WorldWideScience

Sample records for newly generated transuranic

  1. Complications Associated with Long-Term Disposition of Newly-Generated Transuranic Waste: A National Laboratory Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; T.L. Carlson; R.P. Grant

    2009-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a multipurpose national laboratory delivering specialized science and engineering solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sponsorship of INL was formally transferred to the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) by Secretary Spencer Abraham in July 2002. The move to NE, and designation as the DOE lead nuclear energy laboratory for reactor technology, supports the nation’s expanding nuclear energy initiatives, placing INL at the center of work to develop advanced Generation IV nuclear energy systems; nuclear energy/hydrogen coproduction technology; advanced nuclear energy fuel cycle technologies; and providing national security answers to national infrastructure needs. As a result of the Laboratory’s NE mission, INL generates both contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from ongoing operations. Generation rates are relatively small and fluctuate based on specific programs and project activities being conducted; however, the Laboratory will continue to generate TRU waste well into the future in association with the NE mission. Currently, plans and capabilities are being established to transfer INL’s contact-handled TRU waste to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (AMWTP) for certification and disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Remote-handled TRU waste is currently placed in storage at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). In an effort to minimize future liabilities associated with the INL NE mission, INL is evaluating and assessing options for the management and disposition of all its TRU waste on a real-time basis at time of generation. This paper summarizes near-term activities to minimize future re handling of INL’s TRU waste, as well as, potential complications associated with the long-term disposition of newly-generated TRU waste. Potential complications impacting the disposition of INL newly-generated TRU waste include, but are not limited to

  2. Gas generation from transuranic waste degradation: data summary and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1979-12-01

    A comprehensive review of all applicable gas generation data resulting from the degradation of existing and potential forms of transuranic-contaminated wastes is presented. Extensive experimental studies have been performed under both realistic environmental conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and overtest conditions. Degradation mechanisms investigated were radiolysis, thermal decomposition and dewatering, bacterial action, and chemical corrosion. Waste matrices studied include cellulosics, plastics, rubbers, organic composite, concrete-TRU ash, asphalt, process sludges, and mild steel. Measured gas generation rates are presented in terms of gas moles/year/drum of waste and in G(gas) values for radiolysis. The effects of multiple variables on gas generation are also described. 7 figures, 15 tables.

  3. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment appendices. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of this report contains six appendices to the report: Inventory and generation of remote-handled transuranic waste; Remote-handled transuranic waste site storage; Characterization of remote-handled transuranic waste; RH-TRU waste treatment alternatives system analysis; Packaging and transportation study; and Remote-handled transuranic waste disposal alternatives.

  4. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment appendices. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of this report contains six appendices to the report: Inventory and generation of remote-handled transuranic waste; Remote-handled transuranic waste site storage; Characterization of remote-handled transuranic waste; RH-TRU waste treatment alternatives system analysis; Packaging and transportation study; and Remote-handled transuranic waste disposal alternatives.

  5. Waste Generator Instructions: Key to Successful Implementation of the US DOE's 435.1 for Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions (LA-UR-12-24155) - 13218

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, David M. [LANL EES-12, Carlsbad, NM, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hayes, Timothy A. [LANL EES-12, Carlsbad, NM, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Pope, Howard L. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc., P.O. Box 3038, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Enriquez, Alejandro E. [LANL NCO-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Carson, Peter H. [LANL NPI-7, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In times of continuing fiscal constraints, a management and operation tool that is straightforward to implement, works as advertised, and virtually ensures compliant waste packaging should be carefully considered and employed wherever practicable. In the near future, the Department of Energy (DOE) will issue the first major update to DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This update will contain a requirement for sites that do not have a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste certification program to use two newly developed technical standards: Contact-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions and Remote-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions. The technical standards are being developed from the DOE O 435.1 Notice, Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging, approved August 2011. The packaging instructions will provide detailed information and instruction for packaging almost every conceivable type of transuranic (TRU) waste for disposal at WIPP. While providing specificity, the packaging instructions leave to each site's own discretion the actual mechanics of how those Instructions will be functionally implemented at the floor level. While the Technical Standards are designed to provide precise information for compliant packaging, the density of the information in the packaging instructions necessitates a type of Rosetta Stone that translates the requirements into concise, clear, easy to use and operationally practical recipes that are waste stream and facility specific for use by both first line management and hands-on operations personnel. The Waste Generator Instructions provide the operator with step-by-step instructions that will integrate the sites' various operational requirements (e.g., health and safety limits, radiological limits or dose limits) and result in a WIPP certifiable waste and package that can be transported to and emplaced at WIPP. These little known but widely

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-14

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste.

  7. Impact of newly developed, next-generation artificial endocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Noriko; Kawahito, Shinji; Mita, Naoji; Takaishi, Kazumi; Katayama, Toshiko; Sakai, Yoko; Soga, Tomohiro; Kawano, Hiroaki; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that strict perioperative blood glucose management may reduce mortality and morbidity in critically ill adult patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and efficacy of the intraoperative application of a newly developed, next-generation artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-55, Nikkiso Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Twenty patients scheduled to undergo surgery were enrolled in this study. The STG-55 is designed to be more user-friendly than its conventional counterpart (STG-22) while maintaining the latter's fundamental functions, such as a closed-loop system using algorithms for insulin and glucose infusion. After anesthetic induction, a 20G intravenous catheter was inserted into a peripheral forearm vein and connected to a continuous blood glucose monitor. The resultant 105 scores for paired blood glucose values were compared by Bland-Altman analysis. Stable blood glucose values were maintained automatically, and there were no complications related to use of the STG-55. A close correlation (r=0.96) was observed between continuous glucose measurements using the STG-55 and conventional intermittent glucose measurements. The difficulty of manipulation using this system was decreased by improved preparation procedures. The glycemic control system using the STG-55 could provide an alternative way to achieve effective and safe perioperative glycemic control.

  8. CLAB Transuranic Waste Spreadsheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyba, J.D.

    2000-08-11

    The Building 772-F Far-Field Transuranic (TRU) Waste Counting System is used to measure the radionuclide content of waste packages produced at the Central Laboratory Facilities (CLAB). Data from the instrument are entered into one of two Excel spreadsheets. The waste stream associated with the waste package determines which spreadsheet is actually used. The spreadsheets calculate the necessary information required for completion of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Form (OSR 29-90) and the Radioactive Solid Waste Burial Ground Record (OSR 7-375 or OSR 7-375A). In addition, the spreadsheets calculate the associated Low Level Waste (LLW) stream information that potentially could be useful if the waste container is ever downgraded from TRU to LLW. The spreadsheets also have the capability to sum activities from source material added to a waste container after assay. A validation data set for each spreadsheet along with the appropriate results are also presented in this report for spreadsheet verification prior to each use.

  9. Neuraminidase-Dependent Degradation of Polysialic Acid Is Required for the Lamination of Newly Generated Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Sajo

    Full Text Available Hippocampal granule cells (GCs are generated throughout the lifetime and are properly incorporated into the innermost region of the granule cell layer (GCL. Hypotheses for the well-regulated lamination of newly generated GCs suggest that polysialic acid (PSA is present on the GC surface to modulate GC-to-GC interactions, regulating the process of GC migration; however, direct evidence of this involvement is lacking. We show that PSA facilitates the migration of newly generated GCs and that the activity of N-acetyl-α-neuraminidase 1 (NEU1, sialidase 1 cleaves PSA from immature GCs, terminating their migration in the innermost GCL. Developing a migration assay of immature GCs in vitro, we found that the pharmacological depletion of PSA prevents the migration of GCs, whereas the inhibition of PSA degradation with a neuraminidase inhibitor accelerates this migration. We found that NEU1 is highly expressed in immature GCs. The knockdown of NEU1 in newly generated GCs in vivo increased PSA presence on these cells, and attenuated the proper termination of GC migration in the innermost GCL. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel mechanism that underlies the proper lamination of newly generated GCs through the modulation of PSA presence by neuronal NEU1.

  10. Neuraminidase-Dependent Degradation of Polysialic Acid Is Required for the Lamination of Newly Generated Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajo, Mari; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Tanii, Takashi; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal granule cells (GCs) are generated throughout the lifetime and are properly incorporated into the innermost region of the granule cell layer (GCL). Hypotheses for the well-regulated lamination of newly generated GCs suggest that polysialic acid (PSA) is present on the GC surface to modulate GC-to-GC interactions, regulating the process of GC migration; however, direct evidence of this involvement is lacking. We show that PSA facilitates the migration of newly generated GCs and that the activity of N-acetyl-α-neuraminidase 1 (NEU1, sialidase 1) cleaves PSA from immature GCs, terminating their migration in the innermost GCL. Developing a migration assay of immature GCs in vitro, we found that the pharmacological depletion of PSA prevents the migration of GCs, whereas the inhibition of PSA degradation with a neuraminidase inhibitor accelerates this migration. We found that NEU1 is highly expressed in immature GCs. The knockdown of NEU1 in newly generated GCs in vivo increased PSA presence on these cells, and attenuated the proper termination of GC migration in the innermost GCL. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel mechanism that underlies the proper lamination of newly generated GCs through the modulation of PSA presence by neuronal NEU1.

  11. Electroconvulsive stimulation results in long-term survival of newly generated hippocampal neurons in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Wörtwein, Gitta; Folke, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) is one of the strongest stimulators of hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents that represents a plausible mechanism for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder. Using design-based stereological cell counting, we recently...... documented an initial 2.6-fold increase in neurogenesis following a clinical relevant schedule of ECS, a treatment also rescuing depression-like behavior in rats. However, these results gave no demonstration of the longevity of newly generated neurons. The present study is a direct continuation...... in neurogenesis facilitates the behavioral outcome of the forced swim test (FST), an animal model of depression. The results showed that ECS in conjunction with CRS stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis, and that a significant quantity of the newly formed hippocampal neurons survives up to 12 months. The new Brd...

  12. Impaired mastication reduced newly generated neurons at the accessory olfactory bulb and pheromonal responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsugi, Chizuru; Miyazono, Sadaharu; Osada, Kazumi; Matsuda, Mitsuyoshi; Kashiwayanagi, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    A large number of neurons are generated at the subventricular zone (SVZ) even during adulthood. In a previous study, we have shown that a reduced mastication impairs both neurogenesis in the SVZ and olfactory functions. Pheromonal signals, which are received by the vomeronasal organ, provide information about reproductive and social states. Vomeronasal sensory neurons project to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) located on the dorso-caudal surface of the main olfactory bulb. Newly generated neurons at the SVZ migrate to the AOB and differentiate into granule cells and periglomerular cells. This study aimed to explore the effects of changes in mastication on newly generated neurons and pheromonal responses. Bromodeoxyuridine-immunoreactive (BrdU-ir; a marker of DNA synthesis) and Fos-ir (a marker of neurons excited) structures in sagittal sections of the AOB after exposure to urinary odours were compared between the mice fed soft and hard diets. The density of BrdU-ir cells in the AOB in the soft-diet-fed mice after 1 month was essentially similar to that of the hard-diet-fed mice, while that was lower in the soft-diet-fed mice for 3 or 6 months than in the hard-diet-fed mice. The density of Fos-ir cells in the soft-diet-fed mice after 2 months was essentially similar to that in the hard-diet-fed mice, while that was lower in the soft-diet-fed mice for 4 months than in the hard-diet-fed mice. The present results suggest that impaired mastication reduces newly generated neurons at the AOB, which in turn impairs olfactory function at the AOB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. IMPROVEMENTS IN HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) PROGRAM UTILIZING SYSTEMS MODELING AND ANALYSES

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    UYTIOCO EM

    2007-11-12

    Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Real-Time Radiography, Non-Destructive Assay, and Head Space Gas Sampling), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates.

  14. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

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    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-01

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package

  15. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-06

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package

  16. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  17. Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

    1996-12-01

    Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

  18. Origin, migration and fate of newly generated neurons in the adult rodent piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lee A; Ng, Kwan L; Kinyamu, Richard; Whitaker-Azmitia, Patricia; Geisert, Eldon E; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Ribak, Charles E

    2007-09-01

    Newly generated neurons are continuously added to the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulbs of adult mammals. Studies also report newly generated neurons in the piriform cortex, the primary cortical projection site of the olfactory bulbs. The current study used BrdU-injection paradigms, and in vivo and in vitro DiI tracing methods to address three fundamental issues of these cells: their origin, migratory route and fate. The results show that 1 day after a BrdU-injection, BrdU/DCX double-labeled cells appear deep to the ventricular subependyma, within the white matter. Such cells appear further ventral and caudal in the ensuing days, first appearing in the rostral piriform cortex of mice at 2 days after the BrdU-injection, and at 4 days in the rat. In the caudal piriform cortex, BrdU/DCX labeled cells first appear at 4 days after the injection in mice and 7 days in rats. The time it takes for these cells to appear in the piriform cortex and the temporal distribution pattern suggest that they migrate from outside this region. DiI tracing methods confirmed a migratory route to the piriform cortex from the ventricular subependyma. The presence of BrdU/NeuN labeled cells as early as 7 days after a BrdU injection in mice and 10 days in the rat and lasting as long as 41 days indicates that some of these cells have extended survival durations in the adult piriform cortex.

  19. Five simple guidelines for establishing basic authenticity and reliability of newly generated fungal ITS sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Henrik Nilsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular data form an important research tool in most branches of mycology. A non-trivial proportion of the public fungal DNA sequences are, however, compromised in terms of quality and reliability, contributing noise and bias to sequence-borne inferences such as phylogenetic analysis, diversity assessment, and barcoding. In this paper we discuss various aspects and pitfalls of sequence quality assessment. Based on our observations, we provide a set of guidelines to assist in manual quality management of newly generated, near-full-length (Sanger-derived fungal ITS sequences and to some extent also sequences of shorter read lengths, other genes or markers, and groups of organisms. The guidelines are intentionally non-technical and do not require substantial bioinformatics skills or significant computational power. Despite their simple nature, we feel they would have caught the vast majority of the severely compromised ITS sequences in the public corpus. Our guidelines are nevertheless not infallible, and common sense and intuition remain important elements in the pursuit of compromised sequence data. The guidelines focus on basic sequence authenticity and reliability of the newly generated sequences, and the user may want to consider additional resources and steps to accomplish the best possible quality control. A discussion on the technical resources for further sequence quality management is therefore provided in the supplementary material.

  20. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  1. Newly generated cells are increased in hippocampus of adult mice lacking a serine protease inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticker Melanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone occurs throughout the life of mammals and newly generated neurons can integrate functionally into established neuronal circuits. Neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus are modulated by changes in the environment (enrichment, exercise, hippocampal-dependent tasks, NMDA receptor (NMDAR activity, sonic hedgehog (SHH and/or other factors. Results previously, we showed that Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1, a potent serine protease inhibitor, regulates the NMDAR availability and activity as well as SHH signaling. Compared with wild-type (WT, we detected a significant increase in BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of mice lacking PN-1 (PN-1 -/- both in controls and after running exercise. Patched homologue 1 (Ptc1 and Gli1 mRNA levels were higher and Gli3 down-regulated in mutant mice under standard conditions and to a lesser extent after running exercise. However, the number of surviving BrdU-positive cells did not differ between WT and PN-1 -/- animals. NMDAR availability was altered in the hippocampus of mutant animals after exercise. Conclusion All together our results indicate that PN-1 controls progenitors proliferation through an effect on the SHH pathway and suggest an influence of the serpin on the survival of newly generated neurons through modulation of NMDAR availability.

  2. Sensory deprivation disrupts homeostatic regeneration of newly generated olfactory sensory neurons after injury in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Shu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagayama, Shin; Kanaya, Kaori; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kondo, Kenji; Tsunoda, Koichi; Mori, Kensaku; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-02-11

    Although it is well known that injury induces the generation of a substantial number of new olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the adult olfactory epithelium (OE), it is not well understood whether olfactory sensory input influences the survival and maturation of these injury-induced OSNs in adults. Here, we investigated whether olfactory sensory deprivation affected the dynamic incorporation of newly generated OSNs 3, 7, 14, and 28 d after injury in adult mice. Mice were unilaterally deprived of olfactory sensory input by inserting a silicone tube into their nostrils. Methimazole, an olfactotoxic drug, was also injected intraperitoneally to bilaterally ablate OSNs. The OE was restored to its preinjury condition with new OSNs by day 28. No significant differences in the numbers of olfactory marker protein-positive mature OSNs or apoptotic OSNs were observed between the deprived and nondeprived sides 0-7 d after injury. However, between days 7 and 28, the sensory-deprived side showed markedly fewer OSNs and mature OSNs, but more apoptotic OSNs, than the nondeprived side. Intrinsic functional imaging of the dorsal surface of the olfactory bulb at day 28 revealed that responses to odor stimulation were weaker in the deprived side compared with those in the nondeprived side. Furthermore, prevention of cell death in new neurons 7-14 d after injury promoted the recovery of the OE. These results indicate that, in the adult OE, sensory deprivation disrupts compensatory OSN regeneration after injury and that newly generated OSNs have a critical time window for sensory-input-dependent survival 7-14 d after injury.

  3. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-12-14

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  4. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  5. Transuranic contaminated waste functional definition and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the problem(s) of TRU waste classification and to document the development of an easy-to-apply standard(s) to determine whether or not this waste package should be emplaced in a geologic repository for final disposition. Transuranic wastes are especially significant because they have long half-lives and some are rather radiotoxic. Transuranic radionuclides are primarily produced by single or multiple neutron capture by U-238 in fuel elements during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Reprocessing of spent fuel elements attempts to remove plutonium, but since the separation is not complete, the resulting high-activity liquids still contain some plutonium as well as other transuranics. Likewise, transuranic contamination of low-activity wastes also occurs when the transuranic materials are handled or processed, which is primarily at federal facilities involved in R and D and nuclear weapons production. Transuranics are persistent in the environment and, as a general rule, are strongly retained by soils. They are not easily transported through most food chains, although some reconcentration does take place in the aquatic food chain. They pose no special biological hazard to humans upon ingestion because they are weakly absorbed from the gastrointestional tract. A greater hazard results from inhalation since they behave like normal dust and fractionate accordingly.

  6. Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2001-03-01

    The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

  7. Third-generation biosensor for lactose based on newly discovered cellobiose dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Leonard; Ludwig, Roland; Haltrich, Dietmar; Gorton, Lo

    2006-01-15

    The present paper describes the principle and characteristics of a biosensor for lactose based on a third-generation design involving cellobiose dehydrogenase. As resulted from a previous comparative study (submitted manuscript), the novelty of this lactose biosensor is based on highly efficient direct electron transfer between two newly discovered cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH), from the white rot fungi Trametes villosa and Phanerochaete sordida, and a solid spectrographic graphite electrode. CDH was immobilized on the electrode surface (0.073 cm2) by simple physical adsorption, and the CDH-modified electrode was next inserted into a wall-jet amperometric cell connected on-line to a flow injection setup (0.5 mL x min(-1)). The P. sordida CDH-based lactose biosensor, proved to be the better one, has a detection limit for lactose of 1 microM, a sensitivity of 1100 microA x mM(-1) x cm(-2), a response time of 4 s (the time required to obtain the maximum peak current), and a linear range from 1 to 100 microM lactose (correlation coefficient 0.998). The simplicity of construction and analytical characteristics make this CDH-based lactose biosensor an excellent alternative to previous lactose biosensors reported in the literature or commercially available. The CDH-lactose sensor was used to quantify the content of lactose in pasteurized milk, buttermilk, and low-lactose milk, using the standard addition method. No effects of the samples matrixes were observed. The operational stability of the sensor was tested for 11 h by continuous injection of 100 microM lactose (290 injections). The final signal of the sensor was maintained at 98% of its initial signal, with a low standard deviation of 1.72 (RSD 2.41%).

  8. Newly generated heparanase knock-out mice unravel co-regulation of heparanase and matrix metalloproteinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Zcharia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heparanase, a mammalian endo-beta-D-glucuronidase, specifically degrades heparan sulfate proteoglycans ubiquitously associated with the cell surface and extracellular matrix. This single gene encoded enzyme is over-expressed in most human cancers, promoting tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report that targeted disruption of the murine heparanase gene eliminated heparanase enzymatic activity, resulting in accumulation of long heparan sulfate chains. Unexpectedly, the heparanase knockout (Hpse-KO mice were fertile, exhibited a normal life span and did not show prominent pathological alterations. The lack of major abnormalities is attributed to a marked elevation in the expression of matrix metalloproteinases, for example, MMP2 and MMP14 in the Hpse-KO liver and kidney. Co-regulation of heparanase and MMPs was also noted by a marked decrease in MMP (primarily MMP-2,-9 and 14 expression following transfection and over-expression of the heparanase gene in cultured human mammary carcinoma (MDA-MB-231 cells. Immunostaining (kidney tissue and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis (Hpse-KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts suggest that the newly discovered co-regulation of heparanase and MMPs is mediated by stabilization and transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of heparanase expression and activity was accompanied by alterations in the expression level of MMP family members, primarily MMP-2 and MMP-14. It is conceivable that MMP-2 and MMP-14, which exert some of the effects elicited by heparanase (i.e., over branching of mammary glands, enhanced angiogenic response can compensate for its absence, in spite of their different enzymatic substrate. Generation of viable Hpse-KO mice lacking significant abnormalities may provide a promising indication for the use of heparanase as a target for drug development.

  9. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each US Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the QAPP.

  10. The extraction behaviors of transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, Kee Hoh; Lee, Eil Hee; Kwon, Seon Gil; Kim, Kwang Wook; Yang, Han Beom; Chung, Dong Yong; Lim, Jae Kwan; Shin, Hyun Kyoo; Kim, Soo Ho

    1999-10-01

    We have studied the distribution data between organic and aqueous phases and the related reaction data in the state of extraction equilibrium for neptunium, americium and curium of transuranic elements, and also studied the chemical properties for these chemical elements. In the results of study, distribution coefficients of transuranic elements such as Np(IV), Np(V), Np(VI) Am(III), CM(III) and the redox reactions of neptunium were rearranged numerically with the data in the published literatures. (author)

  11. Bidirectional GABAergic control of AP firing in newly-generated young granule cells of the adult hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Heigele, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the first transmitter which provides synaptic input to newly generated neurons. In the first 2-3 weeks after mitosis, young neurons show an elevated intracellular chloride concentration due to the expression of the NKCC1 Cl- importer. Hence, GABAergic transmission provides depolarization to the newborn cells, which is known to be crucial for activity-dependent cell survival, development and functional maturation. However, it is still unknown whether activatio...

  12. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-30

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes.

  13. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-30

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes.

  14. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2001-08-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

  16. Chronological analysis with fluorescent timer reveals unique features of newly generated β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Sasaki, Shugo; Kubo, Fumiyo; Shimomura, Iichiro; Watada, Hirotaka; German, Michael S; Hara, Manami

    2014-10-01

    Although numerous studies have uncovered the molecular mechanisms regulating pancreas development, it remains to be clarified how β-cells arise from progenitors and how recently specified β-cells are different from preexisting β-cells. To address these questions, we developed a mouse model in which the insulin 1 promoter drives DsRed-E5 Timer fluorescence that shifts its spectrum over time. In transgenic embryos, green fluorescent β-cells were readily detected by FACS and could be distinguished from mature β-cells only until postnatal day 0, suggesting that β-cell neogenesis occurs exclusively during embryogenesis. Transcriptome analysis with green fluorescent cells sorted by FACS demonstrated that newly differentiated β-cells highly expressed progenitor markers, such as Sox9, Neurog3, and Pax4, showing the progenitor-like features of newborn β-cells. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle dynamics showed that green fluorescent cells were mostly quiescent, and differentiated β-cells were mitotically active. Thus, the precise temporal resolution of this model enables us to dissect the unique features of newly specified insulin-producing cells, which could enhance our understanding of β-cell neogenesis for future cell therapy. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Fusion option to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.

    2000-02-10

    The fusion option is examined to solve the disposition problems of the spent nuclear fuel and the transuranic elements. The analysis of this report shows that the top rated solution, the elimination of the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products, can be achieved in a fusion reactor. A 167 MW of fusion power from a D-T plasma for sixty years with an availability factor of 0.75 can transmute all the transuranic elements and the long-lived fission products of the 70,000 tons of the US inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. The operating time can be reduced to thirty years with use of 334 MW of fusion power, a system study is needed to define the optimum time. In addition, the fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future. Fusion blankets with a liquid carrier for the transuranic elements can achieve a transmutation rate for the transuranic elements up to 80 kg/MW.y of fusion power with k{sub eff} of 0.98. In addition, the liquid blankets have several advantages relative to the other blanket options. The energy from this transmutation is utilized to produce revenue for the system. Molten salt (Flibe) and lithium-lead eutectic are identified as the most promising liquids for this application, both materials are under development for future fusion blanket concepts. The Flibe molten salt with transuranic elements was developed and used successfully as nuclear fuel for the molten salt breeder reactor in the 1960's.

  18. Microstructural evolution and castability prediction in newly designed modern third-generation nickel-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffakh-Moosavy, Homam

    2016-05-01

    The present research aims to establish a quantitative relation between microstructure and chemical composition (i.e., Ti, Al, and Nb) of newly designed nickel-based superalloys. This research attempts to identify an optimum microstructure at which the minimum quantities of γ/γ' and γ/γ″ compounds are achieved and the best castability is predicted. The results demonstrate that the highest quantity of intermetallic eutectics (i.e., 41.5wt%) is formed at 9.8wt% (Ti + Al). A significant quantity of intermetallics formed in superalloy 1 (with a composition of γ - 9.8wt% (Ti + Al)), which can deteriorate its castability. The type and morphology of the eutectics changed and the amount considerably decreased with decreasing Ti + Al content in superalloy 2 (with a composition of γ - 7.6wt% (Ti + Al), 1.5wt% Nb). Thus, it is predicted that the castability would improve for superalloy 2. The same trend was observed for superalloy 4 (with a composition of γ - 3.7wt% (Ti + Al), 4.4wt% Nb). This means that the amount of Laves increases with increasing Nb (to 4.4wt%) and decreasing Ti + Al (to 3.7wt%) in superalloy 4. The best castability was predicted for superalloy 3 (with a composition of γ - 5.7wt% (Ti + Al), 2.8wt% Nb).

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory code assessment of the Rocky Flats transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report is an assessment of the content codes associated with transuranic waste shipped from the Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado, to INEL. The primary objective of this document is to characterize and describe the transuranic wastes shipped to INEL from Rocky Flats by item description code (IDC). This information will aid INEL in determining if the waste meets the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The waste covered by this content code assessment was shipped from Rocky Flats between 1985 and 1989. These years coincide with the dates for information available in the Rocky Flats Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). The majority of waste shipped during this time was certified to the existing WIPP WAC. This waste is referred to as precertified waste. Reassessment of these precertified waste containers is necessary because of changes in the WIPP WAC. To accomplish this assessment, the analytical and process knowledge available on the various IDCs used at Rocky Flats were evaluated. Rocky Flats sources for this information include employee interviews, SWIMS, Transuranic Waste Certification Program, Transuranic Waste Inspection Procedure, Backlog Waste Baseline Books, WIPP Experimental Waste Characterization Program (headspace analysis), and other related documents, procedures, and programs. Summaries are provided of: (a) certification information, (b) waste description, (c) generation source, (d) recovery method, (e) waste packaging and handling information, (f) container preparation information, (g) assay information, (h) inspection information, (i) analytical data, and (j) RCRA characterization.

  20. Defense Transuranic Waste Program. Transuranic waste transportation assessment and guidance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-08-01

    The Transportation Assessment and Guidance Report (TAGR) is designed to provide DOE-managed defense sites with guidance and citable analyses addressing National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements for qualifying and transporting transuranic (TRU) wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico.

  1. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-12-14

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the quality assurance project plan (QAPP).

  2. Pre-1970 transuranic solid waste at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1995-05-23

    The document is based on a search of pre-1970 Hanford Solid Waste Records. The available data indicates seven out of thirty-one solid waste burial sites used for pre-1970 waste appear to be Transuranic (TRU). A burial site defined to be TRU contains >100 nCi/gm Transuranic nuclides.

  3. Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel cell by a newly isolated Shewanella marisflavi EP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jiexun [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). Hefei National Lab. for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences; State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources; Sun, Baolin [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). Hefei National Lab. for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences; Zhang, Xiaobo [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Coll. of Life Sciences; State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources

    2010-01-15

    Increasing the ionic strength of the electrolyte in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) can remarkably increase power output due to the reduction of internal resistance. However, only a few bacterial strains are capable of producing electricity at a very high ionic strength. In this report, we demonstrate a newly isolated strain EP1, belonging to Shewanella marisflavi based on polyphasic analysis, which could reduce Fe(III) and generate power at a high ionic strength of up to 1,488 mM (8% NaCl) using lactate as the electron donor. Using this bacterium, a measured maximum power density of 3.6 mW/m{sup 2} was achieved at an ionic strength of 291 mM. The maximum power density was increased by 167% to 9.6 mW/m{sup 2} when ionic strength was increased to 1,146 mM. However, further increasing the ionic strength to 1,488 mM resulted in a decrease in power density to 5.2 mW/m{sup 2}. Quantification of the internal resistance distribution revealed that electrolyte resistance was greatly reduced from 1,178 to 50 {omega} when ionic strength increased from 291 to 1,488 mM. These results indicate that isolation of specific bacterial strains can effectively improve power generation in some MFC applications. (orig.)

  4. Physical Properties of Hanford Transuranic Waste Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, John C.

    2005-06-01

    Equipment that was purchased in the abbreviated year 1 of this project has been used during year 2 to study the fundamental behavior of materials that simulate the behavior of the Hanford transuranic waste sludge. Two significant results have been found, and each has been submitted for publication. Both studies found non-DLVO behavior in simulant systems. These separate but related studies were performed concurrently. It was previously shown in Rassat et al.'s report Physical and Liquid Chemical Simulant Formulations for Transuranic Wastes in Hanford Single-Shell Tanks that colloidal clays behave similarly to transuranic waste sludge (PNNL-14333, National Technical Information Service, U.S. Dept. of Commerce). Rassat et al. also discussed the pH and salt content of actual waste materials. It was shown that these materials exist at high pHs, generally above 10, and at high salt content, approximately 1.5 M from a mixture of different salts. A type of clay commonly studied, due to its uniformity, is a synthetic hectorite, Laponite. Therefore the work performed over the course of the last year was done mainly using suspensions of Laponite at high pH and involving high salt concentrations. One study was titled ''Relating Clay Rheology to Colloidal Parameters''. It has been submitted to the Journal of Colloid and INterface Science and is currently in the review process. The idea was to gain the ability to use measurable quantities to predict the flow behavior of clay systems, which should be similar to transuranic waste sludge. Leong et al. had previously shown that the yield stress of colloidal slurries of titania and alumina could be predicted, given the measurement of the accessible parameter zeta potential (Leong YK et al. J Chem Soc Faraday Trans, 19 (1993) 2473). Colloidal clays have a fundamentally different morphology and surface charge distribution than the spheroidal, uniformly charged colloids previously studied. This study was

  5. Physical Properties of Hanford Transuranic Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, John C.

    2010-03-25

    The research described herein was undertaken to provide needed physical property descriptions of the Hanford transuranic tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging and transportation for disposal. The work addressed the development of a fundamental understanding of the types of systems represented by these sludge suspensions through correlation of the macroscopic rheological properties with particle interactions occurring at the colloidal scale in the various liquid media. The results of the work have advanced existing understanding of the sedimentation and aggregation properties of complex colloidal suspensions. Bench scale models were investigated with respect to their structural, colloidal and rheological properties that should be useful for the development and optimization of techniques to process the wastes at various DOE sites.

  6. Newly-generated Daliangshan Fault Zone—Shortcutting on the central section of Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IKEDA; Yasutaka; TOGO; Masayoshi; TAJIKARA; Masayoshi; ECHIGO; Tomoo; OKADA; Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    The Daliangshan fault zone is the eastern branch in the central section of Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system. It has been neglected for a long time, partly because of no destructive earthquake records along this fault zone. On the other hand, it is located on the remote and inaccessible plateau. So far it was excluded as part of the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system. Based on the interpretation of aerophotographs and field investigations, we document this fault zone in detail, and give an estimation of strike-slip rate about 3 mm/a in Late Quaternary together with age dating data. The results suggest that the Daliangshan fault zone is a newly-generated fault zone resulted from shortcutting in the central section of Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system because of the clockwise rotation of the Southeastern Tibetan Crustal Block, which is bounded by the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault system. Moreover, the shortcutting may make the Daliangshan fault zone replace the Anninghe and Zemuhe fault zones gradually, and finally, the later two fault zones will probably die out with the continuous clockwise rotation.

  7. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Sampling and Analysis Methods Manual (Methods Manual) provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP.

  8. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Sampling and Analysis Methods Manual (Methods Manual) provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP.

  9. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  10. Fusion solution to dispose of spent nuclear fuel, transuranic elements, and highly enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Yousry E-mail: gohar@anl.gov

    2001-11-01

    The disposal of the nuclear spent fuel, the transuranic elements, and the highly enriched uranium represents a major problem under investigation by the international scientific community to identify the most promising solutions. The investigation of this paper focused on achieving the top rated solution for the problem, the elimination goal, which requires complete elimination for the transuranic elements or the highly enriched uranium, and the long-lived fission products. To achieve this goal, fusion blankets with liquid carrier, molten salts or liquid metal eutectics, for the transuranic elements and the uranium isotopes are utilized. The generated energy from the fusion blankets is used to provide revenue for the system. The long-lived fission products are fabricated into fission product targets for transmutation utilizing the neutron leakage from the fusion blankets. This paper investigated the fusion blanket designs for small fusion devices and the system requirements for such application. The results show that 334 MW of fusion power from D-T plasma for 30 years with an availability factor of 0.75 can dispose of the 70,000 tons of the U.S. inventory of spent nuclear fuel generated up to the year 2015. In addition, this fusion solution eliminates the need for a geological repository site, which is a major advantage. Meanwhile, such utilization of the fusion power will provide an excellent opportunity to develop fusion energy for the future.

  11. Removal of technetium-99 from simulated Oak Ridge National Laboratory Newly-Generated Liquid Low-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, D.E.; Osborne, P.E.; Bunch, D.H.; Fellows, R.L.; Sellers, G.F.; Shoemaker, J.L.; Bowser, K.T. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Bostick, D.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We report laboratory investigations on treatment options for the removal of the radionuclide {sup 99}{Tc} (as the pertechnetate anion, {Tc}O{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) from simulated Oak Ridge National Laboratory Newly Generated Liquid Low-Level Waste. The waste stimulant is alkaline (pH 12-13), containing sodium carbonate ({approximately}0.10 mot/L) and sodium hydroxide ({approximately} 0.125 mol/L), plus a modest concentration of sodium nitrate ({approximately}0.06 mol/L). Several organic resin anion exchange media were tested; Dowex{trademark} 1-X-8 and Reillex{trademark} HPQ resins were notably effective (with equilibrium distribution coefficients {approximately}2,000 mL/g, as-received basis). We also tested steel wool as a reagent to chemically reduce and sorb {sup 99}Tc. At pH values above {approximately}10, the iron surface was passivated and became ineffective as a reagent for technetium; however, as the test solution pH value was adjusted to near-neutrality (e.g., pH 8-9), the steel was noted to be more effective than the organic resins tested. In dynamic flow conditions, steel wool packed in a column was noted to continuously leak {approximately}1--3% of the amount of {sup 99}{Tc} activity in the feed solution, although no additional increase in eluent activity was noted for the duration of the testing ({approximately}1200 bed volumes of {approximately}0.11 mg/L {sup 99}{Tc} flowed at a rate equivalent to {approximately}0.5 gal/min/ft{sup 2} of column cross sectional area). Although no breakthrough was noted (other than the 1--3 % continuous ``bleed`` noted previously) during the column operation ({approximately} 2 weeks), the steel in the column was deteriorated, causing plugging and erratic flow toward the end of the testing interval.

  12. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  13. Update on intrusive characterization of mixed contact-handled transuranic waste at Argonne-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwight, C.C.; Jensen, B.A.; Bryngelson, C.D.; Duncan, D.S.

    1997-02-03

    Argonne National Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company have jointly participated in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Characterization Program since 1990. Intrusive examinations have been conducted in the Waste Characterization Area, located at Argonne-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on over 200 drums of mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. This is double the number of drums characterized since the last update at the 1995 Waste Management Conference. These examinations have provided waste characterization information that supports performance assessment of WIPP and that supports Lockheed`s compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Operating philosophies and corresponding regulatory permits have been broadened to provide greater flexibility and capability for waste characterization, such as the provision for minor treatments like absorption, neutralization, stabilization, and amalgamation. This paper provides an update on Argonne`s intrusive characterization permits, procedures, results, and lessons learned. Other DOE sites that must deal with mixed contact-handled transuranic waste have initiated detailed planning for characterization of their own waste. The information presented herein could aid these other storage and generator sites in further development of their characterization efforts.

  14. Optimization of magnetite carrier precipitation process for transuranic waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, S.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Aase, S.A.; Babcock, B.D.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-12-31

    Transuranic (TRU) waste that is being generated at Argonne National Laboratory has a TRU activity ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 7} nCi/g with a wide variety of chemical compositions. Currently, the waste is stored in highly acidic solutions that must be neutralized for intermediate storage. A magnetite carrier precipitation process has been adapted to concentrate TRU isotopes in a noncorrosive solid phase. In this paper, the authors report the results of a series of laboratory tests done to optimize the process. The parameters they optimized included (1) magnetite concentration used to precipitate the TRUs from solution, (2) formation of magnetite (in situ or ex situ), (3) processing pH, and (4) temperature and mixing time of the carrier precipitation. They also studied the effects of anions, cations, and complexing agents in the waste solutions on the carrier precipitation and the effect of magnetite solids loading on the filtration equipment. An overview is given of the planned full-scale process, which will be operated in a glovebox.

  15. Characterization of intracellular dynamics of inoculated PrP-res and newly generated PrP(Sc) during early stage prion infection in Neuro2a cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Baron, Gerald S; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2014-02-01

    To clarify the cellular mechanisms for the establishment of prion infection, we analyzed the intracellular dynamics of inoculated and newly generated abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in Neuro2a cells. Within 24h after inoculation, the newly generated PrP(Sc) was evident at the plasma membrane, in early endosomes, and in late endosomes, but this PrP(Sc) was barely evident in lysosomes; in contrast, the majority of the inoculated PrP(Sc) was evident in late endosomes and lysosomes. However, during the subsequent 48 h, the newly generated PrP(Sc) increased remarkably in early endosomes and recycling endosomes. Overexpression of wild-type and mutant Rab proteins showed that membrane trafficking along not only the endocytic-recycling pathway but also the endo-lysosomal pathway is involved in de novo PrP(Sc) generation. These results suggest that the trafficking of exogenously introduced PrP(Sc) from the endo-lysosomal pathway to the endocytic-recycling pathway is important for the establishment of prion infection.

  16. De-Inventory Plan for Transuranic Waste Stored at Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Christensen, Davis V. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shepard, Mark D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-21

    This report describes the strategy and detailed work plan developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to disposition transuranic (TRU) waste stored at its Area G radioactive waste storage site. The focus at this time is on disposition of 3,706 m3 of TRU waste stored above grade by June 30, 2014, which is one of the commitments within the Framework Agreement: Realignment of Environmental Priorities between the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the State of New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), Reference 1. A detailed project management schedule has been developed to manage this work and better ensure that all required activities are aligned and integrated. The schedule was developed in conjunction with personnel from the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office (LASO), the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), the Central Characterization Project (CCP), and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). A detailed project management schedule for the remainder of the above grade inventory and the below grade inventory will be developed and incorporated into the De-Inventory Plan by December 31, 2012. This schedule will also include all newly-generated TRU waste received at Area G in FYs 2012 and 2013, which must be removed by no later than December 31, 2014, under the Framework Agreement. The TRU waste stored above grade at Area G is considered to be one of the highest nuclear safety risks at LANL, and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board has expressed concern for the radioactive material at risk (MAR) contained within the above grade TRU waste inventory and has formally requested that DOE reduce the MAR. A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned extensive areas west of LANL in late June and July 2011. Although there was minimal to no impact by the fire to LANL, the fire heightened public concern and news media attention on TRU waste storage at Area G. After the fire, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez also

  17. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, W.C.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-07-01

    This report outlines the sources, quantities, characteristics and treatment of transuranic wastes in the United States. This document serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of transuranic wastes, waste forms, waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present NRC waste management program. No attempt is made to evaluate or analyze the suitability of one technology over another. Indeed, by the nature of this report, there is little critical evaluation or analysis of technologies because such analysis is only appropriate when evaluating a particular application or transuranic waste streams. Due to fiscal restriction, the data base is developed from a myriad of technical sources and does not necessarily contain operating experience and the current status of all technologies. Such an effort was beyond the scope of this report.

  18. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRONIUM AND TRANSURANIC SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMALLEY CS

    2011-04-25

    In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

  19. Technical Evaluations of Proposed Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Characterization Requirements at WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Channell, J. K.

    2002-02-26

    Characterization, packaging, transport, handling and disposal of remotely handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste at WIPP will be different than similar operations with contact handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste. This paper presents results of technical evaluations associated with the planned disposal of remotely handled transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  20. Transuranic storage and assay facility interim safety basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porten, D.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-12

    The Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) Interim Safety Basis document provides the authorization basis for the interim operation and restriction on interim operations for the TRUSAF. The TRUSAF ISB demonstrates that the TRUSAF can be operated safely, protecting the workers, the public, and the environment. The previous safety analysis document TRUSAF Hazards Identification and Evaluation (WHC 1987) is superseded by this document.

  1. Transuranic contamination of stainless steel in nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Timothy; Banford, Anthony W.; Thompson, Olivia R.; Carey, Thomas; Schild, Dieter; Geist, Andreas; Sharrad, Clint A.

    2017-09-01

    Stainless steels coupons have been exposed to transuranic species in conditions representative of those found in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Stainless steel was prepared to different surface finishes and exposed to nitric acid of varying concentrations containing 237Np, 239Pu or 243Am for one month at 50 °C. Contamination by these transuranics has been observed on all surfaces exposed to the solution through the use of autoradiography. This technique showed that samples held in 4 M HNO3 bind 2-3 times as much radionuclide as those held in 10.5 M HNO3. It was also found that the polished steel surfaces generally took up more transuranic contamination than the etched and ;as received; steel finishes. The extent of corrosion on the steel surfaces was found, by scanning electron microscopy, to be greater in solutions containing Np and Pu in comparison to that observed from contact with Am containing solutions, indicating that redox activity of transuranics can influence the mechanism of stainless steel corrosion.

  2. Temporal and spacial relationships between PSA-NCAM-expressing, newly generated granule cells, and radial glia-like cells in the adult dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, T; Arai, Y

    1999-08-02

    The granule cell layer of the adult dentate gyrus possesses two characteristics of an immature nervous system. The first is that granule cells continue to be generated in the innermost region of the granule cell layer, and newly generated and developing granule cells in the adult express highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). PSA-NCAM-expressing apical dendrites have dynamically unstable processes such as irregular shafts and many stick-like or fan-shaped fine processes. The second is that radial glia-like cells expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) remain in a similar region of the granular layer. The numbers of PSA-NCAM-expressing granule cells and GFAP-expressing radial glia-like cells show a parallel age-dependent decrease during aging. Moreover, by using confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy, we demonstrated that PSA-NCAM-expressing dendrites and GFAP-expressing radial processes are partly in contact with each other, and occasionally the radial glial processes envelop the PSA-NCAM-positive dendritic processes. The temporal and spatial relationship between the two immature elements suggests that the processes of the radial glia-like cells are closely associated with the dendritic growth of the newly generated granule cells in the adult dentate gyrus and that these two immature features of neurons and glia in the dentate gyrus diminish with age.

  3. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nixon, Archie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fife, Keith W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Arnold M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos

  4. Environmental aspects of the transuranics: a selected, annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, C.S.; Martin, F.M.; Faust, R.A. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This bibliography of 500 references is compiled from the Data Base on the Environmental Aspects of the Transuranics built to provide information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) of ERDA`s Nevada Operations Office. The general scope is environmental aspects of uranium and the transuranic elements, with emphasis on plutonium. Laboratory and field studies dealing with the effects of plutonium-239 on animals are highlighted in this bibliography. Supporting information on ecology of the Nevada Test Site and reviews on the effects of other radionuclides upon man and his environment has been included at the request of the NAEG. The references are arranged by subject category with first authors appearing alphabetically in each category. Indexes are given for author, geographic location, keywords, taxons, permuted title and publication description.

  5. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    KANEKO-ISHINO, Tomoko; ISHINO, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is “mammalian-specific genomic functions”, a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of “mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons”, based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes. PMID:26666304

  6. Solid waste transuranic storage and assay facility indoor air sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingel, L.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze samples of the indoor air at the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF), Westinghouse Hanford. A modified US EPA TO-14 methodology, using gas chromatography/mass spectrography, may be used for the collection and analysis of the samples. The information obtained will be used to estimate the total release of volatile organic compounds from TRUSAF to determine the need for air emmission permits.

