of nuclear

  6. Development of radiation hard components for remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Obara, Kenjiro; Kakudate, Satoshi; Tominaga, Ryuichiro; Akada, Tamio; Morita, Hirosuke.

    1997-01-01

    In International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel remote-handling is inevitably required to assemble and maintain activated in-vessel components due to D-T operation. The components of the in-vessel remote-handling system must have sufficient radiation hardness to allow for operation under an intense gamma-ray radiation of over 30 kGy/h for periods up to more than 1,000 hours. To this end, extensive irradiation tests and quality improvements including the optimization of material composition have been conducted through the ITER R and D program in order to develop radiation hard components which satisfy radiation doses from 10 MGy to 100 MGy at the dose rate of 10 kGy/h. This paper outlines the latest status of the radiation hard component development that has been conducted as the Japan Home Team's contribution to ITER. The remote-handling components tested are categorized into either robotics, viewing systems or common components. The irradiation tests include commercial base products for screening both modified and newly developed products to improve their radiation hardness. (author)

  7. radiation safety culture for developing country: Basis for s minimum operational radiation protection programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozental, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a methodology for an integrated strategy aiming at establishing an adequate radiation Safety infrastructure for developing countries, non major power reactor programme. Its implementation will allow these countries, about 50% of the IAEA's Member States, to improve marginal radiation safety, specially to those recipients of technical assistance and do not meet the Minimum radiation Safety Requirements of the IAEA's Basic Safety Standards for radiation protection Progress in the implementation of safety regulations depends on the priority of the government and its understanding and conviction about the basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. There is no doubt to conclude that the reasons for the deficiency of sources control and dose limitation are related to the lack of an appropriate legal and regulatory framework, specially considering the establishment of an adequate legislation; A minimum legal infrastructure; A minimum operational radiation safety programme; Alternatives for a Point of Optimum Contact, to avoid overlap and conflict, that is: A 'Memorandum of Understanding' among Regulatory Authorities in the Country, dealing with similar type of licensing and inspection

  8. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT

  9. Study on external beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Yoo, Seoung Yul; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Lee, Dong Hoon; Choi, Mun Sik; Yoo, Dae Heon; Lee, Hyo Nam; Kim, Kyeoung Jung

    1999-04-01

    To develop the therapy technique which promote accuracy and convenience in external radiation therapy, to obtain the development of clinical treatment methods for the global competition. The contents of the R and D were 1. structure, process and outcome analysis in radiation therapy department. 2. Development of multimodality treatment in radiation therapy 3. Development of computation using networking techniques 4. Development of quality assurance (QA) system in radiation therapy 5. Development of radiotherapy tools 6. Development of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) tools. The results of the R and D were 1. completion of survey and analysis about Korea radiation therapy status 2. Performing QA analysis about ICR on cervix cancer 3. Trial of multicenter randomized study on lung cancers 4. Setting up inter-departmental LAN using MS NT server and Notes program 5. Development of ionization chamber and dose-rate meter for QA in linear accelerator 6. Development on optimized radiation distribution algorithm for multiple slice 7. Implementation on 3 dimensional volume surface algorithm and 8. Implementation on adaptor and cone for IORT.

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation and partial hepatectomy on messenger RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Newly synthesized messenger RNA, as measured by a 40 min uptake of the radioactive precursor (6- 14 C) orotic acid, was studied in the regenerating livers of non-irradiated and gamma-irradiated (1800 rad) adrenal-intact and adrenalectomized rats 24 and 48 hours after partial hepatectomy. Two groups of rats, one with and one without adrenal glands were each divided into four subgroups: (1) control rats, (2) irradiated rats, (3) partially hepatectomized rats and (4) irradiated, partially hepatectomized rats. The radioactive profile of polyribosome formation and distribution was determined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation (10 to 40 per cent). The result of this study indicates that ionizing radiation decreases the synthesis of newly formed messenger RNA in regenerating livers of adrenal-intact rats. However, adrenalectomy largely abolished that inhibition. These data suggest that the decrease in messenger RNA synthesis may be explained by the disturbance of adrenal hormones induced by partial hepatectomy and ionizing radiation. (author)

  11. Confidence in leadership among the newly qualified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss-Pratt, Lisa; Morley, Mary; Bagley, Liz; Alderson, Steven

    2013-10-23

    The Francis report highlighted the importance of strong leadership from health professionals but it is unclear how prepared those who are newly qualified feel to take on a leadership role. We aimed to assess the confidence of newly qualified health professionals working in the West Midlands in the different competencies of the NHS Leadership Framework. Most respondents felt confident in their abilities to demonstrate personal qualities and work with others, but less so at managing or improving services or setting direction.

  12. CMOS front-end electronics for radiation sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071026

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive treatment of front-end electronics for radiation detection. It discusses the fundamental principles of signal processing for radiation detectors and describes circuits at the level of functional building blocks, omitting transistor-level implementation. It also covers important system-level topics commonly found in the world of front-end electronics for radiation sensors. The book develops the topics in detail, with a constant focus on practical problems. It also provides real implementation examples that offer insights and stimuli for more experienced engineers already working in the field.

  13. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation sources is a privilege; in order to retain the privilege, all persons who use sources of radiation must follow policies and procedures for their safe and legal use. The purpose of this poster is to describe the policies and procedures of the Radiation Protection Program. Specific conditions of radiation safety require the establishment of peer committees to evaluate proposals for the use of radionuclides, the appointment of a radiation safety officer, and the implementation of a radiation safety program. In addition, the University and Medical Centre administrations have determined that the use of radiation producing machines and non-ionizing radiation sources shall be included in the radiation safety program. These Radiation Safety policies are intended to ensure that such use is in accordance with applicable State and Federal regulations and accepted standards as directed towards the protection of health and the minimization of hazard to life or property. It is the policy that all activities involving ionizing radiation or radiation emitting devices be conducted so as to keep hazards from radiation to a minimum. Persons involved in these activities are expected to comply fully with the Canadian Nuclear Safety Act and all it. The risk of prosecution by the Department of Health and Community Services exists if compliance with all applicable legislation is not fulfilled. (author)

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2005-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the the resolutions of its general conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. several general conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training (e.g. GC (XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991,GC (XXXVI)/ RES/584 in 1992, GC (43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC (44)/RES/13 in 2000). In response to GC (44) /RES/13, the IAEA prepared a strategic approach to education and training in radiation and waste safety (strategy on education and training) aiming at establishing, by 2010 sustainable education and training programmes in member states. This strategy was endorsed by the general conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the secretariat to implement the strategy on education and training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation

  15. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2004-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the resolutions of its General Conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training [e.g. GC(XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991; GC(XXXVI)/RES/584 in 1992; GC(43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC(44)/RES/13 in 2000]. In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a S trategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety ( Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by the General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member State' national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation. (Author)

  16. Competition of neutrino and gravitational radiation in neutron star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanas, D.; Schramm, D.N.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility is explored that neutrino radiation, rather than gravitational radiation, may be the dominant way by which non-radial pulsations are damped out in a collapsing star. If this is so it implies that hopes of detecting gravity waves from supernovae explosions are very optimistic. Neutron stars and black holes are probably the collapsed central remnants of a supernovae explosion. These objects presumably originate from collapse of the cores of sufficiently massive stars, following the cessation of thermonuclear burning. Although there is at present no completely consistent detailed theory as to how collapse of the core and the subsequent supernova explosion take place, a general model exists for the final stages of stellar evolution and supernovae explosions. According to this model the electrons of a sufficiently massive stellar core, due to the high density and temperature, become absorbed by the protons through the reaction p + e - → n + v. Very large numbers of neutrinos, resulting from this and other thermal processes, such as pair annihilation, plasma decay, and Bremsstrahlung, are emitted, taking away most of the gravitational energy of the collapse. These neutrinos possibly drive ejection of the overlying stellar mantle, whilst the neutron-rich core collapses further to a condensed remnant. Gravitational radiation comes into play only at very late stages of the collapse. All of this implies that neutrino radiation might contribute to the decay of the non-radial oscillations of the collapsing core and the newly formed neutron star, possibly damping out these oscillations much faster than gravitational radiation. In order to obtain a more quantitative answer to the question the effects of neutrino radiation on the non-radial oscillations are examined. The implication is that neutrino radiation, by more rapid damping of the non-radial oscillations of a newly formed neutron star in a supernova explosion, would hinder gravitational radiation and

  17. Assessment of the Portuguese building thermal code: Newly revised requirements for cooling energy needs used to prevent the overheating of buildings in the summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Panao, Marta J.N.; Camelo, Susana M.L.; Goncalves, Helder J.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, cooling energy needs are calculated by the steady-state methodology of the Portuguese building thermal code. After the first period of building code implementation, re-evaluation according to EN ISO 13790 is recommended in order to compare results with the dynamic simulation results. From these analyses, a newly revised methodology arises including a few corrections in procedure. This iterative result is sufficiently accurate to calculate the building's cooling energy needs. Secondly, results show that the required conditions are insufficient to prevent overheating. The use of the gain utilization factor as an overheating risk index is suggested, according to an adaptive comfort protocol, and is integrated in the method used to calculate the maximum value for cooling energy needs. This proposed streamlined method depends on reference values: window-to-floor area ratio, window shading g-value, integrated solar radiation and gain utilization factor, which leads to threshold values significantly below the ones currently used. These revised requirements are more restrictive and, therefore, will act to improve a building's thermal performance during summer. As a rule of thumb applied for Portuguese climates, the reference gain utilization factor should assume a minimum value of 0.8 for a latitude angle range of 40-41 o N, 0.6 for 38-39 o N and 0.5 for 37 o N. -- Highlights: → A newly revised methodology for Portuguese building thermal code. → The use of the gain utilization factor as an overheating risk index is suggested. → The proposed streamlined method depends on reference values. → Threshold maximum values are significantly below the ones currently used.

  18. Performance Analysis of Si-Based Ultra-Shallow Junction Photodiodes for UV Radiation Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, L.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a performance investigation of newly-developed ultra-shallow junction photodiodes (PureB-diodes) for ultraviolet (UV) radiation detection. The photodiodes are fabricated by pure boron chemical vapor deposition (PureB CVD) technology, which can provide nanometer-thin boron

  19. Consideration of sky-shine radiation effects for the development of Korean regulatory guidance about industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Ki Chi; Bokyun Seo; Wantae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Although most of the sky-shine radiation levels in industrial radiography are below regulatory limits, sky-shine radiation could make a valuable contribution to the total radiation level near shielding facility with little shielding and open field without shielding. Therefore sky-shine radiation should be thoroughly predicted and supervised with the ALARA principle. In this study, we simulated sky-shine radiation for mobile irradiators using MCNP and newly suggested the equation for calculating sky-shine radiation. Also these results were applied to developing Korean regulatory guidance about industrial radiography and to recommending the requirement of the facility design, controlled or supervised area at work places. (author)

  20. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Habing, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  1. Problems faced by newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes mellitus can be a frightening experience for newly diagnosed patients. The aim of this study was to determine and describe the problems faced by newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients at primary healthcare facilities at Mopani district, Limpopo Province. A qualitative, descriptive and contextual research ...

  2. Radiative contribution to the thermal conductivity of fibrous insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, R. M. F.; Schmitt, R. J.; Hughes, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    An approach is shown for using a simple two-flux model to interpret infrared transmission data for a variety of reuseable surface insulations materials and to calculate the radiation transmission. A description is given of preliminary experiments on mullite and silica-based materials. The calculated parameters are compared with the measured values of the total thermal conductivity, as determined on guarded hot plate equipment. It is pointed out that for many samples the newly developed four-flux model must be utilized because the scattering properties of the fibers are often dependent on the wavelength of the radiation.

  3. Procedure and methodology of Radiation Protection optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hengde

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of Radiation Protection is one of the most important principles in the system of radiation protection. The paper introduces the basic principles of radiation protection optimization in general, and the procedure of implementing radiation protection optimization and methods of selecting the optimized radiation protection option in details, in accordance with ICRP 55. Finally, some economic concepts relating to estimation of costs are discussed briefly

  4. Computation of the radiation Q of dielectric-loaded electrically small antennas in integral equation formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    A new technique for estimating the impedance frequency bandwidth of electrically small antennas loaded with magneto-dielectric material from a single-frequency simulation in a surface integral equation solver is presented. The estimate is based on the inverse of the radiation Q computed using newly...... derived expressions for the stored energy and the radiated power of arbitrary coupled electric and magnetic currents in free space....

  5. The impact of bevacizumab treatment on survival and quality of life in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Urup, Thomas; Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Staberg, Mikkel; Villingshøj, Mette; Lassen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains one of the most devastating tumors, and patients have a median survival of 15 months despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, including maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy, and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The purpose of antineoplastic treatment is therefore to prolong life, with a maintenance or improvement of quality of life. GBM is a highly vascular tumor and overexpresses the vascular endothelial growth factor A, which promotes angiogenesis. Preclinical data have suggested that anti-angiogenic treatment efficiently inhibits tumor growth. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor A, and treatment has shown impressive response rates in recurrent GBM. In addition, it has been shown that response is correlated to prolonged survival and improved quality of life. Several investigations in newly diagnosed GBM patients have been performed during recent years to test the hypothesis that newly diagnosed GBM patients should be treated with standard multimodality treatment, in combination with bevacizumab, in order to prolong life and maintain or improve quality of life. The results of these studies along with relevant preclinical data will be described, and pitfalls in clinical and paraclinical endpoints will be discussed

  6. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources in clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Wiechula, Rick

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses' use in clinical decision-making and why and how they are used. BACKGROUND: In spite of an increased educational focus on skills and competencies within evidence based practice newly graduated nurses' ability to use...... approaches to strengthen the knowledgebase used in clinical decision-making. DESIGN AND METHODS: Ethnographic study using participant-observation and individual semi-structured interviews of nine Danish newly graduated nurses in medical and surgical hospital settings. RESULTS: Newly graduates use...... in clinical decision-making. If newly graduates are to be supported in an articulate and reflective use of a variety of sources, they have to be allocated to experienced nurses who model a reflective, articulate and balanced use of knowledge sources. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  7. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety in the frame of the Chernobyl shelter Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, V.; Demchyuk, A.; Kilochitska, T.; Redko, V. [State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, SNRCU, Arsenalna St. 9/11, Kyiv (Ukraine); Bogorinski, P. [GRS/IPSN-RISKAUDIT, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany); Vasilchenko, V.; Erickson, L.; Kadkin, E.; Kondratyev, S.; Kutina, L.; Smyshliaeva, S. [SSTC NRS, Stusa St. 35-37, 03142, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2003-07-01

    Since 1998 the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) has been carried out on the Chernobyl NPP Unit 4 (the object Shelter - OS). The State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine (SNRCU) recognizes the exceptional importance of successful and efficient SIP implementation and acts accordingly in regulation, licensing, and inspection. Technical support of the SNRCU in SIP licensing are provided by the State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC) and the SIP Licensing Consultant (LC) representing RISKAUDIT IPSN/GRS International and SCIENTECH, Inc. Support of the SNRCU is also provided by the International Consultative Committee of Regulatory Bodies (ICCRB). ICCRB members represent regulatory authorities from nine European countries, Canada and the U.S. Summarizing the information above, it can be stated that a sound basis has been created for the licensing process for SIP. The approach for using the regulatory base has been determined. It ensures the establishment of safety objectives and gives ChNPP the freedom of optimal choice of specific technical decisions. The License has been issued for OS-related activities and a number of documents have been developed to conduct an effective and high quality authorization process: the Licensing Process; Recommendations on single SSR, Licensing Plan for SIP. The Order of State Safety Supervision for SIP has been approved. Working groups are functioning, whose purposes are to coordinate actions of participants in authorization activities, including ChNPP, SNRCU, and other RA.

  8. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety in the frame of the Chernobyl shelter Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Demchyuk, A.; Kilochitska, T.; Redko, V.; Bogorinski, P.; Vasilchenko, V.; Erickson, L.; Kadkin, E.; Kondratyev, S.; Kutina, L.; Smyshliaeva, S.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1998 the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) has been carried out on the Chernobyl NPP Unit 4 (the object Shelter - OS). The State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine (SNRCU) recognizes the exceptional importance of successful and efficient SIP implementation and acts accordingly in regulation, licensing, and inspection. Technical support of the SNRCU in SIP licensing are provided by the State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC) and the SIP Licensing Consultant (LC) representing RISKAUDIT IPSN/GRS International and SCIENTECH, Inc. Support of the SNRCU is also provided by the International Consultative Committee of Regulatory Bodies (ICCRB). ICCRB members represent regulatory authorities from nine European countries, Canada and the U.S. Summarizing the information above, it can be stated that a sound basis has been created for the licensing process for SIP. The approach for using the regulatory base has been determined. It ensures the establishment of safety objectives and gives ChNPP the freedom of optimal choice of specific technical decisions. The License has been issued for OS-related activities and a number of documents have been developed to conduct an effective and high quality authorization process: the Licensing Process; Recommendations on single SSR, Licensing Plan for SIP. The Order of State Safety Supervision for SIP has been approved. Working groups are functioning, whose purposes are to coordinate actions of participants in authorization activities, including ChNPP, SNRCU, and other RA

  9. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj

    2014-01-01

    and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses...... heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting...

  10. The radiation metrology network related to the field of mammography: implementation and uncertainty analysis of the calibration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, J. G. P.; de Almeida, C. E.

    2001-09-01

    It is recognized by the international guidelines that it is necessary to offer calibration services for mammography beams in order to improve the quality of clinical diagnosis. Major efforts have been made by several laboratories in order to establish an appropriate and traceable calibration infrastructure and to provide the basis for a quality control programme in mammography. The contribution of the radiation metrology network to the users of mammography is reviewed in this work. Also steps required for the implementation of a mammography calibration system using a constant potential x-ray and a clinical mammography x-ray machine are presented. The various qualities of mammography radiation discussed in this work are in accordance with the IEC 61674 and the AAPM recommendations. They are at present available at several primary standard dosimetry laboratories (PSDLs), namely the PTB, NIST and BEV and a few secondary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs) such as at the University of Wisconsin and at the IAEA's SSDL. We discuss the uncertainties involved in all steps of the calibration chain in accord with the ISO recommendations.

  11. Three dimensional analysis of planar solid oxide fuel cell stack considering radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Inui, Y.; Urata, A.; Kanno, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    The authors have been engaged in numerical simulations of the planar type solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to make clear the dependence of the cell performance on its operating conditions. Up to now, the authors have already developed the simulation codes for the one channel region and the single cell plate in its cell stack. To calculate accurately the effect of radiation heat transfer from the cell stack surfaces, however, a code that can treat the whole cell stack is necessary. In the present study, therefore, the authors newly develop a three dimensional simulation code of the planar SOFC stack, and the detailed effect of the radiation heat transfer is investigated. It is made clear that the conventional codes are sufficiently accurate, and the newly developed whole cell stack code is not inevitable to predict the maximum cell temperature. This is because the thermal conductivity of the cell materials made of ceramics is very small, and the central part of the cell stack is almost free from the influence of radiation heat transfer. On the other hand, the stack simulation is needed to calculate accurately the cell voltage because the radiation heat transfer reduces it when the ambient temperature is low. The bad influence of low ambient temperature on the voltage is, however, small and relatively high voltage is obtained even when the ambient temperature is very low. (author)

  12. Strategies of NSC in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentijo, J. C.; Gil, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramos, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Spanish radiation protection model is consistent with the recommendations established in the ICRP-60, and it is strongly implemented in all practices and related activities of the country. the practical implementation of that model is assuring a high level of protection of workers, public and environment. The Nuclear Safety Council (CSN), as Spanish regulator, is currently involved in the implementation of a new Strategic Plan, which contains, among others, strategic and operational objectives to improve the national system of radiation protection, so they will drive the activities of the CSN in this field during the coming years. A summary of those objectives and the related action plan are described. (Author)

  13. Approaches to promotion and implementation of action on radiation protection for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goske, M. J.; Applegate, K. E.; Bulas, D.; Butler, P. F.; Callahan, M. J.; Coley, B. D.; Don, S.; Farley, S.; Frush, D. P.; Hernanz-Schulman, M.; Kaste, S. C.; Morrison, G.; Sidhu, M.; Strauss, K. J.; Treves, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    The Radiation Protection in Medicine conference, reviewed in this journal supplement, outlined nine strategies to promote radiation protection for patients. The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging has focused its work on three of those areas: creating awareness of the need and opportunities for radiation protection for children; developing open-source educational materials for medical professionals and parents on this critical topic for improved patient safety and communication; and lastly, advocating on behalf of children with industry, government and regulatory bodies to improve equipment design and safety features, standardisation of nomenclature and displays of dose reports across vendor platforms that reflect the special considerations of children. (authors)

  14. Dose Assurance in Radiation Processing Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Chadwick, K.H.; Nam, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed...... at the radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing....

  15. Methodological guide for the implementation of a workstation radiation protection optimization approach: case of the external exposure of the whole body. Report nr 305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, C.; Boucher, A.; Schieber, C.

    2008-02-01

    The first part of this report presents the different steps of the radiation protection optimization approach and proposes some methodological elements for its implementation when designing a maintenance or modification operation. For each step of this optimization approach, the guide presents objectives, peculiarities, recommendations to deepen the approach. The second part proposes a set of technical forms related to the study and the implementation of some actions aimed at dose reduction. These actions are notably: circuit rinsing, decontamination of an irradiation source, setting up of biological protections, removal of an irradiating component, tele-dosimetry, and so on

  16. Development of accelerator radiation protection at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohig, T.

    1993-11-01

    The design of the Superconducting Super Collider evolved over a series of studies from 1984 to 1989. Considerations of concentration of radiation sources and provisions for operational control and monitoring of radiation were determining elements in the design concepts for the facility. The development of the designs involved an extension of the range of applicability of energy deposition and radiation shielding codes beyond the 3 TeV level of the proposed UNK collider to 20 TeV for single beam effects and to 40 TeV in the collision regions. This extrapolation was complicated by the newly discovered, very energetic muons from short-lived states associated with heavy quark states. The design guideline for radiation protection was specified to be 10 mRem/yr, 10% of the Federal limit. In order to limit the amount of land required for the facility, which would extend over some 250 mi. sq., the configuration of the land to be acquired was tailored to the requirements for radiation containment below the levels of the guideline

  17. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  18. Implementation of ICRP-60 recommendations on dose limits to radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    The handling of radioactive material and radiation generating plants in India is regulated by the Atomic Energy Act, 1962 and rules issued under the Act. The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board enforces the rules. Currently, there are about 40,000 radiation workers in the country. Nearly half of them are employed in nuclear installations. During 1989, the Board considered the impact of restricting the maximum individual exposure to different values of dose limits. Through this analysis, the Board alerted all radiation users including persons responsible for radiation safety in nuclear facilities. When ICRP published ICRP-60, the Board issued directives to all radiation installations reducing the dose limit to occupational workers in a phased manner (40 mSv for 1991, 35 mSv for 1992 and 30 mSv for 1993). To meet the recommendations of ICRP-60, AERB issued a directive for the five year block 1994-1998, restricting the cumulative effective dose constraint to one hundred milliSievert (100 mSv) for individual radiation workers. Also, the annual effective dose to individual workers in any calendar year during the five-year block was restricted to thirty milliSievert (30 mSv). The stipulations of AERB are thus more conservative than those of ICRP. There was near total compliance with the dose limits by radiation installations in the country. For instance, in 1989, the number of radiation workers in nuclear power plants, who exceeded the dose level of 20 mSv/year was 9% of the total. This declined gradually to 2.2% in 1993 and 0.3% in 1997. During 1998, only 9 out of 10,145 exceeded 20 mSv/year. This has been achieved by the concerted efforts of the management, health physics staff and radiation workers. The health physicists regulated the radiation doses to workers by issuing work permits when the workers are assigned any job in high radiation areas. Appropriate training programmes are also in place. The broad guidelines to regulate radiation exposures in nuclear facilities

  19. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system

  20. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system. 8 refs

  1. Helical Tomotherapy-Based STAT RT: Dosimetric Evaluation for Clinical Implementation of a Rapid Radiation Palliation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, Alyson; Dunlap, Neal; Sheng, Ke; Geezey, Constance; Turner, Benton; Blackhall, Leslie; Weiss, Geoffrey; Lappinen, Eric; Larner, James M.; Read, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy-based STAT radiation therapy (RT) uses an efficient software algorithm for rapid intensity-modulated treatment planning, enabling conformal radiation treatment plans to be generated on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans for CT simulation, treatment planning, and treatment delivery in one session. We compared helical tomotherapy-based STAT RT dosimetry with standard linac-based 3D conformal plans and standard helical tomotherapy-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry for palliative treatments of whole brain, a central obstructive lung mass, multilevel spine disease, and a hip metastasis. Specifically, we compared the conformality, homogeneity, and dose with regional organs at risk (OARs) for each plan as an initial step in the clinical implementation of a STAT RT rapid radiation palliation program. Hypothetical planning target volumes (PTVs) were contoured on an anthropomorphic phantom in the lung, spine, brain, and hip. Treatment plans were created using three planning techniques: 3D conformal on Pinnacle 3 , helical tomotherapy, and helical tomotherapy-based STAT RT. Plan homogeneity, conformality, and dose to OARs were analyzed and compared. STAT RT and tomotherapy improved conformality indices for spine and lung plans (CI spine = 1.21, 1.17; CI lung = 1.20, 1.07, respectively) in comparison with standard palliative anteroposterior/posteroanterior (AP/PA) treatment plans (CI spine = 7.01, CI lung = 7.30), with better sparing of heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. For palliative whole-brain radiotherapy, STAT RT and tomotherapy reduced maximum and mean doses to the orbits and lens (maximum/mean lens dose: STAT RT = 2.94/2.65 Gy, tomotherapy = 3.13/2.80 Gy, Lateral opposed fields = 7.02/3.65 Gy), with an increased dose to the scalp (mean scalp dose: STAT RT = 16.19 Gy, tomotherapy = 15.61 Gy, lateral opposed fields = 14.01 Gy). For bony metastatic hip lesions, conformality with both tomotherapy techniques (CI = 1

