WorldWideScience

Sample records for newer imaging modalities

  1. Chronic granulomatous disease: Value of the newer imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricof, D.D.; Glazer, M.; Amendola, A.

    1984-01-01

    The contribution of computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and nuclear medicine studies in the evaluation and management of seven patients with chronic granulatous disease was retrospectively reviewed. These modalities proved valuable in detecting sites of infection, particularly in the abdomen. Three patients had liver abscesses, two had suppurative retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, one had empyema, and one hand a scrotal abscess. Furthermore, CT or US-guided percutaneous aspiration and/or drainage of infected material was successfully performed on three separate occasions in a single patient, obviating the need for surgery. The newer imaging modalities are useful in the prompt diagnosis and in some instances non-operative therapy of complications of chronic granulomatous disease. (orig.)

  2. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient′s quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described.

  3. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  4. Radiation protection in newer imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Not even a week passes without a paper getting published in peer reviewed journals on radiation protection in newer imaging technologies that either did not exist 10 y ago or were not established for routine use. Computed tomography (CT) happens to be a common element in most of these technologies. Radiation protection is high on the agenda of manufacturers and researchers and that is becoming a driving force for users and international organisations. The media and thus the public have their own share in increasing the momentum. The slice war seems to be shifting to dose war. Manufacturers are now chasing the target of sub-mSv CT. The era of two digit mSv effective dose for a CT procedure is far from losing ground, although cardiac CT within 5 mSv seems possible. A few years ago the change in technology was faster than adoption of dose management but currently even the development of dose reduction techniques is faster than its adoption. There is dearth of large scale surveys of practice and lack of surveys with change in technology. (authors)

  5. Special imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, W.E.; Fajman, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Continual advances in technology have made a wide variety of techniques available for diagnostic imaging. The physician caring for the critically ill patient is, therefore, confronted not only with a choice of different procedures, but also frequently with a choice of imaging modalites. Relatively few of these procedures can be performed at the bedside. Consultation between the radiologist and referring physician is necessary not only for choosing the optimum procedure to answer a specific question, but also for expediting movement of the patient with life-support apparatus through a busy radiology department. It is of utmost importance that there be a coordinated effort when a critically ill patient is to be sent to the radiology department; nursing staff and support personnel should be available to accompany the patient to an area where nursing care is generally not available

  6. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Medical imaging has seen many developments as it has evolved since the mid-1890s. In the last 30-40 years, the pace of innovation has increased, starting with the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s. During the last decade, the rate of change has accelerated further, in terms of continuing innovation and its global application. Most patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. These developments are evident in the technology on which this volume is based - multislice/detector CT scanning and its application in cardiac imaging. However, this advance is achieved at the cost of a radiation burden to the individual patient, and possibly to the community, if its screening potential is exploited. Much effort will be required to ensure that the undoubted benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed as part of the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture

  7. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    A major part of patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago, and the technological basis for their successful dissemination only began to flourish in the last decade or so. Hybrid imaging systems, such as the combination of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET), are an example of a technique that has only been introduced in the last decade. PET/CT has established a valuable place for itself in medical research and diagnosis. However, it is an application that can result in high patient and staff doses. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven both by the imaging industry and by an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill the growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed within the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through

  8. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Multislice/detector computed tomography (CT) scanning, applied to visualization of the colon in CT colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy (VC), is a relatively new application of CT introduced in recent years. The possibility of its application in population screening techniques raises a number of questions. Effort is required to ensure that the benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations being achieved. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice to bear on the problems involved. Under its statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for worldwide application of these standards, the IAEA has developed the Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The BSS was issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and requires radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. The IAEA programme on radiation protection of patients encourages the reduction of patient doses without losing diagnostic benefits. To facilitate this

  9. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  10. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    in real-time and facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic interventions such as joint aspiration and injection. Exciting experimental modalities are also being developed with the potential to provide not just morphological but functional imaging. Techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET......) and high-resolution computerized tomography. Erosions are very clearly depicted using these modalities and MRI also allows imaging of soft tissues with assessment of joint inflammation. High-resolution ultrasound is a convenient clinical technique for the assessment of erosions, synovitis and tenosynovitis...

  11. A review of imaging modalities in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ascha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is defined as resting mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg measured by right heart catheterization. PH is a progressive, life-threatening disease with a variety of etiologies. Swift and accurate diagnosis of PH and appropriate classification in etiologic group will allow for earlier treatment and improved outcomes. A number of imaging tools are utilized in the evaluation of PH, such as chest X-ray, computed tomography (CT, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Newer imaging tools such as dual-energy CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography V/Q scanning have also emerged; however, their place in the diagnostic evaluation of PH remains to be determined. In general, each imaging technique provides incremental information, with varying degrees of sensitivity and specificity, which helps suspect the presence and identify the etiology of PH. The present study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the utility, advantages, and shortcomings of the imaging modalities that may be used to evaluate patients with PH.

  12. Imaging Breast Density: Established and Emerging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon-Hor Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mammographic density has been proven as an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Women with dense breast tissue visible on a mammogram have a much higher cancer risk than women with little density. A great research effort has been devoted to incorporate breast density into risk prediction models to better estimate each individual’s cancer risk. In recent years, the passage of breast density notification legislation in many states in USA requires that every mammography report should provide information regarding the patient’s breast density. Accurate definition and measurement of breast density are thus important, which may allow all the potential clinical applications of breast density to be implemented. Because the two-dimensional mammography-based measurement is subject to tissue overlapping and thus not able to provide volumetric information, there is an urgent need to develop reliable quantitative measurements of breast density. Various new imaging technologies are being developed. Among these new modalities, volumetric mammographic density methods and three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging are the most well studied. Besides, emerging modalities, including different x-ray–based, optical imaging, and ultrasound-based methods, have also been investigated. All these modalities may either overcome some fundamental problems related to mammographic density or provide additional density and/or compositional information. The present review article aimed to summarize the current established and emerging imaging techniques for the measurement of breast density and the evidence of the clinical use of these density methods from the literature.

  13. Impact of Medical Therapy on Atheroma Volume Measured by Different Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad C. N. Sinno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS. Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT, positron emission tomography (PET, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA, B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT, and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities.

  14. Multimodal Image Alignment via Linear Mapping between Feature Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanyun; Zheng, Yuanjie; Hou, Sujuan; Chang, Yuchou; Gee, James

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel landmark matching based method for aligning multimodal images, which is accomplished uniquely by resolving a linear mapping between different feature modalities. This linear mapping results in a new measurement on similarity of images captured from different modalities. In addition, our method simultaneously solves this linear mapping and the landmark correspondences by minimizing a convex quadratic function. Our method can estimate complex image relationship between different modalities and nonlinear nonrigid spatial transformations even in the presence of heavy noise, as shown in our experiments carried out by using a variety of image modalities.

  15. Multi-Modality Imaging in the Evaluation and Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Marc-André; Côté-Laroche, Claudia; Beaudoin, Jonathan

    2017-10-13

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is frequent and associated with increased mortality and morbidity when severe. It may be caused by intrinsic valvular disease (primary MR) or ventricular deformation (secondary MR). Imaging has a critical role to document the severity, mechanism, and impact of MR on heart function as selected patients with MR may benefit from surgery whereas other will not. In patients planned for a surgical intervention, imaging is also important to select candidates for mitral valve (MV) repair over replacement and to predict surgical success. Although standard transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line modality to evaluate MR, newer imaging modalities like three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography, stress echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and computed tomography (CT) are emerging and complementary tools for MR assessment. While some of these modalities can provide insight into MR severity, others will help to determine its mechanism. Understanding the advantages and limitations of each imaging modality is important to appreciate their respective role for MR assessment and help to resolve eventual discrepancies between different diagnostic methods. With the increasing use of transcatheter mitral procedures (repair or replacement) for high-surgical-risk patients, multimodality imaging has now become even more important to determine eligibility, preinterventional planning, and periprocedural guidance.

  16. Imaging modalities of abdominal tumors in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reither, M.

    1993-01-01

    Further technological progress in cross-sectional imaging modalities, accumuting experience with increasingly refined hardware and software and accumulating specific contrast media allow new algorithms for the assessment of abdominal tumors in children. However, ultrasound remains the diagnostic method of choice: Conventional roentgenology with or without contrast media is decreasing, but often reveals further differential diagnostic details. MRI is becoming more prominent and is often performed immediately after ultrasound. The inauguration of gradient echo sequences and consequent shorter examination times combined with the elimination of pulsation and motion artefacts extends the diagnostic spectrum of the upper and middle abdomen. The application of oral or rectal contrast agents for imaging of the GI tract ameliorates the differentiation of pathologic processes. Recently volumetric CT/ultrafast CT has been gaining in importance for abdominal examinations in the pediatric age group. CT especially is helpful if there are bony structures in the region being examined. CT, however, involves ionizing radiation and timely administration of oral and intravenous contrast material. Moreover, as pediatric radiologists, we must strongly withstand tendencies to perform CT more often because it is less expensive, rather than avoiding ionizing radiation by using MRI. (orig.) [de

  17. Image and Dose Simulation in Support of New Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 2-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary outcome of the work was a new Monte Carlo code, MCMIS-DS, for Monte Carlo for Mammography Image Simulation including Differential Sampling. The code was written to generate simulated images and dose distributions from two different new digital x-ray imaging modalities, namely, synchrotron imaging (SI) and a slot geometry digital mammography system called Fisher Senoscan. A differential sampling scheme was added to the code to generate multiple images that included variations in the parameters of the measurement system and the object in a single execution of the code. The code is to serve multiple purposes; (1) to answer questions regarding the contribution of scattered photons to images, (2) for use in design optimization studies, and (3) to do up to second-order perturbation studies to assess the effects of design parameter variations and/or physical parameters of the object (the breast) without having to re-run the code for each set of varied parameters. The accuracy and fidelity of the code were validated by a large variety of benchmark studies using published data and also using experimental results from mammography phantoms on both imaging modalities

  18. Imaging Modalities for Cervical Spondylotic Stenosis and Myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a spectrum of pathology presenting as neck pain, radiculopathy, and myelopathy or all in combination. Diagnostic imaging is essential to diagnosis and preoperative planning. We discuss the modalities of imaging in common practice. We examine the use of imaging to differentiate among central, subarticular, and lateral stenosis and in the assessment of myelopathy.

  19. Diagnostic Approach in Impotence and Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medih Celiktas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Penile erection results from a complex interplay between central nerveus system and local factors. Several aspects of these interactions have been the subject of many reviews. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT monitoring is the best single non-invasive examination to differentiate organic from psychogenic impotence. Angiography and pharmaco-cevernosometry are accepted as gold standard modalities in the assesment of vasculojenic impotence. Recently color Doppler sonography made the detection of vessels easier and the correction of the Doppler angle more accurate, resulting in more rapid and accurate acquisition of data. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 208-211

  20. Optical cell sorting with multiple imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Carrissemoux, Caro; Palima, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    healthy cells. With the richness of visual information, a lot of microscopy techniques have been developed and have been crucial in biological studies. To utilize their complementary advantages we adopt both fluorescence and brightfield imaging in our optical cell sorter. Brightfield imaging has...... the advantage of being non-invasive, thus maintaining cell viability. Fluorescence imaging, on the other hand, takes advantages of the chemical specificity of fluorescence markers and can validate machine vision results from brightfield images. Visually identified cells are sorted using optical manipulation...

  1. Multi-Modality Registration And Fusion Of Medical Image Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassak, P.; Vencko, D.; Cerovsky, I.

    2008-01-01

    Digitalisation of health care providing facilities allows US to maximize the usage of digital data from one patient obtained by various modalities. Complex view on to the problem can be achieved from the site of morphology as well as functionality. Multi-modal registration and fusion of medical image data is one of the examples that provides improved insight and allows more precise approach and treatment. (author)

  2. Autonomy of image and use of single or multiple sense modalities in original verbal image production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatena, J

    1978-06-01

    The use of a single or of multiple sense modalities in the production of original verbal images as related to autonomy of imagery was explored. 72 college adults were administered Onomatopoeia and Images and the Gordon Test of Visual Imagery Control. A modified scoring procedure for the Gordon scale differentiated imagers who were moderate or low in autonomy. The two groups produced original verbal images using multiple sense modalities more frequently than a single modality.

  3. Feature-based Alignment of Volumetric Multi-modal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Matthew; Zöllei, Lilla; Wells, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for aligning image volumes acquired from different imaging modalities (e.g. MR, CT) based on 3D scale-invariant image features. A novel method for encoding invariant feature geometry and appearance is developed, based on the assumption of locally linear intensity relationships, providing a solution to poor repeatability of feature detection in different image modalities. The encoding method is incorporated into a probabilistic feature-based model for multi-modal image alignment. The model parameters are estimated via a group-wise alignment algorithm, that iteratively alternates between estimating a feature-based model from feature data, then realigning feature data to the model, converging to a stable alignment solution with few pre-processing or pre-alignment requirements. The resulting model can be used to align multi-modal image data with the benefits of invariant feature correspondence: globally optimal solutions, high efficiency and low memory usage. The method is tested on the difficult RIRE data set of CT, T1, T2, PD and MP-RAGE brain images of subjects exhibiting significant inter-subject variability due to pathology. PMID:24683955

  4. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  5. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome

  7. Modality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge, Alex; Müller, Henrik Høeg

    Modality: Studies in Form and Function reflects the diversity of theoretical frameworks and the heterogeneity of linguistic phenomena under the general heading of modality. Researchers in the fields of logic, philosophy and linguistics have for many years been pondering the elusive nature...... of modality and grappled with ways of capturing it. The 11 studies included here cover the span from contributions that seek to clarify controversial theoretical constructs to studies which take an empirical approach to linguistic categories and cross-linguistic typological issues. The key concepts addressed...

  8. Musculoskeletal ultrasound and other imaging modalities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrndorf, Sarah; Werner, Stephanie G; Finzel, Stephanie; Backhaus, Marina

    2013-05-01

    This review refers to the use of musculoskeletal ultrasound in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) both in clinical practice and research. Furthermore, other novel sensitive imaging modalities (high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography and fluorescence optical imaging) are introduced in this article. Recently published ultrasound studies presented power Doppler activity by ultrasound highly predictive for later radiographic erosions in patients with RA. Another study presented synovitis detected by ultrasound being predictive of subsequent structural radiographic destruction irrespective of the ultrasound modality (grayscale ultrasound/power Doppler ultrasound). Further studies are currently under way which prove ultrasound findings as imaging biomarkers in the destructive process of RA. Other introduced novel imaging modalities are in the validation process to prove their impact and significance in inflammatory joint diseases. The introduced imaging modalities show different sensitivities and specificities as well as strength and weakness belonging to the assessment of inflammation, differentiation of the involved structures and radiological progression. The review tries to give an answer regarding how to best integrate them into daily clinical practice with the aim to improve the diagnostic algorithms, the daily patient care and, furthermore, the disease's outcome.

  9. Implementation and applications of dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Barber, William C.; Funk, Tobias; Hwang, Andrew B.; Taylor, Carmen; Sun, Mingshan; Seo, Youngho

    2004-06-01

    In medical diagnosis, functional or physiological data can be acquired using radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography or with single-photon emission computed tomography. However, anatomical or structural data can be acquired using X-ray computed tomography. In dual-modality imaging, both radionuclide and X-ray detectors are incorporated in an imaging system to allow both functional and structural data to be acquired in a single procedure without removing the patient from the imaging system. In a clinical setting, dual-modality imaging systems commonly are used to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake with respect to the patient's anatomy. This helps the clinician to differentiate disease from regions of normal radiopharmaceutical accumulation, to improve diagnosis or cancer staging, or to facilitate planning for radiation therapy or surgery. While initial applications of dual-modality imaging were developed for clinical imaging on humans, it now is recognized that these systems have potentially important applications for imaging small animals involved in experimental studies including basic investigations of mammalian biology and development of new pharmaceuticals for diagnosis or treatment of disease.

  10. Automatic intra-modality brain image registration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, J.M.; Ardekani, B.A.; Braun, M.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Registration of 3D images of brain of the same or different subjects has potential importance in clinical diagnosis, treatment planning and neurological research. The broad aim of our work is to produce an automatic and robust intra-modality, brain image registration algorithm for intra-subject and inter-subject studies. Our algorithm is composed of two stages. Initial alignment is achieved by finding the values of nine transformation parameters (representing translation, rotation and scale) that minimise the nonoverlapping regions of the head. This is achieved by minimisation of the sum of the exclusive OR of two binary head images, produced using the head extraction procedure described by Ardekani et al. (J Comput Assist Tomogr, 19:613-623, 1995). The initial alignment successfully determines the scale parameters and gross translation and rotation parameters. Fine alignment uses an objective function described for inter-modality registration in Ardekani et al. (ibid.). The algorithm segments one of the images to be aligned into a set of connected components using K-means clustering. Registration is achieved by minimising the K-means variance of the segmentation induced in the other image. Similarity of images of the same modality makes the method attractive for intra-modality registration. A 3D MR image, with voxel dimensions, 2x2x6 mm, was misaligned. The registered image shows visually accurate registration. The average displacement of a pixel from its correct location was measured to be 3.3 mm. The algorithm was tested on intra-subject MR images and was found to produce good qualitative results. Using the data available, the algorithm produced promising qualitative results in intra-subject registration. Further work is necessary in its application to intersubject registration, due to large variability in brain structure between subjects. Clinical evaluation of the algorithm for selected applications is required

  11. Imaging of congenital heart disease in adults: choice of modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwat, Stefan; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in noninvasive imaging of adult congenital heart disease have been accomplished. These tools play now a key role in comprehensive diagnostic work-up, decision for intervention, evaluation for the suitability of specific therapeutic options, monitoring of interventions and regular follow-up. Besides echocardiography, magnetic resonance (CMR) and computed tomography (CT) have gained particular importance. The choice of imaging modality has thus become a critical issue. This review summarizes strengths and limitations of the different imaging modalities and how they may be used in a complementary fashion. Echocardiography obviously remains the workhorse of imaging routinely used in all patients. However, in complex disease and after surgery echocardiography alone frequently remains insufficient. CMR is particularly useful in this setting and allows reproducible and accurate quantification of ventricular function and comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy, aorta, pulmonary arteries and venous return including complex flow measurements. CT is preferred when CMR is contraindicated, when superior spatial resolution is required or when "metallic" artefacts limit CMR imaging. In conclusion, the use of currently available imaging modalities in adult congenital heart disease needs to be complementary. Echocardiography remains the basis tool, CMR and CT should be added considering specific open questions and the ability to answer them, availability and economic issues.

  12. Multi-modality molecular imaging: pre-clinical laboratory configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanjun; Wellen, Jeremy W.; Sarkar, Susanta K.

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, the prevalence of in vivo molecular imaging applications has rapidly increased. Here we report on the construction of a multi-modality imaging facility in a pharmaceutical setting that is expected to further advance existing capabilities for in vivo imaging of drug distribution and the interaction with their target. The imaging instrumentation in our facility includes a microPET scanner, a four wavelength time-domain optical imaging scanner, a 9.4T/30cm MRI scanner and a SPECT/X-ray CT scanner. An electronics shop and a computer room dedicated to image analysis are additional features of the facility. The layout of the facility was designed with a central animal preparation room surrounded by separate laboratory rooms for each of the major imaging modalities to accommodate the work-flow of simultaneous in vivo imaging experiments. This report will focus on the design of and anticipated applications for our microPET and optical imaging laboratory spaces. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to maximize the daily throughput of animal scans through development of efficient experimental work-flows and the use of multiple animals in a single scanning session.

  13. Comparison of imaging modalities for diagnosis of thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfannenstiel, P.; Hirsch, H.; Stein, N.; Maier, R.; Meindl, S.; Voges, K.; Willmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    From 4-1-1980 to 3-30-1983 in more than 10000 patients scanning of the thyroid was performed by a rectiliniear scanner and predominantly by a gamma-camera using a special collimator and a data processing unit for evaluation of global and regional uptake of sup(99m)TcO 4 or 123 I. The functional scans were compared with the structural information provided by real-time ultrasonography of the thyroid, employing in questionable cases specially developed computer aided pattern recognition methods. Other modalities as a multiwire camera, X-ray fluorescence, CT-imaging, NMR-tomography were also evaluated in selected cases. From the data a diagnostic strategy for the use of imaging modalities to diagnose thyroid diseases was derived. (orig.) [de

  14. Cardiac Computed Tomography as an Imaging Modality in Coronary Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliova, Irem; Fries, Peter; Schmidt, Jörg; Schneider, Ulrich; Shalabi, Ahmad; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    Coronary artery fistulae and coronary aneurysms are rare anomalies. When they become symptomatic, they require precise anatomic information to allow for planning of the therapeutic procedure. We report a case in which both fistulae and aneurysm were present. The required information could only be obtained by electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography with reformation. This imaging modality should be considered in every case of fistula or coronary aneurysm. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiological Evaluation of Ambiguous Genitalia with Various Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, N.; Bindushree, Kadakola

    2012-07-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. These can be classified broadly into four categories on the basis of gonadal histologic features: female pseudohermaphroditism (46,XX with two ovaries); male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY with two testes); true hermaphroditism (ovotesticular DSD) (both ovarian and testicular tissues); and gonadal dysgenesis, either mixed (a testis and a streak gonad) or pure (bilateral streak gonads). Imaging plays an important role in demonstrating the anatomy and associated anomalies. Ultrasonography is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs and magnetic resonance imaging is used as an adjunct modality to assess for internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychologic development of children with ambiguous genitalia. Gender assignment can be facilitated with a team approach that involves a pediatric endocrinologist, geneticist, urologist, psychiatrist, social worker, neonatologist, nurse, and radiologist, allowing timely diagnosis and proper management. We describe case series on ambiguous genitalia presented to our department who were evaluated with multiple imaging modalities.

  16. The research progress of dual-modality probes for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Feng; Chen Yue

    2010-01-01

    Various imaging modalities have been exploited to investigate the anatomic or functional dissemination of tissues in the body. However, no single imaging modality allows overall structural, functional, and molecular information as each imaging modality has its own unique strengths and weaknesses. The combination of two imaging modalities that investigates the strengths of different methods might offer the prospect of improved diagnostic abilities. As more and more dual-modality imaging system have become clinically adopted, significant progress has been made toward the creation of dual-modality imaging probes, which can be used as novel tools for future multimodality systems. These all-in-one probes take full advantage of two different imaging modalities and could provide comprehensive information for clinical diagnostics. This review discusses the advantages and challenges in developing dual-modality imaging probes. (authors)

  17. Role of the multi-modality image archival and communication system in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bela Kari; Adam Mester; Erno Mako; Zoltan Gyorfi; Bela Mihalik; Zsolt; Hegyi

    2004-01-01

    Various non-invasive imaging systems produce increasing amount of diagnostic images day by day in digital format. The direct consequence of this tendency places electronic archives and image transfers in spotlight. Moreover, the digital image archives may support any other activities like simultaneous displaying of multi-modality images, telediagnostics, on-line consultation, construction of standard databases for dedicated organs by regional and/or country wide (e.g. myocardial scintigraphy, mammography, etc....) in order to obtain much more exact diagnosis as well as to support education and training. Our institute started similar research and developing activities few years ago, resulting the construction of our PACS systems -MEDISA LINUX Debian and eRAD ImageMedical TM LINUX Red Hat- together with the telecommunication part. Mass storage unit of PACS is based on hard drives connecting in RAID with l.2Tbyte capacity. The on-line telecommunication system consists of an ISDN Multi-Media System (MMS) and Internet based independent units. MMS was dedicated mainly for on-line teleconferencing and consultation by the simultaneously transferred morphological and functional images obtaining from the central archives by DICOM or any other allowable image formats. MMS has been created as a part and requirements of an EU research project - RETRANSPLANT -. The central archives -PACS- can be accessed by DICOM 3.0 protocol on Internet surface through well maintained and secure access rights. Displaying and post-processing of any retrieved images on individual workstations are supported by eRAD ImageMedical TM PracticeBuilder1-2-3 (Window based) image manager with its unique supports and services. The 'real engine' of PracticeBuilder is Ver.5.0 or newer Internet Explorer. The unique feature of PracticelBuilder1-2-3 is the extremely fast patient and image access from the archives even from very 'far distance' (through continents), due to the exceptional image communication

  18. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  19. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-01-01

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems

  20. Optical imaging modalities: From design to diagnosis of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korde, Vrushali Raj

    This study investigates three high resolution optical imaging modalities to better detect and diagnose skin cancer. The ideal high resolution optical imaging system can visualize pre-malignant tissue growth non-invasively with resolution comparable to histology. I examined 3 modalities which approached this goal. The first method examined was high magnification microscopy of thin stained tissue sections, together with a statistical analysis of nuclear chromatin patterns termed Karyometry. This method has subcellular resolution, but it necessitates taking a biopsy at the desired tissue site and imaging the tissue ex-vivo. My part of this study was to develop an automated nuclear segmentation algorithm to segment cell nuclei in skin histology images for karyometric analysis. The results of this algorithm were compared to hand segmented cell nuclei in the same images, and it was concluded that the automated segmentations can be used for karyometric analysis. The second optical imaging modality I investigated was Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). OCT is analogous to ultrasound, in which sound waves are delivered into the body and the echo time and reflected signal magnitude are measured. Due to the fast speed of light and detector temporal integration times, low coherence interferometry is needed to gate the backscattered light. OCT acquires cross sectional images, and has an axial resolution of 1-15 mum (depending on the source bandwidth) and a lateral resolution of 10-20 mum (depending on the sample arm optics). While it is not capable of achieving subcellular resolution, it is a non-invasive imaging modality. OCT was used in this study to evaluate skin along a continuum from normal to sun damaged to precancer. I developed algorithms to detect statistically significant differences between images of sun protected and sun damaged skin, as well as between undiseased and precancerous skin. An Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) endoscope was developed in the third

  1. Dual-modal photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Sungjo; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Dental implants are common method to replace decayed or broken tooth. As the implant treatment procedures varies according to the patients' jawbone, bone ridge, and sinus structure, appropriate examinations are necessary for successful treatment. Currently, radiographic examinations including periapical radiology, panoramic X-ray, and computed tomography are commonly used for diagnosing and monitoring. However, these radiographic examinations have limitations in that patients and operators are exposed to radioactivity and multiple examinations are performed during the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) combined imaging of dental implant that can lower the total amount of absorbed radiation dose in dental implant treatment. An acoustic resolution PA macroscopy and a clinical PA/US system was used for dental implant imaging. The acquired dual modal PA/US imaging results support that the proposed photoacoustic imaging strategy can reduce the radiation dose rate during dental implant treatment.