  7. IMPROVEMENTS IN CONTAINER MANAGEMENT OF TRANSURANIC (TRU) AND LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORED AT THE CENTRAL WASTE COMPLEX (CWC) AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UYTIOCO EM

    2007-11-14

    The Central Waste Complex (CWC) is the interim storage facility for Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA) mixed waste, transuranic waste, transuranic mixed waste, low-level and low-level mixed radioactive waste at the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The majority of the waste stored at the facility is retrieved from the low-level burial grounds in the 200 West Area at the Site, with minor quantities of newly generated waste from on-site and off-site waste generators. The CWC comprises 18 storage buildings that house 13,000 containers. Each waste container within the facility is scanned into its location by building, module, tier and position and the information is stored in a site-wide database. As waste is retrieved from the burial grounds, a preliminary non-destructive assay is performed to determine if the waste is transuranic (TRU) or low-level waste (LLW) and subsequently shipped to the CWC. In general, the TRU and LLW waste containers are stored in separate locations within the CWC, but the final disposition of each waste container is not known upon receipt. The final disposition of each waste container is determined by the appropriate program as process knowledge is applied and characterization data becomes available. Waste containers are stored within the CWC based on their physical chemical and radiological hazards. Further segregation within each building is done by container size (55-gallon, 85-gallon, Standard Waste Box) and waste stream. Due to this waste storage scheme, assembling waste containers for shipment out of the CWC has been time consuming and labor intensive. Qualitatively, the ratio of containers moved to containers in the outgoing shipment has been excessively high, which correlates to additional worker exposure, shipment delays, and operational inefficiencies. These inefficiencies impacted the LLW Program's ability to meet commitments established by the Tri-Party Agreement, an agreement between the State

  8. ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' LEARY, GERALD A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-04

    One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) most significant risks is the site's inventory of transuranic waste retrievably stored above and below-ground in Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, particularly the dispersible high-activity waste stored above-ground in deteriorating facilities. The high activity waste represents approximately 50% (by activity) of the total 292,000 PE-Ci inventory remaining to be disposed. The transuramic waste inventory includes contact-handled and remote-handled waste packaged in drums, boxes, and oversized containers which are retrievably stored both above and below-ground. Although currently managed as transuranic waste, some of the inventory is low-level waste that can be disposed onsite or at approved offsite facilities. Dispositioning the transuranic waste inventory requires retrieval of the containers from above and below-ground storage, examination and repackaging or remediation as necessary, characterization, certification and loading for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad New Mexico, all in accordance with well-defined requirements and controls. Although operations are established to process and characterize the lower-activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, LAN L does not currently have the capability to repack high activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers (> 56 PE-Ci) or to process oversized containers with activity levels over 0.52 PE-Ci. Operational issues and compliance requirements have resulted in less than optimal processing capabilities for lower activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, limiting preparation and reducing dependability of shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Since becoming the Los Alamos National Laboratory contract in June 2006, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) L.L.C. has developed a comprehensive, integrated plan to effectively and efficiently disposition the transuranic waste inventory, working in concert with

  9. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

    2010-02-01

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

  10. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - HANDSS-55 TRANSURANIC WASTE REPACKAGING MODULE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-08-31

    The Transuranic waste generated at the Savannah River Site from nuclear weapons research, development, and production is currently estimated to be over 10,000 cubic meters. Over half of this amount is stored in 55-gallon drums. The waste in drums is primarily job control waste and equipment generated as the result of routine maintenance performed on the plutonium processing operations. Over the years that the drums have been accumulating, the regulatory definitions of materials approved for disposal have changed. Consequently, many of the drums now contain items that are not approved for disposal at DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The HANDSS-55 technology is being developed to allow remote sorting of the items in these drums and then repackaging of the compliant items for disposal at WIPP.

  11. Inventory and sources of transuranic solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    In the past, solid radioactive waste has often been buried in the most accessible and convenient vacant place, without a great deal of thought for the long-term consequences. The transuranium (TRU) elements were very strictly conserved and, at first, solid waste containing separated fission products was not a serious land burial problem. Wartime pressures for production and lack of knowledge or understanding led to siting and operational practices that, in many situations, are unsatisfactory by present day standards. Purpose of this report is to support the development of standards and criteria which will specifically address the problem of TRU contaminated waste generated by Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear programs and commercial application of nuclear technology. This report covers: DOE facilities, commercial disposal sites, commercial nuclear industry, TRU-contaminated waste inventory, and waste projections. (DLC)

  12. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, K M

    2000-01-01

    From 1970 to 1987, TRU and suspect TRU wastes at Hanford were placed in the SWBG. At the time of placement in the SWBG these wastes were not regulated under existing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations, since they were generated and disposed of prior to the effective date of RCRA at the Hanford Site (1987). From the standpoint of DOE Order 5820.2A1, the TRU wastes are considered retrievably stored, and current plans are to retrieve these wastes for shipment to WIPP for disposal. This plan provides a strategy for the Phase I retrieval that meets the intent of TPA milestone M-91 and Project W-113, and incorporates the lessons learned during TRU retrieval campaigns at Hanford, LANL, and SRS. As in the original Project W-113 plans, the current plan calls for examination of approximately 10,000 suspect-TRU drums located in the 218-W-4C burial ground followed by the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Unlike the older plan, however, this plan proposes an open-air retrieval ...

  13. MANAGING THE RETRIEVAL RISK OF BURIED TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE WITH UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WOJTASEK, R.D.; GADD, R.R.; GREENWELL, R.D.

    2006-01-19

    United States-Department of Energy (DOE) sites that store transuranic (TRU) waste are almost certain to encounter waste packages with characteristics that are so unique as to warrant special precautions for retrieval. At the Hanford Site, a subgroup of stored TRU waste (12 drums) had special considerations due to the radioactive source content of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}), and the potential for high heat generation, pressurization, criticality, and high radiation. These characteristics bear on the approach to safely retrieve, overpack, vent, store, and transport the waste package. Because of the potential risk to personnel, contingency planning for unexpected conditions played an effective role in work planning and in preparing workers for the field inspection activity. As a result, the integrity inspections successfully confirmed waste package configuration and waste confinement without experiencing any perturbations due to unanticipated packaging conditions. This paper discusses the engineering and field approach to managing the risk of retrieving TRU waste with unique characteristics.

  14. Nondestructive boxed transuranic (TRU) waste assay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, John T.; Jones, Stephanie A.; Lucero, Randy F.

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of boxed waste assay systems (primarily those developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) is presented. The characteristics and design process involved with current generation systems--as practiced by BII--are also discussed in some detail. Finally, a specific boxed waste assay system and acceptance test results are presented. This system was developed by BII and installed at the Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility in Hanford, Washington in early 1997. The WRAP system combines imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) techniques with gamma- ray energy analysis (GEA) to assay crates up to 2.5 m X 2.5 m X 6.5 m in size. (Systems that incorporate both these methodologies are usually denoted IPAN/GEA types.) Two separate gamma-ray measurements are accomplished utilizing 16 arrayed NaI detectors and a moveable HPGe detector, while 3He detectors acquire both active and passive neutron data. These neutron measurements use BII's proprietary imaging methodology. Acceptance testing of the system was conducted at Hanford in January 1998. The system's operating performance was evaluated based on accuracy and sensitivity requirements for three different matrix types. Test results indicate an average 13% active mode accuracy for 10 nCi/g loadings of Pu waste and 5% passive mode accuracy for 10 g loadings of Pu waste. Sensitivity testing demonstrated an active mode lower limit of detection of less than 5 nCi/g of 239Pu for the medium matrix and less than 20 pCi/g of fission and activation products at 3(sigma) above background.

  15. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  16. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    2000-09-28

    From 1970 to 1987, TRU and suspect TRU wastes at Hanford were placed in the SWBG. At the time of placement in the SWBG these wastes were not regulated under existing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations, since they were generated and disposed of prior to the effective date of RCRA at the Hanford Site (1987). From the standpoint of DOE Order 5820.2A1, the TRU wastes are considered retrievably stored, and current plans are to retrieve these wastes for shipment to WIPP for disposal. This plan provides a strategy for the Phase I retrieval that meets the intent of TPA milestone M-91 and Project W-113, and incorporates the lessons learned during TRU retrieval campaigns at Hanford, LANL, and SRS. As in the original Project W-113 plans, the current plan calls for examination of approximately 10,000 suspect-TRU drums located in the 218-W-4C burial ground followed by the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Unlike the older plan, however, this plan proposes an open-air retrieval scenario similar to those used for TRU drum retrieval at LANL and SRS. Phase I retrieval consists of the activities associated with the assessment of approximately 10,000 55-gallon drums of suspect TRU-waste in burial ground 218-W-4C and the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Four of the trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 1, 4, 20, and 29) are prime candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain large numbers of suspect TRU drums, stacked from 2 to 5 drums high, on an asphalt pad. In fact, three of the trenches (Trenches 1 , 20, and 29) contain waste that has not been covered with soil, and about 1500 drums can be retrieved without excavation. The other three trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 7, 19, and 24) are not candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain significant numbers of boxes. Drums will be retrieved from the four candidate trenches, checked for structural integrity, overpacked, if necessary, and assayed at the burial

  17. The waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository: A case study in radioactive waste disposal safety and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Leif G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) repository in the United States was certified on the 13 of May 1998 and opened on the 26 of March 1999. Two sets of safety/performance assessment calculations supporting the certification of the WIPP TRUW repository show that the maximum annual individual committed effective dose will be 32 times lower than the regulatory limit and that the cumulative amount of radionuclide releases will be at least 10 times, more likely at least 20 times, lower than the regulatory limits. Yet, perceptions remain among the public that the WIPP TRUW repository imposes an unacceptable risk.

  18. Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-23

    This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

  19. Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of transuranic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kevin S; Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-09-01

    We have developed the Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) system for transuranic materials. The ARPES transuranic system is an endstation upgrade to the Laser Plasma Light Source (LPLS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The LPLS is a tunable light source for photoemission with a photon energy range covering the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft x-ray regions (27-140 eV). The LPLS was designed and developed for transuranic materials. Transuranic photoemission is currently not permitted at the public synchrotrons worldwide in the VUV energy range due to sample encapsulation requirements. With the addition of the ARPES capability to the LPLS system there is an excellent opportunity to explore new details centered on the electronic structure of actinide and transuranic materials.

  20. Cellular and molecular characterization of multipolar Map5-expressing cells: a subset of newly generated, stage-specific parenchymal cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions.

  1. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suermann, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits.

  2. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-12-06

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and includes test methods, details of planned waste sampling and analysis, and a description of the waste characterization and verification process. In addition, the QAPjP includes a description of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements for the waste characterization program. Before TRU waste is shipped to the WIPP site by the TRU Project, all applicable requirements of the QAPjP shall be implemented. Additional requirements necessary for transportation to waste disposal at WIPP can be found in the ''Quality Assurance Program Document'' (DOE 1999b) and HNF-2600, ''Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan.'' TRU mixed waste contains both TRU radioactive and hazardous components, as defined in the WLPP-WAP. The waste is designated and separately packaged as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH), based on the radiological dose rate at the surface of the waste container. RH TRU wastes are not currently shipped to the WIPP facility.

  3. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suermann, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits.

  4. Transuranic waste baseline inventory report. Revision No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties from across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system into a series of {open_quotes}waste profiles{close_quotes} that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The purpose of Revisions 0 and 1 of this report was to provide data to be included in the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) performance assessment (PA) processes for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revision 2 of the document expanded the original purpose and was also intended to support the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) requirement for providing the total DOE TRU waste inventory. The document included a chapter and an appendix that discussed the total DOE TRU waste inventory, including nondefense, commercial, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-contaminated, and buried (predominately pre-1970) TRU wastes that are not planned to be disposed of at WIPP.

  5. Transcriptional Profiling of Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells Using TU Tagging Reveals Pattern Shifts in Gene Expression during Circuit Integration1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzi, Christina; Shen, Rongkun; Goodman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite representing only a small fraction of hippocampal granule cells, adult-generated newborn granule cells have been implicated in learning and memory (Aimone et al., 2011). Newborn granule cells undergo functional maturation and circuit integration over a period of weeks. However, it is difficult to assess the accompanying gene expression profiles in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution using traditional methods. Here we used a novel method [“thiouracil (TU) tagging”] to map the profiles of nascent mRNAs in mouse immature newborn granule cells compared with mature granule cells. We targeted a nonmammalian uracil salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, to newborn neurons and mature granule cells using retroviral and lentiviral constructs, respectively. Subsequent injection of 4-TU tagged nascent RNAs for analysis by RNA sequencing. Several hundred genes were significantly enhanced in the retroviral dataset compared with the lentiviral dataset. We compared a selection of the enriched genes with steady-state levels of mRNAs using quantitative PCR. Ontology analysis revealed distinct patterns of nascent mRNA expression, with newly generated immature neurons showing enhanced expression for genes involved in synaptic function, and neural differentiation and development, as well as genes not previously associated with granule cell maturation. Surprisingly, the nascent mRNAs enriched in mature cells were related to energy homeostasis and metabolism, presumably indicative of the increased energy demands of synaptic transmission and their complex dendritic architecture. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our modified TU-tagging method provides a foundation for comparison with steady-state RNA analyses by traditional transcriptomic approaches in defining the functional roles of newborn neurons. PMID:27011954

  6. Use of alpha spectroscopy for conducting rapid surveys of transuranic activity on air sample filters and smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robert B; Peña, Adan M; Goff, Thomas E

    2005-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the utility of a portable alpha Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) as a bench top scalar counter for multiple sample types. These include using the CAM to count fixed air sample filters and radiological smears. In counting radiological smears, the CAM is used very much like a gas flow proportional counter (GFPC), albeit with a lower efficiency. Due to the typically low background in this configuration, the minimum detectable activity for a 5-min count should be in the range of about 10 dpm which is acceptably below the 20 dpm limit for transuranic isotopes. When counting fixed air sample filters, the CAM algorithm along with other measurable characteristics can be used to identify and quantify the presence of transuranic isotopes in the samples. When the radiological control technician wants to take some credit from naturally occurring radioactive material contributions due to radon progeny producing higher energy peaks (as in the case with a fixed air sample filter), then more elaborate techniques are required. The techniques presented here will generate a decision level of about 43 dpm for such applications. The calibration for this application should alternatively be done using the default values of channels 92-126 for region of interest 1. This can be done within 10 to 15 min resulting in a method to rapidly evaluate air filters for transuranic activity. When compared to the 1-h count technique described by , the technique presented in the present work demonstrates a technique whereby more than two thirds of samples can be rapidly shown (within 10 to 15 min) to be within regulatory compliant limits. In both cases, however, spectral quality checks are required to insure sample self attenuation is not a significant bias in the activity estimates. This will allow the same level of confidence when using these techniques for activity quantification as is presently available for air monitoring activity quantification using CAMs.

  7. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-03-11

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  8. Vitrification of transuranic and beta-gamma contaminated solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    Vitrification of solid transuranic contaminated (TRU) wastes alone and with high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) was studied. Homogeneous glasses containing 20 to 30 wt % ash were made by using glass frits previously developed at the Savannah River Plant and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. If the ash is vitrified along with the HLLW, 1.0 wt % as can be added to the waste forms without affecting their quality. This loading of ash is well above the loading required by the relative amounts of HLLW and TRU ash that will be processed at the Savannah River Plant. Vitrification of TRU-contaminated electropolishing sludges and high efficiency particular air filter materials along with HLLW would require an increase in the quantity of glass to be produced. However, if these TRU-contaminated solids were vitrified with the HLLW, the addition of low-level beta-gamma contaminated ash would require no further increase in glass production.

  9. In situ quantitative determination of transuranic elements in areas of high-level gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Wogman, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is described for passive neutron monitoring of transuranic elements. The method provides quantitative determinations of transuranic element concentrations in a variety of field situations where no other measurement method is possible. The technique can measure concentrations of transuranic oxides as low as 8 nCi/cm/sup 3/ and is capable of operating in gamma radiation fields up to megarads per hour. Information on chemical and isotopic composition can also be obtained from the data. Several successful applications of the technique are discussed.

  10. Molten salt extraction of transuranic and reactive fission products from used uranium oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2014-05-27

    Used uranium oxide fuel is detoxified by extracting transuranic and reactive fission products into molten salt. By contacting declad and crushed used uranium oxide fuel with a molten halide salt containing a minor fraction of the respective uranium trihalide, transuranic and reactive fission products partition from the fuel to the molten salt phase, while uranium oxide and non-reactive, or noble metal, fission products remain in an insoluble solid phase. The salt is then separated from the fuel via draining and distillation. By this method, the bulk of the decay heat, fission poisoning capacity, and radiotoxicity are removed from the used fuel. The remaining radioactivity from the noble metal fission products in the detoxified fuel is primarily limited to soft beta emitters. The extracted transuranic and reactive fission products are amenable to existing technologies for group uranium/transuranic product recovery and fission product immobilization in engineered waste forms.

  11. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the environment at accident sites, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, A.C.; Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M. [and others

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. The authors intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions. An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of the literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments.

  12. In-line Kevlar filters for microfiltration of transuranic-containing liquid streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G J; Beddingfield, D H; Lieberman, J L; Curtis, J M; Ficklin, A C

    1992-06-01

    The Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant has numerous ongoing efforts to minimize the generation of residue and waste and to improve safety and health. Spent polypropylene liquid filters held for plutonium recovery, known as "residue," or as transuranic mixed waste contribute to storage capacity problems and create radiation safety and health considerations. An in-line process-liquid filter made of Kevlar polymer fiber has been evaluated for its potential to: (1) minimize filter residue, (2) recover economically viable quantities of plutonium, (3) minimize liquid storage tank and process-stream radioactivity, and (4) reduce potential personnel radiation exposure associated with these sources. Kevlar filters were rated to less than or equal to 1 mu nominal filtration and are capable of reducing undissolved plutonium particles to more than 10 times below the economic discard limit, however produced high back-pressures and are not yet acid resistant. Kevlar filters performed independent of loaded particles serving as a sieve. Polypropylene filters removed molybdenum particles at efficiencies equal to Kevlar filters only after loading molybdenum during recirculation events. Kevlars' high-efficiency microfiltration of process-liquid streams for the removal of actinides has the potential to reduce personnel radiation exposure by a factor of 6 or greater, while simultaneously achieving a reduction in the generation of filter residue and waste by a factor of 7. Insoluble plutonium may be recoverable from Kevlar filters by incineration.

  13. Full-scale retrieval of simulated buried transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentich, D.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the results of a field test conducted to determine the effectiveness of using conventional type construction equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic (TRU) waste. A cold (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) test pit (1,100 yd{sup 3} volume) was constructed with boxes and drums filled with simulated waste materials, such as metal, plastic, wood, concrete, and sludge. Large objects, including truck beds, tanks, vaults, pipes, and beams, were also placed in the pit. These materials were intended to simulate the type of wastes found in TRU buried waste pits and trenches. A series of commercially available equipment items, such as excavators and tracked loaders outfitted with different end effectors, were used to remove the simulated waste. Work was performed from both the abovegrade and belowgrade positions. During the demonstration, a number of observations, measurements, and analyses were performed to determine which equipment was the most effective in removing the waste. The retrieval rates for the various excavation techniques were recorded. The inherent dust control capabilities of the excavation methods used were observed. The feasibility of teleoperating reading equipment was also addressed.

  14. Safer Transportation and Disposal of Remote Handled Transuranic Waste - 12033

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Vicente; Timm, Christopher M.; Fox, Jerry V. [PECOS Management Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Since disposal of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) began in 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) has had difficulty meeting the plans and schedule for disposing this waste. PECOS Management Services, Inc. (PECOS) assessed the feasibility of proposed alternate RH-TRU mixed waste containerisation concepts that would enhance the transportation rate of RH-TRU waste to WIPP and increase the utilization of available WIPP space capacity for RH-TRU waste disposal by either replacing or augmenting current and proposed disposal methods. In addition engineering and operational analyses were conducted that addressed concerns regarding criticality, heat release, and worker exposure to radiation. The results of the analyses showed that the concept, development, and use of a concrete pipe based design for an RH-TRU waste shipping and disposal container could be potentially advantageous for disposing a substantial quantity of RHTRU waste at WIPP in the same manner as contact-handled RH waste. Additionally, this new disposal method would eliminate the hazard associated with repackaging this waste in other containers without the requirement for NRC approval for a new shipping container. (authors)

  15. Promises and Challenges of Thorium Implementation for Transuranic Transmutation - 13550

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.; Wenner, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Lindley, B. [University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fiorina, C. [Polytechnic of Milan (Italy); Phillips, C. [Energy Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper focuses on the challenges of implementing a thorium fuel cycle for recycle and transmutation of long-lived actinide components from used nuclear fuel. A multi-stage reactor system is proposed; the first stage consists of current UO{sub 2} once-through LWRs supplying transuranic isotopes that are continuously recycled and burned in second stage reactors in either a uranium (U) or thorium (Th) carrier. The second stage reactors considered for the analysis are Reduced Moderation Pressurized Water Reactors (RMPWRs), reconfigured from current PWR core designs, and Fast Reactors (FRs) with a burner core design. While both RMPWRs and FRs can in principle be employed, each reactor and associated technology has pros and cons. FRs have unmatched flexibility and transmutation efficiency. RMPWRs have higher fuel manufacturing and reprocessing requirements, but may represent a cheaper solution and the opportunity for a shorter time to licensing and deployment. All options require substantial developments in manufacturing, due to the high radiation field, and reprocessing, due to the very high actinide recovery ratio to elicit the claimed radiotoxicity reduction. Th reduces the number of transmutation reactors, and is required to enable a viable RMPWR design, but presents additional challenges on manufacturing and reprocessing. The tradeoff between the various options does not make the choice obvious. Moreover, without an overarching supporting policy in place, the costly and challenging technologies required inherently discourage industrialization of any transmutation scheme, regardless of the adoption of U or Th. (authors)

  16. Non-Destructive Assay of Curium Contaminated Transuranic Waste Drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, L.A.

    1998-11-01

    At the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a series of non-destructive assays were performed on five transuranic waste (TRU) drums containing non-plutonium scrap metal that was potentially contaminated with weapons grade plutonium and trace quantities of curium. Typically, waste drums containing metal matrices are assayed for plutonium content using passive neutron coincidence counting techniques. The presence of trace quantities of Cm-244 prevents this type of analysis because of the strong coincidence signal created by spontaneous fission of Cm-244. To discriminate between the plutonium and curium materials present, an active neutron measurement technique was used. A Cf shuffler designed for measurement of uranium bearing materials was calibrated for plutonium in the active mode. The waste drums were then assayed for plutonium content in the shuffler using the active-mode calibration. The curium contamination levels were estimated from the difference between the active-mode measurement in the shuffler and a passive assay in a neutron coincidence counter. Far field gamma-ray measurements were made to identify additional radioactive contaminants and to corroborate the plutonium measurement results obtained from the active-mode assay. This report describes in detail the measurement process used for characterization of these waste drums. The measurement results and the estimated uncertainty will be presented.

  17. Transuranics Transmutation Using Neutrons Spectrum from Spallation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Gilberti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to analyse the neutron spectrum influence in a hybrid system ADS-fission inducing transuranics (TRUs transmutation. A simple model consisting of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical (ADS system containing spallation target, moderator or coolant, and spheres of actinides, “fuel,” at different locations in the system was modelled. The simulation was performed using the MCNPX 2.6.0 particles transport code evaluating capture (n,γ and fission (n,f reactions, as well as the burnup of actinides. The goal is to examine the behaviour and influences of the hard neutron spectrum from spallation reactions in the transmutation, without the contribution or interference of multiplier subcritical medium, and compare the results with those obtained from the neutron fission spectrum. The results show that the transmutation efficiency is independent of the spallation target material used, and the neutrons spectrum from spallation does not contribute to increased rates of actinides transmutation even in the vicinity of the target.

  18. Large-area proportional counter for in situ transuranic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Improved methods for site characterization are desired for environmental restoration at nuclear facilities. Measurements of transuranics, in particular several isotopes of plutonium, are especially difficult due to the low penetrating nature of the radiations involved, namely, alpha particles and X rays. The effects of attenuation by soil and vegetation generally render direct alpha survey methods useless. For this reason, thin scintillators, such as the FIDLER (field instrument for detection of low-energy radiation) or its more sophisticated successor, the VIOLINIST, that rely on the detection of the L shell X rays (13 to 21 keV) are used for survey work. Semiconductor detectors (germanium and silicon), used singly or in arrays, can be effective, especially for situations where {sup 241}Am (60 keV) is present in the isotropic mix. In principle, in situ spectrometric techniques that have been successfully applied at higher photon energies for the measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the environment can be extended to the X-ray region as well. For situations where {sup 241}Am is not present or its ratio to plutonium is unknown, an alternative detector that we have explored for in situ X-ray spectrometry is a large-area proportional counter (LAPC). These instruments were developed for X-ray astronomical measurements in space and offer the combination of large window area and medium energy resolution. Smaller versions have also been used for lung counting.

  19. Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

    2013-12-01

    The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

  20. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste - transuranics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.; Scott, P.A.; Bray, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    At the Hanford Plutonium and Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX), in Richland, Washington, plutonium and uranium products are recovered from irradiated fuel by a solvent extraction process. A byproduct of this process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste (CAW), is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks (DSTs) on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant located nearby. In B-Plant, the transuranic (TRU) elements in NCAW are separated from the non-TRU elements. The majority of the TRU elements in NCAW are in the solids. Therefore, the primary processing operation is to separate the NCAW solids (NCAW-TRU) from the NCAW liquid. These two waste streams will be pumped to suitable holding tanks before being further processed for permanent disposal. To ensure that the retrieval and transportation of NCAW and NCAW-TRU are successful, researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the rheological and transport properties of the slurries. This evaluation had two phases. First, researchers conducted laboratory rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW and NCAW-TRU. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. This scale-up procedure has already been successfully used to predict the critical transport properties of a slurry (Neutralized Cladding Removal Waste) with rheological properties similar to those displayed by NCAW and NCAW-TRU.

  1. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W. Udo [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-28

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the “boiling” and “vaporization” of atomic nuclei, but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, “head-on” collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (“neck”) between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  2. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W. Udo [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-28

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the “boiling” and “vaporization” of atomic nuclei but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, “head-on” collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (“neck”) between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  3. Hanford Site Hazardous waste determination report for transuranic debris waste streams NPFPDL2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WINTERHALDER, J.A.

    1999-09-29

    This hazardous waste determination report (Report) describes the process and information used on the Hanford Site to determine that waste stream number NPFPDLZA, consisting of 30 containers of contact-handled transuranic debris waste, is not hazardous waste regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. For a waste to be hazardous under these statutes, the waste either must be specifically listed as a hazardous waste, or exhibit one or more of the characteristics of a hazardous waste, Le., ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity. Waste stream NPFPDLZA was generated, packaged, and placed into storage between 1993 and 1997. Extensive knowledge of the waste generating process, facility operational history, and administrative controls and operating procedures in effect at the time of generation, supported the initial nonhazardous waste determination. Because of the extent and reliability of information pertaining to this waste type, and the total volume of waste in the debris matrix parameter category, the Hanford Site is focusing initial efforts on this and similar waste streams for the first shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). RCRA regulations authorize hazardous waste determinations to be made either by using approved sampling and analysis methods or by applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or the process(es) used. This latter approach typically is referred to as process knowledge. The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) for WIPP refers to acceptable knowledge in essentially the same terms; acceptable knowledge as used throughout this Report is synonymous with the term process knowledge. The 30 containers addressed in this Report were characterized by the following methods: Acceptable knowledge; Nondestructive examination using real-time radiography; Visual examination; and Headspace gas sampling and analysis. The initial

  4. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Chen, Xuanmao; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs), the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ), however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  5. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Luo

    Full Text Available The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3 is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs, the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB, remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ, however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  6. Review of the WIPP draft application to show compliance with EPA transuranic waste disposal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Clemo, T.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The EEG was established in 1978 with funds provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to the State of New Mexico. Public Law 100-456, the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989, Section 1433, assigned EEG to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and continued the original contract DE-AC04-79AL10752 through DOE contract DE-AC04-89AL58309. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, continues the authorization. EEG performs independent technical analyses of the suitability of the proposed site; the design of the repository, its planned operation, and its long-term integrity; suitability and safety of the transportation systems; suitability of the Waste Acceptance Criteria and the generator sites` compliance with them; and related subjects. These analyses include assessments of reports issued by the DOE and its contractors, other federal agencies and organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP. Another important function of EEG is the independent environmental monitoring of background radioactivity in air, water, and soil, both on-site and off-site.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant transuranic wastes experimental characterization program: executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1978-11-01

    A general overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant transuranic wastes experimental characterization program is presented. Objectives and outstanding concerns of this program are discussed. Characteristics of transuranic wastes are also described. Concerns for the terminal isolation of such wastes in a deep bedded salt facility are divided into two phases, those during the short-term operational phase of the facility, and those potentially occurring in the long-term, after decommissioning of the repository. An inclusive summary covering individual studies, their importance to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, investigators, general milestones, and comments are presented.

  8. Automation of ORIGEN2 calculations for the transuranic waste baseline inventory database using a pre-processor and a post-processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscum-Powell, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Safety and Systems Analysis

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the work described in this report was to automate ORIGEN2 calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (WTWBID); this was done by developing a pre-processor to generate ORIGEN2 input files from WWBID inventory files and a post-processor to remove excess information from the ORIGEN2 output files. The calculations performed with ORIGEN2 estimate the radioactive decay and buildup of various radionuclides in the waste streams identified in the WTWBID. The resulting radionuclide inventories are needed for performance assessment calculations for the WIPP site. The work resulted in the development of PreORG, which requires interaction with the user to generate ORIGEN2 input files on a site-by-site basis, and PostORG, which processes ORIGEN2 output into more manageable files. Both programs are written in the FORTRAN 77 computer language. After running PreORG, the user will run ORIGEN2 to generate the desired data; upon completion of ORIGEN2 calculations, the user can run PostORG to process the output to make it more manageable. All the programs run on a 386 PC or higher with a math co-processor or a computer platform running under VMS operating system. The pre- and post-processors for ORIGEN2 were generated for use with Rev. 1 data of the WTWBID and can also be used with Rev. 2 and 3 data of the TWBID (Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database).

  9. PROJECT STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDIATION AND DISPOSITION OF LEGACY TRANSURANIC WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, South Carolina, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.

    2010-12-17

    This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006 to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing

  10. Process Description for the Retrieval of Earth Covered Transuranic (TRU) Waste Containers at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DEROSA, D.C.

    2000-01-13

    This document describes process and operational options for retrieval of the contact-handled suspect transuranic waste drums currently stored below grade in earth-covered trenches at the Hanford Site. Retrieval processes and options discussed include excavation, container retrieval, venting, non-destructive assay, criticality avoidance, incidental waste handling, site preparation, equipment, and shipping.

  11. Using Downhole Probes to Locate and Characterize Buried Transuranic and Mixed Low Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, Donald K; Bramblett, Richard L; Hertzog, Russel C

    2012-06-25

    Borehole logging probes were developed and tested to locate and quantify transuranic elements in subsurface disposal areas and in contaminated sites at USDOE Weapons Complex sites. A new method of measuring very high levels of chlroine in the subsurface was developed using pulsed neutron technology from oilfield applications. The probes were demonstrated at the Hanford site in wells containing plutonium and other contaminants.

  12. Biodetoxification of toxins generated from lignocellulose pretreatment using a newly isolated fungus, Amorphotheca resinae ZN1, and the consequent ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degradation of the toxic compounds generated in the harsh pretreatment of lignocellulose is an inevitable step in reducing the toxin level for conducting practical enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation processes. Various detoxification methods have been tried and many negative outcomes were found using these methods, such as the massive freshwater usage and wastewater generation, loss of the fine lignocellulose particles and fermentative sugars and incomplete removal of inhibitors. An alternate method, biodetoxification, which degrades the toxins as part of their normal metabolism, was considered a promising option for the removal of toxins without causing the above problems. Results A kerosene fungus strain, Amorphotheca resinae ZN1, was isolated from the microbial community growing on the pretreated corn stover material. The degradation of the toxins as well as the lignocelluloses-derived sugars was characterized in different ways, and the results show that A. resinae ZN1 utilized each of these toxins and sugars as the sole carbon sources efficiently and grew quickly on the toxins. It was found that the solid-state culture of A. resinae ZN1 on various pretreated lignocellulose feedstocks such as corn stover, wheat straw, rice straw, cotton stalk and rape straw degraded all kinds of toxins quickly and efficiently. The consequent simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation was performed at the 30% (wt/wt solid loading of the detoxified lignocellulosic feedstocks without a sterilization step, and the ethanol titer in the fermentation broth reached above 40 g/L using food crop residues as feedstocks. Conclusions The advantages of the present biodetoxification by A. resinae ZN1 over the known detoxification methods include zero energy input, zero wastewater generation, complete toxin degradation, processing on solid pretreated material, no need for sterilization and a wide lignocellulose feedstock spectrum

  13. COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

    2003-02-27

    Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the

  14. 高温气冷堆和轻水堆超铀元素管理特性研究%Management Feature of Transuranic for HTGR and LWR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    位金锋; 李富; 孙玉良

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived actinides from spent fuels can cause potential long-term environmental hazards.The generation and incineration of transuranic in different closed fuel cycles were studied.U and Pu were recycled from spent fuel in the 250 MW hightemperature gas-cooled reactor-pebble-bed-module (HTR-PM) U-Pu fuelled core,and then PuO2 and MOX fuel elements were designed based on this recycled U and Pu.These fuel elements were used to build up a new PuO2 or MOX fuelled core with the same geometry of the original reactor.Characteristics of transuranic incineration with HTGR open and closed fuel cycles were studied with VSOP code,and the corresponding results from the light water reactor were compared and analyzed.The transuranic generation with HTGR open fuel cycle is almost half of the corresponding result of the light water reactor.Thus,HTGR closed fuel cycles can effectively burn transuranic.%乏燃料中长寿命锕系元素对环境造成长期潜在危害,本文研究球床高温气冷堆不同燃料循环中超铀元素的产生和焚烧特性.在250 MW球床模块式高温气冷堆示范电站HTR-PM铀钚循环的乏燃料中提取铀和钚作为核燃料,设计了PuO2和MOX燃料元件,将新设计的燃料元件重新装入与HTR-PM相同结构和尺寸的堆芯,分别形成纯钚燃料循环和MOX燃料循环.采用高温气冷堆物理设计程序VSOP,研究了高温气冷堆一次通过燃料循环和不同闭式燃料循环的超铀元素焚烧特性,并与轻水堆燃料循环结果进行比较和分析.结果表明:高温气冷堆一次通过燃料循环超铀元素生成率约为轻水堆的1/2;高温气冷堆闭式燃料循环能有效嬗变超铀元素.

  15. High-energy deposits newly recognized in Hawaii Island (South Point): a catastrophic tsunami generated by South Kona or Kalae flank collapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, F. O.; Hildenbrand, A.; McMurtry, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Most of the population and economic activity on Earth is concentrated in coastal areas. Tsunamis, in particular, represent a major threat, because they can travel great distances and impact the far surrounding shorelines within a few hours and cause considerable damage. Two main geological processes can generate destructive tsunamis: (1) high-magnitude earthquakes within the oceans, mostly along active margins, which can generate long-wavelength, low amplitude waves; and (2) giant mass-movements, such as catastrophic flank failure at oceanic volcanoes, which can instantaneously mobilize great amounts of material (several hundreds of km3) and generate high amplitude, medium-wavelength tsunamis. The Hawaiian volcanic chain has been affected by the largest landslides on Earth. Big Island, especially, has faced several catastrophic episodes of flank destabilization, the number, the amplitude and the age of which remain controversial. Knowing that there were flank collapses in South Kona and Kalae, we went to South Point to look for onland evidence of the collapse(s) and related tsunami(s), and found a deposit composed of polygenetic clasts, from mm3 to several m3 in size, mostly angular to sub-rounded, with a sandy to silty matrix. The deposit is covered by pyroclasts (the Pahala ash?), which seem to have been locally remobilized to fill in the spaces in the underlying conglomeratic deposit. The absence of a continuous indurate cement precludes an inland origin for the sedimentary deposit. Moreover, the South Point deposit lies on a flat platform far from the main topographic relief of the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes. Emplacement of the ash layers covering the deposits requires a highly explosive eruption, which we attribute to pressure release driven by the collapse. Presently the deposit is lying at an altitude of ca. 10 m, but in the past it was higher, since the island has experienced significant ongoing subsidence. From previous estimates of the age of the

  16. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Advanced Test Reactor Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum TRA010029

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. R. Adams; R. P. Grant; P. R. Smith; J. L. Weisgerber

    2013-09-01

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of one drum containing contact-handled transuranic (TRU) actinide standards generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) for storage and subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for final disposal. The drum (i.e., Integrated Waste Tracking System Bar Code Number TRA010029) is currently stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex. The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and applicable sections of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and disposal of this TRU waste generated from ATR. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for this TRU waste originating from ATR.

  17. Synthesis of neutron-rich transuranic nuclei in fissile spallation targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mishustin, Igor; Pshenichnov, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A possibility of synthesizing neutron-reach super-heavy elements in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is considered. A dedicated software called Nuclide Composition Dynamics (NuCoD) was developed to model the evolution of isotope composition in the targets during a long-time irradiation by intense proton and deuteron beams. Simulation results show that transuranic elements up to Bk-249 can be produced in multiple neutron capture reactions in macroscopic quantities. However, the neutron flux achievable in a spallation target is still insufficient to overcome the so-called fermium gap. Further optimization of the target design, in particular, by including moderating material and covering it by a reflector will turn ADS into an alternative source of transuranic elements in addition to nuclear fission reactors.

  18. Environmental aspects of the transuranics: a selected, annotated bibliography. [Pu-238, Pu-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Martin, F.M.; Fore, C.S. (comps.)

    1977-03-01

    This eighth published bibliography of 427 references is compiled from the Nevada Applied Ecology Information Center's Data Base on the Environmental Aspects of the Transuranics. The data base was built to provide information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) of ERDA's Nevada Operations Office. The general scope covers environmental aspects of uranium and the transuranic elements, with emphasis on plutonium. This bibliography highlights literature on plutonium 238 and 239 and americium in the critical organs of man and animals. Supporting information on ecology of the Nevada Test Site and reviews and summarizing literature on other radionuclides have been included at the request of the NAEG. The references are arranged by subject category with leading authors appearing alphabetically in each category. Indexes are provided for author(s), geographic location, keyword(s), taxon, title, and publication description.

  19. Evaluation of alternative treatments for spent fuel rod consolidation wastes and other miscellaneous commercial transuranic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Oma, K.H.; Smith, R.I.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1986-05-01

    Eight alternative treatments (and four subalternatives) are considered for both existing commercial transuranic wastes and future wastes from spent fuel consolidation. Waste treatment is assumed to occur at a hypothetical central treatment facility (a Monitored Retrieval Storage facility was used as a reference). Disposal in a geologic repository is also assumed. The cost, process characteristics, and waste form characteristics are evaluated for each waste treatment alternative. The evaluation indicates that selection of a high-volume-reduction alternative can save almost $1 billion in life-cycle costs for the management of transuranic and high-activity wastes from 70,000 MTU of spent fuel compared to the reference MRS process. The supercompaction, arc pyrolysis and melting, and maximum volume reduction alternatives are recommended for further consideration; the latter two are recommended for further testing and demonstration.

  20. Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-18

    This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

  1. Behavior of a high-temperature gas reactor with transuranic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortini, A.; Pereira, C.; Sousa, R.V.; Veloso, M.A.F.; Costa, A.L.; Silva, C.A.; Cardoso, F.S., E-mail: fortini@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we modeled a high-temperature gas reactor, HTGR, of prismatic block type using the SCALE 6.0 code to analyze the use of transuranic fuel in these reactors. To represent the concept, the Japanese HTTR reactor was chosen. The fuels considered used transuranic elements from UREX+ reprocessing of burned PWR fuel spiked with depleted U or Th. The calculations, performed for typical temperatures of HTR reactors, showed that, in mixtures with the same percentage of fissile material, the initial effective multiplication factor, K{sub eff} , is higher in the mixtures containing Th than that with U. Comparisons between the two types of fuel were performed using fuel pairs with the same initial K{sub eff}. During burn-up, the two mixtures show a slow and practically equal decrease in K{sub eff}. For the same level of burnup, mixtures containing Th show greater effectiveness in burning transuranics and total plutonium when compared to corresponding mixtures with depleted U. (author)

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Transport Properties of Molten Transuranic Salt Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Austin; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    The Accelerator Research Laboratory at Texas A&M is proposing a revolutionary design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt (ADSMS), a system that destroys the transuranic elements in spent nuclear fuel. The transuranics are the most enduring hazard of nuclear power, since they contain high radiotoxicity and have half-lives of a thousand to a million years. The ADSMS core is fueled by a homogeneous chloride-based molten salt mixture containing the chlorides of the transuranics and NaCl. Knowledge of the density, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, etc. of the salt mixtures is needed to accurately model the complex ADSMS system. There is a lack of experimental data on the density and transport properties of such mixtures. Molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable ion potentials are used to determine the density and heat capacity of these melts as a function of temperature. Green-Kubo methods are employed to calculate the electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and viscosity of the salt using the outputs of the model. Results for pure molten salt systems are compared to experimental data when possible to validate the potentials used. Here we discuss potential salt systems, their neutronic behavior, and the calculated transport properties.

  3. Heat loading limits for solid transuranic wastes storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spatz, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    Heat loading limits have been established for four storage configurations of TRU wastes. The calculations were performed assuming the worst case scenario whereby all the heat generated within a drum was generated within one ``cut`` and that this cut was located in the very center of the drum. Poly-boxes containing one HEPA filter were assumed to have a uniform heat generation throughout the filter. The maximum allowable temperatures were based on the materials in the containers. A comparison between the drum center temperature for a uniform heat load distribution and for the center temperature when the heat load is confined to one cut in the center of the drum is also illustrated. This comparison showed that the heat load of a particular drum can be more than doubled by distributing the sources of heat uniformly throughout the container.

  4. Transmutation of present transuranics elements in the fuel nuclear radiated; Transmutacion de elementos transuranicos presentes en los combustible nucleares irradiados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Alvarez, F.; Blazquez, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Fernandez Ordonez, M.; Guerrero, C.; Martin-Fuertes, F.; Martinez, T.; Vicente, C.; Villamarin, D.

    2008-07-01

    This technical report of ENRESA refers to the transmutation of some transuranic elements, mainly plutonium and minor actinides (Np, Am and Cm). The transmutation of minor actinides (MA) could be efficiently made by very energetic neutrons, using fast reactors of Generation IV or accelerator driven systems (ADS). This publication is dedicated to expose the state-of-the-art situation of the ADS, mainly the activities developed by CIEMAT within the R+D projects of the EU. This technical publication of ENRESA on Transmutation is the second volume, of a set of two, on Partitioning and Transmutation. The first volume, entitled Partitioning of transuranic elements and some fission products from spent nuclear fuels, was published in 2006. The present report has ten chapters; the first one is an introduction on the spent fuels management, mainly in Spain. In the second one a summary of the main characteristics of spent fuels is provided; in the third the transmutation concept including their nuclear reactions is described; and in the fourth one a description of the present management options of the spent fuels is given. In the fifth chapter several new advanced closed cycles with transmutation of Pu and MA are given and in the sixth one the main proposed transmutation systems are de scribed. Among these, a great emphasis is given to the ADS including its main parts, as they are: the proton accelerator, the spallation source for neutrons production and the subcritical core. Also a re view of different fuels and proposed cool ants for the ADS is made, as well as proposed reprocessing of the transmuted spent fuel from ADS. In this chapter a description of some R+D projects is given, most of them supported by the European Union, with participation of CIEMAT. Chapters seven and eight show the progress on the measurement of new nuclear data to complete the simulation of the transmutation basic processes and systems, together in chapter nine with new R+D activities on

  5. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Mark Lee

    2002-04-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

  6. Transuranic contaminated waste container characterization and data base. Revision I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is developing regulations governing the management, handling and disposal of transuranium (TRU) radioisotope contaminated wastes as part of the NRC's overall waste management program. In the development of such regulations, numerous subtasks have been identified which require completion before meaningful regulations can be proposed, their impact evaluated and the regulations implemented. This report was prepared to assist in the development of the technical data base necessary to support rule-making actions dealing with TRU-contaminated wastes. An earlier report presented the waste sources, characteristics and inventory of both Department of Energy (DOE) generated and commercially generated TRU waste. In this report a wide variety of waste sources as well as a large TRU inventory were identified. The purpose of this report is to identify the different packaging systems used and proposed for TRU waste and to document their characteristics. This document then serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of TRU waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present TRU waste management program. It is the purpose of this report to serve as a working document which will be used as appropriate in the TRU Waste Management Program. This report, and those following, will be compatible not only in format, but also in reference material and direction.

  7. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  8. Understanding the Subsurface Reactive Transport of Transuranic Contaminants at DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Mark O. [Auburn University; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [University of Notre Dame; Saiers, James E. [Yale University; Shuh, David K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-12-20

    Our primary hypothesis is that actinides can interact with surfaces in fundamentally different ways than other metals, metalloids, and oxyanions and that this fundamental difference requires new approaches to studying and modeling transuranic sorption to minerals and geomedia. This project supports a key mission of the SBR program to develop sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites will be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes into decision making for environmental management and long-term stewardship, while also supporting DOE’s commitment to education, training, and collaboration with DOE user facilities.

  9. The use of EDTA and DTPA for accelerating the removal of deposited transuranic elements from humans

    CERN Document Server

    Spoor, N L

    1977-01-01

    EDTA and DTPA have been prominent among the chelating agents used to increase the rate of excretion of certain deposited heavy metals from the human body. Since 1959, DTPA, administered either by intravenous injection or by aerosol inhalation, has been widely used to treat workers contaminated by plutonium or a higher actinide. In this report, an attempt is made to assess the toxicities of EDTA and DTPA and to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of DTPA as a drug for removing deposited transuranic elements.