  2. Implementation of the ICRP 2007 recommendations in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kun-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is about to publish new recommendations on radiation protection. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is also under process in revising its International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) to take into account of the changes of the ICRP recommendations. As soon as the revision of the BSS is completed, Korean government is considering to implement those changes in the BSS and the ICRP recommendations into its national radiation protection laws and regulations. This paper introduces the current activities and future prospects in this matter. In the 2007 ICRP recommendations, there are some new concepts, principles and quantities such as the changes in the nominal risk coefficient for cancer and hereditary effects, new definitions on the tissue weighting factors and radiation weighting factors for neutron and proton, extended application of the dose constraints in all exposure situations in source-related radiation protection, and the introduction of new system of protection for non-human species. Based on the study carried out by KINS so far, the following points are identified as major areas that need for further in-depth review and consideration for the implementation of the ICRP 2007 recommendations into Korean radiation protection laws and regulations; changes in the radiation risk factors, radiation weighting factors and tissue weighting factors, maintenance of the ICRP 60 dose limits, practical application of the dose constraints and determination of the reference levels in many source to individual exposure relationships, change from process-based system to exposure situation-based system, strengthening of the principle of optimization in all exposure situations, system of radiation protection for the environment, practical application of the exclusion and exemption principles, active participation of the stake holders, changes in glossary etc. The study for the implementation of the ICRP

  3. Review of Real-Time 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy on Standard-Equipped Cancer Radiation Therapy Systems: Are We at the Tipping Point for the Era of Real-Time Radiation Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, Paul J; Nguyen, Doan Trang; O'Brien, Ricky; Zhang, Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Bertholet, Jenny; Poulsen, Per R

    2018-04-14

    To review real-time 3-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy systems, focusing on clinically implemented solutions. Three groups in 3 continents have clinically implemented novel real-time 3D IGRT solutions on standard-equipped linear accelerators. These technologies encompass kilovoltage, combined megavoltage-kilovoltage, and combined kilovoltage-optical imaging. The cancer sites treated span pelvic and abdominal tumors for which respiratory motion is present. For each method the 3D-measured motion during treatment is reported. After treatment, dose reconstruction was used to assess the treatment quality in the presence of motion with and without real-time 3D IGRT. The geometric accuracy was quantified through phantom experiments. A literature search was conducted to identify additional real-time 3D IGRT methods that could be clinically implemented in the near future. The real-time 3D IGRT methods were successfully clinically implemented and have been used to treat more than 200 patients. Systematic target position shifts were observed using all 3 methods. Dose reconstruction demonstrated that the delivered dose is closer to the planned dose with real-time 3D IGRT than without real-time 3D IGRT. In addition, compromised target dose coverage and variable normal tissue doses were found without real-time 3D IGRT. The geometric accuracy results with real-time 3D IGRT had a mean error of real-time 3D IGRT methods using standard-equipped radiation therapy systems that could also be clinically implemented. Multiple clinical implementations of real-time 3D IGRT on standard-equipped cancer radiation therapy systems have been demonstrated. Many more approaches that could be implemented were identified. These solutions provide a pathway for the broader adoption of methods to make radiation therapy more accurate, impacting tumor and normal tissue dose, margins, and ultimately patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018

  4. Nuclear and radiation technologies in Ukraine: opportunities, status and problems of implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbulyin, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The collection contains research materials and information presented at the Scientific Conference 'Nuclear and radiation technologies in Ukraine' (September 17, 2009, Kyiv). The articles offered specific ways to address a number of issues relevant to nuclear energy, science, technology, medicine and related to the radiation and environmental safety, the use of radiation technologies in medicine, development of uranium and uranium processing industry, safety on factories of NFC, nuclear physical instrumentation, behaviour with radioactive wastes.

  5. Training in ionizing radiation metrology: a systematic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.G.P.; Sales, E.; Wieland, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the systematic approach to training applied to the determination of backscattering factor of the mammography radiation qualities implemented at LNMRI/IRD/CNEN. The strategy for training includes the procedures described at the IAEA Safety Reports Series 201, i.e. analysis, design, implementation and evaluation with feedback . The training included theoretical and practical classes on dosimetry tools, interaction of radiation with matter, radiation protection, laboratory rules, and measurements and uncertainty analysis. At the end the trainee presents a seminar to show the competency acquired and to improve the scientific communication skills. (author)

  6. Newly Generated Liquid Waste Processing Alternatives Study, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, William Henry; Bates, Steven Odum; Bonnema, Bruce Edward; Palmer, Stanley Leland; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Walsh, Stephanie

    2002-09-01

    This report identifies and evaluates three options for treating newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The three options are: (a) treat the waste using processing facilities designed for treating sodium-bearing waste, (b) treat the waste using subcontractor-supplied mobile systems, or (c) treat the waste using a special facility designed and constructed for that purpose. In studying these options, engineers concluded that the best approach is to store the newly generated liquid waste until a sodium-bearing waste treatment facility is available and then to co-process the stored inventory of the newly generated waste with the sodium-bearing waste. After the sodium-bearing waste facility completes its mission, two paths are available. The newly generated liquid waste could be treated using the subcontractor-supplied system or the sodium-bearing waste facility or a portion of it. The final decision depends on the design of the sodium-bearing waste treatment facility, which will be completed in coming years.

  7. Predictors of Distant Brain Recurrence for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawrie, Stephen M.; Guthrie, Barton L.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Nordal, Robert A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Markert, James M.; Cloud, Gretchen A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain predictors of distant brain failure (DBF) in patients treated initially with stereotactic radiosurgery alone for newly diagnosed brain metastases. We hypothesize that these factors may be used to group patients according to risk of DBF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 100 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases treated from 2003 to 2005 at our Gamma Knife radiosurgery facility. The primary endpoint was DBF. Potential predictors included number of metastases, tumor volume, histologic characteristics, extracranial disease, and use of temozolomide. Results: One-year actuarial risk of DBF was 61% for all patients. Significant predictors of DBF included more than three metastases (hazard ratio, 3.30; p = 0.004), stable or poorly controlled extracranial disease (hazard ratio, 2.16; p = 0.04), and melanoma histologic characteristics (hazard ratio, 2.14; p = 0.02). These were confirmed in multivariate analysis. Those with three or fewer metastases, no extracranial disease, and nonmelanoma histologic characteristics (N = 18) had a median time to DBF of 89 weeks vs. 33 weeks for all others. One-year actuarial freedom from DBF for this group was 83% vs. 26% for all others. Conclusions: Independent significant predictors of DBF in our series included number of metastases (more than three), present or uncontrolled extracranial disease, and melanoma histologic characteristics. These factors were combined to identify a lower risk subgroup with significantly longer time to DBF. These patients may be candidates for initial localized treatment, reserving whole-brain radiation therapy for salvage. Patients in the higher risk group may be candidates for initial whole-brain radiation therapy or should be considered for clinical trials

  8. Activities on calibration of radiation protection instruments in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trijoko, S.

    1995-01-01

    As the use of the ionizing radiation emitted by radionuclides or produced by modern machines in Indonesia has increased significantly in the past two decades, the demand for radiation protection measures has also grown up very rapidly. In the mind of Indonesian people, ionizing radiation is always associated with atomic bombs. Indonesian government has set up National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) through the Act No. 31/1964. The BATAN has responsibility in the research and development, implementation and inspection of the safe use of ionizing radiation for peaceful purposes, and always put a great concern on radiation protection matter. The Center for Standardization and Radiation Safety Research (CSRSR) has been founded to implement research and services in the fields of radiation safety, standardization, dosimetry, radiation health, as well as the application of nuclear techniques to medicine. In order to provide the national reference in terms of radiation dosimetry and calibration, the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory was completely set up in Jakarta by 1984. As available facilities, radiation instruments and radiation sources are described. Calibration and personal monitoring services are reported. (K.I.)

  9. ALARA and an integrated approach to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.; Edwards, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Exposures of individuals to ionizing radiation have been restricted for many years by a number of guidelines and rules developed by various advisory and regulatory groups. Accompanying these restrictions has been an evolving principle that exposures to individuals and groups should be kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), consistent with provision of the benefits of radiation use to society. Although the ALARA concept is a laudable goal in principle, its implementation in a clinical facility has not been a straightforward process. Problems of implementing ALARA have been confounded further by the efforts of regulatory agencies to incorporate the ALARA concept into regulations governing radiation exposures. To facilitate the implementation of ALARA as a workable construct in a clinical facility, guidelines are needed for its application to both individual and collective exposures to radiation. The provision of such guidelines, including action and inaction levels for both individual and collective exposures, are presented here

  10. Consequences of the new radiation protection law on the radiation protection register and the occupational radiation protection; Auswirkungen des neuen Strahlenschutzgesetzes auf das Strahlenschutzregister und die berufliche Strahlenueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of the guideline 2013/59/EURATOM has been performed in the new radiation protection law. The most important consequences of the new radiation protection law for the occupational radiation protection are the following: the introduction of an explicit personal indicator and the actualization of occupational categories for employees. These facts require technical and administrative reorganization in data transmission of the licensee to the regulatory monitoring executive and the radiation protection register.

  11. Illumination and radiative cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Shanhui; Raman, Aaswath Pattabhi; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden

    2018-03-20

    Aspects of the present disclosure are directed to providing and/or controlling electromagnetic radiation. As may be implemented in accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus includes a first structure that contains an object, and a second structure that is transparent at solar wavelengths and emissive in the atmospheric electromagnetic radiation transparency window. The second structure operates with the first structure to pass light into the first structure for illuminating the object, and to radiatively cool the object while preserving the object's color.

  12. The radiation performance standard. A presentation model for ionizing radiation in the living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaap, L.E.J.J.; Bosmans, G.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Hendriks, Ch.F.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the so-called radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) the total radioactivity from building constructions which contributes to the indoor radiation dose can be calculated. The SPN is implemented with related boundary values and is part of the Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit') in the Netherlands. The model, presented in this book, forms the basis of a new Dutch radiation protection standard, to be published by the Dutch Institute for Standardization NEN (formerly NNI). 14 refs

  13. Radiation-magnetohydrodynamics of fusion plasmas on parallel supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasar, O.; Moses, G.A.; Tautges, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    A parallel computational model to simulate fusion plasmas in the radiation-magnetohydrodynamics (R-MHD) framework is presented. Plasmas are often treated in a fluid dynamics context (magnetohydrodynamics, MHD), but when the flow field is coupled with the radiation field it falls into a more complex category, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (R-MHD), where the interaction between the flow field and the radiation field is nonlinear. The solution for the radiation field usually dominates the R-MHD computation. To solve for the radiation field, one usually chooses the S N discrete ordinates method (a deterministic method) rather than the Monte Carlo method if the geometry is not complex. The discrete ordinates method on a massively parallel processor (Intel iPSC/860) is implemented. The speedup is 14 for a run on 16 processors and the performance is 3.7 times better than a single CRAY YMP processor implementation. (orig./DG)

  14. Radiative transitions of new particles and the puzzle of cc-bar pseudoscalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafune, J.; Fukugita, M.; Oyanagi, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transitions between psi's and chi's are investigated in terms of a nonrelativistic quark model. When the level mixing is taken into account, no difficulties are met in M1 transitions, if the newly discovered chi (3454) is assigned to the ground state of the pseudoscalar meson

  15. Modeling Radiative Heat Transfer and Turbulence-Radiation Interactions in Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Ge, Wenjun [University of California Merced (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for a full-load (peak pressure ~200 bar) heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.

  16. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  17. Observation of the bone mineral density of newly formed bone using rabbits. Compared with newly formed bone around implants and cortical bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hiroshi; Numata, Yasuko; Sakae, Toshiro; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takao

    2009-01-01

    There have been many studies reporting that newly formed bone around implants is spongy bone. However, although the morphology is reported as being like spongy bone, it is difficult to discriminate whether the bone quality of newly formed bone appears similar to osteoid or cortical bone; therefore, evaluation of bone quality is required. The aims of this study were to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) values of newly formed bone around implants after 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 weeks, to represent these values on three-dimensional color mapping (3Dmap), and to evaluate the change in bone quality associated with newly formed bone around implants. The animal experimental protocol of this study was approved by the Ethics Committee for Animal Experiments of our University. This experiment used 20 surface treatment implants (Ti-6Al-4V alloy: 3.1 mm in diameter and 30.0 mm in length) by grit-blasting. They were embedded into surgically created flaws in femurs of 20 New Zealand white rabbits (16 weeks old, male). The rabbits were sacrificed with an ear intravenous overdose of pentobarbital sodium under general anesthesia each period, and the femurs were resected. We measured BMD of newly formed bone around implants and cortical bone using Micro-CT, and the BMD distribution map of 3Dmap (TRI/3D Bon BMD, Ratoc System Engineering). The BMD of cortical bone was 1,026.3±44.3 mg/cm 3 at 4 weeks, 1,023.8±40.9 mg/cm 3 at 8 weeks, 1,048.2±45.6 mg/cm 3 at 16 weeks, 1,067.2±60.2 mg/cm 3 at 24 weeks, and 1,069.3±50.7 mg/cm 3 at 48 weeks after implantation, showing a non-significant increase each period. The BMD of newly formed bone around implants was 296.8±25.6 mg/cm 3 at 4 weeks, 525.0±72.4 mg/cm 3 at 8 weeks, 691.2±26.0 mg/cm 3 at 16 weeks, 776.9±27.7 mg/cm 3 at 24 weeks, and 845.2±23.1 mg/cm 3 at 48 weeks after implantation, showing a significant increase after each period. It was revealed that the color scale of newly formed bone was Low level at 4 weeks, and then it

  18. Development of rubber gloves by radiation vulcanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, K.; Yoshii, F.; Ishigaki, I.; Mogi, M.; Saito, T.

    1990-01-01

    The processes of radiation vulcanization and production of protective rubber gloves for radioactive contamination are described. A newly developed sensitizing system consisting of 5 phr 2-ethylhexyl acrylate and 1 phr carbon tetrachloride was used to vulcanize natural rubber latex at 12 kGy. Transparent and soft gloves were obtained from the radiation vulcanized latex by a coagulant dipping process. The mechanical properties of the gloves meet Japanese Industrial Standard specification for protective gloves. Combustion analysis of the gloves revealed that the amount of evolved sulfur dioxide and remaining ashes are less than those from commercially available rubber gloves. A trial usage of the gloves at a nuclear power plant showed that the gloves were easy to use for delicate work without undergoing fatigue. (author)

  19. Neutron and photon spectrometry in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancar, A.; Kopecky, Z.; Veskrna, M.

    2014-01-01

    Spectrometric measurements of the mixed fields of neutron and photon radiation in the workplaces with the L-R-0 research reactor located in the UJV Rez and with the Van de Graaff accelerator, located in the UTEF laboratories Prague, are presented in this paper. The experimental spectrometric measurements were performed using a newly developed digital measuring system, based on the technology of analog-digital converters with a very high sampling frequency (up to 2 GHz), in connection with organic scintillation detector, type BC-501A, and stilbene detector. The results of experimental measurements show high quality of spectrometry mixed fields of neutron and photon radiation across the wide dynamic range of measured energy. (authors)

  20. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Rémi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified “field-in-field” technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347–1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349–1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0–63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0–57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  1. The practical skills of newly qualified nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Birkelund, Regner

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of newly qualified nurses and which subjects the nurses regarded as the most important in order to be able to live up to the requirements of clinical practice, and how they experience their potential for developing practical and moral skills, after the decrease in practical training. A qualitative approach guided the research process and the analysis of the data. The data was collected by participant observation and qualitative interviews with four nurses as informants. The conclusions made in this study are based on the statements and the observations of the newly qualified nurses. Our findings are discussed in relation to the Aristotelian concept and other relevant literature. The main message is that the newly qualified nurses did not feel equipped when they finished their training. This could be interpreted as a direct consequence of the decrease in practical training. Our study also underlines that the way nursing theory is perceived and taught is problematic. The interviews revealed that the nurses think that nursing theories should be applied directly in practice. This misunderstanding is probably also applicable to the teachers of the theories. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Contingent Analysis of the Relationship between IS Implementation Strategies and IS Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jinjoo

    1991-01-01

    Considers approaches to dealing with user attitudes toward newly implemented information systems (IS), and suggests that behavioral management strategies relevant to IS fall into three categories: (1) empirical/rational; (2) normative/reeducative; and (3) power/coercive, based on "planned change" theories. An integrative contingent model…

  3. Organisation et mise en oeuvre d'une infrastructure reglementaire nationale chargee de la protection contre les rayonnements ionisants et de la surete des sources de rayonnements. Rapport interimaire pour observations; Organization and implementation of a national regulatory infrastructure governing protection against ionizing radiation and the safety of radiation sources. Interim report for comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    A number of IAEA Member States are undertaking to strengthen their radiation protection and safety infrastructures in order to facilitate the adoption of the requirements established in the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (the Standards). In this connection, the IAEA has developed a technical co-operation programme (Model Project on Upgrading Radiation Protection Infrastructure) to improve radiation protection and safety infrastructures in 51 Member States, taking into account national profiles and needs of the individual participating, countries. The present report deals with the elements of a regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection and safety and intends to facilitate the, implementation of the Basic Safety Standards in practice. It takes into account the proposals in an earlier report, IAEA-TECDOC-663, but it has been expanded to include enabling legislation and modified to be more attuned to infrastructure issues related to implementation of the Standards. The orientation is toward infrastructures concerned with protection and safety for radiation sources used in medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education rather than infrastructures for protection and safety for complex nuclear facilities. It also discusses options for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of the infrastructure in accordance with the size and scope of radiation practices and available regulatory resources within a country.

  4. Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

  5. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources: a meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Hall, Elisabeth O C

    2016-08-01

    To advance evidence on newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources. Clinical decisions need to be evidence-based and understanding the knowledge sources that newly graduated nurses use will inform both education and practice. Qualitative studies on newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources are increasing though generated from scattered healthcare contexts. Therefore, a metasynthesis of qualitative research on what knowledge sources new graduates use in decision-making was conducted. Meta-ethnography. Nineteen reports, representing 17 studies, published from 2000-2014 were identified from iterative searches in relevant databases from May 2013-May 2014. Included reports were appraised for quality and Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography guided the interpretation and synthesis of data. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources during their first 2-year postgraduation were interpreted in the main theme 'self and others as knowledge sources,' with two subthemes 'doing and following' and 'knowing and doing,' each with several elucidating categories. The metasynthesis revealed a line of argument among the report findings underscoring progression in knowledge use and perception of competence and confidence among newly graduated nurses. The transition phase, feeling of confidence and ability to use critical thinking and reflection, has a great impact on knowledge sources incorporated in clinical decisions. The synthesis accentuates that for use of newly graduated nurses' qualifications and skills in evidence-based practice, clinical practice needs to provide a supportive environment which nurtures critical thinking and questions and articulates use of multiple knowledge sources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Spherically symmetric cosmological spacetimes with dust and radiation — numerical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woei Chet; Regis, Marco; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present new numerical cosmological solutions of the Einstein Field Equations. The spacetime is spherically symmetric with a source of dust and radiation approximated as a perfect fluid. The dust and radiation are necessarily non-comoving due to the inhomogeneity of the spacetime. Such a model can be used to investigate non-linear general relativistic effects present during decoupling or big-bang nucleosynthesis, as well as for investigating void models of dark energy with isocurvature degrees of freedom. We describe the full evolution of the spacetime as well as the redshift and luminosity distance for a central observer. After demonstrating accuracy of the code, we consider a few example models, and demonstrate the sensitivity of the late time model to the degree of inhomogeneity of the initial radiation contrast

  7. Spherically symmetric cosmological spacetimes with dust and radiation — numerical implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Woei Chet; Regis, Marco; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-10-01

    We present new numerical cosmological solutions of the Einstein Field Equations. The spacetime is spherically symmetric with a source of dust and radiation approximated as a perfect fluid. The dust and radiation are necessarily non-comoving due to the inhomogeneity of the spacetime. Such a model can be used to investigate non-linear general relativistic effects present during decoupling or big-bang nucleosynthesis, as well as for investigating void models of dark energy with isocurvature degrees of freedom. We describe the full evolution of the spacetime as well as the redshift and luminosity distance for a central observer. After demonstrating accuracy of the code, we consider a few example models, and demonstrate the sensitivity of the late time model to the degree of inhomogeneity of the initial radiation contrast.

  8. Radiation damage monitoring in the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to an integrated luminosity 5.6 fb −1 is presented along with a comparison to a model. -- Highlights: ► Radiation damage monitoring via silicon leakage current is implemented in the ATLAS (LHC) pixel detector. ► Leakage currents measured are consistent with the Hamburg/Dortmund model. ► This information can be used to validate the ATLAS simulation model.

  9. Radiation Safety Aspects of Nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, David; Cash, Leigh Jackson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guilmette, Raymond [Ray Guilmette & Associates, LLC, Perry, ME (United States); Kreyling, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Munchen, (Germany); Oberdorster, Gunter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Smith, Rachel [Public Health England, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom). Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards

    2017-03-27

    This Report is intended primarily for operational health physicists, radiation safety officers, and internal dosimetrists who are responsible for establishing and implementing radiation safety programs involving radioactive nanomaterials. It should also provide useful information for workers, managers and regulators who are either working directly with or have other responsibilities related to work with radioactive nanomaterials.

  10. 47 CFR 1.1310 - Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radiofrequency radiation exposure limits. 1... Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1310 Radiofrequency radiation... exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation as specified in § 1.1307(b), except in the case of portable...

  11. Group consensus peer review in radiation oncology: commitment to quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggar, W Neil; Bhandari, Rahul; Yang, Chunli Claus; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2018-03-27

    Peer review, especially prospective peer review, has been supported by professional organizations as an important element in optimal Radiation Oncology practice based on its demonstration of efficacy at detecting and preventing errors prior to patient treatment. Implementation of peer review is not without barriers, but solutions do exist to mitigate or eliminate some of those barriers. Peer review practice at our institution involves three key elements: new patient conference, treatment planning conference, and chart rounds. The treatment planning conference is an adaptation of the group consensus peer review model from radiology which utilizes a group of peers reviewing each treatment plan prior to implementation. The peer group in radiation oncology includes Radiation Oncologists, Physician Residents, Medical Physicists, Dosimetrists, and Therapists. Thus, technical and clinical aspects of each plan are evaluated simultaneously. Though peer review is held in high regard in Radiation Oncology, many barriers commonly exist preventing optimal implementation such as time intensiveness, repetition, and distraction from clinic time with patients. Through the use of automated review tools and commitment by individuals and administration in regards to staffing, scheduling, and responsibilities, these barriers have been mitigated to implement this Group Consensus Peer Review model into a Radiation Oncology Clinic. A Group Consensus Peer Review model has been implemented with strategies to address common barriers to effective and efficient peer review.

  12. The impact of organisational culture on the adaptation of newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Usually newly employed nurses find adjusting to a work setting a challenging experience. Their successful adaptation to their work situation is greatly influenced by the socialisation process inherent in the organisational culture. The newly employed nurse often finds that the norms are unclear, confusing and restrictive.

  13. Chinese reference human voxel phantoms for radiation protection: development, application and recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yuxi; Qiu Rui; Ren Li; Zhu Huanjun; Li Junli; Liu Liye

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the work of constructing Chinese reference human voxel phantoms, taking Chinese reference adult female voxel model for example. In this study, a site-specific skeleton structure was built, some radiation sensitive organs were supplemented. Organ sub-segmentation was taken into account. The constructed phantoms include almost all radiation sensitive organs required by ICRP new recommendation. Masses of the organs are almost consistent with the Chinese reference data within 5%. The Chinese reference human phantoms have been applied both in internal dosimetry and external dosimetry. The results provide fundamental data for Chinese radiation dosimetry. In addition, the newly established detailed breast model and micro-bone model were introduced. (authors)

  14. Radiation protection in medicine. Actual regulations and the new EU BSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loose, R.; Wucherer, M.

    2013-01-01

    Medical radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, optimisation and dose limitation. Depending on the application, medical staff and patients are affected. The implementation of new basic safety standards (BSS) of the European Commission (EC) brings changes, which must be implemented into national law. They have varying effects depending on the type of application (radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy) for all three principles of radiation protection. (orig.)

  15. Radiation risk education program - local

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.; Archer, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    This article points out the lack of knowledge by the general public and medical profession concerning the true risks of radiation exposure. The author describes an educational program which can be implemented at the local level to overcome this deficiency. The public must understand the enormous extent of benefit derived from radiation applications in our society

  16. Assessment for markers of nephropathy in newly diagnosed type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess for markers of nephropathy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, using blood pressure levels, endogenous creatinine clearance and urinary protein excretion as markers of renal disease. Study design: Ninety newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics were studied within 6 weeks of diagnosis. They were in ...