  2. Acoustic Angiography: A New Imaging Modality for Assessing Microvasculature Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Gessner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide the biomedical imaging community with details of a new high resolution contrast imaging approach referred to as “acoustic angiography.” Through the use of dual-frequency ultrasound transducer technology, images acquired with this approach possess both high resolution and a high contrast-to-tissue ratio, which enables the visualization of microvascular architecture without significant contribution from background tissues. Additionally, volumetric vessel-tissue integration can be visualized by using b-mode overlays acquired with the same probe. We present a brief technical overview of how the images are acquired, followed by several examples of images of both healthy and diseased tissue volumes. 3D images from alternate modalities often used in preclinical imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-CT and photoacoustics, are also included to provide a perspective on how acoustic angiography has qualitatively similar capabilities to these other techniques. These preliminary images provide visually compelling evidence to suggest that acoustic angiography may serve as a powerful new tool in preclinical and future clinical imaging.

  3. Nanogels as imaging agents for modalities spanning the electromagnetic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Minnie; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-01-21

    In the past few decades, advances in imaging equipment and protocols have expanded the role of imaging in in vivo diagnosis and disease management, especially in cancer. Traditional imaging agents have rapid clearance and low specificity for disease detection. To improve accuracy in disease identification, localization and assessment, novel nanomaterials are frequently explored as imaging agents to achieve high detection specificity and sensitivity. A promising material for this purpose are hydrogel nanoparticles, whose high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and tunable size in the nanometer range make them ideal for imaging. These nanogels (10 to 200 nm) can circumvent uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, allowing longer circulation times than small molecules. In addition, their size/surface properties can be further tailored to optimize their pharmacokinetics for imaging of a particular disease. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of nanogels as imaging agents in various modalities with sources of signal spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, including MRI, NIR, UV-vis, and PET. Many materials and formulation methods will be reviewed to highlight the versatility of nanogels as imaging agents.

  4. Modality prediction of biomedical literature images using multimodal feature representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelka, Obioma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling approaches performed to automatically predict the modality of images found in biomedical literature. Various state-of-the-art visual features such as Bag-of-Keypoints computed with dense SIFT descriptors, texture features and Joint Composite Descriptors were used for visual image representation. Text representation was obtained by vector quantisation on a Bag-of-Words dictionary generated using attribute importance derived from a χ-test. Computing the principal components separately on each feature, dimension reduction as well as computational load reduction was achieved. Various multiple feature fusions were adopted to supplement visual image information with corresponding text information. The improvement obtained when using multimodal features vs. visual or text features was detected, analysed and evaluated. Random Forest models with 100 to 500 deep trees grown by resampling, a multi class linear kernel SVM with C=0.05 and a late fusion of the two classifiers were used for modality prediction. A Random Forest classifier achieved a higher accuracy and computed Bag-of-Keypoints with dense SIFT descriptors proved to be a better approach than with Lowe SIFT.

  5. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  6. TU-C-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT I: Multi-Modality 4D Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J; Mageras, G; Pan, T

    2014-01-01

    Motion management is one of the critical technical challenges for radiation therapy. 4D imaging has been rapidly adopted as essential tool to assess organ motion associated with respiratory breathing. A variety of 4D imaging techniques have been developed and are currently under development based on different imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, PET, and CBCT. Each modality provides specific and complementary information about organ and tumor respiratory motion. Effective use of each different technique or combined use of different techniques can introduce a comprehensive management of tumor motion. Specifically, these techniques have afforded tremendous opportunities to better define and delineate tumor volumes, more accurately perform patient positioning, and effectively apply highly conformal therapy techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Successful implementation requires good understanding of not only each technique, including unique features, limitations, artifacts, imaging acquisition and process, but also how to systematically apply the information obtained from different imaging modalities using proper tools such as deformable image registration. Furthermore, it is important to understand the differences in the effects of breathing variation between different imaging modalities. A comprehensive motion management strategy using multi-modality 4D imaging has shown promise in improving patient care, but at the same time faces significant challenges. This session will focuses on the current status and advances in imaging respiration-induced organ motion with different imaging modalities: 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, 4D-PET, and 4D-CBCT/DTS. Learning Objectives: Understand the need and role of multimodality 4D imaging in radiation therapy. Understand the underlying physics behind each 4D imaging technique. Recognize the advantages and limitations of each 4D imaging technique

  7. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Fusion of different modalities of imaging the fist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdenet, J.; Garbuio, P.; Runge, M.; Cardot, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The standard radiographical pictures are not able always to bring out the fracture of one of the fist bones. In an early study it was shown that 40% of patients presenting a suspicion of fracture and in which the radio- image was normal, have had a fracture confirmed with quantification by MRI and scintigraphy. The last one does not allow to specify the localization and consequently we developed a code to fusion entirely automatically the radiologic image and the scintigraphic image using no external marker. The code has been installed on a PC and uses the Matlab environment. Starting from the histogram processing the contours are individualized on the interpolated radio- and scinti-images. For matching there are 3 freedom degrees: one of rotation and 2 of translation (in x and y axes). The internal axes of the forearm was chosen to effect the rotation and translation. The forehand thickness, identical for each modality, allows to match properly the images. We have obtained an anatomic image on which the contour and the hyper-fixating zones of the scintigraphy are added. On a set of 100 examinations we observed 38 fractures while the difference between a fracture of the scaphoid and of another fist bone is confirmed in 93% of cases

  9. Algorithm of imaging modalities in cases of mandibular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailova, H.

    2009-01-01

    Mandibular fracture is the most common bone fracture of maxillo-facial trauma. Up to now the main method for examination of the mandible is radiography. The aim of the issue is to present an algorithm of imaging modalities for investigation of patients in cases of mandibular trauma. It consists of series of X ray techniques and views of the facial skull named mandibulo-facial. This standardizes mandibulo-facial series includes exactly determined four projections done by conventional X ray techniques: posterior-anterior view of skull (PA or AP), oblique view of the left mandible; oblique view of the right mandible; occipito-mental view. Using these four planned radiograms is obligatory for each mandibular trauma. Panoramic X-ray is obligatory in cases of apparatus availability; this abolish only oblique views (left and right). Occipito-mental view of the skull gives anatomically better the coronoid process of the mandible, the zygoma complex, the orbital edges and maxillar sinus than Waters projection. So mandibulo-facial series of four planned radiograms is not only for diagnostic of mandibular fractures, but as a screening of mandibulo-facial trauma too. Thus using algorithm of imaging modalities in cases of mandibular fracture leads to optimization of diagnostic process in patients with mandibular trauma. (author)

  10. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  11. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, David C.; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  12. Biomedical imaging modality classification using combined visual features and textual terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xian-Hua; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We describe an approach for the automatic modality classification in medical image retrieval task of the 2010 CLEF cross-language image retrieval campaign (ImageCLEF). This paper is focused on the process of feature extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010.

  13. Newer trends in the diagnosis of pulmonary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankharia, G R

    1996-12-31

    The contents are indications for the newer modalities i.e. ultrasound, computerized tomography HRTC, magnetic resonance on the pulmonary lesions such as lung diseases, emphysema , tuberculosis, bronchogenic carcinoma.

  14. Newer trends in the diagnosis of pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankharia, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are indications for the newer modalities i.e. ultrasound, computerized tomography HRTC, magnetic resonance on the pulmonary lesions such as lung diseases, emphysema , tuberculosis, bronchogenic carcinoma

  15. Combining Different Modalities for 3D Imaging of Biological Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, E; Kulkarni, P; Mason, R; Parkey, R; Seliuonine, S; Shay, J; Soesbe, T; Zhezher, V; Zinchenko, A I

    2005-01-01

    A resolution enhanced NaI(Tl)-scintillator micro-SPECT device using pinhole collimator geometry has been built and tested with small animals. This device was constructed based on a depth-of-interaction measurement using a thick scintillator crystal and a position sensitive PMT to measure depth-dependent scintillator light profiles. Such a measurement eliminates the parallax error that degrades the high spatial resolution required for small animal imaging. This novel technique for 3D gamma-ray detection was incorporated into the micro-SPECT device and tested with a $^{57}$Co source and $^{98m}$Tc-MDP injected in mice body. To further enhance the investigating power of the tomographic imaging different imaging modalities can be combined. In particular, as proposed and shown in this paper, the optical imaging permits a 3D reconstruction of the animal's skin surface thus improving visualization and making possible depth-dependent corrections, necessary for bioluminescence 3D reconstruction in biological objects. ...

  16. Combining different modalities for 3D imaging of biological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, Eh.; Antich, P.; Kulkarni, P.; Mason, R.; Parkey, R.; Seliuonine, S.; Shay, J.; Soesbe, T.; Zhezher, V.; Zinchenko, A.

    2005-01-01

    A resolution enhanced NaI(Tl)-scintillator micro-SPECT device using pinhole collimator geometry has been built and tested with small animals. This device was constructed based on a depth-of-interaction measurement using a thick scintillator crystal and a position sensitive PMT to measure depth-dependent scintillator light profiles. Such a measurement eliminates the parallax error that degrades the high spatial resolution required for small animal imaging. This novel technique for 3D gamma-ray detection was incorporated into the micro-SPECT device and tested with a 57 Co source and 98m Tc-MDP injected in mice body. To further enhance the investigating power of the tomographic imaging different imaging modalities can be combined. In particular, as proposed and shown, the optical imaging permits a 3D reconstruction of the animal's skin surface thus improving visualization and making possible depth-dependent corrections, necessary for bioluminescence 3D reconstruction in biological objects. This structural information can provide even more detail if the x-ray tomography is used as presented in the paper

  17. Imaging by multiple modalities of patients with a carotidynia syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Uematsu, Hidemasa; Kimura, Hirohiko; Itoh, Harumi [University of Fukui, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui (Japan); Sagoh, Tadashi; Noguchi, Masato [Fukui Red Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fukui (Japan); Miyayama, Shiro [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Fukui (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers with the clinical syndrome of carotidynia. In the past, the International Headache Society (IHS) described idiopathic carotidynia as a diagnostic entity consisting of a self-limiting neck pain syndrome and tenderness over the carotid bifurcation without structural abnormality and then recently removed it from its classification. Although the clinical criteria of carotidynia in the former classification of the IHS included the absence of structural abnormality, several publications have demonstrated associated radiological findings and have described the usefulness of radiological investigations in diagnosing this syndrome. In this paper, we report four additional cases with a carotidynia clinical syndrome (according to the former classification) and the presence of abnormal soft tissue infiltration surrounding the symptomatic carotid artery as demonstrated by multiple imaging modalities, without any other underlying cause for the carotid pain syndrome. Our findings support the hypothesis that carotidynia could be a distinct disease entity, possibly caused by inflammation. (orig.)

  18. Imaging by multiple modalities of patients with a carotidynia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Uematsu, Hidemasa; Kimura, Hirohiko; Itoh, Harumi; Sagoh, Tadashi; Noguchi, Masato; Miyayama, Shiro

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers with the clinical syndrome of carotidynia. In the past, the International Headache Society (IHS) described idiopathic carotidynia as a diagnostic entity consisting of a self-limiting neck pain syndrome and tenderness over the carotid bifurcation without structural abnormality and then recently removed it from its classification. Although the clinical criteria of carotidynia in the former classification of the IHS included the absence of structural abnormality, several publications have demonstrated associated radiological findings and have described the usefulness of radiological investigations in diagnosing this syndrome. In this paper, we report four additional cases with a carotidynia clinical syndrome (according to the former classification) and the presence of abnormal soft tissue infiltration surrounding the symptomatic carotid artery as demonstrated by multiple imaging modalities, without any other underlying cause for the carotid pain syndrome. Our findings support the hypothesis that carotidynia could be a distinct disease entity, possibly caused by inflammation. (orig.)

  19. Breast US as primary imaging modality for diagnosing gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, M; Introna, T; Coi, L; Cornacchia, I; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of breast US in diagnosing and classifying gynecomastia as the primary imaging modality and to compare US findings and classification system with the mammographic ones. 48 patients suspected of having gynecomastia underwent mammography and US. Two radiologists in consensus retrospectively evaluated mammograms and sonograms. Both US and mammographic images were evaluated categorizing gynecomastia into non-mass, nodular and flame shaped patterns. The two category assignations were compared in order to find any difference. The reference standard for both the classification systems was represented by the cytological examination in 18 out of 44 cases (41%) and the six-month US follow-up in the remaining cases. The US examination revealed pseudo-gynecomastia in 4/48 (8%) and true gynecomastia in the remaining 44 (92%). Gynecomastia was bilateral in 25/44 cases (57%) and unilateral in the remaining 19 (43%). The cases of true gynecomastia included non mass shape in 26/44 cases (59%), nodular shape in 12 (27%) and flame shape in 6 (14%). The mammographic examination revealed the same results as compared with US findings. 18/44 (41%) patients affected by nodular or dendritic gynecomastia underwent cytological examination confirming the presence of glandular tissue and the benign nature of the clinical condition. US could be proposed as the primary imaging tool for diagnosing and classifying gynecomastia, avoiding unnecessary Xray examinations or invasive procedures in case of diffuse gynecomastia. In case of nodular or dendritic patterns, biopsy remains mandatory for a definitive diagnosis.

  20. Imaging modalities in radiation treatment planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, D.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation therapy is a standard treatment after surgery for most of malignant and some of benignant brain tumors. The restriction in acquiring local tumor control is an inability in realization of high dose without causing radiation necrosis in irradiated area and sparing normal tissues. The development of imaging modalities during the last years is responsible for better treatment results and lower early and late toxicity. Essential is the role of image methods not only in the diagnosis and also in the precise anatomical (during last years also functional) localisation, spreading of the tumor, treatment planning process and the effects of the treatment. Target delineation is one of the great geometrical uncertainties in the treatment planning process. Early studies on the use of CT in treatment planning documented that tumor coverage without CT was clearly inadequate in 20% of the patients and marginal in another 27 %. The image fusion of CT, MBI and PET and also the use of contrast materia helps to get over those restrictions. The use of contrast material enhances the signal in 10 % of the patients with glioblastoma multiform and in a higher percentage of the patients with low-grade gliomas

  1. Imaging modalities for the non-invasive diagnosis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisenblat, Vicki; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Farquhar, Cindy; Johnson, Neil; Hull, M Louise

    2016-02-26

    About 10% of women of reproductive age suffer from endometriosis. Endometriosis is a costly chronic disease that causes pelvic pain and subfertility. Laparoscopy, the gold standard diagnostic test for endometriosis, is expensive and carries surgical risks. Currently, no non-invasive tests that can be used to accurately diagnose endometriosis are available in clinical practice. This is the first review of diagnostic test accuracy of imaging tests for endometriosis that uses Cochrane methods to provide an update on the rapidly expanding literature in this field. • To provide estimates of the diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities for the diagnosis of pelvic endometriosis, ovarian endometriosis and deeply infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) versus surgical diagnosis as a reference standard.• To describe performance of imaging tests for mapping of deep endometriotic lesions in the pelvis at specific anatomical sites.Imaging tests were evaluated as replacement tests for diagnostic surgery and as triage tests that would assist decision making regarding diagnostic surgery for endometriosis. We searched the following databases to 20 April 2015: MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, LILACS, OAIster, TRIP, ClinicalTrials.gov, MEDION, DARE, and PubMed. Searches were not restricted to a particular study design or language nor to specific publication dates. The search strategy incorporated words in the title, abstracts, text words across the record and medical subject headings (MeSH). We considered published peer-reviewed cross-sectional studies and randomised controlled trials of any size that included prospectively recruited women of reproductive age suspected of having one or more of the following target conditions: endometrioma, pelvic endometriosis, DIE or endometriotic lesions at specific intrapelvic anatomical locations. We included studies that compared the diagnostic test accuracy of one or more imaging modalities versus findings of surgical

  2. Localisation of epileptic foci using novel imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Lemieux, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This review examines recent reports on the use of advanced techniques to map the regions and networks involved during focal epileptic seizure generation in humans. Recent findings A number of imaging techniques are capable of providing new localizing information on the ictal processes and epileptogenic zone. Evaluating the clinical utility of these findings has been mainly performed through post-hoc comparison with the findings of invasive EEG and ictal single-photon emission computed tomography, using postsurgical seizure reduction as the main outcome measure. Added value has been demonstrated in MRI-negative cases. Improved understanding of the human ictiogenic processes and the focus vs. network hypothesis is likely to result from the application of multimodal techniques that combine electrophysiological, semiological, and whole-brain coverage of brain activity changes. Summary On the basis of recent research in the field of neuroimaging, several novel imaging modalities have been improved and developed to provide information about the localization of epileptic foci. PMID:23823464

  3. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI: A viable functional lung imaging modality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patz, Samuel; Hersman, F. William; Muradian, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Ruset, Iulian C.; Ketel, Stephen; Jacobson, Francine; Topulos, George P.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of researchers investigating hyperpolarized gas MRI as a candidate functional lung imaging modality have used 3 He as their imaging agent of choice rather than 129 Xe. This preference has been predominantly due to, 3 He providing stronger signals due to higher levels of polarization and higher gyromagnetic ratio, as well as its being easily available to more researchers due to availability of polarizers (USA) or ease of gas transport (Europe). Most researchers agree, however, that hyperpolarized 129 Xe will ultimately emerge as the imaging agent of choice due to its unlimited supply in nature and its falling cost. Our recent polarizer technology delivers vast improvements in hyperpolarized 129 Xe output. Using this polarizer, we have demonstrated the unique property of xenon to measure alveolar surface area noninvasively. In this article, we describe our human protocols and their safety, and our results for the measurement of the partial pressure of pulmonary oxygen (pO 2 ) by observation of 129 Xe signal decay. We note that the measurement of pO 2 by observation of 129 Xe signal decay is more complex than that for 3 He because of an additional signal loss mechanism due to interphase diffusion of 129 Xe from alveolar gas spaces to septal tissue. This results in measurements of an equivalent pO 2 that accounts for both traditional T 1 decay from pO 2 and that from interphase diffusion. We also provide an update on new technological advancements that form the foundation for an improved compact design polarizer as well as improvements that provide another order-of-magnitude scale-up in xenon polarizer output

  4. Exogenous Molecular Probes for Targeted Imaging in Cancer: Focus on Multi-modal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in our healthcare system. Molecular imaging is an emerging methodology for the early detection of cancer, guidance of therapy, and monitoring of response. The development of new instruments and exogenous molecular probes that can be labeled for multi-modality imaging is critical to this process. Today, molecular imaging is at a crossroad, and new targeted imaging agents are expected to broadly expand our ability to detect and manage cancer. This integrated imaging strategy will permit clinicians to not only localize lesions within the body but also to manage their therapy by visualizing the expression and activity of specific molecules. This information is expected to have a major impact on drug development and understanding of basic cancer biology. At this time, a number of molecular probes have been developed by conjugating various labels to affinity ligands for targeting in different imaging modalities. This review will describe the current status of exogenous molecular probes for optical, scintigraphic, MRI and ultrasound imaging platforms. Furthermore, we will also shed light on how these techniques can be used synergistically in multi-modal platforms and how these techniques are being employed in current research

  5. Compositional-prior-guided image reconstruction algorithm for multi-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qianqian; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The development of effective multi-modality imaging methods typically requires an efficient information fusion model, particularly when combining structural images with a complementary imaging modality that provides functional information. We propose a composition-based image segmentation method for X-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and a structural-prior-guided image reconstruction for a combined DBT and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) breast imaging system. Using the 3D DBT images from 31 clinically measured healthy breasts, we create an empirical relationship between the X-ray intensities for adipose and fibroglandular tissue. We use this relationship to then segment another 58 healthy breast DBT images from 29 subjects into compositional maps of different tissue types. For each breast, we build a weighted-graph in the compositional space and construct a regularization matrix to incorporate the structural priors into a finite-element-based DOT image reconstruction. Use of the compositional priors enables us to fuse tissue anatomy into optical images with less restriction than when using a binary segmentation. This allows us to recover the image contrast captured by DOT but not by DBT. We show that it is possible to fine-tune the strength of the structural priors by changing a single regularization parameter. By estimating the optical properties for adipose and fibroglandular tissue using the proposed algorithm, we found the results are comparable or superior to those estimated with expert-segmentations, but does not involve the time-consuming manual selection of regions-of-interest. PMID:21258460

  6. Imaging modalities used to confirm diaphragmatic hernia in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Leveille, R.; Myer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    When a patient is presented for treatment following a traumatic accident such as being hit by a car, thoracic radiographs are usually an integral part of the overall diagnostic evaluation. Diagnosis at diaphragmatic hernia (DH) is often challenging in small animals. The thorax may contain substantial fluid, thereby masking the presence of cranially displaced abdominal soft tissues (e.g., liver or spleen). The most common cause of decreased radiographic visualization of the diaphragm on survey radiographs is pleural fluid; however, the second most common cause is DH. Obviously, if a gas-filledviscus is identified within the thoracic cavity on survey radiographs, the diagnosis of DH is straightforward and relatively routine. If, however, there is substantial pleural effusion and the herniated structure is a soft tissue parenchymal organ (e.g., liver or spleen), the diagnosis is less clearly defined on survey radiographs. This review discusses the various imaging modalities (survey, positional, and contrast-enhanced radiographs and ultrasonography) that can be used in the diagnosis or confirmation of DH

  7. Biomedical Imaging Modality Classification Using Combined Visual Features and Textual Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hua Han

    2011-01-01

    extraction from medical images and fuses the different extracted visual features and textual feature for modality classification. To extract visual features from the images, we used histogram descriptor of edge, gray, or color intensity and block-based variation as global features and SIFT histogram as local feature. For textual feature of image representation, the binary histogram of some predefined vocabulary words from image captions is used. Then, we combine the different features using normalized kernel functions for SVM classification. Furthermore, for some easy misclassified modality pairs such as CT and MR or PET and NM modalities, a local classifier is used for distinguishing samples in the pair modality to improve performance. The proposed strategy is evaluated with the provided modality dataset by ImageCLEF 2010.

  8. Compton scatter imaging: A promising modality for image guidance in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Gage; Jones, Kevin C; Templeton, Alistair; Bernard, Damian; Turian, Julius; Chu, James C H

    2018-03-01

    Lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires delivering large radiation doses with millimeter accuracy, making image guidance essential. An approach to forming images of patient anatomy from Compton-scattered photons during lung SBRT is presented. To investigate the potential of scatter imaging, a pinhole collimator and flat-panel detector are used for spatial localization and detection of photons scattered during external beam therapy using lung SBRT treatment conditions (6 MV FFF beam). MCNP Monte Carlo software is used to develop a model to simulate scatter images. This model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated phantom images. Patient scatter images are then simulated from 4DCT data. Experimental lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise to visualize the tumor with as few as 10 MU (0.5 s temporal resolution). The relative signal intensity from objects of different composition as well as lung tumor contrast for simulated phantom images agree quantitatively with experimental images, thus validating the Monte Carlo model. Scatter images are shown to display high contrast between different materials (lung, water, bone). Simulated patient images show superior (~double) tumor contrast compared to MV transmission images. Compton scatter imaging is a promising modality for directly imaging patient anatomy during treatment without additional radiation, and it has the potential to complement existing technologies and aid tumor tracking and lung SBRT image guidance. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Cross-Modality Image Synthesis via Weakly Coupled and Geometry Co-Regularized Joint Dictionary Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yawen; Shao, Ling; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2018-03-01

    Multi-modality medical imaging is increasingly used for comprehensive assessment of complex diseases in either diagnostic examinations or as part of medical research trials. Different imaging modalities provide complementary information about living tissues. However, multi-modal examinations are not always possible due to adversary factors, such as patient discomfort, increased cost, prolonged scanning time, and scanner unavailability. In additionally, in large imaging studies, incomplete records are not uncommon owing to image artifacts, data corruption or data loss, which compromise the potential of multi-modal acquisitions. In this paper, we propose a weakly coupled and geometry co-regularized joint dictionary learning method to address the problem of cross-modality synthesis while considering the fact that collecting the large amounts of training data is often impractical. Our learning stage requires only a few registered multi-modality image pairs as training data. To employ both paired images and a large set of unpaired data, a cross-modality image matching criterion is proposed. Then, we propose a unified model by integrating such a criterion into the joint dictionary learning and the observed common feature space for associating cross-modality data for the purpose of synthesis. Furthermore, two regularization terms are added to construct robust sparse representations. Our experimental results demonstrate superior performance of the proposed model over state-of-the-art methods.