  10. Limits for the burial of the Department of Energy transuranic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, J.W.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1979-01-15

    Potential limits for the shallow earth burial of transuranic elements were examined by simplified models of the individual pathways to man. Pathways examined included transport to surface steams, transport to ground water, intrusion, and people living on the burial ground area after the wastes have surfaced. Limits are derived for each pathway and operational limits are suggested based upon a dose to the organ receiving the maximum dose rate of 0.5 rem/y after 70 years of exposure for the maximum exposed individual.

  11. In situ vitrification of transuranic wastes: An updated systems evaluation and applications assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.; FitzPatrick, V.F.; Carter, J.G.

    1987-03-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a process whereby joule heating immobilizes contaminated soil in place into a durable glass and crystalline waste form. Numerous technological advances made during the past three years in the design, fabrication, and testing of the ISV process are discussed. Performance analysis of ISV focuses on process equipment, element retention (in the vitrified soil during processing), melt geometry, depth monitors, and electrodes. The types of soil and waste processed by ISV are evaluated as process parameters. Economic data provide the production costs of the large-scale unit for radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes (wet and dry). The processing of transuranic-contaminated soils are discussed with respect to occupational and public safety. Alternative applications and operating sequences for various waste sites are identified. The technological data base warrants conducting a large-scale radioactive test at a contaminated soil site at Hanford to provide a representative waste form that can be evaluated to determine its suitability for in-place stabilization of transuranic-contaminated soils.

  12. RETRIEVING SUSPECT TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS PROGRESS PLANS & CHALLENGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRENCH, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of the program for retrieval of suspect transuranic (TRU) waste stored in the Hanford Site low-level burial grounds. Beginning in 1970 and continuing until the late 1980's, waste suspected of containing significant quantities of transuranic isotopes was placed in ''retrievable'' storage in designated modules in the Hanford burial grounds, with the intent that the waste would be retrieved when a national repository for disposal of such waste became operational. Approximately 15,000 cubic meters of waste, suspected of being TRU, was placed in storage modules in four burial grounds. With the availability of the national repository (the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), retrieval of the suspect TRU waste is now underway. Retrieval efforts, to date, have been conducted in storage modules that contain waste, which is in general, contact-handled, relatively new (1980's and later), is stacked in neat, engineered configurations, and has a relatively good record of waste characteristics. Even with these optimum conditions, retrieval personnel have had to deal with a large number of structurally degraded containers, radioactive contamination issues, and industrial hazards (including organic vapors). Future retrieval efforts in older, less engineered modules are expected to present additional hazards and difficult challenges.

  13. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To advance evidence on newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources. BACKGROUND: Clinical decisions need to be evidence-based and understanding the knowledge sources that newly graduated nurses use will inform both education and practice. Qualitative studies on newly graduated nurses' use...... of knowledge sources are increasing though generated from scattered healthcare contexts. Therefore, a metasynthesis of qualitative research on what knowledge sources new graduates use in decision-making was conducted. DESIGN: Meta-ethnography. DATA SOURCES: Nineteen reports, representing 17 studies, published...... sources during their first 2-year postgraduation were interpreted in the main theme 'self and others as knowledge sources,' with two subthemes 'doing and following' and 'knowing and doing,' each with several elucidating categories. The metasynthesis revealed a line of argument among the report findings...

  14. Performance assessment requirements for the identification and tracking of transuranic waste intended for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, C.A. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Weston, W.W. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    To demonstrate compliance with environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes, a performance assessment (PA) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was made of waste-waste and waste-repository interactions and impacts on disposal system performance. An estimate of waste components and accumulated quantities was derived from a roll-up of the generator/storage sites` TRU waste inventories. Waste components of significance, and some of negligible effect, were fixed input parameters in the model. The results identified several waste components that require identification and tracking of quantities to ensure that repository limits are not exceeded. The rationale used to establish waste component limits based on input estimates is discussed. The distinction between repository limits and waste container limits is explained. Controls used to ensure that no limits are exceeded are identified. For waste components with no explicit repository based limits, other applicable limits are contained in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The 10 radionuclides targeted for identification and tracking on either a waste container or a waste stream basis include Am-241, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242, U-233, U-234, U-238, Sr-90, and Cs-137. The accumulative activities of these radionuclides are to be inventoried at the time of emplacement in the WIPP. Changes in inventory curie content as a function of radionuclide decay and ingrowth over time will be calculated and tracked. Due to the large margin of compliance demonstrated by PA with the 10,000 year release limits specified, the quality assurance objective for radioassay of the 10 radionuclides need to be no more restrictive than those already identified for addressing the requirements imposed by transportation and WIPP disposal operations in Section 9 of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. 6 refs.

  15. Soil Sampling Plan for the transuranic storage area soil overburden and final report: Soil overburden sampling at the RWMC transuranic storage area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanisich, S.N.

    1994-12-01

    This Soil Sampling Plan (SSP) has been developed to provide detailed procedural guidance for field sampling and chemical and radionuclide analysis of selected areas of soil covering waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The format and content of this SSP represents a complimentary hybrid of INEL Waste Management--Environmental Restoration Program, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) sampling guidance documentation. This sampling plan also functions as a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP). The QAPP as a controlling mechanism during sampling to ensure that all data collected are valid, reliabile, and defensible. This document outlines organization, objectives and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) activities to achieve the desired data quality goals. The QA/QC requirements for this project are outlined in the Data Collection Quality Assurance Plan (DCQAP) for the Buried Waste Program. The DCQAP is a program plan and does not outline the site specific requirements for the scope of work covered by this SSP.

  16. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A.

  17. A method of discriminating transuranic radionuclides from radon progeny using low-resolution alpha spectroscopy and curve-fitting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzen, Kevin; Brey, Richard

    2012-05-01

    ²²²Rn (radon) and ²²⁰Rn (thoron) progeny are known to interfere with determining the presence of long-lived transuranic radionuclides, such as plutonium and americium, and require from several hours up to several days for conclusive results. Methods are proposed that should expedite the analysis of air samples for determining the amount of transuranic radionuclides present using low-resolution alpha spectroscopy systems available from typical alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) with multi-channel analyzer (MCA) capabilities. An alpha spectra simulation program was developed in Microsoft Excel visual basic that employed the use of Monte Carlo numerical methods and serial-decay differential equations that resembled actual spectra. Transuranic radionuclides were able to be quantified with statistical certainty by applying peak fitting equations using the method of least squares. Initial favorable results were achieved when samples containing radon progeny were decayed 15 to 30 min, and samples containing both radon and thoron progeny were decayed at least 60 min. The effort indicates that timely decisions can be made when determining transuranic activity using available alpha CAMs with alpha spectroscopy capabilities for counting retrospective air samples if accompanied by analyses that consider the characteristics of serial decay.

  18. Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  19. Layer thickness evaluation for transuranic transmutation in a fusion–fission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E., E-mail: carlosvelcab@eng-nucl.mest.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F., E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L., E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear—Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627 Campus UFMG, 31.270-90, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rede Nacional de Fusão (FINEP/CNPq), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Layer thickness for transmutation in a fusion–fission system was evaluated. • The calculations were performed using MONTEBURNS code. • The results indicate the best thickness and volume ratio to induce transmutation. - Abstract: Layer thickness for transuranic transmutation in a fusion–fission system was evaluated using two different ways. In the first one, transmutation layer thicknesses were designed maintaining the fuel rod radius constant; in the second part, while the transmutation layer thickness increases, the fuel rod radius decreases maintaining k{sub s} (source-multiplication factor) ≈0.95. Spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ method and then spiked with thorium and uranium composes the transmutation layer. The calculations were performed using MONTEBURNS code (MCNP5 and ORIGEN 2.1). The results indicate the best thickness and the volume ratio between the coolant and the fuel composition to induce transmutation.

  20. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodman, D.W.; Spry, M.J.; Nolte, E.P.; Barry, G.A.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plans for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. Future plans for the unit include incorporating the earthen-covered portion of the TSA-2 pad into a TSA retrieval enclosure along with the TSA-1 and TSAR pads, and closure of the portion of the TSA-2 pad under the Air Support Weather Shield (ASWS-2). This plan addresses closure of the ASWS-2 by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted the waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all closure activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart.

  1. Evaluation of the Contamination Control Unit during simulated transuranic waste retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.N.; Freeman, A.L.; Wixom, V.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report presents the results of a field demonstration at the INEL of the Contamination Control Unit (CCU). The CCU is a field deployable self-contained trailer mounted system to control contamination spread at the site of transuranic (TRU) handling operations. This is accomplished primarily by controlling dust spread. This demonstration was sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Technology Development Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. The CCU, housed in a mobile trailer for easy transport, supports four different contamination control systems: water misting, dust suppression application, soil fixative application, and vacuuming operations. Assessment of the CCU involved laboratory operational performance testing, operational testing and contamination control at a decommissioned Idaho National Engineering Laboratory reactor, and field testing in conjunction with a simulated TRU buried waste retrieval effort at the Cold Test Pit.

  2. Techniques of preparation and crystal chemistry of transuranic chalcogenides and pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The crystal chemistry of a number of transuranic chalcogenides and pnictides has been investigated using /sup 243/Am, /sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, and /sup 249/Cf. These compounds were prepared from the corresponding metals by direct reaction with the chalcogen or pnictogen element at elevated temperatures. Higher chalcogenides were thermally dissociated to yield ones of lower stoichiometry, terminating with the sesquichalcogenides; only monopnictides of these transplutonium elements were found. All products were examined by x-ray powder diffraction. In this paper the methods for preparing the actinide chalcogenides and pnictides on a gram scale are reviewed, and the microtechniques used for submilligram quantities of the transamericium elements are presented. The results obtained during this study are compared to data previously reported for the lighter actinide compounds, and the trends observed across the series are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of alternatives for high-level and transuranic radioactive- waste disposal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, M.M. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The remand of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s long-term performance standards for radioactive-waste disposal provides an opportunity to suggest modifications that would make the regulation more defensible and remove inconsistencies yet retain the basic structure of the original rule. Proposed modifications are in three specific areas: release and dose limits, probabilistic containment requirements, and transuranic-waste disposal criteria. Examination of the modifications includes discussion of the alternatives, demonstration of methods of development and implementation, comparison of the characteristics, attributes, and deficiencies of possible options within each area, and analysis of the implications for performance assessments. An additional consideration is the impact on the entire regulation when developing or modifying the individual components of the radiological standards.

  4. Identification of the fast and thermal neutron characteristics of transuranic waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, B.H. Jr.; Bramblett, R.L. [Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Largo, FL (United States); Hensley, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Fissile and spontaneously fissioning material in transuranic waste drums can be most sensitively assayed using an active and passive neutron assay system such as the Active Passive Neutron Examination and Assay. Both the active and the passive assays are distorted by the presence of the waste matrix and containerization. For accurate assaying, this distortion must be characterized and accounted for. An External Matrix Probe technique has been developed that accomplishes this task. Correlations between in-drum neutron flux measurements and monitors in the Active Passive Neutron Examination and Assay chamber with various matrix materials provide a non-invasive means of predicting the thermal neutron flux in waste drums. Similarly, measures of the transmission of fast neutrons emitted from sources in the drum. Results obtained using the Lockheed Martin Specialty Components Active Passive Neutron Examination and Assay system are discussed. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Nevada Test Site Perspective on Characterization and Loading of Legacy Transuranic Drums Utilizing the Central Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.G. Lahoud; J. F. Norton; I. L. Siddoway; L. W. Griswold

    2006-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has successfully completed a multi-year effort to characterize and ship 1860 legacy transuranic (TRU) waste drums for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a permanent TRU disposal site. This has been a cooperative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), the U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO), the NTS Management and Operations (M&O) contractor Bechtel Nevada (BN), and various contractors under the Central Characterization Project (CCP) umbrella. The success is due primarily to the diligence, perseverance, and hard work of each of the contractors, the DOE/CBFO, and NNSA/NSO, along with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (DOE/HQ). This paper presents, from an NTS perspective, the challenges and successes of utilizing the CCP for obtaining a certified characterization program, sharing responsibilities for characterization, data validation, and loading of TRU waste with BN to achieve disposal at WIPP from a Small Quantity Site (SQS) such as the NTS. The challenges in this effort arose from two general sources. First, the arrangement of DOE/CBFO contractors under the CCP performing work and certifying waste at the NTS within a Hazard Category 2 (HazCat 2) non-reactor nuclear facility operated by BN, presented difficult challenges. The nuclear safety authorization basis, safety liability and responsibility, conduct of operations, allocation and scheduling of resources, and other issues were particularly demanding. The program-level and field coordination needed for the closely interrelated characterization tasks was extensive and required considerable effort by all parties. The second source of challenge was the legacy waste itself. None of the waste was generated at the NTS. The waste was generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lynchburg, Rocky Flats

  6. The utilization of freeze-cast scaffolds for burning transuranic elements in SMRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ana C.A.A.; Maiorino, Jose R., E-mail: ana.fernandes@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas; Lang, Amanda L., E-mail: amandaleelang@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed at investigating the viability of burning transuranic elements in SMRs, using the IRIS model as a basis, including freeze-cast sc olds in the fuel pins. The IRIS reactor is an integral design reactor, having all of its primary components inside the pressure vessel, assuring unique characteristics regarding economy, safety and non-proliferation. Freeze-cast scaffolds are strong solid structures, built in a process of freezing powder material. When applied to the fuel pins, they allow a precise placement of different materials. Am-241 is a representative of the transuranic elements with high cross section values in the thermal spectrum, presenting itself as a great candidate for this application. Two models were compared: the Am model, having two types of fuel - the americium alloy and UO{sub 2} -, and a reference model, with the freeze-cast structures but only uranium as a fuel. Through the utilization of the package MCNP5, it was possible to obtain and analyze: (I) k{sub eff} values, (II) axial and radial flux proles, (III) maximum fuel temperature and (IV) power peaking factors. It was possible to observe that the k{sub eff} values, even though higher than 1, are considered small in both models when compared to PWRs in beginning of life, compromising the fuel life, and showing a tendency of neutron absorption by the ceramic scaffolds. The values were even lower for the Am model, confirming the suspicion that americium would be a great neutron absorber due to the resonances observed in the cross section. However, shutdown margin was achieved in both models, both in hot and cold conditions. The flux profiles showed consistency, showing a visible flattening in the radial flux profile for the Am model. The power peaking factors are close to those of a typical PWR, and fuel maximum temperature also showed satisfying numbers. (author)

  7. The behaviour of transuranic mixed oxide fuel in a Candu-900 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morreale, A. C.; Ball, M. R.; Novog, D. R.; Luxat, J. C. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, McMaster Univ., 1280 Main St. W, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The production of transuranic actinide fuels for use in current thermal reactors provides a useful intermediary step in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Extraction of actinides reduces the longevity, radiation and heat loads of spent material. The burning of transuranic fuels in current reactors for a limited amount of cycles reduces the infrastructure demand for fast reactors and provides an effective synergy that can result in a reduction of as much as 95% of spent fuel waste while reducing the fast reactor infrastructure needed by a factor of almost 13.5 [1]. This paper examines the features of actinide mixed oxide fuel, TRUMOX, in a CANDU{sup R}* nuclear reactor. The actinide concentrations used were based on extraction from 30 year cooled spent fuel and mixed with natural uranium in 3.1 wt% actinide MOX fuel. Full lattice cell modeling was performed using the WIMS-AECL code, super-cell calculations were analyzed in DRAGON and full core analysis was executed in the RFSP 2-group diffusion code. A time-average full core model was produced and analyzed for reactor coefficients, reactivity device worth and online fuelling impacts. The standard CANDU operational limits were maintained throughout operations. The TRUMOX fuel design achieved a burnup of 27.36 MWd/kg HE. A full TRUMOX fuelled CANDU was shown to operate within acceptable limits and provided a viable intermediary step for burning actinides. The recycling, reprocessing and reuse of spent fuels produces a much more sustainable and efficient nuclear fuel cycle. (authors)

  8. Transuranic Waste Burning Potential of Thorium Fuel in a Fast Reactor - 12423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenner, Michael; Franceschini, Fausto; Ferroni, Paolo [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC,Cranberry Township, PA, 16066 (United States); Sartori, Alberto; Ricotti, Marco [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company (referred to as 'Westinghouse' in the rest of this paper) is proposing a 'back-to-front' approach to overcome the stalemate on nuclear waste management in the US. In this approach, requirements to further the societal acceptance of nuclear waste are such that the ultimate health hazard resulting from the waste package is 'as low as reasonably achievable'. Societal acceptability of nuclear waste can be enhanced by reducing the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste, which is currently driven primarily by the protracted radiotoxicity of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes. Therefore, a transition to a more benign radioactive waste can be accomplished by a fuel cycle capable of consuming the stockpile of TRU 'legacy' waste contained in the LWR Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) while generating waste which is significantly less radio-toxic than that produced by the current open U-based fuel cycle (once through and variations thereof). Investigation of a fast reactor (FR) operating on a thorium-based fuel cycle, as opposed to the traditional uranium-based is performed. Due to a combination between its neutronic properties and its low position in the actinide chain, thorium not only burns the legacy TRU waste, but it does so with a minimal production of 'new' TRUs. The effectiveness of a thorium-based fast reactor to burn legacy TRU and its flexibility to incorporate various fuels and recycle schemes according to the evolving needs of the transmutation scenario have been investigated. Specifically, the potential for a high TRU burning rate, high U-233 generation rate if so desired and low concurrent production of TRU have been used as metrics for the examined cycles. Core physics simulations of a fast reactor core running on thorium-based fuels and burning an external TRU feed supply have been carried out over multiple cycles of irradiation, separation and reprocessing. The TRU burning capability as well as

  9. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  10. T-Rex system for operation in TRU, LLW, and hazardous zones. Transuranic storage area-retrieval enclosure program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, H.M. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andreychek, T.P.; Beeson, B.K. [Martin Marietta Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States). Aero and Naval Systems

    1993-04-01

    There are a large number of sites around the world containing TRU (transuranic) waste, low level waste (LLW), and hazardous areas that require teleoperated, heavy lift manipulators with long reach and high precision to handle the materials stored there. Teleoperation of the equipment is required to reduce the risk to operating personnel to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. The Transuranic Storage Area Remote Excavator system (T-Rex) is designed to fill this requirement at low cost through the integration of a production front shovel excavator with a control system, local and remote operator control stations, a closed-circuit television system (CCTV), multiple end effectors and a quick-change system. This paper describes the conversion of an off-the-shelf excavator with a hydraulic control system, the integration of an onboard remote control system, vision system, and the design of a remote control station.

  11. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, Lawrence A. [Colorado Christian Univ., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1994-08-15

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  12. Advanced disposal systems for transuranic waste: Preliminary disposal criteria for Plutonium-239 at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.E.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility and potential application of advanced disposal systems is being conducted for defense transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Hanford site. The advanced waste disposal options include those developed to provide ''greater confinement'' than provided by shallow-land burial. An example systems analysis is discussed with assumed performance objectives and various Hanford-specific disposal conditions, waste forms, site characteristics, and engineered barriers. Preliminary waste disposal criteria for /sup 239/Pu are determined by applying the allowable residual contamination level (ARCL) method. This method is based on compliance with a radiation dose rate limit through a site specific analysis of the potential for radiation exposure to individuals. A 10,000-year environmental performance period is assumed, and the dose rate limit for human intrusion is assumed to be 500 mrem/yr to any exposed individual. Preliminary waste disposal criteria derived by this method for /sup 239/Pu in soils at the Hanford Site are 0.5 nCi/g in soils between the surface and a depth of 1 m, 2200 nCi/g of soil at a depth of 5 m, and 10,000 nCi/g of soil at depths 10 m and below. These waste disposal criteria are based on exposure scenarios that reflect the dependence of exposure versus burial depth.

  13. Transuranic advanced disposal systems: preliminary /sup 239/Pu waste-disposal criteria for Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1982-08-01

    An evaluation of the feasibility and potential application of advanced disposal systems is being conducted for defense transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Hanford Site. The advanced waste disposal options include those developed to provide greater confinement than provided by shallow-land burial. An example systems analysis is discussed with assumed performance objectives and various Hanford-specific disposal conditions, waste forms, site characteristics, and engineered barriers. Preliminary waste disposal criteria for /sup 239/Pu are determined by applying the Allowable Residual Contamination Level (ARCL) method. This method is based on compliance with a radiation dose rate limit through a site-specific analysis of the potential for radiation exposure to individuals. A 10,000 year environmental performance period is assumed, and the dose rate limit for human intrusion is assumed to be 500 mrem/y to any exposed individual. Preliminary waste disposal criteria derived by this method for /sup 239/Pu in soils at the Hanford Site are: 0.5 nCi/g in soils between the surface and a depth of 1 m, 2200 nCi/g of soil at a depth of 5 m, and 10,000 nCi/g of soil at depths 10 m and below. These waste disposal criteria are based on exposure scenarios that reflect the dependence of exposure versus burial depth. 2 figures, 5 tables.

  14. W-026, transuranic waste restricted waste management (TRU RWM) glovebox operational test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-18

    The TRU Waste/Restricted Waste Management (LLW/PWNP) Glovebox 401 is designed to accept and process waste from the Transuranic Process Glovebox 302. Waste is transferred to the glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagless Transfer Port (DO-07401) on a transfer stand. The stand is removed with a hoist and the operator inspects the waste (with the aid of the Sampling and Treatment Director) to determine a course of action for each item. The waste is separated into compliant and non compliant. One Trip Port DO-07402A is designated as ``Compliant``and One Trip Port DO-07402B is designated as ``Non Compliant``. As the processing (inspection, bar coding, sampling and treatment) of the transferred items takes place, residue is placed in the appropriate One Trip port. The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved for sampling or storage or it`s state altered by treatment, the Operator will track an items location using a portable barcode reader and entry any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolutions (described here) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  15. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

  16. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, C.L. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described.

  17. Transuranics Laboratory, achievements and performance; Laboratorio de Transuranicos, logros y fundamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M. P.

    2004-07-01

    The Marine and Aquatic Radioecology Group (MARG) was established in 1985 with the main scope of analysing the consequences of the Palomares accident in the adjacent Mediterranean ecosystem. From then on and up to now , this Group has extended its investigations to other European marine environments, such as the Spanish Mediterranean margin, the Artic and the Atlantic. The main research of long-lived radionuclides (plutonium, americium and Cs-137) determining the orography influence, riverine inputs and their geo-chemical associations. This group is currently accomplishing new challenges on the radioecology field such as the development of techniques for transuranics speciation to determine their geo-chemical association to the main sediment compounds. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides distribution on salt-marsh areas affected by dry-wet periods is being studied as well as the possibilities of fusing crossed techniques for dating recent sediments (pollen, anthropogenic, ''210 Pb, etc). The Laboratory performance description, the procedures used, calculations, challenges and gaps are described in this report. (Author) 22 refs.

  18. Transuranic and Low-Level Boxed Waste Form Nondestructive Assay Technology Overview and Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Becker; M. Connolly; M. McIlwain

    1999-02-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) identified the need to perform an assessment of the functionality and performance of existing nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques relative to the low-level and transuranic waste inventory packaged in large-volume box-type containers. The primary objectives of this assessment were to: (1) determine the capability of existing boxed waste form NDA technology to comply with applicable waste radiological characterization requirements, (2) determine deficiencies associated with existing boxed waste assay technology implementation strategies, and (3) recommend a path forward for future technology development activities, if required. Based on this assessment, it is recommended that a boxed waste NDA development and demonstration project that expands the existing boxed waste NDA capability to accommodate the indicated deficiency set be implemented. To ensure that technology will be commercially available in a timely fashion, it is recommended this development and demonstration project be directed to the private sector. It is further recommended that the box NDA technology be of an innovative design incorporating sufficient NDA modalities, e.g., passive neutron, gamma, etc., to address the majority of the boxed waste inventory. The overall design should be modular such that subsets of the overall NDA system can be combined in optimal configurations tailored to differing waste types.

  19. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Presented is an investigation of the utilization of Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) particle-based fuel designs for the recycling of transuranic (TRU) wastes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Though numerous studies have evaluated the recycling of TRU in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing TRU-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a SiC matrix and formed into pellets that can be loaded into standard 17 x 17 fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of TRU recycling and, by virtue of the TRISO particle design, will allow for greater burnup (i.e., removal of the need for UO2 mixing) and improved fuel reliability. In this study, a variety of assembly layouts and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the feasibility of TRU-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core design herein reported are a work in progress, so they still require some fine-tuning to further flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, TRU-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing TRU production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in PWRs.

  20. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Caldwell, J.T. (Pajarito Scientific Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States))

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Hot Cell Liners Category of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Robert Wesley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is an agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Hot Cell Liners category; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and the justification to reclassify the five containers as LLW rather than TRU waste.

  2. Consideration of nuclear criticality when disposing of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.; SANCHEZ,LAWRENCE C.; STOCKMAN,CHRISTINE T.; TRELLUE,HOLLY R.

    2000-04-01

    Based on general arguments presented in this report, nuclear criticality was eliminated from performance assessment calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for waste contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes, located in southeastern New Mexico. At the WIPP, the probability of criticality within the repository is low because mechanisms to concentrate the fissile radioisotopes dispersed throughout the waste are absent. In addition, following an inadvertent human intrusion into the repository (an event that must be considered because of safety regulations), the probability of nuclear criticality away from the repository is low because (1) the amount of fissile mass transported over 10,000 yr is predicted to be small, (2) often there are insufficient spaces in the advective pore space (e.g., macroscopic fractures) to provide sufficient thickness for precipitation of fissile material, and (3) there is no credible mechanism to counteract the natural tendency of the material to disperse during transport and instead concentrate fissile material in a small enough volume for it to form a critical concentration. Furthermore, before a criticality would have the potential to affect human health after closure of the repository--assuming that a criticality could occur--it would have to either (1) degrade the ability of the disposal system to contain nuclear waste or (2) produce significantly more radioisotopes than originally present. Neither of these situations can occur at the WIPP; thus, the consequences of a criticality are also low.

  3. Overall strategy and program plan for management of radioactively contaminated liquid wastes and transuranic sludges at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeese, L.E.; Berry, J.B.; Butterworth, G.E. III; Collins, E.D.; Monk, T.H.; Patton, B.D.; Snider, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    The use of hydrofracture was terminated after 1984, and LW concentrate has been accumulated and stored since that time. Currently, the volume of stored LW concentrate is near the safe fill limit for the 11 storage tanks in the active LW system, and significant operational constraints are being experienced. The tanks that provide the storage capacity of the active LW system contain significant volumes of TRU sludges that have been designated remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes because of associated quantities of other radioisotopes, including /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs. Thirty-three additional tanks, which are inactive, also contain significant volumes of TRU waste and radioactive LW. A lack of adequate storage volume for LW jeopardizes ORNL's ability to ensure continued conduct of research and development (RandD) activities that generate LW because an unexpected operational incident could quickly deplete the remaining storage volume. Accordingly, a planning team comprised of staff members from the ORNL Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (NCWP) was created for developing recommended actions to be taken for management of LW. A program plan is presented which outlines work required for the development of a disposal method for each of the likely future waste streams associated with LW management and the disposal of the bulk of the resulting solid waste on the ORR. 8 refs., 20 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Transuranic waste detection by photon interrogation and on-line delayed neutron counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyoussi, A. E-mail: lyoussi@cea.fr; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Jallu, F.; Payan, E.; Buisson, A.; Nurdin, G.; Allano, J

    1999-02-01

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRUs) in bulk solid wastes. This paper describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from an electron linear accelerator to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in a TRU waste package which is inside an original neutron separating and counting cavity (NS2C). When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides 'signatures' from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. We give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U in sample matrices. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC by using the sequential photon interrogation and neutron counting signatures (SPHINCS) technique which had been developed in the present framework. The SPHINCS method enhances the available counts by a factor of about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only, after the irradiation period. Furthermore, the use of SPHINCS measurement technique coupled with the NS2C facility improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 30. This decreases the detection limit. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 {mu}s wide pulse at a 50 and 6.25 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, NS2C advantages and performances, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and future experimental works are discussed.

  5. Development of Modern Performance Assessment Tools and Capabilities for Underground Disposal of Transuranic Waste at WIPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, T.; Kirchner, T. B.; Hammond, G. E.; Park, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic (deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. Containment of TRU waste at the WIPP is regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The DOE demonstrates compliance with the containment requirements by means of performance assessment (PA) calculations. WIPP PA calculations estimate the probability and consequence of potential radionuclide releases from the repository to the accessible environment for a regulatory period of 10,000 years after facility closure. The long-term performance of the repository is assessed using a suite of sophisticated computational codes. In a broad modernization effort, the DOE has overseen the transfer of these codes to modern hardware and software platforms. Additionally, there is a current effort to establish new performance assessment capabilities through the further development of the PFLOTRAN software, a state-of-the-art massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport code. Improvements to the current computational environment will result in greater detail in the final models due to the parallelization afforded by the modern code. Parallelization will allow for relatively faster calculations, as well as a move from a two-dimensional calculation grid to a three-dimensional grid. The result of the modernization effort will be a state-of-the-art subsurface flow and transport capability that will serve WIPP PA into the future. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  6. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R. [Benchmark Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  7. Study of a conceptual accelerator driven system loaded with thorium dioxide mixed with transuranic dioxides in TRISO particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear spent fuel management is one of the top major subjects in the utilization of nuclear energy. Hence, solutions to this problem have been increasingly researched in recent years. The basic aim of this work is to examine the fissile breeding and transuranic fuel transmutation potentials of a gas cooled accelerator-driven system. In line with this purpose, firstly, the conceptually designed system is optimized by using several target materials and fuel mixtures, from the point of neutronic. Secondly, three different material compositions, namely, pure lead bismuth eutectic (LBE, LBE+natural UO2, and LBE+15 % enrichment UO2, are considered as target material. The target zone is separated to two sub-zones but as one within the other. The outer sub-zone is pure LBE target, and the inner sub-zone is either UO2 or pure LBE target. The UO2 target sub-zone is cooled with helium gas. Finally, the thorium dioxide mixed with transuranic dioxides, discharged from PWR-MOX spent fuel, in pebbles composed of graphite and TRISO-coated spherical fuel particles, is used for breeding fissile fuel and transmuting transuranic fuels. Three different thorium-transuranic mixtures, (Th, PuO2, (Th, CmO2, (Th, Pu, MAO2, are examined with various mixture fractions. The packing fractions of the fuel pebbles in the transmutation core and the tristructural-isotropic coated fuel particles in a pebble are assumed as 60 % and 29 %, respectively. The transmutation core is also cooled with a high-temperature helium coolant. In order to produce high-flux neutrons that penetrate through the transmutation core, the target is exposed to the continuous beams of 1 GeV protons. The computations have been carried out with the high-energy Monte Carlo code MCNPX using the LA150 library. The numerical outcomes show that the examined accelerator-driven system has rather high neutronic data in terms of the energy production and fissile fuel breeding.

  8. A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

    2008-04-01

    In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the

  9. ANALYSIS OF AVAILABLE HYDROGEN DATA & ACCUMULATION OF HYDROGEN IN UNVENTED TRANSURANIC (TRU) DRUMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAYLEY, L

    2004-06-24

    This document provides a response to the second action required in the approval for the Justification for Continued Operations (JCO) Assay and Shipment of Transuranic (TRU) Waste Containers in 218-W-4C. The Waste Management Project continues to make progress toward shipping certified TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As the existing inventory of TRU waste in the Central Waste Complex (CWC) storage buildings is shipped, and the uncovered inventory is removed from the trenches and prepared for shipment from the Hanford Site, the covered inventory of suspect TRU wastes must be retrieved and prepared for processing for shipment to WIPP. Accumulation of hydrogen in unvented TRU waste containers is a concern due to the possibility of explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. The frequency and consequence of these gas mixtures resulting in an explosion must be addressed. The purpose of this study is to recommend an approach and schedule for venting TRU waste containers in the low-level burial ground (LLBG) trenches in conjunction with TRU Retrieval Project activities. This study provides a detailed analysis of the expected probability of hydrogen gas accumulation in significant quantities in unvented drums. Hydrogen gas accumulation in TRU drums is presented and evaluated in the following three categories: Hydrogen concentrations less than 5 vol%; Hydrogen between 5-15 vol%; and Hydrogen concentrations above 15 vol%. This analysis is based on complex-wide experience with TRU waste drums, available experimental data, and evaluations of storage conditions. Data reviewed in this report includes experience from the Idaho National Environmental Engineering Laboratories (INEEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratories, (ORNL), Rocky Flats sites, Matrix Depletion Program and the National Transportation and Packaging Program. Based on this analysis, as well as an assessment of the probability and

  10. RESULTS OF THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE CLASSIFIED TRANSURANIC WASTES DISPOSED AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. COCHRAN; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Most transuranic (TRU) wastes are destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). However, the TRU wastes from the cleanup of US nuclear weapons accidents are classified for national security reasons and cannot be disposed in WIPP. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sought an alternative disposal method for these ''special case'' TRU wastes and from 1984 to 1987, four Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes were used to place these special case TRU wastes a minimum of 21 m (70 ft) below the land surface and a minimum of 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in arid alluvium at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because of state regulatory concerns, the GCD boreholes have not been used for waste disposal since 1989. DOE requires that TRU waste disposal facilities meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) requirements for disposal of TRU wastes, which are contained in 40 CFR 191. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU waste emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA's requirements. Sandia has completed the PA using all available information and an iterative PA methodology. This paper overviews the PA of the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes [1]. As such, there are few cited references in this paper and the reader is referred to [1] and [2] for references. The results of the PA are that disposal of TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes easily complies with the EPA's 40 CFR 191 safety standards for disposal of TRU wastes. The PA is undergoing a DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ) peer review, and the final PA will be released in FY2001 or FY2002.

  11. A Newly Defined and Xeno-Free Culture Medium Supports Every-Other-Day Medium Replacement in the Generation and Long-Term Cultivation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian Baghbaderani, Behnam; Tian, Xinghui; Scotty Cadet, Jean; Shah, Kevan; Walde, Amy; Tran, Huan; Kovarcik, Don Paul; Clarke, Diana; Fellner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) present an unprecedented opportunity to advance human health by offering an alternative and renewable cell resource for cellular therapeutics and regenerative medicine. The present demand for high quality hPSCs for use in both research and clinical studies underscores the need to develop technologies that will simplify the cultivation process and control variability. Here we describe the development of a robust, defined and xeno-free hPSC medium that supports reliable propagation of hPSCs and generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from multiple somatic cell types; long-term serial subculturing of hPSCs with every-other-day (EOD) medium replacement; and banking fully characterized hPSCs. The hPSCs cultured in this medium for over 40 passages are genetically stable, retain high expression levels of the pluripotency markers TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-3/4 and SSEA-4, and readily differentiate into ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Importantly, the medium plays an integral role in establishing a cGMP-compliant process for the manufacturing of hiPSCs that can be used for generation of clinically relevant cell types for cell replacement therapy applications.

  12. Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates.

  13. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eudes; GV; Barbosa; Flavia; F; Aburjaile; Rommel; TJ; Ramos; Adriana; R; Carneiro; Yves; Le; Loir; Jan; Baumbach; Anderson; Miyoshi; Artur; Silva; Vasco; Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing(NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft(partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information.

  14. Advice for the Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these cases, the mutated gene is passed from generation to generation, resulting in a great number of Parkinson's disease ... variety of treatments that can allow you to lead a fulfilling and productive life for many years ...

  15. Conceptual design of retrieval systems for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogleman, S.F.

    1980-04-01

    The US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have jurisdiction over the nuclear waste management program. Design studies were previously made of proposed repository site configurations for the receiving, processing, and storage of nuclear wastes. However, these studies did not provide operational designs that were suitable for highly reliable TRU retrieval in the deep geologic salt environment for the required 60-year period. The purpose of this report is to develop a conceptual design of a baseline retrieval system for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. The conceptual design is to serve as a working model for the analysis of the performance available from the current state-of-the-art equipment and systems. Suggested regulations would be based upon the results of the performance analyses.

  16. Thorium Fuel Options for Sustained Transuranic Burning in Pressurized Water Reactors - 12381

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Fariz Abdul; Lee, John C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Franceschini, Fausto; Wenner, Michael [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As described in companion papers, Westinghouse is proposing the adoption of a thorium-based fuel cycle to burn the transuranics (TRU) contained in the current Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) and transition towards a less radio-toxic high level waste. A combination of both light water reactors (LWR) and fast reactors (FR) is envisaged for the task, with the emphasis initially posed on their TRU burning capability and eventually to their self-sufficiency. Given the many technical challenges and development times related to the deployment of TRU burners fast reactors, an interim solution making best use of the current resources to initiate burning the legacy TRU inventory while developing and testing some technologies of later use is desirable. In this perspective, a portion of the LWR fleet can be used to start burning the legacy TRUs using Th-based fuels compatible with the current plants and operational features. This analysis focuses on a typical 4-loop PWR, with 17x17 fuel assembly design and TRUs (or Pu) admixed with Th (similar to U-MOX fuel, but with Th instead of U). Global calculations of the core were represented with unit assembly simulations using the Linear Reactivity Model (LRM). Several assembly configurations have been developed to offer two options that can be attractive during the TRU transmutation campaign: maximization of the TRU transmutation rate and capability for TRU multi-recycling, to extend the option of TRU recycling in LWR until the FR is available. Homogeneous as well as heterogeneous assembly configurations have been developed with various recycling schemes (Pu recycle, TRU recycle, TRU and in-bred U recycle etc.). Oxide as well as nitride fuels have been examined. This enabled an assessment of the potential for burning and multi-recycling TRU in a Th-based fuel PWR to compare against other more typical alternatives (U-MOX and variations thereof). Results will be shown indicating that Th-based PWR fuel is a promising option to multi-recycle and

  17. Repackaging of High Fissile TRU Waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center - 13240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakley, Brian; Heacker, Fred [WAI, TRU Waste Processing Center, 100 WIPP Road Lenoir City, TN 37771 (United States); McMillan, Bill [DOE, Oak Ridge Operations, Bldg. 2714, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Twenty-six drums of high fissile transuranic (TRU) waste from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operations were declared waste in the mid-1980's and placed in storage with the legacy TRU waste inventory for future treatment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Repackaging and treatment of the waste at the TRU Waste Packaging Center (TWPC) will require the installation of additional equipment and capabilities to address the hazards for handling and repackaging the waste compared to typical Contact Handled (CH) TRU waste that is processed at the TWPC, including potential hydrogen accumulation in legacy 6M/2R packaging configurations, potential presence of reactive plutonium hydrides, and significant low energy gamma radiation dose rates. All of the waste is anticipated to be repackaged at the TWPC and certified for disposal at WIPP. The waste is currently packaged in multiple layers of containers which presents additional challenges for repackaging activities due to the potential for the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the container headspace in quantities than could exceed the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL). The outer container for each waste package is a stainless steel 0.21 m{sup 3} (55-gal) drum which contains either a 0.04 m{sup 3} or 0.06 m{sup 3} (10-gal or 15-gal) 6M drum. The inner 2R container in each 6M drum is ∼12 cm (5 in) outside diameter x 30-36 cm (12-14 in) long and is considered to be a > 4 liter sealed container relative to TRU waste packaging criteria. Inside the 2R containers are multiple configurations of food pack cans, pipe nipples, and welded capsules. The waste contains significant quantities of high burn-up plutonium oxides and metals with a heavy weight percentage of higher atomic mass isotopes and the subsequent in-growth of significant quantities of americium. Significant low energy gamma radiation is expected to be present due to the americium in-growth. Radiation dose rates on inner containers are estimated

  18. Reactions and Electrochemical Kinetics of Newly-Generated Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    Published as a Result of this Contract Work) 1. "One-Dimensional Pits in Titanium," presented at Electrochemical Society , Miami Beach, Florida...Alkire, to be presented at Electrochemical Society , Dallas, Texas, October, 1975. (Extended Abstra’ct in App~adix 1), to he submitted to 1. Electrochem...Soc.) Reprints submitted to AFOSR with 1)I)1473 Appendix A Electrochemical Society Boston, Mass. October, 1973 bst.ract No. 99 FO"ATION AN) PROPERTIES

  19. Shallow-Buried Transuranic Waste: A Comparison of Remediation Alternatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HELEN R. NEILL; ROBERT H. NEILL

    2009-01-01

    ... for this waste at DOE generator sites. The article then evaluates these two disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where DOE has not yet made a decision on remediation for TRU waste containing 20,800 Curies of radioactivity...

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Implementation of Chemical Evaluation Requirements for Transuranic Waste Disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Alison [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States); Barkley, Michelle [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States); Poppiti, James [USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report summarizes new controls designed to ensure that transuranic waste disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) does not contain incompatible chemicals. These new controls include a Chemical Compatibility Evaluation, an evaluation of oxidizing chemicals, and a waste container assessment to ensure that waste is safe for disposal. These controls are included in the Chapter 18 of the Documented Safety Analysis for WIPP (1).

  1. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj

    2014-01-01

    and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the "scientific value" of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses...

  2. Effect of Burnable Absorbers on Inert Matrix Fuel Performance and Transuranic Burnup in a Low Power Density Light-Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Recktenwald

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium dioxide has received particular attention as a fuel matrix because of its ability to form a solid solution with transuranic elements, natural radiation stability and desirable mechanical properties. However, zirconium dioxide has a lower coefficient of thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide and this presents an obstacle to the deployment of these fuels in commercial reactors. Here we show that axial doping of a zirconium dioxide based fuel with erbium reduces power peaking and fuel temperature. Full core simulations of a modified AP1000 core were done using MCNPX 2.7.0. The inert matrix fuel contained 15 w/o transuranics at its beginning of life and constituted 28% of the assemblies in the core. Axial doping reduced power peaking at startup by more than ~23% in the axial direction and reduced the peak to average power within the core from 1.80 to 1.44. The core was able to remain critical between refueling while running at a simulated 2000 MWth on an 18 month refueling cycle. The results show that the reactor would maintain negative core average reactivity and void coefficients during operation. This type of fuel cycle would reduce the overall production of transuranics in a pressurized water reactor by 86%.

  3. Characterization of 618-11 solid waste burial ground, disposed waste, and description of the waste generating facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hladek, K.L.

    1997-10-07

    The 618-11 (Wye or 318-11) burial ground received transuranic (TRTJ) and mixed fission solid waste from March 9, 1962, through October 2, 1962. It was then closed for 11 months so additional burial facilities could be added. The burial ground was reopened on September 16, 1963, and continued operating until it was closed permanently on December 31, 1967. The burial ground received wastes from all of the 300 Area radioactive material handling facilities. The purpose of this document is to characterize the 618-11 solid waste burial ground by describing the site, burial practices, the disposed wastes, and the waste generating facilities. This document provides information showing that kilogram quantities of plutonium were disposed to the drum storage units and caissons, making them transuranic (TRU). Also, kilogram quantities of plutonium and other TRU wastes were disposed to the three trenches, which were previously thought to contain non-TRU wastes. The site burial facilities (trenches, caissons, and drum storage units) should be classified as TRU and the site plutonium inventory maintained at five kilograms. Other fissile wastes were also disposed to the site. Additionally, thousands of curies of mixed fission products were also disposed to the trenches, caissons, and drum storage units. Most of the fission products have decayed over several half-lives, and are at more tolerable levels. Of greater concern, because of their release potential, are TRU radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-240, and Np-237. TRU radionuclides also included slightly enriched 0.95 and 1.25% U-231 from N-Reactor fuel, which add to the fissile content. The 618-11 burial ground is located approximately 100 meters due west of Washington Nuclear Plant No. 2. The burial ground consists of three trenches, approximately 900 feet long, 25 feet deep, and 50 feet wide, running east-west. The trenches constitute 75% of the site area. There are 50 drum storage units (five 55-gallon steel drums welded together

  4. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  5. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford waste via hydrothermal processing -- FY 1994/95 test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, R.J.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lehmann, R.W.; Momont, J.A. [Zimpro Environmental, Inc. (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating and developing organic destruction technologies that may be incorporated into the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) to treat Hanford tank waste. Organic (and ferrocyanide) destruction removes the compounds responsible for waste safety issues, and conditions the supernatant for low-level waste disposal by removing compounds that may be responsible for promoting strontium and transuranic (TRU) components solubility. Destruction or defunctionalization of complexing organics in tank wastes eliminates organic species that can reduce the efficiency of radionuclide (E.g., {sup 90}Sr) separation processes, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, and precipitation. The technologies being evaluated and tested for organic destruction are low-temperature hydrothermal processing (HTP) and wet air oxidation (WAO). Four activities are described: Batch HTP/WAO testing with Actual Tank Waste (Section 3.0), Batch HTP Testing with Simulant (Section 4.0), Batch WAO testing with Simulant (Section 5.0), and Continuous Bench-scale WAO Testing with Simulant (Section 6.0). For each of these activities, the objectives, test approach, results, status, and direction of future investigations are discussed. The background and history of the HTP/WAO technology is summarized below. Conclusions and Recommendations are provided in Section 2.0. A continuous HTP off-gas safety evaluation conducted in FY 1994 is included as Appendix A.

  6. An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

  7. Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister Categories of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is a settlement agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister categories; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and potential issues in retrieval and processing of the waste containers.

  8. Preservation of artifacts in salt mines as a natural analog for the storage of transuranic wastes at the WIPP repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martell, M.A.; Hansen, F.; Weiner, R.