  17. Sweden's Cooperation with Eastern Europe in Radiation Safety 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dassen, Lars; Andersson, Sarmite; Bejarano, Gabriela

    2011-09-01

    The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority implemented in 2010 cooperation projects in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia, Lithuania and Moldova based on instructions from the Swedish Government and agreements with the European Union and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SIDA. The projects aim at achieving a net contribution to radiation safety (including nuclear safety, nuclear security and non-proliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness) for the benefit of the host country as well as Sweden. This report gives an overview of all the projects implemented in 2010

  18. The implementation of the operational dose quantities into radiation protection dosimetry (NRPB Association)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.; Chartier, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The main objectives of this project are to improve the measurement of spectral and angular distributions of external radiations in the workplace and to examine the implications of these measurements for personal dosimetry. They include measurement techniques for X-ray, γ-radiation and neutron radiation, performance testing of personal dosemeters, the implications of spectral and spatial distributions measurements on personal dosimetry. (R.P.)

  19. DRIVING TURBULENCE AND TRIGGERING STAR FORMATION BY IONIZING RADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Burkert, Andreas; Heitsch, Fabian

    2009-01-01

    We present high-resolution simulations on the impact of ionizing radiation of massive O stars on the surrounding turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). The simulations are performed with the newly developed software iVINE which combines ionization with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and gravitational forces. We show that radiation from hot stars penetrates the ISM, efficiently heats cold low-density gas and amplifies overdensities seeded by the initial turbulence. The formation of observed pillar-like structures in star-forming regions (e.g. in M16) can be explained by this scenario. At the tip of the pillars gravitational collapse can be induced, eventually leading to the formation of low-mass stars. Detailed analysis of the evolution of the turbulence spectra shows that UV radiation of O stars indeed provides an excellent mechanism to sustain and even drive turbulence in the parental molecular cloud.

  20. Radiation Detection Center on the Front Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A

    2005-01-01

    Many of today's radiation detection tools were developed in the 1960s. For years, the Laboratory's expertise in radiation detection resided mostly within its nuclear test program. When nuclear testing was halted in the 1990s, many of Livermore's radiation detection experts were dispersed to other parts of the Laboratory, including the directorates of Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS); Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT); Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT); and Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and International Security (NAI). The RDC-- was formed to maximize the benefit of radiation detection technologies being developed in 15 to 20 research and development (R and D) programs. These efforts involve more than 200 Laboratory employees across eight directorates, in areas that range from electronics to computer simulations. The RDC's primary focus is the detection, identification, and analysis of nuclear materials and weapons. A newly formed outreach program within the RDC-- is responsible for conducting radiation detection workshops and seminars across the country and for coordinating university student internships. Simon Labov, director of the RDC, says, ''Virtually all of the Laboratory's programs use radiation detection devices in some way. For example, DNT uses radiation detection to create radiographs for their work in stockpile stewardship and in diagnosing explosives; CMS uses it to develop technology for advancing the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer; and the Energy and Environment Directorate uses radiation detection in the Marshall Islands to monitor the aftermath of nuclear testing in the Pacific. In the future, the National Ignition Facility will use radiation detection to probe laser targets and study shock dynamics.''

  1. Cumulative genetic damage in children exposed to preconception and intrauterine radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, I.D.; Natarajan, N.

    1980-01-01

    Using a mathematical model and newly developed computer software, the data from the Tri-State Leukemia Survey involving different combinations of radiation exposures to the father and mother prior to conception and to the mother during pregnancy were analyzed. The hypothesis that radiation exposure produces genetic damage which may be expressed in the child both as indicator disease and as leukemia was tested. The genetic damage was estimated in terms of the proportion affected by a given exposure. The relative risk of leukemia and certain other indicator diseases among those affected could then be estimated. The results show that there are at least two distinguishable risk groups, one group with lower (one or two exposures); and the other group with higher (two or three) radiation exposures

  2. An international intercomparison of passive dosemeters, electronic dosemeters and dose rate meters used for environmental radiation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    during 1994. The intercomparison was organised by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig, Germany, and by the Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark. This paper describes the intercomparison experiments performed at the newly established Riso Natural Environmental Radiation...

  3. Preliminary Results on Design and Implementation of a Solar Radiation Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz Jäntschi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solar radiation monitoring system, using two scientificpyranometers and an on-line computer home-made data acquisition system. The firstpyranometer measures the global solar radiation and the other one, which is shaded,measure the diffuse radiation. The values of total and diffuse solar radiation arecontinuously stored into a database on a server. Original software was created for dataacquisition and interrogation of the created system. The server application acquires the datafrom pyranometers and stores it into a database with a baud rate of one record at 50seconds. The client-server application queries the database and provides descriptivestatistics. A web interface allow to any user to define the including criteria and to obtainthe results. In terms of results, the system is able to provide direct, diffuse and totalradiation intensities as time series. Our client-server application computes also derivateheats. The ability of the system to evaluate the local solar energy potential is highlighted.

  4. 14 CFR 26.39 - Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank... Tank Flammability § 26.39 Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability. (a) Applicability: This... Series 767 Series (b) Any fuel tank meeting all of the criteria stated in paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(2) and...

  5. The combined effect of gamma radiation and some bacterial biocides on potato tuber moth Phthorimaea operculella Zeller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, N.F.M.; Hedaya, S.A.; Iman, H.M.; Madiha, R.A.; Youssef, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiment were carried out to investigate the effect of both two bacterial commercial products of Bacillus thurimgiensis ( Dipel - 2x and Protecto ) on the newly hatched larvae of Phthorimaea operculelal at four concentrations (0.15, 0.30, 0.45 and 0.60 g/100ml water).The results showed that the percentages mortality of newly hatched larvae was increased by increasing the applied concentration. Also LC50 and LD90 values was calculated for bacterial and viral product. Significant positive relationship between dose levels and the percentage of adult emergence was obtained. Fecundity and fertility were significantly decreased by the increase of dose levels. Protecto gave (4.4 %) malformed larvae and no malformed larvae was obtained with Dipel-2x. On the other hand, using the radiation doses (10, 30 and 40 Gy) combined with LC50 of Protecto gave synergistic effect for the tested compound. The results indicated that the percentage of larvae survived to adult stage was reduced as the radiation doses increased. The longevity of adults was decreased by increasing the doses of radiation and concentrations of Protecto.

  6. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Eleanor; Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  7. Nuclear safeguards implementations in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, R-H.; Chang, C-K.; Lin, C-R.; Gone, J-K.; Chen, W-L.; Yao, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Now with six Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) units in operation, two Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) units under construction, and other peaceful applications of nuclear and radiation technology expanding in great pace, the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) has been focused on reactor safety regulation, radiation protection, radioactive waste administration, environmental monitoring and R and D for technology development and other civilian nuclear applications. Despite Taiwan's departure from the United Nations and therefore its family member International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1971, Taiwan remains its commitment to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). To date, Taiwan is still part of the international nuclear safeguards system and accepts IAEA's inspections in accordance with its regulations on nuclear safeguards. In 1998, Taiwan further agreed, through exchange of letters between the AEC and IAEA, to implementation of the measures provided for in the model Protocol Additional to its safeguards agreement. In this paper, we will introduce Taiwan's nuclear safeguards history and describe some highlights of safeguards implementation in recent years, such as complementary accesses, transparency visits, remote monitoring inspections, unannounced inspections, facility attachment termination for the decommissioned facilities, and annual safeguards implementation meeting with IAEA

  8. Radiation damage in natural and synthetic halite. Progress report January 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.

    1993-12-01

    This report complements the information presented in the report of December 1992 regarding the research performed at the ECN on radiation damage in salt. It consists of two parts. The first part regards the amount of stored energy which can be developed by gamma-irradiation on different types of halite and considers both the effect of low dose rates in developing radiation damage, and the possible saturation level of radiation damage in natural halite. The second part presents a model to simulate radiation damage development which incorporates some extensions in the Jain-Lidiard model. Due to malfunction of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering installation, neither the previously reported results nor the newly obtained can be trusted and therefore are not reported here. These results regard the shape, size and size distribution of radiation damage defects. (orig.)

  9. Radiation protection textbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, D.J.; Granier, R.

    2007-01-01

    This textbook of radiation protection presents the scientific bases, legal and statutory measures and technical means of implementation of the radioprotection in the medical and industrial sectors, research and nuclear installations. It collects the practical information (organization, analysis of post, prevention, evaluation and risks management, the controls, the training and the information) usually scattered and the theoretical knowledge allowing every person using ionizing radiation: To analyze jobs in controlled areas, to watch the respect for the current regulations, to participate in the training and in the information of the staffs exposed to intervene in accidental situation. This third edition is widely updated and enriched by the most recent scientific and legal data concerning, notably, the human exposure, the dosimetry, the optimization of the radiation protection and the epidemiological inquiries. The contents is as follows: physics of ionizing radiation, ionizing radiation: origin and interaction with matter, dosimetry and protection against ionizing radiation, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, radiobiology, legal measures relative to radiation protection, human exposure of natural origin, human exposure of artificial origin, medical, dental and veterinarian radiology, radiotherapy, utilization of unsealed sources in medicine and research, electronuclear industry, non nuclear industrial and aeronautical activities exposing to ionizing radiation, accidental exposures. (N.C.)

  10. Implementing Shared Memory Parallelism in MCBEND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird Adam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MCBEND is a general purpose radiation transport Monte Carlo code from AMEC Foster Wheelers’s ANSWERS® Software Service. MCBEND is well established in the UK shielding community for radiation shielding and dosimetry assessments. The existing MCBEND parallel capability effectively involves running the same calculation on many processors. This works very well except when the memory requirements of a model restrict the number of instances of a calculation that will fit on a machine. To more effectively utilise parallel hardware OpenMP has been used to implement shared memory parallelism in MCBEND. This paper describes the reasoning behind the choice of OpenMP, notes some of the challenges of multi-threading an established code such as MCBEND and assesses the performance of the parallel method implemented in MCBEND.

  11. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled some fundamental notions and measurement units related to ionizing radiations, this document describes various aspects of natural and occupational exposures: exposure modes and sources, exposure levels, biological effects, health impacts. Then, it presents prevention principles aimed at, in an occupational context of use of radiation sources (nuclear industry excluded), reducing and managing these exposures: risk assessment, implementation of safety from the front end. Some practical cases illustrate the radiation protection approach. The legal and regulatory framework is presented: general notions, worker exposure, measures specific to some worker categories (pregnant and breast feeding women, young workers, temporary workers). A last part describes what is to be done in case of incident or accident (dissemination of radioactive substances from unsealed sources, anomaly occurring when using a generator or a sealed source, post-accident situation)

  12. Chrysosplenium japonicum (Saxifragaceae, Newly Recorded from Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Chuan Hsu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Chrysosplenium japonicum (Maxim. Makino (Saxifragaceae is newly recorded from northeastern Taiwan. Description, color photos and a key to the Chrysosplenium species in Taiwan are provided.

  13. [Radiative and hygienic certification in Armed Forces, problems of its implementation and ways of perfection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, V N; Cherkashin, A V; Shishkanov, A P; Ian'shin, L A; Gracheva, T N

    2010-12-01

    Radiative and hygienic passportization is one of the most actual pattern of socio and hygienic monitoring in Armed Forces. Radiative and hygienic passport is the main document which characterizes the safety control in military unit and uses the sources of ionizing radiation. Sanitary and epidemiologic institutions were imputed to control the formation of radiative and hygienic passports, analysis and generalization of its data, formation of conclusions about the condition of radiation security in the military units. According to radiative and hygienic passportization, which took place in 2009, the radiation security in the Armed Forces and organizations is satisfactory, but there are some problems of providing of radiation security of personnel under the professional and medical radiation. The salvation of its problems requires the effective work of official functionary of radiac object and institutions of state sanitary and epidemiological supervision in Armed Forces of Russian Federation.

  14. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graziani, L.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Kawata, D.; de Bennassuti, M.; Maselli, A.

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline that implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post-process realistic outputs of

  15. Status of radiation sterilization of healthcare products in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Nankang; Wang Chunlei; Teng Weifang

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the status of 60 Co radiation facilities both in service and under construction in China and examines the future market for radiation sterilization of healthcare products. Policies for developing the industry of radiation sterilization are also put forward; these include implementation of appropriate quality systems, scale-up and merging of existing radiation facilities, development of electron beam radiation for sterilization purposes and increasing awareness of the technology of radiation sterilization

  16. Being a team leader: newly registered nurses relate their experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Louise; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how newly qualified registered nurses experience their leadership role in the ward-based nursing care team. A nurse's clinical leadership affects the quality of care provided. Newly qualified nurses experience difficulties during the transition period from student to qualified professional and find it challenging to lead nursing care. Twelve nurses were interviewed and the transcribed texts analysed using qualitative content analysis to assess both manifest and latent content. Five themes were identified: feeling stranded; forming well-functioning teams; learning to lead; having the courage, strength, and desire to lead; and ensuring appropriate care. The findings indicate that many factors limit nurses' leadership but some circumstances are supportive. The leadership prerequisites for newly registered nurses need to improve, emphasizing different ways to create a supportive atmosphere that promotes professional development and job satisfaction. To increase nurse retention and promote quality of care, nurse managers need to clarify expectations and guide and support newly qualified nurses in a planned way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. People newly in love are more responsive to positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cassandra L; Beninger, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    Passionate love is associated with increased activity in dopamine-rich regions of the brain. Increased dopamine in these regions is associated with a greater tendency to learn from reward in trial-and-error learning tasks. This study examined the prediction that individuals who were newly in love would be better at responding to reward (positive feedback). In test trials, people who were newly in love selected positive outcomes significantly more often than their single (not in love) counterparts but were no better at the task overall. This suggests that people who are newly in love show a bias toward responding to positive feedback, which may reflect a general bias towards reward-seeking.

  18. Implementation and modification of a three-dimensional radiation stress formulation for surf zone and rip-current applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Voulgaris, G.; Warner, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v 3.0), a three-dimensional numerical ocean model, was previously enhanced for shallow water applications by including wave-induced radiation stress forcing provided through coupling to wave propagation models (SWAN, REF/DIF). This enhancement made it suitable for surf zone applications as demonstrated using examples of obliquely incident waves on a planar beach and rip current formation in longshore bar trough morphology (Haas and Warner, 2009). In this contribution, we present an update to the coupled model which implements a wave roller model and also a modified method of the radiation stress term based on Mellor (2008, 2011a,b,in press) that includes a vertical distribution which better simulates non-conservative (i.e., wave breaking) processes and appears to be more appropriate for sigma coordinates in very shallow waters where wave breaking conditions dominate. The improvements of the modified model are shown through simulations of several cases that include: (a) obliquely incident spectral waves on a planar beach; (b) obliquely incident spectral waves on a natural barred beach (DUCK'94 experiment); (c) alongshore variable offshore wave forcing on a planar beach; (d) alongshore varying bathymetry with constant offshore wave forcing; and (e) nearshore barred morphology with rip-channels. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons to previous analytical, numerical, laboratory studies and field measurements show that the modified model replicates surf zone recirculation patterns (onshore drift at the surface and undertow at the bottom) more accurately than previous formulations based on radiation stress (Haas and Warner, 2009). The results of the model and test cases are further explored for identifying the forces operating in rip current development and the potential implication for sediment transport and rip channel development. Also, model analysis showed that rip current strength is higher when waves approach at angles of 5

  19. Radiation safety and inventory of sealed radiation sources in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Mannan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sealed radiation sources (SRS) of various types and activities are widely used in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and teaching in Pakistan. The proper maintenance of records of SRS is mandatory for users/licensees. Since 1956, more than 2000 radiation sources of different isotopes having activities of Bq to TBq have been imported. Of these, several hundred sources have been disposed of and some have been exported/returned to the suppliers. To ensure the safety and security of the sources and to control and regulate the safe use of radiation sources in various disciplines, the Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (DNSRP), the implementing arm of the regulatory authority in the country, has introduced a system for notifying, registering and licensing the use of all types of SRS. In order to update the inventory of SRS used throughout the country, the DNSRP has developed a database. (author)

  20. Effects of the new radiation protection act on the radiation protection register and the monitoring of occupational radiation exposure; Auswirkungen des neuen Strahlenschutzgesetzes auf das Strahlenschutzregister und die berufliche Strahlenueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The implementation of DIRECTIVE 2013/59 / EURATOM (EURATOM Basic Safety Standards) is via the new radiation protection law and brings in the monitoring of occupational radiation among others two significant new features and changes: - Introduction of a unique personal identifier, - update of the occupational categories. Both require technical and organizational changes in the data transmission of the licensees to the dosimetry services and the radiation protection register.

  1. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation

  2. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naiyyum Choudhury; Najmul Alam Chowdhury; Feroza Akhtar

    2001-01-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  3. Application of radiation in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Naiyyum; Chowdhury, Najmul Alam; Akhtar, Feroza [Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2001-03-01

    Radiation technology offers a very wide scope for utilisation and commercial exploitation in various field. All over the world, this technology is being favourably considered for different applications like radiation sterilisation of medical products, preservation of food by controlling the physiological processes for extending shelf-life and eradication of microbial and insect pests, radiation processing of polymeric materials and treatment of sewage sludge. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has taken radiation processing programmes in a big way right from its inception. This paper describes the studies carried out by various research groups in Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission mainly using Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The investigation covers medical sterilisation, food preservation and development and modification of polymeric materials by gamma radiation. Both food preservation and radiation sterilisation of medical products are now being commercially carried out in the Gammatech facility as a joint venture company of BAEC and a private entrepreneur. Bangladesh is soon going to establish a full-fledged Tissue Bank to cater the needs of various tissue allografts for surgical replacement. Recently Government of Bangladesh has allocated US$ 1.00 million for strengthening of the Tissue Banking Laboratory. BAEC has made quite a good research contribution on vulcanization of natural rubber latex, wood plastic composites, surface coating curing, polymer modification etc. As a result of successful achievement of R and D activities in all these projects, a pilot plant project involving about US$ 4.00 million is under implementation at the Atomic energy Research Establishment campus of BAEC. In addition a project on 'National Polymer Centre' at a cost of US$ 2.00 million has already been approved. It is expected that work on radiation processing including commercialization will be accelerated with the implementation of these projects. The impact of radiation processing

  4. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  5. Identification of new biomarker of radiation exposure for establishing rapid, simplified biodosimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Daisuke; Kawai, Hidehiko; Kamiya, Kenji; Suzuki, Fumio; Izumi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Until now, counting chromosome aberration is the most accurate method for evaluating radiation doses. However, this method is time consuming and requires skills for evaluating chromosome aberrations. It could be difficult to apply this method to majority of people who are expected to be exposed to ionizing radiation. In this viewpoint, establishment of rapid, simplified biodosimetric methods for triage will be anticipated. Due to the development of mass spectrometry method and the identification of new molecules such as microRNA (miRNA), it is conceivable that new molecular biomarker of radiation exposure using some newly developed mass spectrometry. In this review article, the part of our results including the changes of protein (including the changes of glycosylation), peptide, metabolite, miRNA after radiation exposure will be shown. (author)

  6. Status and problem of radiation education in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramrattana, Manoon [Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Vibhavadee Rangsit Road, Chatuchak, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1999-09-01

    Knowledge of radiation and its application and protection have been routinely taught, discussed and transferred to end users and the public. Limited resource and a strategic plan are identified to be the major obstacle to fully implementation of radiation education in Thailand. Current strategic planning on radiation education in Thailand will be discussed. (author)

  7. Status and problem of radiation education in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, Manoon

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of radiation and its application and protection have been routinely taught, discussed and transferred to end users and the public. Limited resource and a strategic plan are identified to be the major obstacle to fully implementation of radiation education in Thailand. Current strategic planning on radiation education in Thailand will be discussed. (author)

  8. 6. national congress of radiation protection S.F.R.P. 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This congress tackles the following subjects: individual dosimetry for external irradiation, update of arrangements in the public health code relative to the radiation protection, implementation of zoning decree, regulation, radiation protection in professional area, radiation protection in ITER, non ionizing radiation, radiation protection in accident situation, biological radiation effects, radiation protection for patients, dosimetry, environmental exposure, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. (N.C.)

  9. There is more into 'doing' than 'knowing': The function of the right inferior frontal sulcus is specific for implementing versus memorising verbal instructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demanet, J.; Liefooghe, B.; Hartstra, E.; Wenke, D.; Houwer, J. de; Brass, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we examine the mechanism underlying the human ability to implement newly instructed stimulus-response mappings for their future application. We introduce a novel procedure in which we can investigate the processes underlying such implementation while controlling for more general

  10. A case of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma of an 87-year-old physician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takatsuka, Sumiko; Takenouchi, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    We reported a case of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma on the bilateral middle finger of an 87-year-old physician. He had exposed his hands to radiation without defense when he took an X-ray photograph. Squamous papules and ulcers occurred on both of his hands 10-years ago. The ulcer on the right middle finger enlarged rapidly after a one-month duration. A biopsy specimen showing squamous cell carcinoma derived from chronic radiation dermatitis, and disarticulation at the proximal interpharyngeal joint (PIP) joint of the right middle finger was performed. Six month later, hyperkeratotic tumor newly occurred on the opposite middle finger, and were operated on in the same way. The remaining lesions of chronic radiation dermatitis were treated by topical bleomycin hydrochloride. Since medical workers carelessly exposed their skin to radiation several decades ago, attention to late occurrence of radiation-induced skin cancer is needed. (author)

  11. Standards for radiation protection instrumentation: design of safety standards and testing procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes by means of examples the role of safety standards for radiation protection and the testing and qualification procedures. The development and qualification of radiation protection instrumentation is a significant part of the work of TUV NORD SysTec, an independent expert organisation in Germany. The German Nuclear Safety Standards Commission (KTA) establishes regulations in the field of nuclear safety. The examples presented may be of importance for governments and nuclear safety authorities, for nuclear operators and for manufacturers worldwide. They demonstrate the advantage of standards in the design of radiation protection instrumentation for new power plants, in the upgrade of existing instrumentation to nuclear safety standards or in the application of safety standards to newly developed equipment. Furthermore, they show how authorities may proceed when safety standards for radiation protection instrumentation are not yet established or require actualization. (author)

  12. Consequences of the new Slovenian legislation on radiation protection and nuclear safety for radiation protection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents brief description of the old Slovenian regulations and an overview of the new, harmonised regulations in the field of radiation protection training. The most important novelties were pointed out with possible consequences for the implementation of radiation protection training. Some suggestions on how to overcome transitional problems and how to improve training were also given. (author)

  13. Workplace Violence and Job Outcomes of Newly Licensed Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hyoung Eun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of workplace violence toward newly licensed nurses and the relationship between workplace violence and job outcomes. Methods: An online survey was conducted of newly licensed registered nurses who had obtained their license in 2012 or 2013 in South Korea and had been working for 5–12 months after first being employed. The sample consisted of 312 nurses working in hospitals or clinics. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire...

  14. Radiation protection programme in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essien, E. C.

    2014-04-01

    The oil and gas industry uses many radiation sources in various radiation based technologies which are of great benefit to the industry, this includes nucleonic gauges, multiphase flow meters, well logging etc. Inappropriate use of these equipment and installations and uncontrolled activities associated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) can contaminate the environment resulting in occupational and public exposures. The objective of this work is to develop a Radiation Protection Programme (RPP) for the oil and gas industry which when implemented by the operating organisation will keep doses to the workers and public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), maximize the benefits while minimizing the hazards associated with the use of radiation based technologies. In order to achieve the aim of this work, review of previous works on radiation sources in nucleonic gauges, well logging and waste management processes of NORMs was carried out. Some recommendations were stated, which if strictly implemented would improve the scope of radiation protection in the oil and gas industries. (au)

  15. Regulatory control and safety of radiation and radioactive sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The application of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources in different fields such as, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and teaching is constantly increasing in Bangladesh. Any system enacted to control exposure to ionizing radiation has as primary objective the protection of health of people against the deleterious effects of radiation. Establishing the appropriate level of radiological protection and safety of radiation sources used in practice or intervention attains this objective. The regulatory program governing the safe use of radioactive and radiation sources in Bangladesh is based on the legislation enacted as Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NSRC) Act-93 and NSRC Rules-97 and its implementation by the competent authority. The radiation control infrastructures and procedure are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing, regular inspection, personal dose monitoring, emergency preparedness, etc. The issue of security of radiation source is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country

  16. A comprehensive literature review of guidelines facilitating transition of newly graduated nurses to professional nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, Dalena R M; Jordan, Portia J; Ten Ham-Baloyi, Wilma; Caka, Ernestina M

    2018-05-01

    Literature shows that successful transition of newly graduate nurses to professional nurses is imperative but does not always take place, resulting in difficulty in performance, cognizance or behaviour of a role as a nurse, affecting the quality of patient care negatively. No integrative literature review could be found to summarize available guidelines facilitating transition of final year nursing students to professional nurses. An extensive search of the literature by means of an integrative literature review was conducted in 2014 and updated in June 2017, following a five-step process. All relevant studies were subsequently appraised for rigour and quality using the AGREE II tool by two independent reviewers. Eight (n = 8) guidelines on transitions were independently extracted. After thematic analysis was done, three factors to facilitate transition of final year nursing students to professional nurses were found: 1) support for new graduates, 2) the graduate's need for socialization and belonging, and 3) a positive clinical learning environment. The availability and implementation of guidelines on transition of final year nursing students by educational institutions and healthcare facilities could ease the transition from being final year nursing students to becoming professional nurses as well as improve retention of newly qualified professional nurses. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volodin, V; Hanson, G P

    1993-12-31

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  18. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, V.; Hanson, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this Chapter is to give a general outline of the essential principles and procedures for radiation protection in a nuclear medicine department where radionuclides are used for diagnosis and therapy. More detailed recommendations regarding radiation protection in nuclear medicine are given in the publications of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP, publications 25, 57, 60) and in ILO/IAEA/WHO Manual on Radiation Protection in Hospitals and General Practice (Volume 2: Unsealed Sources, WHO, Geneva, 1975), on which this Chapter is based. This chapter is not intended to replace the above-mentioned international recommendations on radiation protection, as well as existing national regulations on this subject, but intended only to provide guidance for implementing these recommendations in clinical practice

  19. Implementation of the learning problems of physics-based medical and radiation protection in a medical school; Implementacion del aprendizaje basado en problemas de la fisica medica y la proteccion radiologica en una facultad de medicina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Montplet, C.; Casas Curto, J. D.; Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Vilanova Busquets, J. C.; Balliu Collgros, E.; Barcelo Obregon, J.; Fuentes Raspall, R.; Guirao Marin, S.; Maroto Genover, A.; Pont Valles, J.; Agramunt Chaler, S.; Jurado Bruggeman, D.