  10. Dual-Modality Prostate Imaging with PET and Transrectal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Downloaded on April 07,2010 at 23:12:26 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. HUBER et al.: MULTI-MODALITY PHANTOM DEVELOPMENT 2723 As soon as...allow Authorized licensed use limited to: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Downloaded on April 07,2010 at 23:12:26 UTC from IEEE Xplore ...April 07,2010 at 23:12:26 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. HUBER et al.: MULTI-MODALITY PHANTOM DEVELOPMENT 2725 Fig. 3. Reconstructed

  11. MR imaging of recurrent hyperparathyroidism in comparison with other imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffermann, W.; Thurnher, S.; Okerland, M.; Levin, K.; Gooding, G.W.; Clark, O.H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent hyperparathyroidism were evaluated with MR imaging, performed using a saddle-shaped surface coil producing 5-mm sections with T1 and T2 weighting. Twenty-six and 22 of these patients also underwent T1-201 scintigraphy and high-resolution US, respectively. MR imaging accurately localized abnormal parathyroid glands in 75% evaluated prospectively and 86% retrospectively. Scintigraphy localized 64% prospectively and 72% retrospectively. US demonstrated 57% prospectively and 67% retrospectively. MR imaging showed three of four mediastinal adenomas evaluated prospectively retrospectively. There were two false-positive studies with MR imaging, two with scintigraphy, and one with US. Thus, MR imaging was the most effective imaging modality for parathyroid localization in recurrent hyperparathyroidism

  12. Radiation dose reduction and new image modalities development for interventional C-arm imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai

    Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading health problems and causes of death in the US. Due to the minimally invasive nature of the evolution of image guided techniques, interventional radiological procedures are becoming more common and are preferred in treating many cardiovascular diseases and strokes. In addition, with the recent advances in hardware and device technology, the speed and efficacy of interventional treatment has significantly improved. This implies that more image modalities can be developed based on the current C-arm system and patients treated in interventional suites can potentially experience better health outcomes. However, during the treatment patients are irradiated with substantial amounts of ionizing radiation with a high dose rate (digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with 3muGy/frame and 3D cone beam CT image with 0.36muGy/frame for a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system) and/or a long irradiation time (a roadmapping image sequence can be as long as one hour during aneurysm embolization). As a result, the patient entrance dose is extremely high. Despite the fact that the radiation dose is already substantial, image quality is not always satisfactory. By default a temporal average is used in roadmapping images to overcome poor image quality, but this technique can result in motion blurred images. Therefore, reducing radiation dose while maintaining or even improving the image quality is an important area for continued research. This thesis is focused on improving the clinical applications of C-arm cone beam CT systems in two ways: (1) Improve the performance of current image modalities on the C-arm system. (2) Develop new image modalities based on the current system. To be more specific, the objectives are to reduce radiation dose for current modalities (e.g., DSA, fluoroscopy, roadmapping, and cone beam CT) and enable cone beam CT perfusion and time resolved cone beam CT angiography that can be used to diagnose and triage acute

  13. Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellum, C.D.; Fisher, L.M.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the advantages of the use of excretory urography for diagnosis. According to the authors, excretory urography remains the basic radiologic examination of the urinary tract and is the foundation for the evaluation of suspected urologic disease. Despite development of the newer diagnostic modalities such as isotope scanning, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonsance imaging (MRI), excretory urography has maintained a prominent role in ruorradiology. Some indications have been altered and will continue to change with the newer imaging modalities, but the initial evaluation of suspected urinary tract structural abnormalities; hematuria, pyuria, and calculus disease is best performed with excretory urography. The examination is relatively inexpensive and simple to perform, with few contraindictions. Excretory urography, when properly performed, can provide valuable information about the renal parenchyma, pelvicalyceal system, ureters, and urinary bladder

  14. Newer antiatherosclerosis treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Amitesh; Singh, Safal

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has been a target of much clinical and molecular research. As a result of this extensive research, it is amply clear that atherogenesis is a multifactorial process involving an interplay of metabolic, immune and inflammatory mechanisms. Antiatherosclerotic strategies are today aiming for a multipronged approach targeting each arm of this multifactorial process. The newer agents under development can be divided into three broad categories: anti-inflammatory agents, modulators of intermediary metabolism and antiatherosclerosis vaccines. Potential targets for anti-inflammatory agents include inhibition of conversion of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidised LDL, blocking or downregulation of cell adhesion molecules, chemokine modulation and macrophage receptor blockade. Beyond inhibition of plaque formation, efforts are also ongoing to develop agents which stabilise the plaque by increasing its fibrous content and inhibiting its disruption. So far as research in the sphere of intermediary metabolism is concerned, the focus is now primarily on raising high-density lipoprotein and promoting reverse cholesterol transport; potential targets include cholesteryl ester transfer protein, liver X-receptor, lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase and high-density lipoprotein mimetics. Acyl-coenzymeA: cholesterol acyltransferase is another enzyme whose selective and differential inhibition is under active investigation. The concept of immunisation against a non-communicable disease such as atherosclerosis is still in its nascent stages. However, with increasing evidence to suggest the role of antigen-specific T-cell-mediated immunity in atherogenesis, this approach is potentially promising. Possible antigens under evaluation include oxidised LDL and its subparticles, heat-shock proteins and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. With cardiovascular disease being the single leading cause of death worldwide, the development of a safe and successful antiatherosclerosis

  15. Multi-Modality Medical Image Fusion Based on Wavelet Analysis and Quality Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Multi-modality medical image fusion has more and more important applications in medical image analysisand understanding. In this paper, we develop and apply a multi-resolution method based on wavelet pyramid to fusemedical images from different modalities such as PET-MRI and CT-MRI. In particular, we evaluate the different fusionresults when applying different selection rules and obtain optimum combination of fusion parameters.

  16. Applications of Novel X-Ray Imaging Modalities in Food Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou

    science for understanding and designing food products. In both of these aspects, X-ray imaging methods such as radiography and computed tomography provide a non-destructive solution. However, since the conventional attenuation-based modality suers from poor contrast in soft matter materials, modalities...... with improved contrast are needed. Two possible candidates in this regard are the novel X-ray phase-contrast and X-ray dark-eld imaging modalities. The contrast in phase-contrast imaging is based on dierences in electron density which is especially useful for soft matter materials whereas dark-eld imaging....... Furthermore, the process of translating the image in image analysis was addressed. For improved handling of multimodal image data, a multivariate segmentation scheme of multimodal X-ray tomography data was implemented. Finally, quantitative data analysis was applied for treating the images. Quantitative...

  17. Evaluation of registration strategies for multi-modality images of rat brain slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, Christoph; Vieten, Andrea; Salber, Dagmar; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In neuroscience, small-animal studies frequently involve dealing with series of images from multiple modalities such as histology and autoradiography. The consistent and bias-free restacking of multi-modality image series is obligatory as a starting point for subsequent non-rigid registration procedures and for quantitative comparisons with positron emission tomography (PET) and other in vivo data. Up to now, consistency between 2D slices without cross validation using an inherent 3D modality is frequently presumed to be close to the true morphology due to the smooth appearance of the contours of anatomical structures. However, in multi-modality stacks consistency is difficult to assess. In this work, consistency is defined in terms of smoothness of neighboring slices within a single modality and between different modalities. Registration bias denotes the distortion of the registered stack in comparison to the true 3D morphology and shape. Based on these metrics, different restacking strategies of multi-modality rat brain slices are experimentally evaluated. Experiments based on MRI-simulated and real dual-tracer autoradiograms reveal a clear bias of the restacked volume despite quantitatively high consistency and qualitatively smooth brain structures. However, different registration strategies yield different inter-consistency metrics. If no genuine 3D modality is available, the use of the so-called SOP (slice-order preferred) or MOSOP (modality-and-slice-order preferred) strategy is recommended.

  18. Multi-Modal Curriculum Learning for Semi-Supervised Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Maybank, Stephen J; Liu, Wei; Kang, Guoliang; Yang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Semi-supervised image classification aims to classify a large quantity of unlabeled images by typically harnessing scarce labeled images. Existing semi-supervised methods often suffer from inadequate classification accuracy when encountering difficult yet critical images, such as outliers, because they treat all unlabeled images equally and conduct classifications in an imperfectly ordered sequence. In this paper, we employ the curriculum learning methodology by investigating the difficulty of classifying every unlabeled image. The reliability and the discriminability of these unlabeled images are particularly investigated for evaluating their difficulty. As a result, an optimized image sequence is generated during the iterative propagations, and the unlabeled images are logically classified from simple to difficult. Furthermore, since images are usually characterized by multiple visual feature descriptors, we associate each kind of features with a teacher, and design a multi-modal curriculum learning (MMCL) strategy to integrate the information from different feature modalities. In each propagation, each teacher analyzes the difficulties of the currently unlabeled images from its own modality viewpoint. A consensus is subsequently reached among all the teachers, determining the currently simplest images (i.e., a curriculum), which are to be reliably classified by the multi-modal learner. This well-organized propagation process leveraging multiple teachers and one learner enables our MMCL to outperform five state-of-the-art methods on eight popular image data sets.

  19. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guo

    Full Text Available To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors.A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV, the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC, and the local standard deviation (SDlocal. Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation.The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09 and 0.07(± 0.01 for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05 with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00 with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method.With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  20. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun Ki; Herbst, Roy

    2006-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  1. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2008-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  2. IMPACT (Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets and Complementary, Innovative and Therapeutic Modalities)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Waun K; Herbst, Roy

    2007-01-01

    .... These projects combine targeted approaches using molecular and imaging techniques to validate activity against a target and monitor response using imaging modalities specific to the receptor using...

  3. Molecular imaging needles: dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence imaging of labeled antibodies deep in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolaro, Loretta; Lorenser, Dirk; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Kirk, Rodney W.; Kramer, Anne S.; Yeoh, George C.; Godbout, Nicolas; Sampson, David D.; Boudoux, Caroline; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging using optical techniques provides insight into disease at the cellular level. In this paper, we report on a novel dual-modality probe capable of performing molecular imaging by combining simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and two-dimensional fluorescence imaging in a hypodermic needle. The probe, referred to as a molecular imaging (MI) needle, may be inserted tens of millimeters into tissue. The MI needle utilizes double-clad fiber to carry both imaging modalities, and is interfaced to a 1310-nm OCT system and a fluorescence imaging subsystem using an asymmetrical double-clad fiber coupler customized to achieve high fluorescence collection efficiency. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first dual-modality OCT and fluorescence needle probe with sufficient sensitivity to image fluorescently labeled antibodies. Such probes enable high-resolution molecular imaging deep within tissue. PMID:26137379

  4. Newer techniques of mechanical ventilation: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2002-10-01

    The introduction of newer, state-of-the-art, microprocessor controlled ventilator systems provides clinicians with opportunities to apply a number of advanced ventilatory modalities which were not previously available for treating newborns. Some of these techniques will need further scientific evaluation in controlled trials, but this should not preclude their use in clinical settings, as their safety has already been proved by "standard setters" for use in neonates. There is a firm physiological rationale for their use, and individual centres have already acquired substantial experience in the application of these modalities. The trend towards increasing sophistication and greater versatility is likely to continue, and clinicians involved in the care of sick newborn infants must keep abreast of these developments.

  5. Classifying magnetic resonance image modalities with convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Samuel; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.; Roy, Snehashis

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging allows the acquisition of images with different contrast properties depending on the acquisition protocol and the magnetic properties of tissues. Many MR brain image processing techniques, such as tissue segmentation, require multiple MR contrasts as inputs, and each contrast is treated differently. Thus it is advantageous to automate the identification of image contrasts for various purposes, such as facilitating image processing pipelines, and managing and maintaining large databases via content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Most automated CBIR techniques focus on a two-step process: extracting features from data and classifying the image based on these features. We present a novel 3D deep convolutional neural network (CNN)- based method for MR image contrast classification. The proposed CNN automatically identifies the MR contrast of an input brain image volume. Specifically, we explored three classification problems: (1) identify T1-weighted (T1-w), T2-weighted (T2-w), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) contrasts, (2) identify pre vs postcontrast T1, (3) identify pre vs post-contrast FLAIR. A total of 3418 image volumes acquired from multiple sites and multiple scanners were used. To evaluate each task, the proposed model was trained on 2137 images and tested on the remaining 1281 images. Results showed that image volumes were correctly classified with 97.57% accuracy.

  6. Future of newer basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu, S. V.; Velmurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Basal insulin have been developed over the years. In recent times newer analogues have been added to the armanentarium for diabetes therapy. This review specifically reviews the current status of different basal insulins

  7. Integrating imaging modalities: what makes sense from a workflow perspective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Burger, Cyrill

    2010-01-01

    From a workflow/cost perspective integrated imaging is not an obvious solution. An analysis of scanning costs as a function of system cost and relevant imaging times is presented. This analysis ignores potential clinical advantages of integrated imaging. An analysis comparing separate vs integrated imaging costs was performed by deriving pertinent equations and using reasonable cost numbers for imaging devices and systems, room and other variable costs. Integrated systems were divided into those sequentially and simultaneously. Sequential scanning can be done with two devices placed in a single or in two different scanning rooms. Graphs were derived which represent the cost difference between integrated imaging system options and their separate counterparts vs scanning time on one of the devices and cost ratio of an integrated system and its counterpart of separate devices. Integrated systems are favoured by the fact that patients have to be up- and downloaded only once. If imaging times become longer than patient changing times, imaging on separate devices is advantageous. An integrated imaging cost advantage is achieved if the integrated systems typically and overall cost three fourths or less of the separate systems. If PET imaging takes 15 min or less, PET/CT imaging costs less than separate PET and CT imaging, while this time is below 5 min for SPECT/CT. A two-room integrated system has the added advantage that patient download time is not cost relevant, when imaging times on the two devices differ by more than the patient download time. PET/CT scanning is a cost-effective implementation of an integrated system unlike most current SPECT/CT systems. Integration of two devices in two rooms by a shuttle seems the way how to make PET/MR cost-effective and may well also be a design option for SPECT/CT systems. (orig.)

  8. Modeling decision-making in single- and multi-modal medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa, R. L.; Baum, K. G.

    2009-02-01

    This research introduces a mode-specific model of visual saliency that can be used to highlight likely lesion locations and potential errors (false positives and false negatives) in single-mode PET and MRI images and multi-modal fused PET/MRI images. Fused-modality digital images are a relatively recent technological improvement in medical imaging; therefore, a novel component of this research is to characterize the perceptual response to these fused images. Three different fusion techniques were compared to single-mode displays in terms of observer error rates using synthetic human brain images generated from an anthropomorphic phantom. An eye-tracking experiment was performed with naÃve (non-radiologist) observers who viewed the single- and multi-modal images. The eye-tracking data allowed the errors to be classified into four categories: false positives, search errors (false negatives never fixated), recognition errors (false negatives fixated less than 350 milliseconds), and decision errors (false negatives fixated greater than 350 milliseconds). A saliency model consisting of a set of differentially weighted low-level feature maps is derived from the known error and ground truth locations extracted from a subset of the test images for each modality. The saliency model shows that lesion and error locations attract visual attention according to low-level image features such as color, luminance, and texture.

  9. Multi-modal brain imaging software for guiding invasive treatment of epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenblok, P.P.W.; Marien, S.; Meesters, S.P.L.; Florack, L.M.J.; Hofman, P.; Schijns, O.E.M.G.; Colon, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The surgical treatment of patients with complex epilepsies is changing more and more from open, invasive surgery towards minimally invasive, image guided treatment. Multi-modal brain imaging procedures are developed to delineate preoperatively the region of the brain which is responsible

  10. Dual-modality imaging with a ultrasound-gamma device for oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; De Vincentis, G.; Lo Meo, S.; Fabbri, A.; Bennati, P.; Cencelli, V. Orsolini; Pani, R.

    2018-06-01

    Recently, dual-modality systems have been developed, aimed to correlate anatomical and functional information, improving disease localization and helping oncological or surgical treatments. Moreover, due to the growing interest in handheld detectors for preclinical trials or small animal imaging, in this work a new dual modality integrated device, based on a Ultrasounds probe and a small Field of View Single Photon Emission gamma camera, is proposed.

  11. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions

  12. MO-B-BRC-00: Prostate HDR Treatment Planning - Considering Different Imaging Modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  13. Value of imaging modalities in sinus tarsi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.W.R.; Resnick, C.S.; Kenzora, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Sinus tarsi syndrome consists of ankle pain, giving way of the ankle, and tenderness over the sinus tarsi after acute ankle injury (usually inversion). Plan radiographic evaluation is unrewarding. This paper reports on stress CT scanning performed in 25 patients with sinus tarsi syndrome; 18 of these patients also underwent MR imaging; and all patients had routine radiographs. No consistent significant abnormalities were seen on CT. Ligamentous injury of the calcaneofibular or talocalcaneal ligament was suggested on MR images in six cases. Therefore, CT was not helpful in evaluating sinus tarsi syndrome, and the MR findings were present in only one-third of cases, suggesting either that MR imaging is not at present sufficiently accurate to detect all abnormalities or ligamentous injury is not the underlying cause for sinus tarsi syndrome

  14. Development of in vivo imaging modalities for experimental oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesnel, S.

    2010-01-01

    Small animal imaging is more and more used in pharmacology to identify and to characterize the activities of new antitumor agents. The first part of my work consisted in the development of new tools to improve the quantitation in bioluminescence. A method, based on spectral characteristics of emitted photons, has been established to correct tissue absorption. The second, using methods of image restoration had for objective to correct tissue scattering to increase the resolution. In a second part, I developed in vivo models of bioluminescent tumors (intracranial glioblastoma, a large cell anaplastic lymphoma and a metastatic neuroblastoma) using the imaging methods described previously. These studies allowed the characterization of the activity of a new antitumor agent. The aim of the last part was to develop imaging probes. The first, a monoclonal antibody antiCD45 labeled with a fluoro chrome allowed the detection of human leukemic cells implanted in the mice using fluorescence imaging. The second was developed to predict the uptake of a antitumor agent, a spermine-podophyllotoxin conjugate, in tumor cells via the polyamine transport system. The synthesized probe is a spermine conjugated to a HYNIC group to bind a radioisotope: the Technetium-99m and to realize a scintigraphic examination. The results showed the feasibility of a preclinical use of this probe. So, at this end of this thesis, the developed methods of bioluminescent signal processing are available to improve the use of optical imaging in pharmacology. Of course, supplementary studies are necessary to define precisely in which context these corrections will be the most appropriate. (author)

  15. Robotic 3D scanner as an alternative to standard modalities of medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromy, Adam; Zalud, Ludek

    2014-01-01

    There are special medical cases, where standard medical imaging modalities are able to offer sufficient results, but not in the optimal way. It means, that desired results are produced with unnecessarily high expenses, with redundant informations or with needless demands on patient. This paper deals with one special case, where information useful for examination is the body surface only, inner sight into the body is needless. New specialized medical imaging device is developed for this situation. In the Introduction section, analysis of presently used medical imaging modalities is presented, which declares, that no available imaging device is best fitting for mentioned purposes. In the next section, development of the new specialized medical imaging device is presented, and its principles and functions are described. Then, the parameters of new device are compared with present ones. It brings significant advantages comparing to present imaging systems.

  16. Dual modality CT/PET imaging in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Gabriel A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic capability of PET-HCT image fusion and helical computed tomography (HCT) for nodal and distant metastases detection in patients with lung cancer. Material and methods: Between February, 2003 and March, 2004 sixty-six consecutive lung cancer patients (45 men and 21 women, mean ages: 63 years old, range: 38 to 96 years old) who underwent HCT and PET-HCT fusion imaging were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had histological confirmation of lung cancer and a definitive diagnosis established on the basis of pathology results and/or clinical follow-up. Results: For global nodal staging (hilar and mediastinal) HCT showed a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 72%, 47%, 62% and 58% respectively, versus 94%, 77%, 83% and 92% corresponding to PET-HCT examination. For assessment of advanced nodal stage (N3) PET-HCT showed values of 92%, 100%, 100% and 98% respectively. For detection of distant metastasis, HCT alone had values of 67%, 93%, 84% and 83% respectively versus 100%, 98%, 96% and 100% for the PET-HCT fusion imaging. In 20 (30%) patients under-staged or over-staged on the basis of HCT results, PET-HCT allowed accurate staging. Conclusions: PET-HCT fusion imaging was more effective than HCT alone for nodal and distant metastasis detection and oncology staging. (author)

  17. Accuracy of different imaging modalities prior to biventricular repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    catheterization with invasive angiocardiography is indicated when the PA ... arterial and venous imaging.3,4. The major ... history of aorto-pulmonary shunt awaiting bi-ventricular ..... regarding the central and peripheral PAs, APCs as well as in ...

  18. Percutaneous Ultrasonography as Imaging Modality and Sampling Guide for Pulmonologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, Jos A.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is gradually progressing into common practice in contemporary pulmonology. Its main applications are to determine the presence and amount of pleural effusions and to guide subsequent treatment interventions. Guidelines recommend the use of US for these indications. Training

  19. Multi-modal image registration: matching MRI with histology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alić, L.; Haeck, J.C.; Klein, S.; Bol, K.; Tiel, S.T. van; Wielopolski, P.A.; Bijster, M.; Niessen, W.J.; Bernsen, M.; Veenland, J.F.; Jong, M. de

    2010-01-01

    Spatial correspondence between histology and multi sequence MRI can provide information about the capabilities of non-invasive imaging to characterize cancerous tissue. However, shrinkage and deformation occurring during the excision of the tumor and the histological processing complicate the co

  20. Comparisons of three alternative breast modalities in a common phantom imaging experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dun; Meaney, Paul M.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Jiang Shudong; Kerner, Todd E.; McBride, Troy O.; Pogue, Brian W.; Hartov, Alexander; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2003-01-01

    Four model-based imaging systems are currently being developed for breast cancer detection at Dartmouth College. A potential advantage of multimodality imaging is the prospect of combining information collected from each system to provide a more complete diagnostic tool that covers the full range of the patient and pathology spectra. In this paper it is shown through common phantom experiments on three of these imaging systems that it was possible to correlate different types of image information to potentially improve the reliability of tumor detection. Imaging experiments were conducted with common phantoms which mimic both dielectric and optical properties of the human breast. Cross modality comparison was investigated through a statistical study based on the repeated data sets of reconstructed parameters for each modality. The system standard error between all methods was generally less than 10% and the correlation coefficient across modalities ranged from 0.68 to 0.91. Future work includes the minimization of bias (artifacts) on the periphery of electrical impedance spectroscopy images to improve cross modality correlation and implementation of the multimodality diagnosis for breast cancer detection

  1. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Huang Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A; Humm, John L; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S; Martin, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ∼0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ∼0.8 mm could be obtained.

  2. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities for bio-durg development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Choi, Dae Seong; Park, Jeonghoon; Jung, Uhee; Lee, Yun Jong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we established the image modalities (micro-PET, SPECT/CT) using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-durg and extramural collaboration proposal. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with 99m Tc tricarbonyl bifunctional chelators and 18 F-clotrimazole derivative. SPECT imaging studies were performed with 99m Tc tricarbonyl BFCs. PET imaging study was performed with 18 F-clotrimazole derivatives. We performed the PET image study of 18 F-clotrimazole derivatives using U87MG tumor bearing mice. Also we tested the intramural and extramural collaboration using small animal imaging modalities and prepared the draft of extramural R and D operation manual for small animal imaging modalities and the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug

  3. ADMultiImg: a novel missing modality transfer learning based CAD system for diagnosis of MCI due to AD using incomplete multi-modality imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaonan; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Teresa; Weidman, David; Lure, Fleming; Li, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and currently has no cure. Treatments targeting early stages of AD such as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) may be most effective to deaccelerate AD, thus attracting increasing attention. However, MCI has substantial heterogeneity in that it can be caused by various underlying conditions, not only AD. To detect MCI due to AD, NIA-AA published updated consensus criteria in 2011, in which the use of multi-modality images was highlighted as one of the most promising methods. It is of great interest to develop a CAD system based on automatic, quantitative analysis of multi-modality images and machine learning algorithms to help physicians more adequately diagnose MCI due to AD. The challenge, however, is that multi-modality images are not universally available for many patients due to cost, access, safety, and lack of consent. We developed a novel Missing Modality Transfer Learning (MMTL) algorithm capable of utilizing whatever imaging modalities are available for an MCI patient to diagnose the patient's likelihood of MCI due to AD. Furthermore, we integrated MMTL with radiomics steps including image processing, feature extraction, and feature screening, and a post-processing for uncertainty quantification (UQ), and developed a CAD system called "ADMultiImg" to assist clinical diagnosis of MCI due to AD using multi-modality images together with patient demographic and genetic information. Tested on ADNI date, our system can generate a diagnosis with high accuracy even for patients with only partially available image modalities (AUC=0.94), and therefore may have broad clinical utility.