    1998-10-01

    Use of nature`s laboratory for scientific analysis of complex systems is a largely untapped resource for understanding long-term disposal of hazardous materials. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the US is a facility designed and approved for storage of transuranic waste in a salt medium. Isolation from the biosphere must be ensured for 10,000 years. Natural analogs provide a means to interpret the evolution of the underground disposal setting. Investigations of ancient sites where manmade materials have experienced mechanical and chemical processes over millennia provide scientific information unattainable by conventional laboratory methods. This paper presents examples of these pertinent natural analogs, provides examples of features relating to the WIPP application, and identifies potential avenues of future investigations. This paper cites examples of analogical information pertaining to the Hallstatt salt mine in Austria and Wieliczka salt mine in Poland. This paper intends to develop an appreciation for the applicability of natural analogs to the science and engineering of a long-term disposal facility in geomedia.

  9. A little here, a little there, a fairly big problem everywhere: Small quantity site transuranic waste disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Luke; D. Parker; J. Moss; T. Monk (INEEL); L. Fritz (DOE-ID); B. Daugherty (SRS); K. Hladek (WM Federal Services Hanford); S. Kosiewicx (LANL)

    2000-02-27

    Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound Laboratory. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

  10. A Little Here, A Little There, A Fairly Big Problem Everywhere: Small Quantity Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Dale Elden; Parker, Douglas Wayne; Moss, J.; Monk, Thomas Hugh; Fritz, Lori Lee; Daugherty, B.; Hladek, K.; Kosiewicx, S.

    2000-03-01

    Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

  11. Newly-graduated midwives transcending barriers: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Michele J; Hauck, Yvonne L; O'Donoghue, Thomas; Clarke, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Midwifery has developed its own philosophy to formalise its unique identity as a profession. Newly-graduated midwives are taught, and ideally embrace, this philosophy during their education. However, embarking in their career within a predominantly institutionalised and the medically focused health-care model may challenge this application. The research question guiding this study was as follows: 'How do newly graduated midwives deal with applying the philosophy of midwifery in their first six months of practice?' The aim was to generate a grounded theory around this social process. This Western Australian grounded theory study is conceptualised within the social theory of symbolic interactionism. Data were collected by means of in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 11 recent midwifery graduates. Participant and interviewer's journals provided supplementary data. The 'constant comparison' approach was used for data analysis. The substantive theory of transcending barriers was generated. Three stages in transcending barriers were identified: Addressing personal attributes, Understanding the 'bigger picture', and finally, 'Evaluating, planning and acting' to provide woman-centred care. An overview of these three stages provides the focus of this article. The theory of transcending barriers provides a new perspective on how newly-graduated midwives deal with applying the philosophy of midwifery in their first six months of practice. A number of implications for pre and post registration midwifery education and policy development are suggested, as well as recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of transuranic contaminated soils for uranium soil integrated demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elless, M.P. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-10-01

    DOE has initiated the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) project. The objective of the USID project is to develop a remediation strategy that can be adopted for use at other DOE sites requiring remediation. Four major task groups within the USID project were formed, namely the Characterization Task Group (CTG), the Treatability Task Group (TTG), the Secondary Waste Treatment and Disposal Task Group (SWTDTG), and the Risk and Performance Assessment Task Group (RPATG). The CTG is responsible for determining the nature of the uranium contamination in both untreated and treated soil. The TTG is responsible for the selective removal of uranium from these soils in such a manner that the leaching does not seriously degrade the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generate a secondary waste form that is difficult to manage and/or dispose. The SWTDTG is responsible for developing strategies for the removal of uranium from all wastewaters generated by the TTGs. Finally the RPATG is responsible for developing the human health and environmental risk assessment of the untreated and treated soils. Because of the enormity of the work required to successfully remediate uranium-contaminated soils, an integrated approach was designed to avoid needless repetition of activities among the various participants in the USID project. Researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were assigned characterization and/or treatability duties in their areas of specialization. All tasks groups are involved in the integrated approach; however, the thrust of this report concentrates on the utility of the integrated approach among the various members of the CTG. This report illustrates the use of the integrated approach for the overall CTG and to provide the results generated specifically by the CTG or ORNL from FY1993 to the present.

  13. Confidence in leadership among the newly qualified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss-Pratt, Lisa; Morley, Mary; Bagley, Liz; Alderson, Steven

    2013-10-23

    The Francis report highlighted the importance of strong leadership from health professionals but it is unclear how prepared those who are newly qualified feel to take on a leadership role. We aimed to assess the confidence of newly qualified health professionals working in the West Midlands in the different competencies of the NHS Leadership Framework. Most respondents felt confident in their abilities to demonstrate personal qualities and work with others, but less so at managing or improving services or setting direction.

  14. Habenaria kilimanjari newly recorded for Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Bytebier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The orchid flora of Namibia is depauperate and as a result is poorly studied. Objectives: To further document the orchid flora of Namibia. Method: New herbarium collections were studied and the relevant published literature consulted. Results: Habenaria kilimanjari is newly recorded for Namibia. Conclusion: The newly recorded species increases our understanding of the orchid diversity in Namibia and underlines the need for continued botanical inventory work.

  15. 33 Shafts Category of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Monk, Thomas H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-22

    This report compiles information to support the evaluation of alternatives and analysis of regulatory paths forward for the 33 shafts. The historical information includes a form completed by waste generators for each waste package (Reference 6) that included a waste description, estimates of Pu-239 and uranium-235 (U-235) based on an accounting technique, and calculations of mixed fission products (MFP) based on radiation measurements. A 1979 letter and questionnaire (Reference 7) provides information on waste packaging of hot cell waste and the configuration of disposal shafts as storage in the 33 Shafts was initiated. Tables of data by waste package were developed during a review of historical documents that was performed in 2005 (Reference 8). Radiological data was coupled with material-type data to estimate the initial isotopic content of each waste package and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory computer code was used to calculate 2009 decay levels. Other sources of information include a waste disposal logbook for the 33 shafts (Reference 9), reports that summarize remote-handled waste generated at the CMR facility (Reference 10) and placement of waste in the 33 shafts (Reference 11), a report on decommissioning of the LAMPRE reactor (Reference 12), interviews with an employee and manager involved in placing waste in the 33 shafts (References 13 and 14), an interview with a long-time LANL employee involved in waste operations (Reference 15), a 2002 plan for disposition of remote-handled TRU waste (Reference 16), and photographs obtained during field surveys of several shafts in 2007. The WIPP Central Characterization Project (CCP) completed an Acceptable Knowledge (AK) summary report for 16 canisters of remote-handled waste from the CMR Facility that contains information relevant to the 33 Shafts on hot-cell operations and timeline (Reference 17).

  16. Assessment of degradation concerns for spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes in monitored retrievalbe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Slate, S.C.; Partain, W.L.; Divine, J.R.; Kreid, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    It has been concluded that there are no significant degradation mechanisms that could prevent the design, construction, and safe operation of monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facilities. However, there are some long-term degradation mechanisms that could affect the ability to maintain or readily retrieve spent fuel (SF), high-level wastes (HLW), and transuranic wastes (TRUW) several decades after emplacement. Although catastrophic failures are not anticipated, long-term degradation mechanisms have been identified that could, under certain conditions, cause failure of the SF cladding and/or failure of TRUW storage containers. Stress rupture limits for Zircaloy-clad SF in MRS range from 300 to 440/sup 0/C, based on limited data. Additional tests on irradiated Zircaloy (3- to 5-year duration) are needed to narrow this uncertainty. Cladding defect sizes could increase in air as a result of fuel density decreases due to oxidation. Oxidation tests (3- to 5-year duration) on SF are also needed to verify oxidation rates in air and to determine temperatures below which monitoring of an inert cover gas would not be required. Few, if any, changes in the physical state of HLW glass or canisters or their performance would occur under projected MRS conditions. The major uncertainty for HLW is in the heat transfer through cracked glass and glass devitrification above 500/sup 0/C. Additional study of TRUW is required. Some fraction of present TRUW containers would probably fail within the first 100 years of MRS, and some TRUW would be highly degraded upon retrieval, even in unfailed containers. One possible solution is the design of a 100-year container. 93 references, 28 figures, 17 tables.

  17. Cycling of transuranic radionuclides in the Columbia River, its Estuary, and the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Progress report, February 1981-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, T.M.

    1981-12-01

    Progress from February, 1981 through December, 1981 in research dealing with the behavior of transuranic and other radionuclides in the Columbia River downstream from the Hanford Reservation is summarized. All of the objectives outlined in last year's renewal proposal except one were met. The analyses of all cores raised from the Columbia River between McNary Reservoir and the mouth of the river were completed. This permits the establishment of a budget for Pu and Am. Analyses of four natural matrix standard reference materials for the National Bureau of Standards were also performed.

  18. A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

    1991-08-01

    This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Sources, Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium and Other Transuranics in the Groundwater at the Savannah River Site (Sept. 2003-Sept. 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, S.; Buesseler, K.O.; Dai, M.; Kaplan, D.

    2006-06-01

    The intent of this research effort is to: (1) provide the basis for accurate modeling and prediction of actinide transport; (2) allow for remediation strategies to be planned that might use in-situ manipulations of geochemical variables to enhance (for extraction) or retard (for immobilization) Pu mobility in the groundwater zone; (3) identify specific Pu sources and the extent of far field, or long-term migration of transuranics in groundwater; (4) reduce costly uncertainty in performance and risk assessment calculations. This new knowledge is essential to ensure continued public and worker safety at the DOE sites and the efficient management of cleanup and containment strategies.

  20. Sources, Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium and Other Transuranics in the Groundwater at the Savannah River Site (Sept. 2003-Sept. 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buesseler, K.O.; Kaplan, D.; Peterson, S.; Dai, M.

    2006-11-07

    The intent of this research effort is to: i) provide the basis for accurate modeling and prediction of actinide transport; ii) allow for remediation strategies to be planned that might use in-situ manipulations of geochemical variables to enhance (for extraction) or retard (for immobilization) Pu mobility in the groundwater zone; iii) identify specific Pu sources and the extent of far field, or long-term migration of transuranics in groundwater; iv) reduce costly uncertainty in performance and risk assessment calculations. This new knowledge is essential to ensure continued public and worker safety at the DOE sites and the efficient management of cleanup and containment strategies.

  1. Sources, Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium and Other Transuranics in the Groundwater at the Savannah River Site (Sept. 2003-Sept. 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buesseler, K.O.; Kaplan, D.; Peterson, S.; Dai, M.

    2006-11-07

    The intent of this research effort is to: (1) provide the basis for accurate modeling and prediction of actinide transport; (2) allow for remediation strategies to be planned that might use in-situ manipulations of geochemical variables to enhance (for extraction) or retard (for immobilization) Pu mobility in the groundwater zone; (3) identify specific Pu sources and the extent of far field, or long-term migration of transuranics in groundwater; (4) reduce costly uncertainty in performance and risk assessment calculations. This new knowledge is essential to ensure continued public and worker safety at the DOE sites and the efficient management of cleanup and containment strategies.

  2. Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ice) conducted at Z machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed by the DOE to support its science-based approach to stockpile stewardship. SNL/NM researchers also use the Z machine to test radiation effects on various materials in experiments designed to mimic nuclear explosions. Numerous components, parts, and materials have been tested. These experiments use a variety of radionuclides; however, plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment are the primary radionuclides used in the experiments designed for stockpile stewardship. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies, which were fabricated by SNL/NM. LANL shipped the loaded assemblies to SNL/NM for Z machine experiments. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and packaged into a respective 55-gallon drum each. Based on a memorandum of understanding between the two laboratories, LANL provides the plutonium samples and the respective radio-isotopic information. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of topics such as material control and accountability

  3. Meeting and activating the newly unemployed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Gabriel Pons

    Exposing newly unemployed workers to intensive activation aims to enhancing individual employment through its effects on search incentives and skills. However if the incentive effect is missing, activation may reduce the job search activity of many employable individuals by locking them in a time...... activation, contrary to job search meetings, reduces employment and increases sickness benefit claims.......-demanding activity. As intensive activation is usually accompanied by intensive search monitoring, it is important to disentangling the contribution of the costly activation programs from that of caseworker meetings. Using Danish data for the period 2010-13, the paper shows that requiring newly unemployed intensive...

  4. The practical skills of newly qualified nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Birkelund, Regner

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of newly qualified nurses and which subjects the nurses regarded as the most important in order to be able to live up to the requirements of clinical practice, and how they experience their potential for developing practical and moral skills, after...

  5. Monoballism Associated with Newly Onset Ketotic Hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Ersil Soysal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders as the initial symptoms of diabetes mellitus are rare. Here, we describe one of these rare manifestations of primary diabetes: a case of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus in an old-age female patient with transient monoballismus during an episode of ketotic hyperglycemia.

  6. Meeting and activating the newly unemployed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Gabriel Pons

    Exposing newly unemployed workers to intensive activation aims to enhancing individual employment through its effects on search incentives and skills. However if the incentive effect is missing, activation may reduce the job search activity of many employable individuals by locking them in a time...... activation, contrary to job search meetings, reduces employment and increases sickness benefit claims....

  7. Establishment probability in newly founded populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusset Markus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishment success in newly founded populations relies on reaching the established phase, which is defined by characteristic fluctuations of the population’s state variables. Stochastic population models can be used to quantify the establishment probability of newly founded populations; however, so far no simple but robust method for doing so existed. To determine a critical initial number of individuals that need to be released to reach the established phase, we used a novel application of the “Wissel plot”, where –ln(1 – P0(t is plotted against time t. This plot is based on the equation P0t=1–c1e–ω1t, which relates the probability of extinction by time t, P0(t, to two constants: c1 describes the probability of a newly founded population to reach the established phase, whereas ω1 describes the population’s probability of extinction per short time interval once established. Results For illustration, we applied the method to a previously developed stochastic population model of the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus. A newly founded population reaches the established phase if the intercept of the (extrapolated linear parts of the “Wissel plot” with the y-axis, which is –ln(c1, is negative. For wild dogs in our model, this is the case if a critical initial number of four packs, consisting of eight individuals each, are released. Conclusions The method we present to quantify the establishment probability of newly founded populations is generic and inferences thus are transferable to other systems across the field of conservation biology. In contrast to other methods, our approach disaggregates the components of a population’s viability by distinguishing establishment from persistence.

  8. Hanford transuranic analytical capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-02-24

    With the current DOE focus on ER/WM programs, an increase in the quantity of waste samples that requires detailed analysis is forecasted. One of the prime areas of growth is the demand for DOE environmental protocol analyses of TRU waste samples. Currently there is no laboratory capacity to support analysis of TRU waste samples in excess of 200 nCi/gm. This study recommends that an interim solution be undertaken to provide these services. By adding two glove boxes in room 11A of 222S the interim waste analytical needs can be met for a period of four to five years or until a front end facility is erected at or near the 222-S facility. The yearly average of samples is projected to be approximately 600 samples. The figure has changed significantly due to budget changes and has been downgraded from 10,000 samples to the 600 level. Until these budget and sample projection changes become firmer, a long term option is not recommended at this time. A revision to this document is recommended by March 1996 to review the long term option and sample projections.

  9. Accumulation of transuranic elements in the aquatic biota of the Belarusian sector of contaminated area near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant - Accumulation of transuranic elements in aquatic biota of Belarusian sector of contaminated area of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, Alexander; Mironov, Vladislav [International Sakharov Environmental University. Box 220070, 23 Dolgobrodskaya Street, Minsk, 220070 (Belarus)

    2014-07-01

    The evolution of nuclear contamination of Belarus territory after Chernobyl accident includes the four stages: 1. Iodine-neptunium stage, caused mainly by short-lived radionuclides {sup 131}I, {sup 239}Np and others with a half-life period of several weeks; II. Intermediate stage, caused by radionuclides with a half-life period of a year ({sup 144}Ce, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 134}Cs, etc.); III. Strontium-cesium stage, caused by {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs with a half-life period of about 30 years; IV. Plutonium-americium, caused by long-lived α-emitting radionuclides {sup 241}Am (period of half-life of 432 years) and {sup 239+240}Pu, having high radio and chemo-toxicity. According to forecasts, activity of {sup 241}Am to 2050 year will increase by 2.5 times and it will be the most important dose-related factor for the aquatic biota within the Chernobyl accident zone. In 2002 - 2008 years we have studied the accumulation of trans-uranic elements (TUE, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239+240}Pu) in basic components of water body ecosystems within the Chernobyl zone - non-flowing Perstok Lake, weak-flowing Borschevka flooding and small Braginka River. Among investigated components are water, bottom sediments, submerged macrophytes (Ceratophyllum submersum, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae, Lemna minor, Nuphar lutea, Stratiotes aloides), emergent macrophytes (Typha spp.), shellfish and fish. In the soil cover in the vicinity of the Perstok Lake activity of {sup 241}Am at present is equivalent to 300 - 600 Bq.kg{sup -1}, that is the basic source of its income to the lake. Radionuclides mobility in the water environment is higher than in the soil, that facilitates the rapid incorporation of {sup 241}Am to the trophic nets of water bodies and its removal by near-water animals in the terrestrial biotopes, including outside Chernobyl zone. Thus, the activity of {sup 241}Am in bottom sediments in the Perstok Lake and Borschevka flooding in 2008 year reach respectively 324 and 131 Bq.kg{sup -1}, and the

  10. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  11. The practical skills of newly qualified nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Birkelund, Regner

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of newly qualified nurses and which subjects the nurses regarded as the most important in order to be able to live up to the requirements of clinical practice, and how they experience their potential for developing practical and moral skills, after the decrease in practical training. A qualitative approach guided the research process and the analysis of the data. The data was collected by participant observation and qualitative interviews with four nurses as informants. The conclusions made in this study are based on the statements and the observations of the newly qualified nurses. Our findings are discussed in relation to the Aristotelian concept and other relevant literature. The main message is that the newly qualified nurses did not feel equipped when they finished their training. This could be interpreted as a direct consequence of the decrease in practical training. Our study also underlines that the way nursing theory is perceived and taught is problematic. The interviews revealed that the nurses think that nursing theories should be applied directly in practice. This misunderstanding is probably also applicable to the teachers of the theories.

  12. The Second Opening of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant? Review of Salient Characteristics and Unique Operational Considerations for Remote Handled Transuranic Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Walker, B.A.

    2003-02-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to dispose of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) beginning in 2005. (1) Four principle regulatory agencies are involved in the process of approving the RH TRU waste activities. The DOE is responsible for operational activities. The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves the design and use of shipping containers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for assuring safe and environmentally effective long-term disposal of the radioactive component of the waste and operational environmental monitoring. The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) is responsible for the handling and the disposal of the non-radioactive hazardous component of the waste. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is responsible for performing independent technical oversight of all WIPP activities, and will comment on documents and practices for the various regulated RH TRU waste activities. The DOE has already obtained the necessary approvals from the NRC, and has submitted a Class 3 Modification request to the NMED. On December 16, 2002 the DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) provided the EPA with a notice of proposed change, in accordance with 40 CFR 194.4 (b) (3), to receive and dispose of remote handled transuranic waste. (2) WIPP procedures for the management of RH TRU waste at the site are being developed. While there are no issues with current NRC Certificates of Compliance for the RH TRU waste shipping containers, it is likely that there will be some controversy over other aspects of the currently planned RH TRU waste program. These issues may include: (1) the published RH TRU waste inventory, (2) the characterization of the radionuclide portion of the waste, for which one planned method is to use dose-to-Curie conversions, and (3) the plans to use bounding estimates for the hazardous portion of the WIPP waste, rather than measuring VOCs on a container

  13. HOW CAN NEWLY BORN RAPIDLY ROTATING NEUTRON STARS BECOME MAGNETARS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Quan; Yu, Yun-Wei, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2014-05-10

    In a newly born (high-temperature and Keplerian rotating) neutron star, r-mode instability can lead to stellar differential rotation, which winds the seed poloidal magnetic field (∼10{sup 11} G) to generate an ultra-high (∼10{sup 17} G) toroidal field component. Subsequently, by succumbing to the Tayler instability, the toroidal field could be partially transformed into a new poloidal field. Through such dynamo processes, the newly born neutron star with sufficiently rapid rotation could become a magnetar on a timescale of ∼10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} s, with a surface dipolar magnetic field of ∼10{sup 15} G. Accompanying the field amplification, the star could spin down to a period of ∼5 ms through gravitational wave radiation due to the r-mode instability and, in particular, the non-axisymmetric stellar deformation caused by the toroidal field. This scenario provides a possible explanation for why the remnant neutron stars formed in gamma-ray bursts and superluminous supernovae could be millisecond magnetars.

  14. Problems of Newly-Founded Universities and Solution Offers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem DOĞAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many new universities have recently been founded due to economic, social and cultural reasons in our country. These universities face various problems stemming from whether their locations or their organizational structures. Revealing problems experienced within these newly-founded universities and developing possible solutions for these problems are important in in order to increase the service quality provided by higher education which is one of the most important institutions that generate qualified human power. In this study, the problems of the universities founded after 2006 have been put forth with both administrative and academic staffs' view points and solution offers have been developed towards these problems with a common point of view. In this study in which quantitative and qualitative research methods used, is used Scale of Academicians' Problems was applied to 150 academics as the data gathering device. In order to profoundly examine the data acquired by the scale, two administrative personnel were interviewed and a focus-group interview was performed with eight academics. According to the study data, the most important problem of newly-founded universities is the lack of institutionalization. Physical inadequacy and lack of qualified personnel follow this problem. Efficient management and forming an efficient organization structure are among suggested solution offers.

  15. Removal of strontium and transuranics from Hanford tank waste via addition of metal cations and chemical oxidant: FY 1995 test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, R.J.; Zacher, A.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Elliott, K.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Gano, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    Chelating organics and some of their degradation products in the Hanford tank waste, such as EDTA, HEDTA, and NTA act to solubilize strontium and transuranics (TRU) in the tank waste supernatant. Displacement of strontium and TRU will facilitate the removal of these radionuclides via precipitation/filtration, ion exchange, or solvent extraction so that low-level waste feed specifications can be met. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has investigated two methods for releasing organic-complexed strontium and TRU components to allow for effective pretreatment of tank waste supernatant: metal cation addition (to promote displacement and flocculation) and chemical oxidant (pennanganate) addition (to promote chelator destruction/defunctionalization and possibly flocculation). These methods, which can be conducted at near-ambient. temperatures and pressures, could be deployed as intank processes.

  16. Millisecond newly born pulsars as efficient accelerators of electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Z; Machabeli, G; Chkheidze, N

    2015-01-01

    The newly born millisecond pulsars are investigated as possible energy sources for creating ultra-high energy electrons. The transfer of energy from the star rotation to high energy electrons takes place through the Landau damping of centrifugally driven (via a two stream instability) electrostatic Langmuir waves. Generated in the bulk magnetosphere plasma, such waves grow to high amplitudes, and then damp, very effectively, on relativistic electrons driving them to even higher energies. We show that the rate of transfer of energy is so efficient that no energy losses might affect the mechanism of particle acceleration; the electrons might achieve energies of the order of 10^{18}eV for parameters characteristic of a young star.

  17. Teaching intubation skills using newly deceased infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfield, D G; Flaksman, R J; Lin, T H; Kantak, A D; Kokomoor, F W; Vollman, J H

    1991-05-08

    This prospective study was designed to (1) test the hypothesis that the majority of families of newly dead infants in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit would consent to their infants' being intubated for teaching purposes, (2) determine factors related to family consent, and (3) determine the effects of participation on resident physicians and respiratory therapists. Family consent for intubation was requested following 44 (80%) of the 55 deaths that occurred during the 10-month study period. Of these requests, 32 (73%) were granted. Proportionately more white than black families consented and consent was positively related to autopsy permission. Fifty-three (75%) of 71 trainees completed a mailed questionnaire after their first intubation experience. Although each respondent found the experience helpful, many reported mixed feelings categorized as doubt about participating, apprehension and discomfort, respect for the body, appreciation for the opportunity, a sense of achievement, and feelings of comfort knowing that consent had been obtained. These findings confirm our initial hypothesis and suggest that (1) newly dead infants can be a valuable resource for teaching intubation skills, and (2) others considering a similar approach need to be aware of and sensitive to trainees' feelings.

  18. Position paper on gas generation in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, L.H.

    1994-11-15

    Gas generation by transuranic (TRU) waste is a significant issue because gas will, if produced in significant quantities, affect the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) with respect to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations for the long-term isolation of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. If significant gas production occurs, it will also affect, and will be affected by, other processes and parameters in WIPP disposal rooms. The processes that will produce gas in WIPP disposal rooms are corrosion, microbial activity and radiolysis. This position paper describes these processes and the models, assumptions and data used to predict gas generation in WIPP disposal rooms.

  19. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony.

  20. Landscape heterogeneity shapes predation in a newly restored predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Matthew J; Varley, Nathan; Smith, Douglas W; Stahler, Daniel R; MacNulty, Daniel R; Boyce, Mark S

    2007-08-01

    Because some native ungulates have lived without top predators for generations, it has been uncertain whether runaway predation would occur when predators are newly restored to these systems. We show that landscape features and vegetation, which influence predator detection and capture of prey, shape large-scale patterns of predation in a newly restored predator-prey system. We analysed the spatial distribution of wolf (Canis lupus) predation on elk (Cervus elaphus) on the Northern Range of Yellowstone National Park over 10 consecutive winters. The influence of wolf distribution on kill sites diminished over the course of this study, a result that was likely caused by territorial constraints on wolf distribution. In contrast, landscape factors strongly influenced kill sites, creating distinct hunting grounds and prey refugia. Elk in this newly restored predator-prey system should be able to mediate their risk of predation by movement and habitat selection across a heterogeneous risk landscape.

  1. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  2. Fluoride release from newly marketed fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Beth L; Bartoloni, Joseph A; Hensley, Donna M; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2012-03-01

    New fluoride varnishes have been marketed that reportedly release more fluoride (Enamel Pro) or release fluoride more slowly (Vanish XT). The purpose of this study was to compare the amount and rate of fluoride release of new fluoride varnishes with other traditional fluoride varnishes. Extracted molars were cut into block sections. The enamel surfaces of the sections were painted with Enamel Pro, Duraphat, Vanish, or Vanish XT fluoride varnishes. One group was not treated and served as a negative control. The tooth sections were immersed in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in parts per million was measured after the first 30 minutes, daily for the first week, and weekly until the level was below the limit of detection. Fluoride release was plotted over time. Cumulative fluoride release and rate of release (slope) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Tukey (α = .05). Enamel Pro had the greatest cumulative fluoride release. There was no significant difference between Duraphat and Vanish. Vanish XT had the lowest cumulative fluoride release. The rate of fluoride release from 1 week to limit of detection was Enamel Pro > Vanish > Duraphat > Vanish XT. The two newly marketed fluoride varnishes (Enamel Pro and Vanish XT) had significantly different fluoride release from the two conventional fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Vanish).

  3. Comparison of inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium, strontium, and transuranic elements from K-basin water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; DesChane, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    The work presented in this report was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Crosscutting Program (ESP), Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this work was to investigate radionuclide uptake by several newly produced ion exchange materials under actual waste conditions, and to compare the performance of those materials with that of commercially available ion exchangers. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing cesium and strontium from 105-KE Basin water. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion exchange materials under similar operating conditions. Additional flow studies are needed to predict material capacities and to develop complete ion exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 (manufactured by UOP), clinoptilolite (a naturally occurring zeolite), and materials produced on an experimental basis by AlliedSignal (biotites and nonatitanates), 3M (hexacyanoferrates), Selion Technologies, Inc. (hexacyanoferrates and titanates), and Texas A&M University (pharmacosiderites, biotites, and nonatitanates). In all, the performance of 14 ion exchange materials was evaluated at two solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}) using actual 105-KE Basin water. Evaluation consisted of determining cesium and strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Actual 105-KE Basin water was obtained from a sample collected during the sludge dissolution work conducted by PNNL in FY 1996. This sample was taken from the bottom of the basin and contained significantly higher concentrations of the radioactive constituents than do samples taken from the top of the basin.

  4. End-of-life experiential learning for newly licensed nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Joellen; Thirlwell, Sarah

    2014-03-01

    Many newly licensed nurses begin their careers with limited knowledge and experience in end-of-life care. Findings from a literature review and a learning needs assessment of newly licensed nurses at a comprehensive cancer center guided the development of an 8-hour educational program on end-of-life care. An experiential learning approach was used to foster confidence and develop knowledge and skills in delivery of end-of-life care by newly licensed nurses. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Review of the geological and structural setting near the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility (TRUWF) Technical Area 52 (TA-52), Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Gardner, Jamie N.

    2007-10-01

    Because of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s proximal location to active geologic structures, assessment of seismic hazards, including the potential for seismic surface rupture, must occur before construction of any facilities housing nuclear or other hazardous materials. A transuranic waste facility (TRUWF) planned for construction at Technical Area 52 (TA-52) provides the impetus for this report. Although no single seismic hazards field investigation has focused specifically on TA-52, numerous studies at technical areas surrounding TA-52 have shown no significant, laterally continuous faults exhibiting activity in the last 10 ka within 3,000 ft of the proposed facility. A site-specific field study at the footprint of the proposed TRUWF would not yield further high-precision data on possible Holocene faulting at the site because post-Bandelier Tuff sediments are lacking and the shallowest subunit contacts of the Bandelier Tuff are gradational. Given the distal location of the proposed TRUWF to any mapped structures with demonstrable Holocene displacement, surface rupture potential appears minimal at TA-52.

  6. Newly Identified Rydberg Emission Lines in Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David K.; Rudy, R. J.; Bernstein, L. S.

    2008-09-01

    Newly Identified Rydberg Emission Lines in Novae David K. Lynch, Richard. J. Rudy (The Aerospace Corporation) & Lawrence S. Bernstein (Spectral Sciences, Inc.) Novae spectra in the near infrared frequently show a set of six emission lines that have not been positively identified (Williams, Longmore, & Geballe 1996, MNRAS, 279, 804; Lynch et al. 2001, AJ, 122, 2013; Rudy et al. 2002 ApJ, 573, 794; Lynch et al. 2004 Astron. J. 127, 1089-1097). These lines are at 0.8926, 1.1114, 1.1901, 1.5545, 2.0996 and 2.425 µm ± 0.005 µm. Krautter et al. (1984 A&A 137, 304) suggested that three of the lines were due to rydberg (hydrogenic) transitions in an unspecified atomic species that was in the 4th or 5th ionization stage (core charge = 4 & 5). We believe that Krautter et al.'s explanation is correct based on 4 additional lines that we have identified in the visible and near infrared spectrum of V723 Cassiopeiae. The observed Rydberg lines appear to originate from high angular momentum states with negligible quantum defects. The species cannot be determined with any certainty because in rydberg states, the outer electron sees a nucleus shielded by the inner electrons and together the inner atom appears to have a charge of +1, like hydrogen. As a result, the atom looks hydrogenic and species such as CV, NV, OV, MgV, SiV, etc. have their rydberg transitions at very similar wavelengths. All the lines represent permitted transitions, most likely formed by recombination. Atoms with core charges 4, 5 & 6 are rarely seen in the astrophysical environment because an extremely hot radiation field is necessary to ionize them. Thermonuclear runaways on the surface of a white dwarf can reach millions of degrees K, and thus there are enough X-ray photons available to achieve the necessary high ionization levels.

  7. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Bock Lee; Jin Sik Cheon; Sung Ho Kim; Jeong-Yong Park; Hyung-Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU)–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochem...

  8. Performance of a newly developed implantable centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Tatsumi, E; Takano, H

    2001-01-01

    The performance of the newly developed implantable centrifugal blood pump was investigated in vitro. The pump was developed with the end goal of building a versatile system that includes a left ventricular assist system with an internal secondary battery or an implantable biventricular assist system with two implantable blood pumps. The hydrodynamic characteristics and efficiency of the blood pump were evaluated, and the mechanical damage to the blood caused by the blood pump was assessed through a hemolysis test using fresh goat blood. The pump could generate 120 mm Hg at a flow rate of 5 L/min and a motor speed of 2,500 rpm. The electric input power to the pump was approximately 5 watts under these working conditions. The hemolysis caused by the pump was a bit higher than that by the former model, but stayed within an acceptable range. Performance of the pump in vitro was considered sufficient for a left ventricular assist device, although further design improvement is necessary in terms of hemolysis and system efficiency to improve biocompatibility of the pump.

  9. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2008-05-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a

  10. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2008-05-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a

  11. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL: DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FIELD TESTING PROTOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is a generic verification protocol by which EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program tests newly developed equipment for distributed generation of electric power, usually micro-turbine generators and internal combustion engine generators. The protocol will ...

  12. Newly established AGU awards and lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Beth; Kumar, Mohi

    2012-05-01

    The Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring (Biogeosciences section) recognizes AGU members who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences while excelling as teachers and serving as role models for the next generation of female scientists. This new award acknowledges the importance of female mentors in enhancing gender balance in physical science career paths. The award is being endowed to honor Elizabeth Sulzman, an isotope biogeochemist and soil scientist, whose enthusiasm for teaching awed many undergraduates at Oregon State University. Current plans are to present the first Sulzman award at the 2013 Fall Meeting. Applicants must be women who are within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D., and nomination packages should include a cover letter, resumé, and three letters of recommendation. As they become available, more details will be posted on the Biogeosciences section Web site (http://www.agu.org/sections/biogeo/). The award will provide up to $1000 to one successful nominee each year, although the exact monetary amount is yet to be determined. AGU is currently accepting donations to endow this award; contact Victoria Thompson (vthompson@agu.org) to get involved.

  13. A model for community physiotherapy from the perspective of newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model for community physiotherapy from the perspective of newly graduated physiotherapists as a guide to curriculum revision. ... To develop a model of community service physiotherapy to guide curriculum reform. Methods ... Article Metrics.

  14. Concomitant HIV infection in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV-positive MM patients with unusual clinical presentations and aggressive ... fatigue, weight loss, bone marrow plasmacytosis, renal insufficiency ... cell transplantation. ... HIV was newly diagnosed during the work-up of MM in eight cases.

  15. Antipsychotic medications and dental caries in newly diagnosed schizophrenia: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Wen, Yen-Hsia; Hsieh, Kun-Pin; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard

    2016-11-30

    We investigated the association between antipsychotic medications and the risk of dental caries in patients with schizophrenia. We enroled a nationwide cohort of patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia within 1 year of dental caries development. Exposure to antipsychotics and other medications was categorised according to their type and duration, and the association between exposure and dental caries was assessed through logistic regressions. Of the 3610 patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia, 2149 (59.5%) exhibited an incidence of treated dental caries. Logistic regression analysis identified a younger age, female sex, high income, a 2-year history of dental caries, and exposure to first-generation antipsychotics, and antihypertensives as independent risk factors for treated dental caries in patients with schizophrenia. Hyposalivation, the adverse effect of first-generation antipsychotics and antihypertensives, was associated with an increased risk of treated dental caries. However, hypersalivation from first-generation antipsychotics for dental caries was associated with a protective factor. These findings suggest that clinicians should pay attention to the aforementioned risk factors for dental caries in patients with schizophrenia, particularly while prescribing first-generation antipsychotics and antihypertensives to such patients.

  16. The waste isolation pilot plant. Permanent isolation of defense transuranic waste in deep geologic salt. A national solution and international model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose; Van Luik, Abraham [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Carlsbad Field Office

    2015-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is located about 42 kilometers from the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. It is an operating deep geologic repository in bedded salt 657 meters below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert. Since its opening in March of 1999, it has received about 12,000 shipments totaling about 91,000 cubic meters of defense related transuranic (TRU) wastes. Twenty-two sites have been cleaned up of their defense-legacy TRU waste. The WIPP's shipping program has an untarnished safety record and its trucks and trailers have safely traveled the equivalent of about 60 round-trips to the Moon. WIPP received, and deserved, a variety of safety accolades over its nearly 15 year working life. In February of 2014, however, two incidents resulted in a major operational suspension and reevaluation of its safety systems, processes and equipment. The first incident was an underground mining truck fire, followed nine days later by an airborne radiation release incident. Accident Investigation Board (AIB) reports on both incidents point to failures of plans, procedures and persons. The AIB recommendations for recovery from both these incidents are numerous and are being carefully implemented. One major recommendation is to no longer have different maintenance and safety requirements for nuclear handling equipment and mining equipment. Maintenance and cleanliness of mining equipment was cited as a contributing cause to the underground fire, and the idea that there can be lesser rigor in taking care of mining equipment, when it is being operated in the same underground space as the waste handling equipment, is not tenable. At some point in the future, the changes made in response to these two incidents will be seen as a valuable lesson learned on behalf of future repository programs. WIPP will once again be seen as a ''pilot'' in the nautical sense, in terms of 'showing the way' - the way to a national and international radioactive waste

  17. Generational (age) differences in nursing students' preferences for teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jean T; Martin, Tina; White, Jill; Elliott, Rowena; Norwood, Anne; Mangum, Carl; Haynie, Lisa

    2006-09-01

    A generational age transformation is occurring in nursing classrooms across the United States. Nurse educators need to prepare for the different values and expectations of students from Generation X and the newly emerging Generation Y in the educational environment. This quantitative, descriptive research begins to examine the preferences and expectations of these generations regarding teaching methods.

  18. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekoe, Eunice

    2014-04-24

    South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997). The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa.  A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis) in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied.  The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro) based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation.  The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  19. A model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Seekoe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa transformed higher education through the enactment of the Higher Education Act (No. 101 of 1997. The researcher identified the need to develop a model for the mentoring of newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Objectives: To develop and describe the model for mentoring newly-appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa. Method: A qualitative and theory-generating design was used (following empirical findings regarding needs analysis in order to develop the model. The conceptualisation of the framework focused on the context, content, process and the theoretical domains that influenced the model. Ideas from different theories were borrowed from and integrated with the literature and deductive and inductive strategies were applied. Results: The structure of the model is multidimensional and complex in nature (macro, mesoand micro based on the philosophy of reflective practice, competency-based practice andcritical learning theories. The assumptions are in relation to stakeholders, context, mentoring, outcome, process and dynamic. The stakeholders are the mentor and mentee within an interactive participatory relationship. The mentoring takes place within the process with a sequence of activities such as relationship building, development, engagement, reflective process and assessment. Capacity building and empowerment are outcomes of mentoring driven by motivation. Conclusion: The implication for nurse managers is that the model can be used to develop mentoring programmes for newly-appointed nurse educators.

  20. An analysis of delegation styles among newly qualified nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Carin; Allan, Helen; Horton, Khim; Johnson, Martin; Evans, Karen; Ball, Elaine

    2017-02-15

    Aim The aim of this research was to explore how newly qualified nurses learn to organise, delegate and supervise care in hospital wards when working with and supervising healthcare assistants. It was part of a wider UK research project to explore how newly qualified nurses recontextualise the knowledge they have gained during their pre-registration nurse education programmes for use in clinical practice. Method Ethnographic case studies were conducted in three hospital sites in England. Data collection methods included participant observations and semi-structured interviews with newly qualified nurses, healthcare assistants and ward managers. A thematic analysis was used to examine the data collected. Findings Five styles of how newly qualified nurses delegated care to healthcare assistants were identified: the do-it-all nurse, who completes most of the work themselves; the justifier, who over-explains the reasons for decisions and is sometimes defensive; the buddy, who wants to be everybody's friend and avoids assuming authority; the role model, who hopes that others will copy their best practice but has no way of ensuring how; and the inspector, who is acutely aware of their accountability and constantly checks the work of others. Conclusion Newly qualified nurses require educational and organisational support to develop safe and effective delegation skills, because suboptimal or no delegation can have negative effects on patient safety and care.

  1. Promoting Reproductive Health among Newly Married Couples in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan CHE; Yong-gang DING; Chen-ping XU; Er-sheng GAO

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of health education promotion among newly married couples who need reproductive health knowledge and service.Methods An intervention study was conducted at three sub-districts, Xuhui district,Shanghai, which aimed to improve reproductive health of newly married couples. The main intervention activities included creating educational web pages, organizing participatory activities, distributing leaflets, and providing relevant counseling and technique service.Results After intervention, the knowledge of family planning and reproductive health and their sanitary habit for these newly married couples were much improved.Conclusion This project produced a model to improve reproductive health at sub-district level and this model can be expanded to provide relevant service to other groups of people.

  2. Characteristics of newly-formed cementum following Emdogain application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Al-Askar, Mansour; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal regenerative techniques have been proposed; however, the outcomes remain debatable. The present investigation assessed the regenerated cementum following enamel matrix derivative application in dehiscence-type defects. Buccal osseous dehiscences were surgically created on the maxillary cuspid, and the second and fourth premolars in five female beagle dogs. The treatment group (n = 15 sites) received the enamel matrix derived application, whereas the control groups (n = 15) did not. The dogs were sacrificed 4 months following treatment and the specimens were histologically and histometrically examined. The newly formed cementum was uneven in thickness and mineralization, overlapped the old cementum and exhibited functional orientation, cementocyte lacunae and collagen fibril bundles. Most of the histological specimens showed the presence of a gap between the newly formed cementum and the underlying dentin. Control sites did not exhibit any cementum formation. The present study concluded that newly formed cementum is of cellular type and exhibits multiple characteristics.

  3. Solid state physics of transuranics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terminello, L J; Allen, P G; Shuh, D K; Terry, J

    2000-08-22

    The experimental validation of first principals calculations of plutonium and its alloys is an important part of LLNL's science-based stockpile stewardship mission. This project has addressed this issue in the following ways. We have measured the electronic structure of U, Pu, and their alloys using valence band photoemission (PES), Soft X-Ray fluorescence (SXF), and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). In the long term, this will allow a direct comparison between calculated and measured density of electronic states, identifying the degree of f-electron localization in the alloys, and thus, permit selection of the best modeling code.

  4. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase.......Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  5. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  6. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  7. Dilemmas of a Newly Recruited Academic Qualified Professor: A Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the situation of a newly recruited academic professor who volunteered to teach a course on Research Methods to first-term MBA students in a practitioner-oriented case method Business School. Research Methods is a unique course due to its relevance not only in business but also across all graduate programs. Instructional and…

  8. 30 CFR 46.6 - Newly hired experienced miner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TRAINING TRAINING AND RETRAINING OF MINERS ENGAGED IN SHELL DREDGING OR EMPLOYED AT SAND, GRAVEL, SURFACE STONE, SURFACE CLAY, COLLOIDAL PHOSPHATE, OR SURFACE LIMESTONE MINES. § 46.6 Newly hired experienced...) Instruction on the recognition and avoidance of electrical hazards and other hazards present at the mine,...

  9. Oral Definitions of Newly Learned Words: An Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sara C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined and compared patterns of errors in the oral definitions of newly learned words. Fifteen 9- to 11-year-old children with language learning disability (LLD) and 15 typically developing age-matched peers inferred the meanings of 20 nonsense words from four novel reading passages. After reading, children provided oral definitions…

  10. Health problems of newly arrived migrants and refugees in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena

    2017-07-01

    The number of migrants and refugees in Europe in the past few years has increased dramatically due to war, violence or prosecutions in their homeland. Migration may affect physical, mental and social health. The objective of this article is to assess migrants and refugees' health problems, and to recommend appropriate interventions. A PubMed search of published articles on health problems of newly arrived migrants and refugees was conducted from 2003 through 2016, focusing on the current refugee crisis in Europe. In addition to communicable diseases, such as respiratory, gastrointestinal and dermatologic infections, non-communicable diseases, including chronic conditions, mental and social problems, account for a significant morbidity burden in newly arrived migrants and refugees. Vaccine-preventable diseases are also of outmost importance. The appropriate management of newly arrived refugees and migrants' health problems is affected by barriers to access to health care including legal, communication, cultural and bureaucratic difficulties. There is diversity and lack of integration regarding health care provision across Europe due to policy differences between health care systems and social services. There is a notable burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases among newly arrived migrants and refugees. Provision of health care at reception and temporary centres should be integrated and provided by a multidisciplinary team Appropriate health care of migrants and refugees could greatly enhance their health and social status which will benefit also the host countries at large.

  11. Weight and Height in Children Newly Diagnosed With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Aeltsje; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Sulkers, Esther; Hooimeijer, H. Louise; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; van Sonderen, Eric; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although weight loss and lack of linear growth occur in children with cancer, growth history is not included in research that aims to determine nutritional status in children newly diagnosed with cancer. Therefore, this study aimed to determine weight loss and lack of linear growth in th

  12. Continuous lenalidomide treatment for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palumbo, Antonio; Hajek, Roman; Delforge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Lenalidomide has tumoricidal and immunomodulatory activity against multiple myeloma. This double-blind, multicenter, randomized study compared melphalan-prednisone-lenalidomide induction followed by lenalidomide maintenance (MPR-R) with melphalan-prednisone-lenalidomide (MPR) or melphalan......-prednisone (MP) followed by placebo in patients 65 years of age or older with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma....

  13. Genome Sequences of Newly Isolated Mycobacteriophages Forming Cluster S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Monique L; Bragg, Judd; Bruce, Asri; Dehn, Ari; Drouin, Jordan; Hefner, Morgan; Katon, Dylan; McHugh, Dustin; Zeba, Franck; Bowman, Charles A; Cresawn, Steven G; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Russell, Daniel A; Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F; Dunbar, David A; Zegers, Gerard P; Page, Shallee T

    2016-09-29

    We describe the genomes of two mycobacteriophages, MosMoris and Gattaca, newly isolated on Mycobacterium smegmatis The two phages are very similar to each other, differing in 61 single nucleotide polymorphisms and six small insertion/deletions. Both have extensive nucleotide sequence similarity to mycobacteriophage Marvin and together form cluster S. Copyright © 2016 Mills et al.