    2013-07-01

    The learning objectives related to medical physics and radiation protection work mostly in the module of Radiology and physical medicine of the second year of the curriculum, complemented by a visit to medical physics and radiation protection and radiation oncology at the Hospital services University of reference during the third course. In this paper we present our experience in the design and implementation during the period 2009-2012 of the module focusing in these disciplines. (Author)

  20. A peer review process as part of the implementation of clinical pathways in radiation oncology: Does it improve compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Brian J; Heron, Dwight E; Beriwal, Sushil

    Clinical pathways are patient management plans that standardize evidence-based practices to ensure high-quality and cost-effective medical care. Implementation of a pathway is a collaborative process in our network, requiring the active involvement of physicians. This approach promotes acceptance of pathway recommendations, although a peer review process is necessary to ensure compliance and to capture and approve off-pathway selections. We investigated the peer review process and factors associated with time to completion of peer review. Our cancer center implemented radiation oncology pathways for every disease site throughout a large, integrated network. Recommendations are written based upon national guidelines, published literature, and institutional experience with evidence evaluated hierarchically in order of efficacy, toxicity, and then cost. Physicians enter decisions into an online, menu-driven decision support tool that integrates with medical records. Data were collected from the support tool and included the rate of on- and off-pathway selections, peer review decisions performed by disease site directors, and time to complete peer review. A total of 6965 treatment decisions were entered in 2015, and 605 (8.7%) were made off-pathway and were subject to peer review. The median time to peer review decision was 2 days (interquartile range, 0.2-6.8). Factors associated with time to peer review decision >48 hours on univariate analysis include disease site (P peer review (P 48 hours. Clinical pathways are an integral tool for standardizing evidence-based care throughout our large, integrated network, with 91.3% of all treatment decisions being made as per pathway. The peer review process was feasible, with peer review of treatment decisions encourages compliance with clinical pathway recommendations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaiskos, Pantelis, E-mail: pkaraisk@med.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Gamma Knife Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Roussakis, Arkadios [CT and MRI Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Torrens, Michael [Gamma Knife Department, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece); Seimenis, Ioannis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  2. Possibilities to reduce the effect of ionizing radiation by interaction of two types of radiation into a matter: ionized and non-ionized radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanvir

    2007-01-01

    fiber from various types of sources of radiation by using the wave equation of Maxwell. The research study is actually based on its physical and medical implementation; such as regulation and optimization of radiation of various sources and on neurooncological therapy. However, this research study is a pioneer stage of viewing the interaction of two types of radiation into matter and could have many valuable results for future implementation. (author)

  3. Development and implementation of an automated system for antiquated of the process of gamma radiation monitors calibration; Desenvolvimento e implantacao de um sistema automatizado para adequacao do processo de calibracao de monitores de radiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, Iremar Alves

    2012-07-01

    In this study it was carried out the development and implementation of a system for the appropriate process of gamma radiation monitors calibration, constituted by a pneumatic dispositive to exchange the attenuators and a positioning table, both actuated through a control panel. We also implemented a System of Caesa-Gammatron Irradiator, which increased the range of the air kerma rates, due to its higher activity comparing with the current system of gamma radiation in use in the calibration laboratory of gamma irradiation. Hence, it was necessary the installation of an attenuator dispositive remotely controlled in this irradiator system. Lastly, it was carried out an evaluation of the reduction in the rates of the occupational dose. This dissertation was developed with the aim of improving the quality of the services of calibration and tests of gamma radiation monitors - provided by the IPEN Laboratory of Instrument Calibration - as well as decreasing the occupational dose of the technicians involved in the process of calibration, following thus the principles of radiation protection. (author)

  4. The MCART radiation physics core: the quest for radiation dosimetry standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Abdul M; MacVittie, Thomas J; Lasio, Giovanni; Lu, Wei; Prado, Karl L

    2014-01-01

    Dose-related radiobiological research results can only be compared meaningfully when radiation dosimetry is standardized. To this purpose, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)-sponsored Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological Threats (MCART) consortium recently created a Radiation Physics Core (RPC) as an entity to assume responsibility of standardizing radiation dosimetry practices among its member laboratories. The animal research activities in these laboratories use a variety of ionizing photon beams from several irradiators such as 250-320 kVp x-ray generators, Cs irradiators, Co teletherapy machines, and medical linear accelerators (LINACs). In addition to this variety of sources, these centers use a range of irradiation techniques and make use of different dose calculation schemes to conduct their experiments. An extremely important objective in these research activities is to obtain a Dose Response Relationship (DRR) appropriate to their respective organ-specific models of acute and delayed radiation effects. A clear and unambiguous definition of the DRR is essential for the development of medical countermeasures. It is imperative that these DRRs are transparent between centers. The MCART RPC has initiated the establishment of standard dosimetry practices among member centers and is introducing a Remote Dosimetry Monitoring Service (RDMS) to ascertain ongoing quality assurance. This paper will describe the initial activities of the MCART RPC toward implementing these standardization goals. It is appropriate to report a summary of initial activities with the intent of reporting the full implementation at a later date.

  5. Phototherapy cabinet for ultraviolet radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, S.N.; Frost, P.

    1981-01-01

    A newly designed cabinet can be used for the treatment of psoriasis with fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) lamps. the new design provides more uniform distribution of UV radiation in both the horizontal and vertical axes, and several safety features have been added. The distribution and uniformity of UV output in this and in a previously described cabinet are compared. The UV output at the vertical center of the older UV light cabinet was six times greater than that at either the top or bottom, while the design of the present cabinet provides uniform UV radiation except for a slight increase at head height and at the level of the lower legs compared with the middle third of the cabinet. The variation in output of the older cabinet may, in part, explain the commonly encountered difficulty in the phototherapy of psoriasis of the scalp and lower extremities

  6. Curriculum Policy Implementation: How Schools Respond to Government's "Soft" Policy in the Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jacqueline K. S.

    2012-01-01

    "Soft" policy has newly emerged as a policy implementation concept in relation to governance. Non-binding in character, "soft" policy is designed for multi-level systems of governance in which there is relative autonomy at different levels of collective decision-making. "Soft" policy has gained attention since the…

  7. Galactic cosmic ray simulation at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Slaba, Tony C.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Badavi, Francis F.; Baiocco, Giorgio; Benton, Eric; Bindi, Veronica; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Boothman, David A.; Borak, Thomas B.; Britten, Richard A.; Curtis, Stan; Dingfelder, Michael; Durante, Marco; Dynan, William S.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Elgart, S. Robin; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Guida, Peter M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hellweg, Christine E.; Huff, Janice L.; Kronenberg, Amy; La Tessa, Chiara; Lowenstein, Derek I.; Miller, Jack; Morita, Takashi; Narici, Livio; Nelson, Gregory A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Patel, Zarana S.; Reitz, Guenther; Rusek, Adam; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Scott-Carnell, Lisa A.; Semones, Edward; Shay, Jerry W.; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Sihver, Lembit; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Story, Michael D.; Turker, Mitchell S.; Uchihori, Yukio; Williams, Jacqueline; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2017-01-01

    Most accelerator-based space radiation experiments have been performed with single ion beams at fixed energies. However, the space radiation environment consists of a wide variety of ion species with a continuous range of energies. Due to recent developments in beam switching technology implemented at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), it is now possible to rapidly switch ion species and energies, allowing for the possibility to more realistically simulate the actual radiation environment found in space. The present paper discusses a variety of issues related to implementation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulation at NSRL, especially for experiments in radiobiology. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to developing a GCR simulator are presented. In addition, issues common to both GCR simulation and single beam experiments are compared to issues unique to GCR simulation studies. A set of conclusions is presented as well as a discussion of the technical implementation of GCR simulation. PMID:26948012

  8. Implementation of the basic safety standards directive in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bines, W.

    2003-01-01

    Implementation of the European Council BSS Directive 96/29/Euratom in the UK is not achieved through any one piece of legislation (though the majority of the provisions are implemented by the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999) but by a mosaic of provisions, supported by codes of practice, non-statutory guidance and administrative arrangements. The paper describes some of the features of UK occupational radiation protection and the reason for the apparent differences between the UK and other EU Member States in their approach to agreeing the precise provisions of European legislation. (author)

  9. The effects of teacher fidelity of implementation of pathways to health on student outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Melissa A; Riggs, Nathaniel R; Shin, Hee-Sung; Tate, Eleanor B; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the importance of ensuring that programs are implemented as intended by program developers in order to achieve desired program effects. The current study examined implementation fidelity of Pathways to Health (Pathways), a newly developed obesity prevention program for fourth- through sixth-grade children. We explored the associations between self-reported and observed implementation fidelity scores and whether implementation fidelity differed across the first 2 years of program implementation. Additionally, we examined whether implementation fidelity affected program outcomes and whether teacher beliefs were associated with implementation fidelity. The program was better received, and implementation fidelity had more effects on program outcomes in fifth grade than in fourth grade. Findings suggest that implementation in school-based obesity programs may affect junk food intake and intentions to eat healthfully and exercise. School support was associated with implementation fidelity, suggesting that prevention programs may benefit from including a component that boosts school-wide support. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Implementation of Information Management System for Radiation Safety of Personnel at the Russian Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management 'SevRAO' - 13131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chizhov, K.; Simakov, A.; Seregin, V.; Kudrin, I.; Shandala, N.; Tsovyanov, A.; Kryuchkov, V. [Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of Federal Medical Biological Agency, RF Ministry of Health and Social Development. 46, Zhivopisnaya St., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Krasnoschekov, A.; Kosnikov, A. [Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management ' SevRAO' - a branch of the Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' Enterprise for Radioactive Waste Management' ' RosRAO' 183017, Murmansk, Lobova st., 100 (Russian Federation); Kemsky, I. [Regional management - 120 of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency, 184682, Snezhnogorsk, Valentina Biryukova St., 5/1 (Russian Federation); Sneve, M. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Postboks 55, 1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The report is an overview of the information-analytical system designed to assure radiation safety of workers. The system was implemented in the Northwest Radioactive Waste Management Center 'SevRAO' (which is a branch of the Federal State Unitary Enterprise 'Radioactive Waste Management Enterprise RosRAO'). The center is located in the Northwest Russia. In respect to 'SevRAO', the Federal Medical-Biological Agency is the regulatory body, which deals with issues of radiation control. The main document to regulate radiation control is 'Reference levels of radiation factors in radioactive wastes management center'. This document contains about 250 parameters. We have developed a software tool to simplify control of these parameters. The software includes: input interface, the database, dose calculating module and analytical block. Input interface is used to enter radiation environment data. Dose calculating module calculates the dose on the route. Analytical block optimizes and analyzes radiation situation maps. Much attention is paid to the GUI and graphical representation of results. The operator can enter the route at the industrial site or watch the fluctuations of the dose rate field on the map. Most of the results are presented in a visual form. Here we present some analytical tasks, such as comparison of the dose rate in some point with control levels at this point, to be solved for the purpose of radiation safety control. The program helps to identify points making the largest contribution to the collective dose of the personnel. The tool can automatically calculate the route with the lowest dose, compare and choose the best route. The program uses several options to visualize the radiation environment at the industrial site. This system will be useful for radiation monitoring services during the operation, planning of works and development of scenarios. The paper presents some applications of this system on real data

  11. Implementation of radioecological education in secondary school by a 'Radiation and man' elective course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, B.; Boyanova, L.; Tsakovski, S.; Pavlova, P.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a didactic investigation within the period 1998-2000 carried out at the Chair of Chemistry Didactics at Sofia University 'St. Kliment Ohridski'. The proposed system, which includes a program, supplied with appropriate literature, visualization aids and control tools was approbated in three variants, as follows: Elective training; Presentation of seminars or discussion lessons; Inclusion of several topics in the existing physics educational section 'From Atoms to Space', which is enough to provide substantial radioecological information corresponding to the amount planned in the 'Radiation and Man' educational program. The project was carried out at two secondary schools: 'Vassil Levski' in Velingrad and 'Yane Sandanski' in Sandanski. These schools were chosen mainly because of their location - outside the city of Sofia and far from the 30 km zone around the Kozloduy NPP. The project implementation started in the middle of the 2001/2002 school year second term and ended before the end of the term. The current paper summarizes results from teaching of the elective course to secondary school students (10 th grade). Questionnaires and results evaluation scheme are worked out. The data are treated by correlation and cluster analysis

  12. Development of multi copter based autonomous unmanned aerial radiation monitoring system for the remote impact assessment of radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, Jis Romal; Gupta, Ashutosh; Bahadur, Shuchita; Chaudhury, Probal; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2016-01-01

    During any radiation emergency, the level and extent of radioactive contamination need to be monitored for the timely and effective implementation of countermeasures to reduce the radiation exposure to public. In such a scenario, radiation surveillance can be carried out using either ground based mobile monitoring techniques or aerial radiation monitoring. Aerial radiation monitoring is quick and capable of scanning the areas which are not easily accessible by the ground based mobile monitoring. Compact unmanned aerial vehicle based radiation surveillance system is ideal in above mentioned radiation emergency scenarios as it can be rapidly deployed in the affected area and radiation exposure to the monitoring personal can be totally avoided. This paper describes development of multi copter based autonomous unmanned aerial radiation monitoring system for the remote impact assessment of radiation emergencies

  13. IRPA Regional Congress on Radiation Protection in Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Congress proceedings included 93 papers. The IRPA Congress materials deals with progress the various IRPA initiatives to implement new radiation protection concepts. In accordance to this actual trends the main topics of the congress are 'Clearance levels and material release' and 'Environmental impact assessment of workplaces resp. facilities with radiation sources'. Papers and posters in all traditional radiation protection subjects (general aspects, biological effects of radiation, radiation protection in medicine, dosimetry, instrumentation, quality assurance)

  14. IRPA Regional Congress on Radiation Protection in Central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The Congress proceedings included 93 papers. The IRPA Congress materials deals with progress the various IRPA initiatives to implement new radiation protection concepts. In accordance to this actual trends the main topics of the congress are 'Clearance levels and material release' and 'Environmental impact assessment of workplaces resp. facilities with radiation sources'. Papers and posters in all traditional radiation protection subjects (general aspects, biological effects of radiation, radiation protection in medicine, dosimetry, instrumentation, quality assurance)

  15. Implementation of the 96/29/EURATOM industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.

    2005-01-01

    The European directive 96/29/EURATOM [The Council of the European Union, Council Directive of 13 May 1996 Laying down Basic Safety Standards for the Protection of the Health of Workers and the General Public against the Danger Arising from Ionising Radiation, Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM, Official Journal European Communities L 349, 21-25 (1996). ] set up in 1996 a series of specific requirements related to a safe use of radiation sources and also to the exposure of a member of public and workers. The implementation of these requirements based on the ICRP 60 is reflected in the comprehensive radiation protection measures at the user site. In addition, the requirements are reflected in a practice of a regulatory authority. The implementation of the 96/29/EURATOM in the last years in Slovenia will be discussed based on the inspection practice including inspections of industry radiography, industrial gauges and practice with smoke detectors. The problems related to the safe use of sources with recommended working life given by a producer will be discussed.(author)

  16. Cost basis for implementing ALARA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of implementing effective ALARA programs is discussed. A basic element of the cost benefit methodology is the valuation of a man-rem. In the program, this is derived from an assessment of radiation exposure risk and societal valuation of harmful effects. The man-rem value is used as an element in the cost benefit analysis. The analysis includes an assessment of the differential man-rem resulting from the action, implementation cost, and operational savings

  17. Atmospheric radiation modeling of galactic cosmic rays using LRO/CRaTER and the EMMREM model with comparisons to balloon and airline based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; deWet, W. C.; Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Tobiska, W. K.; Shelton-Mur, K.; Yarborough, A.; Harvey, J.; Herbst, A.; Koske-Phillips, A.; Molina, F.; Omondi, S.; Reid, C.; Reid, D.; Shultz, J.; Stephenson, B.; McDevitt, M.; Phillips, T.

    2016-09-01

    We provide an analysis of the galactic cosmic ray radiation environment of Earth's atmosphere using measurements from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) together with the Badhwar-O'Neil model and dose lookup tables generated by the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM). This study demonstrates an updated atmospheric radiation model that uses new dose tables to improve the accuracy of the modeled dose rates. Additionally, a method for computing geomagnetic cutoffs is incorporated into the model in order to account for location-dependent effects of the magnetosphere. Newly available measurements of atmospheric dose rates from instruments aboard commercial aircraft and high-altitude balloons enable us to evaluate the accuracy of the model in computing atmospheric dose rates. When compared to the available observations, the model seems to be reasonably accurate in modeling atmospheric radiation levels, overestimating airline dose rates by an average of 20%, which falls within the uncertainty limit recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). Additionally, measurements made aboard high-altitude balloons during simultaneous launches from New Hampshire and California provide an additional comparison to the model. We also find that the newly incorporated geomagnetic cutoff method enables the model to represent radiation variability as a function of location with sufficient accuracy.

  18. 1 D analysis of Radiative Shock damping by lateral radiative losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Michel; Audit, Edouard

    2008-11-01

    We have demonstrated the effect of the lateral radiative losses in radiative shocks propagative in layered quasi-planar atmospheres.[1,2] The damping of the precursor is sensitive to the fraction of self-emitted radiation reflected by the walls (called albedo) We have given recently an experimental determination of the wall albedo.[2] For parametric analysis of this effect, we implement lateral losses in the 1D hydro-rad code MULTI [3] and compared results with 2D simulations. [1] S.Leygnac, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 113301 (2006) [2] M.Busquet, et al, High Energy Density Plasmas 3, 8-11 (2007); M.Gonzalez, et al, Laser Part. Beams 24, 1-6 (2006) [3] Ramis et al, Comp. Phys. Comm., 49, 475 (1988)

  19. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase.......Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  20. Transformation of organic N newly added to red soil treated with different cultural practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangQin-Zheng; YeQing-Fu; 等

    1998-01-01

    By using 15N tracer method,transformation of organic N,which wqas newly added to red soil treated with different cultural practices,was studied under thelaboratory incubation condition.The experimental results showed that the transformation of N from newly added organic matter and soil native pool during incubation was influenced by cultural practice treatment beforeincubation.Fallow was favorable to the mineralization of newly added organic N and soil N compared with the planting wheat treatment.Planting wheat greatly increased the loss of soil N.Application of fertilizers stimulated the mineralization of newly added organic N and application of organic matter reduced the mineralization,but stimulated microbialtransformation of newly adde4d organic N.

  1. Weak Memory Models: Balancing Definitional Simplicity and Implementation Flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sizhuo; Vijayaraghavan, Muralidaran; Arvind

    2017-01-01

    The memory model for RISC-V, a newly developed open source ISA, has not been finalized yet and thus, offers an opportunity to evaluate existing memory models. We believe RISC-V should not adopt the memory models of POWER or ARM, because their axiomatic and operational definitions are too complicated. We propose two new weak memory models: WMM and WMM-S, which balance definitional simplicity and implementation flexibility differently. Both allow all instruction reorderings except overtaking of...

  2. Recurrent analysis of radiation protection conditions at the nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    National Institute of Radiation Protection has cause of the Government Bill 1980/81:90 analysed following viewpoints of radiation protection: - Occupational exposes. - Dose rate trends. - Implemented and planned measures of importance from the viewpoint of radiation protection. - Releases and environmental impact. - Organisation and training in radiation protection. (authors)

  3. Radiation related cancer risk after ionization radiation exposure to the Bulgarian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Vasilev, G.; Hadjieva, T.

    2008-01-01

    Average annual individual effective dose of natural radiation background (NRB) for the Bulgarian population is estimated to be 2.33 mSv.a -1 (from 1.60 to 3.06). NRB has been considered nearly constant in time, but during the 20th century the radiation above NRB has gradually increased. It was mainly caused by the medical X-ray and radionuclide diagnostics, radiation treatment, occupational radiation, global radioactive fallout, Chernobyl accident, exploitation of thermal power and nuclear power stations, etc. For the years 1950-2000 collective dose from NRB represents 965 000 man.Sv and radiation over NRB gives 1 042 800 man.Sv. Population risk following radiation exposure is estimated mainly on stochastic health effect by implementation of the so-called Linear non-threshold model (LNM) dose-effect. It postulates no dose threshold for radiation-induced health effects. Using different models, assumptions and assessments, authors have determined the contribution of lethal radiogenic cancer to Bulgarian spontaneous cancer rate to be from 3.7% to 20.6%. Numerous contradictions and concepts about the LNM still persist, because from statistical point of view, LNM can neither be proved nor rejected. (authors)

  4. Design of a statewide radiation survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagda, N.L.; Koontz, M.D.; Rector, H.E.; Nifong, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Florida Institute of Phosphate Research (FIPR) recently sponsored a statewide survey to identify all significant land areas in Florida where the state's environmental radiation rule should be applied. Under this rule, newly constructed buildings must be tested for radiation levels unless approved construction techniques are used. Two parallel surveys - a land-based survey and a population-based survey - were designed and conducted to address the objective. Each survey included measurements in more than 3000 residences throughout the state. Other information sources that existed at the outset of the study, such as geologic profiles mapped by previous investigators and terrestrial uranium levels characterized through aerial gamma radiation surveys, were also examined. Initial data analysis efforts focused on determining the extent of evidence of radon potential for each of 67 counties in the state. Within 18 countries that were determined to have definite evidence of elevated radon potential, more detailed spatial analyses were conducted to identify areas of which the rule should apply. A total of 74 quadrangles delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey, representing about 7% of those constituting the state, were identified as having elevated radon potential and being subject to the rule

  5. Biological response of cancer cells to radiation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam eBaskar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth and has the ability to spread or metastasize throughout the body. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development, care and treatment modalities. Radiation therapy or radiotherapy is an important and integral component of cancer management, mostly conferring a survival benefit. Radiation therapy destroys cancer by depositing high-energy radiation on the cancer tissues. Over the years, radiation therapy has been driven by constant technological advances and approximately 50% of all patients with localized malignant tumors are treated with radiation at some point in the course of their disease. In radiation oncology, research and development in the last three decades has led to considerable improvement in our understanding of the differential responses of normal and cancer cells. The biological effectiveness of radiation depends on the linear energy transfer (LET, total dose, number of fractions and radiosensitivity of the targeted cells or tissues. Radiation can either directly or indirectly (by producing free radicals damages the genome of the cell. This has been challenged in recent years by a newly identified phenomenon known as radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE. In RIBE, the non-irradiated cells adjacent to or located far from the irradiated cells/tissues demonstrate similar responses to that of the directly irradiated cells. Understanding the cancer cell responses during the fractions or after the course of irradiation will lead to improvements in therapeutic efficacy and potentially, benefitting a significant proportion of cancer patients. In this review, the clinical implications of radiation induced direct and bystander effects on the cancer cell are discussed.

  6. New legislative regulations for ensuring radiation protection using ionizing radiation sources in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, K.