  4. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rappaz, B.; Depeursinge, Christian; Jourdain, P.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2016-01-01

    parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  6. Multifunctional Magnetic and Upconverting Nanobeads as Dual Modal Imaging Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Maria Elena; Pernia Leal, Manuel; Scotto, Marco; Balakrishnan, Preethi Bala; Kumar Avugadda, Sahitya; García-Martín, María L; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2017-11-15

    We report the fabrication of aqueous multimodal imaging nanocomposites based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and two different sizes of photoluminescent upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs). The controlled and simultaneous incorporation of both types of nanoparticles (NPs) was obtained by controlling the solvent composition and the addition rate of the destabilizing solvent. The magnetic properties of the MNPs remained unaltered after their encapsulation into the polymeric beads as shown by the T2 relaxivity measurements. The UCNPs maintain photoluminescent properties even when embedded with the MNPs into the polymer bead. Moreover, the light emitted by the magnetic and upconverting nanobeads (MUCNBs) under NIR excitation (λ exc = 980 nm) was clearly observed through different thicknesses of agarose gel or through a mouse skin layer. The comparison with magnetic and luminescent nanobeads based on red-emitting quantum dots (QDs) demonstrated that while the QD-based beads show significant autofluorescence background from the skin, the signal obtained by the MUCNBs allows a decrease in this background. In summary, these results indicate that MUCNBs are good magnetic and optical probes for in vivo multimodal imaging sensors.

  7. Multi-modal image registration: matching MRI with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alic, Lejla; Haeck, Joost C.; Klein, Stefan; Bol, Karin; van Tiel, Sandra T.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Bijster, Magda; Niessen, Wiro J.; Bernsen, Monique; Veenland, Jifke F.; de Jong, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Spatial correspondence between histology and multi sequence MRI can provide information about the capabilities of non-invasive imaging to characterize cancerous tissue. However, shrinkage and deformation occurring during the excision of the tumor and the histological processing complicate the co registration of MR images with histological sections. This work proposes a methodology to establish a detailed 3D relation between histology sections and in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are a very dense histological sampling (up to 100 histology slices per tumor), mutual information based non-rigid B-spline registration, the utilization of the whole 3D data sets, and the exploitation of an intermediate ex vivo MRI. In this proof of concept paper, the methodology was applied to one tumor. We found that, after registration, the visual alignment of tumor borders and internal structures was fairly accurate. Utilizing the intermediate ex vivo MRI, it was possible to account for changes caused by the excision of the tumor: we observed a tumor expansion of 20%. Also the effects of fixation, dehydration and histological sectioning could be determined: 26% shrinkage of the tumor was found. The annotation of viable tissue, performed in histology and transformed to the in vivo MRI, matched clearly with high intensity regions in MRI. With this methodology, histological annotation can be directly related to the corresponding in vivo MRI. This is a vital step for the evaluation of the feasibility of multi-spectral MRI to depict histological groundtruth.

  8. Role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MR spectroscopy (MRS) and other imaging modalities in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uma; Virendra Kumar; Jagannathan, N.R.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer among women world over and the diagnosis continues to generate fear and turmoil in the life of patients and their families. This article describes the currently available techniques used for screening primary and recurrent breast cancers and the evaluation of therapeutic response of breast cancer with special emphasis on MRI and MRS techniques. MRI, a noninvasive technique, provides anatomic images in multiple planes enabling tissue characterization. Contrast enhanced MR studies have been found to be useful in the diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast benign diseases from malignant ones. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is another useful technique for diagnosis and for assessing the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Being noninvasive, MR techniques can be used repetitively for assessment of response of the tumor to various therapeutic regimens and for evaluating the efficacy of drugs at both the structural and molecular level. An overview of the various aspects of different imaging modalities used in breast cancer research including various in vivo MR methodologies with clinical examples is presented in this review. (author)

  9. Integration of vibro-acoustography imaging modality with the traditional mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, H Gholam; Alizad, A; Fatemi, M

    2007-01-01

    Vibro-acoustography (VA) is a new imaging modality that has been applied to both medical and industrial imaging. Integrating unique diagnostic information of VA with other medical imaging is one of our research interests. In this work, we establish correspondence between the VA images and traditional X-ray mammogram by adopting a flexible control-point selection technique for image registration. A modified second-order polynomial, which simply leads to a scale/rotation/translation invariant registration, was used. The results of registration were used to spatially transform the breast VA images to map with the X-ray mammography with a registration error of less than 1.65 mm. The fused image is defined as a linear integration of the VA and X-ray images. Moreover, a color-based fusion technique was employed to integrate the images for better visualization of structural information.

  10. Congenital syphylitic hepatitis: a case report with multiple imaging modalities (syphilitic hepatitis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyman, S; Rosenberg, H K; Mandell, G A; Golden, D A

    1983-11-14

    A case of syphilitic hepatitis is described with no evidence of mass effect on the ultrasonic and computerized tomographic study, but with discrete areas of decreased uptake on liver scan suggestive of space-occupying lesion. This is the second instance in the literature of the incongruence of the liver scan and the other imaging modalities in syphilitic hepatitis.

  11. Extended feature-fusion guidelines to improve image-based multi-modal biometrics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brown, Dane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The feature-level, unlike the match score-level, lacks multi-modal fusion guidelines. This work demonstrates a practical approach for improved image-based biometric feature-fusion. The approach extracts and combines the face, fingerprint...

  12. Congenital syphylitic hepatitis: a case report with multiple imaging modalities (syphilitic hepatitis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyman, S.; Rosenberg, H.K.; Mandell, G.A.; Golden, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    A case of syphilitic hepatitis is described with no evidence of mass effect on the ultrasonic and computerized tomographic study, but discrete areas of decreased uptake on liver scan suggestive of space-occupying lesion. This is the second instance in the literature of the incongruence of the liver scan and the other imaging modalities in syphilitic hepatitis. (orig.)

  13. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G.; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of hepatocellular carcinoma labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.

  14. Diagnosis and Characterization of Patellofemoral Instability: Review of Available Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Thawait, Gaurav K; Tanaka, Miho J; Demehri, Shadpour

    2017-06-01

    Patellofemoral instability (PI) is defined as single or multiple episodes of patellar dislocation. Imaging modalities are useful for characterization of patellar malalignment, maltracking, underlying morphologic abnormalities, and stabilizing soft-tissue injuries. Using these findings, orthopedic surgeons can decide when to operate, determine the best operation, and measure degree of correction postoperatively in PI patients. Also, these methods assist with PI diagnosis in some suspicious cases. Magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred method especially in the setting of acute dislocations. Multidetector computed tomography allows a more accurate assessment for malalignment such as patellar tilt and lateral subluxation and secondary osteoarthritis. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and 4-dimensional computed tomography have been introduced for better kinematic assessment of the patellofemoral maltracking during extension-flexion motions. In this review article, we will discuss the currently available evidence regarding both the conventional and the novel imaging modalities that can be used for diagnosis and characterization of PI.

  15. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  16. Continuous monitoring of arthritis in animal models using optical imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Lee, Saseong; Jang, Won Seuk; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-10-01

    Given the several difficulties associated with histology, including difficulty in continuous monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of optical imaging modalities-cross-polarization color (CPC) imaging, erythema index (EI) imaging, and laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging-for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models. C57BL/6 mice, used for the evaluation of arthritis, were divided into three groups: arthritic mice group (AMG), positive control mice group (PCMG), and negative control mice group (NCMG). Complete Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil, and saline were injected into the footpad for AMG, PCMG, and NCMG, respectively. LSC and CPC images were acquired from 0 through 144 h after injection for all groups. EI images were calculated from CPC images. Variations in feet area, EI, and speckle index for each mice group over time were calculated for quantitative evaluation of arthritis. Histological examinations were performed, and the results were found to be consistent with those from optical imaging analysis. Thus, optical imaging modalities may be successfully applied for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models.

  17. Visual tracking for multi-modality computer-assisted image guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basafa, Ehsan; Foroughi, Pezhman; Hossbach, Martin; Bhanushali, Jasmine; Stolka, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    With optical cameras, many interventional navigation tasks previously relying on EM, optical, or mechanical guidance can be performed robustly, quickly, and conveniently. We developed a family of novel guidance systems based on wide-spectrum cameras and vision algorithms for real-time tracking of interventional instruments and multi-modality markers. These navigation systems support the localization of anatomical targets, support placement of imaging probe and instruments, and provide fusion imaging. The unique architecture - low-cost, miniature, in-hand stereo vision cameras fitted directly to imaging probes - allows for an intuitive workflow that fits a wide variety of specialties such as anesthesiology, interventional radiology, interventional oncology, emergency medicine, urology, and others, many of which see increasing pressure to utilize medical imaging and especially ultrasound, but have yet to develop the requisite skills for reliable success. We developed a modular system, consisting of hardware (the Optical Head containing the mini cameras) and software (components for visual instrument tracking with or without specialized visual features, fully automated marker segmentation from a variety of 3D imaging modalities, visual observation of meshes of widely separated markers, instant automatic registration, and target tracking and guidance on real-time multi-modality fusion views). From these components, we implemented a family of distinct clinical and pre-clinical systems (for combinations of ultrasound, CT, CBCT, and MRI), most of which have international regulatory clearance for clinical use. We present technical and clinical results on phantoms, ex- and in-vivo animals, and patients.

  18. Image quality and dose distributions of three linac-based imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Ames, Evemarie; Nuesken, Frank; Palm, Jan; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Linac-based patient imaging is possible with a variety of techniques using different photon energies. The purpose of this work is to compare three imaging systems operating at 6 MV, flattening free filter (FFF) 1 MV, and 121 kV. The dose distributions of all pretreatment set-up images (over 1,000) were retrospectively calculated on the planning computed tomography (CT) images for all patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer treated at our institution in 2013. We analyzed the dose distribution and the dose to organs at risk. For head-and-neck cancer patients, the imaging dose from 6-MV cone beam CT (CBCT) reached maximum values at around 8 cGy. The 1-MV CBCT dose was about 63-79 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose for all organs at risk. Planar imaging reduced the imaging dose from CBCT to 30-40 % for both megavoltage modalities. The dose from the kilovoltage CBCT was 4-10 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose. For prostate cancer patients, the maximum dose from 6-MV CBCT reached 13-15 cGy, and was reduced to 66-73 % for 1 MV. Planar imaging reduces the MV CBCT dose to 10-20 %. The kV CBCT dose is 15-20 % of the 6-MV CBCT dose, slightly higher than the dose from MV axes. The dose distributions differ markedly in response to the different beam profiles and dose-depth characteristics. (orig.) [German] Linac-basierte Bildgebung zur Patientenlagerung ist mit einer Vielzahl von Techniken unterschiedlicher Photonenenergien moeglich. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist der Vergleich dreier Bildgebungssysteme mit 6 MV (Megavolt), FFF 1 MV, und 121 kV (Kilovolt). Fuer alle im Jahr 2013 an unserer Klinik behandelten Prostata- und HNO-Patienten wurden retrospektiv die Dosisverteilungen aller Verifikationsaufnahmen (ueber 1000 insgesamt) auf der Planungs-Computertomographie (CT) berechnet. Wir analysierten die Dosisverteilung und die Dosis an den Risikoorganen. Bei HNO-Patienten erreichte die Dosis von 6 MV ''Cone-beam''-CT (CBCT)Maximalwerte um 8 cGy. Mit 1 MV wird die Dosis auf 63

  19. Automatic classification of early Parkinson's disease with multi-modal MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Long

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years, neuroimaging has been increasingly used as an objective method for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD. Most previous studies were based on invasive imaging modalities or on a single modality which was not an ideal diagnostic tool. In this study, we developed a non-invasive technology intended for use in the diagnosis of early PD by integrating the advantages of various modals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen early PD patients and twenty-seven normal volunteers participated in this study. For each subject, we collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI and structural images. For the rsfMRI images, we extracted the characteristics at three different levels: ALFF (amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations, ReHo (regional homogeneity and RFCS (regional functional connectivity strength. For the structural images, we extracted the volume characteristics from the gray matter (GM, the white matter (WM and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. A two-sample t-test was used for the feature selection, and then the remaining features were fused for classification. Finally a classifier for early PD patients and normal control subjects was identified from support vector machine training. The performance of the classifier was evaluated using the leave-one-out cross-validation method. RESULTS: Using the proposed methods to classify the data set, good results (accuracy  = 86.96%, sensitivity  = 78.95%, specificity  = 92.59% were obtained. CONCLUSIONS: This method demonstrates a promising diagnosis performance by the integration of information from a variety of imaging modalities, and it shows potential for improving the clinical diagnosis and treatment of PD.

  20. Empirical gradient threshold technique for automated segmentation across image modalities and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Peskin, A; Breen, C; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-10-01

    New microscopy technologies are enabling image acquisition of terabyte-sized data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of images. In order to retrieve and analyze the biological information in these large data sets, segmentation is needed to detect the regions containing cells or cell colonies. Our work with hundreds of large images (each 21,000×21,000 pixels) requires a segmentation method that: (1) yields high segmentation accuracy, (2) is applicable to multiple cell lines with various densities of cells and cell colonies, and several imaging modalities, (3) can process large data sets in a timely manner, (4) has a low memory footprint and (5) has a small number of user-set parameters that do not require adjustment during the segmentation of large image sets. None of the currently available segmentation methods meet all these requirements. Segmentation based on image gradient thresholding is fast and has a low memory footprint. However, existing techniques that automate the selection of the gradient image threshold do not work across image modalities, multiple cell lines, and a wide range of foreground/background densities (requirement 2) and all failed the requirement for robust parameters that do not require re-adjustment with time (requirement 5). We present a novel and empirically derived image gradient threshold selection method for separating foreground and background pixels in an image that meets all the requirements listed above. We quantify the difference between our approach and existing ones in terms of accuracy, execution speed, memory usage and number of adjustable parameters on a reference data set. This reference data set consists of 501 validation images with manually determined segmentations and image sizes ranging from 0.36 Megapixels to 850 Megapixels. It includes four different cell lines and two image modalities: phase contrast and fluorescent. Our new technique, called Empirical Gradient Threshold (EGT), is derived from this reference

  1. Improved medical image modality classification using a combination of visual and textual features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Ivica; Kocev, Dragi; Kitanovski, Ivan; Loskovska, Suzana; Džeroski, Sašo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the approach that we applied to the medical modality classification tasks at the ImageCLEF evaluation forum. More specifically, we used the modality classification databases from the ImageCLEF competitions in 2011, 2012 and 2013, described by four visual and one textual types of features, and combinations thereof. We used local binary patterns, color and edge directivity descriptors, fuzzy color and texture histogram and scale-invariant feature transform (and its variant opponentSIFT) as visual features and the standard bag-of-words textual representation coupled with TF-IDF weighting. The results from the extensive experimental evaluation identify the SIFT and opponentSIFT features as the best performing features for modality classification. Next, the low-level fusion of the visual features improves the predictive performance of the classifiers. This is because the different features are able to capture different aspects of an image, their combination offering a more complete representation of the visual content in an image. Moreover, adding textual features further increases the predictive performance. Finally, the results obtained with our approach are the best results reported on these databases so far. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Novelty detection of foreign objects in food using multi-modal X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Emerson, Monica Jane; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a method for novelty detection of foreign objects in food products using grating-based multimodal X-ray imaging. With this imaging technique three modalities are available with pixel correspondence, enhancing organic materials such as wood chips, insects and soft...... plastics not detectable by conventional X-ray absorption radiography. We conduct experiments, where several food products are imaged with common foreign objects typically found in the food processing industry. To evaluate the benefit from using this multi-contrast X-ray technique over conventional X......-ray absorption imaging, a novelty detection scheme based on well known image- and statistical analysis techniques is proposed. The results show that the presented method gives superior recognition results and highlights the advantage of grating-based imaging....

  3. MO-AB-BRA-02: A Novel Scatter Imaging Modality for Real-Time Image Guidance During Lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redler, G; Bernard, D; Templeton, A; Chu, J; Nair, C Kumaran; Turian, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel scatter imaging modality is developed and its feasibility for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients is assessed using analytic and Monte Carlo models as well as experimental testing. Methods: During treatment, incident radiation interacts and scatters from within the patient. The presented methodology forms an image of patient anatomy from the scattered radiation for real-time localization of the treatment target. A radiographic flat panel-based pinhole camera provides spatial information regarding the origin of detected scattered radiation. An analytical model is developed, which provides a mathematical formalism for describing the scatter imaging system. Experimental scatter images are acquired by irradiating an object using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging simple objects of known compositions (water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is fabricated and imaged to investigate image quality for various quantities of delivered radiation. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code is used for validation and testing by simulating scatter image formation using the experimental pinhole camera setup. Results: Analytical calculations, MCNP simulations, and experimental results when imaging the water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent objects show close agreement, thus validating the proposed models and demonstrating that scatter imaging differentiates these materials well. Lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) to clearly distinguish tumor from surrounding lung tissue. CNR=4.1 and CNR=29.1 for 10MU and 5000MU images (equivalent to 0.5 and 250 second images), respectively. Conclusion: Lung SBRT provides favorable treatment outcomes, but depends on accurate target localization. A comprehensive

  4. MO-AB-BRA-02: A Novel Scatter Imaging Modality for Real-Time Image Guidance During Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Bernard, D; Templeton, A; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Nair, C Kumaran [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Turian, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Rush Radiosurgery LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel scatter imaging modality is developed and its feasibility for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer patients is assessed using analytic and Monte Carlo models as well as experimental testing. Methods: During treatment, incident radiation interacts and scatters from within the patient. The presented methodology forms an image of patient anatomy from the scattered radiation for real-time localization of the treatment target. A radiographic flat panel-based pinhole camera provides spatial information regarding the origin of detected scattered radiation. An analytical model is developed, which provides a mathematical formalism for describing the scatter imaging system. Experimental scatter images are acquired by irradiating an object using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging simple objects of known compositions (water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is fabricated and imaged to investigate image quality for various quantities of delivered radiation. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code is used for validation and testing by simulating scatter image formation using the experimental pinhole camera setup. Results: Analytical calculations, MCNP simulations, and experimental results when imaging the water, lung, and cortical bone equivalent objects show close agreement, thus validating the proposed models and demonstrating that scatter imaging differentiates these materials well. Lung tumor phantom images have sufficient contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) to clearly distinguish tumor from surrounding lung tissue. CNR=4.1 and CNR=29.1 for 10MU and 5000MU images (equivalent to 0.5 and 250 second images), respectively. Conclusion: Lung SBRT provides favorable treatment outcomes, but depends on accurate target localization. A comprehensive

  5. Dermatological Feasibility of Multimodal Facial Color Imaging Modality for Cross-Evaluation of Facial Actinic Keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Son, Taeyoon; Nelson, J. Stuart; Kim, Jae-Hong; Choi, Eung Ho; Jung, Byungjo

    2010-01-01

    Background/Purpose Digital color image analysis is currently considered as a routine procedure in dermatology. In our previous study, a multimodal facial color imaging modality (MFCIM), which provides a conventional, parallel- and cross-polarization, and fluorescent color image, was introduced for objective evaluation of various facial skin lesions. This study introduces a commercial version of MFCIM, DermaVision-PRO, for routine clinical use in dermatology and demonstrates its dermatological feasibility for cross-evaluation of skin lesions. Methods/Results Sample images of subjects with actinic keratosis or non-melanoma skin cancers were obtained at four different imaging modes. Various image analysis methods were applied to cross-evaluate the skin lesion and, finally, extract valuable diagnostic information. DermaVision-PRO is potentially a useful tool as an objective macroscopic imaging modality for quick prescreening and cross-evaluation of facial skin lesions. Conclusion DermaVision-PRO may be utilized as a useful tool for cross-evaluation of widely distributed facial skin lesions and an efficient database management of patient information. PMID:20923462

  6. A new procedure of modal parameter estimation for high-speed digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huňady, Róbert; Hagara, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with the use of 3D digital image correlation in determining modal parameters of mechanical systems. It is a non-contact optical method, which for the measurement of full-field spatial displacements and strains of bodies uses precise digital cameras with high image resolution. Most often this method is utilized for testing of components or determination of material properties of various specimens. In the case of using high-speed cameras for measurement, the correlation system is capable of capturing various dynamic behaviors, including vibration. This enables the potential use of the mentioned method in experimental modal analysis. For that purpose, the authors proposed a measuring chain for the correlation system Q-450 and developed a software application called DICMAN 3D, which allows the direct use of this system in the area of modal testing. The created application provides the post-processing of measured data and the estimation of modal parameters. It has its own graphical user interface, in which several algorithms for the determination of natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping of particular modes of vibration are implemented. The paper describes the basic principle of the new estimation procedure which is crucial in the light of post-processing. Since the FRF matrix resulting from the measurement is usually relatively large, the estimation of modal parameters directly from the FRF matrix may be time-consuming and may occupy a large part of computer memory. The procedure implemented in DICMAN 3D provides a significant reduction in memory requirements and computational time while achieving a high accuracy of modal parameters. Its computational efficiency is particularly evident when the FRF matrix consists of thousands of measurement DOFs. The functionality of the created software application is presented on a practical example in which the modal parameters of a composite plate excited by an impact hammer were determined. For the

  7. Costs, charges, and revenues for hospital diagnostic imaging procedures: differences by modality and hospital characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistrom, Christopher Lee; McKay, Niccie L

    2005-06-01

    This study examined financial data reported by Florida hospitals concerning costs, charges, and revenues related to imaging services. Financial reports to the Florida Hospital Uniform Reporting System by all licensed acute care facilities for fiscal year 2002 were used to calculate four financial indices on a per procedure basis. These included charge, net revenue, operating expense (variable cost), and contribution margin. Analysis, stratified by cost center (imaging modality), tested the effects of bed size, ownership, teaching status, and urban or rural status on the four indices. The mean operating expense and charge per procedure were as follows: computed tomography (CT): $51 and $1565; x-ray and ultrasound: $55 and $410; nuclear medicine (NM): $135 and $1138; and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): $165 and $2048. With all four modalities, for-profit hospitals had higher charges than not-for-profit and public facilities. Excepting NM, however, the difference by ownership disappeared when considering net revenue. Operating expense did not differ by ownership type or bed size. Operating expense (variable cost) per procedure is considerably lower for CT than for MRI. Consequently, when diagnostically equivalent, CT is preferable to MRI in terms of costs for hospitals. If the cost structure of nonhospital imaging is at all similar to hospitals, the profit potential for performing CT and MRI seems to be substantial, which has relevance to the issue of imaging self-referral.

  8. Interactive, multi-modality image registrations for combined MRI/MRSI-planned HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Reed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the steps and criteria involved in the series of image registrations used clinically during the planning and dose delivery of focal high dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy of the prostate. Material and methods: Three imaging modalities – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI, and Computed Tomography (CT – were used at different steps during the process. MRSI is used for identification of dominant intraprosatic lesions (DIL. A series of rigid and nonrigid transformations were applied to the data to correct for endorectal-coil-induced deformations and for alignment with the planning CT. Mutual information was calculated as a morphing metric. An inverse planning optimization algorithm was applied to boost dose to the DIL while providing protection to the urethra, penile bulb, rectum, and bladder. Six prostate cancer patients were treated using this protocol. Results: The morphing algorithm successfully modeled the probe-induced prostatic distortion. Mutual information calculated between the morphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe showed a significant (p = 0.0071 increase to that calculated between the unmorphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe. Both mutual information and visual inspection serve as effective diagnostics of image morphing. The entire procedure adds less than thirty minutes to the treatment planning. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the utility of image transformations and registrations to HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

  9. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Multi-Modality Isointense Infant Brain Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Li, Rongjian; Deng, Houtao; Wang, Li; Lin, Weili; Ji, Shuiwang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    The segmentation of infant brain tissue images into white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in studying early brain development in health and disease. In the isointense stage (approximately 6–8 months of age), WM and GM exhibit similar levels of intensity in both T1 and T2 MR images, making the tissue segmentation very challenging. Only a small number of existing methods have been designed for tissue segmentation in this isointense stage; however, they only used a single T1 or T2 images, or the combination of T1 and T2 images. In this paper, we propose to use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting isointense stage brain tissues using multi-modality MR images. CNNs are a type of deep models in which trainable filters and local neighborhood pooling operations are applied alternatingly on the raw input images, resulting in a hierarchy of increasingly complex features. Specifically, we used multimodality information from T1, T2, and fractional anisotropy (FA) images as inputs and then generated the segmentation maps as outputs. The multiple intermediate layers applied convolution, pooling, normalization, and other operations to capture the highly nonlinear mappings between inputs and outputs. We compared the performance of our approach with that of the commonly used segmentation methods on a set of manually segmented isointense stage brain images. Results showed that our proposed model significantly outperformed prior methods on infant brain tissue segmentation. In addition, our results indicated that integration of multi-modality images led to significant performance improvement. PMID:25562829

  10. Comparing Image Perception of Bladder Tumors in Four Different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System Modalities Using the íSPIES App

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Guido M.; de Bruin, D. Martijn; Brandt, Martin J.; Knoll, Thomas; Conort, Pierre; Lapini, Alberto; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose L.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the variation of interpretation of the same bladder urothelium image in different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System (SPIES) modalities. SPIES contains a White light (WL), Spectra A (SA), Spectra B (SB), and Clara and Chroma combined (CC) modality. An App for the iPAD retina was

  11. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  12. Detection of relationships among multi-modal brain imaging meta-features via information flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robyn L; Vergara, Victor M; Calhoun, Vince D

    2018-01-15

    Neuroscientists and clinical researchers are awash in data from an ever-growing number of imaging and other bio-behavioral modalities. This flow of brain imaging data, taken under resting and various task conditions, combines with available cognitive measures, behavioral information, genetic data plus other potentially salient biomedical and environmental information to create a rich but diffuse data landscape. The conditions being studied with brain imaging data are often extremely complex and it is common for researchers to employ more than one imaging, behavioral or biological data modality (e.g., genetics) in their investigations. While the field has advanced significantly in its approach to multimodal data, the vast majority of studies still ignore joint information among two or more features or modalities. We propose an intuitive framework based on conditional probabilities for understanding information exchange between features in what we are calling a feature meta-space; that is, a space consisting of many individual featurae spaces. Features can have any dimension and can be drawn from any data source or modality. No a priori assumptions are made about the functional form (e.g., linear, polynomial, exponential) of captured inter-feature relationships. We demonstrate the framework's ability to identify relationships between disparate features of varying dimensionality by applying it to a large multi-site, multi-modal clinical dataset, balance between schizophrenia patients and controls. In our application it exposes both expected (previously observed) relationships, and novel relationships rarely considered investigated by clinical researchers. To the best of our knowledge there is not presently a comparably efficient way to capture relationships of indeterminate functional form between features of arbitrary dimension and type. We are introducing this method as an initial foray into a space that remains relatively underpopulated. The framework we propose is

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of imaging modalities for internal derangements of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Igarashi, Chinami; Yuasa, Masao; Imanaka, Masahiro; Kondoh, Toshirou

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and review the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of imaging diagnosis for temporomandibular disorders. The role of diagnostic imaging is to detect and document specific anatomic abnormalities associated with the signs and symptoms in the temporomandibular joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) can accurately depict disc displacement and disc deformity. MR imaging is our first choice among the various imaging modalities for the patients with clinical signs and symptoms. However, it has been shown that intra-capsular adhesions and perforations of the disc and retrodiscal tissue are sometimes not detected by MR imaging. To improve the diagnostic technique for adhesions and perforations, double-contrast arthrotomography with fluoroscopy should be employed. The irregular surface of the eminences and the glenoid fossae shown by MR imaging and tomography are correlated with subchondral bone exposure by arthroscopy. Erosion of the condyles detected by MR imaging, tomography and rotational panoramic radiography is correlated with subchondral bone exposure detected by arthroscopy. (author). 69 refs

  14. On the Multi-Modal Object Tracking and Image Fusion Using Unsupervised Deep Learning Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, N.; Ott, J.; Garay, M. J.; El-Askary, H. M.; Linstead, E.