  14. Strong decays of newly observed heavy flavor hadrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang

    2009-01-01

    In this talk, we briefly review the experimental status of newly observed charmed hadrons during the past years. Then we introduce the theoretical progresses on these charmed hadrons, especially our studies on the strong decays of new charmed hadrous during the past one year.

  15. Bone histomorphometry in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, JA; Koudstaal, J; Wiersema-Buist, J; Kamps, WA; Timens, W

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain insight into bone formation and resorption in children with newly diagnosed untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In 23 consecutive children with ALL, a bone biopsy was taken from the crista iliaca posterior under ketamine anesthesia, together with t

  16. Greening industries in newly industrialising countries: Asian-style leapfrogging?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, P.P.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the six contributions in this edited volume. An overview is given of the main issues, debates and concepts on the greening of industries in Newly Industrialising Economies (NIE or NIC) with particular reference to China, Taiwan and Singapore. The rapid economic

  17. Being a team leader: newly registered nurses relate their experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Louise; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how newly qualified registered nurses experience their leadership role in the ward-based nursing care team. A nurse's clinical leadership affects the quality of care provided. Newly qualified nurses experience difficulties during the transition period from student to qualified professional and find it challenging to lead nursing care. Twelve nurses were interviewed and the transcribed texts analysed using qualitative content analysis to assess both manifest and latent content. Five themes were identified: feeling stranded; forming well-functioning teams; learning to lead; having the courage, strength, and desire to lead; and ensuring appropriate care. The findings indicate that many factors limit nurses' leadership but some circumstances are supportive. The leadership prerequisites for newly registered nurses need to improve, emphasizing different ways to create a supportive atmosphere that promotes professional development and job satisfaction. To increase nurse retention and promote quality of care, nurse managers need to clarify expectations and guide and support newly qualified nurses in a planned way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The 1000 Brightest HIPASS Galaxies Newly Cataloged Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan-Weber, E; Staveley-Smith, L; Jerjen, H; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Ryder, S D; Barnes, D G; De Blok, W J G; Kilborn, V A

    2002-01-01

    The HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) is a blind 21-cm survey for extragalactic neutral hydrogen, covering the whole southern sky. The HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalog (BGC; Koribalski et al. 2002) is a subset of HIPASS and contains the 1000 HI-brightest (peak flux density) galaxies. Here we present the 138 HIPASS BGC galaxies, which had no redshift measured prior to the Parkes multibeam HI surveys. Of the 138 galaxies, 87 are newly cataloged. Newly cataloged is defined as no optical (or infrared) counterpart in the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Using the Digitized Sky Survey we identify optical counterparts for almost half of the newly cataloged galaxies, which are typically of irregular or magellanic morphological type. Several HI sources appear to be associated with compact groups or pairs of galaxies rather than an individual galaxy. The majority (57) of the newly cataloged galaxies lie within ten degrees of the Galactic Plane and are missing from optical surveys due to confusion with stars or dust extinc...

  19. Dilemmas of a Newly Recruited Academic Qualified Professor: A Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the situation of a newly recruited academic professor who volunteered to teach a course on Research Methods to first-term MBA students in a practitioner-oriented case method Business School. Research Methods is a unique course due to its relevance not only in business but also across all graduate programs. Instructional and…

  20. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  1. Young Infants Encode Lexical Stress in Newly Encountered Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the nature of infants' representations of newly encountered word forms. Using a word-object association task, we taught 14-month-olds novel three-syllable words differing in segments and stress patterns. At test, we manipulated the stress pattern of the word or the position of the stressed syllable in the word. Our…

  2. Chenodeoxycholic acid reduces intestinal permeability in newly weaned piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der Y.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Bosch, van den M.; Holst, J.J.; Moreto, M.; Buurman, W.A.; Kulik, W.; Kempen, van T.A.T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Piglets are highly susceptible to gut health-related problems. Intravenously administered chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) affects gut health mediated through glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2). To test whether CDCA is a suitable feed additive for improving gut health, a trial was performed with newly wean

  3. Increased gluconeogenesis in youth with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of increased gluconeogenesis as an important contributor to fasting hyperglycaemia at diabetes onset is not known. We evaluated the contribution of gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis to fasting hyperglycaemia in newly diagnosed youths with type 2 diabetes following an overnight fast. Basal ...

  4. Quality of life of elderly persons with newly diagnosed cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, B A; Osterlind, K; Roer, O

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to investigate quality of life (QoL) in elderly persons newly diagnosed with cancer (65+ years) in relation to age, contact with the health-care system, ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), hope, social network and support, and to identify which factors were associated...

  5. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.A. Obateru

    2016-05-06

    May 6, 2016 ... patients. Methods: This hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out from December 2010 to June. 2011. ... phages, and defect in the production of immunoglobulin A ... result is immunosuppression.7 There have been reports of the ... parasites in newly diagnosed treatment naıve adult HIV/AIDS.

  6. Weight and Height in Children Newly Diagnosed With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Aeltsje; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Sulkers, Esther; Hooimeijer, H. Louise; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; van Sonderen, Eric; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although weight loss and lack of linear growth occur in children with cancer, growth history is not included in research that aims to determine nutritional status in children newly diagnosed with cancer. Therefore, this study aimed to determine weight loss and lack of linear growth in th

  7. Erosion effect of a newly developed soft drink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.C.; Voss, H.P.; Ruben, J.L.; Jager, D.J.; Vieira, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the erosion effect of a newly developed soft drink available in 3 different flavours is compared with the erosion effect of some common soft drinks. Several basic parameters of the soft drinks were determined: pH, titratable acidity, and the calcium as well as phosphate concentratio

  8. Chromosomal structural changes and microsatellite variations in newly synthesized hexaploid wheat mediated by unreduced gametes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAO LI; YAJUAN WANG; XIAOXUE GUO; YINPENG DU; CHANGYOU WANG; WANQUAN JI

    2016-12-01

    Allohexaploid wheat was derived from interspecific hybridization, followed by spontaneous chromosome doubling. Newly synthesized hexaploid wheat by crossing Triticum turgidum and Aegilops tauschii provides a classical model to understand the mechanisms of allohexaploidization in wheat. However, immediate chromosome level variation and microsatellite level variation of newly synthesized hexaploid wheat have been rarely reported. Here, unreduced gametes were applied to develop synthesized hexaploid wheat, NA0928, population by crossing T. turgidum ssp. dicoccum MY3478 and Ae. tauschii SY41, and further S0–S3 generations of NA0928 were assayed by sequential cytological and microsatellite techniques. We demonstrated that plentiful chromosomal structural changes and microsatellite variations emerged in the early generations of newlysynthesized hexaploid wheat population NA0928, including aneuploidy with whole-chromosome loss or gain, aneuploidy with telosome formation, chromosome-specific repeated sequence elimination (indicated by fluorescence in situ hybridization) and microsatellite sequence elimination (indicated by sequencing), and many kinds of variations have not been previously reported. Additionally, we reported a new germplasm, T. turgidum accession MY3478 with excellent unreduced gametes trait, and then succeeded to transfer powdery mildew resistance from Ae. tauschii SY41 to synthesized allohexaploid wheatpopulation NA0928, which would be valuable resistance resources for wheat improvement.

  9. Generating Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Generating Units are any combination of physically connected generators, reactors, boilers, combustion turbines, and other prime movers operated together to produce...

  10. Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

    2011-07-01

    Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

  11. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of transuranic waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of transuranic waste (TRUW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but is necessary to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) contact- and remote-handed (CH and RH) TRUW. Included are definitions of the TRUW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of CH and RH TRUW, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM TRUW case considered.

  12. Generational diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  13. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  14. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  15. Competence of newly qualified registered nurses from a nursing college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BG Morolong

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The South African education and training system, through its policy of outcomesbased education and training, has made competency a national priority. In compliance to this national requirement of producing competent learners, the South African Nursing Council ( 1999 B require that the beginner professional nurse practitioners and midwives have the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and values which will enable them to render efficient professional service. The health care system also demands competent nurse practitioners to ensure quality in health care. In the light of competency being a national priority and a statutory demand, the research question that emerges is, how competent are the newly qualified registered nurses from a specific nursing college in clinical nursing education? A quantitative, non-experimental contextual design was used to evaluate the competence of newly qualified registered nurses from a specific nursing college. The study was conducted in two phases. The first phase dealt with the development of an instrument together with its manual through the conceptualisation process. The second phase focused on the evaluation of the competency of newly qualified nurses using the instrument based on the steps of the nursing process. A pilot study was conducted to test the feasibility of the items of the instrument. During the evaluation phase, a sample of twenty-six newly qualified nurses was selected by simple random sampling from a target population of thirty-six newly qualified registered nurses. However, six participants withdrew from the study. Data was collected in two general hospitals where the newly qualified registered nurses were working. Observation and questioning were used as data collection techniques in accordance with the developed instrument. Measures were taken to ensure internal validity and reliability of the results. To protect the rights of the participants, the researcher adhered to DENOSA’S (1998

  16. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively, high burst size (125 and 145, respectively, stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  17. Quality of life of elderly persons with newly diagnosed cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, B A; Osterlind, K; Roer, O

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to investigate quality of life (QoL) in elderly persons newly diagnosed with cancer (65+ years) in relation to age, contact with the health-care system, ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL), hope, social network and support, and to identify which factors were associated...... with low QoL. The sample consisted of 101 patients (75 women and 26 men) newly diagnosed with cancer. EORTC QLQ-C30, Nowotny's Hope Scale, Katz ADL and the Interview Schedule for Social Interaction (ISSI) were used. The analysis was carried out in four age groups and revealed no significant differences...... in QoL. Compared with the other age groups, those of a high age (80+ years) more often lived alone, used more home-help service and had a smaller social network. Factors associated with low QoL were 'no other incomes than retirement pension', 'low level of hope' and 'lung cancer'. In addition, 'being...

  18. Insulin Oedema in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinkaya, Semra; Yılmaz Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat; Peltek Kendirici, Havva Nur; Bilgili, Hatice; Yıldırım, Nurdan; Aycan, Zehra

    2010-01-01

    Despite the essential role of insulin in the management of patients with insulin deficiency, insulin use can lead to adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia and weight gain. Rarely, crucial fluid retention can occur with insulin therapy, resulting in an oedematous condition. Peripheral or generalised oedema is an extremely rare complication of insulin therapy in the absence of heart, liver or renal involvement. It has been reported in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes following the initiation of insulin therapy, and in underweight patients on large doses of insulin. The oedema occurs shortly after the initiation of intensive insulin therapy. We describe two adolescent girls with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, who presented with oedema of the lower extremities approximately one week after the initiation of insulin treatment; other causes of oedema were excluded. Spontaneous recovery was observed in both patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274337

  19. Clinical characteristics of 297 newly diagnosed Chinese HIV / AIDS patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玮

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical characteristics of HIV infected patients in China in order to improve early recognition and diagnosis of AIDS.Methods A total of297 newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS patients were enrolled in Peking Union Medical College Hospital(PUMCH)from January 2001 to December 2012,including 19 patients of primary phase,115 of asymptomatic phase and 163 of AIDS phase.Clinical characteristics of these patients were retrospectively analyzed.Results Two hundred and

  20. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending...... a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received either a course or written information on the Danish healthcare system and subsequently evaluated this quantitatively. Results: The evaluation revealed a positive appraisal of the course/information provided. Conclusion: In times of austerity, incorporating...

  1. [Textual research on Newly Carved sun Zhenren's Qian jin fang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L

    1995-01-01

    As one of the ancient edition of Qian jin fang, this Newly Carved Sun Zhenren's Qian Jin Fang is far more authentic in the structure of its contents and its text, as compared to those editions of the Song Dynasty, and is, of course, closer to its original form and more reliable with textual significance. This article explores the distribution, characters of the edition and time of carving.

  2. A newly developed snack effective for enhancing bone volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Hidetaka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of primary osteoporosis is higher in Japan than in USA and European countries. Recently, the importance of preventive medicine has been gradually recognized in the field of orthopaedic surgery with a concept that peak bone mass should be increased in childhood as much as possible for the prevention of osteoporosis. Under such background, we have developed a new bean snack with an aim to improve bone volume loss. In this study, we examined the effects of a newly developed snack on bone volume and density in osteoporosis model mice. Methods Orchiectomy (ORX and ovariectomy (OVX were performed for C57BL/6J mice of twelve-week-old (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbar, ME, USA were used in this experiment. We prepared and given three types of powder diet e.g.: normal calcium diet (NCD, Ca: 0.9%, Clea Japan Co., Tokyo, Japan, low calcium diet (LCD, Ca: 0.63%, Clea Japan Co., and special diet (SCD, Ca: 0.9%. Eighteen weeks after surgery, all the animals were sacrified and prepared for histomorphometric analysis to quantify bone density and bone mineral content. Results As a result of histomorphometric examination, SCD was revealed to enhance bone volume irrespective of age and sex. The bone density was increased significantly in osteoporosis model mice fed the newly developmental snack as compared with the control mice. The bone mineral content was also enhanced significantly. These phenomena were revealed in both sexes. Conclusion It is shown that the newly developed bean snack is highly effective for the improvement of bone volume loss irrespective of sex. We demonstrated that newly developmental snack supplements may be a useful preventive measure for Japanese whose bone mineral density values are less than the ideal condition.

  3. Hope as experienced in women newly diagnosed with gynaecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Kristianna; Mogensen, Ole; Hall, Elisabeth O C

    2009-01-01

    AIM: This article presents findings from a hermeneutic-phenomenological study with the aim to investigate the meaning of the lived experience of hope in women newly diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. METHOD: Fifteen women were interviewed the day they were receiving the diagnosis at a gynaecol......AIM: This article presents findings from a hermeneutic-phenomenological study with the aim to investigate the meaning of the lived experience of hope in women newly diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. METHOD: Fifteen women were interviewed the day they were receiving the diagnosis...... at a gynaecological department of a Danish university hospital. The women, aged 24-87 (median 52yrs), were diagnosed with ovarian, endometrial, cervical and vulvar cancer. RESULTS: Hope was found to be connected to both diagnosis, cure, family life and life itself and closely tied to hopelessness. The newly received...... cancer diagnosis made the women oscillate between hope and hopelessness, between positive expectations of getting cured and frightening feelings of the disease taking over. Five major interrelated themes of hope were identified: hope of being cured, cared for and getting back to normal, hope as being...

  4. Hope as experienced in women newly diagnosed with gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Kristianna; Mogensen, Ole; Hall, Elisabeth O C

    2009-09-01

    This article presents findings from a hermeneutic-phenomenological study with the aim to investigate the meaning of the lived experience of hope in women newly diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. Fifteen women were interviewed the day they were receiving the diagnosis at a gynaecological department of a Danish university hospital. The women, aged 24-87 (median 52 yrs), were diagnosed with ovarian, endometrial, cervical and vulvar cancer. Hope was found to be connected to both diagnosis, cure, family life and life itself and closely tied to hopelessness. The newly received cancer diagnosis made the women oscillate between hope and hopelessness, between positive expectations of getting cured and frightening feelings of the disease taking over. Five major interrelated themes of hope were identified: hope of being cured, cared for and getting back to normal, hope as being active and feeling well, hope as an internal power to maintain integration, hope as significant relationships and hope as fighting against hopelessness. Thus, hope was woven together with hopelessness in a mysterious way; it took command through inner strength and courage based on a trust in being cured and of being in relationship with significant others. The findings of the close relationship between the shades of hope and hopelessness support the need for nurses to continue to practice hope-inspiring nursing. Nurses need to understand the complexity of hope and its close connection to hopelessness when newly diagnosed with a threatening disease as cancer; and the findings might help nurses assist patients in fighting hopelessness.

  5. Instant Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Elaina

    2017-01-01

    Generation Z students (born between 1995-2010) have replaced millennials on college campuses. Generation Z students are entrepreneurial, desire practical skills with their education, and are concerned about the cost of college. This article presents what need to be known about this new generation of students.

  6. The Heterogeneity of Early Parkinson’s Disease: A Cluster Analysis on Newly Diagnosed Untreated Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amboni, Marianna; Picillo, Marina; Moccia, Marcello; Longo, Katia; Santangelo, Gabriella; De Rosa, Anna; Allocca, Roberto; Giordano, Flavio; Orefice, Giuseppe; De Michele, Giuseppe; Santoro, Lucio; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Barone, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background The variability in the clinical phenotype of Parkinson’s disease seems to suggest the existence of several subtypes of the disease. To test this hypothesis we performed a cluster analysis using data assessing both motor and non-motor symptoms in a large cohort of newly diagnosed untreated PD patients. Methods We collected data on demographic, motor, and the whole complex of non-motor symptoms from 100 consecutive newly diagnosed untreated outpatients. Statistical cluster analysis allowed the identification of different subgroups, which have been subsequently explored. Results The data driven approach identified four distinct groups of patients, we have labeled: 1) Benign Pure Motor; 2) Benign mixed Motor-Non-Motor; 3) Non-Motor Dominant; and 4) Motor Dominant. Conclusion Our results confirmed the existence of different subgroups of early PD patients. Cluster analysis revealed the presence of distinct subtypes of patients profiled according to the relevance of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Identification of such subtypes may have important implications for generating pathogenetic hypotheses and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23936396

  7. Dynalight Next Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Dam-Hansen, Carsten;

    2016-01-01

    The project aims to develop the next generation of energy cost-efficient artificial lighting control that enables greenhouse growers to adapt their use of artificial lighting dynamically to fluctuations in the price of electricity. This is a necessity as fluctuations in the price of electricity can...... be so large that it directly affects the production costs. The project results show that the newly developed lighting control software, DynaLight NG, allows greenhouse growers to adapt their use of artificial lighting to market variations in electricity prices without negative impacts on plant quality...... or production time. The electricity savings that DynaLight NG can achieve depends on the installed lamp type. When used together with conventional SON-T lamps DynaLight NG can achieve an electricity savings of 25% compared to traditional artificial lighting control. The project results also show that shifting...

  8. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

  9. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  10. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  11. Coping strategies among patients with newly diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson Larsson, Birgitta; Nordin, Karin; Askmark, Håkan; Nygren, Ingela

    2014-11-01

    To prospectively identify different coping strategies among newly diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and whether they change over time and to determine whether physical function, psychological well-being, age and gender correlated with the use of different coping strategies. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal disease with impact on both physical function and psychological well-being. Different coping strategies are used to manage symptoms and disease progression, but knowledge about coping in newly diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients is scarce. This was a prospective study with a longitudinal and descriptive design. A total of 33 patients were included and evaluation was made at two time points, one to three months and six months after diagnosis. Patients were asked to complete the Motor Neuron Disease Coping Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Physical function was estimated using the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale. The most commonly used strategies were support and independence. Avoidance/venting and information seeking were seldom used at both time points. The use of information seeking decreased between the two time points. Men did not differ from women, but patients ≤64 years used positive action more often than older patients. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale was positively correlated with positive action at time point 1, but not at time point 2. Patients' psychological well-being was correlated with the use of different coping strategies. Support and independence were the most used coping strategies, and the use of different strategies changed over time. Psychological well-being was correlated with different coping strategies in newly diagnosed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. The knowledge about coping strategies in early stage of the disease may help the nurses to improve and develop the care and support for these patients. © 2014 John Wiley

  12. Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1981-04-03

    Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing ~24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Details analysis indicates that the design offers a substantial improvement in specific power over the present generator of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There are three copies in the file.

  13. Newly Described Tumor Entities in Sinonasal Tract Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal tract (nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses) is extremely challenging due in part to the tremendous diversity of tumor types that may arise in this region. Compounding the difficulty, a number of new sinonasal tumor entities have been recently described, and pathologists may not yet be familiar with these neoplasms. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the newly described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and renal cell-like adenocarcinoma.

  14. “Genealogy Record of Yehe Nala” newly completed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueBaicheng

    2004-01-01

    Na shiyuan from Benxi of Liaoning Province finally completed compiling the “Genealogy Record of Yehe Nala” after spending years in studying a large number of ancient documentsand tracking the migration and the growth of the clan's ancestors about 500 years ago. The genealogy record is mostly based on “Genealogy Record of Na Clan” which was first written by Na Shoushan in 1943 and then re-compiled by his son. The newly edition records in detail the clan members' political, military and academic achievements,

  15. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  16. The experience of learning to speak up: a narrative inquiry on newly graduated registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Bernice Yee-Shui; Chan, Engle Angela

    2015-07-01

    To explore the process of learning to speak up in practice among newly graduated registered nurses. Speaking up is an important aspect of communication to ensure patient safety within a healthcare team. However, nurses have reported being hesitant about speaking up or being unable to be heard, despite adopting various safety tools. A power differential could be a factor in their hesitation to speak up. While a large number of new graduates are employed in the lower rungs of the hospital hierarchy to resolve local and global nursing shortages, the process of their learning to speak up remains under-explored. The narrative concept of experience is addressed through the three-dimensional space of a narrative inquiry. Eighteen new graduates were recruited. Stories of experiences of speaking up emerged naturally during repeated unstructured interviews and ongoing email conversations with three participants. The complex process of learning to speak up is schematically represented. Three interrelated narrative threads were identified: (1) learning to speak up requires more than one-off training and safety tools, (2) mentoring speaking up in the midst of educative and miseducative experiences and (3) making public spaces safe for telling secret stories. Speaking up requires ongoing mentoring to see new possibilities for sustaining professional identities in the midst of miseducative experiences under the potential shaping of the Chinese culture and generational differences. Appreciative inquiry might be a new approach that can be used to promote positive cultural changes to encourage newly graduated registered nurses to learn to speak up to ensure patient safety. Cultivating a safe and open culture of communication and mentoring new graduates to speak up will benefit patient safety now and in the future by helping to retain committed patient advocates who could mentor future generations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Wind Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  18. Rainfall generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Mehrotra, Raj

    This chapter presents an overview of methods for stochastic generation of rainfall at annual to subdaily time scales, at single- to multiple-point locations, and in a changing climatic regime. Stochastic rainfall generators are used to provide inputs for risk assessment of natural or engineering systems that can undergo failure under sustained (high or low) extremes. As a result, generation of rainfall has evolved to provide options that adequately represent such conditions, leading to sequences that exhibit low-frequency variability of a nature similar to the observed rainfall. The chapter consists of three key sections: the first two outlining approaches for rainfall generation using endogenous predictor variables and the third highlighting approaches for generation using exogenous predictors often simulated to represent future climatic conditions. The first section presents approaches for generation of annual and seasonal rainfall and daily rainfall, both at single-point locations and multiple sites, with an emphasis on alternatives that ensure appropriate representation of low-frequency variability in the generated rainfall sequences. The second section highlights advancements in the subdaily rainfall generation procedures including commonly used approaches for daily to subdaily rainfall generation. The final section (generation using exogenous predictors) presents a range of alternatives for stochastic downscaling of rainfall for climate change impact assessments of natural and engineering systems. We conclude the chapter by outlining some of the key challenges that remain to be addressed, especially in generation under climate change conditions, with an emphasis on the importance of incorporating uncertainty present in both measurements and models, in the rainfall sequences that are generated.

  19. Determination of Atterberg limits using newly devised mud press machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayabali, Kamil; Akturk, Ozgur; Fener, Mustafa; Ozkeser, Ali; Ustun, Ayla Bulut; Dikmen, Orhan; Harputlugil, Furkan; Asadi, Ramin

    2016-04-01

    Consistency limits are one of the most prominent parameters to be determined in geotechnical investigations. While these limits are akin to one another, different tools determine each one. Each method of determining consistency limits has its own uncertainties, the operator dependency being the top source of uncertainty. Liquid limit (LL) and plastic limit (PL) tests have a number of uncertainties affecting the test results. The very speculative nature of the bead-rolling method for the plastic limit has long been known. Besides this, its results can be barely accepted as quantitative. In the past, a number of attempts have been made to eliminate these setbacks for Atterberg limits. The scope of this investigation is to evaluate the potential of newly developed "mud press method (MPM)" to predict the two consistency limits. The material employed for this investigation covers 275 soils, whose liquid limits range from 28 to 166. The log(a) and 1/b parameters obtained from the MPM method were correlated to results of the conventional methods. The PL and LL for each soil were predicted using empirical forms and were compared with the laboratory values. Remarkably good matches were obtained between the conventionally determined test results and the predicted values for the liquid and plastic limits. The newly developed tool is superior in several aspects to the available conventional methods and tools.

  20. Newly velocity field of Sulawesi Island from GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsito, D. A.; Susilo, Simons, W. J. F.; Abidin, H. Z.; Sapiie, B.; Triyoso, W.; Andreas, H.

    2017-07-01

    Sulawesi microplate Island is located at famous triple junction area of the Eurasian, India-Australian, and Philippine Sea plates. Under the influence of the northward moving Australian plate and the westward motion of the Philippine plate, the island at Eastern part of Indonesia is collide and with the Eurasian plate and Sunda Block. Those recent microplate tectonic motions can be quantitatively determine by GNSS-GPS measurement. We use combine GNSS-GPS observation types (campaign type and continuous type) from 1997 to 2015 to derive newly velocity field of the area. Several strategies are applied and tested to get the optimum result, and finally we choose regional strategy to reduce error propagation contribution from global multi baseline processing using GAMIT/GLOBK 10.5. Velocity field are analyzed in global reference frame ITRF 2008 and local reference frame by fixing with respect alternatively to Eurasian plate - Sunda block, India-Australian plate and Philippine Sea plates. Newly results show dense distribution of velocity field. This information is useful for tectonic deformation studying in geospatial era.

  1. Compaction and transport properties of newly replicated Caulobacter crescentus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; McAdams, Harley H

    2011-12-01

    Upon initiating replication of the Caulobacter chromosome, one copy of the parS centromere remains at the stalked pole; the other moves to the distal pole. We identified the segregation dynamics and compaction characteristics of newly replicated Caulobacter DNA during transport (highly variable from cell to cell) using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The parS centromere and a length (also highly variable) of parS proximal DNA on each arm of the chromosome are segregated with the same relatively slow transport pattern as the parS locus. Newly replicated DNA further than about 100 kb from parS segregates with a different and faster pattern, while loci at 48 kb from parS segregate with the slow pattern in some cells and the fast pattern in others. The observed parS-proximal DNA compaction characteristics have scaling properties that suggest the DNA is branched. HU2-deletion strains exhibited a reduced compaction phenotype except near the parS site where only the ΔHU1ΔHU2 double mutant had a compaction phenotype. The chromosome shows speed-dependent extension during translocation suggesting the DNA polymer is under tension. While DNA segregation is highly reliable and succeeds in virtually all wild-type cells, the high degree of cell to cell variation in the segregation process is noteworthy.

  2. Technical Equivalency Documentation for a Newly Aquired Alpha Spectroscopy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, D P; Fisher, S K; Hann, P R; Hume, R

    2007-04-25

    The response of a recently acquired Canberra{trademark} Alpha Analyst 'Blue' system (Chamber Number's 173-208) used by the Hazards Control, Radiation Safety Section, WBC/Spectroscopy Team has been studied with respect to an existing Canberra system. The existing Canberra system consists of thirty Alpha Analyst dual chambers Model XXXX comprising a total of sixty detectors (Chambers Number's 101-124 and 137-172). The existing chambers were previously compared to an older system consisting of thirty-six Model 7401 alpha spectrometry chambers (Chamber Number's 1-36) Chambers 101-124 and 137-172 are DOELAP accredited. The older system was previously DOELAP accredited for the routine Alpha Spectroscopy program used in LLNL's in vitro bioassay program. The newly acquired Alpha Analyst system operates on a network with software that controls and performs analysis of the current Alpha Analyst system (Chamber Number's 101-124 and 137-172). This exact same software is used for the current system and the newly acquired system and is DOELAP accredited. This document compares results from the existing Alpha System with the newer Alpha Analyst system.

  3. [Synthetic Drugs - An Overview of Important and Newly Emerging Substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzler, F; Heinz, A; Köhler, S

    2016-11-01

    Background: Synthetic drug use and abuse are on the rise. Governmental institutions report a shift in consumption from natural drugs to synthetic drugs, and show an increase in confiscation, particularly of methamphetamine and newly identified psychoactive substances. In addition, the media report an alarming increase in the rate of consumption and casualties resulting from the use of drugs such as "crystal meth" and warn against a flood of this and other designer drugs from eastern European countries. Objectives: The present article gives an overview of current popular and widely used synthetic drugs, both classical substances (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDMA) and new psychoactive substances ("designer drugs", "legal highs"). It addresses their pharmacology, effects, side effects, and risks. It furthermore explores newly emerging problems for the health system and clinical practice regarding the treatment of intoxication as well as withdrawal. Methods: The current scientific literature concerning synthetic drugs is summarized and official statistics and reports provided by the government are reviewed. Results: Different derivatives of amphetamine vary in their risk of harm and addictive potential. Methamphetamine, one of the most dangerous derivatives, is increasingly being consumed in certain regions of Germany. New psychoactive substances represent a heterogeneous group of substances. Since the substances are often unknown to the user, they are unpredictable in their effects and side effects.

  4. Gas generation from radiolytic attack of TRU-contaminated hydrogenous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerwekh, A.

    1979-06-01

    In 1970, the Waste Management and Transportation Division of the Atomic Energy Commission ordered a segregation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated solid wastes. Those below a contamination level of 10 nCi/g could still be buried; those above had to be stored retrievably for 20 y. The possibility that alpha-radiolysis of hydrogenous materials might produce toxic, corrosive, and flammable gases in retrievably stored waste prompted an investigation of gas identities and generation rates in the laboratory and field. Typical waste mixtures were synthesized and contaminated for laboratory experiments, and drums of actual TRU-contaminated waste were instrumented for field testing. Several levels of contamination were studied, as well as pressure, temperature, and moisture effects. G (gas) values were determined for various waste matrices, and degradation products were examined.

  5. Generative Semantics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  6. Experimental Measurements of Belt Gears in Newly Developed Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Mascenik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the alternative of determination of state of the belt gear. To realize themeasurements a newly developed device was designed for measurement and diagnostics of the belt gears. The main task is to detect the V-belt slip expressed by the coefficient of elastic creep and of specific slip with a measuring device. The measurements regarding can be performed if input revolutions of the electric motor and torque of the belt gear are constant whereas the tensioning force of the belt gear changes. It is also possible to perform the measurement if the input revolutions of the electric motor and the tensioning forces are constant and the torque changes.

  7. Weight history of patients with newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, N de Fine; Richelsen, B; Siersma, V

    2008-01-01

    .3 years was 14.7 kg (interquartile range 6.0-23.0). Women gained weight more than men, and the lower the weight at age 20 years, the greater the weight gain. The average weight gain from 10 years prior to diabetes diagnosis until diagnosis, however, was only 1 kg and decreased markedly with age. These 10...... newly diagnosed with diabetes aged > or = 40 years. Patients' weight at diagnosis was measured by the doctor, while patients recalled their weight approximately 1, 5 and 10 years prior to diagnosis and at age 20 years. RESULTS: Median weight gain from age 20 years to diabetes diagnosis at median age 65...... that it is important to advise young patients in particular, especially women, who have gained and sustained considerable weight to curb this upward weight trend in order to prevent the development of diabetes....

  8. Chenodeoxycholic acid reduces intestinal permeability in newly weaned piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Y; Gerrits, W J J; van den Bosch, M

    2012-01-01

    , peptide YY (PYY), and glucose. Afterwards, piglets were offered the experimental diets ad libitum. On days 3.5, 7.5, and 10.5 after weaning, serum responses to an intragastric dose of lactulose and Co-EDTA were tested at 2 h after dosing in 8 piglets per treatment. Immediately thereafter, piglets were......, and plasma GLP-2 and PYY. Serum cobalt and lactulose at day 10.5 tended to be lower in CDCA pigs compared with control pigs. Serum cobalt and lactulose concentrations were positively correlated (r = 0.67; P ... to newly weaned piglets, implying that CDCA deserves further study as a means for improving intestinal health. The positive correlation found between Co-EDTA and lactulose indicates that both marker molecules measure similar change in permeability....

  9. Hadronic decay properties of newly observed $\\Omega_c$ baryons

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ze; Ye, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Ailin

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic decay widths of the newly observed charmed strange baryons, $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ have been calculated in a $^3P_0$ model. Our results indicate that $\\Omega_c(3066)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3090)^0$ can be interpreted as the $1P-$wave $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{3}{2}^-)$ or $\\Omega_{c2}(\\frac{5}{2}^-)$. Though the measured masses of $\\Omega_c(3000)^0$, $\\Omega_c(3050)^0$ and $\\Omega_c(3119)^0$ are lower than existed theo...

  10. Illness-behaviour, attitude, and knowledge in newly diagnosed diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, B E; Vesterdal Jørgensen, H; Sestoft, L

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five consecutive patients with newly diagnosed type I diabetes, aged 15-52, were exposed to a systematic educational programme and followed up by three-monthly controls for two to four years. In order to identify psychic, social and behavioural factors associated with good metabolic control...... programme was evaluated by the patients as useful and satisfying. Actual illness-related knowledge, skills and compliance were not closely associated, suggesting that knowledge itself is an insufficient precondition to appropriate management of the illness. Social class and other social environment factors...... were not associated with illness-related behaviour and attitudes and neither was metabolic control. There were no psychological or social differences between the patients with good and those with poor control. A possible interpretation of these findings is that an increase of quality of life...

  11. Open Defecation in Newly Created Kenyan Counties: A Situational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuguna, John; Muruka, Charles

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 5.6 million Kenyans defecate in the open. This exposes them to sanitation related diseases. This study analysed open defecation trends among the 47 counties in Kenya, newly created in 2013. The study used four data sets on open defecation, unimproved water supply coverage, poverty levels, and population density. Mean open defecation rate across the 47 counties was 23.5% and the median rate 6.9%. The lowest rate was 0.1% and the highest 88.4%. Fifteen counties had open defecation rates of 40% and above. Another 21 counties had open defecation rates of less than 5%. Poverty was the most significant predictor accounting for 68.4% of the variance in open defecation after controlling for unimproved water supply and population density. Some counties have unacceptably high open defecation rates. Alleviating poverty may reduce open defecation in Kenya.

  12. Four newly recorded species of Dryopteridaceae from Kashmir valley, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAKOOR AHMAD MIR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mir SA, Mishra AK, Reshi ZA, Sharma MP. 2014. Four newly recorded species of Dryopteridaceae from Kashmir valley, India. Biodiversitas 15: 6-11. Habitat diversity, elevation, cloud cover, rainfall, seasonal and temperature variations have created many ideal sites for the luxuriant growth of pteridophytes in the Kashmir valley, yet all the regions of the valley have not been surveyed. In Kashmir valley the family Dryopteridaceae is represented by 31 species. During the recent extensive field surveys of Shopian district four more species viz., Dryopteris caroli-hopei Fraser-Jenkins, Dryopteris blanfordii subsp. nigrosquamosa (Ching Fraser-Jenkins, Dryopteris pulvinulifera (Bedd. Kuntze and Polystichum Nepalense (Spreng C. Chr. have been recorded for the first time from the valley. The taxonomic description, synonyms, distribution and photographs of each species are given in this article.

  13. Subclassification of newly diagnosed glioblastomas through an immunohistochemical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Conroy

    Full Text Available Molecular signatures in Glioblastoma (GBM have been described that correlate with clinical outcome and response to therapy. The Proneural (PN and Mesenchymal (MES signatures have been identified most consistently, but others including Classical (CLAS have also been reported. The molecular signatures have been detected by array techniques at RNA and DNA level, but these methods are costly and cannot take into account individual contributions of different cells within a tumor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether subclasses of newly diagnosed GBMs could be assessed and assigned by application of standard pathology laboratory procedures. 123 newly diagnosed GBMs were analyzed for the tumor cell expression of 23 pre-identified proteins and EGFR amplification, together allowing for the subclassification of 65% of the tumors. Immunohistochemistry (IHC-based profiling was found to be analogous to transcription-based profiling using a 9-gene transcriptional signature for PN and MES subclasses. Based on these data a novel, minimal IHC-based scheme for subclass assignment for GBMs is proposed. Positive staining for IDH1R132H can be used for PN subclass assignment, high EGFR expression for the CLAS subtype and a combined high expression of PTEN, VIM and/or YKL40 for the MES subclass. The application of the proposed scheme was evaluated in an independent tumor set, which resulted in similar subclass assignment rates as those observed in the training set. The IHC-based subclassification scheme proposed in this study therefore could provide very useful in future studies for stratification of individual patient samples.

  14. Sulfasalazine and temozolomide with radiation therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A recent phase 1/2 clinical trial argued for caution for the use of sulfasalazine in progressive glioblastoma (GBM. However, the study enrolled patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma indicating that patients recruited probably had severe disease. Thus, the study may not accurately reflect the effectiveness of sulfasalazine for GBM and we hypothesized that earlier sulfasalazine administration may lead to anticancer effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulfasalazine can improve the outcomes of patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Subjects and Methods: A total of 12 patients were treated with temozolomide and sulfasalazine with radiation therapy after surgery. Twelve patients with primary GBM treated with temozolomide and radiation therapy formed the control group. Progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and seizure-free survival (SFS curves were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. The survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The median OS, PFS and SFS did not differ between the groups. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred over the duration of the study in nine (75% patients. The median SFS was 12 months in nine patients who received sulfasalazine administration for more than 21 days, which was strongly but not significantly longer than the 3 months observed in the control group (P = 0.078. Conclusions: Sulfasalazine treatment with temozolomide plus radiotherapy for newly diagnosed primary GBM is associated with a high rate of discontinuation due to hematologic toxic effects. This treatment may have no effect on OS or PFS, although it may improve seizure control if an adequate dose can be administered.

  15. [The newly certified 105 Japanese medical technologists in clinical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Kazunari

    2002-05-01

    Interest in quality assurance(QA) in clinical laboratories in Japan has increased over the past 30 years. We have however been lagging behind countries such as the USA, Canada and the UK in QA of clinical microbiology. The main problem of QA in Japan is human resources. There are only about 400 laboratory physicians certified by the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine(JSLM). Almost no academics in microbiology are interested in QA and they mostly lack clinical competence. There is a small number of faculty positions, and promotions are mostly based on research productivity while medical graduates are increasingly drawn to bench work for basic, short-term research. The Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM) was established in 1990 in order to promote the development of clinical microbiology and its relevant fields in Japan. And 2001 was a milestone in sustained efforts of the JSLM to initiate qualifying examinations of medical technologists(MT) in clinical microbiology. 105 MT in clinical microbiology were newly certified by the Joint Committee of JSCM, JSLM, Japanese Association of Medical Technologists (JAMT) and College of Clinical Pathology of Japan(CCPJ). The certified MTs have appropriate educational background and are well motivated. With good on-the-job training, they are expected to perform effectively various tasks, including laboratory management. Recent radical changes in the health care delivery system have also had serious implications on laboratory services and QA of microbiological tests. The primary goal of the clinical microbiology laboratory is to provide accurate diagnostic testing and high-quality service at a low cost for its customers. It is believed that the Joint Committee and the newly certified MTs will contribute to narrowing the gap between Japan and other countries in clinical microbiology.

  16. Vibro-acoustic performance of newly designed tram track structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladin, Ivo; Lakušić, Stjepan; Ahac, Maja

    2017-09-01

    Rail vehicles in interaction with a railway structure induce vibrations that are propagating to surrounding structures and cause noise disturbance in the surrounding areas. Since tram tracks in urban areas often share the running surface with road vehicles one of top priorities is to achieve low maintenance and long lasting structure. Research conducted in scope of this paper gives an overview of newly designed tram track structures designated for use on Zagreb tram network and their performance in terms of noise and vibration mitigation. Research has been conducted on a 150 m long test section consisted of three tram track types: standard tram track structure commonly used on tram lines in Zagreb, optimized tram structure for better noise and vibration mitigation and a slab track with double sleepers embedded in a concrete slab, which presents an entirely new approach of tram track construction in Zagreb. Track has been instrumented with acceleration sensors, strain gauges and revision shafts for inspection. Relative deformations give an insight into track structure dynamic load distribution through the exploitation period. Further the paper describes vibro-acoustic measurements conducted at the test site. To evaluate the track performance from the vibro-acoustical standpoint, detailed analysis of track decay rate has been analysed. Opposed to measurement technique using impact hammer for track decay rate measurements, newly developed measuring technique using vehicle pass by vibrations as a source of excitation has been proposed and analysed. Paper gives overview of the method, it’s benefits compared to standard method of track decay rate measurements and method evaluation based on noise measurements of the vehicle pass by.

  17. Serum irisin levels and thyroid function--newly discovered association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchala, Marek; Zybek, Ariadna; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina

    2014-10-01

    Irisin is a newly discovered adipo-myokin, which is reported to have a significant influence on the body metabolism and thermogenesis. Other influencing factors on metabolic state are thyroid hormones, which increase heat production and control the energy balance. Due to numerous similarities in action it seems imperative to explore these substances' potential mutual influence on the body. The aim of the study is to provide the first ever, according to our knowledge, evaluation of serum irisin concentrations in patients with thyroid dysfunction and its correlation with creatine kinase (CK) levels - a serum marker of muscle damage. The studied group consisted of 20 patients with newly diagnosed thyroid disorder - hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Venous blood samples were analyzed for irisin, thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and CK serum concentrations. Patients' body mass index (BMI), body weight and muscle mass were evaluated using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Median serum irisin levels were lower in hypothyroid (117.30ng/ml) than hyperthyroid (161.95ng/ml) patients with a borderline statistical significance (p=0.0726). The negative correlation between irisin and TSH levels was demonstrated (r=-0.4924, p=0.0230), as well as the positive correlation between irisin and FT4 levels (r=0.4833, p=0.0360). The CK level was negatively correlated with irisin, FT4 and FT3 concentrations (r=-0.7272, p=0.0140; r=-0.9636, p=<0.0001; r=-0.8838, p=0.0007, respectively). The study demonstrates that irisin concentrations may vary according to the thyrometabolic state, which potentially could be related to the degree of muscle damage.

  18. Report Generator

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Download data from HP Quality Center using of OTA Client. Implementation must be scalable to all projects under test. That is, it will be possible to generate automatically test reports at least for 2010, Modulaser and Gen2 (FW or SW). Report Generator is a software implemented in VBA that allows get data from HP Quality Center for export it (either tables, charts or text) to a document in Word format. Report Generator es un Software implementado en VBA que permite extraer datos de HP Q...

  19. Radioecology of transuranics: characterization and behaviour of nuclear fuels particulates in soil of Palomares (Almeria); Radiecologia de transuranidos: Caracterizacion y comportamiento de particulas de combustible nuclear en suelos afectados por el accidente de Palomares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon del Valle, A.

    2003-07-01

    The framework of this work is within Radioecology. Its objective is to improve our knowledge on the environmental impact of transuranic elements (plutonium and americium principally) in a Mediterranean ecosystem in SE Spain. The studies concerning the transuranide behavior in the affected area include solubility tests with contaminated soils (in physiological and aqueous solutions)and control of the evolution and effects caused by the agricultural activities. The interaction degree between plutonium and soil constituents has been studied by adapting and applying a sequential extraction procedure, based on the specificity of the reagents in the solubilization of the different mineralogical phases. The level of plutonium and americium has been determined in gastropods collected in the surroundings of Palomares, thus proving the presence of transuranides in the food chain. Autoradiographic studies show that the radioactive contamination present in soils, affected by a nuclear accident that occurred in 1966, is in particle form. In order to characterize the contamination, isolation, description and destructive and nondestructive analyses of radioactive particles have been performed and the results appear in this work. All these studies have been carried out by standard metrological procedures (field and laboratory), and by performing a huge number of radiochemical analysis and alpha and gamma spectrometric measurements. Therefore, the research work of this doctoral. Thesis will contribute to the obtention of an adequate scientific basis for the assessment of the radiological situation in radioactively-contaminates sites, as well as to the development of methods and criteria for restoration. (Author)

  20. Elucidating interactions and conductivity of newly synthesised low bandgap polymer with protic and aprotic ionic liquids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Attri

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have examined the conductivity and interaction studies of ammonium and imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs with the newly synthesised low bandgap polymer (Poly(2-heptadecyl-4-vinylthieno[3,4-d]thiazole (PHVTT. Use of low bandgap polymers is the most suitable way to harvest a broader spectrum of solar radiations for solar cells. But, still there is lack of most efficient low bandgap polymer. In order to solve this problem, we have synthesised a new low bandgap polymer and investigated its interaction with the ILs to enhance its conductivity. ILs may undergo almost unlimited structural variations; these structural variations have attracted extensive attention in polymer studies. The aim of present work is to illustrate the state of art progress of implementing the interaction of ILs (protic and aprotic ILs with newly synthesised low bandgap polymer. In addition to this, our UV-Vis spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy results have revealed that all studied ILs (tributylmethylammonium methyl sulfate ([N1444][MeSO4] from ammonium family and 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim]Cl, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl from imidazolium family have potential to interact with polymer. Our semi empirical calculation with help of Hyperchem 7 shows that protic IL ([Mim]Cl interacts strongly with the low bandgap polymer through the H-bonding. Further, protic ILs shows enhanced conductivity than aprotic ILs in association with low bandgap polymer. This study provides the combined effect of low bandgap polymer and ILs that may generate many theoretical and experimental opportunities.