    2018-01-01

    European Commission Directive No. 2013/59 / EURATOM laying down basic safety requirements for the provision of radiation protection regulates the provision of radiation protection for workers with radiation sources and residents in all areas of use of ionizing radiation sources. This Directive also addresses radiation protection in the use of ionizing radiation sources in medicine. The European Commission Directive regulates the requirements for radiation protection but also extends to its scope and provisions on the use of medical radiation sources (so-called m edical exposure ) in the scope of further legislation in the field of health care, which has to be amended and modified or possibly issued new. It was necessary in the preparation of the new act on radiation protection to amend simultaneously Act no. 576/2004 on the provision of health care and services related to provision of health care and Act no. 578/2004 on Health care Providers, Health care Professionals and Organizations in Health Care and to prepare a series of implementing regulations not only to the Law on Radiation Protection but also to the Laws governing the Provision of Health Care. The paper presents changes to existing legislation on radiation protection in medical radiation and new requirements for the construction and operation of health workplaces with radiation sources, the protection of the health of patients, the requirements for instrumentation used for medical radiation and radiological instrumentation tests. (authors)

  7. The Case of a Newly Implemented Modern Management Accounting System in a Multinational Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Watts

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary management accounting techniques (such as TQM, BSC, JIT are widely lauded by academia but the proposed relevance to business has not necessarily the view held by industry (e.g. Burns & Vaivio, 2001; Chenhall & Langfield-Smith, 1998; Innes et al., 2000. The purpose of this article is to investigate the acquisition by a modern multi-national firm of a major IT-based management accounting program to assess the relevance and usefulness of its functionality by identifying the type(s of systems that are utilised and the rationale for upgrading or modifying its system(s. This study relies on a single case based on two in-depth semi structured interviews with accounting and finance professionals in a multi-national manufacturing company that recently implemented a modern management accounting system. The findings indicate that despite demonstrating some relevance of the management accounting information, the manufacturer deactivated components of the system that were deemed irrelevant at particular levels of the organisation. This paper provides evidence about the non-reliance on management accounting information in a multinational company operating in Australia. The findings in the study imply that relevance is linked to implementation, planning and training will help managers to better prepare themselves in setting up contemporary management accounting systems.

  8. Is whole brain radiation therapy needed for all patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Miller, David W.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cohen, Bruce H.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Since whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) carries risks for long term survivors of brain metastases, some have advocated the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone for patients with brain metastases. We retrospectively reviewed our results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with immediate or delayed WBRT. MATERIALS/METHODS: From March 1990 to December 1996, linear accelerator-based SRS was performed on patients with Karnofsky score ≥ 70 and asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic brain metastases < 4 cm diameter. After excluding those patients with recurrent disease, 87 patients with 106 metastatic lesions (72 pts- single or solitary lesion, 13 pts- 2 lesions, 1 pt- 3 lesions, and 1 pt- 5 lesions) remained for analysis. The use of WBRT was dependent on physician preference but was given to all patients who developed local or regional failure after SRS. Survival was measured from the date of SRS until death or last follow-up using Kaplan-Meier method. Freedom from progression (FFP) was defined as no local or regional brain failure on follow-up radiographs and was measured from the date of SRS. RESULTS: Prognostic variables (age, sex, initial KPS, systemic disease, and extent of surgical resection) were similar for the 40 patients in the immediate WBRT group (iWBRT) and for the 47 patients in the delayed WBRT group (dWBRT). With a median follow-up of 5.8 months, no significant difference in median survival (6.9 months for both groups) was noted. On multivariate analysis, absence of systemic disease (p=0.008) and KPS 90-100 (p=0.001) were the only significant predictors for survival. For the 29 patients with a minimum KPS of 90 and no systemic disease, the median survival was 17.8 months. For those patients with a solitary lesion (no systemic disease), there was a trend for better median survival for the iWBRT group (22.8 months) versus the dWBRT group (9.3 months), p=0.06. FFP data was available on 78 patients (97 lesions). A significant difference was

  9. Applications of radiation technology and isotopes in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Sueo [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports the current status of applications of radiation technology and radioisotopes in industries, environmental conservation and medical products. The topics discussed are radiation processing - features and advantages, radiation sources, polymeric products, radiation cross-linking and grafting of polymers, radiation curing of surface coating, new developments; sterilization of medical products, applications for environmental protection i.e. cleaning the flue gases, disinfection of sewage and its recycling; nucleonic control system (NCS); major mechanisms of implementation of the Agency`s programme for technology transfer - research contract programme, model projects and technical cooperation projects.

  10. Applications of radiation technology and isotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueo Machi

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the current status of applications of radiation technology and radioisotopes in industries, environmental conservation and medical products. The topics discussed are radiation processing - features and advantages, radiation sources, polymeric products, radiation cross-linking and grafting of polymers, radiation curing of surface coating, new developments; sterilization of medical products, applications for environmental protection i.e. cleaning the flue gases, disinfection of sewage and its recycling; nucleonic control system (NCS); major mechanisms of implementation of the Agency's programme for technology transfer - research contract programme, model projects and technical cooperation projects

  11. Comparison of Radiation Protection Training in European Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Practice and implementation of radiation protection in European countries and in majority of other countries all over the world relies on common principles and recommendations established by international organisations. These principles and recommendations were incorporated in national legislation ensuring similar and compatible standards of protection for occupationally exposed workers and members of the public. One of the basic requirements derived from international recommendations is also formal request for training of occupationally exposed workers. The final goals of the training are defined only indirectly through standards of safety and protection. Therefore national regulation regarding radiation protection training in particular country is a result of general approach to education and training, historical circumstances, influence and importance of nuclear technology and other factors influencing health protection and national well-being in general. The result is variety of national regulations ranging from very stringent and detailed to rather general and flexible. Nevertheless, results of implemented training do not differ sufficiently to significantly affect achieved standards of radiation protection. According to available information European countries implement radiation protection training in dissimilar ways. Institutions and organisations involved, as well as form and duration of training varies from country to country. Therefore, it is not possible to determine common rules just by reviewing radiation protection training in different countries. It is the intention of this contribution to analyse and discuss available information regarding radiation protection training and point out the necessity of international co-operation in this field, especially in the sense of the future trends. (author)

  12. WE-E-304-00: Implementing SBRT Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    SBRT is having a dramatic impact on radiation therapy of early-stage, locally advanced cancers. A number of national protocols have been and are being developed to assess the clinical efficacy of SBRT for various anatomical sites, such as lung and spine. Physics credentialing for participating and implementation of trial protocols involve a broad spectrum of requirements from image guidance, motion management, to planning technology and dosimetric constrains. For radiation facilities that do not have extensive experiences in SBRT treatment and protocol credentialing, these complex processes of credentialing and implementation could be very challenging and, sometimes, may lead to ineffective even unsuccessful execution of these processes. In this proposal, we will provide comprehensive review of some current SBRT protocols, explain the requirements and their underline rationales, illustrate representative failed and successful experiences, related to SBRT credentialing, and discuss strategies for effective SBRT credentialing and implementation. Learning Objectives: Understand requirements and challenges of SBRT credentailing and implentation Discuss processes and strategies of effective SBRT credentailing Discuss practical considerations, potential pitfalls and solutions of SBRT implentation

  13. WE-E-304-00: Implementing SBRT Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    SBRT is having a dramatic impact on radiation therapy of early-stage, locally advanced cancers. A number of national protocols have been and are being developed to assess the clinical efficacy of SBRT for various anatomical sites, such as lung and spine. Physics credentialing for participating and implementation of trial protocols involve a broad spectrum of requirements from image guidance, motion management, to planning technology and dosimetric constrains. For radiation facilities that do not have extensive experiences in SBRT treatment and protocol credentialing, these complex processes of credentialing and implementation could be very challenging and, sometimes, may lead to ineffective even unsuccessful execution of these processes. In this proposal, we will provide comprehensive review of some current SBRT protocols, explain the requirements and their underline rationales, illustrate representative failed and successful experiences, related to SBRT credentialing, and discuss strategies for effective SBRT credentialing and implementation. Learning Objectives: Understand requirements and challenges of SBRT credentailing and implentation Discuss processes and strategies of effective SBRT credentailing Discuss practical considerations, potential pitfalls and solutions of SBRT implentation.

  14. Randomized comparison of operator radiation exposure comparing transradial and transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: rationale and design of the minimizing adverse haemorrhagic events by TRansradial access site and systemic implementation of angioX - RAdiation Dose study (RAD-MATRIX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Calabrò, Paolo; Sarandrea, Alessandro; Rigattieri, Stefano; Tomassini, Francesco; Sardella, Gennaro; Zavalloni, Dennis; Cortese, Bernardo; Limbruno, Ugo; Tebaldi, Matteo; Gagnor, Andrea; Rubartelli, Paolo; Zingarelli, Antonio; Valgimigli, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Radiation absorbed by interventional cardiologists is a frequently under-evaluated important issue. Aim is to compare radiation dose absorbed by interventional cardiologists during percutaneous coronary procedures for acute coronary syndromes comparing transradial and transfemoral access. The randomized multicentre MATRIX (Minimizing Adverse Haemorrhagic Events by TRansradial Access Site and Systemic Implementation of angioX) trial has been designed to compare the clinical outcome of patients with acute coronary syndromes treated invasively according to the access site (transfemoral vs. transradial) and to the anticoagulant therapy (bivalirudin vs. heparin). Selected experienced interventional cardiologists involved in this study have been equipped with dedicated thermoluminescent dosimeters to evaluate the radiation dose absorbed during transfemoral or right transradial or left transradial access. For each access we evaluate the radiation dose absorbed at wrist, at thorax and at eye level. Consequently the operator is equipped with three sets (transfemoral, right transradial or left transradial access) of three different dosimeters (wrist, thorax and eye dosimeter). Primary end-point of the study is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators at thorax. An important secondary end-point is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators comparing the right or left radial approach. Patient randomization is performed according to the MATRIX protocol for the femoral or radial approach. A further randomization for the radial approach is performed to compare right and left transradial access. The RAD-MATRIX study will probably consent to clarify the radiation issue for interventional cardiologist comparing transradial and transfemoral access in the setting of acute coronary syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics and land suitability of newly establish rice field in Lesung Batu Muda, Rawas Ulu, Musi Rawas, South Sumatera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sudaryanto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice field has a strategic function because it is the main provider of food for the population of Indonesia. The data of the land use for the rice field in Indonesia showed that around 41% in Java Island. Agricultural technology at the level of industry experienced rapid progress, but the technology implementation at the level by farmer is relatively slow. Increased production of rice in Indonesia was reported of less than 1% per year. The research aimed to study the characteristics and land suitability of newly established rice field in Lesung Batu Muda, Rawas Ulu, Musi Rawas, South Sumatera. There were two soil land units that were tested included water availability, rooting medium, level of erosion, soil chemical properties and land preparation. The results of the study showed that newly established rice fields in Lesung Batu Muda, Rawas Ulu, Musi Rawas, South Sumatera could be used to open new rice fields by planting twice a year. In opening new rice fields, the application of organic matter and creation of terracing on sloping areas were needed.

  16. A newly designed radiation therapy protocol in combination with prednisolone as treatment for meningoencephalitis of unknown origin in dogs: a prospective pilot study introducing magnetic resonance spectroscopy as monitor tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Katrin; Carrera, Inés; Steffen, Frank; Golini, Lorenzo; Kircher, Patrick R; Schneider, Uwe; Bley, Carla Rohrer

    2015-01-31

    A plethora of treatment options have been described for canine meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO), yet a gold standard has not been established. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to document the effect of a newly designed 30 Gray (Gy) radiation therapy (RT) protocol plus corticosteroids as treatment for focal and multifocal MUO, to monitor clinical and imaging changes during the course of the disease with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton MR Spectroscopy (H-1 MRS) and to detect the occurrence of radiation related side effects. Six dogs (3 with focal and 3 with multifocal lesions) were included in the study. The RT protocol used consisted of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The neurological status of all six dogs improved during RT, with 3 of 6 cases returning to a normal condition. One dog was euthanized early during follow-up (dog and improved in 3 dogs and H-1 MRS normalized in 4. In the dog without improvement of the MRI lesions, the N-acetyl aspartate continued to decrease, while choline and creatine concentrations remained stable during that time. This dog was euthanized 18 month after the end of RT due to relapse. One dog was lost to follow up 12 month after completion of RT. The other 3 dogs are still alive at the time of writing. RT with 30 Gy in 10 fractions can provide an additional option for anti-inflammatory treatment of focal and multifocal MUO. The protocol used for treatment monitoring was feasible while no side effects of RT could be observed during the follow up period. Moreover, H-1 MRS could represent a new and non-invasive tool to control the progression of the disease during the treatment course.

  17. Radiation monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Farias, Marcos S. de; Lacerda, Fabio de; Heimlich, Adino [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Design of a portable low-power multichannel analyzer with wireless connectivity for remote radiation monitoring, powered from a solar panel with a internal battery to be operated in field. The multichannel analyzer is based on a single microcontroller which performs the digital functions and an analog signal processing board for implementing a Gaussian shaper preamplifier, a Gaussian stretcher, sample and hold, pile-up rejector and a 10 bit ADC. Now this design is to be used with a NaI(Ti) scintillator detector. This multichannel analyzer is designed to be a part of radiation monitoring network. All of them are connected, by radio in a radius of 10 kilometers, to a supervisor computer that collects data from the network of multichannel analyzers and numerically display the latest radiation measurements or graphically display measurements over time for all multichannel analyzers. Like: dose rate, spectra and operational status. Software also supports remotely configuring operating parameters (such as radiation alarm level) for each monitor independently. (author)

  18. Radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Farias, Marcos S. de; Lacerda, Fabio de; Heimlich, Adino

    2015-01-01

    Design of a portable low-power multichannel analyzer with wireless connectivity for remote radiation monitoring, powered from a solar panel with a internal battery to be operated in field. The multichannel analyzer is based on a single microcontroller which performs the digital functions and an analog signal processing board for implementing a Gaussian shaper preamplifier, a Gaussian stretcher, sample and hold, pile-up rejector and a 10 bit ADC. Now this design is to be used with a NaI(Ti) scintillator detector. This multichannel analyzer is designed to be a part of radiation monitoring network. All of them are connected, by radio in a radius of 10 kilometers, to a supervisor computer that collects data from the network of multichannel analyzers and numerically display the latest radiation measurements or graphically display measurements over time for all multichannel analyzers. Like: dose rate, spectra and operational status. Software also supports remotely configuring operating parameters (such as radiation alarm level) for each monitor independently. (author)

  19. Possible origin of Saturn's newly discovered outer ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    Within a planetogonic model the self-gravitationally caused formation of pre-planetary and pre-satellite rings from an earlier thin disk is reported. The theoretically derived orbital radii of these rings are compared with the orbital levels in the planetary system and the satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. From this comparison it is concluded that at the radial position of Saturn's newly discovered outer ring an early pre-satellite ring of more or less evolved satellites could have existed. These satellites should have been disturbed in their evolution by the gravitation of the neighbouring massive satellite Titan. The comparison also may indicate similarities between the asteroidal belt and the newly discovered outer ring of Saturn

  20. Oral Cancer Knowledge Assessment: Newly Graduated versus Senior Dental Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado de Souza, Ricardo; Gallego Arias Pecorari, Vanessa; Lauria Dib, Luciano

    2018-01-01

    The present study assessed the level of dentists' knowledge regarding oral cancer in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A questionnaire was used to compare the level of knowledge among newly graduated and senior clinicians. A total of 20,154 e-mails were correctly delivered to the dentists registered in the database of the Regional Dentistry Council of São Paulo, and 477 (2.36%) responses were received. This sample consisted of 84 newly graduated clinicians and 105 senior clinicians. For the statistical analysis, the chi-square test and the logistic regression analysis were performed with α = 0.05, and the results were described herein. According to their knowledge level, the results were statistically different between the groups, since 19% of the newly graduated clinicians were evaluated with knowledge grade A (excellent) in comparison to 6.7% of the senior clinicians. In spite of the results indicated that newly graduated clinicians' knowledge regarding oral cancer was 2.1 times higher, 34.5% of the professionals in this group had regular or poor knowledge on the subject, and several questions relating to clinical characteristics and risk factors indicated that there still exist some knowledge gaps, demonstrating that there is a need for further studies and information activities addressing oral cancer. PMID:29666649

  1. National Environmental Radiation Warning And Monitoring Network And Proposed Radiation Monitoring Programme For The 1st Nuclear Power Plant Ninth Thuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Thu Bac

    2011-01-01

    National Environmental Radiation Warning and Monitoring Network has been gradually setting up based on some of legislative documents which have been issued in recent years. Studies and surveys to build an environmental radiation monitoring program for nuclear power plant (NPP) have also been implemented. This paper aims to introduce National Environmental Radiation Warning and Monitoring Network in Vietnam which has been approved by the government, the draft program for environmental radiation monitoring Ninh Thuan NPP and some initial results of research about environmental radiation in the planning area for building first NPP in Vietnam. (author)

  2. Career Motivation in Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: What Makes Them Remain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Zarata Mann; Bailey, Jessica H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite vast research on newly licensed registered nurses (RNs), we don't know why some newly licensed registered nurses remain in their current jobs and others leave the nursing profession early in their career. Job satisfaction, the most significant factor emerging from the literature, plays a significant role in nurses' decisions to remain in…

  3. Forms of Knowledge Incorporated in Clinical Decision-making among Newly-Graduated Nurses: A Metasynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri; Elgaard Sørensen, Erik; Grønkjær, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Clinical-decision-making is of decisive importance to how evidence-based practice is put into practice. Schools of Nursing have a responsibility to teach and train nursing students to make clinical decisions within a frame of evidence-based practice. Clinical decision-making among nurses has been...... explored from numerous angles using a diversity of methodologies. Existing research has mainly focused on promoting and inhibiting factors for implementation of evidence-based practice and incorporation of research evidence in the clinical-decision. Little attention has been given to the nurses' behavior......, including the knowledge that actually informs the newly graduated nurses’ clinical decision. The aim of the study is to combine and synthesize results from qualitative research. Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnographic approach is used to conduct a metasynthesis of qualitative research that has studied...

  4. Verification of gamma knife based fractionated radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Singh, Manmohan Jit; Agarwal, Deepak; Garg, Ajay; Rath, Goura Kishore; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Pratik; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of the study is to verify the Gamma Knife Extend™ system (ES) based fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom. Methods: Phantoms are extensively used to measure radiation dose and verify treatment plan in radiotherapy. A human upper body shaped phantom with thorax was designed to simulate fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery using Extend™ system of Gamma Knife. The central component of the phantom aids in performing radiological precision test, dosimetric evaluation and treatment verification. A hollow right circular cylindrical space of diameter 7.0 cm was created at the centre of this component to place various dosimetric devices using suitable adaptors. The phantom is made of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), a transparent thermoplastic material. Two sets of disk assemblies were designed to place dosimetric films in (1) horizontal (xy) and (2) vertical (xz) planes. Specific cylindrical adaptors were designed to place thimble ionization chamber inside phantom for point dose recording along xz axis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were used to analyze and map radiation field. The focal precision test was performed using 4 mm collimator shot in phantom to check radiological accuracy of treatment. The phantom head position within the Extend™ frame was estimated using encoded aperture measurement of repositioning check tool (RCT). For treatment verification, the phantom with inserts for film and ion chamber was scanned in reference treatment position using X-ray computed tomography (CT) machine and acquired stereotactic images were transferred into Leksell Gammaplan (LGP). A patient treatment plan with hypo-fractionated regimen was delivered and identical fractions were compared using EBT3 films and in-house MATLAB codes. Results: RCT measurement showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.265 mm (range 0.223 mm–0.343 mm). Gamma index analysis across fractions exhibited close agreement between LGP and film

  5. Inspecting the medical use of radiation at five large hospitals in 2004 - to new radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmark, Anders; Bjerke, Hans; Unhjem, Jan Frede; Friberg, Eva; Hult, Elin Agathe; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde

    2005-01-01

    An audit has been performed in five health enterprises. The audit was carried out in relation to new radiation protection legislation and comprised all use of medical radiation at the enterprises. This report summarizes some of the findings and also gives an evaluation on the level of implementation of the legislation and what challenges that are left for the enterprises. (Author)

  6. Screening for Infectious Diseases among Newly Arrived Migrants in EU/EEA Countries—Varying Practices but Consensus on the Utility of Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommi Kärki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Screening is one possible tool for monitoring infectious diseases among migrants. However, there is limited information on screening programmes targeted for newly arrived migrants in EU/EEA countries. Our aim was to investigate the implementation, practices and usefulness of these programmes. We conducted a survey among country experts from EU/EEA countries and Switzerland, asking whether their countries had implemented screening programmes. We also estimated the association between the implementation of these programmes and the rate of asylum-seekers in the population. Of the countries, 16 (59% had implemented screening programmes and 15 (56% had national guidelines. The rate of asylum-seekers was associated with implementation of screening programmes (p = 0.014. Screening was performed most often for tuberculosis; most commonly on holding level, and was targeted to specific migrant groups in over half of the countries performing screening. Twenty-five of all the country experts (96% considered screening among migrants useful, and 24 (92% would welcome EU level guidelines for screening. The implementation of screening programmes varied, and the practices were different among countries. Our survey suggests, that establishing EU level guidelines for screening would be useful, although they would have to take into account differences between individual countries.

  7. Radiation resistance of ethylene-styrene copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaoru; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Kusama, Yasuo; Harashige, Masahiro; Yazaki, Fumihiko.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the radiation resistance of ethylene-styrene copolymer, a polymeric resin developed newly by the authors, is reported. Resin examined were five kinds of ethylene-styrene copolymers: three random and two graft copolymers with different styrene contents. Low-density polyethylene was used as a reference. The samples were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays to total absorbed doses up to 10 MGy. The mechanical properties of the smaples were examined. Infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray scattering techniques were used to examine the morphology of the samples. The random copolymers are soft and easy to extend, because benzene rings which exisist highly at random hinder the crystallization. As for the radiation resistance, they are highly resistant to γ-rays in the aspects of carbonyl group formation, gel formation, and elongation. Further, they show even better radiation resistance when proper additives were compounded in. The graft copolymers are hard to extend, because they consist of segregated polystyrene and polyethylene regions which are connected with each other. The tensile strength of irradiated graft copolymers does not decrease below that of unirradiated copolymers, up to a total dose of 10 MGy. As a consequence, it can be said that ethylene-styrene copolymers have good radiation resistance owing to the so-called 'sponge' effect of benzene rings. (author)

  8. Meeting and activating the newly unemployed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Gabriel Pons

    -demanding activity. As intensive activation is usually accompanied by intensive search monitoring, it is important to disentangling the contribution of the costly activation programs from that of caseworker meetings. Using Danish data for the period 2010-13, the paper shows that requiring newly unemployed intensive...... activation, contrary to job search meetings, reduces employment and increases sickness benefit claims....

  9. Comments to the German society's for radiation protection (Gesellschaft fur Strahlenschutz) proposed principles for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    2002-01-01

    The German Society for Radiation Protection (in German Gesellschaft fur Strahlenschutz) is a separate society for radiation protection in Germany in addition to the leading society named Association of German and Swiss Radiation Protection Specialists (in German Fachverband fur Strahlenschutz). The Society is an international professional society. There are several hundreds members of the German Society for Radiation Protection. The German Society for Radiation Protection is not a member of IRPA (the International Radiation Protection Society). The IRPA member is the Association of German and Swiss Radiation Protection Specialists. According to information given on the web site of the Society for Radiation Protection (www.gfstrahlenschutz.de) the Society was founded in 1990 because in the opinion of the founding members the older professional societies and associations have not adequately considered and implemented the present knowledge of radiation risks and radiation protection. In accordance with its statutes the society pursues besides other aims the best possible protection of humans and the environment from the detrimental action of ionising and non-ionising radiation. The dealing with ionising and non-ionising radiation can according to the Society only be justified on the basis of biological and medical state of the art knowledge

  10. Forms of Approximate Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, G

    2002-01-01

    Photon radiation transport is described by the Boltzmann equation. Because this equation is difficult to solve, many different approximate forms have been implemented in computer codes. Several of the most common approximations are reviewed, and test problems illustrate the characteristics of each of the approximations. This document is designed as a tutorial so that code users can make an educated choice about which form of approximate radiation transport to use for their particular simulation.

  11. Implementing the GBT data transmission protocol in FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    Baron, S; Marin, F; Moreira, P; Soos, C

    2009-01-01

    The GBT chip [1] is a radiation tolerant ASIC that can be used to implement bidirectional multipurpose 4.8Gb/s optical links for high-energy physics experiments. It will be proposed to the LHC experiments for combined transmission of physics data, trigger, timing, fast and slow control and monitoring. Although radiation hardness is required on detectors, it is not necessary for the electronics located in the counting rooms, where the GBT functionality can be realized using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components. This paper describes efficient physical implementation of the GBT protocol achieved for FPGA devices on Altera and Xilinx devices with source codes developed in Verilog and VHDL. The current platforms are based on Altera StratixIIGX and Xilinx Virtex5.