    2017-12-01

    The number of different modalities of remote-sensors has been on the rise, resulting in large datasets with different complexity levels. Such complex datasets can provide valuable information separately, yet there is a bigger value in having a comprehensive view of them combined. As such, hidden information can be deduced through applying data mining techniques on the fused data. The curse of dimensionality of such fused data, due to the potentially vast dimension space, hinders our ability to have deep understanding of them. This is because each dataset requires a user to have instrument-specific and dataset-specific knowledge for optimum and meaningful usage. Once a user decides to use multiple datasets together, deeper understanding of translating and combining these datasets in a correct and effective manner is needed. Although there exists data centric techniques, generic automated methodologies that can potentially solve this problem completely don't exist. Here we are developing a system that aims to gain a detailed understanding of different data modalities. Such system will provide an analysis environment that gives the user useful feedback and can aid in research tasks. In our current work, we show the initial outputs our system implementation that leverages unsupervised deep learning techniques so not to burden the user with the task of labeling input data, while still allowing for a detailed machine understanding of the data. Our goal is to be able to track objects, like cloud systems or aerosols, across different image-like data-modalities. The proposed system is flexible, scalable and robust to understand complex likenesses within multi-modal data in a similar spatio-temporal range, and also to be able to co-register and fuse these images when needed.

  15. Detection ability of FDG-PET/CT comparing with other imaging modalities in multiple myeloma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Min Jeong; Lee, Tae Hyun; Pai, Moon Sun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by bone marrow infiltration with malignant plasma cells. It is important to detect involving bone for diagnosis and management of MM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability and limitation of 18F-FDG-PET/CT (PET/CT) comparing other imaging modalities (separated PET and CT, whole body plain X-ray (XR), bone scintigraphy (BS), and MRI) in MM. Twenty PET/CT scans were performed in 16 patients (M: F=6: 10, median age=59 y). PET/CT findings were compared with available other images (n of CT=21, XR=21, BS=8, and MRI=5). Concordance with more than 2 image modalities, laboratory data, symptom, and biopsies were used for diagnosis of detected lesions. PET/CT revealed 256 of total 287 sites (sensitivity, 89.2%; accuracy, 84.8%). The sensitivity and accuracy of separating PET, CT, and XR were 86.3%, 70.4%; 47.4%, 50.3%; and 72.8%, 72.4%, respectively. Available BS identified 67 of 202 sites (sensitivity, 33.2%; accuracy, 44.0%). MRI detected 20 of 24 sites (sensitivity, 83.3%; accuracy, 36.3%). False positive rate (FP) of PET, XR, and MRI was as high as 87.8%, 95.1%, and 100%. PET for rib lesion identified 9 of 10 patients (90.0%) but for skull lesion only 4 of 7 patients (57.2%) with underestimation. 5 patients in MRI showed diffuse marrow signal change but only 3 had marrow involvement. But PET/CT showed higher accuracy than MRI. PET/CT was the most useful tool for detecting involving bone of MM comparing with other imaging modalities. Moreover, PET/CT is expected to overcome the limitations for the small osteolytic bone lesions with diffuse FDG uptake on PET

  16. The Impact of Imaging Modality on the Measurement of Coronal Plane Alignment After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Vajapey, Sravya; Nunley, Ryan M; Barrack, Robert L

    2016-10-01

    The optimal coronal alignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become an area of increased debate. Sources of variability among investigations include the radiographic technique used for both preoperative surgical planning and postoperative alignment assessments. This study's purpose was to assess the impact of the imaging modality used on the measurement of coronal plane alignment after TKA. A consecutive series of patients undergoing TKA using the same cruciate-retaining prosthesis were included for analysis. Postoperatively, all patients received both a rotationally controlled, scout computed tomography scan and a hip-knee-ankle (HKA) image using the EOS Imaging system (EOS Inc., Paris, France). Two, independent observers measured the HKA angle, and femoral and tibial component alignment from each image. After classifying overall and component alignment as neutral, varus, or valgus, 40.6% (65 of 160) of knees had a discordant alignment classification for HKA, 28.1% (45 of 160) for femoral component alignment, and 26.9% (43 of 160) for tibial component alignment between their computed tomography and EOS images. Overall, 24.4% (39 of 160) of patients had a HKA difference of ≥3° between the 2 images, whereas 18.8% (30 of 160) and 20.0% (32 of 160) of patients had a femoral and tibial component alignment difference of ≥2°, respectively. Significant differences are present when comparing 2 measurement techniques of mechanical alignment after TKA. The impact of imaging modality on postoperative assessments must be accounted for and be consistent when comparing the results of different investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. VoxelStats: A MATLAB Package for Multi-Modal Voxel-Wise Brain Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathotaarachchi, Sulantha; Wang, Seqian; Shin, Monica; Pascoal, Tharick A; Benedet, Andrea L; Kang, Min Su; Beaudry, Thomas; Fonov, Vladimir S; Gauthier, Serge; Labbe, Aurélie; Rosa-Neto, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, behavioral outcomes are highly associated with the variability on brain regional structure or neurochemical phenotypes. Similarly, in the context of neurodegenerative conditions, neuroimaging reveals that cognitive decline is linked to the magnitude of atrophy, neurochemical declines, or concentrations of abnormal protein aggregates across brain regions. However, modeling the effects of multiple regional abnormalities as determinants of cognitive decline at the voxel level remains largely unexplored by multimodal imaging research, given the high computational cost of estimating regression models for every single voxel from various imaging modalities. VoxelStats is a voxel-wise computational framework to overcome these computational limitations and to perform statistical operations on multiple scalar variables and imaging modalities at the voxel level. VoxelStats package has been developed in Matlab(®) and supports imaging formats such as Nifti-1, ANALYZE, and MINC v2. Prebuilt functions in VoxelStats enable the user to perform voxel-wise general and generalized linear models and mixed effect models with multiple volumetric covariates. Importantly, VoxelStats can recognize scalar values or image volumes as response variables and can accommodate volumetric statistical covariates as well as their interaction effects with other variables. Furthermore, this package includes built-in functionality to perform voxel-wise receiver operating characteristic analysis and paired and unpaired group contrast analysis. Validation of VoxelStats was conducted by comparing the linear regression functionality with existing toolboxes such as glim_image and RMINC. The validation results were identical to existing methods and the additional functionality was demonstrated by generating feature case assessments (t-statistics, odds ratio, and true positive rate maps). In summary, VoxelStats expands the current methods for multimodal imaging analysis by allowing the

  18. Lipid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jinying Liang,1–3 Xinxin Zhang,2 Yunqiu Miao,2 Juan Li,1 Yong Gan2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Pharmacy, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The development of noninvasive imaging techniques for the accurate diagnosis of progressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is of great clinical significance and has always been desired. Herein, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell-targeting fluorescent magnetic nanoparticle (NP was obtained by conjugating near-infrared fluorescence to the surface of Fe3O4 (NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs, followed by coating the lipids consisting of tumoral hepatocytes-targeting polymer (Gal-P123. This magnetic NP (GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 with superparamagnetic behavior showed high stability and safety in physiological conditions. In addition, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 achieved more specific uptake of human liver cancer cells than free Fe3O4 NPs. Importantly, with superparamagnetic iron oxide and strong NIR absorbance, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs demonstrate prominent tumor-contrasted imaging performance both on fluorescent and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR imaging modalities in a living body. The relative MR signal enhancement of GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs achieved 5.4-fold improvement compared with NIR-Fe3O4 NPs. Therefore, GPC@NIRF-Fe3O4 NPs may be potentially used as a candidate for dual-modal imaging of tumors with information covalidated and directly compared by combining fluorescence and MR imaging. Keywords: dual-imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatocellular carcinoma, tumor-targeting

  19. Newer treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E Harris

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard E Harris, Daniel J ClauwDepartment of Anesthesiology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a common chronic pain disorder of unknown etiology. The lack of understanding of the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia has made this condition frustrating for patients and clinicians alike. The most common symptoms of this disorder are chronic widespread pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, difficulty with memory, and morning stiffness. Emerging evidence points towards augmented pain processing within the central nervous system (CNS as having a primary role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Currently the two drugs that are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the management of fibromyalgia are pregabalin and duloxetine. Newer data suggests that milnacipran, a dual norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, may be promising for the treatment of fibromyalgia. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of milnacipran in 125 fibromyalgia patients showed significant improvements relative to placebo. Milnacipran given either once or twice daily at doses up to 200 mg/day was generally well tolerated and yielded significant improvements relative to placebo on measures of pain, patient’s global impression of change in their disease state, physical function, and fatigue. Future studies are needed to validate the efficacy of milnacipran in fibromyalgia.Keywords: fibromyalgia, pain, pharmacological, treatment

  20. Endoscopic Tri-Modal Imaging (ETMI With Optical Magnification in the Detection of Barrett's Early Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmed S. Sami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early lesion detection and characterisation is vital to ensure accurate management in patients with gastrointestinal neoplasia. Endoscopic Tri-modal Imaging (ETMI technology has been shown to improve the targeted detection of early dysplastic lesions in Barrett's Oesophagus, but these results were not confirmed in non-expert hands [1]. This technology incorporates high resolution while light endoscopy (HRE, Auto Fluorescence Imaging (AFI and Narrow Band Imaging (NBI in one endoscope. The mucosa is first inspected with HRE, and then AFI is switched on to help in highlighting any suspicious areas in the mucosa [2]. These areas can be further examined by switching to NBI mode with magnification which helps to characterise mucosal patterns and identify early neoplasia [3].

  1. A tri-modal molecular imaging agent for sentinel lymph node mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Zhengtao; Hoh, Carl K.; Hall, David J.; Vera, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We report an “instant kit” method to radiolabel fluorescent-tilmanocept with 68 Ga and 99m Tc for tri-modal molecular imaging of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Methods: Solutions of sodium acetate, 68 GaCl 3 and Na 99m TcO 4 were added successively to a “kit vial” containing lyophilized 800CW-tilmanocept, SnCl 2 , trehalose and ascorbic acid. After a 30-min incubation, the pH was neutralized with PBS. No purification was required. Radiochemical and fluorescence purity was measured by HPLC and ITLC techniques. In vitro stability was measured by standing gel chromatography (SGC) and ITLC by a 100-fold dilution 0.25 h after radiolabeling. In vivo stability was measured by SGC and ITLC after an 11 h incubation in human plasma. A dose (0.1 nmol, ~ 1 MBq 68 Ga, ~ 25 MBq 99m Tc) was injected to the footpad of 4 mice. Popliteal SLNs were imaged by PET and fluorescence imaging systems at 0.5, 24, 48, 72 h, then excised and assayed for 99m Tc. Results: Radiochemical and fluorescent purity exceeded 98%. The in vitro stability assay demonstrated high irreversibility of both radiolabels and the fluorescent label, and in vivo stability assay demonstrated high stability of the technetium and fluorescent labels to plasma metabolism. Popliteal SLNs were identified by PET and fluorescence imaging within 0.5 h of injection. SLN fluorescence intensity remained constant for 72 h, when ~ 1% of the injected dose resided in the SLN. Conclusions: Fluorescent-labeled tilmanocept can be radiolabeled with 68 Ga and 99m Tc by the sequential addition of each generator eluate to a lyophilized kit. The resulting tri-modal agent provides: PET images for pre-operative SLN mapping, fluorescence imaging up to 72 hours after injection, and quantitative radiometric measurement of SLN accumulation after excision.

  2. Investigation of optical coherence tomography as an imaging modality in tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ying; Dubois, Arnaud; Qin Xiangpei; Li Jian; Haj, Alicia El; Wang, Ruikang K

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring cell profiles in 3D porous scaffolds presents a major challenge in tissue engineering. In this study, we investigate optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging modality to monitor non-invasively both structures and cells in engineered tissue constructs. We employ time-domain OCT to visualize macro-structural morphology, and whole-field optical coherence microscopy to delineate the morphology of cells and constructs in a developing in vitro engineered bone tissue. The results show great potential for the use of OCT in non-invasive monitoring of cellular activities in 3D developing engineered tissues

  3. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  4. FogBank: a single cell segmentation across multiple cell lines and image modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, Joe; Majurski, Michael; Dima, Alden; Stuelten, Christina; Peskin, Adele; Brady, Mary

    2014-12-30

    Many cell lines currently used in medical research, such as cancer cells or stem cells, grow in confluent sheets or colonies. The biology of individual cells provide valuable information, thus the separation of touching cells in these microscopy images is critical for counting, identification and measurement of individual cells. Over-segmentation of single cells continues to be a major problem for methods based on morphological watershed due to the high level of noise in microscopy cell images. There is a need for a new segmentation method that is robust over a wide variety of biological images and can accurately separate individual cells even in challenging datasets such as confluent sheets or colonies. We present a new automated segmentation method called FogBank that accurately separates cells when confluent and touching each other. This technique is successfully applied to phase contrast, bright field, fluorescence microscopy and binary images. The method is based on morphological watershed principles with two new features to improve accuracy and minimize over-segmentation. First, FogBank uses histogram binning to quantize pixel intensities which minimizes the image noise that causes over-segmentation. Second, FogBank uses a geodesic distance mask derived from raw images to detect the shapes of individual cells, in contrast to the more linear cell edges that other watershed-like algorithms produce. We evaluated the segmentation accuracy against manually segmented datasets using two metrics. FogBank achieved segmentation accuracy on the order of 0.75 (1 being a perfect match). We compared our method with other available segmentation techniques in term of achieved performance over the reference data sets. FogBank outperformed all related algorithms. The accuracy has also been visually verified on data sets with 14 cell lines across 3 imaging modalities leading to 876 segmentation evaluation images. FogBank produces single cell segmentation from confluent cell

  5. Newer insights in teledermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garehatty Rudrappa Kanthraj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study and practice of dermatology care using interactive audio, visual, and data communications from a distance is called teledermatology. A teledermatology practice (TP provides teleconsultation as well tele-education. Initially, dermatologists used videoconference. Convenience, cost-effectiveness and easy application of the practice made "store and forward" to emerge as a basic teledermatology tool. The advent of newer technologies like third generation (3G and fourth generation (4G mobile teledermatology (MT and dermatologists′ interest to adopt tertiary TP to pool expert (second opinion to address difficult-to-manage cases (DMCs has resulted in a rapid change in TP. Online discussion groups (ODGs, author-based second opinion teledermatology (AST, or a combination of both are the types of tertiary TP. This article analyzes the feasibility studies and provides latest insight into TP with a revised classification to plan and allocate budget and apply appropriate technology. Using the acronym CAP-HAT, which represents five important factors like case, approach, purpose, health care professionals, and technology, one can frame a TP. Store-and-forward teledermatology (SAFT is used to address routine cases (spotters. Chronic cases need frequent follow-up care. Leg ulcer and localized vitiligo need MT while psoriasis and leprosy require SAFT. Pigmented skin lesions require MT for triage and combination of teledermoscopy, telepathology, and teledermatology for diagnosis. A self-practising dermatologist and national health care system dermatologist use SAFT for routine cases and a combination of ASTwith an ODG to address a DMC. A TP alone or in combination with face-to-face consultation delivers quality care.

  6. Medical Students’ Knowledge of Indications for Imaging Modalities and Cost Analysis of Incorrect Requests, Shiraz, Iran 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Islami Parkoohi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20. In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%. The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff and $205581 (private tariff. Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  7. Medical students' knowledge of indications for imaging modalities and cost analysis of incorrect requests, shiraz, iran 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami Parkoohi, Parisa; Jalli, Reza; Danaei, Mina; Khajavian, Shiva; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent) using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20). In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%). The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff) and $205581 (private tariff). Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  8. Photoacoustic cystography using handheld dual modal clinical ultrasound photoacoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Periyasamy, Vijitha; Austria, Dienzo Rhonnie; Pramanik, Manojit

    2018-02-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux is the abnormal flow of urine from your bladder back up the tubes (ureters) that connect your kidneys to your bladder. Normally, urine flows only down from your kidneys to your bladder. Vesicoureteral reflux is usually diagnosed in infants and children. The disorder increases the risk of urinary tract infections, which, if left untreated, can lead to kidney damage. X-Ray cystography is used currently to diagnose this condition which uses ionising radiation, making it harmful for patients. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the urinary bladder using a handheld clinical ultrasound and photoacoustic dual modal imaging system in small animals (rats). Additionally, we demonstrate imaging vesicoureteral reflux using bladder mimicking phantoms. Urinary bladder imaging is done with the help of contrast agents like black ink and gold nanoparticles which have high optical absorption at 1064 nm. Imaging up to 2 cm was demonstrated with this system. Imaging was done at a framerate of 5 frames per second.

  9. Thoracic neuroblastoma: what is the best imaging modality for evaluating extent of disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovis, T.L.; Meza, M.P.; Cushing, B.; Elkowitz, S.S.; Leonidas, J.C.; Festa, R.; Kogutt, M.S.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    Thoracic neuroblastoma accounts for 15% of all cases of neuroblastoma. A minority of children with thoracic neuroblastoma will have dumbbell tumors, i.e., intraspinal extension, but only half these patients will have neurologic signs or symptoms. Hypothesis. MR imaging is the single best test to evaluate the extent of thoracic and spinal disease in thoracid neuroblastoma after the diagnosis of a mass is estbalished on plain film. A retrospective multi-institutional investigation over 7 years of all cases of thoracic neuroblastoma (n=26) imaged with CT and/or MR were reviewed for detection of the extent of disease. The chest film, nuclear bone scan, and other imaging modalities were also reviewed. The surgical and histologic correlation in each case, as well as the patients' staging and outcome, were tabulated. The chest radiography was 100% sensitive in suggesting the diagnosis. MR imaging was 100% sensitive in predicting enlarged lymph nodes, intraspinal extension, and chest wall involvement. CT was 88% sensitive for intraspinal extension but only 20% sensitive for lymph node enlargement. CT was 100% sensitive in detecting chest wall involvement. Direct comparison of CT and MR imaging in six cases revealed no difference in detection of enlarged lymph nodes or chest wall involvement. Neither test was able to detect remote disease, as noted by bone scan. The chest film is 100% sensitive in suggesting the diagnosis of thoracic neuroblastoma; MR imaging appears to be the single best test for detecting nodal involvement, intraspinal extension, and chest wall involvement. (orig.)

  10. Emerging Cardiac Imaging Modalities for the Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity Due to Anticancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Teresa; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh

    2017-06-01

    The undeniable advances in the field of oncology have finally led to a decrease in overall cancer-related mortality. However, this population of long-term cancer survivors is now facing a shift toward a substantial increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Because the development of overt cardiotoxicity can be associated with poor outcomes, preclinical identification of cardiac toxicity is important. This will promote early instauration of treatments to prevent overt heart dysfunction and allow oncologists to continue cancer therapy in an uninterrupted manner. Surveillance strategies for the early detection of cardiac injury include cardiac imaging and biomarkers during treatment. In this review, we outline existing cardiac imaging modalities to detect myocardial changes in patients undergoing cancer treatment and in survivors, and their strengths and limitations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiac imaging modalities with ionizing radiation: the role of informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterick, Timothy E; Jan, M Fuad; Paterick, Zachary R; Tajik, A Jamil; Gerber, Thomas C

    2012-06-01

    Informed consent ideally results in patient autonomy and rational health care decisions. Frequently, patients face complex medical decisions that require a delicate balancing of anticipated benefits and potential risks, which is the concept of informed consent. This balancing process requires an understanding of available medical evidence and alternative medical options, and input from experienced physicians. The informed consent doctrine places a positive obligation on physicians to partner with patients as they try to make the best decision for their specific medical situation. The high prevalence and mortality related to heart disease in our society has led to increased cardiac imaging with modalities that use ionizing radiation. This paper reviews how physicians can meet the ideals of informed consent when considering cardiac imaging with ionizing radiation, given the limited evidence for risks and benefits. The goal is an informed patient making rational choices based on available medical information. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endoscopic tri-modal imaging for detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's oesophagus: a multi-centre feasibility study using high-resolution endoscopy, autofluorescence imaging and narrow band imaging incorporated in one endoscopy system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curvers, W. L.; Singh, R.; Song, L.-M. Wong-Kee; Wolfsen, H. C.; Ragunath, K.; Wang, K.; Wallace, M. B.; Fockens, P.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic potential of endoscopic tri-modal imaging and the relative contribution of each imaging modality (i.e. high-resolution endoscopy (HRE), autofluorescence imaging (AFI) and narrow-band imaging (NBI)) for the detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's oesophagus.

  13. Characterization and functional correlation of multiple imaging modalities with focal choroidal excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Chen Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the clinical manifestations and imaging features of near-infrared autofluorescence (NIA, infrared reflectance (IR, fundus autofluorescence (FAF, indocyanine green angiography (ICGA and fluorescein angiography (FAG in the detection of patients with focal choroidal excavation (FCE identified by cross-sectional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study included 12 eyes of 10 Taiwanese patients with FCE diagnosed by SD-OCT. The areas and depths of FCE in serial cross-sectional and en-face OCT were compared in different imaging modalities. NIA, IR, FAF, ICGA and FAG images were obtained. Best corrected visual acuity, subjective distortion area in the Amsler grid and history of maculopathies were also recorded. Results: In areas where the choroid started to excavate as shown in SD-OCT, hypo-autofluorescence in NIA was noted. The area of hypo-fluorescence in NIA of all the FCE lesions showed good correlation with the size. The area of FCE was associated with complications such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous chorioretinopathy (p = 0.014, d.f = 1 and the volume (NIA area × Depth measured by SD-OCT × 1/3 was associated with subjective distortion strongly (p = 0.051, Spearman's correlation = 0.600. Conclusion: Among all image modalities, NIA was the most sensitive tool in area measurement of FCE and peripheral lesion detection. Also, the volume of FCE was associated with subjective distortion and the area was related to complications. Recording the area and volume of FCE could play an important role in monitoring complications. Keywords: Choroid-retina disease, Focal choroidal excavation, Near-infrared autofluorescence, Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

  14. Three-dimensional imaging of flat natural and cultural heritage objects by a Compton scattering modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Prado, Patricio; Nguyen, Mai K.; Dumas, Laurent; Cohen, Serge X.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization and interpretation of flat ancient material objects, such as those found in archaeology, paleoenvironments, paleontology, and cultural heritage, have remained a challenging task to perform by means of conventional x-ray tomography methods due to their anisotropic morphology and flattened geometry. To overcome the limitations of the mentioned methodologies for such samples, an imaging modality based on Compton scattering is proposed in this work. Classical x-ray tomography treats Compton scattering data as noise in the image formation process, while in Compton scattering tomography the conditions are set such that Compton data become the principal image contrasting agent. Under these conditions, we are able, first, to avoid relative rotations between the sample and the imaging setup, and second, to obtain three-dimensional data even when the object is supported by a dense material by exploiting backscattered photons. Mathematically this problem is addressed by means of a conical Radon transform and its inversion. The image formation process and object reconstruction model are presented. The feasibility of this methodology is supported by numerical simulations.

  15. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  16. Pleomorphic adenoma: Choice of radiographic imaging modality - Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging? Illustration through a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common benign neoplasm of the major salivary glands arising primarily from the parotid gland. Computed tomography (CT is one of the primary imaging modalities used to assess the tumors of salivary glands. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may provide additional information over CT. Case Report: We report the case of a 60-year-old male with a slowly enlarging, well-defined, round, painless, non-fixated, rubber-like swelling over the left ramus region below the ear, measuring about 4 × 4.5 cm, covering the lower border of the mandible near the angle. A provisional diagnosis of PA was given and CT and MRI were used to study the lesion. Discussion: Through this case, which was suspected to have undergone malignant transformation because of indistinct margins and focal hypodense areas on CT but was later confirmed to be a benign salivary gland tumor on MRI, we illustrate the role of CT and MRI as diagnostic aids in PA and emphasize on what should be the choice of imaging modality for parotid tumors.