  1. Prolonged Temozolomide Maintenance Therapy in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardelly, Marco; Dangel, Elena; Gohde, Julia; Noell, Susan; Behling, Felix; Lepski, Guilherme; Borchers, Christian; Koch, Marilin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Bisdas, Sotirios; Naumann, Aline; Paulsen, Frank; Zips, Daniel; von Hehn, Ulrike; Ritz, Rainer; Tatagiba, Marcos Soares; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh

    2017-05-01

    The impact of prolonging temozolomide (TMZ) maintenance beyond six cycles in newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) remains a topic of discussion. We investigated the effects of prolonged TMZ maintenance on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In this retrospective single-center cohort study, we included patients with GBM who were treated with radiation therapy with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ. For analysis, patients were considered who either completed six TMZ maintenance cycles (group B), continued with TMZ therapy beyond six cycles (group C), or stopped TMZ maintenance therapy within the first six cycles (group A). Patients with progression during the first six TMZ maintenance cycles were excluded. Clinical data from 107 patients were included for Kaplan-Meier analyses and 102 for Cox regressions. Median PFS times were 8.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1-12.4) in group A, 13.7 months (95% CI 10.6-17.5) in group B, and 20.9 months (95% CI 15.2-43.5) in group C. At first progression, response rates of TMZ/lomustine rechallenge were 47% in group B and 13% in group C. Median OS times were 12.7 months (95% CI 10.3-16.8) in group A, 25.2 months (95% CI 17.7-55.5) in group B, and 28.6 months (95% CI 24.4-open) in group C. Nevertheless, multivariate Cox regression for patients in group C compared with group B that accounted for imbalances of other risk factors showed no different relative risk (RR) for OS (RR 0.77, p = .46). Our data do not support a general extension of TMZ maintenance therapy beyond six cycles. The Oncologist 2017;22:570-575 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Radiation therapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) maintenance therapy is still the standard of care in patients below the age of 65 years in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. However, in clinical practice, many centers continue TMZ maintenance therapy beyond six cycles. The impact of this continuation is controversial and has not yet been addressed in

  2. Newly qualified teachers' visions of science learning and teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Deborah L.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated newly qualified teachers' visions of science learning and teaching. The study also documented their preparation in an elementary science methods course. The research questions were: What educational and professional experiences influenced the instructor's visions of science learning and teaching? What visions of science learning and teaching were promoted in the participants' science methods course? What visions of science learning and teaching did these newly qualified teachers bring with them as they graduated from their teacher preparation program? How did these visions compare with those advocated by reform documents? Data sources included participants' assignments, weekly reflections, and multi-media portfolio finals. Semi-structured interviews provided the emic voice of participants, after graduation but before they had begun to teach. These data were interpreted via a combination of qualitative methodologies. Vignettes described class activities. Assertions supported by excerpts from participants' writings emerged from repeated review of their assignments. A case study of a typical participant characterized weekly reflections and final multi-media portfolio. Four strands of science proficiency articulated in a national reform document provided a framework for interpreting activities, assignments, and interview responses. Prior experiences that influenced design of the methods course included an inquiry-based undergraduate physics course, participation in a reform-based teacher preparation program, undergraduate and graduate inquiry-based science teaching methods courses, participation in a teacher research group, continued connection to the university as a beginning teacher, teaching in diverse Title 1 schools, service as the county and state elementary science specialist, participation in the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, service on a National Research Council committee, and experience teaching a

  3. Microwave generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  4. Solar Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The Vanguard I dish-Stirling module program, initiated in 1982, produced the Vanguard I module, a commercial prototype erected by the Advanco Corporation. The module, which automatically tracks the sun, combines JPL mirrored concentrator technology, an advanced Stirling Solar II engine/generator, a low cost microprocessor-controlled parabolic dish. Vanguard I has a 28% sunlight to electricity conversion efficiency. If tests continue to prove the system effective, Advanco will construct a generating plant to sell electricity to local utilities. An agreement has also been signed with McDonnell Douglas to manufacture a similar module.

  5. Optimized transition from the reactors of second and third generations to the thorium molten salt reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Ghetta, V.; Le Brun, C.; Mathieu, L.; Brissot, R.; Liatard, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC/IN2P3/CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present in this article a very promising, simple and feasible concept of Molten Salt Reactor with no moderator in the core, operated in the Th/U{sup 233} fuel cycle with fluoride salts and called non-moderated Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR). We have detailed in this article some parametric studies, related to the system reprocessing constraints, and the heavy nuclei composition of the salt which modifies the neutron spectrum of the reactor. Since U{sup 233} does not exist on earth and is not being produced today, we aim at designing a critical MSR able to burn the Plutonium and the Minor Actinides produced in the current operating reactors, and consequently to convert this Plutonium into U{sup 233}. This leads to closing the current fuel cycle thanks to TMSRs started with transuranic elements on a Thorium base, i.e. started in the Th/Pu fuel cycle, similarly to fast neutron reactors operated in the U/Pu fuel cycle. The burning of transuranic elements in these Pu-started TMSRs results in high waste reduction rates, up to 95-97% for all TMSR configurations assessed. We particularly point out in our analyses the excellent level of deterministic safety of all the TMSR configurations studied, for the U{sup 233}-started TMSRs as well as for the Pu-started TMSRs. We will detail optimizations of this transition between the reactors of second and third generations to the Thorium cycle. Such a transition is based on a fleet of TMSRs with no moderator in the core, including TMSRs started with Plutonium and TMSRs directly started with U{sup 233}. We have analyzed the characteristics of each reactor configuration, in terms of deterministic safety parameters, fissile matter inventory, salt reprocessing, radiotoxicity and waste production, and finally deployment capacities.

  6. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This EIS reflects the public review of and comments offered on the draft statement. Included are descriptions of the characteristics of nuclear waste, the alternative disposal methods under consideration, and potential environmental impacts and costs of implementing these methods. Because of the programmatic nature of this document and the preliminary nature of certain design elements assumed in assessing the environmental consequences of the various alternatives, this study has been based on generic, rather than specific, systems. At such time as specific facilities are identified for particular sites, statements addressing site-specific aspects will be prepared for public review and comment.

  7. System of cities dynamics in newly industrializing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D R

    1986-01-01

    Rapid industrialization in such countries as Korea, Malaysia, and Taiwan suggests that the complex functional structures of cities in the periphery may appear early in development. This paper proposes a 4-stage framework for the dynamics of a system of cities in a developing country undergoing industrialization and encompassing both nonindustrial and industrial development. The synthesis is assessed with evidence from the newly industrializing Asian nations of Korea, Malaysia, and Taiwan. The 4 stages of cities' industrial change include 1) increasing primacy with industrial satellites, 2) increasing primacy with industrial satellites and nodal towns on a transport network, 3) rapidly increasing primacy with rapidly growing industrial satellites and nodal towns on the transport network, and 4) decreasing primacy with slowly growing industrial satellites and rapidly growing peripheral industrial towns. The 4-stage synthesis suggests that economic development in the periphery may occur even while the primate city maintains its hegemony over control and coordination functions. Peripheral industrial growth does not challenge this hegemony. The growth of industrial cities is, instead, part of a process of regional specialization in which the low cost labor in the periphery becomes an attraction for industry. These stages are not inevitable. Government efforts are necessary to develop rural areas in terms of social improvements (education and health), capital infrastructure (transportation and utilities), and fair payments to farmers for their outputs. These seem to be the lessons learned from the industrialization process in Korea, Malaysia, and Taiwan.

  8. Ethical erosion in newly qualified doctors: perceptions of empathy decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratta, Emily C; Riding, David M; Baker, Paul

    2016-09-06

    This study sought to understand whether UK Foundation doctors perceived the phenomena of ethical erosion and empathy decline during their initial period of clinical practice, and if so, why this occurred. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with nine doctors in their first year of clinical practice at Royal Bolton Hospital, UK. Participants were invited to discuss the definition of empathy, how individuals acquire and maintain empathic ability, perceptions of ethical erosion in the self and others, and how clinical experiences have influenced their empathic ability. The interviews were transcribed, and analysed to identify emergent themes. Each participant reported a conscious acknowledgement of empathy decline in their own and their colleagues' early clinical experiences as doctors. Stressful working environments, the prioritisation of patients' physical rather than psychological well-being, and the attitudes of senior colleagues were all suggested as possible causes. Some doctors believed that specialties with reduced patient contact had a culture which precluded empathy, and influenced their own practice. In addition, some described how their value judgements of patients had affected their ability to empathise. However, all doctors perceived that empathy skills were desirable in senior clinicians, and some believed that educational interventions may be useful in arresting ethical erosion. Newly qualified doctors are aware of ethical erosion in themselves and their colleagues as they begin clinical practice. This has serious implications for patient care. Improving working conditions may reverse this trend. Empathy skills training within undergraduate and postgraduate curricula may be a useful intervention.

  9. Two ways to save a newly learned motor pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, Ryan T; Bastian, Amy J

    2015-06-01

    Savings, or faster relearning after initial learning, demonstrates humans' remarkable ability to retain learned movements amid changing environments. This is important within the context of locomotion, as the ability of the nervous system to "remember" how to walk in specific environments enables us to navigate changing terrains and progressively improve gait patterns with rehabilitation. Here, we used a split-belt treadmill to study precisely how people save newly learned walking patterns. In Experiment 1, we investigated savings by systematically varying the learning and unlearning environments. Savings was predominantly influenced by 1) previous exposure to similar abrupt changes in the environment and 2) the amount of exposure to the new environment. Relearning was fastest when these two factors coincided, and we did not observe savings after the environment was introduced gradually during initial learning. In Experiment 2, we then studied whether people store explicit information about different walking environments that mirrors savings of a new walking pattern. Like savings, we found that previous exposure to abrupt changes in the environment also drove the ability to recall a previously experienced walking environment accurately. Crucially, the information recalled was extrinsic information about the learning environment (i.e., treadmill speeds) and not intrinsic information about the walking pattern itself. We conclude that simply learning a new walking pattern is not enough for long-term savings; rather, savings of a learned walking pattern involves recall of the environment or extended training at the learned state.

  10. Medical career selection among newly graduated physicians in Madinah, KSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolaly, Mohammed Adnan; Kasim, Khaled; Mahmoud, Manal Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    To study factors influencing medical career selection among newly graduated physicians in Al Madinah, KSA. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during the period from January through March 2011. The study recruited 170 interns and residents working at Al Madinah hospitals, KSA. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was distributed that included personal data and factors influencing medical career selection. Appropriate statistical tests were used with p value ≤ 0.05 was used as an indicator of significant differences. The response rate was 79.4% (n=135, 42.2% male). Statistically significant differences were found between male and female participants regarding all the studied medical carrier selection aspects with the higher mean scores among males. Female participants chose the following specialties more than males: ENT, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and medicine. Linear regression analysis showed specialty characters to be the most important predictor in male (R(2)=0.821) and female (R(2)=0.921). Marital status and specialty training process were found to play a key role among females and personality preference and work achievement among males. Medical career selection is a complex decision-making process. The study revealed specialty characters, personality preference and work achievement (males) and specialty training process and marital status (females), which are the most important predictors for selection.

  11. Structural confirmation of oligosaccharides newly isolated from sugar beet molasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Tatsuya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugar beet molasses is a viscous by-product of the processing of sugar beets into sugar. The molasses is known to contain sucrose and raffinose, a typical trisaccharide, with a well-established structure. Although sugar beet molasses contains various other oligosaccharides as well, the structures of those oligosaccharides have not been examined in detail. The purpose of this study was isolation and structural confirmation of these other oligosaccharides found in sugar beet molasses. Results Four oligosaccharides were newly isolated from sugar beet molasses using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and carbon-Celite column chromatography. Structural confirmation of the saccharides was provided by methylation analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionaization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR measurements. Conclusion The following oligosaccharides were identified in sugar beet molasses: β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1- > 6-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 1-α-D-glucopyranoside (named β-planteose, α-D-galactopyranosyl-(1- > 1-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 1-α-D-glucopyranoside (named1-planteose, α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1- > 6-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 2-β-D-fructofuranoside (theanderose, and β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1- > 3-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 2-β-D-fructofuranoside (laminaribiofructose. 1-planteose and laminaribiofructose were isolated from natural sources for the first time.

  12. Mentoring program for students newly enrolled in an Engineering Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Peña-Martín

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a mentoring program for first year engineering students in the Telecommunications Engineering College (ETSIT at the University of Malaga (UMA. Actors involved in the program are professors from staff, veterans mentoring students and, of course, freshmen. All of them has been organized trough the Moodle based Virtual Learning Environment Platform of the UMA. The program has gone through several phases over three years. This paper shows the main objectives of this mentoring program, the initial design to get them where professors played mentor role, and successive changes made to try to improve the results, including the assumption of the mentor role by senior students (peer mentoring. The tools used for program evaluation are shown too. Despite the low participation, it has been a framework for the development of various educational and socializing activities (for mentors and mentees focused on developing generic competences. Furthermore, it has been a research tool to get a better understanding of problems affecting students newly enrolled.

  13. Circulating microparticles and endogenous estrogen in newly menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, M; Litwiller, R D; Owen, W G; Miller, V M

    2009-04-01

    Estrogen modulates antithrombotic characteristics of the vascular endothelium and the interaction of blood elements with the vascular surface. A marker of these modulatory activities is formation of cell-specific microparticles. This study examined the relationship between blood-borne microparticles and endogenous estrogen at menopause. Platelet activation and plasma microparticles were characterized from women being screened (n = 146) for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Women were grouped according to serum estrogen ( 40 pg/ml; high estrogen, n = 11). Age, body mass index, blood pressure and blood chemistries were the same in both groups. No woman was hypertensive, diabetic or a current smoker. Platelet counts, basal and activated expression of P-selectin on platelet membranes were the same, but activated expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa was greater in the high-estrogen group. Numbers of endothelium-, platelet-, monocyte- and granulocyte-derived microparticles were greater in the low-estrogen group. Of the total numbers of microparticles, those positive for phosphatidylserine and tissue factor were also greater in the low-estrogen group. These results suggest that, with declines in endogenous estrogen at menopause, numbers of procoagulant microparticles increase and thus may provide a means to explore mechanisms for cardiovascular risk development in newly menopausal women.

  14. A NEWLY MARRIED COUPLE SEEKING MAR ITAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivarshini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available I conducted a mental Health Assessment and Marital therapy / Couple Therapy of a young newly married couple at my clinic. Husband ( Mr. A was 28 years old Computer Engineer and wife ( Mrs. A was 23 years old, graduate and a team leader in sports (Football. They were married 3 months ago and it was an arranged marriage. The Marital therapy was conducted in the presence of Mr. A, Mrs. A, and her parents, in four sessions, each lasting for two hours in the month of April 2015. They felt a need to see a Psychiatrist, since there were severe marital conflicts with unconsummated marriage which made the couple think whether they should go for a divorce. My assessment revealed no major treatable mental health problems in the couple. However there was marital disharmony and discord due to incompatibility of both of their personalities. I could not identify any Personality Disorder which would fall in the DSM V category of cluster A and B and C in the couple. There was no past psychiatric history in either of them. There was no significant past medical history or a family history of psychiatric illness. A thorough physical examination was done with no significant abnormal findings. Baseline blood investigations, such as random blood sugar, complete blood picture and TSH was done and was found to be normal.

  15. [Newly devised subcutaneous needle electrodes for EMG recording].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Y; Koibuchi, H; Ai, M; Hibi, H; Haketa, T

    1991-09-01

    Subcutaneous needle electrodes made of stainless steel were newly devised for ease of handling and perfect insulation. This needle (phi 0.20 mm) is used for acupuncture. The electrodes had the capability to record the EMG activity easily from a certain muscle. Then, the EMG activities of the masseter muscle were recorded with both these needle electrodes and surface electrodes and the results were compared. 1. Insertion of the electrodes into the subcutaneous tissue was easily performed because of the application of the acupuncture needle and their lightness of 0.2g was effective in fixing the electrodes on the skin without causing any tension. 2. After the insertion of the needle electrodes, the impedance showed below 5 kohm immediately, and the EMG recordings during biting could be simply achieved with great stability. 3. The action potential from the needle electrodes was less than that from the surface ones. The former reacted more sensitively to the change in the distance between the electrodes, compared with the latter.

  16. A wind tunnel test of newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2012-07-01

    In this study the performance of two newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers was evaluated. The two test samplers are cyclone-based personal samplers that incorporate a recirculating liquid film. The performance evaluations focused on the physical efficiencies that a personal bioaerosol sampler could provide, including aspiration, collection, and capture efficiencies. The evaluation tests were carried out in a wind tunnel, and the test personal samplers were mounted on the chest of a full-size manikin placed in the test chamber of the wind tunnel. Monodisperse fluorescent aerosols ranging from 0.5 to 20 microm were used to challenge the samplers. Two wind speeds of 0.5 and 2.0 m/sec were employed as the test wind speeds in this study. The test results indicated that the aspiration efficiency of the two test samplers closely agreed with the ACGIH inhalable convention within the size range of the test aerosols. The aspiration efficiency was found to be independent of the sampling orientation. The collection efficiency acquired from these two samplers showed that the 50% cutoff diameters were both around 0.6 microm. However the wall loss of these two test samplers increased as the aerosol size increased, and the wall loss of PAS-4 was considerably higher than that of PAS-5, especially in the aerosol size larger than 5 microm, which resulted in PAS-4 having a relatively lower capture efficiency than PAS-5. Overall, the PAS-5 is considered a better personal bioaerosol sampler than the PAS-4.

  17. Promotion of hair growth by newly synthesized ceramide mimetic compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bu-Mahn; Bak, Soon-Sun; Shin, Kyung-Oh; Kim, Minhee; Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Sekyoo; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-09-09

    Based on the crucial roles of ceramides in skin barrier function, use of ceramides or their structural mimetic compounds, pseudoceramides, as cosmetic ingredients are getting more popular. While currently used pseudoceramides are intended to substitute the structural roles of ceramides in stratum corneum, development of bioactive pseudoceramides has been repeatedly reported. In this study, based on the potential involvement of sphingolipids in hair cycle regulation, we investigated the effects of newly synthesized pseudoceramide, bis-oleamido isopropyl alcohol (BOI), on hair growth using cultured human hair follicles and animal models. BOI treatment promoted hair growth in cultured human hair follicles ex vivo and induced earlier conversion of telogen into anagen. Although we did not find a significant enhancement of growth factor expression and follicular cell proliferation, BOI treatment resulted in an increased sphinganine and sphingosine contents as well as increased ceramides contents in cultured dermal papilla (DP) cells. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that biologically active pseudoceramide promotes hair growth by stimulating do novo synthesis of sphingolipids in DP cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in newly diagnosed celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseviero, Maria T; Mazza, Giuseppe A; Pullano, Maria N; Oliveiro, Antonella C; Altomare, Federica; Pedrelli, Luca; Dattilo, Bruno; Miniero, Roberto; Meloni, Gianfranco; Giancotti, Laura; Talarico, Valentina

    2016-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) in children may occur with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations: anemia is the most frequent extraintestinal manifestation, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the common presentation. In our study we aimed to assess IDA condition in a large cohort of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed CD. Our study includes a cohort of 518 children (340 females and 178 males), 6 months-18 years old, joined between January 1990 and January 2013. We have analyzed hematological parameters and iron balance: serum iron, serum ferritin and serum transferrin levels. The diagnosis of IDA was considered on the basis of hemoglobin levels below -2SD, associated with serum iron and ferritin reduction, serum transferrin increase; all compared with the normal reference values for age. Of all patients, 156 patients (30.1%) had anemia, including 103 females (19.8%) and 53 males (10.2%); of these, 112 (21.62%) had IDA (in 18 cases associated with α- or β-thalassemia trait), 22 were thalassemic trait without iron deficiency and the remaining 19 suffered from other forms of anemia. One hundred fifteen patients (22.20%) with low ferritin levels but normal hemoglobin levels were considered as preanemic iron deficient patients. Our data confirm that iron depletion and IDA represent a frequent finding at the diagnosis of CD. This significant relation existing between CD and iron deficiency should be considered by pediatricians at the diagnosis of CD in order to treat the patients.

  19. Climate change and the water cycle in newly irrigated areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Raphael; García-Garizábal, Iker; Merchán, Daniel; Causapé, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Climate change is affecting agriculture doubly: evapotranspiration is increasing due to increments in temperature while the availability of water resources is decreasing. Furthermore, irrigated areas are expanding worldwide. In this study, the dynamics of climate change impacts on the water cycle of a newly irrigated watershed are studied through the calculation of soil water balances. The study area was a 752-ha watershed located on the left side of the Ebro river valley, in Northeast Spain. The soil water balance procedures were carried out throughout 1827 consecutive days (5 years) of hydrological and agronomical monitoring in the study area. Daily data from two agroclimatic stations were used as well. Evaluation of the impact of climate change on the water cycle considered the creation of two future climate scenarios for comparison: 2070 decade with climate change and 2070 decade without climate change. The main indicators studied were precipitation, irrigation, reference evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, drainage from the watershed, and irrigation losses. The aridity index was also applied. The results represent a baseline scenario in which adaptation measures may be included and tested to reduce the impacts of climate change in the studied area and other similar areas.

  20. Martian Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Independent, Internet savvy and with their own Martian language, China’s post-90s generation is rewriting the rules of behavior september 14 was the 18th birth-day of Zhang Zhaoyu from Sichuan Province. He is a new student at Peking University,

  1. Generative Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  2. Synchronous generators

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    This work begins with an introduction to energy resources and the main electric energy conversion solutions, along with efficiency and environmental merits and demerits. The classification and principles of various electric generator topologies are covered alongside their power ratings and main applications including constant-speed synchronous gene

  3. Radiatively Generated $\

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S.; Rindani, Saurabh D.

    2003-01-01

    We study the consequences of assuming that the mass scale $\\Delta_{odot}$ corresponding to the solar neutrino oscillations and mixing angle $U_{e3}$ corresponding to the electron neutrino oscillation at CHOOZ are radiatively generated through the standard electroweak gauge interactions. All the leptonic mass matrices having zero $\\Delta_{odot}$ and $U_{e3}$ at a high scale lead to a unique low energy value for the $\\Delta_{odot}$ which is determined by the (known) size of the radiative corrections, solar and the atmospheric mixing angle and the Majorana mass of the neutrino observed in neutrinoless double beta decay. This prediction leads to the following consequences: ($i$) The MSSM radiative corrections generate only the dark side of the solar neutrino solutions. ($ii$) The inverted mass hierarchy ($m,-m,0$) at the high scale fails in generating the LMA solution but it can lead to the LOW or vacuum solutions. ($iii$) The $\\Delta_{odot}$ generated in models with maximal solar mixing at a high scale is zero t...

  4. Magnetocumulative generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  5. Idea generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollestrup, Christian H. T.; Laursen, Linda Nhu

    2015-01-01

    of an idea generation whether the outset is ill defined and questioned as opposed to straightforward ideation on a proposal for a solution? The hypothesis is that an approach to ideation where ambiguity and discrepancy deliberately is sought creates more radical innovation that an approach without this...... as having new sociocultural meaning in line with Vergantis definition of radical innovation. This paper discusses the results of an experiment with 32 students on idea generation and product concept development. The experiment was setup as and A-B comparison between two set of students with the same...... different solutions when seeking ambiguity and discrepancy. Within the very limited experiment the conclusion seems to be very clear, it leads to more innovation if the designer seeks to question the framing and scope of the task. So seeking ambiguity and discrepancy in the ideation phase aligns...

  6. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  7. Study of Photophysical Properties on Newly Synthesized Coumarin Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidarai, Ashok H; Desai, Vani R; Hunagund, Shirajahammad M; Basanagouda, Mahantesha; Kadadevarmath, Jagadish S

    2017-08-19

    Herein, we have studied the photophysical properties for three newly synthesized coumarin derivatives; 4-((2,6-dibromo-4-methylphenoxy)methyl)-2H-benzo[h]chromen-2-one (DMB), 4-((3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolin-1-yl)methyl)-6-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one (DIM) and 4-((p-tolyloxy)methyl)-6-methoxy-2H-chromen-2-one (TMC). The absorption and emission spectra for above said molecules were recorded in different solvents at room temperature in order to calculate their ground and excited state dipole moments. The ground (μ g ) and excited state dipole (μ e ) moments of these coumarin derivatives were calculated using Lippert's, Bakshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's equations by the solvatochromic shift method, which involves a variation of Stokes shift with the solvent dielectric constant and refractive index. Ground state dipole moments (μ g ) were also calculated from the Guggenheim method using the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solute molecule. The value of ground state dipole moment obtained from these two methods is well correlated. Further, it is notified that the excited state dipole moment is larger than the ground state dipole moment for all three solute molecules. It inferred that the excited state for above said molecules is more polar than the ground state. The present investigations may shine in the design of nonlinear optical materials. Graphical Abstract The photophysical properties for novel coumarin derivatives were studied in different solvents.Ground and excited state dipole moments were estimated by the solvatochromic shift method. The excited state dipole moment is greater than the ground state dipole moment in systems studied. The excited state is more polar than the ground state. The present investigation may be shine in the design of non linear optical materials.

  8. Therapeutic enhancement of newly derived bacteriocins against Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Eglal I; Mossallam, Shereen F; Mahrous, Hoda

    2014-11-01

    Trials for identifying efficient anti-giardial agents are still ongoing. Nowadays, bacteriocins have attracted the attention as potential antimicrobial compounds. For the first time, the current study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of bacteriocins derived from newly isolated Egyptian strains of probiotics Lactobacilli; L. acidophilus (P106) and L. plantarum (P164) against Giardia lamblia. Bacteriocins' efficacy was evaluated both in vitro; by growth inhibition and adherence assays, and in vivo; through estimation of parasite density, intestinal histopathological examination and ultrastructural analysis of Giardia trophozoites. In vivo bacteriocins' clinical safety was assessed. In vitro results proved that 50 µg of L. acidophilus bacteriocin induced reduction of the mean Giardia lamblia trophozoites by 58.3 ± 4.04%, while at lower concentrations of 10 and 20 µg of both L. acidophilus and L. plantarum, non significant reduction of the mean parasite density was achieved. In vitro trophozoites adherence was susceptible to the tested bacteriocins at all studied concentrations with variable degrees, while the highest adherence reduction was demonstrated using 50 µg of L acidophilus bacteriocin. In vivo, oral inoculation of 50 µg/mouse L. acidophilus bacteriocin for 5 successive days resulted in a noteworthy decline of the intestinal parasite density, along with amelioration of intestinal pathology of infected mice. Ultrastructural examination proved thatfive doses of L. acidophilus bacteriocin showed marked changes in cellular architecture of the trophozoites with evident disorganization of the cell membrane, adhesive disc and cytoplasmic components. This is the first reported study of the safe anti-giardial efficacy of L. acidophilus (P106) derived bacteriocin, hence highlighting its great promise as a potential therapeutic safe alternative to existing commercial drugs.

  9. Hα Surges Initiated by Newly-emerging Satellite Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-feng; Zhou, Tuan-hui; Ji, Hai-sheng

    2014-01-01

    On July 22, 2011 and in the active region NOAA 11259 there ap- peared the event of the ejection of solar atmospheric Hα surges. According to the full-disc Hα observations of the Big Bear Solar Observatory in United States, three consecutive surges at one and the same place in the north of the main spot of the active region were discovered. The trajectories of these three surges exhib- ited the figure of straight lines, and their integral configuration is like an inverted Eiffel Tower. The first two surges are quite similar, and in each of them there appeared two bright points in the northern part of the main spot. After several minutes, the surges appeared in the midst of bright points. When the bright- ness of the bright points attained the maximum value, the surges spouted out from the midst of bright points. And after reaching the maximum altitude, they quickly vanished. Before the ejection of the third surge took place, no bright points appeared. Besides, its maximal altitude is merely one half of that of the first two surges. Via a comparison with the SDO/HMI (Solar Dynamics Obser- vatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) data of radial magnetic fields, it is found that in more than one hour before the appearance of the first surge there emerged bipolar magnetic fields in the region of ejection. Besides, in several min- utes before the ejection of each Hα surge the magnetic fluxes of positive polarity diminished. Via our analysis it is found that there appeared reconnections be- tween the newly emerging satellite magnetic fields and the preexisting magnetic fields in the spot, and this caused the continuous ejections of Hα surges.

  10. A newly developed open-end intracranial hematoma drainage tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao He; Nongnaphat Wanussakul; Dong Yang; Tianya Wu; Ming Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Methods:The newly developed device consists of two parts:the plunger and barrel. On one side, the barrel is bullet shaped with an opening tip. The plunger is located in the middle cavity of the tube barrel and extended out at the open-end. It was designed for strengthening the tube barrel and for convenience in performing the drainage procedure. It can be used by inserting the drainage tube into the lesion and pulling out the plunger, whereby blood will forcefully rise up inside the barrel, providing a satisfactory outcome. It is made for effusion drainage purposes. During the procedure, the drainage tip is placed at the deepest part of the intracranial hematoma to completely drain the blood. Moreover, the plunger fits tightly in the tube, preventing leakage during the operation. With the use of the device, brain can be separated. In addition, the device can help reduce the risk of cerebral damage because of the small operating area. The barrel sidewall has matching opening holes bilaterally and equally for exchanging substances between the inner and outer parts. The overlapping ratio in each horizontal pair is around 1/3–1/2. Each pair on the opposite side will form a different pressure. Thus, the opening holes will not easily get blocked with blood clot. Results: Blood and accumulated liquid from the deepest part of the intracranial hematoma can be directly drawn through the drainage tube without damaging a large area. The tube does not get blocked easily and allows for complete removal of the hematoma. Conclusions:The device is asuitable instrument for clinical application.

  11. Tipifarnib in the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E Karp

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith E Karp1, Jeffrey E Lancet21Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2H. Lee Moffitt Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USAAbstract: Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs represent a new class of signal transduction inhibitors that block the processing of cellular polypeptides that have cysteine terminal residues and, by so doing, interdict multiple pathways involved in proliferation and survival of diverse malignant cell types. Tipifarnib is an orally bioavailable, nonpeptidomimetic methylquinolone FTI that has exhibited clinical activity in patients with myeloid malignancies including elderly adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML who are not candidates for traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, patients with high-risk myelodysplasia, myeloproliferative disorders, and imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because of its relatively low toxicity profile, tipifarnib provides an important alternative to traditional cytotoxic approaches for elderly patients who are not likely to tolerate or even benefit from aggressive chemotherapy. In this review, we will focus on the clinical development of tipifarnib for treatment of newly diagnosed AML, both as induction therapy for elderly adults with poor-risk AML and as maintenance therapy following achievement of first complete remission following induction and consolidation therapies for poor-risk AML. As with all other malignancies, the optimal approach is likely to lie in rational combinations of tipifarnib with cytotoxic, biologic and/or immunomodulatory agents with non-cross-resistant mechanisms of action. Gene expression profi ling has identified networks of differentially expressed genes and gene combinations capable of predicting response to single agent tipifarnib. The clinical and correlative laboratory trials in progress and under development will provide the critical foundations for

  12. A Novel Cellulase Produced by a Newly Isolated Trichoderma virens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Zeng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Screening and obtaining a novel high activity cellulase and its producing microbe strain is the most important and essential way to improve the utilization of crop straw. In this paper, we devoted our efforts to isolating a novel microbe strain which could produce high activity cellulase. A novel strain Trichoderma virens ZY-01 was isolated from a cropland where straw is rich and decomposed, by using the soil dilution plate method with cellulose and Congo red. The strain has been licensed with a patent numbered ZL 201210295819.6. The cellulase activity in the cultivation broth could reach up to 7.4 IU/mL at a non-optimized fermentation condition with the newly isolated T. virens ZY-01. The cellulase was separated and purified from the T. virens culture broth through (NH42SO4 fractional precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. With the separation process, the CMC specific activity increased from 0.88 IU/mg to 31.5 IU/mg with 35.8 purification fold and 47.04% yield. Furthermore, the enzymatic properties of the cellulase were investigated. The optimum temperature and pH is 50 °C and pH 5.0 and it has good thermal stability. Zn2+, Ca2+ and Mn2+ could remarkably promote the enzyme activity. Conversely, Cu2+ and Co2+ could inhibit the enzymatic activity. This work provides a new highly efficient T. virens strain for cellulase production and shows good prospects in practical application.

  13. Ageing with HIV: newly diagnosed older adults in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchi, N; Balzano, R; Scognamiglio, P; Navarra, A; De Carli, G; Elia, P; Grisetti, S; Sampaolesi, A; Giuliani, M; De Filippis, A; Puro, V; Ippolito, G; Girardi, E

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV/AIDS among people in midlife and late adulthood has been increasing in Western countries over the last decade. We analyzed data from a prospective, observational multi-centre study on individuals newly diagnosed with HIV between January 2004 and March 2007 in 10 public counselling and testing sites in Latium, Italy. At diagnosis, routine demographic, epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data are recorded, and patients are asked to complete a questionnaire investigating socio-demographic and psycho-behavioural aspects. To analyze the association of individual characteristics with age, we compared older adults (> or = 50 years) with their younger counterpart (18-49 years). To adjust for potential confounding effect of the epidemiological, clinical and behavioural characteristics, to identify factors associated with older age at HIV diagnosis, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Overall, 1073 individuals were identified, 125 of whom (11.6%) were aged 50 years or above. The questionnaire was completed by 41% (440/1073). Compared with their younger counterparts, a higher proportion of older patients were males, born in Italy, reported heterosexual or unknown HIV risk exposure, were never tested for HIV before and were in a more advanced stage of HIV infection at diagnosis. In addition, older adults had a lower educational level and were more frequently living with their partners or children. With respect to psycho-behavioural characteristics, older patients were more likely to have paid money for sex and have never used recreational drugs. Interestingly, no differences were found regarding condom use, which was poor in both age groups. These findings may have important implications for the management of older adults with HIV, who should be targeted by appropriate public health actions, such as opportunistic screening and easier access to healthcare. Moreover, strategies including information on HIV and prevention of risk

  14. Clinical Epidemiology of SIRS and Sepsis in Newly Admitted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjoo, Sheetal; Ahmad, Kaisar; Qureshi, Umar Amin; Mir, Zahed Hussain

    2015-08-01

    To assess the clinical and demographic profile of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis, among newly admitted children in different age groups in a hospital in North India. This prospective study was conducted at a referral care centre in Northern India. All children, age group 0 to SIRS) and sepsis and to gain clinical and demographic data. The criteria laid at International consensus conference, 2002, were used to define patients as SIRS, Sepsis, Severe sepsis and Septic shock. During the study period, a total of 865 patients were screened for SIRS. Prevalence of SIRS amongst hospitalised children was 23 % (n = 201). Seventy nine percent (n = 159) of patients had infection associated SIRS and 21 % (42) had non-infective SIRS. Sixty four percent (n = 129) SIRS patients had uncomplicated sepsis, 15 % (n = 30) patients fulfilled criteria for severe sepsis. Out of the latter 30, 19 had septic shock. Organ dysfunction in SIRS was noted in 25 % (n = 51). 37.25 % (n = 19) had multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). The most common organism isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (n = 9). Focus of infection in majority was pulmonary (44 %). Mean duration of antibiotic therapy and hospital stay in the SIRS group were 6.4 and 6.5 d respectively. In the group without SIRS, mean duration were 2.44 d and 3.07 d respectively The differences were statistically significant. In conclusion, the proportion of sepsis contributing to SIRS is high in a tertiary care hospital. Therefore rapid recognition of SIRS is essential. Goal directed treatment of sepsis is also important so that high mortality associated with severe sepsis and septic shock are prevented.

  15. Implementation of a True Enterprise Web Based System to Manage Low Level, Mixed, Weapons Grade, Transuranic and Hazardous Waste at Lawrence Livermore National Laboaratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J; Plunkett, J; Haigh, D; Plunkett, J; Haigh, D; Collins, J

    2003-11-21

    Faced with increasing challenges imposed by a new mixed waste treatment facility under construction, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) embarked on a yearlong process of finding and implementing a new system to replace its existing waste tracking software. After a review of several applications, including the IWTS system in use at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)a, LLNL decided to implement HazTrack. HazTrack represents a new generation of browser based enterprise level business applications that are replacing the hardcoded client-server software that has been so prevalent for the last 15 years. It is widely believed that the object-oriented application frameworks of these applications, such as the model view controller (MVC) framework for HazTrack will be at the core of leading-edge software technology in the twenty-first century. MVC applications adapt more readily to changes in business and technical requirements than do applications built using traditional programming techniques, anywhere from 2.5 to 12 times faster than propagating the same changes to programmatically implemented solutions. Because of this ability, the HazTrack team was able to rapidly modify the HazTrack application for management of radiological waste storage, including support for an unlimited number of dose conversion factors (DCF's) for calculation of Plutonium Equivalent (Pu-Eq) curies, nuclide tracking, nuclide distribution tracking, and storage area limits management. LLNL also required extensive security management features including a waste approval process with lockdown and audit trail capability that was also incorporated during the implementation, as well as a flexible access control architecture to facilitate customized user views and access rights to functions based on user groups. HazTrack supports the full range of waste handling activities including waste generation, characterization, storage, treatment, and disposal through its

  16. The Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine against Newly Emerging Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Henao-Tamayo

    Full Text Available To date, most new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including new recombinant versions of the current BCG vaccine, have usually been screened against the laboratory strains H37Rv or Erdman. In this study we took advantage of our recent work in characterizing an increasingly large panel of newly emerging clinical isolates [from the United States or from the Western Cape region of South Africa], to determine to what extent vaccines would protect against these [mostly high virulence] strains. We show here that both BCG Pasteur and recombinant BCG Aeras-422 [used here as a good example of the new generation BCG vaccines] protected well in both mouse and guinea pig low dose aerosol infection models against the majority of clinical isolates tested. However, Aeras-422 was not effective in a long term survival assay compared to BCG Pasteur. Protection was very strongly expressed against all of the Western Cape strains tested, reinforcing our viewpoint that any attempt at boosting BCG would be very difficult to achieve statistically. This observation is discussed in the context of the growing argument made by others that the failure of a recent vaccine trial disqualifies the further use of animal models to predict vaccine efficacy. This viewpoint is in our opinion completely erroneous, and that it is the fitness of prevalent strains in the trial site area that is the centrally important factor, an issue that is not being addressed by the field.

  17. Assessing the comparative effectiveness of newly marketed medications: methodological challenges and implications for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweiss, S; Gagne, J J; Glynn, R J; Ruhl, M; Rassen, J A

    2011-12-01

    Comparative-effectiveness research (CER) aims to produce actionable evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of medical products and interventions as they are used outside of controlled research settings. Although CER evidence regarding medications is particularly needed shortly after market approval, key methodological challenges include (i) potential bias due to channeling of patients to the newly marketed medication because of various patient-, physician-, and system-related factors; (ii) rapid changes in the characteristics of the user population during the early phase of marketing; and (iii) lack of timely data and the often small number of users in the first few months of marketing. We propose a mix of approaches to generate comparative-effectiveness data in the early marketing period, including sequential cohort monitoring with secondary health-care data and propensity score (PS) balancing, as well as extended follow-up of phase III and phase IV trials, indirect comparisons of placebo-controlled trials, and modeling and simulation of virtual trials.

  18. Newly developed SSR markers reveal genetic diversity and geographical clustering in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göl, Şurhan; Göktay, Mehmet; Allmer, Jens; Doğanlar, Sami; Frary, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Spinach is a popular leafy green vegetable due to its nutritional composition. It contains high concentrations of vitamins A, E, C, and K, and folic acid. Development of genetic markers for spinach is important for diversity and breeding studies. In this work, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology was used to develop genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. After cleaning and contig assembly, the sequence encompassed 2.5% of the 980 Mb spinach genome. The contigs were mined for SSRs. A total of 3852 SSRs were detected. Of these, 100 primer pairs were tested and 85% were found to yield clear, reproducible amplicons. These 85 markers were then applied to 48 spinach accessions from worldwide origins, resulting in 389 alleles with 89% polymorphism. The average gene diversity (GD) value of the markers (based on a GD calculation that ranges from 0 to 0.5) was 0.25. Our results demonstrated that the newly developed SSR markers are suitable for assessing genetic diversity and population structure of spinach germplasm. The markers also revealed clustering of the accessions based on geographical origin with clear separation of Far Eastern accessions which had the overall highest genetic diversity when compared with accessions from Persia, Turkey, Europe, and the USA. Thus, the SSR markers have good potential to provide valuable information for spinach breeding and germplasm management. Also they will be helpful for genome mapping and core collection establishment.

  19. Tsunamigenic potential of a newly discovered active fault zone in the outer Messina Strait, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lili; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Cukur, Deniz; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Ridente, Domenico; Gross, Felix; Bialas, Jörg; Krastel, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    The 1908 Messina tsunami was the most catastrophic tsunami hitting the coastline of Southern Italy in the younger past. The source of this tsunami, however, is still heavily debated, and both rupture along a fault and a slope failure have been postulated as potential origin of the tsunami. Here we report a newly discovered active Fiumefreddo-Melito di Porto Salvo Fault Zone (F-MPS_FZ), which is located in the outer Messina Strait in a proposed landslide source area of the 1908 Messina tsunami. Tsunami modeling showed that this fault zone would produce devastating tsunamis by assuming slip amounts of ≥5 m. An assumed slip of up to 17 m could even generate a tsunami comparable to the 1908 Messina tsunami, but we do not consider the F-MPS_FZ as a source for the 1908 Messina tsunami because its E-W strike contradicts seismological observations of the 1908 Messina earthquake. Future researches on the F-MPS_FZ, however, may contribute to the tsunami risk assessment in the Messina Strait.

  20. A newly designed ultrasonic spray pyrolysis device to fabricate YBCO tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Zhou, M. L.; Zhai, L. H.; Liu, D. M.; Gao, X.; Liu, W.

    2003-04-01

    A newly designed ultrasonic spray pyrolysis device has been manufactured to fabricate YBCO tapes. The apparatus is primarily composed of four zones: the ultrasonic generator, the atomization chamber, the pyrolysis chamber and the rotating equipment. Every part of them is designed and fabricated by us. The whole system costs far less than the ready-made equipment facility in which there is always a vacuum apparatus. This apparatus with processing parameters accurately controlled can fabricate short and long YBCO tapes. In this paper, we mainly focused on how to design and manufacture four parts of the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. We have deposited c-axis aligned short YBCO tapes on biaxially textured Ag {1 1 0} substrates with Jc=10 3 A/cm 2 using this method with our device. The method is very promising in terms of its precise control of metal compositions, high deposition rate and low cost non-vacuum approach. Improvements of this technique are being carried out to fabricate long YBCO tapes.

  1. Conventional and improved cytotoxicity test methods of newly developed biodegradable magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Yu-Chan; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Kim, Young-Yul

    2015-11-01

    Unique biodegradable property of magnesium has spawned countless studies to develop ideal biodegradable orthopedic implant materials in the last decade. However, due to the rapid pH change and extensive amount of hydrogen gas generated during biocorrosion, it is extremely difficult to determine the accurate cytotoxicity of newly developed magnesium alloys using the existing methods. Herein, we report a new method to accurately determine the cytotoxicity of magnesium alloys with varying corrosion rate while taking in-vivo condition into the consideration. For conventional method, extract quantities of each metal ion were determined using ICP-MS and the result showed that the cytotoxicity due to pH change caused by corrosion affected the cell viability rather than the intrinsic cytotoxicity of magnesium alloy. In physiological environment, pH is regulated and adjusted within normal pH (˜7.4) range by homeostasis. Two new methods using pH buffered extracts were proposed and performed to show that environmental buffering effect of pH, dilution of the extract, and the regulation of eluate surface area must be taken into consideration for accurate cytotoxicity measurement of biodegradable magnesium alloys.