  12. Royal Order of 22 April 1974 on Establishment of Fees in Implementation of Regulations on Protection at Work, Protection against Hazardous Equipment and Ionizing Radiations and amending the General Regulations on Protection at Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Order was made in implementation of the Act of 3 December 1969 empowering the King to establish fees in application of regulations on protection at work, dangerous equipment and ionizing radiations. In particular, it sets fees for the licensing procedure for establishment classified according to the General Regulations for the Protection of the Population and Workers against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations of 28 February 1963. (NEA) [fr

  13. On achieving a uniform approach to radiation control in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T. N.

    1995-01-01

    Legislation and the associated regulatory processes to control radiation exposure of persons in the workplace, of patients undergoing medical exposures and of members of the public have been in place in all Australian States, including the ACT and NT, for some decades. Most States have completely rewritten their original legislation and all have made minor modifications from time to time. As a consequence, the legislation and the regulatory processes and controls used in all the States differ considerably, although they all have the same intent. For many years now, attempts have been made to overcome problems arising from the differences in the radiation control legislation and practices. These have been through the preparation of recommendations and codes of practice by the Radiation Health Standing Committee (RHSC) of the NHMRC and through discussions by State radiation control officers in the Radiation Control Implementation Panel, which reports to the RHSC. The recommendations and codes of practice can be utilised by the States in their radiation control activities, but this procedure can be restricted by different requirements in State legislation. Despite the efforts to overcome the problems, the main stumbling block to the implementation of uniform control derives from the legislation currently in use in each state. It is seen that changes will take a number of years to implements and that changes to legislation would be a top priority

  14. General organisation of radiation protection in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, P.; Ndiaye, M.; Sow, M.L.; Ndao, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Organization of radiation protection in Senegal is governed by three main texts that define the general principles and implement legal means for their actions. Efficient control of nuclear activities to ensure protection of workers, the environment and patients against ionizing radiation is subject to criminal penalties in case of breach of this legislation. (authors)

  15. Clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Bart; Speelman, Johannes D.; de Haan, Rob J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease using cluster analysis and to describe the subgroups in terms of impairment, disability, perceived quality of life, and use of dopaminergic therapy. METHODS: We conducted a k-means cluster analysis in a prospective

  16. SPACE RADIATION ENVIRONMENT MONITORED BY KITSAT-1 AND KITSAT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Shin

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of space radiation experiments carried out on board the first two Korean technology demonstration microsatellites are presented in this paper. The first satellite, KITSAT-1, launched in August 1992, carries a radiation monitoring payload called cosmic ray experiment(CRE for characterizing the low-earth orbit(LEO radiation environment. The CRE consists of two sub-systems: the cosmic particle experiment (CPE and the total dose experiment(TDE. In addition, single event upset(SEUrates of the program memory and the RAM disk are also monitored. The second satellite, KITSAT-2, launched in September 1993, carries a newly developed 32-bit on-board computer(OBC, KASCOM(KAIST satellite computer in addition to OBC186. SEUs ocurred in the KASCOM, as well as in the program memory and RAM disk memory, have been monitored since the beginning of the satellite operation. These two satellites, which are very similar in structures but different in orbits, provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of the radiation environment characterized by the orbit.

  17. Radiation safety management system in a radioactive facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador, Zayda H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This paper illustrates the Cuban experience in implementing and promoting an effective radiation safety system for the Centre of Isotopes, the biggest radioactive facility of our country. Current management practice demands that an organization inculcate culture of safety in preventing radiation hazard. The aforementioned objectives of radiation protection can only be met when it is implemented and evaluated continuously. Commitment from the workforce to treat safety as a priority and the ability to turn a requirement into a practical language is also important to implement radiation safety policy efficiently. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. All those areas of the radiation protection program are considered (e.g. licensing and training of the staff, occupational exposure, authorization of the practices, control of the radioactive material, radiological occurrences, monitoring equipment, radioactive waste management, public exposure due to airborne effluents, audits and safety costs). A set of indicators designed to monitor key aspects of operational safety performance are used. Their trends over a period of time are analyzed with the modern information technologies, because this can provide an early warning to plant management for searching causes behind the observed changes. In addition to analyze the changes and trends, these indicators are compared against identified targets and goals to evaluate performance strengths and weaknesses. A structured and proper radiation self-auditing system is seen as a basic requirement to meet the current and future needs in sustainability of radiation safety. The integrated safety management system establishment has been identified as a goal and way for the continuous improvement. (author)

  18. What defines an adaptive radiation? Macroevolutionary diversification dynamics of an exceptionally species-rich continental lizard radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel; Harvey, Lilly P; Ruta, Marcello

    2015-08-07

    Adaptive radiation theory posits that ecological opportunity promotes rapid proliferation of phylogenetic and ecological diversity. Given that adaptive radiation proceeds via occupation of available niche space in newly accessed ecological zones, theory predicts that: (i) evolutionary diversification follows an 'early-burst' process, i.e., it accelerates early in the history of a clade (when available niche space facilitates speciation), and subsequently slows down as niche space becomes saturated by new species; and (ii) phylogenetic branching is accompanied by diversification of ecologically relevant phenotypic traits among newly evolving species. Here, we employ macroevolutionary phylogenetic model-selection analyses to address these two predictions about evolutionary diversification using one of the most exceptionally species-rich and ecologically diverse lineages of living vertebrates, the South American lizard genus Liolaemus. Our phylogenetic analyses lend support to a density-dependent lineage diversification model. However, the lineage through-time diversification curve does not provide strong support for an early burst. In contrast, the evolution of phenotypic (body size) relative disparity is high, significantly different from a Brownian model during approximately the last 5 million years of Liolaemus evolution. Model-fitting analyses also reject the 'early-burst' model of phenotypic evolution, and instead favour stabilizing selection (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck, with three peaks identified) as the best model for body size diversification. Finally, diversification rates tend to increase with smaller body size. Liolaemus have diversified under a density-dependent process with slightly pronounced apparent episodic pulses of lineage accumulation, which are compatible with the expected episodic ecological opportunity created by gradual uplifts of the Andes over the last ~25My. We argue that ecological opportunity can be strong and a crucial driver of adaptive

  19. Synthesis of some new heterocyclic compounds bearing a sulfonamide moiety and studying their combined anticancer effect with γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossary, E.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In search for new cytotoxic agents with improved anticancer profile, some new halogen-containing quinoline and pyrimido[4,5-b]quinoline derivatives bearing a free sulfonamide moiety were synthesized. All the newly synthesized target compounds were subjected to in vitro anticancer screening against human breast cancer cell line (MCF7). The most potent compounds, as concluded from the in vitro anticancer screening, were selected to be evaluated again for their in vitro anticancer activity in combination with radiation. Also, the newly synthesized compounds were docked in the active site of the carbonic anhydrase enzyme

  20. A comparison of the structure of radiation oncology in the United States and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Jean B.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Teshima, Teruki; Sato, Shinichiro; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The United States and Japan have very different backgrounds in their medical care systems. In the field of radiation oncology, national surveys on structure have been conducted for both countries and compared to illustrate any similarities and differences present from 1989-1990. Methods and Materials: The Patterns of Care Study Facility Survey conducted in 1989 in the United States and the National Survey of Structure in Japan in 1990 were compared to evaluate the equipment pattern, staffing pattern, compliance rate with the 'blue book' (3) guideline, and the geographic distribution of institutions. Results: In the United States, a total of 598,184 (49% of the total of newly diagnosed) patients were treated with radiation therapy. In Japan, 62,829 (approximately 15% of the total of newly diagnosed) patients were treated. The numbers of external megavoltage treatment machines were 2,397 in the United States and 494 in Japan. The numbers of full time equivalent (FTE) radiation oncologists were 2,335 in the United States and 366 in Japan. Only 15% of United States facilities and 11% of Japan facilities complied with the narrow blue book guideline for the patients per FTE radiation oncologist (200-250), while the most common ratio was 151-200 patients/FTE in the United States and 51-100 in Japan. In Japan, more than 60% of institutions were staffed by a part-time radiation oncologist (FTE < 1.0). Between geographic regions, there was variation in the percentage of cancer patients treated with radiation therapy for both the United States (42-56%) and Japan (6-25%). Conclusion: There is a major difference in the usage of radiation therapy for treating cancer between the United States and Japan with 49% of all new cancer patients treated in the United States and approximately 15% treated in Japan. Equipment structure in the United States is more complete than in Japan with important differences in treatment simulators, treatment planning computers, and support

  1. Basic principles for occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Safety Guide sets forth the objectives of an adequate strategy for monitoring internal and external radiation exposures of workers. It covers individual monitoring, and workplace monitoring to the extent required for assessment and control of individual radiation doses. The responsibilities of authorities for organizing the monitoring of radiation workers are discussed, and brief descriptions are given of the rules governing the implementation of monitoring methods. The general principles to be considered in selecting instrumentation and appropriate monitoring techniques are described, as well as calibrating techniques, methods of record keeping and related aspects

  2. Implementation of the model project: Ghanaian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schandorf, C.; Darko, E.O.; Yeboah, J.; Asiamah, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Upgrading of the legal infrastructure has been the most time consuming and frustrating part of the implementation of the Model project due to the unstable system of governance and rule of law coupled with the low priority given to legislation on technical areas such as safe applications of Nuclear Science and Technology in medicine, industry, research and teaching. Dwindling Governmental financial support militated against physical and human resource infrastructure development and operational effectiveness. The trend over the last five years has been to strengthen the revenue generation base of the Radiation Protection Institute through good management practices to ensure a cost effective use of the limited available resources for a self-reliant and sustainable radiation and waste safety programme. The Ghanaian experience regarding the positive and negative aspects of the implementation of the Model Project is highlighted. (author)

  3. Dose constraint implementation in AREVA group: an optimization tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decobert, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    AREVA offers customers reliable technology solutions for CO 2 free power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group counts 68000 employees worldwide and for its nuclear activities there are about 33.000 people who work under ionizing radiation. Risk management and prevention is one of the ten engagements of the sustainable development policy of AREVA, to establish and maintain the highest level of nuclear and occupational safety in all of the group's operations to preserve public and worker health, and to protect the environment. The implementation of these engagements is founded on a voluntary continuous improvement program, AREVA Way: objectives, common for the all entities, are laid down in the policies documents. Indicators are defined and a common reporting method for each indicator and the result of performance self-assessment is set up. AREVA chose to federate the whole of the nuclear entities around a common policy, the Nuclear Safety Charter, implemented at the beginning of 2005. This charter sets up principles of organization, action and engagements of transparency. Regarding radiation protection, the Charter reaffirms the engagement to limit in the installations of the group, at a level as low as reasonably possible, the exposure of the workers, through the implementation of the ALARA principle and the implementation of a continuous improvement policy. This approach, basically different from the simple respect of imposed limits, radically modifies the dynamics of progress. In the activities of engineering, the optimization of protection against radiation is also integrated in the design, by taking account the experience feedback of the operational activities. This determination of constraints is taken on all levels of the organization. Thus sustainable development performance indicators and especially those relating to protection against radiation are discussed between the managers in charge of Units Business and the Top managers

  4. IAEA Conference on Large Radiation Sources in Industry (Warsaw 1959): Which technologies of radiation processing survived and why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1999-01-01

    The IAEA has organized in Warsaw an International Conference on Large Radiation Sources in Industry from 8 to 12 September 1959. Proceedings of the Conference have been published in two volumes of summary amount of 925 pages. This report presents analysis, which technologies presented at the Conference have survived and why. The analysis is interesting because already in the fifties practically full range of possibilities of radiation processing was explored, and partially implemented. Not many new technologies were presented at the next IAEA Conferences on the same theme. Already at the time of the Warsaw Conference an important role of economy of the technology has recognized. The present report selects the achievements of the Conference into two groups: the first concerns technologies which have not been implemented in the next decades and the second group which is the basis of highly profitable, unsubsidized commercial production. The criterion of belonging of the technology to the second group, is the value of the quotient of the cost of the ready, saleable product diminished by the cost of a raw material before processing, to the expense of radiation processing, being the sum of irradiation cost and such operations as transportation of the object to and from the irradiation facility. Low value of the quotient, as compared to successful technologies is prophesying badly as concerns the future of the commercial proposal. A special position among objects of radiation processing is occupied by radiation processing technologies direct towards the protection or improving of the environment. Market economy does not apply here and the implementation has to be subsidized. (author)

  5. Radiation source states on-line supervision system design and implementation based on RFID technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Binhua; Ling Qiu; Yin Guoli; Yang Kun; Wan Xueping; Wang Kan

    2011-01-01

    It puts forward radiation source states on-line monitoring resolution based on RFID technology. Firstly, the system uses RFID in real-time transmission of the radiation dose rate, and monitors the radiation source states and dose rate of the surrounding environment on-line. Then it adopts regional wireless networking mode to construct enterprise level monitoring network, which resolves long-distance wiring problems. And then it uses GPRS wireless to transport the real-time data to the monitoring center and the government supervision department, By adopting randomly dynamic cording in display update every day, it strengthens the supervision of the radiation source. At last this system has been successful applied to a thickness gauge project, which verifies the feasibility and practicality is good. (authors)

  6. [Principles of nutrition in patients with newly appointed stoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachocka, Lucyna Małgorzata; Urbanik, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of intestinal stoma is often a difficult experience for patients and results in numerous problems in the physical, psychological and social aspects. Therefore, post-operative care of the patient with the newly appointed stoma should be taken by therapeutic team consisting of doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, dieticians, psychologists and social workers. Appropriate nutritional education of patients aims to improve their quality of life and to prevent from unpleasant ailments formed after the operation. The specific type of stoma may decide about certain dietary recommendations. The presented work provides a practical dietary recommendations for patients with newly appointed stoma.

  7. Medical and industrial application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajayi, I.R.

    1999-01-01

    While dosimetry is not a radiation application, accurate dosage of radiation of utmost importance for all radiation applications. For both therapeutic and industrial applications it can be matter of life and death. For this reason, great efforts have been made to ensure that radiation dosages given to patients and used in all industrial applications are as near as possible to those prescribed. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the IAEA, together with many National Standard Laboratories and with the International Bureau of Weight and Measures, have been very active and successful during the last 20 years in ascertaining that normal cobalt-60 therapy unit. For this purpose, 63 Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories have been established of which more than half are in developing countries. FRPS houses one of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. As accurate dosimetry is a prerequisite in radiotherapy, so it is in industrial exposures and all laboratories responsible for dosimetry have to make frequent intercomparisons with one of the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. The SSDL at FRPS hopes to commence this as soon as our new Harshaw 6600 TLD reader arrives. This has already been approved by the IAEA. Much high doses of radiation are used for some industrial applications, as discussed in a previous lecture, such as sterilization of rubber, and food preservation and newly developed techniques are being used for the assurance of the prescribed dose. IAEA provides assistance in this area also through the secondary standard dosimetry laboratories. The IAEA has a broad programme of assistance which includes the calibration of all instruments in the laboratories of the participants, be it for radiation protection, or high dose measurements

  8. Randomized comparison of operator radiation exposure comparing transradial and transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: rationale and design of the minimizing adverse haemorrhagic events by TRansradial access site and systemic implementation of angioX – RAdiation Dose study (RAD-MATRIX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Calabrò, Paolo; Sarandrea, Alessandro; Rigattieri, Stefano; Tomassini, Francesco; Sardella, Gennaro; Zavalloni, Dennis; Cortese, Bernardo; Limbruno, Ugo; Tebaldi, Matteo; Gagnor, Andrea; Rubartelli, Paolo; Zingarelli, Antonio; Valgimigli, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radiation absorbed by interventional cardiologists is a frequently under-evaluated important issue. Aim is to compare radiation dose absorbed by interventional cardiologists during percutaneous coronary procedures for acute coronary syndromes comparing transradial and transfemoral access. Methods: The randomized multicentre MATRIX (Minimizing Adverse Haemorrhagic Events by TRansradial Access Site and Systemic Implementation of angioX) trial has been designed to compare the clinical outcome of patients with acute coronary syndromes treated invasively according to the access site (transfemoral vs. transradial) and to the anticoagulant therapy (bivalirudin vs. heparin). Selected experienced interventional cardiologists involved in this study have been equipped with dedicated thermoluminescent dosimeters to evaluate the radiation dose absorbed during transfemoral or right transradial or left transradial access. For each access we evaluate the radiation dose absorbed at wrist, at thorax and at eye level. Consequently the operator is equipped with three sets (transfemoral, right transradial or left transradial access) of three different dosimeters (wrist, thorax and eye dosimeter). Primary end-point of the study is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators at thorax. An important secondary end-point is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators comparing the right or left radial approach. Patient randomization is performed according to the MATRIX protocol for the femoral or radial approach. A further randomization for the radial approach is performed to compare right and left transradial access. Conclusions: The RAD-MATRIX study will probably consent to clarify the radiation issue for interventional cardiologist comparing transradial and transfemoral access in the setting of acute coronary syndromes

  9. Randomized comparison of operator radiation exposure comparing transradial and transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: rationale and design of the minimizing adverse haemorrhagic events by TRansradial access site and systemic implementation of angioX – RAdiation Dose study (RAD-MATRIX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciahbasi, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.sciahbasi@fastwebnet.it [Interventional Cardiology, Sandro Pertini Hospital – ASL RMB, Rome (Italy); Calabrò, Paolo [Division of Cardiology - Department of Cardio-Thoracic Sciences - Second University of Naples (Italy); Sarandrea, Alessandro [HSE Management, Rome (Italy); Rigattieri, Stefano [Interventional Cardiology, Sandro Pertini Hospital – ASL RMB, Rome (Italy); Tomassini, Francesco [Department of Cardiology, Infermi Hospital, Rivoli (Italy); Sardella, Gennaro [La Sapienza University, Rome (Italy); Zavalloni, Dennis [UO Emodinamica e Cardiologia Invasiva, IRCCS, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (Italy); Cortese, Bernardo [Interventional Cardiology, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Milan (Italy); Limbruno, Ugo [Cardiology Unit, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto (Italy); Tebaldi, Matteo [Cardiology Department, University of Ferrara, Department of Cardiology (Italy); Gagnor, Andrea [Department of Cardiology, Infermi Hospital, Rivoli (Italy); Rubartelli, Paolo [Villa Scassi Hospital, Genova (Italy); Zingarelli, Antonio [San Martino Hospital, Genova (Italy); Valgimigli, Marco [Thoraxcenter, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Radiation absorbed by interventional cardiologists is a frequently under-evaluated important issue. Aim is to compare radiation dose absorbed by interventional cardiologists during percutaneous coronary procedures for acute coronary syndromes comparing transradial and transfemoral access. Methods: The randomized multicentre MATRIX (Minimizing Adverse Haemorrhagic Events by TRansradial Access Site and Systemic Implementation of angioX) trial has been designed to compare the clinical outcome of patients with acute coronary syndromes treated invasively according to the access site (transfemoral vs. transradial) and to the anticoagulant therapy (bivalirudin vs. heparin). Selected experienced interventional cardiologists involved in this study have been equipped with dedicated thermoluminescent dosimeters to evaluate the radiation dose absorbed during transfemoral or right transradial or left transradial access. For each access we evaluate the radiation dose absorbed at wrist, at thorax and at eye level. Consequently the operator is equipped with three sets (transfemoral, right transradial or left transradial access) of three different dosimeters (wrist, thorax and eye dosimeter). Primary end-point of the study is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators at thorax. An important secondary end-point is the procedural radiation dose absorbed by operators comparing the right or left radial approach. Patient randomization is performed according to the MATRIX protocol for the femoral or radial approach. A further randomization for the radial approach is performed to compare right and left transradial access. Conclusions: The RAD-MATRIX study will probably consent to clarify the radiation issue for interventional cardiologist comparing transradial and transfemoral access in the setting of acute coronary syndromes.

  10. Medical school gift restriction policies and physician prescribing of newly marketed psychotropic medications: difference-in-differences analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Marissa; Essick, Connor; Bearman, Peter; Ross, Joseph S

    2013-01-30

    To examine the effect of attending a medical school with an active policy on restricting gifts from representatives of pharmaceutical and device industries on subsequent prescribing behavior. Difference-in-differences approach. 14 US medical schools with an active gift restriction policy in place by 2004. Prescribing patterns in 2008 and 2009 of physicians attending one of the schools compared with physicians graduating from the same schools before the implementation of the policy, as well as a set of contemporary matched controls. Probability that a physician would prescribe a newly marketed medication over existing alternatives of three psychotropic classes: lisdexamfetamine among stimulants, paliperidone among antipsychotics, and desvenlafaxine among antidepressants. None of these medications represented radical breakthroughs in their respective classes. For two of the three medications examined, attending a medical school with an active gift restriction policy was associated with reduced prescribing of the newly marketed drug. Physicians who attended a medical school with an active conflict of interest policy were less likely to prescribe lisdexamfetamine over older stimulants (adjusted odds ratio 0.44, 95% confidence interval 0.22 to 0.88; P=0.02) and paliperidone over older antipsychotics (0.25, 0.07 to 0.85; P=0.03). A significant effect was not observed for desvenlafaxine (1.54, 0.79 to 3.03; P=0.20). Among cohorts of students who had a longer exposure to the policy or were exposed to more stringent policies, prescribing rates were further reduced. Exposure to a gift restriction policy during medical school was associated with reduced prescribing of two out of three newly introduced psychotropic medications.

  11. Two Newly Discovered Plants in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Tian-Chuan Hsu; Jia-Jung Lin; Shih-Wen Chung

    2009-01-01

    Two herbs are newly discovered in Taiwan. Limnophila fragrans (G. Forst.) Seem. (Scrophulariaceae), native in SE Asia, is recognized from southern lowlands. Anagallis minima (L.) E. H. L. Krause (Primulaceae), native in N America and Europe, was found from northern mountainous region at low altitudes. In this study, descriptions, line drawings, color photos and a distribution map of the two species are provided.

  12. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data are processed for positioning solarpanels, in order their efficiency to be maximized.

  13. Newly-formed emotional memories guide selective attention processes: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Harald T; Kirmse, Ursula; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta

    2016-06-20

    Emotional cues can guide selective attention processes. However, emotional stimuli can both activate long-term memory representations reflecting general world knowledge and engage newly formed memory representations representing specific knowledge from the immediate past. Here, the self-completion feature of associative memory was utilized to assess the regulation of attention processes by newly-formed emotional memory. First, new memory representations were formed by presenting pictures depicting a person either in an erotic pose or as a portrait. Afterwards, to activate newly-built memory traces, edited pictures were presented showing only the head region of the person. ERP recordings revealed the emotional regulation of attention by newly-formed memories. Specifically, edited pictures from the erotic compared to the portrait category elicited an early posterior negativity and late positive potential, similar to the findings observed for the original pictures. A control condition showed that the effect was dependent on newly-formed memory traces. Given the large number of new memories formed each day, they presumably make an important contribution to the regulation of attention in everyday life.

  14. Newly-formed emotional memories guide selective attention processes: Evidence from event-related potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Harald T.; Kirmse, Ursula; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Emotional cues can guide selective attention processes. However, emotional stimuli can both activate long-term memory representations reflecting general world knowledge and engage newly formed memory representations representing specific knowledge from the immediate past. Here, the self-completion feature of associative memory was utilized to assess the regulation of attention processes by newly-formed emotional memory. First, new memory representations were formed by presenting pictures depicting a person either in an erotic pose or as a portrait. Afterwards, to activate newly-built memory traces, edited pictures were presented showing only the head region of the person. ERP recordings revealed the emotional regulation of attention by newly-formed memories. Specifically, edited pictures from the erotic compared to the portrait category elicited an early posterior negativity and late positive potential, similar to the findings observed for the original pictures. A control condition showed that the effect was dependent on newly-formed memory traces. Given the large number of new memories formed each day, they presumably make an important contribution to the regulation of attention in everyday life. PMID:27321471

  15. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  16. New infrastructures for training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Van der Steen, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an analysis of the new infrastructure used in the radiation protection training and professional education, which is developed nowadays, is carried out. CIEMAT has been making many efforts in the education and training of professionals at all levels, for years. At present CIEMAT is developing educational activities in radiation protection general courses and professionals updating courses. The newest strategies for the radiation protection learning are developing in collaboration with professional societies. These try to encourage the technology transference, the collaboration between the actors involved with the radiation protection and the new information technology implementation. (Author) 11 refs

  17. State of art in radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi; Young Soo; Kim, Seong Ho; Cho, Jae Wan; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Young Chil

    2002-02-01

    Working in radiation environment such as nuclear power plant, RI facility, nuclear fuel fabrication facility, medical center has to be considered radiation exposure, and we can implement these job by remote observation and operation. However the camera used for general industry is weakened at radiation, so radiation-tolerant camera is needed for radiation environment. The application of radiation-tolerant camera system is nuclear industry, radio-active medical, aerospace, and so on. Specially nuclear industry, the demand is continuous in the inspection of nuclear boiler, exchange of pellet, inspection of nuclear waste. In the nuclear developed countries have been an effort to develop radiation-tolerant cameras. Now they have many kinds of radiation-tolerant cameras which can tolerate to 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} rad total dose. In this report, we examine into the state-of-art about radiation-tolerant cameras, and analyze these technology. We want to grow up the concern of developing radiation-tolerant camera by this paper, and upgrade the level of domestic technology.