  17. Facile Fabrication of Animal-Specific Positioning Molds For Multi-modality Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Oh, Ji Eun; Woo, Seung Tae

    2008-01-01

    Recently multi-modal imaging system has become widely adopted in molecular imaging. We tried to fabricate animal-specific positioning molds for PET/MR fusion imaging using easily available molding clay and rapid foam. The animal-specific positioning molds provide immobilization and reproducible positioning of small animal. Herein, we have compared fiber-based molding clay with rapid foam in fabricating the molds of experimental animal. The round bottomed-acrylic frame, which fitted into microPET gantry, was prepared at first. The experimental mice was anesthetized and placed on the mold for positioning. Rapid foam and fiber-based clay were used to fabricate the mold. In case of both rapid foam and the clay, the experimental animal needs to be pushed down smoothly into the mold for positioning. However, after the mouse was removed, the fabricated clay needed to be dried completely at 60 .deg. C in oven overnight for hardening. Four sealed pipe tips containing [ 18 F]FDG solution were used as fiduciary markers. After injection of [ 18 F]FDG via tail vein, microPET scanning was performed. Successively, MRI scanning was followed in the same animal. Animal-specific positioning molds were fabricated using rapid foam and fiber-based molding clay for multimodality imaging. Functional and anatomical images were obtained with microPET and MRI, respectively. The fused PET/MR images were obtained using freely available AMIDE program. Animal-specific molds were successfully prepared using easily available rapid foam, molding clay and disposable pipet tips. Thanks to animal-specific molds, fusion images of PET and MR were co-registered with negligible misalignment

  18. 3D reconstruction of microvascular flow phantoms with hybrid imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingying; Hsiung, Kevin; Ritenour, Russell; Golzarian, Jafar

    2011-03-01

    Microvascular flow phantoms were built to aid the development of a hemodynamic simulation model for treating hepatocelluar carcinoma. The goal is to predict the blood flow routing for embolotherapy planning. Embolization is to deliver agents (e.g. microspheres) to the vicinity of the tumor to obstruct blood supply and nutrients to the tumor, targeting into 30 - 40 μm arterioles. Due to the size of the catheter, it has to release microspheres at an upper stream location, which may not localize the blocking effect. Accurate anatomical descriptions of microvasculature will help to conduct a reliable simulation and prepare a successful embolization strategy. Modern imaging devices can generate 3D reconstructions with ease. However, with a fixed detector size, larger field of view yields lower resolution. Clinical CT images can't be used to measure micro vessel dimensions, while micro-CT requires more acquisitions to reconstruct larger vessels. A multi-tiered, montage 3D reconstruction method with hybrid-modality imagery is devised to minimize the reconstruction effort. Regular CT is used for larger vessels and micro-CT is used for micro vessels. The montage approach aims to stitch up images with different resolutions and orientations. A resolution-adaptable 3D image registration is developed to assemble the images. We have created vessel phantoms that consist of several tiers of bifurcating polymer tubes in reducing diameters, down to 25 μm. No previous work of physical flow phantom has ventured into this small scale. Overlapping phantom images acquired from clinical CT and micro-CT are used to verify the image registration fidelity.

  19. The guarantee of the consistency of patient information through modality worklist among PACS, RIS and imaging equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Min; Peng Chenglin; Wang Xiaolin; Luo Song; Lei Wenyong; Wang Kang; Wang Xuejian; Wen Hongyu; Wu Hongxing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To realize the consistency of patient information through modality worklist among picture archiving and communication system (PACS), radiology information systems (RIS), and imaging equipments. Methods: Many digital modalities including GE Signa 1.5 T MR system, digital mammography, Agfa digital radiography, computed radiography, GE CT, and etc were installed in our hospital. Since the GE PACS system was in English version, the images were saved and the information was managed to PACS without a truly worklist. Two months later, while still using the previous PACS, the consistency of patient information was resolved through modality worklist by adopting the international advanced approach to realize thread worklist of digital imaging and communication in medicine. The information in Chinese will be transformed into information in English in RIS system and saved as the English information to worklist. Results: After the implementation and integration of PACS and RIS was achieved in my hospital, the consistency of patient information was guaranteed through modality worklist between RIS and imaging equipments and the first-rate effect was acquired. The patient information could be checked, edited, and created by using the Chinese RIS system on all diagnostic workstations. Conclusion: The consistency of patient information through modality worklist was realized among PACS, RIS, and imaging equipments, yet at present, the question of guarantee the consistency of patient information must be thought over in PACS building

  20. Evaluation of 3D modality-independent elastography for breast imaging: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, J J; Ong, R E; Yankeelov, T E; Miga, M I

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and preliminary testing of a three-dimensional implementation of an inverse problem technique for extracting soft-tissue elasticity information via non-rigid model-based image registration. The modality-independent elastography (MIE) algorithm adjusts the elastic properties of a biomechanical model to achieve maximal similarity between images acquired under different states of static loading. A series of simulation experiments with clinical image sets of human breasts were performed to test the ability of the method to identify and characterize a radiographically occult stiff lesion. Because boundary conditions are a critical input to the algorithm, a comparison of three methods for semi-automated surface point correspondence was conducted in the context of systematic and randomized noise processes. The results illustrate that 3D MIE was able to successfully reconstruct elasticity images using data obtained from both magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography systems. The lesion was localized correctly in all cases and its relative elasticity found to be reasonably close to the true values (3.5% with the use of spatial priors and 11.6% without). In addition, the inaccuracies of surface registration performed with thin-plate spline interpolation did not exceed empiric thresholds of unacceptable boundary condition error

  1. Multi-modal imaging, model-based tracking, and mixed reality visualisation for orthopaedic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Bernhard; Tateno, Keisuke; Johnson, Alex; Fotouhi, Javad; Osgood, Greg; Tombari, Federico; Navab, Nassir

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons are still following the decades old workflow of using dozens of two-dimensional fluoroscopic images to drill through complex 3D structures, e.g. pelvis. This Letter presents a mixed reality support system, which incorporates multi-modal data fusion and model-based surgical tool tracking for creating a mixed reality environment supporting screw placement in orthopaedic surgery. A red–green–blue–depth camera is rigidly attached to a mobile C-arm and is calibrated to the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging space via iterative closest point algorithm. This allows real-time automatic fusion of reconstructed surface and/or 3D point clouds and synthetic fluoroscopic images obtained through CBCT imaging. An adapted 3D model-based tracking algorithm with automatic tool segmentation allows for tracking of the surgical tools occluded by hand. This proposed interactive 3D mixed reality environment provides an intuitive understanding of the surgical site and supports surgeons in quickly localising the entry point and orienting the surgical tool during screw placement. The authors validate the augmentation by measuring target registration error and also evaluate the tracking accuracy in the presence of partial occlusion. PMID:29184659

  2. A multi-modality concept for radiotherapy planning with imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reported multi-modality concept of radiotherapy planning in the LAN can be realised in any hospital with standard equipment, although in some cases by way of auxiliary configurations. A software is currently developed as a tool for reducing the entire planning work. The heart of any radiotherapy planning is the therapy simulator, which has to be abreast with the requirements of modern radiotherapy. Integration of tomograpy, digitalisation, and electronic data processing has added important modalities to therapy planning which allow more precise target volume definition, and better biophysical planning. This is what is needed in order to achieve well differentiated radiotherapy for treatment of the manifold tumors, and the quality standards expected by the supervisory quality assurance regime and the population. At present, the CT data still are transferred indirect, on storage media, to the EDP processing system of the radiotherapy planning system. Based on the tomographic slices given by the imaging data, the contours and technical problem solutions are derived automatically, either for multi-field radiotherapy or moving field irradiation, depending on the anatomy or the targets to be protected from ionizing radiation. (orig./VHE) [de

  3. A convergent functional architecture of the insula emerges across imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Clare; Toro, Roberto; Di Martino, Adriana; Cox, Christine L; Bellec, Pierre; Castellanos, F Xavier; Milham, Michael P

    2012-07-16

    Empirical evidence increasingly supports the hypothesis that patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) are sculpted by a history of evoked coactivation within distinct neuronal networks. This, together with evidence of strong correspondence among the networks defined by iFC and those delineated using a variety of other neuroimaging techniques, suggests a fundamental brain architecture detectable across multiple functional and structural imaging modalities. Here, we leverage this insight to examine the functional organization of the human insula. We parcellated the insula on the basis of three distinct neuroimaging modalities - task-evoked coactivation, intrinsic (i.e., task-independent) functional connectivity, and gray matter structural covariance. Clustering of these three different covariance-based measures revealed a convergent elemental organization of the insula that likely reflects a fundamental brain architecture governing both brain structure and function at multiple spatial scales. While not constrained to be hierarchical, our parcellation revealed a pseudo-hierarchical, multiscale organization that was consistent with previous clustering and meta-analytic studies of the insula. Finally, meta-analytic examination of the cognitive and behavioral domains associated with each of the insular clusters obtained elucidated the broad functional dissociations likely underlying the topography observed. To facilitate future investigations of insula function across healthy and pathological states, the insular parcels have been made freely available for download via http://fcon_1000.projects.nitrc.org, along with the analytic scripts used to perform the parcellations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. System Characterizations and Optimized Reconstruction Methods for Novel X-ray Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng

    In the past decade there have been many new emerging X-ray based imaging technologies developed for different diagnostic purposes or imaging tasks. However, there exist one or more specific problems that prevent them from being effectively or efficiently employed. In this dissertation, four different novel X-ray based imaging technologies are discussed, including propagation-based phase-contrast (PB-XPC) tomosynthesis, differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography (D-XPCT), projection-based dual-energy computed radiography (DECR), and tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT). System characteristics are analyzed or optimized reconstruction methods are proposed for these imaging modalities. In the first part, we investigated the unique properties of propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique when combined with the X-ray tomosynthesis. Fourier slice theorem implies that the high frequency components collected in the tomosynthesis data can be more reliably reconstructed. It is observed that the fringes or boundary enhancement introduced by the phase-contrast effects can serve as an accurate indicator of the true depth position in the tomosynthesis in-plane image. In the second part, we derived a sub-space framework to reconstruct images from few-view D-XPCT data set. By introducing a proper mask, the high frequency contents of the image can be theoretically preserved in a certain region of interest. A two-step reconstruction strategy is developed to mitigate the risk of subtle structures being oversmoothed when the commonly used total-variation regularization is employed in the conventional iterative framework. In the thirt part, we proposed a practical method to improve the quantitative accuracy of the projection-based dual-energy material decomposition. It is demonstrated that applying a total-projection-length constraint along with the dual-energy measurements can achieve a stabilized numerical solution of the decomposition problem, thus overcoming the

  5. Antibiofouling polymer coated gold nanoparticles as a dual modal contrast agent for X-ray and photoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guojia Huang; Yi Yuan; Xing Da

    2011-01-01

    X-ray is one of the most useful diagnostic tools in hospitals in terms of frequency of use and cost, while photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a rapidly emerging non-invasive imaging technology that integrates the merits of high optical contrast with high ultrasound resolution. In this study, for the first time, we used gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a dual modal contrast agent for X-ray and PA imaging. Soft gelatin phantoms with embedded tumor simulators of GNPs in various concentrations are clearly shown in both X-ray and PA imaging. With GNPs as a dual modal contrast agent, X-ray can fast detect the position of tumor and provide morphological information, whereas PA imaging has important potential applications in the image guided therapy of superficial tumors such as breast cancer, melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma.

  6. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality

  7. Dual-Modal Nanoprobes for Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplant by MRI and Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Chang Kyu; Hong, Kyung Ah; Lin, Shun Mei

    2009-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of labeling human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with bifunctional nanoparticles and assessing their potential as imaging probes in the monitoring of hMSC transplantation. The T1 and T2 relaxivities of the nanoparticles (MNP SiO 2 [RITC]-PEG) were measured at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance scanner. Using hMSCs and the nanoparticles, labeling efficiency, toxicity, and proliferation were assessed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to specify the intracellular localization of the endocytosed iron nanoparticles. We also observed in vitro and in vivo visualization of the labeled hMSCs with a 3T MR scanner and optical imaging. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG showed both superparamagnetic and fluorescent properties. The r 1 and r 2 relaxivity values of the MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG were 0.33 and 398 mM -1 s -1 at 1.5T, respectively, and 0.29 and 453 mM -1 s -1 at 3T, respectively. The effective internalization of MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG into hMSCs was observed by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. The transmission electron microscopy images showed that MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG was internalized into the cells and mainly resided in the cytoplasm. The viability and proliferation of MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were not significantly different from the control cells. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were observed in vitro and in vivo with optical and MR imaging. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG can be a useful contrast agent for stem cell imaging, which is suitable for a bimodal detection by MRI and optical imaging

  8. Intraoperative Imaging Modalities and Compensation for Brain Shift in Tumor Resection Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative brain shift during neurosurgical procedures is a well-known phenomenon caused by gravity, tissue manipulation, tumor size, loss of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and use of medication. For the use of image-guided systems, this phenomenon greatly affects the accuracy of the guidance. During the last several decades, researchers have investigated how to overcome this problem. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of publications concerning different aspects of intraoperative brain shift especially in a tumor resection surgery such as intraoperative imaging systems, quantification, measurement, modeling, and registration techniques. Clinical experience of using intraoperative imaging modalities, details about registration, and modeling methods in connection with brain shift in tumor resection surgery are the focuses of this review. In total, 126 papers regarding this topic are analyzed in a comprehensive summary and are categorized according to fourteen criteria. The result of the categorization is presented in an interactive web tool. The consequences from the categorization and trends in the future are discussed at the end of this work.

  9. Multi-modal and targeted imaging improves automated mid-brain segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; D'Haese, Pierre F.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Newton, Allen T.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The basal ganglia and limbic system, particularly the thalamus, putamen, internal and external globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and sub-thalamic nucleus, comprise a clinically relevant signal network for Parkinson's disease. In order to manually trace these structures, a combination of high-resolution and specialized sequences at 7T are used, but it is not feasible to scan clinical patients in those scanners. Targeted imaging sequences at 3T such as F-GATIR, and other optimized inversion recovery sequences, have been presented which enhance contrast in a select group of these structures. In this work, we show that a series of atlases generated at 7T can be used to accurately segment these structures at 3T using a combination of standard and optimized imaging sequences, though no one approach provided the best result across all structures. In the thalamus and putamen, a median Dice coefficient over 0.88 and a mean surface distance less than 1.0mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and an optimized inversion recovery imaging sequences. In the internal and external globus pallidus a Dice over 0.75 and a mean surface distance less than 1.2mm was achieved using a combination of T1 and FGATIR imaging sequences. In the substantia nigra and sub-thalamic nucleus a Dice coefficient of over 0.6 and a mean surface distance of less than 1.0mm was achieved using the optimized inversion recovery imaging sequence. On average, using T1 and optimized inversion recovery together produced significantly improved segmentation results than any individual modality (p<0.05 wilcox sign-rank test).

  10. A novel 3D volumetric voxel registration technique for volume-view-guided image registration of multiple imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guang; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Capala, Jacek; Arora, Barbara C.; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide more clinically useful image registration with improved accuracy and reduced time, a novel technique of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric voxel registration of multimodality images is developed. Methods and Materials: This technique can register up to four concurrent images from multimodalities with volume view guidance. Various visualization effects can be applied, facilitating global and internal voxel registration. Fourteen computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) image sets and two computed tomography/positron emission tomography (CT/PET) image sets are used. For comparison, an automatic registration technique using maximization of mutual information (MMI) and a three-orthogonal-planar (3P) registration technique are used. Results: Visually sensitive registration criteria for CT/MR and CT/PET have been established, including the homogeneity of color distribution. Based on the registration results of 14 CT/MR images, the 3D voxel technique is in excellent agreement with the automatic MMI technique and is indicatory of a global positioning error (defined as the means and standard deviations of the error distribution) using the 3P pixel technique: 1.8 deg ± 1.2 deg in rotation and 2.0 ± 1.3 (voxel unit) in translation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such positioning error has been addressed. Conclusion: This novel 3D voxel technique establishes volume-view-guided image registration of up to four modalities. It improves registration accuracy with reduced time, compared with the 3P pixel technique. This article suggests that any interactive and automatic registration should be safeguarded using the 3D voxel technique

  11. vECTlab-A fully integrated multi-modality Monte Carlo simulation framework for the radiological imaging sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Joerg; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2007-01-01

    Alongside and in part motivated by recent advances in molecular diagnostics, the development of dual-modality instruments for patient and dedicated small animal imaging has gained attention by diverse research groups. The desire for such systems is high not only to link molecular or functional information with the anatomical structures, but also for detecting multiple molecular events simultaneously at shorter total acquisition times. While PET and SPECT have been integrated successfully with X-ray CT, the advance of optical imaging approaches (OT) and the integration thereof into existing modalities carry a high application potential, particularly for imaging small animals. A multi-modality Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach at present has been developed that is able to trace high-energy (keV) as well as optical (eV) photons concurrently within identical phantom representation models. We show that the involved two approaches for ray-tracing keV and eV photons can be integrated into a unique simulation framework which enables both photon classes to be propagated through various geometry models representing both phantoms and scanners. The main advantage of such integrated framework for our specific application is the investigation of novel tomographic multi-modality instrumentation intended for in vivo small animal imaging through time-resolved MC simulation upon identical phantom geometries. Design examples are provided for recently proposed SPECT-OT and PET-OT imaging systems

  12. Comparison of 3D computer-aided with manual cerebral aneurysm measurements in different imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.; Buhk, J.H.; Schoenfeld, M.; Goebell, E.; Fiehler, J.; Forkert, N.D.

    2013-01-01

    To compare intra- and inter-observer reliability of aneurysm measurements obtained by a 3D computer-aided technique with standard manual aneurysm measurements in different imaging modalities. A total of 21 patients with 29 cerebral aneurysms were studied. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA), contrast-enhanced (CE-MRA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA). Aneurysm neck and depth diameters were manually measured by two observers in each modality. Additionally, semi-automatic computer-aided diameter measurements were performed using 3D vessel surface models derived from CE- (CE-com) and TOF-MRA (TOF-com) datasets. Bland-Altman analysis (BA) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer agreement. BA revealed the narrowest relative limits of intra- and inter-observer agreement for aneurysm neck and depth diameters obtained by TOF-com (ranging between ±5.3 % and ±28.3 %) and CE-com (ranging between ±23.3 % and ±38.1 %). Direct measurements in DSA, TOF-MRA and CE-MRA showed considerably wider limits of agreement. The highest ICCs were observed for TOF-com and CE-com (ICC values, 0.92 or higher for intra- as well as inter-observer reliability). Computer-aided aneurysm measurement in 3D offers improved intra- and inter-observer reliability and a reproducible parameter extraction, which may be used in clinical routine and as objective surrogate end-points in clinical trials. (orig.)

  13. Enhanced Visualization of Subtle Outer Retinal Pathology by En Face Optical Coherence Tomography and Correlation with Multi-Modal Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta M Sampson

    Full Text Available To present en face optical coherence tomography (OCT images generated by graph-search theory algorithm-based custom software and examine correlation with other imaging modalities.En face OCT images derived from high density OCT volumetric scans of 3 healthy subjects and 4 patients using a custom algorithm (graph-search theory and commercial software (Heidelberg Eye Explorer software (Heidelberg Engineering were compared and correlated with near infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, adaptive optics flood-illumination ophthalmoscopy (AO-FIO and microperimetry.Commercial software was unable to generate accurate en face OCT images in eyes with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE pathology due to segmentation error at the level of Bruch's membrane (BM. Accurate segmentation of the basal RPE and BM was achieved using custom software. The en face OCT images from eyes with isolated interdigitation or ellipsoid zone pathology were of similar quality between custom software and Heidelberg Eye Explorer software in the absence of any other significant outer retinal pathology. En face OCT images demonstrated angioid streaks, lesions of acute macular neuroretinopathy, hydroxychloroquine toxicity and Bietti crystalline deposits that correlated with other imaging modalities.Graph-search theory algorithm helps to overcome the limitations of outer retinal segmentation inaccuracies in commercial software. En face OCT images can provide detailed topography of the reflectivity within a specific layer of the retina which correlates with other forms of fundus imaging. Our results highlight the need for standardization of image reflectivity to facilitate quantification of en face OCT images and longitudinal analysis.

  14. Research progress of functional magnetic resonance imaging in cross-modal activation of visual cortex during tactile perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Jie; Gong Honghan

    2013-01-01

    An increasing amount of neuroimaging studies recently demonstrated activation of visual cortex in both blind and sighted participants when performing a variety of tactile tasks such as Braille reading and tactile object recognition, which indicates that visual cortex not only receives visual information, but may participate in tactile perception. To address these cross-modal changes of visual cortex and the neurophysiological mechanisms, many researchers conducted explosive studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and have made some achievements. This review focuses on cross-modal activation of visual cortex and the underlying mechanisms during tactile perception in both blind and sighted individuals. (authors)

  15. Role of Artificial Intelligence Techniques (Automatic Classifiers) in Molecular Imaging Modalities in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascianelli, Silvia; Scialpi, Michele; Amici, Serena; Forini, Nevio; Minestrini, Matteo; Fravolini, Mario Luca; Sinzinger, Helmut; Schillaci, Orazio; Palumbo, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a very active Computer Science research field aiming to develop systems that mimic human intelligence and is helpful in many human activities, including Medicine. In this review we presented some examples of the exploiting of AI techniques, in particular automatic classifiers such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Classification Tree (ClT) and ensemble methods like Random Forest (RF), able to analyze findings obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) scans of patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases, in particular Alzheimer's Disease. We also focused our attention on techniques applied in order to preprocess data and reduce their dimensionality via feature selection or projection in a more representative domain (Principal Component Analysis - PCA - or Partial Least Squares - PLS - are examples of such methods); this is a crucial step while dealing with medical data, since it is necessary to compress patient information and retain only the most useful in order to discriminate subjects into normal and pathological classes. Main literature papers on the application of these techniques to classify patients with neurodegenerative disease extracting data from molecular imaging modalities are reported, showing that the increasing development of computer aided diagnosis systems is very promising to contribute to the diagnostic process.

  16. Machine learning techniques for breast cancer computer aided diagnosis using different image modalities: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Nisreen I R; Omran, Shaimaa; El Houby, Enas M F; Allam, Hemat

    2018-03-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in the recent years. Physician experience of diagnosing and detecting breast cancer can be assisted by using some computerized features extraction and classification algorithms. This paper presents the conduction and results of a systematic review (SR) that aims to investigate the state of the art regarding the computer aided diagnosis/detection (CAD) systems for breast cancer. The SR was conducted using a comprehensive selection of scientific databases as reference sources, allowing access to diverse publications in the field. The scientific databases used are Springer Link (SL), Science Direct (SD), IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and applied to each retrieved work to select those of interest. From 320 studies retrieved, 154 studies were included. However, the scope of this research is limited to scientific and academic works and excludes commercial interests. This survey provides a general analysis of the current status of CAD systems according to the used image modalities and the machine learning based classifiers. Potential research studies have been discussed to create a more objective and efficient CAD systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Feature-Fusion Guidelines for Image-Based Multi-Modal Biometric Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane Brown

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The feature level, unlike the match score level, lacks multi-modal fusion guidelines. This work demonstrates a new approach for improved image-based biometric feature-fusion. The approach extracts and combines the face, fingerprint and palmprint at the feature level for improved human identification accuracy. Feature-fusion guidelines, proposed in our recent work, are extended by adding a new face segmentation method and the support vector machine classifier. The new face segmentation method improves the face identification equal error rate (EER by 10%. The support vector machine classifier combined with the new feature selection approach, proposed in our recent work, outperforms other classifiers when using a single training sample. Feature-fusion guidelines take the form of strengths and weaknesses as observed in the applied feature processing modules during preliminary experiments. The guidelines are used to implement an effective biometric fusion system at the feature level, using a novel feature-fusion methodology, reducing the EER of two groups of three datasets namely: SDUMLA face, SDUMLA fingerprint and IITD palmprint; MUCT Face, MCYT Fingerprint and CASIA Palmprint.

  18. Diagnostic ability of differential diagnosis in ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst by imaging modalities and observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Tae In; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Moon, Je Woon; Choi, Soon Chul

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability in differentiating between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst according to the imaging modalities and observes. We evaluated thirty-six cases of ameloblastomas and forty-seven cases of odontogenic keratocysts all histologically confirmed. Six oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnosed the lesions by 3 methods: using panoramic radiograph, using computed tomograph (CT), and using panoramic radiograph and CT. The observers were classified by 3 groups: group 1 had experienced over 10 years in oral and mazilofacial radiologic field, group 2 had experienced for 3-4 years, and group 3 was in the process of residentship. After over 2 weeks, the observers diagnosed them by the same methods. The ROC curve areas except for group 3 were the highest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph and CT, followed by interpretation using CT only, and the lowest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph only. The overall difference was not found in diagnostic ability among groups in using panoramic radiograph only, but there was difference in diagnostic ability of group 1 and 2 vs 3 in using CT only, and combination panoramic radiograph and CT. To differentiate between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst more accurately, the experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologist should diagnose with combination of panoramic radiograph and CT

  19. Diagnostic ability of differential diagnosis in ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst by imaging modalities and observers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Tae In; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Moon, Je Woon; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability in differentiating between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst according to the imaging modalities and observes. We evaluated thirty-six cases of ameloblastomas and forty-seven cases of odontogenic keratocysts all histologically confirmed. Six oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnosed the lesions by 3 methods: using panoramic radiograph, using computed tomograph (CT), and using panoramic radiograph and CT. The observers were classified by 3 groups: group 1 had experienced over 10 years in oral and mazilofacial radiologic field, group 2 had experienced for 3-4 years, and group 3 was in the process of residentship. After over 2 weeks, the observers diagnosed them by the same methods. The ROC curve areas except for group 3 were the highest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph and CT, followed by interpretation using CT only, and the lowest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph only. The overall difference was not found in diagnostic ability among groups in using panoramic radiograph only, but there was difference in diagnostic ability of group 1 and 2 vs 3 in using CT only, and combination panoramic radiograph and CT. To differentiate between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst more accurately, the experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologist should diagnose with combination of panoramic radiograph and CT.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Gomaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to computed tomography (CT and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases, followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases. While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity.