  2. High Transferability of Homoeolog-Specific Markers between Bread Wheat and Newly Synthesized Hexaploid Wheat Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Deying; Luo, Jiangtao; Li, Zenglin; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Lianquan; Ning, Shunzong; Yuan, Zhongwei; Zheng, Youliang; Hao, Ming; Liu, Dengcai

    2016-01-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) has a complex allohexaploid genome, which makes it difficult to differentiate between the homoeologous sequences and assign them to the chromosome A, B, or D subgenomes. The chromosome-based draft genome sequence of the ‘Chinese Spring’ common wheat cultivar enables the large-scale development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers specific for homoeologs. Based on high-confidence ‘Chinese Spring’ genes with known functions, we developed 183 putative homoeolog-specific markers for chromosomes 4B and 7B. These markers were used in PCR assays for the 4B and 7B nullisomes and their euploid synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) line that was newly generated from a hybridization between Triticum turgidum (AABB) and the wild diploid species Aegilops tauschii (DD). Up to 64% of the markers for chromosomes 4B or 7B in the SHW background were confirmed to be homoeolog-specific. Thus, these markers were highly transferable between the ‘Chinese Spring’ bread wheat and SHW lines. Homoeolog-specific markers designed using genes with known functions may be useful for genetic investigations involving homoeologous chromosome tracking and homoeolog expression and interaction analyses. PMID:27611704

  3. DISABILITIES OF HANDS, FEET AND EYES IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPER, A; LUBBERS, WJ; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude of hand/feet/eye disabilities in newly diagnosed leprosy patients by examining all newly diagnosed leprosy patients who presented at the Eastern Leprosy Control Project (supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association), made up of a r

  4. Plurilinguism in Teachers' Professionalization: Views of Newly Qualified Pedagogues of Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinskis, Mihails; Aleksejeva, Ludmila; Zascerinska, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' professionalization is promoted by language education that includes mother tongue across the curriculum, foreign languages and professional language. Aim of the research is to analyze views of newly qualified pedagogues of social work on languages of professionalization. The object of the present research is views of newly qualified…

  5. DISABILITIES OF HANDS, FEET AND EYES IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPER, A; LUBBERS, WJ; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude of hand/feet/eye disabilities in newly diagnosed leprosy patients by examining all newly diagnosed leprosy patients who presented at the Eastern Leprosy Control Project (supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association), made up of a

  6. Prospective Study of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Parents of Children with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, Markus A.; Vollrath, Margarete; Laimbacher, Joseph; Gnehm, Hanspeter E.; Sennhauser, Felix H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, course, and predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in mothers and fathers of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Method: Forty-nine mothers and 48 fathers of 52 children (response rate 65%) with newly diagnosed diabetes (age 6.5-15 years) were assessed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12…

  7. Dietary protein and fermentable carbohydrates contents influence growth performance and intestinal characteristics in newly weaned pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, P.; Dirkzwager, A.; Fledderus, J.; Trevisi, P.; Huërou-Luron, Le I.; Lallès, J.P.; Awati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the dietary amount of fermentable carbohydrates (FC) may counteract the negative effects of protein fermentation in newly weaned piglets. To study this hypothesis, 272 newly weaned piglets were allotted to 4 dietary treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with low and high FC (7.5 and

  8. Characteristics of dysfunction of islet β-cell in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延兵

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of the dysfunction of isletβ-cell in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was carried out on 352 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and 48 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and then blood samples were collected 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 minutes later to measure the

  9. Geomorphological evolution of a newly restored upland temporary stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteau, Baptiste; Batalla, Ramon J.; Gibbins, Chris N.; Green, David R.; Vericat, Damià

    2015-04-01

    The river Ehen, NW England, has been designated as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) as it hosts England's largest population of freshwater pearl mussels (M. margaritifera). One of the Ehen's main headwater tributary, Ben Gill, was diverted to Ennerdale Lake in the 1970s to help increase the volume of water available for abstraction. Concerns over this diversion on the hydrology and sediment dynamics of the Ehen has led to the reconnection of this temporary stream as part of a project designed to improve habitat conditions for mussels in the Ehen. The reconnection has involved the construction of a new section of channel, following the natural (pre-diversion) course of Ben Gill. This paper presents findings of research designed to track the morphological evolution of the newly created Ben Gill channel. The work follows a previous research in which fluvial dynamics in the Ehen were studied before the reconnection of Ben Gill. Morpho-sedimentary dynamics are analysed at multiple scales: from the movement of individual particles, to changes on channel morphology following competent flow events. Changes in the channel's grain size distributions have been investigated in different sections, while bed mobility has been assessed using a combination of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags inserted into representative particles and painted bed patches. Additionally, digital elevation models (DEMs) of the entire new channel have been constructed by means of automatic digital photogrammetry using high resolution aerial photography taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). DEMs of difference (DoD) between major flow events have been used to track lateral and longitudinal changes in the channel at a spatial resolution of less than 5cm. Finally, in order to link sedimentological changes in the new channel to its impact on the main stem Ehen, morpho-sedimentary changes of a gravel bar at the confluence have been monitored combining tracers (i.e. RFID) and repeated

  10. Initial experience with a newly developed cementless hip endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hach, V; Delfs, G

    2009-01-01

    The HELICA-Endoprosthesis is a newly developed cementless hip prosthesis for dogs. It was implanted in 39 dogs that had severe hip osteoarthritis and a history of hip pain, as well as in one dog that had chronic hip luxation. One dog had a bilateral arthroplasty. The body weight of the patients ranged between 22 and 54 kg and their ages between nine months and 10 years. Both the femoral stem and acetabular component of the prosthesis were screwed into position following bony preparation. Additional fixation was not necessary as the components remain fixed in position until osteointegration is complete. There are currently five sizes of prosthesis available, and the various components such as the stem, cup and head are readily interchangeable. Although it appeared that good osseous anchorage of the prostheses in the bone on the surgery table had been obtained, three patients experienced both stem and cup loosening (one week, three weeks and six months after surgery). In one animal, stem loosening was observed six weeks after surgery, and another dog experienced a cup loosening two weeks postoperatively. Most of the complications were due to technical errors that occurred during the learning phase. Surgical revisions were successful in three out of five animals. In two animals we had to perform a femoral head and neck excision. Two other animals experienced radiographic bone resorption underneath the segmented collar of the femoral prosthesis but did not show any significant clinical signs of lameness. Another dog that showed signs of ischial neuropraxy after surgery, recovered completely within six weeks after surgery. All of the dogs were capable of weight bearing on the operated leg one day after surgery. The main advantage of the HELICA-Endoprosthesis is the relatively easy surgical technique and short surgery time. The initial clinical results in these 40 cases have been very encouraging. The aim of this study was to assess the early clinical results in these 39

  11. Newly developed apparatus for calibration of quadrupole mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong; Yongjun, Cheng; Detian, Li; Wenjun, Sun; Lan, Zhao; Meiru, Guo; Yongjun, Wang; Huzhong, Zhang; Yanwu, Li; Gang, Li

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new calibration apparatus has been developed for calibrating quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) from 10-8 Pa to 10-2 Pa for He, N2 and Ar. Based on the apparatus, two calibration methods are introduced to generate standard pressure P i ‧ (or P i ″) of lower than 10-2 Pa, which are named as ‘the SRG measurement method’ and ‘the CDG measurement method’. The SRG measurement method can generate a standard pressure range from 10-8 Pa to 10-5 Pa, and the CDG measurement method can generate a standard pressure range from 10-5 Pa to 10-2 Pa. A molecular flow condition is determined and a QMS is calibrated by the two methods using single gas and mixture gas. The gas flow through the small tube and orifice realizes molecular flow at an upstream pressure of less than 70 Pa. The sensitivities calibration results with the two methods agree well, and the difference is less than 3%. The sensitivity calibrated with single gas is different from that calibrated with mixture gas. Obtained results are roughly consistent with those of previous studies.

  12. Microsatellite Mutation Rate during Allohexaploidization of Newly Resynthesized Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Zhang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeats (SSRs, also known as microsatellites are known to be mutational hotspots in genomes. DNA rearrangements have also been reported to accompany allopolyploidization. A study of the effect of allopolyploidization on SSR mutation is therefore important for understanding the origin and evolutionary dynamics of SSRs in allopolyploids. Three synthesized double haploid (SynDH populations were made from 241 interspecific F1 haploid hybrids between Triticum turgidum L. and Aegilops tauschii (Coss. through spontaneous chromosome doubling via unreduced gametes. Mutation events were studied at 160 SSR loci in the S1 generation (the first generation after chromosome doubling of the three SynDH populations. Of the 148260 SSR alleles investigated in S1 generation, only one mutation (changed number of repeats was confirmed with a mutation rate of 6.74 × 10−6. This mutation most likely occurred in the respective F1 hybrid. In comparison with previously reported data, our results suggested that allohexaploidization of wheat did not increase SSR mutation rate.

  13. Analysis of newly established EST databases reveals similarities between heart regeneration in newt and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The newt Notophthalmus viridescens possesses the remarkable ability to respond to cardiac damage by formation of new myocardial tissue. Surprisingly little is known about changes in gene activities that occur during the course of regeneration. To begin to decipher the molecular processes, that underlie restoration of functional cardiac tissue, we generated an EST database from regenerating newt hearts and compared the transcriptional profile of selected candidates with genes deregulated during zebrafish heart regeneration. Results A cDNA library of 100,000 cDNA clones was generated from newt hearts 14 days after ventricular injury. Sequencing of 11520 cDNA clones resulted in 2894 assembled contigs. BLAST searches revealed 1695 sequences with potential homology to sequences from the NCBI database. BLAST searches to TrEMBL and Swiss-Prot databases assigned 1116 proteins to Gene Ontology terms. We also identified a relatively large set of 174 ORFs, which are likely to be unique for urodele amphibians. Expression analysis of newt-zebrafish homologues confirmed the deregulation of selected genes during heart regeneration. Sequences, BLAST results and GO annotations were visualized in a relational web based database followed by grouping of identified proteins into clusters of GO Terms. Comparison of data from regenerating zebrafish hearts identified biological processes, which were uniformly overrepresented during cardiac regeneration in newt and zebrafish. Conclusion We concluded that heart regeneration in newts and zebrafish led to the activation of similar sets of genes, which suggests that heart regeneration in both species might follow similar principles. The design of the newly established newt EST database allows identification of molecular pathways important for heart regeneration.

  14. The Anatomische Gesellschaft and National Socialism: an analysis based on newly available archival material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The newly available scientific estate of Heinrich von Eggeling (1869-1954), long-time secretary of the Anatomische Gesellschaft (AG), allows a more profound analysis of how this scientific association went through the period of the "Third Reich". At the first meeting under the new rulers in 1934, von Eggeling and Siegfried Mollier prevented their board colleague Martin Heidenhain from giving an introductory talk because they (not unjustly) feared anti-Jewish protests, but also because many anatomy professors, like other German scholars, were fervent nationalists who welcomed Hitler and largely accepted the expulsion of Jewish and other colleagues as 'inevitable' for national renewal. Many persecuted members nevertheless remained on the membership lists and the AG never officially introduced anti-Jewish bylaws. Eggeling and his like-minded colleagues successfully defended the international status of the AG, though not so much against the Nazi authorities but against a younger generation of anatomists who were willing to benefit from the new political situation and strived for their own German anatomical association. The available archival material suggests that the motivation of the established leading members of the AG to take this specific path was not rooted in opposition to the new rulers but rather in defence of their traditional status of reputed professors running a time-honoured, world leading society. This made international reputation an important guideline for many decisions. While they did ward off attempts by the younger generation to politicise the AG, their post-war calls for an apolitical science remain ambivalent, as their own stance had not always been apolitical.

  15. Different selective pressures lead to different genomic outcomes as newly-formed hybrid yeasts evolve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybridization occurs in every eukaryotic kingdom. While hybrid progeny are frequently at a selective disadvantage, in some instances their increased genome size and complexity may result in greater stress resistance than their ancestors, which can be adaptively advantageous at the edges of their ancestors' ranges. While this phenomenon has been repeatedly documented in the field, the response of hybrid populations to long-term selection has not often been explored in the lab. To fill this knowledge gap we crossed the two most distantly related members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, and established a mixed population of homoploid and aneuploid hybrids to study how different types of selection impact hybrid genome structure. Results As temperature was raised incrementally from 31°C to 46.5°C over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored loss of the S. uvarum genome, although the kinetics of genome loss differed among independent replicates. Temperature-selected isolates exhibited greater inherent and induced thermal tolerance than parental species and founding hybrids, and also exhibited ethanol resistance. In contrast, as exogenous ethanol was increased from 0% to 14% over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored euploid S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum hybrids. Ethanol-selected isolates were more ethanol tolerant than S. uvarum and one of the founding hybrids, but did not exhibit resistance to temperature stress. Relative to parental and founding hybrids, temperature-selected strains showed heritable differences in cell wall structure in the forms of increased resistance to zymolyase digestion and Micafungin, which targets cell wall biosynthesis. Conclusions This is the first study to show experimentally that the genomic fate of newly-formed interspecific hybrids depends on the type of selection they encounter during the course of evolution, underscoring the importance of

  16. Different selective pressures lead to different genomic outcomes as newly-formed hybrid yeasts evolve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Jeff S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecific hybridization occurs in every eukaryotic kingdom. While hybrid progeny are frequently at a selective disadvantage, in some instances their increased genome size and complexity may result in greater stress resistance than their ancestors, which can be adaptively advantageous at the edges of their ancestors' ranges. While this phenomenon has been repeatedly documented in the field, the response of hybrid populations to long-term selection has not often been explored in the lab. To fill this knowledge gap we crossed the two most distantly related members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto group, S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum, and established a mixed population of homoploid and aneuploid hybrids to study how different types of selection impact hybrid genome structure. Results As temperature was raised incrementally from 31°C to 46.5°C over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored loss of the S. uvarum genome, although the kinetics of genome loss differed among independent replicates. Temperature-selected isolates exhibited greater inherent and induced thermal tolerance than parental species and founding hybrids, and also exhibited ethanol resistance. In contrast, as exogenous ethanol was increased from 0% to 14% over 500 generations of continuous culture, selection favored euploid S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum hybrids. Ethanol-selected isolates were more ethanol tolerant than S. uvarum and one of the founding hybrids, but did not exhibit resistance to temperature stress. Relative to parental and founding hybrids, temperature-selected strains showed heritable differences in cell wall structure in the forms of increased resistance to zymolyase digestion and Micafungin, which targets cell wall biosynthesis. Conclusions This is the first study to show experimentally that the genomic fate of newly-formed interspecific hybrids depends on the type of selection they encounter during the course of evolution

  17. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from

  18. Transformation of organic N newly added to red soil treated with different cultural practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangQin-Zheng; YeQing-Fu; 等

    1998-01-01

    By using 15N tracer method,transformation of organic N,which wqas newly added to red soil treated with different cultural practices,was studied under thelaboratory incubation condition.The experimental results showed that the transformation of N from newly added organic matter and soil native pool during incubation was influenced by cultural practice treatment beforeincubation.Fallow was favorable to the mineralization of newly added organic N and soil N compared with the planting wheat treatment.Planting wheat greatly increased the loss of soil N.Application of fertilizers stimulated the mineralization of newly added organic N and application of organic matter reduced the mineralization,but stimulated microbialtransformation of newly adde4d organic N.

  19. Apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of newly diagnosed grade II gliomas†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayal, Inas S.; McKnight, Tracy R.; McGue, Colleen; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Cha, Soonmee; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing between low-grade oligodendrogliomas (ODs) and astrocytomas (AC) is of interest for defining prognosis and stratifying patients to specific treatment regimens. The purpose of this study was to determine if the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion imaging can help to differentiate between newly diagnosed grade II OD and AC subtypes and to evaluate the ADC and FA values for the mixed population of oligoastrocytomas (OA). Fifty-three patients with newly diagnosed grade II gliomas were studied using a 1.5T whole body scanner (23 ODs, 16 ACs, and 14 OAs). The imaging protocol included post-gadolinium T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images, and either three and/or six directional diffusion imaging sequence with b = 1000 s/mm2. Diffusion-weighted images were analyzed using in-house software to calculate maps of ADC and for six directional acquisitions, FA. The intensity values were normalized by values from normal appearing white matter (NAWM) to generate maps of normalized apparent diffusion coefficient (nADC) and normalized fractional anisotropy (nFA). The hyperintense region in the T2 weighted image was defined as the T2All region. A Mann–Whitney rank-sum test was performed on the 25th, median, and 75th nADC and nFA among the three subtypes. Logistic regression was performed to determine how well the nADC and nFA predict subtype. Lesions diagnosed as being OD had significantly lower nADC and significantly higher nFA, compared to AC. The nADC and nFA values individually classified the data with an accuracy of 87%. Combining the two did not enhance the classification. The patients with OA had nADC and nFA values between those of OD and AC. This suggests that ADC and FA may be helpful in directing tissue sampling to the most appropriate regions for taking biopsies in order to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:19125391

  20. SECONDARY LOW-LEVEL WASTE GENERATION RATE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. LaRue

    1999-05-10

    The objective of this design analysis is -to update the assessment of estimated annual secondary low-level waste (LLW) generation rates resulting from the repackaging of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) for disposal at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis supports the preparation of documentation necessary for license application (LA) for the MGR. For the purposes of this analysis, secondary LLW is defined, in brief terms, as LLW generated as a direct result of processing SNF/HLW through the receiving and repackaging operations. The current Waste Handling Building (WHB) design is based on the predominant movement of fuel assemblies through the wet handling lines within the WHB. Dry handling lines are also included in the current WHB design to accommodate canistered waste (i.e., SNF and/or HLW packages). Major input changes to this analysis in comparison to previous analyses include: (1) changes in the SNF/HLW arrival schedules; (2) changes to the WHB and the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) dimensions; and (3) changes in operational staff sizes within the WHB and WTB. The rates generated in this analysis can be utilized to define necessary waste processes, waste flow rates, and equipment sizes for the processing of secondary LLW for proper disposal. This analysis is based on the present reference design, i.e., Viability Assessment (VA) design, and present projections on spent fuel delivery and processing. LLW generation rates, for both liquids and solids, are a direct function of square footages in radiological areas, and a direct function of spent fuel throughput. Future changes in the approved reference design or spent fuel throughput will directly impact the LLW generation rates defined in this analysis. Small amounts of wastes other than LLW may be generated on a non-routine basis. These wastes may include transuranic (TRU), hazardous, and mixed wastes. Although the objective of this analysis is to define LLW waste generation

  1. An Embeddable Virtual Machine for State Space Generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, M.; Bosnacki, D.; Edelkamp, S.

    2007-01-01

    The semantics of modelling languages are not always specified in a precise and formal way, and their rather complex underlying models make it a non-trivial exercise to reuse them in newly developed tools. We report on experiments with a virtual machine-based approach for state space generation. The

  2. Improved cider fermentation performance and quality with newly generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Frederico; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve; Sandell, Mari; Gibson, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Yeast cryotolerance may be advantageous for cider making, where low temperatures are usually employed. Here, we crossed the cryotolerant S. eubayanus with a S. cerevisiae wine strain and assessed the suitability of the hybrids for low-temperature cider fermentation. All strains fermented the juice to 5% ABV, but at different rates; hybrid strains outperformed S. cerevisiae, which was sensitive to low temperatures. The best hybrid fermented similarly to S. eubayanus. S. eubayanus produced sulphurous off flavours which masked a high concentration of fruity ester notes. This phenotype was absent in the hybrid strains, resulting in distinctly fruitier ciders. Aroma was assessed by an independent consumer panel, which rated the hybrid ciders as identical to the wine strain cider. Both were significantly more pleasant than the S. eubayanus cider. Interspecific hybridization can apparently be used effectively to improve low-temperature fermentation performance without compromising product quality.

  3. Generation of Newly Discovered Resistance Gene mcr-1 Knockout in Escherichia coli Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichang; He, Tao; Zhang, Lili; Pang, Maoda; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Bao, Hongduo; Wang, Ran

    2017-07-28

    The mcr-1 gene is a new "superbug" gene discoverd in China in 2016 that makes bacteria highly resistant to the last-resort class of antibiotics. The mcr-1 gene raised serious concern about its possible global dissemination and spread. Here, we report a potential anti-resistant strategy using the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated approach that can efficiently induce mcr-1 gene knockout in Escherichia coli. Our findings suggested that using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to knock out the resistance gene mcr-1 might be a potential anti-resistant strategy. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 could help deliver plasmid pCas::mcr targeting specific DNA sequences of the mcr-1 gene into microbial populations.

  4. Core physics and safety analysis of Generation-IV Sodium Fast Reactors using existing and newly developed computational tools

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa Valero, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    El futuro de la energía nuclear de fisión dependerá, entre otros factores, de la capacidad que las nuevas tecnologías demuestren para solventar los principales retos a largo plazo que se plantean. Los principales retos se pueden resumir en los siguientes aspectos: la capacidad de proporcionar una solución final, segura y fiable a los residuos radiactivos; así como dar solución a la limitación de recursos naturales necesarios para alimentar los reactores nucleares; y por último, una mejora rob...

  5. Steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, G.; Gilli, P.V.; Fritz, K.; Lippitsch, J.

    1975-12-02

    A steam generator is disclosed which is particularly adapted to be used in nuclear power plants. A casing is provided with an inlet and outlet to receive and discharge a primary heating fluid from which heat is to be extracted. A pair of tube plates extend across the interior of the casing at the region of the inlet and outlet thereof, and a plurality of tubes extend along the interior of the casing and are connected in parallel between the tube plates with all of the tubes having open ends communicating with the inlet and outlet of the casing so that the primary heating fluid will flow through the interior of the tubes while a fluid in the casing at the exterior of the tubes will extract heat from the primary fluid. The casing has between the tubes at the region of the inlet a superheating chamber and at the region of the outlet a preheating chamber and between the latter chambers an evaporating chamber, the casing receiving water through an inlet at the preheating chamber and discharging superheated steam through an outlet at the superheating chamber. A separator communicates with the evaporating chamber to receive a mixture of steam and water therefrom for separating the steam from the water and for delivering the separated steam to the superheating chamber.

  6. Interchange Reconnection Alfven Wave Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, B J; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Given recent observational results of interchange reconnection processes in the solar corona and the theoretical development of the S-Web model for the slow solar wind, we present further analysis of the 3D MHD simulation of interchange reconnection by Edmondson et al. (Astrophys. J. 707, 1427, 2009). Specifically, we analyze the consequences of the dynamic streamer belt jump that corresponds to flux opening by interchange reconnection. Information about the magnetic field restructuring by interchange reconnection is carried throughout the system by Alfven waves propagating away from the reconnection region, distributing the shear and twist imparted by the driving flows, including shedding the injected stress-energy and accumulated magnetic helicity along newly-open field lines. We quantify the properties of the reconnection-generated wave activity in the simulation. There is a localized high frequency component associated with the current sheet/reconnection site and an extended low frequency component associ...

  7. Newly Developed Software Application for Multiple Access Process Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Monkova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purchase of a complex system for computer aided process planning (CAPP can be expensive for little and some middle sized plants, sometimes an inaccessible investment, with a long recoupment period. According to this fact and the author's experience with Eastern European plants, they decided to design a new database application which is suitable for production, stock, and economic data holding as well as processing and exploitation within the manufacturing process. The application can also be used to process a plan according to the selected criteria, for technological documentation and NC program creation. It was based on the theory of a multivariant approach to computer aided plan generation. Its fundamental features, the internal mathematical structure and new code system of processed objects, were prepared by the authors. The verification of the designed information system in real practice has shown that it enables about 30% cost and production time reduction and decreases input material assortment variability.

  8. Newly discovered angiogenesis inhibitors and their mechanisms of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-hong MIAO; Jian-ming FENG; Jian DING

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade,the success of angiogenesis inhibitors in clinical contexts has established the antiangiogenic strategy as an important part of cancer therapy,During that time period,we have discovered and reported 17 compounds that exert potent inhibition on angiogenesis.These compounds exhibit tremendous diversity in their sources,structures,targets and mechanisms.These studies have generated new models for further modification and optimization of inhibitory compounds,new information for mechanistic studies and a new drug candidate for clinical development.In particular,through studies on the antiangiogenic mechanism of pseudolaric acid B,we discovered a novel mechanism by which the stability of hypoxia-irducible factor 1α is regulated by the transcription factor c-Jun.We also completed a preclinical study of AL3810,a compound with the potential to circumvent tumor drug resistance to a certain extent.All of these findings will be briefly reviewed in this article.

  9. Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1993-09-01

    Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

  10. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  11. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  12. Runaway electron generation and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, B.; Boncagni, L.; Buratti, P.; Carnevale, D.; Causa, F.; Gospodarczyk Martin-Solis, M., Jr.; Popovic, Z.; Agostini, M.; Apruzzese, G.; Bin, W.; Cianfarani, C.; De Angelis, R.; Granucci, G.; Grosso, A.; Maddaluno, G.; Marocco, D.; Piergotti, V.; Pensa, A.; Podda, S.; Pucella, G.; Ramogida, G.; Rocchi, G.; Riva, M.; Sibio, A.; Sozzi, C.; Tilia, B.; Tudisco, O.; Valisa, M.; FTU Team

    2017-01-01

    We present an overview of FTU experiments on runaway electron (RE) generation and control carried out through a comprehensive set of real-time (RT) diagnostics/control systems and newly installed RE diagnostics. An RE imaging spectrometer system detects visible and infrared synchrotron radiation. A Cherenkov probe measures RE escaping the plasma. A gamma camera provides hard x-ray radial profiles from RE bremsstrahlung interactions in the plasma. Experiments on the onset and suppression of RE show that the threshold electric field for RE generation is larger than that expected according to a purely collisional theory, but consistent with an increase due to synchrotron radiation losses. This might imply a lower density to be targeted with massive gas injection for RE suppression in ITER. Experiments on active control of disruption-generated RE have been performed through feedback on poloidal coils by implementing an RT boundary-reconstruction algorithm evaluated on magnetic moments. The results indicate that the slow plasma current ramp-down and the simultaneous reduction of the reference plasma external radius are beneficial in dissipating the RE beam energy and population, leading to reduced RE interactions with plasma facing components. RE active control is therefore suggested as a possible alternative or complementary technique to massive gas injection.

  13. Accuracy of newly formulated fast-setting elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur P K; Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2005-06-01

    Elastomeric impression materials have been reformulated to achieve a faster set. The accuracy of fast-setting elastomeric impression materials should be confirmed, particularly with respect to disinfection. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of 2 types of fast-setting impression materials when disinfected with acid glutaraldehyde. Impressions of the mandibular arch of a modified dentoform master model were made, from which gypsum working casts and dies were formed. Measurements of the master model and working casts included anteroposterior (AP) and cross-arch (CA) dimensions. A stainless steel circular crown preparation incorporated within the master model was measured in buccolingual (BL), mesiodistal (MD), and occlusogingival (OG) dimensions and compared to measurements from recovered gypsum dies. The impression materials examined were a fast-set vinyl polysiloxane (VPS-FS, Aquasil Ultra Fast Set), a fast-set polyether (PE-FS, Impregum Penta Soft Quick Step), and a regular-setting polyether as a control (PE, Impregum Penta). Disinfection involved immersion in 3.5% acid glutaraldehyde (Banicide Advanced) for 20 minutes, and nondisinfected impressions served as a control. Linear measurements were made with a measuring microscope. Statistical analysis utilized a 2-way and single-factor analysis of variance with pair-wise comparison of mean values when appropriate. Hypothesis testing was conducted at alpha = .05 No differences were shown between the disinfected and nondisinfected conditions for all locations. However, there were statistical differences among the 3 materials for AP, CA, MD, and OG dimensions. AP and CA dimensions of all working casts were larger than the master model. Impressions produced oval-shaped working dies for all impression materials. PE and PE-FS working dies were larger in all dimensions compared to the stainless steel preparation, whereas VPS-FS-generated working dies were reduced in OG and MD dimensions. Differences

  14. Establishment and Characterization of a Newly Established Diabetic Gerbil Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    Full Text Available We aimed to selectively breed a spontaneous diabetic gerbil when a sub-line of inbred gerbil showed increased blood glucose levels was found recently. Then we investigated the characteristics including the serum insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol, leptin, adiponectin and explored the underlying molecular mechanism for the diabetic phenotype.The spontaneous diabetic line of gerbils was selectively inbreed the sub-line of gerbil by monitoring blood glucose of each animal. The serum insulin, adiponectin, and leptin levels were tested using an ELISA kit. The expression levels of GLUT4, Akt, leptin, adiponectin, and calpain 10 (CAPN10 were tested by western blot and Quantitative Real-time PCR (qPCR in liver, skeletal muscle, and white adipose.Our results show that the percentages of animals with FPG≥5.2 (mmol/l, PG2h≥6.8 (mmol/l and both FPG≥5.2 and PG2h≥6.8 (mmol/l were increased with the number of breeding generations from F0 (21.33% to F6 (38.46%. These diabetic gerbils exhibited insulin resistance and leptin resistance as well as decreased adiponectin level in the serum. We also observed decreased expression of adiponectin and increased expression of leptin in the skeletal muscle, respectively.These results indicate that we have primarily established a spontaneous diabetic gerbil line, and the diabetic phenotypes may have been accounted for by altered expression of leptin and adiponectin.

  15. Vitamin D and Sunlight Exposure in Newly-Diagnosed Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yu, Yu; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo

    2016-01-01

    ...), while the effects of sunlight exposure have not yet been fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the associations between serum vitamin D, vitamin D intake, sunlight exposure, and newly-diagnosed PD patients in a Chinese population...

  16. Preliminary comparison of efficacy and safety of dasatinib and imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周励

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of dasatinib and imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia(CML-CP).Methods37CML-CP patients were randomized to receive

  17. The Effect of Depression on Social Engagement in Newly Admitted Dutch Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco; Pot, Anne Margriet; Kerkstra, Ada; Ooms, Marcel; Muller, Martien; Ribbe, Miel

    2003-01-01

    Studies the effect of depression on social engagement among newly admitted nursing home residents. Results reveal that residents with depression were significantly more often found to have low social engagement. (Contains 26 references and 3 tables.) (GCP)

  18. Discover - deepen - do: A 3D pedagogical approach for developing newly qualified teachers as professional learners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham, Sally; Lester, Nicola; Dickerson, Claire

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a strategy for teaching newly qualified teachers (NQTs) during their first year of teaching, developed by teacher educators from the University of Hertfordshire School of Education...

  19. Further obsrvations on a newly located prawn fishery off Saurashtra coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalan, U.K.

    The abundance of prawns in a newly located ground off Saurashtra has been described Catch omposition showed that Metapenaeus affinis formed the bulk of the catches Previously this species was thought to be of not much commercial importance...

  20. The Effect of Depression on Social Engagement in Newly Admitted Dutch Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco; Pot, Anne Margriet; Kerkstra, Ada; Ooms, Marcel; Muller, Martien; Ribbe, Miel

    2003-01-01

    Studies the effect of depression on social engagement among newly admitted nursing home residents. Results reveal that residents with depression were significantly more often found to have low social engagement. (Contains 26 references and 3 tables.) (GCP)

  1. Newly graduated nurses' use of knowledge sources in clinical decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri Lygum; Grønkjaer, Mette; Wiechula, Rick;

    2016-01-01

    could be used. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Although there is a complexity and variety to knowledge sources used there is an imbalance with the experienced nurse playing a key role, functioning both as predominant source and a role-model as to which sources are valued and used......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses' use in clinical decision-making and why and how they are used. BACKGROUND: In spite of an increased educational focus on skills and competencies within evidence based practice newly graduated nurses' ability to use...... approaches to strengthen the knowledgebase used in clinical decision-making. DESIGN AND METHODS: Ethnographic study using participant-observation and individual semi-structured interviews of nine Danish newly graduated nurses in medical and surgical hospital settings. RESULTS: Newly graduates use...

  2. Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Juul Mylam, Karen;

    Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions......Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions...

  3. Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Juul Mylam, Karen

    Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions......Clinical Features and Outcome in Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Presenting with PET/CT-Ascertained Focal Skeletal Lesions...

  4. Metallicity gradients and newly created star-forming systems in interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia L.

    2015-08-01

    Interactions play an extremely important role in the evolution of galaxies, changing their morphologies and kinematics. Galaxy collisions may result in the formation of intergalactic star-forming objects, such as HII regions, young clusters and/or tidal dwarf galaxies. Several studies have found a wealth of newly created objects in interacting systems. We will exemplify the problems and challenges in this field and will describe observations of the interacting group NGC 6845, which contains four bright galaxies, two of which have extended tidal tails. We obtained Gemini/GMOS spectra for 28 of the regions located in the galaxies and in the tails. All regions in the latter are star-forming objects according to their line ratios, with ages younger than 10 Myr. A super luminous star forming complex is found in the brightest member of the group, NGC 6845A. Its luminosity reveals a star formation density of 0.19 solar masses, per year, per kpc^2, suggesting that this object is a localized starburst. We derived the gas-phase metallicity gradients across NGC 6845A and its two tails and we find that these are shallower than those for isolated galaxies. We speculate that the observed metallicity gradient may be related to one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) interaction induced inflow of fresh gas to the galaxy center, as seen in simulations, which is expected to dilute the metallicity of the central burst, (2) the formation of young metal-rich star forming regions in the tidal tails, which were born out of enriched gas expelled from the central regions of the system during the interaction and (3) the incremental growth of metals accumulated over time, due to the successful generations of star forming regions along the tails. Finally we will describe our plans to do a search for such objects on Halpha images that will soon be available for 17.5k degrees of the sky, with the A-PLUS survey.

  5. Single strand DNA binding proteins 1 and 2 protect newly replicated telomeres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peili Gu; Wei Deng; Ming Lei; Sandy Chang

    2013-01-01

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (hSSB1 and 2) are components of the hSSB1/2-INTS3-C9orf80 heterotrimeric protein complex shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability.However,their roles at telomeres remain unknown.Here,we generated murine SSB1 conditional knockout mice and cells and found that mSSB1 plays a critical role in telomere end protection.Both mSSB1 and mSSB2 localize to a subset of telomeres and are required to repair TRF2-deficient telomeres.Deletion of mSSB1 resulted in increased chromatid-type fusions involving both leading-and lagging-strand telomeric DNA,suggesting that it is required for the protection of G-overhangs.mSSB1's interaction with INTS3 is required for its localization to damaged DNA.mSSB1 interacts with Potla,but not Potlb,and its association with telomeric ssDNA requires Potla.mSSB1△/△ mice die at birth with developmental abnormalities,while mice with the hypomorphic mSSB1F/F allele are born alive and display increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR).Our results suggest that mSSB1 is required to maintain genome stability,and document a previously unrecognized role for mSSB1/2 in the protection of newly replicated leading-and lagging-strand telomeres.

  6. Unexplained Bone Pain Is an Independent Risk Factor for Bone Metastases in Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Helle D; Mørch, Carsten D; Barsi, Tamás;

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between bone pain and bone metastases in newly diagnosed prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective study of bone scintigraphy enrolled 567 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. The presence of all-cause bone pain, known b......: Unexplained bone pain was a strong independent risk factor for bone metastasis. Guidelines should recommend staging bone scintigraphy in patients with unexplained bone pain, regardless of other risk factors....

  7. Newly graduated nurses’ empowerment regarding professional competence and other work-related factors

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Liisa; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Numminen, Olivia; Isoaho, Hannu; Flinkman, Mervi; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Background Although both nurse empowerment and competence are fundamental concepts of describing newly graduated nurses’ professional development and job satisfaction, only few studies exist on the relationship between these concepts. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how newly graduated nurses assess their empowerment and to clarify professional competence compared to other work-related factors. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional and correlational design was applied. ...

  8. Research on indoor air pollution of newly decorated buildings in Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Juan; SHAO Mao-qing; HE Mei

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of indoor-air quality in newly built and newly decorated residences in Chongqing revealed that the average concentration of formaldehyde and ammonia in these residences exceeded the upper limits of the standard. The situation of indoor air pollution varied with the type of rooms. The results of investigation show that the indoor-air pollutants caused by decoration work should not be ignored anymore.

  9. Effect of interference on transmission for newly deployed wireless sensor networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jin; Huang Zailu

    2007-01-01

    The co-channel interference (collisions) seriously affect the transmission for the newly deployed wireless sensor networks since there is no structure at that phase. In this paper, the interference of the whole network is analyzed based on the SNIR model. The new concept of critical transmitting range is proposed, based on which the transmission theorem is obtained and proved. The results provide the theoretical ground to set up the primary structure of newly deployed networks.

  10. Simultaneous Real-Time Monitoring of Oxygen Consumption and Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Cells Using Our Newly Developed Chip-Type Biosensor Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ankush; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kumi Y.; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugiura, Yamato; Sugai, Tomoya; Tomonori, Amano; Tada, Mika; Kobayashi, Masaki; Matsue, Tomokazu; Kasai, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms bear its defense mechanism. Immune cells during invasion by foreign body undergoes phagocytosis during which monocyte and neutrophil produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS generated in animal cells are known to be involved in several diseases and ailments, when generated in excess. Therefore, if the ROS generated in cells can be measured and analyzed precisely, it can be employed in immune function evaluation and disease detection. The aim of the current study is to introduce our newly developed chip-type biosensor device with high specificity and sensitivity. It comprises of counter electrode and working electrodes I and II. The counter electrode is a platinum plate while the working electrodes I and II are platinum microelectrode and osmium-horseradish peroxidase modified gold electrode, respectively which acts as oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection sensors. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and H2O2 generation were measured in animal cells under the effect of exogenous addition of differentiation inducer, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The results obtained showed considerable changes in reduction currents in the absence and presence of inducer. Our newly developed chip-type biosensor device is claimed to be a useful tool for real-time monitoring of the respiratory activity and precise detection of H2O2 in cells. It can thus be widely applied in biomedical research and in clinical trials being an advancement over other H2O2 detection techniques. PMID:27065878

  11. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    1999-08-27

    Phase I retrieval of post-1970 TRU wastes from burial ground 218-W-4C can be done in a safe, efficient, and cost-effective manner. Initiating TRU retrieval by retrieving uncovered drums from Trenches 1, 20, and 29, will allow retrieval to begin under the current SWBG safety authorization basis. The retrieval of buried drums from Trenches 1, 4, 20, and 29, which will require excavation, will commence once the uncovered drum are retrieved. This phased approach allows safety analysis for drum venting and drum module excavation to be completed and approved before the excavation proceeds. In addition, the lessons learned and the operational experience gained from the retrieval of uncovered drums can be applied to the more complicated retrieval of the buried drums. Precedents that have been set at SRS and LANL to perform retrieval without a trench cover, in the open air, should be followed. Open-air retrieval will result in significant cost savings over the original plans for Phase I retrieval (Project W-113). Based on LANL and SRS experience, open-air retrieval will have no adverse impacts to the environment or to the health and safety of workers or the public. Assaying the waste in the SWBG using a mobile assay system, will result in additional cost savings. It is expected that up to 50% of the suspect-TRU wastes will assay as LLW, allowing those waste to remain disposed of in the SWBG. Further processing, with its associated costs, will only occur to the portion of the waste that is verified to be TRU. Retrieval should be done, to the extent possible, under the current SWBG safety authorization basis as a normal part of SWBG operations. The use of existing personnel and existing procedures should be optimized. By working retrieval campaigns, typically during the slow months, it is easier to coordinate the availability of necessary operations personnel, and it is easier to coordinate the availability of a mobile assay vendor.

  12. A newly developed Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles with magnetic property for cancer hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a magnetic iron-doped calcium sulfide (Fe-CaS) nanoparticle was newly developed and studied for the purpose of hyperthermia due to its promising magnetic property, adequate biodegradation rate, and relatively good biocompatibility. Fe-CaS nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemical co-precipitation process with heat treatment in a N2 atmosphere, and were subsequently cooled in N2 and exposed to air at a low temperature. The crystal structure of the Fe-CaS nanoparticles was similar to that of the CaS, which was identified by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The particle size was less than 40 nm based on a Debye-Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. Magnetic properties obtained from the SQUID magnetometer demonstrated that the synthesized CaS was a diamagnetic property. Once the Fe ions were doped, the synthesized Fe-CaS converted into paramagnetism which showed no hysteresis loop. Having been heated above 600 °C in N2, the Fe-CaS showed a promising magnetic property to produce enough energy to increase the temperature for hyperthermia. 10 mg/ml of the Fe-CaS was able to generate heat to elevate the media temperature over 42.5 °C within 6 min. The area of the hysteresis loop increased with the increasing of the treated temperature, especially at 800 °C for 1 h. This is because more Fe ions replaced Ca ions in the lattice at the higher heat treatment temperature. The heat production was also increasing with the increasing of heat treatment temperature, which resulted in an adequate specific absorption ratio (SAR) value, which was found to be 45.47 W/g at 37 °C under an alternative magnetic field of f = 750 KHz , H = 10 Oe. The in vitro biocompatibility test of the synthesized Fe-CaS nanoparticles examined by the LDH assay showed no cytotoxicity to 3T3 fibroblast. The result of in vitro cell hyperthermia shows that under magnetic field the Fe-CaS nanoparticles were able to generate heat and kill the CT-26 cancer

  13. Newly-formed emotional memories guide selective attention processes: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Harald T; Kirmse, Ursula; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta

    2016-06-20

    Emotional cues can guide selective attention processes. However, emotional stimuli can both activate long-term memory representations reflecting general world knowledge and engage newly formed memory representations representing specific knowledge from the immediate past. Here, the self-completion feature of associative memory was utilized to assess the regulation of attention processes by newly-formed emotional memory. First, new memory representations were formed by presenting pictures depicting a person either in an erotic pose or as a portrait. Afterwards, to activate newly-built memory traces, edited pictures were presented showing only the head region of the person. ERP recordings revealed the emotional regulation of attention by newly-formed memories. Specifically, edited pictures from the erotic compared to the portrait category elicited an early posterior negativity and late positive potential, similar to the findings observed for the original pictures. A control condition showed that the effect was dependent on newly-formed memory traces. Given the large number of new memories formed each day, they presumably make an important contribution to the regulation of attention in everyday life.

  14. Perceptions of the clinical competence of newly registered nurses in the North West province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Moeti

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical competence of newly registered nurses relating to the care of individual Clients, depends on their ability to correlate theoretical knowledge learned in the classroom with practice and the development of clinical skills. Its foundation lies in the ability to identify and solve problems that emanate from critical thinking, analytical reasoning and reflective practice. It is clear that the quality of clinical exposure plays a leading role in the development of nursing professionals. Nursing skills alone cannot ensure quality care of clients without the application of theory. Facilitation of this theory to practice therefore remains an essential component of nursing education. This study was aimed at identifying areas of incompetence of newly registered nurses (1998- 2001 in the clinical area by determining the newly registered nurses1 and professional nurses1 perceptions of the competence of the newly registered nurses. A quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive survey was used to collect the data regarding the clinical competence of newly registered nurses (1998-2001.

  15. Technical characterization of dialysis fluid flow of newly developed dialyzers using mass transfer correlation equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunikata, Satoru; Fukuda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Yagi, Yutaka; Matsuda, Masato; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis fluid flow and mass transfer rate of newly developed dialyzers were evaluated using mass transfer correlation equations of dialysis fluid-side film coefficient. Aqueous creatinine clearance and overall mass transfer coefficient for APS-15S (Asahi Kasei Kuraray) as a conventional dialyzer, and APS-15SA (Asahi Kasei Kuraray), PES-150Salpha (Nipro), FPX140 (Fresenius), and CS-1.6U (Toray) as newly developed dialyzers were obtained at a blood-side flow rate (QB) of 200 ml/min, dialysis fluid-side flow rates (QD) of 200-800 ml/min and a net filtration rate (QF) of 0 ml/min. Mass transfer correlation equations between Sherwood number (Sh) containing dialysis fluid-side mass transfer film coefficient and Reynolds number (Re) were formed for each dialyzer. The exponents of Re were 0.62 for APS-15S whereas approximately 0.5 for the newly developed dialyzers. The dialysis fluid-side mass transfer film coefficients of the newly developed dialyzers were higher than those of the conventional dialyzer. Based on the mass transfer correlation equations, introduction of short taper, full baffle of dialyzer jacket and further wave-shaped hollow fiber improves the dialysis fluid flow of the newly developed dialyzers.

  16. Newly-formed emotional memories guide selective attention processes: Evidence from event-related potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Harald T.; Kirmse, Ursula; Schmälzle, Ralf; Flaisch, Tobias; Renner, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Emotional cues can guide selective attention processes. However, emotional stimuli can both activate long-term memory representations reflecting general world knowledge and engage newly formed memory representations representing specific knowledge from the immediate past. Here, the self-completion feature of associative memory was utilized to assess the regulation of attention processes by newly-formed emotional memory. First, new memory representations were formed by presenting pictures depicting a person either in an erotic pose or as a portrait. Afterwards, to activate newly-built memory traces, edited pictures were presented showing only the head region of the person. ERP recordings revealed the emotional regulation of attention by newly-formed memories. Specifically, edited pictures from the erotic compared to the portrait category elicited an early posterior negativity and late positive potential, similar to the findings observed for the original pictures. A control condition showed that the effect was dependent on newly-formed memory traces. Given the large number of new memories formed each day, they presumably make an important contribution to the regulation of attention in everyday life. PMID:27321471

  17. PCTFPeval: a web tool for benchmarking newly developed algorithms for predicting cooperative transcription factor pairs in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fu-Jou; Chang, Hong-Tsun; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Computational identification of cooperative transcription factor (TF) pairs helps understand the combinatorial regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Many advanced algorithms have been proposed to predict cooperative TF pairs in yeast. However, it is still difficult to conduct a comprehensive and objective performance comparison of different algorithms because of lacking sufficient performance indices and adequate overall performance scores. To solve this problem, in our previous study (published in BMC Systems Biology 2014), we adopted/proposed eight performance indices and designed two overall performance scores to compare the performance of 14 existing algorithms for predicting cooperative TF pairs in yeast. Most importantly, our performance comparison framework can be applied to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the performance of a newly developed algorithm. However, to use our framework, researchers have to put a lot of effort to construct it first. To save researchers time and effort, here we develop a web tool to implement our performance comparison framework, featuring fast data processing, a comprehensive performance comparison and an easy-to-use web interface. The developed tool is called PCTFPeval (Predicted Cooperative TF Pair evaluator), written in PHP and Python programming languages. The friendly web interface allows users to input a list of predicted cooperative TF pairs from their algorithm and select (i) the compared algorithms among the 15 existing algorithms, (ii) the performance indices among the eight existing indices, and (iii) the overall performance scores from two possible choices. The comprehensive performance comparison results are then generated in tens of seconds and shown as both bar charts and tables. The original comparison results of each compared algorithm and each selected performance index can be downloaded as text files for further analyses. Allowing users to select eight existing performance indices and 15

  18. ‘It is a dilemma’: perspectives of nurse practitioners on health screening of newly arrived migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustine K. Nkulu Kalengayi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Screening newly arrived migrants from countries with high burden of communicable diseases of public health significance is part of the Swedish national strategy against the spread of these diseases. However, little is known about its implementation. Objective: This study aimed at exploring caregivers’ experiences in screening newly arrived migrants to generate knowledge that could inform policy and clinical practice. Design: Using an interpretive description framework, we conducted semistructured interviews between November and December 2011 in four Swedish counties, with 15 purposively selected nurses with experience in screening migrants. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: Participants described a range of challenges including discordant views between migrants and the nurses about medical screening, inconsistencies in rules and practices, and conflicting policies. Participants indicated that sociocultural differences resulted in divergent expectations with migrants viewing the participants as agents of migration authorities. They also expressed concern over being given a new assignment without training and being expected to share responsibilities with staff from other agencies without adequate coordination. Finally, they indicated that existing policies can be confusing and raise ethical issues. All these were compounded by language barriers, making their work environment extremely complex and stressful. Conclusions: These findings illuminate complex challenges that could limit access to, uptake, and delivery of health screening and undermine public health goals, and highlight the need for a multilevel approach. This entails avoiding the conflation of migration with health issues, harmonizing existing policies to make health care services more accessible and acceptable to migrants, and facilitating health professionals’ work in promoting public health, improving interagency collaboration and the skills of all

  19. Clofarabine, idarubicin, and cytarabine (CIA) as frontline therapy for patients ≤60 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazha, Aziz; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Huang, Xuelin; Choi, Sangbum; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Andreeff, Michael; Estrov, Zeev; Du, Min; Brandt, Mark; Faderl, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue with activity in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A phase I trial of clofarabine, idarubicin, and cytarabine (CIA) in relapsed and refractory AML had shown an overall response rate (ORR) of 48%. To explore this combination further, we conducted a phase II study of (CIA) in patients with newly diagnosed AML ≤60 years. Patients ≥18-60 years with AML and adequate organ function were enrolled. Induction therapy consisted of clofarabine (C) 20 mg m⁻² IV daily (days 1-5), idarubicin (I) 10 mg m⁻² IV daily (days 1-3), and cytarabine (A) 1 g m⁻² IV daily (days 1-5). Patients in remission received up to six consolidation cycles (C 15 mg m⁻² × 3, I 8 mg m⁻² × 2, and A 0.75 g m⁻² × 3). Fifty-seven patients were evaluable. ORR was 79%. With a median follow up of 10.9 months, the median overall survival (OS) was not reached, the median event-free survival (EFS) was 13.5 months. Most toxicities were ≤grade 2. Four week mortality was 2%. In subgroup analysis, patients ≤40 years had better OS (P = 0.04) and EFS (P = 0.04) compared to patients >40 years. Compared to historical patients treated with idarubicin and cyarabine (IA), the OS and EFS were significantly longer for CIA treated patients. In multivariate analysis, CIA retained its favorable impact on OS compared to IA. Thus, CIA is an effective and safe therapy for patients ≤60 years with newly diagnosed AML.