  18. Ukraine International cooperation in nuclear and radiation safety: public-administrative aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Krynychnay

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines international cooperation of Ukraine with other States in the sphere of ensuring nuclear and radiation safety and highlights the main directions of development and improvement of nuclear and radiation safety in Ukraine based on international experience, with the aim of preventing the risks of accidents and contamination areas radiological substances. Illuminated that for more than half a century of experience in the use of nuclear energy by the international community under the auspices of the UN, IAEA and other international organizations initiated and monitored the implementation of key national and international programs on nuclear and radiation safety. Of the Convention in the field of nuclear safety and the related independent peer review, effective national regulatory infrastructures, current nuclear safety standards and policy documents, as well as mechanisms of evaluation in the framework of the IAEA constitute important prerequisites for the creation of a world community, the global regime of nuclear and radiation safety. For analysis of the state of international cooperation of Ukraine with other States in the sphere of nuclear and radiation safety, highlighted the legal substance of nuclear and radiation safety of Ukraine, which is enshrined in the domestic Law of Ukraine «On nuclear energy use and radiation safety». Considered the most relevant legal relations. It is established that, despite the current complex international instruments, existing domestic legislation on nuclear and radiation safety, partly there is a threat of emergency nuclear radiation nature, in connection with the failure of fixed rules and programs, lack of funding from the state is not always on time and in full allows you to perform fixed strategy for overcoming the consequences of radiation accidents, the prevention of the threat of environmental pollution. Found that to improve and further ensuring nuclear and radiation safety of

  19. Pollen parameters estimates of genetic variability among newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pollen parameters estimates of genetic variability among newly selected Nigerian roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) genotypes. ... Estimates of some pollen parameters where used to assess the genetic diversity among ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  20. Tricks of the trade: time management tips for newly qualified doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, Gozie; Doherty, Eva

    2018-03-01

    The transition from medical student to doctor is an important milestone. The discovery that their time is no longer their own and that the demands of their job are greater than the time they have available is extremely challenging. At a recent surgical boot camp training programme, 60 first-year surgical trainees who had just completed their internship were invited to reflect on the lessons learnt regarding effective time management and to recommend tips for their newly qualified colleagues. They were asked to identify clinical duties that were considered urgent and important using the time management matrix and the common time traps encountered by newly qualified doctors. The surgical trainees identified several practical tips that ranged from writing a priority list to working on relationships within the team. These tips are generic and so applicable to all newly qualified medial doctors. We hope that awareness of these tips from the outset as against learning them through experience will greatly assist newly qualified doctors. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Chest Radiographic Findings in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred newly diagnosed cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis were treated with directly observed short-course treatment and 100 of them had chest radiographic examination done. The various chest radiographic patterns in the 100 subjects were studied and included: Fluffy exudative changes 80(80%), fibrosis 70(70%) ...

  2. Actions of radiation protection in the collection of discarded radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, E.P.M.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Brazil has approximately 2000 radiative facilities that use radiation sources in their processes and are controlled by The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN through standards, authorizations and inspections. These radioactive materials, whether in the form of waste or radioactive source, used in medical, industrial, research, etc. are sometimes discarded and found in inappropriate places, such as garbage dumps, industrial waste, streets, squares, etc. found by urban cleaning professionals without the proper knowledge of them. The work presents the radiation protection actions required for the safe collection of radioactive material to be performed by these professionals. According to the type of radioactive material the main actions of radiation protection are, among others: recognition of a radioactive material; correct use of personal protective equipment to contain possible radiation contamination; implementation of an area control etc. In order for the actions of recognition and collection of discarded radioactive material to be effective, there is a need to implement a training program in radiation protection for urban cleaning professionals

  3. Radiation protection at workplaces with increased natural radiation exposure in Greece: recording, monitoring and protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potiriadis, C.; Koukoliou, V.

    2002-01-01

    Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the regulatory, advisory and competent authority on radiation protection matters. It is the authority responsible for the introduction of Radiation Protection regulations and monitoring of their implementation. In 1997, within the frame of its responsibilities the Board of the GAEC appointed a task group of experts to revise and bring the present Radiation Protection Regulations into line with the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) 96/29/Euratom Directive and the 97/43/Euratom Directive (on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure). Concerning the Title 7. of the new European BSS Directive, which refers to the Radiation Protection at work places with increased levels of natural radiation exposure, the Radiation Protection Regulations provides that the authority responsible for recording, monitoring and introducing protection measures at these places is the GAEC. Practices where effective doses to the workers due to increased natural radiation levels, may exceed 1mSv/y, have to be specified and authorised by the GAEC. The identification procedure is ongoing

  4. Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratliff, C.

    1990-01-01

    Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens

  5. Newly graduated nurses' empowerment regarding professional competence and other work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuokkanen, Liisa; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Numminen, Olivia; Isoaho, Hannu; Flinkman, Mervi; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Although both nurse empowerment and competence are fundamental concepts of describing newly graduated nurses' professional development and job satisfaction, only few studies exist on the relationship between these concepts. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how newly graduated nurses assess their empowerment and to clarify professional competence compared to other work-related factors. A descriptive, cross-sectional and correlational design was applied. The sample comprised newly graduated nurses (n = 318) in Finland. Empowerment was measured using the 19-item Qualities of an Empowered Nurse scale and the Nurse Competence Scale measured nurses' self-assessed generic competence. In addition to demographic data, the background data included employment sector (public/private), job satisfaction, intent to change/leave job, work schedule (shifts/business hours) and assessments of the quality of care in the workplace. The data were analysed statistically by using Spearman's correlation coefficient as well as the One-Way and Multivariate Analysis of Variance. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to estimate the internal consistency. Newly graduated nurses perceived their level of empowerment and competence fairly high. The association between nurse empowerment and professional competence was statistically significant. Other variables correlating positively to empowerment included employment sector, age, job satisfaction, intent to change job, work schedule, and satisfaction with the quality of care in the work unit. The study indicates competence had the strongest effect on newly graduated nurses' empowerment. New graduates need support and career opportunities. In the future, nurses' further education and nurse managers' resources for supporting and empowering nurses should respond to the newly graduated nurses' requisites for attractive and meaningful work.

  6. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  7. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  8. Community-acquired Legionnaires' Disease in a Newly Constructed Apartment Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sukhyun; Yang, Kyungho; Chun, Byung Chul

    2017-07-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is a severe type of pneumonia caused by inhalation of aerosols contaminated with Legionella . On September 22, 2016, a single case of LD was reported from a newly built apartment building in Gyeonggi province. This article describes an epidemiologic investigation of LD and identification of the possible source of infection. To identify the source of LD, we interviewed the patient's husband using a questionnaire based on the Legionella management guidelines from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Water samples from the site were collected and analyzed. An epidemiological investigation of the residents and visitors in the apartment building was conducted for 14 days before the index patient's symptoms first appeared to 14 days after the implementation of environmental control measures. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from the heated-water samples from the patient's residence and the basement of the apartment complex. Thirty-two suspected cases were reported from the apartment building during the surveillance period, yet all were confirmed negative based on urinary antigen tests. The likely source of infection was the building's potable water, particularly heated water. Further study of effective monitoring systems in heated potable water should be considered.

  9. Radiobiology, biochemistry and radiation biophysics at CYLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Cyclotron Laboratory (CYLAB) should fill the gap in the field of nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, basic research, metrology of ionizing radiation, education and implications of accelerator technology existing today in Slovak Republic. The main planned activities of this facility are in the fields of nuclear medicine (production of radioisotopes for Positron Emission Tomography - PET and for oncology) and radiotherapy (neutron capture therapy, fast neutron therapy and proton therapy). The radiobiological and biophysical research will be closely connected with medical applications, particularly with radiotherapy. Problems to be addressed include the determination of the values of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for different types of ionizing radiation involved in the therapy, microdosimetric measurements and calculations, which are indispensable in the calculation of the absorbed dose (lineal and specific energy spectra) at the cellular and macromolecular level. Radiation biophysics and medical physics help in creating therapeutic plans for radiotherapy (NCT and fast neutron therapy). In nuclear medicine, in diagnostic and therapeutical procedures it is necessary to assess the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals and to calculate doses in target and critical organs and to determine whole body burden - effective equivalent dose for newly developed radiopharmaceuticals

  10. RADIATION-DRIVEN IMPLOSION AND TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisbas, Thomas G.; Wuensch, Richard; Whitworth, Anthony P.; Walch, Stefanie; Hubber, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present simulations of initially stable isothermal clouds exposed to ionizing radiation from a discrete external source, and identify the conditions that lead to radiatively driven implosion and star formation. We use the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code SEREN and a HEALPix-based photoionization algorithm to simulate the propagation of the ionizing radiation and the resulting dynamical evolution of the cloud. We find that the incident ionizing flux, Φ LyC , is the critical parameter determining the cloud evolution. At moderate fluxes, a large fraction of the cloud mass is converted into stars. As the flux is increased, the fraction of the cloud mass that is converted into stars and the mean masses of the individual stars both decrease. Very high fluxes simply disperse the cloud. Newly formed stars tend to be concentrated along the central axis of the cloud (i.e., the axis pointing in the direction of the incident flux). For given cloud parameters, the time, t * , at which star formation starts is proportional to Φ -1/3 LyC . The pattern of star formation found in the simulations is similar to that observed in bright-rimmed clouds.

  11. Progress report and preliminary 1981-83 agenda of the United States Radiation Policy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The U.S. Radiation Policy Council is responsible for coordinating the formulation and implementation of Federal Policy relating to radiation protection. In carrying out this very broad and basic mandate, the RPC has been directed to: Advise on the formulation of broad radiation protection policies; monitor the implementation of Federal policies; Help resolve conflicts in jurisdiction among Federal agencies; Recommend corrective legislation, if needed; ensure effective liaison with the States and the Congress; and Serve as a forum for public participation and comment. The RPC was established by Executive Order Number 12194 in February 1980. The Council was created to coordinate the formulation and implementation of Federal policies relating to radiation protection. This report summarizes the first 7 months the Council has been in operation, its activities, and decisions through September 1980

  12. Radiation hormesis in plant - Analysis and utilization of plant antioxidative mechanism by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haeng Soon; Kwon, Seok Yoon; Shin, Seung Yung [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In the tobacco transgenic plants simultaneously expressing SOD and APX in chloroplast, the specific activities of SOD and APX (CA, AM, C/A, A/C) were much higher than in the transgenic plants expressing SOD (CuZnSOD, MnSOD) or APX alone, respectively. Plant growth was severely inhibited showing a well correlation with the dose of gamma-irradiation. In 70 Gy-irradiation, C/A plants showed a slight resistance to gamma radiation. The stAPX gene in tobacco was not as strongly affected by gamma irradiation. After irradiation, the stAPX transcript level decreased at 2 h, then slightly increased at 6 h and the level was maintained until 48 h. Catalase transcripts level decreased at the early time point but at the late time points the level slightly increased. The gamma radiation-induced changes of proteins in tobacco suspension cells were investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In the gamma-irradiated cells, a few polypeptides of were newly synthesized, increased, and decreased by comparing total proteins from gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated tobacco suspension cells. With the isolation and analysis of these polypeptides, irradiation-induced proteins could be developed. 35 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  13. Survey of advanced radiation technologies used at designated cancer care hospitals in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Naoto; Tsujino, Kayoko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Our survey assessed the use of advanced radiotherapy technologies at the designated cancer care hospitals in Japan, and we identified several issues to be addressed. We collected the data of 397 designated cancer care hospitals, including information on staffing in the department of radiation oncology (e.g. radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapists), the number of linear accelerators and the implementation of advanced radiotherapy technologies from the Center for Cancer Control and Information Services of the National Cancer Center, Japan. Only 53% prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 16% regional designated cancer care hospitals have implemented intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, and 62% prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 23% regional designated cancer care hospitals use intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Seventy-four percent prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 40% regional designated cancer care hospitals employ stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer. Our multivariate analysis of prefectural designated cancer care hospitals which satisfy the institute's qualifications for advanced technologies revealed the number of radiation oncologists (P=0.01) and that of radiation therapists (P=0.003) were significantly correlated with the implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and the number of radiation oncologists (P=0.02) was correlated with the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy. There was a trend to correlate the number of medical physicists with the implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (P=0.07). Only 175 (51%) regional designated cancer care hospitals satisfy the institute's qualification of stereotactic body radiotherapy and 76 (22%) satisfy that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Seventeen percent prefectural designated cancer care hospitals and 13% regional designated cancer care hospitals

  14. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  15. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Libo; Luo Yunxiao; Wang Jianfeng; Chen Dawei; Cheng Guanghui; Jin Yuke

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation Thyroid Diseases has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, this standard was enacted according to the relevant laws and regulations. It is mainly used for diagnosis of thyroid diseases caused by occupational radiation, and it also can serve as a guide to diagnose thyroid disease induced by medical radiation. To implement this standard, and to diagnose and treat the radiation thyroid diseases patient correctly and timely, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  16. A Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Radiation Therapy, Temozolomide, and the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid for Patients With Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauze, Andra V. [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Myrehaug, Sten D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lakeridge Health Durham Regional Cancer Centre, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Chang, Michael G.; Holdford, Diane J. [Massey Cancer Center Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Smith, Sharon; Shih, Joanna; Tofilon, Philip J. [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Fine, Howard A. [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Camphausen, Kevin, E-mail: camphauk@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic agent with histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) activity shown to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to radiation in preclinical models. We evaluated the addition of VPA to standard radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled between July 2006 and April 2013. Patients received VPA, 25 mg/kg orally, divided into 2 daily doses concurrent with RT and TMZ. The first dose of VPA was given 1 week before the first day of RT at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day and subsequently increased up to 25 mg/kg/day over the week prior to radiation. VPA- and TMZ-related acute toxicities were evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 (National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program) and Cancer Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme for toxicity and adverse event reporting (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment). Results: A total of 81% of patients took VPA according to protocol. Median overall survival (OS) was 29.6 months (range: 21-63.8 months), and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.5 months (range: 6.8-51.2 months). OS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 97%, 86%, and 56%, respectively. PFS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 70%, 43%, and 38% respectively. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities of VPA in conjunction with RT/TMZ therapy were blood and bone marrow toxicity (32%), neurological toxicity (11%), and metabolic and laboratory toxicity (8%). Younger age and class V recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) results were significant for both OS and PFS. VPA levels were not correlated with grade 3 or 4 toxicity levels. Conclusions: Addition of VPA to concurrent RT/TMZ in patients with newly diagnosed GBM was well tolerated. Additionally, VPA may result in improved outcomes compared to historical data and merits further study.

  17. Two Newly Discovered Plants in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Chuan Hsu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two herbs are newly discovered in Taiwan. Limnophila fragrans (G. Forst. Seem. (Scrophulariaceae, native in SE Asia, is recognized from southern lowlands. Anagallis minima (L. E. H. L. Krause (Primulaceae, native in N America and Europe, was found from northern mountainous region at low altitudes. In this study, descriptions, line drawings, color photos and a distribution map of the two species are provided.

  18. A simple and efficient methodology to improve geometric accuracy in gamma knife radiation surgery: implementation in multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaiskos, Pantelis; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Roussakis, Arkadios; Torrens, Michael; Seimenis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, "average" image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proposal to integrate the service on radiation hygiene at the primary health care services for workers exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, Ileana; Lopez Pumar, Georgina; Gonzalez Amil, Melva

    1998-01-01

    The National Health System implemented in the last few years a new pattern of primary attention for workers by creating doctors offices in work centers. At the same time, the Ministry of Public Health (MINSAP) carries the medical surveillance of the staff exposed to ionizing radiation. This work proposes a program to integrate the consulting room on radiation hygiene to primary health care services for workers that work with ionizing radiation sources, aiming to ameliorate and improve them

  20. Diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. Chas; Carey, Marian E.; Cradock, Sue

    2006-01-01

    diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes changes key illness beliefs and that these changes predict quality of life and metabolic control at 3-month follow-up. Practice implications: Newly diagnosed individuals are open to attending self-management programs and, if the program is theoretically driven, can......Objective: To determine the effects of a structured education program on illness beliefs, quality of life and physical activity in people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Individuals attending a diabetes education and self-management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) program...... in 12 Primary Care Trusts completed questionnaire booklets assessing illness beliefs and quality of life at baseline and 3-month follow-up, metabolic control being assessed through assay of HbA1c. Results: Two hundred and thirty-six individuals attended the structured self-management education sessions...

  1. Concurrent radiotherapy: fotemustine combination for newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients, a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchesne, Patrick D; Taillandier, L; Bernier, V; Carnin, C

    2009-06-01

    Fotemustine is a nitrosourea compound used for the treatment of malignant gliomas, especially in France. Recently, an EORTC-NCIC study has shown that a concomitant combination of radiotherapy plus temozolomide (an oral cytotoxic drug) improved survival in glioblastoma patients. We set out to test a concurrent combination of radiotherapy and fotemustine for newly malignant gliomas. A prospective single-center phase II study opened for accrual in September 2004. Patients over 18 years of age able to give informed consent and with histologically proven, newly diagnosed supratentorial malignant gliomas were eligible. All patients were treated by a standard cranial irradiation (conformal irradiation, tumor bulk plus a margin of 2.5 cm) and concomitant daily administration of 10 mg/m(2) of fotemustine (5 days per week, 6 weeks, 1 h 30 min before radiation therapy). Adjuvant chemotherapy, fotemustine, was administered at tumor progression as standard and classic regimen. Twenty-two patients were enrolled, 16 men and 6 women, median age 56 years (range 32-74), median Karnofsky performance status 70 (range 60-90). Histology included 16 glioblastomas, 3 anaplastic astrocytomas, 2 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and 1 mixed glioma. Eight patients underwent surgery (three total resections). Fourteen patients had a stereotactic biopsy. The concurrent radiotherapy-fotemustine combination was well tolerated: toxicity was mild and three hematologic toxicities grade 3-4 were observed. Median survival from the initial diagnosis was 9.9 months, two patients are currently alive. Median survival was 11 months for surgery and 9 months for stereotactic biopsy. Concomitant radiotherapy-fotemustine combination is safe and well tolerated. Overall survival of over 10 months for the whole population compares favorably with other reports.

  2. Report on the Radiation Effects Testing of the Infrared and Optical Transition Radiation Camera Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Presented in this report are the results tests performed at Argonne National Lab in collaboration with Los Alamos National Lab to assess the reliability of the critical 99Mo production facility beam monitoring diagnostics. The main components of the beam monitoring systems are two cameras that will be exposed to radiation during accelerator operation. The purpose of this test is to assess the reliability of the cameras and related optical components when exposed to operational radiation levels. Both X-ray and neutron radiation could potentially damage camera electronics as well as the optical components such as lenses and windows. This report covers results of the testing of component reliability when exposed to X-ray radiation. With the information from this study we provide recommendations for implementing protective measures for the camera systems in order to minimize the occurrence of radiation-induced failure within a ten month production run cycle.

  3. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  4. Use of a cadmium telluride detector in a new tiny personal radiation chirper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.; Entine, G.

    1978-01-01

    By use of a CdTe crystal coupled to newly designed, low power electronics, we have developed a new personal radiation chirper that is superior to existing instruments. The device emits audible chirps or beeps at a rate proportional to the photon radiation exposure to the wearer. The device is small (6.2 cm high by 3.2 cm wide by 1.7 cm thick) and of low mass (50 grams) and is made to be clipped to the shirt collar of the wearer. The instrument has long continuous-use battery life and is sensitive over a large photon energy and exposure rate span

  5. The regulatory control of radiation sources in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Birol, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Turkey, the national competent authority for regulating activities involving radioactive sources is the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, which implements the responsibility for the safety and security of radiation sources through its Radiation Health and Safety Department. The report describes the organization of the regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety in Turkey and, after a brief explanation of the current legal framework for such purpose, it refers to how the management of radiation sources is carried out and to the new provisions regarding radiation sources, including inspections of licensees and training on source safety. Finally, the report provides information on the Ikitelli radiological accident in Turkey and the current public concern about radiation sources after it happened. (author)

  6. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester

  7. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory [University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Delettrez, Jacques [Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  8. Newly qualified teachers' visions of science learning and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Deborah L.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated newly qualified teachers' visions of science learning and teaching. The study also documented their preparation in an elementary science methods course. The research questions were: What educational and professional experiences influenced the instructor's visions of science learning and teaching? What visions of science learning and teaching were promoted in the participants' science methods course? What visions of science learning and teaching did these newly qualified teachers bring with them as they graduated from their teacher preparation program? How did these visions compare with those advocated by reform documents? Data sources included participants' assignments, weekly reflections, and multi-media portfolio finals. Semi-structured interviews provided the emic voice of participants, after graduation but before they had begun to teach. These data were interpreted via a combination of qualitative methodologies. Vignettes described class activities. Assertions supported by excerpts from participants' writings emerged from repeated review of their assignments. A case study of a typical participant characterized weekly reflections and final multi-media portfolio. Four strands of science proficiency articulated in a national reform document provided a framework for interpreting activities, assignments, and interview responses. Prior experiences that influenced design of the methods course included an inquiry-based undergraduate physics course, participation in a reform-based teacher preparation program, undergraduate and graduate inquiry-based science teaching methods courses, participation in a teacher research group, continued connection to the university as a beginning teacher, teaching in diverse Title 1 schools, service as the county and state elementary science specialist, participation in the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, service on a National Research Council committee, and experience teaching a

  9. Radiation resistant quench protection diodes for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, D.; Coull, L.

    1994-01-01

    The quench protection diodes for the proposed Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be located inside the He-II vessel of the short straight section of one half cell, where they could be exposed to a radiation dose of about 50 kGy and a total neutron fluence of about 10 15 n/cm 2 over 10 years at temperatures of about 2 K. To investigate the influence of irradiation on the electrical characteristics of the diodes, newly developed diodes of thin base region of the diffusion type and of the epitaxial type have been submitted to irradiation tests at liquid nitrogen temperature in a target area of the SPS accelerator at CERN. The degradation of the electrical characteristics of the diodes for a radiation dose up to about 20 kGy and neutron fluence of up to about 5 10 14 n/cm 2 and the effect of carrier injection and thermal annealing after irradiation have been measured. The test results show that only the thin base diodes of the epitaxial type are really radiation resistant. A compromise must be found between required blocking characteristics and radiation resistance. Annealing by carrier injection and occasional warm up to room temperature can extend the service life of irradiated diodes quite substantially

  10. The problem of creation of radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipchak, S.I.

    1990-01-01

    The review of problem of radiation monitoring system (RMS) in the territory of the country is presented. Unsolved problems are discussed which are divided into three groups: the organization of structures in RMS; implementation of automated RMS; the solution of scientific problems of global monitoring of radiation situation. 12 refs.; 1 tab

  11. PET scan and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, F.; Lahmi, A.; Rousseau, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was the optimization of the radiation protection during examinations with 18 F-FDG, The immediate validation by the D.G.S.N.R., the results of dosimetry (h.p.10 = 12 μ sievert (average value/ technician / day for 6 patients) demonstrate the efficiency of the implemented means. From the very beginning, the installation of a PET-scanner requires a multidisciplinary conception. This essential thought contributes to an optimal radiation protection of the entire personnel of the service. (N.C.)

  12. Perceptions of the clinical competence of newly registered nurses in the North West province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Moeti

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical competence of newly registered nurses relating to the care of individual Clients, depends on their ability to correlate theoretical knowledge learned in the classroom with practice and the development of clinical skills. Its foundation lies in the ability to identify and solve problems that emanate from critical thinking, analytical reasoning and reflective practice. It is clear that the quality of clinical exposure plays a leading role in the development of nursing professionals. Nursing skills alone cannot ensure quality care of clients without the application of theory. Facilitation of this theory to practice therefore remains an essential component of nursing education. This study was aimed at identifying areas of incompetence of newly registered nurses (1998- 2001 in the clinical area by determining the newly registered nurses1 and professional nurses1 perceptions of the competence of the newly registered nurses. A quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive survey was used to collect the data regarding the clinical competence of newly registered nurses (1998-2001.

  13. Radiation protection at the Cadarache research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    This article recalls the French law about radiation protection and its evolution due to the implementation of the 2013/59-EURATOM directive that separates the missions of counsel from the more operative missions of the person appointed as 'competent in radiation protection'. The organisation of the radiation protection of the Cadarache research center is presented. The issue of sub-contracting and the respect of an adequate standard of radioprotection is detailed since 2 facilities operated by AREVA are being dismantled on the site. (A.C.)

  14. Chemistry and radiation in oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of combustion chemistry and radiation heat transfer in oxy-fuel combustion modeling, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study has been performed for two different oxy-fuel furnaces. One is a lab-scale 0.8MW oxy-natural gas flame furnace whose detailed in....... Among the key issues in combustion modeling, e.g., mixing, radiation and chemistry, this paper derives useful guidelines on radiation and chemistry implementation for reliable CFD analyses of oxy-fuel combustion, particularly for industrial applications....

  15. Implementation of Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms to multi-particle Monte Carlo code for ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms, which have been developed for radio-frequency electromagnetic-field dosimetry, were implemented into multi-particle Monte Carlo transport code to evaluate realistic dose distribution in human body exposed to radiation field. Japanese tomographic phantoms, which were developed from the whole body magnetic resonance images of Japanese average adult male and female, were processed as follows to be implemented into general purpose multi-particle Monte Carlo code, MCNPX2.5. Original array size of Japanese male and female phantoms, 320 x 160 x 866 voxels and 320 x 160 x 804 voxels, respectively, were reduced into 320 x 160 x 433 voxels and 320 x 160 x 402 voxels due to the limitation of memory use in MCNPX2.5. The 3D voxel array of the phantoms were processed by using the built-in repeated structure algorithm, where the human anatomy was described by the repeated lattice of tiny cube containing the information of material composition and organ index number. Original phantom data were converted into ASCII file, which can be directly ported into the lattice card of MCNPX2.5 input deck by using in-house code. A total of 30 material compositions obtained from International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) report 46 were assigned to 54 and 55 organs and tissues in the male and female phantoms, respectively, and imported into the material card of MCNPX2.5 along with the corresponding cross section data. Illustrative calculation of absorbed doses for 26 internal organs and effective dose were performed for idealized broad parallel photon and neutron beams in anterior-posterior irradiation geometry, which is typical for workers at nuclear power plant. The results were compared with the data from other Japanese and Caucasian tomographic phantom, and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 74. The further investigation of the difference in organ dose and effective dose among tomographic

  16. Implementing spatial segregation measures in R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Yun Hong

    Full Text Available Reliable and accurate estimation of residential segregation between population groups is important for understanding the extent of social cohesion and integration in our society. Although there have been considerable methodological advances in the measurement of segregation over the last several decades, the recently developed measures have not been widely used in the literature, in part due to their complex calculation. To address this problem, we have implemented several newly proposed segregation indices in R, an open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics, as a package called seg. Although there are already a few standalone applications and add-on packages that provide access to similar methods, our implementation has a number of advantages over the existing tools. First, our implementation is flexible in the sense that it provides detailed control over the calculation process with a wide range of input parameters. Most of the parameters have carefully chosen defaults, which perform acceptably in many situations, so less experienced users can also use the implemented functions without too much difficulty. Second, there is no need to export results to other software programs for further analysis. We provide coercion methods that enable the transformation of our output classes into general R classes, so the user can use thousands of standard and modern statistical techniques, which are already available in R, for the post-processing of the results. Third, our implementation does not require commercial software to operate, so it is accessible to a wider group of people.