  1. Application of multi-modality image coregistration in paediatric prosthetic endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, T.; Chung, D.K.; Howman-Giles, R.; Lau, Y.H.; University of Technology, Sydney, NSW

    2003-01-01

    This is a case where coregistration of Gallium and chest CT scans provided important clinical information which had a significant impact on management decisions. A 13-year-old girl from Noumea was transferred to our hospital for further management of S.haemolyticus bacteraemia. She had a history of complex congenital heart disease, requiring several cardiac surgical procedures. Seven months earlier she had a patch repair of the ventricular septum and formation of a right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit. On admission she was generally unwell and had hemoptysis. She had fever to 39.9 deg C, oximetry of 83 per cent on room air, finger clubbing and a cardiac murmur. Chest X-ray and CT scans showed widespread pulmonary consolidation with bilateral pleural effusions. An echocardiogram showed no evidence of endocarditis. The crucial diagnostic dilemma was whether she had pneumonia or prosthetic endocarditis: the latter was more ominous and entailed high risk surgery. A Gallium whole body scan with chest SPECT showed focal localisation in the right mid chest. However, its location could not be confidently defined. A specifically developed computer program was used to co-register the Gallium SPECT and chest CT scans. The co-registered images conclusively localised the Gallium scan lesion to the prosthetic pulmonary outflow conduit, consistent with endocarditis. This triggered referral for cardiac MRI, which confirmed the diagnosis. In summary co-registration allowed precise structural localisation of focal Gallium uptake in the prosthetic pulmonary outflow conduit, with profound impact on the patient's diagnosis and subsequent management. This is an example of the potential benefits of co-registering structural and functional imaging modalities. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  2. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using brain perfusion SPECT and MR imaging: which modality achieves better diagnostic accuracy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Takao; Ushijima, Yo; Yamada, Kei; Okuyama, Chio; Kizu, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of MR imaging and brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The transaxial section display of brain perfusion SPECT, three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) SPECT image sets, thin-section MR imaging of the hippocampus and perfusion MR imaging were evaluated in 66 subjects comprising 35 AD patients and 31 subjects without AD. SPECT and MR imaging were visually interpreted by two experts and two novices, and the diagnostic ability of each modality was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the experts' interpretations, there was no significant difference in the area under the ROC curve (A z ) between 3D-SSP and thin-section MR imaging, whereas the A z of transaxial SPECT display was significantly lower than that of 3D-SSP (3D-SSP: 0.97, thin-section MR imaging: 0.96, transaxial SPECT: 0.91), and the A z of perfusion MR imaging was lowest (0.63). The sensitivity and specificity of each modality were, respectively, 80.0% and 96.8% for 3D-SSP, 77.1% and 96.8% for thin-section MR imaging, 60.0% and 93.5% for transaxial SPECT display and 34.3% and 100% for perfusion MR imaging. In the novices' interpretations, the A z , sensitivity and specificity of 3D-SSP were superior to those of thin-section MR imaging. Thin-section hippocampal MR imaging and 3D-SSP image sets had potentially equivalent value for the diagnosis of AD, and they were superior to transaxial SPECT display and perfusion MR imaging. For avoidance of the effect of interpreters' experience on image evaluation, 3D-SSP appears to be optimal. (orig.)

  3. Methylene blue microbubbles as a model dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound and activatable photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mansik; Song, Wentao; Huynh, Elizabeth; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Jeesu; Helfield, Brandon L.; Leung, Ben Y. C.; Goertz, David E.; Zheng, Gang; Oh, Jungtaek; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging are highly complementary modalities since both use ultrasonic detection for operation. Increasingly, photoacoustic and ultrasound have been integrated in terms of hardware instrumentation. To generate a broadly accessible dual-modality contrast agent, we generated microbubbles (a standard ultrasound contrast agent) in a solution of methylene blue (a standard photoacoustic dye). This MB2 solution was formed effectively and was optimized as a dual-modality contrast solution. As microbubble concentration increased (with methylene blue concentration constant), photoacoustic signal was attenuated in the MB2 solution. When methylene blue concentration increased (with microbubble concentration held constant), no ultrasonic interference was observed. Using an MB2 solution that strongly attenuated all photoacoustic signal, high powered ultrasound could be used to burst the microbubbles and dramatically enhance photoacoustic contrast (>800-fold increase), providing a new method for spatiotemporal control of photoacoustic signal generation.

  4. WE-H-206-02: Recent Advances in Multi-Modality Molecular Imaging of Small Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, B. [Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  5. WE-H-206-02: Recent Advances in Multi-Modality Molecular Imaging of Small Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, B.

    2016-01-01

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  6. What are the advantages and disadvantages of imaging modalities to diagnose wear-related corrosion problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Barrack, Robert L; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-12-01

    Adverse tissue reactions are known to occur after total hip arthroplasty using both conventional and metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings and after MoM hip resurfacing arthroplasty (SRA). A variety of imaging tools, including ultrasound (US), CT, and MRI, have been used to diagnose problems associated with wear after MoM hip arthroplasty and corrosion at the head-trunnion junction; however, the relative advantages and disadvantages of each remain a source of controversy. The purposes of this review were to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of (1) US; (2) CT; and (3) MRI as diagnostic tools in the assessment of wear-related corrosion problems after hip arthroplasty. A systematic literature review was performed through Medline, EMBASE, Scopus CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library without time restriction using search terms related to THA, SRA, US, CT, MRI, adverse tissue reactions, and corrosion. Inclusion criteria were Level I through IV studies in the English language, whereas expert opinions and case reports were excluded. The quality of included studies was judged by their level of evidence, method of intervention allocation, outcome assessments, and followup of patients. Four hundred ninety unique results were returned and 40 articles were reviewed. The prevalence of adverse local tissue reactions in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients varies based on the method of evaluation (US, CT, MRI) and imaging protocols. US is accessible and relatively inexpensive, yet has not been used to report synovial thicknesses in the setting of wear-related corrosion. CT scans are highly sensitive and provide information regarding component positioning but are limited in providing enhanced soft tissue contrast and require ionizing radiation. MRI has shown promise in predicting both the presence and severity of adverse local tissue reactions but is more expensive. All three imaging modalities have a role in the assessment of adverse local tissue reactions and tribocorrosion

  7. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Lu Mei; Stricker, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means (μ), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [μ CBCT = (−1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, Σ CBCT = (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, σ CBCT = (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [μ kV = (−2.9, −0.4, 0.5) mm, Σ kV = (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, σ kV = (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [μ US = (−3.6, −1.4, 0.0) mm, Σ US = (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, σ US = (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior–posterior (A/P), superior–inferior (S/I), and the left–right (L

  8. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means ({mu}), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic ({Sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [{mu}{sub CBCT}= (-1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, {Sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, {sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [{mu}{sub kV}= (-2.9, -0.4, 0.5) mm, {Sigma}{sub kV}= (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, {sigma}{sub kV}= (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [{mu}{sub US}= (-3.6, -1.4, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub US}= (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, {sigma}{sub US}= (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior

  9. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Ghent University, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, QCC-Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Bleyen, Luc; Herck, Koen van [Ghent University, Centrum voor Preventie en Vroegtijdige Opsporing van Kanker, Ghent (Belgium); Lemmens, Kim; Ongeval, Chantal van; Steen, Andre van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Martens, Patrick [Centrum voor Kankeropsporing, Bruges (Belgium); Brabander, Isabel de [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); Goossens, Mathieu [UZ Brussel, Dienst Kankerpreventie, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  10. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert; Bleyen, Luc; Herck, Koen van; Lemmens, Kim; Ongeval, Chantal van; Steen, Andre van; Martens, Patrick; Brabander, Isabel de; Goossens, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  11. MO-DE-210-03: Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities. It is inexpensive, portable and provides good soft tissue contrast. For challenging soft tissue targets such as pancreatic cancer, ultrasound imaging can be used in combination with pre-treatment MRI and/or CT to transfer important anatomical features for target localization at time of treatment. The non-invasive and non-ionizing nature of ultrasound imaging is particularly powerful for intra-fraction localization and monitoring. Recognizing these advantages, efforts are being made to incorporate novel robotic approaches to position and manipulate the ultrasound probe during irradiation. These recent enabling developments hold potential to bring ultrasound imaging to a new level of IGRT applications. However, many challenges, not limited to image registration, robotic deployment, probe interference and image acquisition rate, need to be addressed to realize the full potential of IGRT with ultrasound imaging. Learning Objectives: Understand the benefits and limitations in using ultrasound to augment MRI and/or CT for motion monitoring during radiation therapy delivery. Understanding passive and active robotic approaches to implement ultrasound imaging for intra-fraction monitoring. Understand issues of probe interference with radiotherapy treatment. Understand the critical clinical workflow for effective and reproducible IGRT using ultrasound guidance. The work of X.L. is supported in part by Elekta; J.W. and K.D. is supported in part by a NIH grant R01 CA161613 and by Elekta; D.H. is support in part by a NIH grant R41 CA174089

  12. MO-DE-210-03: Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K. [Johns Hopkins University: Development of Intra-Fraction Soft Tissue Monitoring with Ultrasound Imaging (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound imaging is an attractive method for image guided radiation treatment (IGRT), by itself or to complement other imaging modalities. It is inexpensive, portable and provides good soft tissue contrast. For challenging soft tissue targets such as pancreatic cancer, ultrasound imaging can be used in combination with pre-treatment MRI and/or CT to transfer important anatomical features for target localization at time of treatment. The non-invasive and non-ionizing nature of ultrasound imaging is particularly powerful for intra-fraction localization and monitoring. Recognizing these advantages, efforts are being made to incorporate novel robotic approaches to position and manipulate the ultrasound probe during irradiation. These recent enabling developments hold potential to bring ultrasound imaging to a new level of IGRT applications. However, many challenges, not limited to image registration, robotic deployment, probe interference and image acquisition rate, need to be addressed to realize the full potential of IGRT with ultrasound imaging. Learning Objectives: Understand the benefits and limitations in using ultrasound to augment MRI and/or CT for motion monitoring during radiation therapy delivery. Understanding passive and active robotic approaches to implement ultrasound imaging for intra-fraction monitoring. Understand issues of probe interference with radiotherapy treatment. Understand the critical clinical workflow for effective and reproducible IGRT using ultrasound guidance. The work of X.L. is supported in part by Elekta; J.W. and K.D. is supported in part by a NIH grant R01 CA161613 and by Elekta; D.H. is support in part by a NIH grant R41 CA174089.

  13. Newer nonconventional modes of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet Mohinder Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional modes of ventilation suffer many limitations. Although they are popularly used and are well-understood, often they fail to match the patient-based requirements. Over the years, many small modifications in ventilators have been incorporated to improve patient outcome. The ventilators of newer generation respond to patient′s demands by additional feedback systems. In this review, we discuss the popular newer modes of ventilation that have been accepted in to clinical practice. Various intensive care units over the world have found these modes to improve patient ventilator synchrony, decrease ventilator days and improve patient safety. The various modes discusses in this review are: Dual control modes (volume assured pressure support, volume support, Adaptive support ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, mandatory minute ventilation, Bi-level airway pressure release ventilation, (BiPAP, neurally adjusted ventilatory assist and NeoGanesh. Their working principles with their advantages and clinical limitations are discussed in brief.

  14. Development of comprehensive image processing technique for differential diagnosis of liver disease by using multi-modality images. Pixel-based cross-correlation method using a profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akira; Okura, Yasuhiko; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Sanada, Taizo

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as high magnetic field imaging and multidetector-row CT have been markedly improved recently. The final image-reading systems easily produce more than a thousand diagnostic images per patient. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive cross-correlation processing technique using multi-modality images, in order to decrease the considerable time and effort involved in the interpretation of a radiogram (multi-formatted display and/or stack display method, etc). In this scheme, the criteria of an attending radiologist for the differential diagnosis of liver cyst, hemangioma of liver, hepatocellular carcinoma, and metastatic liver cancer on magnetic resonance images with various sequences and CT images with and without contrast enhancement employ a cross-correlation coefficient. Using a one-dimensional cross-correlation method, comprehensive image processing could be also adapted for various artifacts (some depending on modality imaging, and some on patients), which may be encountered at the clinical scene. This comprehensive image-processing technique could assist radiologists in the differential diagnosis of liver diseases. (author)

  15. Newer Trends in Laser Tattoo Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Swapnil D; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J

    2015-01-01

    Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal. PMID:25949019

  16. Newer trends in laser tattoo removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil D Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal.

  17. Superiority of 18F-FNa PET/CT for Detecting Bone Metastases in Comparison with Other Diagnostic Imaging Modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Lapa; Tiago Saraiva; Rodolfo Silva; Margarida Marques; Gracinda Costa; João Pedroso Lima

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The 18F-NaF positron emission tomography/computed tomography is being considered as an excellent imaging modality for bone metastases detection. This ability was compared with other imaging techniques. Material and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 114 patients who underwent 18F-NaF positron emission tomography/ computed tomography. Of these, 49 patients also had bone scintigraphy, 61 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography and 10 18F-FCH positron emis...

  18. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Lore; Bleyen, Luc; Bacher, Klaus; Van Herck, Koen; Lemmens, Kim; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Van Steen, Andre; Martens, Patrick; De Brabander, Isabel; Goossens, Mathieu; Thierens, Hubert

    2017-09-01

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. • Interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. • Cancer detection rate in high-density breasts is superior in DR. • IC rate exceeds CDR for SF and CR in high-density breasts. • DR performs better in high-density breasts for third readings and false-positives.

  19. Epi-detected quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopy for label-free imaging of the tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Stephen Hsu, Chin-Ying [Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore 119083 (Singapore)

    2015-01-19

    We present an epi-detected quadruple-modal nonlinear optical microscopic imaging technique (i.e., coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third-harmonic generation (THG), and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF)) based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of the tooth. We demonstrate that high contrast ps-CARS images covering both the fingerprint (500–1800 cm{sup −1}) and high-wavenumber (2500–3800 cm{sup −1}) regions can be acquired to uncover the distributions of mineral and organic biomaterials in the tooth, while high quality TPEF, SHG, and THG images of the tooth can also be acquired under ps laser excitation without damaging the samples. The quadruple-modal nonlinear microscopic images (CARS/SHG/THG/TPEF) acquired provide better understanding of morphological structures and biochemical/biomolecular distributions in the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction of the tooth without labeling, facilitating optical diagnosis and characterization of the tooth in dentistry.

  20. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-01-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Imaging Modalities and Injection Techniques for the Diagnosis of Femoroacetabular Impingement/Labral Tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P.; Thorborg, Kristian; Goode, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing femoroacetabular impingement/acetabular labral tear (FAI/ALT) and subsequently making a decision regarding surgery are based primarily on diagnostic imaging and intra-articular hip joint injection techniques of unknown accuracy. Purpose: Summarize and evaluate the diagnostic...... probability of disease was demonstrated. Positive imaging findings increased the probability that a labral tear existed by a minimal to small degree with the use of magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiogram (MRI/MRA) and ultrasound (US) and by a moderate degree for CTA. Negative imaging findings...... decreased the probability that a labral tear existed by a minimal degree with the use of MRI and US, a small to moderate degree with MRA, and a moderate degree with CTA. Clinical Relevance: Although findings of the included studies suggested potentially favorable use of these modalities for the diagnosis...

  2. Assessment of rigid multi-modality image registration consistency using the multiple sub-volume registration (MSR) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, C; Heide, U A van der; Bol, G H; Lagendijk, J J W; Kotte, A N T J

    2005-01-01

    Registration of different imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, functional MRI (fMRI), positron (PET) and single photon (SPECT) emission tomography is used in many clinical applications. Determining the quality of any automatic registration procedure has been a challenging part because no gold standard is available to evaluate the registration. In this note we present a method, called the 'multiple sub-volume registration' (MSR) method, for assessing the consistency of a rigid registration. This is done by registering sub-images of one data set on the other data set, performing a crude non-rigid registration. By analysing the deviations (local deformations) of the sub-volume registrations from the full registration we get a measure of the consistency of the rigid registration. Registration of 15 data sets which include CT, MR and PET images for brain, head and neck, cervix, prostate and lung was performed utilizing a rigid body registration with normalized mutual information as the similarity measure. The resulting registrations were classified as good or bad by visual inspection. The resulting registrations were also classified using our MSR method. The results of our MSR method agree with the classification obtained from visual inspection for all cases (p < 0.02 based on ANOVA of the good and bad groups). The proposed method is independent of the registration algorithm and similarity measure. It can be used for multi-modality image data sets and different anatomic sites of the patient. (note)

  3. PSMA-Targeted Nano-Conjugates as Dual-Modality (MRI/PET) Imaging Probes for the Non-Invasive Detection of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Xiankai

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop dual modality imaging probes for the detection of prostate cancer by doping radioisotopes to iron oxide nanoparticles, so that the sensitivity and specificity...

  4. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  5. Newer methods of extraction of teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MHendra Chandha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atraumatic extraction methods are deemed to be important to minimize alveolar bone loss after tooth extraction. With the advent of such techniques, exodontia is no more a dreaded procedure in anxious patients. Newer system and techniques for extraction of teeth have evolved in the recent few decades. This article reviews and discusses new techniques to make simple and complex exodontias more efficient with improved patient outcomes. This includes physics forceps, powered periotome, piezosurgery, benex extractor, sonic instrument for bone surgery, lasers.

  6. Fabrication and imaging study of ultrasound/fluorescence bi-modal contrast agent based on polymeric microbubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhanwen; Ke Hengte; Wang Jinrui; Zhao Bo; Qu Enze; Yue Xiuli; Dai Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To fabricate an ultrasound/fluorescence bi-modal contrast agent by encapsulating fluorescent quantum dots into polymeric ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. Methods: Polylactic acid (PLA, 500 mg), (1R)-(+)-camphor (50 mg) and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (0.5 ml, 2.3 μmol/L)were dissolved or dispersed in dichloromethane (10 ml) to form in an organic phase. Ammonium carbonate solution and poly (vinyl alcohol) solution were employed as the internal and external water phase, respectively. The fluorescent microbubbles were generated using double emulsion solvent evaporation and lyophilization methods. The morphology and illumination were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Synchronized contrast-enhanced ultrasound and fluorescence imaging was acquired by injecting fluorescent microbubbles into the silicone tube coupled to a self-made ultrasound/fluorescence imaging device. Ultrasound/fluorescence bi-modal in vivo imaging was acquired on the kidney of New Zealand rabbits and suckling mice. Results: The fluorescent microbubbles were hollow spheres with an averaged diameter of (1.62 ± 1.47) μm. More than 99% of these microbubbles were less than 8 μm in diameter, which met the size criteria for ultrasound contrast agents. The fluorescence emission peak of the microbubbles appeared at 632 nm, indicating that good luminescence properties of quantum dots were maintained. In vitro ultrasound/fluorescence imaging showed no echoic signal when the silicone tube was filled with saline, but there was a strong echo when filled with fluorescent microbubbles. The liquid column with fluorescent microbubbles emitted red luminescence under ultraviolet irradiation. The kidney of the rabbit was remarkably enhanced after the administration of fluorescent microbubbles. Bright fluorescence could be observed at the injection site of the suckling mice via subcutaneous injection. Conclusions: A bi-modal but single contrast agent

  7. Newer agents for the management of overactive bladder | Epstein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Newer agents for the management of overactive bladder. ... that these newer agents decrease the frequency of incontinence episodes, the number ... for selection of an appropriate agent based on individual factors such as cost and tolerability.

  8. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Armato, Samuel; Doi, Kunio

    1999-10-26

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  9. Graduating 4th year radiology residents' perception of optimal imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma: a pilot study from four U.S. universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine; Semelka, Richard C.; Altun, Ersan; Thomas, Sarah L., E-mail: richsem@med.unc.ed [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Balci, N. Cem [Saint Louis University, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Hussain, Shahid M. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Martin, Diego R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Our purpose was to assess 4th year radiology residents' perception of the optimal imaging modality to investigate neoplasm and trauma. Materials and methods: twenty-seven 4th year radiology residents from four residency programs were surveyed. They were asked about the best imaging modality to evaluate the brain and spine, lungs, abdomen, and the musculoskeletal system. Imaging modalities available were MRI, CT, ultrasound, PET, and Xray. All findings were compared to the ACR appropriateness criteria. Results: MRI was chosen as the best imaging modality to evaluate brain, spine, abdominal, and musculoskeletal neoplasm in 96.3%, 100%, 70.4%, and 63% of residents, respectively. CT was chosen by 88.9% to evaluate neoplasm of the lung. Optimal imaging modality to evaluate trauma was CT for brain injuries (100%), spine (92.6%), lung (96.3%), abdomen (92.6%), and major musculoskeletal trauma (74.1%); MRI was chosen for sports injury (96.3%). There was agreement with ACR appropriateness criteria. Conclusion: residents' perception of the best imaging modalities for neoplasm and trauma concurred with the appropriateness criteria by the ACR. (author)

  10. Residual Shuffling Convolutional Neural Networks for Deep Semantic Image Segmentation Using Multi-Modal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Weinmann, M.; Gao, X.; Yan, M.; Hinz, S.; Jutzi, B.; Weinmann, M.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we address the deep semantic segmentation of aerial imagery based on multi-modal data. Given multi-modal data composed of true orthophotos and the corresponding Digital Surface Models (DSMs), we extract a variety of hand-crafted radiometric and geometric features which are provided separately and in different combinations as input to a modern deep learning framework. The latter is represented by a Residual Shuffling Convolutional Neural Network (RSCNN) combining the characteristics of a Residual Network with the advantages of atrous convolution and a shuffling operator to achieve a dense semantic labeling. Via performance evaluation on a benchmark dataset, we analyze the value of different feature sets for the semantic segmentation task. The derived results reveal that the use of radiometric features yields better classification results than the use of geometric features for the considered dataset. Furthermore, the consideration of data on both modalities leads to an improvement of the classification results. However, the derived results also indicate that the use of all defined features is less favorable than the use of selected features. Consequently, data representations derived via feature extraction and feature selection techniques still provide a gain if used as the basis for deep semantic segmentation.

  11. Feasibility of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) follow-up as the primary imaging modality after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Metzemaekers, Jan D. M.; Dijk, J. Marc C. van; Mooij, Jan Jakob A.; Groen, Rob J. M.; Westerlaan, Henriette E.; Eshghi, Omid S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still regarded as the gold standard for detecting residual flow in treated aneurysms. Recent reports have also shown excellent results from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) imaging. This is an important observation, since DSA is associated with a risk of medical complications, is time consuming, and is more expensive. Purpose: To determine whether MRA could replace conventional DSA and serve as the primary postinterventional imaging modality in patients with coiled intracranial aneurysms. Material and Methods: We studied a prospectively enrolled cohort of 190 patients treated endovascularly for a first-ruptured and/or unruptured intracranial aneurysm between January 2004 and December 2008. The imaging protocol included a 1.5T time-of-flight (TOF) MRA and a DSA at 3 months (on the same day) and, depending on comparability, a 1.5T TOF-MRA or DSA 1 year after treatment. All images were evaluated by a multidisciplinary panel. Results: In 141/190 patients, both an MRA and DSA were performed after 3-month follow-up. In 2/141 patients (1.4%), (small) neck remnants gave false-negative MRA results. In one patient (0.7%), this led to additional neurosurgical clipping of the aneurysm. In 25/141 patients, future follow-up (>3 months) consisted of DSA because of various reasons. In 24/25 of these patients, primary MRA images alone would invariably have led to additional DSA imaging. Conclusion: The present study shows that 1.5T TOF-MRA is a feasible primary follow-up modality after coiling of intracranial aneurysms. Given our data, we now suggest that, in every patient with a coiled intracranial aneurysm, the first follow-up, 3 months after coiling, should be an MRA study. Only when this MRA is inconclusive (e.g., because of coil artifacts), or in the case of suspicion of recanalization, should DSA be performed additionally

  12. Generation of Composite Dose and Biological Effective Dose (BED) Over Multiple Treatment Modalities and Multistage Planning Using Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, T-C; Feygelman, Vladimir; Stevens, Craig; Forster, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Currently there are no commercially available tools to generate composite plans across different treatment modalities and/or different planning image sets. Without a composite plan, it may be difficult to perform a meaningful dosimetric evaluation of the overall treatment course. In this paper, we introduce a method to generate composite biological effective dose (BED) plans over multiple radiotherapy treatment modalities and/or multistage plans, using deformable image registration. Two cases were used to demonstrate the method. Case I was prostate cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a permanent seed implant. Case II involved lung cancer treated with two treatment plans generated on two separate computed tomography image sets. Thin-plate spline or optical flow methods were used as appropriate to generate deformation matrices. The deformation matrices were then applied to the dose matrices and the resulting physical doses were converted to BED and added to yield the composite plan. Cell proliferation and sublethal repair were considered in the BED calculations. The difference in BED between normal tissues and tumor volumes was accounted for by using different BED models, α/β values, and cell potential doubling times. The method to generate composite BED plans presented in this paper provides information not available with the traditional simple dose summation or physical dose summation. With the understanding of limitations and uncertainties of the algorithms involved, it may be valuable for the overall treatment plan evaluation.