  20. Four Newly Recorded Species of the Family Crambidae (Lepidoptera from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roh, Seung Jin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to report the newly recorded species of the family Crambidae, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. During the course of investigation on the family Crambidae in South Korea, the following four species are reported for the first time from Korea: Diplopseustis perieresalis (Walker, 1859, Dolicharthria bruguieralis (Duponchel, 1833, Herpetogramma ochrimaculale (South, 1901, and Omiodes diemenalis ($Guen{\\acute{e}}e$ 수식 이미지, 1854. Among them two genera, Diplopseustis Meyrick and Dolicharthria Stephens, are also newly reported from Korea. External and genital characteristics of adults were examined and illustrated. All of the newly recorded species were enumerated with their available information including the collecting localities, illustrations of adults, and genitalia.

  1. Serum selenium is low in newly diagnosed Graves´disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow Pedersen, Inge; Knudsen, Nils; Carle, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Selenium deficiency may play an important role in the initiation and progression of autoimmune thyroid disease. To compare serum selenium (s‐Se) values in patients with newly diagnosed autoimmune thyroid disease and controls from the Danish population. S‐Se was measured in triplicate...... by a fluorimetric method. Patients with newly diagnosed Graves’ disease (GD) (n = 97) or autoimmune overt hypothyroidism (AIH) (n = 96), euthyroid subjects with high serum levels of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO‐Ab) (TPO‐Ab > 1500 U/ml, n = 92) and random controls (n = 830). Differences in s‐Se values. S......‐Ab and random controls (linear: P = 0·97; multivariate: P = 0·27). Patients with newly diagnosed GD and AIH had significantly lower s‐Se compared with random controls. Our observation supports the postulated link between inadequate selenium supply and overt autoimmune thyroid disease, especially GD....

  2. Housing stability over two years and HIV risk among newly homeless youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Doreen; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Batterham, Philip; Mallett, Shelley; Rice, Eric; Milburn, Norweeta G

    2007-11-01

    The stability of living situation was examined as a predictor of young people's HIV-related sexual and drug use acts two years after leaving home for the first time. Newly homeless youth aged 12-20 years were recruited in Los Angeles County, California, U.S.A. (n = 261) and Melbourne, Australia (n = 165) and followed longitudinally at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Their family history of moves and the type and frequency of moves over the two years following becoming newly homeless were examined. Regression analyses indicated that recent sexual risk two years after becoming newly homeless was not related to the instability of youths' living situations; condom use was higher among youth with more placements in institutional settings and among males. Drug use was significantly related to having moved more often over two years and Melbourne youth used drugs significantly more than youth in Los Angeles.

  3. Changes in immunological status among newly-diagnosed HIV-infected in Denmark 1995-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, S.; Lohse, N.; Hansen, A.B.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The incidence of new HIV diagnoses in Denmark has remained stable since 1991, but it has increased among the subgroup of homosexual men in recent years. This may reflect an actual increase in newly infected, e.g. as a result of increased risk behaviour, or it may reflect increased HIV....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Observational study based on the Danish HIV Cohort Study, which includes all adults seen at Danish HIV clinics since 1995. RESULTS: From 2000 to 2004 the number of newly-infected homosexual men increased (from 69 to 123), particularly in persons under 30 years (from 5 to 42...... from 0 in 2000 to 23 in 2004. The prevalence of patients with high viral load (and thus potentially at risk of transmitting HIV) decreased in all risk groups. CONCLUSION: Newly-diagnosed homosexual men present at an earlier stage of disease progression and with a better preserved immune system today...

  4. Newly Graduated Nurses' use of Knowledge Sources in Clinical Decision Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lygum Voldbjerg, Siri

    of clinical decisions, based on transparent, articulate and reflective use of knowledge sources. Furthermore, it is implied that nurses are able to retrieve, asses, implement and evaluate research evidence. To meet these requirements, nursing educations around the world have organised curricula to educate...... graduated nurses do not work within a framework of evidence-based practice. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses’ use in their clinical decision-making and why they use them in order to understand why newly graduated nurses use research and components...... within evidence-based practice to a limited extent. The thesis is based on a synthesis of findings from two studies. The aim of the first study was to explore which knowledge sources newly graduated nurses use in clinical decision making as reported within international qualitative research. The purpose...

  5. Drag resistance measurements for newly applied antifouling coatings and welding seams on ship hull surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xueting; Olsen, S. M.; Andres, E.

    in their newly applied conditions. The effects of water absorption of newly applied antifouling coatings on frictional resistance were measured. A flexible rotor with artificial welding seams on its periphery has been designed and constructed to estimate the influence of welding seams on drag resistance. Both......Drag resistances of newly applied antifouling coatings and welding seams on ship hull surface have been investigated using a pilot-scale rotary setup. Both conventional biocide-based antifouling (AF) coatings and silicone-based fouling release (FR) coatings have been studied and compared...... the density of welding seams (number per 5 m ship side) and the height of welding seams had a significant effect on drag resistance....

  6. Climate protection and newly industrialized countries: dilemmas and opportunities in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng-Dar Yue [Leader University, Tainan (China). Institute of Resource and Environmental Management; Chih-Hong Sun [National Taiwan University, Taipei (China). Global Change Research Center

    2003-04-01

    Global climate policy currently is making efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions of industrialized countries through implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. Yet, the development of greenhouse gas emissions in newly industrialized and developing countries is deeply influencing the perspectives of stabilizing the global climate system. This study takes a closer look at the challenges facing Taiwan as an illustrative example to analyze the trends of greenhouse gas emissions, to assess current strategies and their controversies, and to explore strategies for mobilizing national climate policies. Analyzing the aspects of emission caps, carbon taxes, and clean development mechanisms may shed light on the necessity of involving newly industrialized countries and joint reduction into global climate protection schemes. Hopefully, this analysis may provide inspiring insights about the international climate regime and to other newly industrialized and developing countries which can then adopt effective policies for stabilizing the global climate system. (author)

  7. Dependency in elderly people newly diagnosed with cancer - A mixed-method study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, Bente Appel; Thomé, Bibbi; Thomsen, Thordis

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study, based on data from an empirical investigation, combines quantitative and qualitative approaches in a mixed-method design to explore dependency in elderly people newly diagnosed with cancer. METHODS AND SAMPLE: 101 elderly people newly diagnosed with cancer were included...... be achieved by assessing, Activities of Daily Living (ADL) in the elderly. Receiving assistance from children seems to increase perceived dependency and to affect QoL negatively. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this mixed-method study indicate that dependency had a negative influence on the elderly with cancer...

  8. Fitness, daily activity and body composition in children with newly diagnosed, untreated asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahlkvist, S; Pedersen, S

    2009-01-01

    Background: Information about how the asthma disease affects the life style and health in children is sparse. Aim: To measure fitness, daily physical activity and body composition in children with newly diagnosed, untreated asthma and healthy controls, and to assess the association between...... the level of asthma control and these parameters. Methods: Daily physical activity measured using accelerometry, cardiovascular fitness and body composition (per cent fat, per cent lean tissue and bone mineral density) were measured in 57 children with newly diagnosed, untreated asthma and in 157 healthy...... fitness and daytime spent in intensive activity. Overweight children are physically less active than normal weight children....

  9. Generational Dynamics and Librarianship: Managing Generation X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Julie F.; Cooper, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the abilities of Generation X (individuals born 1961 to 1981) librarians to respond to the evolving needs of society. Highlights include age demographics, generational attributes, technology, and the seniority system. (PEN)

  10. Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sites Podcasts QR Codes RSS Feeds Social Bookmarking Social Network Sites Text Messaging Twitter Video Games Video Sharing ... in care is similar to that of HIV-negative individuals. Additional Resources AIDSinfo – Just Diagnosed: Next ...

  11. Distributed generation induction and permanent magnet generators

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, L

    2007-01-01

    Distributed power generation is a technology that could help to enable efficient, renewable energy production both in the developed and developing world. It includes all use of small electric power generators, whether located on the utility system, at the site of a utility customer, or at an isolated site not connected to the power grid. Induction generators (IGs) are the cheapest and most commonly used technology, compatible with renewable energy resources. Permanent magnet (PM) generators have traditionally been avoided due to high fabrication costs; however, compared with IGs they are more reliable and productive. Distributed Generation thoroughly examines the principles, possibilities and limitations of creating energy with both IGs and PM generators. It takes an electrical engineering approach in the analysis and testing of these generators, and includes diagrams and extensive case study examples o better demonstrate how the integration of energy sources can be accomplished. The book also provides the ...

  12. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its predecessor, Generation X. Millennials are those individuals born…

  13. Coulomb time delays in high harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the time it takes to remove an electron from an atom or molecule during photoionization using newly developed attosecond spectroscopies has been a focus of many recent experiments. However, the outcome of such measurement depends on measurement protocols and specific observables available in each particular experiment. One of such protocols relies on high harmonic generation. First, we derive rigorous and general expressions for ionization and recombination times in high harmonic generation experiments. We show that these times are different from, but related to ionization times measured in photo-electron spectroscopy, i.e. using attosecond streak camera, RABBITT and atto-clock methods. Second, we use the Analytical R-Matrix theory (ARM) to calculate these times and compare them with experimental values.

  14. Power Generation Using Mechanical Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Chandrasekaran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean wave energy plays a significant role in meeting the growing demand of electric power. Economic, environmental, and technical advantages of wave energy set it apart from other renewable energy resources. Present study describes a newly proposed Mechanical Wave Energy Converter (MEWC that is employed to harness heave motion of floating buoy to generate power. Focus is on the conceptual development of the device, illustrating details of component level analysis. Employed methodology has many advantages such as i simple and easy fabrication; ii easy to control the operations during rough weather; and iii low failure rate during normal sea conditions. Experimental investigations carried out on the scaled model of MWEC show better performance and its capability to generate power at higher efficiency in regular wave fields. Design Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA shows rare failure rates for all components except the floating buoy.

  15. Coulomb time delays in high harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlina, Lisa; Smirnova, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Measuring the time it takes to remove an electron from an atom or molecule during photoionization has been the focus of a number of recent experiments using newly developed attosecond spectroscopies. The interpretation of such measurements, however, depends critically on the measurement protocol and the specific observables available in each experiment. One such protocol relies on high harmonic generation. In this paper, we derive rigorous and general expressions for ionisation and recombination times in high harmonic generation experiments. We show that these times are different from, but related to, ionisation times measured in photoelectron spectroscopy: that is, those obtained using the attosecond streak camera, RABBITT and attoclock methods. We then proceed to use the analytical R-matrix theory to calculate these times and compare them with experimental values.

  16. Color coverage of a newly developed system for color determination and reproduction in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dozic, A.; Voit, N.F.A.; Zwartser, R.; Khashayar, G.; Aartman, I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives A newly developed system for color determination and reproduction is logically arranged and systematically combines a few components to acquire its broad color range. The objective was to evaluate color coverage of human teeth with the range of the new system and to compare it with other

  17. Effects of workplace incivility and empowerment on newly-graduated nurses' organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lesley Marie; Andrusyszyn, Mary Anne; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test an expanded model of Kanter's theory by examining the influence of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the organizational commitment of newly-graduated nurses. The first years of practise represent an important confidence-building phase for newly-graduated nurses, yet many new nurses are exposed to disempowering experiences and incivility in the workplace. A predictive non-experimental design was used to examine the impact of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the affective commitment of newly-graduated nurses (n=117) working in acute care hospitals. Controlling for age, 23.1% of the variance in affective commitment was explained by structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility [R²=0.231, F(5,107) =6.43, P=0.000]. Access to opportunity was the most empowering factor, with access to support and formal power perceived as least empowering. Perceived co-worker incivility was greater than perceived supervisor incivility. Results offer significant support for the use of Kanter's theory in the newly-graduated nurse population. Without specific strategies in place to combat incivility and disempowerment in the workplace, attempts to prevent further organizational attrition of new members may be futile. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. The Control of Posture in Newly Standing Infants is Task Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Laura J.; Melzer, Dawn K.; Ryu, Joong Hyun; Haddad, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The postural sway patterns of newly standing infants were compared under two conditions: standing while holding a toy and standing while not holding a toy. Infants exhibited a lower magnitude of postural sway and more complex sway patterns when holding the toy. These changes suggest that infants adapt postural sway in a manner that facilitates…

  19. Ventilation behaviour and indoor air problems in different types of newly built dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, J.E.F. van; Phaff, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    In four types of newly built single family dwellings and in apartments of a block of flats in the Netherlands, the behaviour and motivations of the occupants are studied with respect to their response to heating and ventilation, as well as their judgment on indoor air and climate variables such as t

  20. How Schools Can Promote Healthy Development for Newly Arrived Immigrant and Refugee Adolescents: Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Clea A.; Morland, Lyn; Doty, S. Benjamin; Meschke, Laurie L.; Awad, Summer; Husain, Altaf; Nashwan, Ayat

    2017-01-01

    Background: The US education system must find creative and effective ways to foster the healthy development of the approximately 2 million newly arrived immigrant and refugee adolescents, many of whom contend with language barriers, limited prior education, trauma, and discrimination. We identify research priorities for promoting the school…

  1. 13 CFR 120.812 - Probationary period for newly certified CDCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Probationary period for newly certified CDCs. 120.812 Section 120.812 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... failure to file a petition before the end of the probationary period as a withdrawal from the 504...

  2. Ventilation behaviour and indoor air problems in different types of newly built dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, J.E.F. van; Phaff, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    In four types of newly built single family dwellings and in apartments of a block of flats in the Netherlands, the behaviour and motivations of the occupants are studied with respect to their response to heating and ventilation, as well as their judgment on indoor air and climate variables such as

  3. Parent Strategies for Addressing the Needs of Their Newly Adopted Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirella, Linda G.; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Miller, Laurie C.; Bedell, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe reflections of nine American parents on the strengths, challenges, and strategies in parenting young children newly adopted from another country. Eight mothers and one father with an adopted child aged less than 3 years and home for less than 3 months completed standardized assessments measuring the…

  4. Pre-Service English Teachers' Perceptions of Newly Arrived Children from Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing Chan, Yu; Gao, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The research reported here investigated pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of newly arrived immigrant children from Mainland China in Hong Kong. Seventeen participants, who had at least 10 weeks of experience working with these immigrant children during teaching practicum, participated in focus group discussions and shared…

  5. EYE DISEASE IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; SCHIPPER, A; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    1994-01-01

    To determine the magnitude of eye lesions in newly diagnosed leprosy patients we examined their eyes. The Eastern Leprosy Control Project was supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association; we used the regional clinic in Biratnagar and 5 mobile clinics in surrounding districts as our survey

  6. Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, thalidomide and dexamethasone for patients with refractory, newly diagnosed or relapsed myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidra, Gamal; Williams, Cathy D; Russell, Nigel H; Zaman, Sonya; Myers, Bethan; Byrne, Jennifer L

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the combination of thalidomide, pulsed dexamethasone and weekly cyclophosphamide (CTD) for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed, relapsed or VAD-refractory multiple myeloma. We found that this combination was highly effective in inducing responses in all treatment groups with an overall response rate of 83.8%. CTD was well tolerated and did not impair stem cell mobilization.

  7. Morbillivirus infections of aquatic mammals: newly identified members of the genus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); H.W. Vos (Helma); P.S. Ross (Peter); M.J.H. Kenter (Marcel); T. Barrett (Thomas)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSeveral disease outbreaks, which have caused the deaths of many thousands of seals and dolphins during the last decade, have now been attributed to infections with newly identified Morbilliviruses. Outbreaks in the late eighties amongst harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals

  8. Perceived Stress and Coping Strategies among Newly Nurse Students in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Rasha; Alsahli, Haya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the stress level and coping strategies among students who were newly in Practicing the clinical training in different hospitals, at the Nursing College, Princess Nourah University. The study design was a descriptive analytical one. The study was conducted at the beginning of second semester in the academic year…

  9. The prognostic value of FET PET at radiotherapy planning in newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sidsel Højklint; Urup, Thomas; Grunnet, Kirsten;

    2017-01-01

    retrospectively analyzed 146 consecutively treated, newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. All patients were treated with temozolomide and radiation therapy (RT). CT/MR and FET PET scans were obtained postoperatively for RT planning. We used Cox proportional hazards models with OS and PFS as endpoints, to test...

  10. The Positioning of Students in Newly Qualified Secondary Teachers' Images of Their "Best Teaching"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Mavis; Kane, Ruth; Sandretto, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Asking newly qualified teachers (NQTs) to provide images of their "best teaching", and encouraging subsequent reflection on these images, has the potential to enhance their understanding of themselves as teachers as they explore their often unconsciously held assumptions about students and classrooms. This paper reports aspects of a…

  11. EYE DISEASE IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; SCHIPPER, A; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    To determine the magnitude of eye lesions in newly diagnosed leprosy patients we examined their eyes. The Eastern Leprosy Control Project was supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association; we used the regional clinic in Biratnagar and 5 mobile clinics in surrounding districts as our survey

  12. The effect of depression on social engagement in newly admitted Dutch nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.; Pot, A.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Ooms, M.; Muller, M.; Ribbe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of depression (high levels of depressive symptoms) on social engagement. Design and Methods: In 65 nursing homes in the Netherlands, 562 newly admitted residents were assessed at admission. Social engagement was measured with the MDS Index of Social Engagement. A multiva

  13. Assessment by Employers of Newly Graduated Civil Engineers from the Islamic University of Gaza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enshassi, Adnan; Hassouna, Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation process is very important to identify and recognize the strengths and the weaknesses of graduated students. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the newly graduated civil engineers from the Islamic University of Gaza in Palestine. The methodology was based on questionnaires and informal interview. The…

  14. Two newly recorded species of the genus Hypsibius (Tardigrada; Hypsibiidae) from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-zhi; LIAN Zhen-min

    2008-01-01

    This paper reported two newly recorded species,Hypsibius convergens Urbanowicz,1925 and Hypsibius hypostomus Barto(s),1935,of the genus Hypsibius (Tardigrada; Hypsibiidae) from China.Both species were collected from Taibai Mt,Shaanxi Province.All specimens are deposited at the College of Life Sciences,Shaanxi Normal University,China.

  15. Central Geological Prospecting Fund Newly Added 16.47 Million Tonnes of Bauxite in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>In 2013,the Central Geological Prospecting Fund(CGPF)Project newly discovered 15 ore fields,including 3 large above ore fields,and 5medium sized ore fields.The reporter learned from the recently published"Annual Report of Central Geological Prospecting Fund Project(2013)"that,from 2006 to 2013 the CGPF

  16. Evaluating the language development of newly arrived migrant pupils: Go beyond words!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    It is a widespread practice to assess Newly Arrived Migrant pupilS (NAMS) with diagnostic tests, even though most tests have only been standardized for monolingual speakers. Sometimes tests are informally translated bilingual clinicians from L2 to L1, without being adapted to the targeted structures

  17. Morbillivirus infections of aquatic mammals: newly identified members of the genus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); H.W. Vos (Helma); P.S. Ross (Peter); M.J.H. Kenter (Marcel); T. Barrett (Thomas)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSeveral disease outbreaks, which have caused the deaths of many thousands of seals and dolphins during the last decade, have now been attributed to infections with newly identified Morbilliviruses. Outbreaks in the late eighties amongst harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Hali

  18. Do personal conditions and circumstances surrounding partner loss explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarsen, B.; Smit, J.H; Snijders, T.A.B.; Knipscheer, K.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    This longitudinal study aims to explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults, taking into account personal and circumstantial conditions surrounding the partner's death. A distinction is made between emotional and social loneliness. Data were gathered both before and after partner loss. Results

  19. Newly graduated nurses use of knowledge sources in clinical decison-making - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri

    into a clinical setting influences the use of knowledge sources among newly graduated nurses. In study 1, meta-ethnography as described by Noblit and Hare was applied as method of synthesis of international qualitative research. Based on iterative literature search in the databases CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPUS...

  20. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS OF NEWLY HATCHED INDIVIDUALS AND COCOON MASS IN LUMBRICID EARTHWORMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Marianne; Bjerre, Arne

    1991-01-01

    Earthworm cocoons from laboratory cultures were collected and their mass was determined. When hatched, the mass of the young worms was found. Cocoon mass and the mass of hatchlings varied considerably within species. The hygromass of newly hatched earthworms was found to correlate linearly...

  1. Pre-Service English Teachers' Perceptions of Newly Arrived Children from Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing Chan, Yu; Gao, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The research reported here investigated pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of newly arrived immigrant children from Mainland China in Hong Kong. Seventeen participants, who had at least 10 weeks of experience working with these immigrant children during teaching practicum, participated in focus group discussions and shared their…

  2. Self-Esteem: A Comparison between Hong Kong Children and Newly Arrived Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yiu Man; Chan, Christine Mei-Sheung

    2004-01-01

    The Self-esteem Inventory developed by Coopersmith (1967) was used to measure the self-esteem of 387 Chinese children. The sample included newly arrived mainland Chinese children and Hong Kong children. The results showed significant statistical differences when measuring the self-esteem level associated with the length of their stay in Hong Kong…

  3. Constructing Practical Knowledge of Teaching: Eleven Newly Qualified Language Teachers' Discursive Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohotie-Lyhty, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the professional development of 11 newly qualified foreign language teachers. It draws on a qualitative longitudinal study conducted at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland between 2002 and 2009. The paper concentrates on the personal side of teacher development by analysing participants' discourses concerning language…

  4. Pre-Service English Teachers' Perceptions of Newly Arrived Children from Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing Chan, Yu; Gao, Xuesong

    2014-01-01

    The research reported here investigated pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of newly arrived immigrant children from Mainland China in Hong Kong. Seventeen participants, who had at least 10 weeks of experience working with these immigrant children during teaching practicum, participated in focus group discussions and shared their…

  5. Nutrient composition of selected newly bred and established mung bean varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahiya, P.K.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Grewal, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    Seven newly bred and three established varieties of mung bean were analysed for proximate composition, minerals, anti-nutrients and in vitro mineral accessibility. They contained 18–23 g protein, 4.0–5.6 g crude fibre and 2.5–4.1 g ash per 100 g dry sample. Iron, zinc, calcium, sodium and potassium

  6. The newly recognised limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome: report of a Bedouin patient and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, T I; al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bastaki, L; al-Othman, S A; Mohammed, F M; AlSuliman, I S; Murthy, D S

    1993-01-01

    A Bedouin infant born to consanguineous parents and grandparents is reported. She had Müllerian aplasia and the phenotypic features of the limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome (MIM 276820). Phenotypic variability of this newly recognised syndrome is briefly discussed.

  7. How Prepared Do Newly-Qualified Teachers Feel? Differences between Routes and Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Does it matter whether teachers are trained in schools or universities? In England, there is an ongoing change in the balance of routes to becoming a newly qualified teacher (NQT). Given this, and widely-reported problems with teacher supply, it is important to consider whether there are discernible differences between the routes in terms of their…

  8. Evaluating the Acceptability and Feasibility of Project ACCEPT: An Intervention for Youth Newly Diagnosed with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosek, Sybil G.; Lemos, Diana; Harper, Gary W.; Telander, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Given the potential for negative psychosocial and medical outcomes following an HIV diagnosis, Project ACCEPT, a 12-session behavioral intervention, was developed and pilot-tested for youth (aged 16-24) newly diagnosed with HIV. Fifty participants recently diagnosed with HIV were enrolled from 4 sites selected through the Adolescent Medicine…

  9. Newly Developed Ceramic Membranes for Dehydration and Separation of Organic Mixtures by Pervaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, van R.W.; Cuperus, F.P.

    1995-01-01

    Polymeric pervaporation membranes sometimes show great variety in performance when they are alternately used for different solvent mixtures. In addition, membrane stability in time is a problem in case of some solvents. Therefore, newly developed ceramic silica membranes with a 'dense' top layer wer

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: newly discovered planets from WASP-South (Turner+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, O. D.; Anderson, D. R.; Cameron, A. Collier; Delrez, L.; Evans, D. F.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2017-02-01

    Lightcurves and radial velocity data of three newly discovered planets from the WASP-South survey. Discovery data come from the WASP-South telescope (SAAO, South Africa) with follow-up lightcurves from the TRAPPIST telescope and EulerCam on the Swiss telescope (La Silla, Chile). Radial velocity data are from the CORALIE spectrograph on the Swiss telescope. (6 data files).

  11. The impact of organisational culture on the adaptation of newly employed nurses to the work environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L B Khoza

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Usually newly employed nurses find adjusting to a work setting a challenging experience. Opsomming Gewoonlik is die aanpassing by ‘n nuwe werksomgewing vir pasaangestelde verpleegkundiges ‘n groot uitdaging. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  12. Semantic Representation of Newly Learned L2 Words and Their Integration in the L2 Lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordag, Denisa; Kirschenbaum, Amit; Rogahn, Maria; Opitz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The present semantic priming study explores the integration of newly learnt L2 German words into the L2 semantic network of German advanced learners. It provides additional evidence in support of earlier findings reporting semantic inhibition effects for emergent representations. An inhibitory mechanism is proposed that temporarily decreases the…

  13. Using newly-designed lint cleaner grid bars to remove seed coat fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experiment was conducted to remove seed coat fragments at the saw-type lint cleaner using newly-designed grid bars. The test consisted of five experimental grid bar designs and one control. The experimental grid bars had angles from the sharp toe of the grid bar (or the angle from vertical) of ...

  14. A novel Botrytis species is associated with a newly emergent foliar disease in cultivated Hemerocallis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grant-Downton, R.T.; Terhem, R.B.; Kapralov, M.; Mehdi, S.; Rodriguez-Enriquez, M.J.; Gurr, S.J.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Dewey, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Foliar tissue samples of cultivated daylilies (Hemerocallis hybrids) showing the symptoms of a newly emergent foliar disease known as ‘spring sickness’ were investigated for associated fungi. The cause(s) of this disease remain obscure. We isolated repeatedly a fungal species which proved to be memb

  15. Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae: first record from Chile and a newly documented host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae: first record from Chile and a newly documented host plant. Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham, 1892 (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae is recorded for the first time from Chile. Male and female adults were reared from leaf-tying larvae collected on Myrica pavonis (Myricaceae, which is a new host plant record for S. smithiana.

  16. Do personal conditions and circumstances surrounding partner loss explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarsen, B.; Smit, J.H; Snijders, T.A.B.; Knipscheer, K.P.M.

    This longitudinal study aims to explain loneliness in newly bereaved older adults, taking into account personal and circumstantial conditions surrounding the partner's death. A distinction is made between emotional and social loneliness. Data were gathered both before and after partner loss. Results

  17. Validating self-reported mobile phone use in adults using a newly developed smartphone application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, Geertje; Kromhout, Hans; Wiart, Joe; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interpretation of epidemiological studies on health effects from mobile phone use is hindered by uncertainties in the exposure assessment. We used a newly developed smartphone application (app) to validate self-reported mobile phone use and behaviour among adults. METHODS: 107

  18. Identifying the Training Needs of Heads of Department in a Newly Established University in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Lan Huong

    2012-01-01

    Although middle-level academic managers really need training in order to perform their roles adequately in the very changing context of higher education, little formal training is provided, particularly in less developed countries. This paper identifies the training needs of Heads of Department in a newly established university in Vietnam as a…

  19. Nonlocal symmetry generators and explicit solutions of some partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Maochang [School of Science, Chongqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing 400067 (China)

    2007-04-27

    The nonlocal symmetry of a partial differential equation is studied in this paper. The partial differential equation written as a conservation law can be transformed into an equivalent system by introducing a suitable potential. The nonlocal symmetry group generators of original partial differential equations can be obtained through their equivalent system. Further, new explicit solutions can be constructed from the newly obtained symmetry generators. The Burgers equation is chosen as an example; many new valuable explicit solutions and nonlocal symmetry generators are presented.

  20. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  1. A longitudinal, mixed methods investigation of newly qualified nurses' workplace stressors and stress experiences during transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Yvonne; Terry, Louise M; Curzio, Joan

    2017-05-24

    To investigate transition in newly qualified nurses through an exploration of their stressors and stress experiences during their first 12 months postqualifying. Globally, thousands of new nurses qualify annually. They are crucial for the profession and healthcare service delivery. Work-related stress has multiple serious consequences, yet there is a lack of robust, empirical evidence that directly analyses newly qualified nurses and the stress they feel and experience in the workplace. Understanding what causes newly qualified nurses' stress is vital to retaining and nurturing this vital component of the workforce. Longitudinal, explanatory sequential mixed methods, cohort study. At the point of qualification (n = 288), 6 months postqualifying (n = 107) and 12 months postqualifying (n = 86), newly qualified nurses completed the Nursing Stress Scale, with 14 completing a one-to-one interview at 12 months postqualifying. Data were collected from 2010 - 2012. Inferential statistics, "thematic analysis" and "side-by-side comparisons in a discussion" were used for analysis. Workload was consistently the highest reported stressor with inadequate staffing and managing multiple role demands given as explanations. Incivility within the workplace was a noted stressor. Conversely, being part of "a good team" provided a civil, supportive, facilitative work environment. Entering nurse education with previous healthcare experience had a mediating effect on the reported frequency of stressors. Newly qualified nurses encounter multiple work-related stressors over their first 12 months postqualifying, which are intrinsically entwined with their transition. Employing organizations need to be more proactive in managing their workload and addressing workplace incivility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Newly Developed Sarcopenia as a Prognostic Factor for Survival in Patients who Underwent Liver Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Young Jeon

    Full Text Available The relationship between a perioperative change in sarcopenic status and clinical outcome of liver transplantation (LT is unknown. We investigated whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status were associated with the survival of patients.This retrospective study was based on a cohort of 145 patients from a single transplant center who during a mean of 1 year after LT underwent computed tomography imaging evaluation. The cross-sectional area of the psoas muscle of LT patients was compared with that of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status affect post-LT survival.The mean age at LT of the 116 male and 29 female patients was 50.2 ± 7.9 years; the mean follow-up duration was 51.6 ± 32.9 months. All pre-LT patients with sarcopenia still had sarcopenia 1 year after LT; 14 (15% patients had newly developed sarcopenia. The mean survival duration was 91.8 ± 4.2 months for non-sarcopenic patients and 80.0 ± 5.2 months for sarcopenic patients (log-rank test, p = 0.069. In subgroup analysis, newly developed sarcopenia was an independent negative predictor for post-LT survival (hazard ratio: 10.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-80.93, p = 0.024.Sarcopenia in LT recipients did not improve in any of the previously sarcopenic patients and newly developed within 1 year in others. Newly developed sarcopenia was associated with increased mortality. Newly developed sarcopenia can be used to stratify patients with regard to the risk of post-LT mortality.

  3. Newly learned word forms are abstract and integrated immediately after acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapnoula, Efthymia C; McMurray, Bob

    2016-04-01

    A hotly debated question in word learning concerns the conditions under which newly learned words compete or interfere with familiar words during spoken word recognition. This has recently been described as a key marker of the integration of a new word into the lexicon and was thought to require consolidation Dumay & Gaskell, (Psychological Science, 18, 35-39, 2007; Gaskell & Dumay, Cognition, 89, 105-132, 2003). Recently, however, Kapnoula, Packard, Gupta, and McMurray, (Cognition, 134, 85-99, 2015) showed that interference can be observed immediately after a word is first learned, implying very rapid integration of new words into the lexicon. It is an open question whether these kinds of effects derive from episodic traces of novel words or from more abstract and lexicalized representations. Here we addressed this question by testing inhibition for newly learned words using training and test stimuli presented in different talker voices. During training, participants were exposed to a set of nonwords spoken by a female speaker. Immediately after training, we assessed the ability of the novel word forms to inhibit familiar words, using a variant of the visual world paradigm. Crucially, the test items were produced by a male speaker. An analysis of fixations showed that even with a change in voice, newly learned words interfered with the recognition of similar known words. These findings show that lexical competition effects from newly learned words spread across different talker voices, which suggests that newly learned words can be sufficiently lexicalized, and abstract with respect to talker voice, without consolidation.

  4. Newly Developed Sarcopenia as a Prognostic Factor for Survival in Patients who Underwent Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ock, So Young; Xu, Weiguang; Lee, Jung-Dong; Lee, Jei Hee; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Dae Jung; Lee, Kwan Woo; Han, Seung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relationship between a perioperative change in sarcopenic status and clinical outcome of liver transplantation (LT) is unknown. We investigated whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status were associated with the survival of patients. Method This retrospective study was based on a cohort of 145 patients from a single transplant center who during a mean of 1 year after LT underwent computed tomography imaging evaluation. The cross-sectional area of the psoas muscle of LT patients was compared with that of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine whether post-LT sarcopenia and changes in sarcopenic status affect post-LT survival. Results The mean age at LT of the 116 male and 29 female patients was 50.2 ± 7.9 years; the mean follow-up duration was 51.6 ± 32.9 months. All pre-LT patients with sarcopenia still had sarcopenia 1 year after LT; 14 (15%) patients had newly developed sarcopenia. The mean survival duration was 91.8 ± 4.2 months for non-sarcopenic patients and 80.0 ± 5.2 months for sarcopenic patients (log-rank test, p = 0.069). In subgroup analysis, newly developed sarcopenia was an independent negative predictor for post-LT survival (hazard ratio: 10.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.37–80.93, p = 0.024). Conclusion Sarcopenia in LT recipients did not improve in any of the previously sarcopenic patients and newly developed within 1 year in others. Newly developed sarcopenia was associated with increased mortality. Newly developed sarcopenia can be used to stratify patients with regard to the risk of post-LT mortality. PMID:26619224

  5. Hazardous Waste Generators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The HazWaste database contains generator (companies and/or individuals) site and mailing address information, waste generation, the amount of waste generated etc. of...

  6. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wright, Alan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), Portland, ME (United States); McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered one of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.

  7. Empirical extraction of mechanisms underlying real world network generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhack, Royi; Muchnik, Lev; Erez, Tom; Tsaban, Lea; Goldenberg, Jacob; Solomon, Sorin; Louzoun, Yoram

    2010-11-01

    The generation mechanisms of real world networks have been described using multiple models. The mathematical features of these models are usually extrapolated from statistical properties of a snapshot of these networks. We here propose an alternative method based on direct measurement of a sequence of consecutive snapshots to uncover the dynamics underlying real world generation. We assume that the probability of adding a node or an edge depends only on local features surrounding the newly added node/edge, and directly measure the contribution of these features to the node/edge addition probability. These measurements are performed using newly defined N-node local structures. Each N-node local structure represents the configuration of edges surrounding a newly added edge. The N-node local structure measurements reproduce for some networks the now classical addition of edges between high degree node mechanisms. It also provides quantitative estimates of more complex mechanisms driving other networks’ evolution, such as the effect of common first and second neighbors. This new methodology reveals the relative importance of different generation mechanisms. We show, for example, that the main mechanism driving hyperlink addition between two websites is the existence of a third website linking to both the source and the target of the new hyperlink.

  8. Biokinetics of a transuranic ({sup 238}PU) and a rare earth element ({sup 152}Eu) in the lobster (Homarus gammarus): transfer mechanisms (accumulation and detoxification) in organs and at the cellular level; Biocinetiques d'un element transuranien, le {sup 238}PU, et d'une terre rare, le {sup 152}EU, chez le homard homarus gammarus (organes et niveau cellulaire) modalites des transferts (accumulation et detoxication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocquet, N

    1995-07-01

    The work presented here is an experimental investigation of the biokinetics of transfer of a transuranic and a rare earth element ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 152}Eu) in the lobster Homarus gammarus. The study of {sup 238}Pu biokinetics forms part of a wider framework of research concerning the transfer of transuranic elements in marine species, while the study of {sup 152}Eu is carried out with a view to supporting the analogy between the behaviour of transuranics and rare earths in living organisms. Exactly the same experimental protocol, based on techniques from various disciplines (biology, biochemistry and metrology), was used to Investigate the biokinetics of transfer of these two radionuclides. The Individual lobsters were radiolabelled by means of one-shot or chronic ingestion of spiked meals. As the first approach, the kinetics and transfer mechanisms were studied In whole animal samples and in different organs distinct series of pathways through the different organs were identified in the case of both radionuclides, being mainly linked to digestive processes induced by the meal as well as the transport function of hemo-lymph in this way, the Important role of the digestive gland was picked out, with two of four cellular types displaying a successive involvement In the fixation and then the retention of the studied radionuclides. As a corroborative approach, the digestive gland was subjected to a more detailed investigation with the aim of describing the mechanisms of Incorporation and elucidating transfer processes at the cellular and molecular levels. {sup 238}Pu is preferentially partitioned into the cytosol, where it is associated with various constituents such as ferritin (iron-storing protein). {sup 152}Eu is more diffusely distributed in the hepato-pancreatic cells, while the lysosomes appear to play a more important role during transfer. The results obtained in this study, both on the macroscopic scale (i.e. the whole animal and different organs) as well

  9. Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1981-01-01

    Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design.

  10. Contemporaneous Production of Amylase and Protease through CCD Response Surface Methodology by Newly Isolated Bacillus megaterium Strain B69

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The enormous increase in world population has resulted in generation of million tons of agricultural wastes. Biotechnological process for production of green chemicals, namely, enzymes, provides the best utilization of these otherwise unutilized wastes. The present study elaborates concomitant production of protease and amylase in solid state fermentation (SSF by a newly isolated Bacillus megaterium B69, using agroindustrial wastes. Two-level statistical model employing Plackett-Burman and response surface methodology was designed for optimization of various physicochemical conditions affecting the production of two enzymes concomitantly. The studies revealed that the new strain concomitantly produced 1242 U/g of protease and 1666.6 U/g of amylase by best utilizing mustard oilseed cake as the substrate at 20% substrate concentration and 45% moisture content after 84 h of incubation. An increase of 2.95- and 2.04-fold from basal media was observed in protease and amylase production, respectively. ANOVA of both the design models showed high accuracy of the polynomial model with significant similarities between the predicted and the observed results. The model stood accurate at the bench level validation, suggesting that the design model could be used for multienzyme production at mass scale.

  11. Elimination of 5S DNA unit classes in newly formed allopolyploids of the genera Aegilops and Triticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, B R; Feldman, M

    2010-06-01

    Two classes of 5S DNA units, namely the short (containing units of 410 bp) and the long (containing units of 500 bp), are recognized in species of the wheat (the genera Aegilops and Triticum) group. While every diploid species of this group contains 2 unit classes, the short and the long, every allopolyploid species contains a smaller number of unit classes than the sum of the unit classes of its parental species. The aim of this study was to determine whether the reduction in these unit classes is due to the process of allopolyploidization, that is, interspecific or intergeneric hybridization followed by chromosome doubling, and whether it occurs during or soon after the formation of the allopolyploids. To study this, the number and types of unit classes were determined in several newly formed allotetraploids, allohexaploids, and an allooctoploid of Aegilops and Triticum. It was found that elimination of unit classes of 5S DNA occurred soon (in the first 3 generations) after the formation of the allopolyploids. This elimination was reproducible, that is, the same unit classes were eliminated in natural and synthetic allopolyploids having the same genomic combinations. No further elimination occurred in the unit classes of the 5S DNA during the life of the allopolyploid. The genetic and evolutionary significance of this elimination as well as the difference in response to allopolyploidization of 5S DNA and rDNA are discussed.

  12. Newly synthesized APOBEC3G is incorporated into HIV virions, inhibited by HIV RNA, and subsequently activated by RNase H.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa B Soros

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a potent antiretroviral deoxycytidine deaminase that, when incorporated into HIV virions, hypermutates nascent viral DNA formed during reverse transcription. HIV Vif counters the effect of A3G by depleting intracellular stores of the enzyme, thereby blocking its virion incorporation. Through pulse-chase analyses, we demonstrate that virion A3G is mainly recruited from the cellular pool of newly synthesized enzyme compared to older "mature" A3G already residing in high-molecular-mass RNA-protein complexes. Virion-incorporated A3G forms a large complex with viral genomic RNA that is clearly distinct from cellular HMM A3G complexes, as revealed by both gel filtration and biochemical fractionation. Unexpectedly, the enzymatic activity of virion-incorporated A3G is lost upon its stable association with HIV RNA. The activity of the latent A3G enzyme is ultimately restored during reverse transcription by the action of HIV RNase H. Degradation of the viral genomic RNA by RNase H not only generates the minus-strand DNA substrate targeted by A3G for hypermutation but also removes the inhibitory RNA bound to A3G, thereby enabling its function as a deoxycytidine deaminase. These findings highlight an unexpected interplay between host and virus where initiation of antiviral enzymatic activity is dependent on the action of an essential viral enzyme.

  13. Educational Interactive eBook for Newly Diagnosed Children with T1DM: Children’s Role in Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damyanka Tsvyatkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the central concerns in technology development for healthcare interventions in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM are how to involve young patients and their families in the design process and what methods, including artbased activities, would best facilitate a child expressing their innermost feelings when applying child-centered and participatory approaches. This paper describes a variety of artbased tools and methods (e.g. Cooperative Inquiry (CI and Informant Design (ID used in the creative design processes for defining features and eliciting the content of the stories, plots, roles, characters, images, animations, languages, etc., that will inform the design of an educational interactive eBook for newly diagnosed children (aged 8-12 years with T1DM. The articulation of design ideas through modeling plasticine figures, drawing and thinking aloud were generated and collected in three workshop sessions organized for diabetic and healthy children who had different roles in and contributions to the design process. Successfully collected data will be used to build a series of low fidelity paper based eBook prototypes.

  14. Evaluation of some Newly Developed Diploid Hybrids and their Breeding Value in 4x-2x Crosses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The narrow genetic base in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. ) limits the progress in cultivar development.The rich diploid germplasm in the origin center of potato provide a unique resource for improvement of tetraploid potatoes. Seven newly developed diploid hybrids with 2n pollen production, all of which have S.phureja background,were developed and evaluated for their value in potato breeding. They were crossed as male parnets to six tetraploid Solanum tuberosum cultivars,and seeds in large quantity from eleven crosses were obtained. Main agronomic traits ,such as tuber yield ,tuber number,mean tuber weight ,tuber shape ,eye depth, skin smoothness, flesh color, and specific gravity, were measured for 4x-2x tetraploid progenies in seedling generation ,and their parents as well. All of the diploid hybrids had some merit for specific traits and the DH39 was more promising ;high specific gravity trait in some diploid hybrids was successfully introgressed into tetroploid progenies via 4x-2x crosses. These diploid hybrids have potential value in potato breeding.

  15. Minding the Generation Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John

    2011-01-01

    Generational conflict is back. After years of relative silence, and mutual ignorance, the young and old are once more at war. With youth unemployment high on the political agenda, the fortunes of the "jobless generation" are being contrasted with those of the "golden generation" of baby boomers, but is one generation really…

  16. Work Values across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  17. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its…

  18. Work Values across Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  19. The socialization process of newly graduated nurses into a clinical setting: role of the clinical nurse educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Lindsay M; Schipper, Linda M

    2011-01-01

    This article is a review and synthesis of the literature related to the socialization of newly graduated nurses. Personal experience and standards frame the clinical nurse educator role in facilitating learner development and socialization. Successful strategies to improve the socialization process of newly graduated nurses from the literature and recommendations for the future are presented.

  20. Education without a Shared Language: Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion in Norwegian Introductory Classes for Newly Arrived Minority Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Line Torbjørnsen

    2017-01-01

    Based upon fieldwork in two upper secondary schools in Norway, this article offers an analysis of inclusion and exclusion processes for newly arrived minority language students. Minority language students are defined by policy as students who have a different mother tongue than the Norwegian and Sami languages, and students who are newly arrived…