  17. Design and implementation on wireless transmission platform of area radiation monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dan; Ge Liangquan; Lai Wanchang; Ren Yong; Liu Huijun; Wang Guangxi

    2011-01-01

    To solve data transmission problems of radiation area monitoring system, Wireless transmission platform is built based on ZigBee module, thus wireless transmission between the radiation area central node and the monitoring points is achieved. It introduces the framework of ZigBee protocol, APL applications between FFD and RFD module, FFD, module and central node host, and RFD module and monitoring equipment, are developed using simplified protocol stack. Wireless network is set up using a FFD module and two RFD modules, the results show that RSSI are above 50, and the data communication is normal for the transmission distance of 60 m. (authors)

  18. Preparation of a newly microbial polymer using ionizing radiation technique and its conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Hwa Jung; Song, Aram; Kim, Dong Ho; Park, Hae Jun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is produced by microorganisms for a variety of purpose in response to environmental stresses. The EPS are heterogeneous mixture composed dominantly of polysaccharides and proteins, with nucleic acid and lipid as minor constituents. Application of a bacterial EPS is in mostly bioremediation in environment and it applied to pharmaceutical industries including indwelling medical devices. Furthermore, the EPS studies have mostly been performed in the only level of bacterial culture system. In this study, we have first investigated the structural modification of EPS using ionizing radiation technique. The extracted EPS solution from bacterial culture step was exposed to gamma-irradiation at room temperature. Especially, the EPS was given irradiation at various ranges of 0, 2, 10 and 30 kGy from {sup 60}Co gamma-ray source. The structural property and surface morphology were characterized by using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Also, the conductivity of EPS was determined by using the Van der PauW method, and the polymeric substances turned out to have semi-conductivity (about 5.38*10{sup -7})

  19. New challenge for the radiation protection: devices for the radioactivity dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, J. C.; Robles, B.; Cancio, C.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years the terrorist attacks produced in several countries have changed the mind of the security experts. This has also included the Radiation Protection aspects. Newly considered features have required the update of emergency response and preparedness, ad well as a greater emphasis on security. Within the Radiation Protection field has been introduced the radiological and nuclear terrorism definition. almost every organism and research centre involved in Radiation Protection is nowadays working on. The possible terrorist attack scenarios have already been defined and the use of an explosive to disperse radioactive material, known as a Radiation Dispersion Devices (RDD), has been specified as the most probable one. Studies to mitigate against the chance of attack and to mitigate the consequences of any attack with a RDD are complex, due to the innovation that introduce. This leads to a need to take some immediate preventative actions and to carry out additional R and D efforts. This document presents some considerations on the possible RDD design and behaviour in order to prevent and prepare against a possible attack. (Author) 17 refs

  20. Analysis of T101 outage radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Collective radiation dose during outage is about 80% of annual collective radiation dose at nuclear power plants (NPPs). T 101 Outage is the first four-year outage of Unit 1 at Tianwan Nuclear Power Station (TNPS) and thorough overhaul was undergone for the 105-day's duration. Therefore, T 101 Outage has significant reference meaning to reducing collective radiation dose at TNPS. This paper collects the radiation dose statistics during T 101 Outage and analyses the radiation dose distribution according to tasks, work kinds and varying trend of the collective radiation dose etc., comparing with other similar PWRs in the world. Based on the analysis this paper attempts to find out the major factors in collective radiation dose during T 101 Outage. The major positive factor is low radiation level at workplace, which profits from low content of Co in reactor construction materials, optimised high-temperature p H value of the primary circuit coolant within the tight range and reactor operation without trips within the first fuel cycle. One of the most negative factors is long outage duration and many person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone, caused by too many tasks and inefficient work. So besides keeping good performance of reducing radioactive sources, it should be focused on how to improve implementation of work management including work selection, planning and scheduling, work preparation, work implementation, work assessment and feedback, which can lead to reduced numbers of workers needed to perform a task, of person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone. Moreover, this leads to reduce occupational exposures in an ALARA fashion. (author)

  1. 'Practising under your own Pin'- a description of the transition experiences of newly qualified midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Mark; Mallik, Maggie; Fraser, Diane M

    2013-11-01

    Transition experiences of newly qualified midwives were examined in depth during the third phase of a UK evaluation study of midwifery education. The fitness to practise and the retention of newly qualified nursing and midwifery graduates are pressing concerns for health care managers. The advantages of preceptorship are reported in the literature but the content and timing of schemes remain unclear. A semi-structured diary was kept for up to 6 months by 35 newly qualified midwives in 18 work sites covering all countries in the UK. The preceptor and supervisor of midwives for each newly qualified midwife completed short questionnaires about their preceptee's performance, and a further sub-sample of newly qualified midwives and preceptors participated in a semi-structured interview. Data were analysed to elicit aspects of newly qualified midwives transition experiences. Findings confirm that structured preceptorship schemes are not widely available. Newly qualified midwives primarily obtained transition support from members of the midwifery team. Although perceived as competent, there is no demarcation point in becoming confident to practise as a registered practitioner. Implications for managers include the importance of a supportive culture within clinical teams for successful transition and the introduction of structured preceptorship schemes facilitated by appropriate rotation patterns. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. XXXIX Days of Radiation Protection. Proceedings of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The publication has been set up as a proceedings of the conference dealing with health protection during work with ionizing radiation for different activities which involve the handling of ionizing radiation sources. The main conference topics are focused on current problems in radiation protection and radioecology. In this proceedings totally 91 abstracts are published. The Conference consists of following sections: (I) Radiation protection, consequences of implementation of the EU2013 / 59 directive in the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic); (II) Radiation protection in the application of ionizing radiation in medicine; (III) Dosimetry and metrology of external and internal irradiation; (IV) Natural sources of ionizing radiation, national radon programs; (V) Nuclear energy, the concept of decommissioning of nuclear power plants in terms of radiation protection; (VI) Use of standards of radiation protection in emergency management; (VII) Biological effects of radiation and estimation of irradiation risk.

  3. Thermal Radiation Anomalies Associated with Major Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Kafatos, Menas C.; Taylor, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments of remote sensing methods for Earth satellite data analysis contribute to our understanding of earthquake related thermal anomalies. It was realized that the thermal heat fluxes over areas of earthquake preparation is a result of air ionization by radon (and other gases) and consequent water vapor condensation on newly formed ions. Latent heat (LH) is released as a result of this process and leads to the formation of local thermal radiation anomalies (TRA) known as OLR (outgoing Longwave radiation, Ouzounov et al, 2007). We compare the LH energy, obtained by integrating surface latent heat flux (SLHF) over the area and time with released energies associated with these events. Extended studies of the TRA using the data from the most recent major earthquakes allowed establishing the main morphological features. It was also established that the TRA are the part of more complex chain of the short-term pre-earthquake generation, which is explained within the framework of a lithosphere-atmosphere coupling processes.

  4. Ten Key Steps to Developing a Programme of University Mentoring for Newly Enrolled Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Casado-Muñoz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Peer mentoring or tutoring is an educational guidance method that is growing in universities around the world. Directed at the integration of students over the first year of university studies, it is based on the support and guidance that a more experienced student offers to a recently enrolled fellow student. It is a recent process in Spain which started a little over a decade ago, but each course brings more experiences. This article, derived from research, seeks to identify a series of key steps and ideas to implement this type of programme. The summary of the proposals stems from three main sources: a the experience and assessment of the Mentoring Programme at the University of Burgos; b the review of the peer mentoring programs implemented at 35 Spanish universities; and c the review, comparison and adaptation of formal mentoring to the university according to Perrone (2003.  The outcomes may be especially useful for those universities that wish to start mentoring programmes, and as a source of reflection and comparison for those with greater experience. We believe that special attention should be given on increasing and improving participation in the mentoring of newly enrolled students and on monitoring and assessing the whole process.

  5. High Prevalence of HIV Drug Resistance Among Newly Diagnosed Infants Aged <18 Months: Results From a Nationwide Surveillance in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth C; Osi, Samuels J; Akinbiyi, Gbenga; Emeka, Asadu; Khamofu, Hadiza; Mpazanje, Rex; Ilesanmi, Oluwafunke; Ndembi, Nicaise; Odafe, Solomon; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Akanmu, Sulaimon

    2018-01-01

    WHO recommends protease-inhibitor-based first-line regimen in infants because of risk of drug resistance from failed prophylaxis used in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). However, cost and logistics impede implementation in sub-Saharan Africa, and >75% of children still receive nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen (NNRTI) used in PMTCT. We assessed the national pretreatment drug resistance prevalence of HIV-infected children aged resistance surveillance protocol. We used remnant dried blood spots collected between June 2014 and July 2015 from 15 early infant diagnosis facilities spread across all the 6 geopolitical regions of Nigeria. Sampling was through a probability proportional-to-size approach. HIV drug resistance was determined by population-based sequencing. Overall, in 48% of infants (205 of 430) drug resistance mutations (DRM) were detected, conferring resistance to predominantly NNRTIs (45%). NRTI and multiclass NRTI/NNRTI resistance were present at 22% and 20%, respectively, while resistance to protease inhibitors was at 2%. Among 204 infants with exposure to drugs for PMTCT, 57% had DRMs, conferring NNRTI resistance in 54% and multiclass NRTI/NNRTI resistance in 29%. DRMs were also detected in 34% of 132 PMTCT unexposed infants. A high frequency of PDR, mainly NNRTI-associated, was observed in a nationwide surveillance among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children in Nigeria. PDR prevalence was equally high in PMTCT-unexposed infants. Our results support the use of protease inhibitor-based first-line regimens in HIV-infected young children regardless of PMTCT history and underscore the need to accelerate implementation of the newly disseminated guideline in Nigeria.

  6. Citation analysis of the Chinese Journal of Radiation Ocology from 2001 to 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hua; Li Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the information absorbency of Chinese Journal of Radiation Oncology and it's half-citing life, find out the core journals and characteristics of literature requested by scientists, and analyze the trend of Radiation Oncology research. Methods: The citation analysis is used to analyze the references cited in 475 articles in Chinese Journal of Radiation Oncology from 2001-2004. Results: Citation rate is 70.5%, and there are 8.6 citations per article. Main types of citations are journals (91.7%) and books (7.8%). The Price Index is 41.6%, and the self-citation rate is 6.2%. The percent of citations from the high-ranked 20 journals are 57.0%. Conclusions: The articles in Chinese Journal of Radiation Oncology concern most journals in the medicine, the most citations are from the English journals. The half-citing life becomes longer than research in 2003. It shows that the use of newly-published articles should be improved. (authors)

  7. Implementation of ICRP-60, BBS-115 and the patient directives in radiation safety regulations of TAEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okyar, H.B.; Vural, M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of radiation sources offers a wide range of benefits throughout the world in medicine, research and industry. Precautions are, however, necessary in order to limit the exposure of persons to the radiation that is emitted. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were published as IAEA Safety Series No 115 in 1996. This publication marks the culmination of efforts that have continued over the past decades towards harmonization of radiation protection and safety standards internationally. The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for the protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. The Standards are based primarily on the recommendations of the ICRP which is a non-governmental scientific organization to establish basic principles and recommendations for radiation protection; the most recent recommendations of the ICRP were issued in 1991. In 1997, the Council of the European Union published a new directive laying down the general principles of the radiation protection of individuals undergoing exposures to ionizing radiations related to medical exposures (Directive 97/43 Euratom). Directive 97/43 Euratom is a supplement to Directive 96/29 Euratom on the basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiations. The European Directives 96/29-97/43 Euratom and BSS-115 constitute a complete and coherent set of regulatory measures on radiation protection. In Turkey, the infrastructure exists to account for ionizing radiation sources by, for example, a system of licensing, legislative requirements on the user to keep appropriate records and perhaps to report to the TAEK on a periodic basis or, in the case of imported items (including re-export procedures) and customs

  8. The role of a Works Council in implementing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eigenwillig, G.G.; Zinke, E.

    2005-01-01

    In Germany, a works council has the right of co-determination concerning the concrete forms of occupational health and safety in the company according to the Labour-Management Relations Act. In practice coordination is needed between radiation protection and occupational health and safety. This makes a qualified cooperation between workers council, employer and other parties in the company necessary. (orig.)

  9. New ICRP recommendations and radiation safety of an NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.

    2007-01-01

    In March 2007 the fundamental radiation protection recommendations used world-widely in nuclear facilities were approved by the ICRP. Implementation of radiation safety standards in an NPP is a challenging issue related to all NPP phases from planning a site and its design to its decommissioning also because if neglected it could be very difficult if not impossible to implement improvement of radiation safety later during operation or decommissioning without a substantial cost. The standards are changing with a period of 15 years which is small regarding a prolonged lifetime of many NPPs and also foreseen lifetime of new NPPs, i.e. 60 years. The new recommendations are actually an upgrading of the ICRP 60. Among other changes new sets of wR and wT are given, as well as an update of around 50 different values related to doses. Two new concepts are also tackled i.e. terrorist attacks and protection of the environment. The influence of the new recommendations on the radiation safety of NPPs can be analysed by a selection of four renewed or new concepts: types of exposure situation, dose constraints, source-related approach and safety and security. Their implementation could lead to upgrading the radiation safety of future or existing NPPs as well as of decommissioning processes. Some of the concepts were already extensively and successfully used by designers of modifications or of new NPPs, as well as by operators. (author)

  10. Combustion, performance and emissions characteristics of a newly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of a newly developed CRDI single cylinder diesel engine. AVINASH ... In case of unit injector and unit pump systems, fuel injection pressure depends on ... nozzle hole diameters were effective in reducing smoke and PM emissions. However ...

  11. Yield and Adaptability Evaluation of Newly Introduced Tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High yield is a major ambition to tomato plant breeders and farmers. The purpose of the ... Tabora Region on the growth and yield of newly introduced tomato varieties. The tested ..... (1985). Evaluation of some American tomatocultivars grown.

  12. Mentorship for newly appointed physicians: a strategy for enhancing patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Reema; McClean, Serwaa; Lawton, Rebecca; Wright, John; Kay, Clive

    2014-09-01

    Mentorship is an increasingly popular innovation from business and industry that is being applied in health-care contexts. This paper explores the concept of mentorship for newly appointed physicians in their first substantive senior post, and specifically its utilization to enhance patient safety. Semi-structured face to face and telephone interviews with Medical Directors (n = 5), Deputy Medical Directors (n = 4), and Clinical Directors (n = 6) from 9 acute NHS Trusts in the Yorkshire and Humber region in the north of England. A focused thematic analysis was used. A number of beneficial outcomes were associated with mentorship for newly appointed physicians including greater personal and professional support, organizational commitment, and general well-being. Providing newly appointed senior physicians with support through mentorship was considered to enhance the safety of patient care. Mentorship may prevent or reduce active failures, be used to identify threats in the local working environment, and in the longer term, address latent threats to safety within the organization by encouraging a healthier safety culture. Offering mentorship to all newly appointed physicians in their first substantive post in health care may be a useful strategy to support the development of their clinical, professional, and personal skills in this transitional period that may also enhance the safety of patient care.

  13. Radiation Damage Monitoring in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, S

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of radiation damage monitoring using measurement of leakage current in the ATLAS silicon pixel sensors. The dependence of the leakage current upon the integrated luminosity is presented. The measurement of the radiation damage corresponding to integrated luminosity 5.6 fb$^{-1}$ is presented along with a comparison to the theoretical model.

  14. Newly elected IAEA Board of Governors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives information about the election of 11 Member States to the IAEA Board of Governors, the 35-member policy-making body, during the 44th regular session of the IAEA's General Conference (18 - 22 September 2000, Austria Center, Vienna). The newly elected Member States are: Argentina, Egypt, Ghana, Ireland, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Switzerland, Thailand, Ukraine. The other 24 Member States of the Board are also given

  15. Results of the implementation of a learning system with incidents in an radiotherapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radicchi, Lucas Augusto; Vilela, Ellen Pedroso Severino; Faustino, Fabio de Lima C.; Rodrigues, Fernanda Arantes C.; Gomes, Franciele N.; Souza, Guilherme Vicente de; Silva, Rose Marta S.; Toledo, Jose Carlos de

    2016-01-01

    An incident learning system (ILS) is an important tool for improving aspects of patient and staff safety. In radiation oncology, ILS has been implemented both at the institutional level as at the national level, allowing to share lessons learned from incidents that have already occurred. The objective of this study is to present the preliminary results of the ILS implemented in a radiation oncology department. In total, 128 incidents were reviewed by a multidisciplinary committee, and the professional groups that registered more were medical physicists, radiation oncologists and radiation therapists. In addition, incidents have occurred and have been detected mainly in the treatment step. The incident learning system proved to be an important process improvement tool, according to the results shown,the improvement actions proposed and the perception of the people involved. (author)

  16. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C., E-mail: ccpinnix@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test and logistic multivariate regression. Results: Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grades 1-3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation therapy (10%, P=.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose of >13.5 Gy, V{sub 20} of >30%, V{sub 15} of >35%, V{sub 10} of >40%, and V{sub 5} of >55%. The likelihood ratio χ{sup 2} value was highest for V{sub 5} >55% (χ{sup 2} = 19.37). Conclusions: In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed

  17. Fiber-optic dosimeters for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enbang; Archer, James

    2017-10-01

    According to the figures provided by the World Health Organization, cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.8 million deaths in 2015. Radiation therapy, which uses x-rays to destroy or injure cancer cells, has become one of the most important modalities to treat the primary cancer or advanced cancer. The newly developed microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), which uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of x-ray microbeams (typically 50 μm wide and separated by 400 μm) produced by synchrotron sources, represents a new paradigm in radiotherapy and has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies on different animal models. Measurements of the absorbed dose distribution of microbeams are vitally important for clinical acceptance of MRT and for developing quality assurance systems for MRT, hence are a challenging and important task for radiation dosimetry. On the other hand, during the traditional LINAC based radiotherapy and breast cancer brachytherapy, skin dose measurements and treatment planning also require a high spatial resolution, tissue equivalent, on-line dosimeter that is both economical and highly reliable. Such a dosimeter currently does not exist and remains a challenge in the development of radiation dosimetry. High resolution, water equivalent, optical and passive x-ray dosimeters have been developed and constructed by using plastic scintillators and optical fibers. The dosimeters have peak edge-on spatial resolutions ranging from 50 to 500 microns in one dimension, with a 10 micron resolution dosimeter under development. The developed fiber-optic dosimeters have been test with both LINAC and synchrotron x-ray beams. This work demonstrates that water-equivalent and high spatial resolution radiation detection can be achieved with scintillators and optical fiber systems. Among other advantages, the developed fiber-optic probes are also passive, energy independent, and radiation hard.

  18. Development and implementation of the regulatory control of sources in Latin American Model Project countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferruz Cruz, P.

    2001-01-01

    After a general assessment of the situation regarding radiation safety and the radiation protection infrastructure in Latin American countries, several of them were invited to participate in a Model Project oriented, in some cases, towards establishing a mechanism for national regulatory control of radiation sources, and in others, towards upgrading their national control programme. All these activities aimed at reaching an effective and sustainable radiation protection infrastructure based on international basic safety standards. The paper presents a general overview of the current situation with regard to radiation protection within the Model Project countries in Latin America after almost five years of activities. It includes: the implementation of regulatory issues; the control of occupational, medical and public exposures; emergency response and waste safety issues. The paper also presents some lessons learned during implementation concerning the numerous activities involved in this interregional project. (author)

  19. A guide to practical radiation protection in medicine. X-Ray Ordinance. Radiation Protection Ordinance. Practice-oriented hints, comments, text compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebich, M.; Nischelsky, J.E.; Pfeiff, H.; Westermann, K.

    2003-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection has been compiled for users who have to implement the X-ray Ordinance and the Radiation Protection Ordinance at their place of work. It presents all acts, ordinances, safety guides, regulations and recommendations of relevance in connection with the above two ordinances, as well as practical instructions and the full text of technical codes. Radiation protection officers and other persons in charge of radiation protection will find the references, information and advice needed to solve problems encountered. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiation Protection and Civil defence Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Elshinawy, R.M.K.; Abdelfattah, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    This conference involves subjects of radiation protection, programming of civil defence, on the implementation of 1990 ICRP recommendation, thermoluminescence properties of bone equivalent calcium phosphate ceramics, potassium body burdens in occupational users of egyptian nuclear research centre, transport of radionuclides in fresh water stream, water treatment process for nuclear reactor, research activities related to internal contamination and bioassay and experience and environmental radiation monitoring in inshass. it contains of figures and tables

  1. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M.

    2002-01-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1β, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  2. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States). Radiation Casualty Management] [and others

    2002-12-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1{beta}, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  3. bhlight: GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH MONTE CARLO TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B. R.; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present bhlight, a numerical scheme for solving the equations of general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics using a direct Monte Carlo solution of the frequency-dependent radiative transport equation. bhlight is designed to evolve black hole accretion flows at intermediate accretion rate, in the regime between the classical radiatively efficient disk and the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF), in which global radiative effects play a sub-dominant but non-negligible role in disk dynamics. We describe the governing equations, numerical method, idiosyncrasies of our implementation, and a suite of test and convergence results. We also describe example applications to radiative Bondi accretion and to a slowly accreting Kerr black hole in axisymmetry

  4. Radiation oncology systems integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    ROLE7 is intended as a complementary addition to the HL7 Standard and not as an alternative standard. Attempt should be made to mould data elements which are specific to radiation therapy with existing HL7 elements. This can be accomplished by introducing additional values to some element's table-of-options. Those elements which might be specific to radiation therapy could from new segments to be added to the Ancillary Data Reporting set. In order to accomplish ROLE7, consensus groups need be formed to identify the various functions related to radiation oncology that might motivate information exchange. For each of these functions, the specific data elements and their format must be identified. HL7 is organized with a number of applications which communicate asynchronously. Implementation of ROLE7 would allow uniform access to information across vendors and functions. It would provide improved flexibility in system selection. It would allow a more flexible and affordable upgrade path as systems in radiation oncology improve. (author). 5 refs

  5. A newly developed snack effective for enhancing bone volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Hidetaka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of primary osteoporosis is higher in Japan than in USA and European countries. Recently, the importance of preventive medicine has been gradually recognized in the field of orthopaedic surgery with a concept that peak bone mass should be increased in childhood as much as possible for the prevention of osteoporosis. Under such background, we have developed a new bean snack with an aim to improve bone volume loss. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly developed snack on bone volume and density in osteoporosis model mice. Methods Orchiectomy (ORX and ovariectomy (OVX were performed for C57BL/6J mice of twelve-week-old (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbar, ME, USA were used in this experiment. We prepared and given three types of powder diet e.g.: normal calcium diet (NCD, Ca: 0.9%, Clea Japan Co., Tokyo, Japan, low calcium diet (LCD, Ca: 0.63%, Clea Japan Co., and special diet (SCD, Ca: 0.9%. Eighteen weeks after surgery, all the animals were sacrified and prepared for histomorphometric analysis to quantify bone density and bone mineral content. Results As a result of histomorphometric examination, SCD was revealed to enhance bone volume irrespective of age and sex. The bone density was increased significantly in osteoporosis model mice fed the newly developmental snack as compared with the control mice. The bone mineral content was also enhanced significantly. These phenomena were revealed in both sexes. Conclusion It is shown that the newly developed bean snack is highly effective for the improvement of bone volume loss irrespective of sex. We demonstrated that newly developmental snack supplements may be a useful preventive measure for Japanese whose bone mineral density values are less than the ideal condition.

  6. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1997-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author) 2 graphs, 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.

    1996-01-01

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALARA principle means that a global work management approach must be adopted, considering together all factors contributing to radiation dose. In the nuclear field, the ALARA approach appears to be more successful when implemented in the framework of a managerial approach through structure ALARA programmes. Outside the nuclear industry it is necessary to clearly define priorities through generic optimisation studies and ALARA audits. At the international level much efforts remain to be done to expand efficiently the ALARA process to internal exposure as well as to public exposure. (author)

  8. Radiation protection optimisation techniques and their application in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C

    1996-12-31

    Since the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendation 60, the optimisation principle appears to be the core of the radiation protection system. In practice applying it, means implementing an approach both predictive and evolutionary - that relies essentially on a prudent and responsible state of mind. the formal expression of this process, called optimization procedure, implies and indispensable tool for its implementation: the system of monetary values for the unit of collective dose. During the last few years, feed ALAR