  13. Cross-modal priming facilitates production of low imageability word strings in a case of deep-phonological dysphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mary Mccarthy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Characteristics of repetition in deep-phonological dysphasia include an inability to repeat nonwords, semantic errors in single word repetition (deep dysphasia and in multiple word repetition (phonological dysphasia and better repetition of highly imageable words (Wilshire & Fisher, 2004; Ablinger et al., 2008. Additionally, visual processing of words is often more accurate than auditory processing of words (Howard & Franklin, 1988. We report a case study of LT who incurred a LCVA on 10/3/2009. She initially presented with deep dysphasia and near normal word reading. When enrolled in this study, approximately 24 months post-onset, she presented with phonological dysphasia. We investigated the hypothesis that (1 reproduction of a word string would be more accurate when preceded by a visual presentation of the word string compared to two auditory presentations of the word string, and (2 that this facilitative boost would be observed only for strings of low image words, consistent with the imageability effect in repetition. Method. Three-word strings were created in four conditions which varied the frequency (F and imageability (I of words within a string: HiF-HiI, LoF-HiI, HiF-LoI, LoF-LoI. All strings were balanced for total syllable length and were unrelated semantically and phonologically. The dependent variable was as accuracy of repetition of each word within a string. We created six modality prime conditions each with 24 strings drawn equally from the four frequency-imageability types, randomized within modality condition: Auditory Once (AudOnce – string presented auditorily one time; Auditory Twice (AudAud – string presented auditorily two consecutive times; Visual Once (VisOnce – string presented visually one time; Visual Twice (VisVis – string presented visually two consecutive times; Auditory then Visual (AudVis – string presented once auditorily, then a second time visually; Visual then Auditory (VisAud

  14. Newer agents in antiplatelet therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Yeung, Michael HolinstatCardeza Foundation for Hematologic Research, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Antiplatelet therapy remains the mainstay in preventing aberrant platelet activation in pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction, ischemia, and stroke. Although there has been significant advancement in antiplatelet therapeutic approaches, aspirin still remains the gold standard treatment in the clinical setting. Limitations in safety, efficacy, and tolerability have precluded many of the antiplatelet inhibitors from use in patients. Unforeseen incidences of increased bleeding risk and recurrent arterial thrombosis observed in patients have hampered the development of superior next generation antiplatelet therapies. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles have also limited the effectiveness of a number of antiplatelet inhibitors currently in use due to variability in metabolism, time to onset, and reversibility. A focused effort in the development of newer antiplatelet therapies to address some of these shortcomings has resulted in a significant number of potential antiplatelet drugs which target enzymes (phosphodiesterase, cyclooxygenase, receptors (purinergic, prostaglandins, protease-activated receptors, thromboxane, and glycoproteins (αIIbß3, GPVI, vWF, GPIb in the platelet. The validation and search for newer antiplatelet therapeutic approaches proven to be superior to aspirin is still ongoing and should yield a better pharmacodynamic profile with fewer untoward side-effects to what is currently in use today.Keywords: platelet aggregation inhibitors, blood platelets, purinergic P2Y receptor antagonists, receptor, PAR-1, platelet glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa, thrombosis

  15. Diagnostic value of FDG PET-CT for detecting primary breast malignancy: comparison with other image modalities and histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Na Young; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Chung Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Yong An; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo; Jung, Sang Seol

    2004-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in detecting the primary breast malignancy with other imaging modalities and to determine whether detectability of PET-CT depends on any factors such as size, differentiation, or nuclear grade of tumor. We evaluated pathologically proven 66 lesions in 61 patients (26-74 years, mean 46.9) who underwent preoperative PET-CT. Other imaging modalities were also evaluated: mammography in 58, US in 49 and MRI in 16. PET-CT images were visually evaluated and peak and mean SUV of mass were measured. For mammography and US, category 4 and 5 lesions as positive, and category 0-3 lesions as negative. For MRI, we used morphology and dynamic kinetic curve data based scoring system; sum of the scores higher than 10 as positive. Sensitivities of each modality were obtained. We analyzed PET-CT positive and negative groups in relation to size, SUV, differentiation and nuclear grade of tumors using paired t-test and Fisher's exact test. 65 among 66 were malignant lesions: invasive ductal carcinoma (n=56), ductal carcinoma in situ (n=3), tubular carcinoma (n=1), medullary carcinoma(n=3), mucinous carcinoma(n=1) and malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n=1). One lesion was benign lesion. Sensitivities of PET-CT, mammography, US, and MRI for detecting malignant mass were 86.2%, 80.7%, 100% and 94.1% respectively. SUV(P) and SUV(M) in PET-CT positive group (5.28±3.24 and 3.56±2.24) was significantly higher than that of PET CT negative group (1.96±0.35 and 1.46±0.44) [p<0.0001 for both]. The size of the primary mass in PET-CT positive group (2.66±1.47) was significantly larger than that in PET-CT negative group (1.52±0.57) (p=0.0002). The nuclear grade and tumor differentiation were not significantly different between two groups. The sensitivity of the FDG PET-CT in detecting primary breast cancer is lower than those of other imaging modalities. The detectability of the FDG PET-CT might be degraded when the tumor is small in size

  16. Phantom evaluation of a commercially available three modality image guided radiation therapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploquin, Nicolas; Rangel, Alejandra; Dunscombe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe a detailed evaluation of the capabilities of imaging and image registration systems available with Varian linear accelerators for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Specifically, they present modulation transfer function curves for megavoltage planar, kilovoltage (kV) planar, and cone beam computed tomography imaging systems and compare these with conventional computed tomography. While kV planar imaging displayed the highest spatial resolution, all IGRT imaging techniques were assessed as adequate for their intended purpose. They have also characterized the image registration software available for use in conjunction with these imaging systems through a comprehensive phantom study involving translations in three orthogonal directions. All combinations of imaging systems and image registration software were found to be accurate, although the planar kV imaging system with automatic registration was generally superior, with both accuracy and precision of the order of 1 mm, under the conditions tested. Based on their phantom study, the attainable accuracy for rigid body translations using any of the features available with Varian equipment will more likely be limited by the resolution of the couch readouts than by inherent limitations in the imaging systems and image registration software. Overall, the accuracy and precision of currently available IGRT technology exceed published experience with the accuracy and precision of contouring for planning.

  17. Multi-Modal Imaging in a Mouse Model of Orthotopic Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Priya; Kato, Tatsuya; Ujiie, Hideki; Wada, Hironobu; Lee, Daiyoon; Hu, Hsin-pei; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Ahn, Jin Young; Zheng, Jinzi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation of CF800, a novel PEGylated nano-liposomal imaging agent containing indocyanine green (ICG) and iohexol, for real-time near infrared (NIR) fluorescence and computed tomography (CT) image-guided surgery in an orthotopic lung cancer model in nude mice. Methods CF800 was intravenously administered into 13 mice bearing the H460 orthotopic human lung cancer. At 48 h post-injection (peak imaging agent accumulation time point), ex vivo NIR and CT imaging was performed. A cli...

  18. Status for NEXIM New X-ray Imaging Modalities for safe and high quality food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    . The main focuses are determined to be threefold: 1)Improving the detectability of low density foreign bodies incidentally present in food products. 2)Development of new modalities for assessment of quality traits in food production, for instance connective tissue and fatty acid composition. 3)Develop...... to developing laboratory-based setups further towards an in-line scanning system. Additionally, close co-operation with industrial partners has further emphasized the need for new techniques for quality control, product development and foreign object detection....

  19. Cervical porcupine quill foreign body involving the spinal cord of a dog: A description of various imaging modality findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle le Roux

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although porcupine quill injuries are common in dogs, the detailed appearance of the quill on diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging has not been sufficiently described. A 4-year-old, intact, female Jack Russel terrier presented with severe neck pain and ataxia after an altercation with a porcupine 2 weeks earlier. Radiology, diagnostic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were all utilised to identify a quill imbedded in the cervical vertebral canal and cervical musculature and were compared to each other. Surgical removal of the quill, guided by imaging findings, led to the resolution of the clinical signs in the patient. Previous ultrasound imaging reports have just stated that the quill consists of paralell hyperechoic lines, and do not mention the finer hyperechoic lines inbetween and do not try to provide a reason for the appearance. Previous computed tomography (CT reports just mention identifying the quill on CT images (whether or not CT could identify the fragments, but do not go into detail about the attenuating appearance of the quill nor try to relate this to the composition of the quill. This is to the authors’ knowledge the first report with detailed imaging descriptions of a case of cranial cervical vertebral canal porcupine quill foreign body in a dog. This is also the first report to allude to a possible difference in imaging findings related to quill structure because of keratin orientation and melanin content. The ideal imaging modality to use remains elusive, but ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could all identify the quill.

  20. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-05-03

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  1. Conical diffraction as a versatile building block to implement new imaging modalities for superresolution in fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallet, Clément; Caron, Julien; Oddos, Stephane; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Moisan, Lionel; Sirat, Gabriel Y.; Braitbart, Philippe O.; Shorte, Spencer L.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new technology for super-resolution fluorescence imaging, based on conical diffraction. Conical diffraction is a linear, singular phenomenon taking place when a polarized beam is diffracted through a biaxial crystal. The illumination patterns generated by conical diffraction are more compact than the classical Gaussian beam; we use them to generate a super-resolution imaging modality. Conical Diffraction Microscopy (CODIM) resolution enhancement can be achieved with any type of objective on any kind of sample preparation and standard fluorophores. Conical diffraction can be used in multiple fashion to create new and disruptive technologies for super-resolution microscopy. This paper will focus on the first one that has been implemented and give a glimpse at what the future of microscopy using conical diffraction could be.

  2. Performance study of a fan beam collimator designed for a multi-modality small animal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, ASM; Kramer, Gary H.; Semmler, Wolfrad; Peter, Jorg

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology to design and conduct the performances of a fan beam collimator. This fan beam collimator was designed to use with a multi-modality small animal imaging device and the performance of the collimator was studied for a 3D geometry. Analytical expressions were formulated to calculate the parameters for the collimator. A Monte Carlo model was developed to analyze the scattering and image noises for a 3D object. The results showed that the performance of the fan beam collimator was strongly dependent on the source distribution and position. The fan beam collimator showed increased counting efficiency in comparison to a parallel hole collimator. Inside attenuating medium, the increased attenuating effect outweighed the fan beam increased counting efficiency.

  3. Multifunctional dendrimer-based nanoparticles for in vivo MR/CT dual-modal molecular imaging of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kangan Li,1,4,5,* Shihui Wen,2,* Andrew C Larson,4,5 Mingwu Shen,2 Zhuoli Zhang,4,5 Qian Chen,3 Xiangyang Shi,2,3 Guixiang Zhang1 1Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Development of dual-mode or multi-mode imaging contrast agents is important for accurate and self-confirmatory diagnosis of cancer. We report a new multifunctional, dendrimer-based gold nanoparticle (AuNP as a dual-modality contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR/computed tomography (CT imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine dendrimers modified with gadolinium chelate (DOTA-NHS and polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether were used as templates to synthesize AuNPs, followed by Gd(III chelation and acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amine groups; multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped AuNPs (Gd-Au DENPs were formed. The formed Gd-Au DENPs were used for both in vitro and in vivo MR/CT imaging of human MCF-7 cancer cells. Both MR and CT images demonstrate that MCF-7 cells and the xenograft tumor model can be effectively imaged. The Gd-Au DENPs uptake, mainly in the cell cytoplasm, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The cell cytotoxicity assay, cell morphology observation, and flow cytometry show that the developed Gd-Au DENPs have good biocompatibility in the given concentration range. Our results

  4. An automated robot arm system for small animal tissue biopsy under dual-image modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.H.; Wu, T.H.; Lin, M.H.; Yang, C.C.; Guo, W.Y.; Wang, Z.J.; Chen, C.L.; Lee, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor cell biology in vivo is one of the most important goals of molecular imaging. Imaging procedures could be inter-subject performed repeatedly at different investigating stages; thereby need not sacrifice small animals during the entire study period. Thus, the ultimate goal of this study was to design a stereotactic image-guided system for small animals and integrated it with an automatic robot arm for in vivo tissue biopsy analysis. The system was composed of three main parts, including one small animal stereotactic frame, one imaging-fusion software and an automatic robot arm system. The system has been thoroughly evaluated with three components; the robot position accuracy was 0.05±0.02 mm, the image registration accuracy was 0.37±0.18 mm and the system integration was satisfactorily within 1.20±0.39 mm of error. From these results, the system demonstrated sufficient accuracy to guide the micro-injector from the planned delivery routes into practice. The entire system accuracy was limited by the image fusion and orientation procedures, due to its nature of the blurred PET imaging obtained from the small objects. The primary improvement is to acquire as higher resolution as possible the fused imaging for localizing the targets in the future

  5. Anterior abdominal Wall scar endometriosis: Case series and review of imaging modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işık Üstüner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of endometriosis to pelvic and abdominal scar tissue is a very rare occurrence. Most commonly observed after cesarean sections due to implantation of uterine endometrial stem cells to outside tissues. Patients are often asymptomatic but may present with cyclic pain and mass. Imaging diagnosis is possible when classical implantation site near the scar tissue, clinical history and imaging findings are combined. In ultrasound imaging the lesion is often solid, mildly hypoechoic and often isoechoic to surrounding muscle. Presence of bleeding and fluid may cause the lesion to appear more heterogeneous. On computed tomography imaging the most pronounced finding is avid contrast enhancement of the lesion whereas in magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity to blood products.

  6. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  7. Evaluation of localized bacterial infection using radioisotope-labeled nucleosides imaging modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang II; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Conventional diagnostic methods for infections are difficult to distinguish localized bacterial infections from sites of sterile inflammation. For this reason, the importance of developing methods to image bacterial infections is widely recognized. In this study to acquire bacterial infection imaging with radiolabeled nucleosides, in vitro bacterial thymidine kinase (tk) activities of Salmonella typhimurium with [{sup 18}F]FLT and [{sup 125}I]IVDU were measured and localized infections model in BALB/c mice was imaged with [{sup 18}F]FLT or [{sup 125}I]FIAU

  8. Efficiency of Imaging Modalities in Male Breast Disease: Can Ultrasound Give Additional Information for Assessment of Gynecomastia Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıca, Özgür; Kahraman, A. Nedim; Öztürk, Enis; Teke, Memik

    2018-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present mammography and ultrasound findings of male breast lesions and to investigate the ability of diagnostic modalities in estimating the evolution of gynecomastia. Materials and Methods Sixty-nine male patients who admitted to Taksim and Bakirkoy Education and Research Hospitals and underwent mammography (MG) and ultrasonography (US) imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Duration of symptoms and mammographic types of gynecomastia according to Appelbaum’s classifications were evaluated, besides the sonographic findings in mammographic types of gynecomastia. Results The distribution of 69 cases were as follows: gynecomastia 47 (68.11%), pseudogynecomastia 6 (8.69%) primary breast carcinoma 7 (10.14%), metastatic carcinoma 1 (1.4%), epidermal inclusion cyst 2 (2.8%), abscess 2 (2.8%), lipoma 2 (2.8%), pyogenic granuloma 1 (1.4%), and granulomatous lobular mastitis 1 (1.4%). Gynecomastia patients who had symptoms less than 1 year had nodular gynecomastia (34.6%) as opposed to dendritic gynecomastia (61.5%) (pgynecomastia (70%) had a higher rate than the dendritic type (20%). Patients having the symptoms more than 2 years had diffuse gynecomastia (57.1%) while 42.9% had dendritic gynecomastia (pgynecomastia (92.3%) than noduler type (1.9 %). Patients having symptoms for 1 to 2 years had more dentritic gynecomastia (70%) than diffuse type (30%). Patients having symptoms more than 2 years had diffuse gynecomastia (57.1%) comparable to dendritic gynecomastia (42.9 %). Conclusion Diagnostic imaging modalities are efficient tools for estimation of gynecomastia evolution as well as the diagnosis of other male breast diseases. There seems to be an incongruity between duration of clinical complaints and diagnostic imaging classification of gynecomastia. The use of these high resolution US findings may demonstrate an early phase fibrosis especially in patients visualized by mammography as with nodular phase. PMID:29322116

  9. Clinical toxicology of newer recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Simon L; Thomas, Simon H L

    2011-10-01

    Novel synthetic 'designer' drugs with stimulant, ecstasy-like (entactogenic) and/or hallucinogenic properties have become increasingly popular among recreational drug users in recent years. The substances used change frequently in response to market trends and legislative controls and it is an important challenge for poisons centres and clinical toxicologists to remain updated on the pharmacological and toxicological effects of these emerging agents. To review the available information on newer synthetic stimulant, entactogenic and hallucinogenic drugs, provide a framework for classification of these drugs based on chemical structure and describe their pharmacology and clinical toxicology. A comprehensive review of the published literature was performed using PUBMED and Medline databases, together with additional non-peer reviewed information sources, including books, media reports, government publications and internet resources, including drug user web forums. Novel synthetic stimulant, entactogenic or hallucinogenic designer drugs are increasingly available to users as demonstrated by user surveys, poisons centre calls, activity on internet drug forums, hospital attendance data and mortality data. Some population sub groups such as younger adults who attend dance music clubs are more likely to use these substances. The internet plays an important role in determining the awareness of and availability of these newer drugs of abuse. Most novel synthetic stimulant, entactogenic or hallucinogenic drugs of abuse can be classified according to chemical structure as piperazines (e.g. benzylpiperazine (BZP), trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), phenethylamines (e.g. 2C or D-series of ring-substituted amfetamines, benzodifurans, cathinones, aminoindans), tryptamines (e.g. dimethyltryptamine, alpha-methyltryptamine, ethyltryptamine, 5-methoxy-alphamethyltryptamine) or piperidines and related substances (e.g. desoxypipradrol, diphenylprolinol). Alternatively classification may

  10. Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, A.; Grosse, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. (orig.) [de

  11. Expert consensus for multi-modality imaging evaluation of cardiovascular complications of radiotherapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Badano, Luigi P

    2013-01-01

    . A comprehensive review of potential cardiac complications related to radiotherapy is warranted. An evidence-based review of several imaging approaches used to detect, evaluate, and monitor RIHD is discussed. Recommendations for the early identification and monitoring of cardiovascular complications...

  12. Preoperative evaluation and monitoring chemotherapy in patients with high-grade osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma: review of current imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woude, H.-J. van der; Bloem, J.L.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is pivotal in the initial detection, characterization, staging and post-treatment follow-up of patients with high-grade osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma. In the present review article, conventional and new imaging modalities are discussed with regard to the monitoring of the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in such patients. Presurgical monitoring of response to chemotherapy may have an impact on modification of neoadjuvant treatment protocols, on patient selection for the performance and timing of limb-salvage surgery and on planning of radiation therapy (in non-operated Ewing's sarcomas) and selection of postoperative chemotherapy regimens. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, as part of a routine MR protocol, assists in the detection of the most viable parts of the tumour and serves as an initial standard for follow-up of the metabolic activity of the tumour during and after chemotherapy, both in small intraosseous tumours and in tumours with an associated soft tissue mass. In combination with selected morphological features, dynamic imaging parameters are therefore advocated for monitoring the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with osteogenic and Ewing's sarcoma. (orig.)

  13. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  14. Image Guided Virtual Autopsy: An Adjunct with Radiographic and Computed Tomography Modalities - An Important Tool in Forensic Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The forensic examination of dead bodies is very helpful in order to identify the person, cause of death, gender, and solving the mysterious cases. It includes a number of techniques, out of which autopsy is the primary investigation that is performed in every medicolegal case. Because of mutilation technologies, traditional autopsy technique is most disturbing in terms of emotions and rituals of relatives. The use of radiology in forensic science comprises performance, interpretation, and reporting of radiographs that is helpful in detecting those changes that are not clinically visible. Forensic radiology plays an important role for identification of humans in mass disasters, criminal investigations, and evaluation of cause of death. The introduction of radiological modalities in autopsy techniques is a complementary tool for forensic identification and is known as virtual autopsy. The advance imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is used in virtual autopsy in order to visualize and reconstruct the internal organs to know the site, type, and depth of injury. This review elaborates the role of maxillofacial imaging in image-guided virtual autopsy.

  15. Multi-modal neuroimaging in premanifest and early Huntington's disease: 18 month longitudinal data from the IMAGE-HD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez D, Juan F; Egan, Gary F; Gray, Marcus A; Poudel, Govinda R; Churchyard, Andrew; Chua, Phyllis; Stout, Julie C; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

    2013-01-01

    IMAGE-HD is an Australian based multi-modal longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in premanifest and early symptomatic Huntington's disease (pre-HD and symp-HD, respectively). In this investigation we sought to determine the sensitivity of imaging methods to detect macrostructural (volume) and microstructural (diffusivity) longitudinal change in HD. We used a 3T MRI scanner to acquire T1 and diffusion weighted images at baseline and 18 months in 31 pre-HD, 31 symp-HD and 29 controls. Volume was measured across the whole brain, and volume and diffusion measures were ascertained for caudate and putamen. We observed a range of significant volumetric and, for the first time, diffusion changes over 18 months in both pre-HD and symp-HD, relative to controls, detectable at the brain-wide level (volume change in grey and white matter) and in caudate and putamen (volume and diffusivity change). Importantly, longitudinal volume change in the caudate was the only measure that discriminated between groups across all stages of disease: far from diagnosis (>15 years), close to diagnosis (fractional anisotropy, FA), only longitudinal FA change was sensitive to group differences, but only after diagnosis. These findings further confirm caudate atrophy as one of the most sensitive and early biomarkers of neurodegeneration in HD. They also highlight that different tissue properties have varying schedules in their ability to discriminate between groups along disease progression and may therefore inform biomarker selection for future therapeutic interventions.

  16. Evaluation of photoshop based image analysis in cytologic diagnosis of pleural fluid in comparison with conventional modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Tasbandi, Aida; Mohamadian Roshan, Nema

    2018-04-19

    The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the results of digital image analysis in pleural effusion cytology samples with conventional modalities. In this cross-sectional study, 53 pleural fluid cytology smears from Qaem hospital pathology department, located in Mashhad, Iran were investigated. Prior to digital analysis, all specimens were evaluated by two pathologists and categorized into three groups as: benign, suspicious, and malignant. Using an Olympus microscope and Olympus DP3 digital camera, digital images from cytology slides were captured. Appropriate images (n = 130) were separately imported to Adobe Photoshop CS5 and parameters including area and perimeter, circularity, Gray Value mean, integrated density, and nucleus to cytoplasm area ratio were analyzed. Gray Value mean, nucleus to cytoplasm area ratio, and circularity showed the best sensitivity and specificity rates as well as significant differences between all groups. Also, nucleus area and perimeter showed a significant relation between suspicious and malignant groups with benign group. Whereas, there was no such difference between suspicious and malignant groups. We concluded that digital image analysis is welcomed in the field of research on pleural fluid smears as it can provide quantitative data to apply various comparisons and reduce interobserver variation which could assist pathologists to achieve a more accurate diagnosis. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature.

  18. Multi-Modal Imaging in a Mouse Model of Orthotopic Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priya; Kato, Tatsuya; Ujiie, Hideki; Wada, Hironobu; Lee, Daiyoon; Hu, Hsin-Pei; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Ahn, Jin Young; Zheng, Jinzi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of CF800, a novel PEGylated nano-liposomal imaging agent containing indocyanine green (ICG) and iohexol, for real-time near infrared (NIR) fluorescence and computed tomography (CT) image-guided surgery in an orthotopic lung cancer model in nude mice. CF800 was intravenously administered into 13 mice bearing the H460 orthotopic human lung cancer. At 48 h post-injection (peak imaging agent accumulation time point), ex vivo NIR and CT imaging was performed. A clinical NIR imaging system (SPY®, Novadaq) was used to measure fluorescence intensity of tumor and lung. Tumor-to-background-ratios (TBR) were calculated in inflated and deflated states. The mean Hounsfield unit (HU) of lung tumor was quantified using the CT data set and a semi-automated threshold-based method. Histological evaluation using H&E, the macrophage marker F4/80 and the endothelial cell marker CD31, was performed, and compared to the liposomal fluorescence signal obtained from adjacent tissue sections. The fluorescence TBR measured when the lung is in the inflated state (2.0 ± 0.58) was significantly greater than in the deflated state (1.42 ± 0.380 (n = 7, p<0.003). Mean fluorescent signal in tumor was highly variable across samples, (49.0 ± 18.8 AU). CT image analysis revealed greater contrast enhancement in lung tumors (a mean increase of 110 ± 57 HU) when CF800 is administered compared to the no contrast enhanced tumors (p = 0.0002). Preliminary data suggests that the high fluorescence TBR and CT tumor contrast enhancement provided by CF800 may have clinical utility in localization of lung cancer during CT and NIR image-guided surgery.

  19. Automatic registration of multi-modal microscopy images for integrative analysis of prostate tissue sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippolis, Giuseppe; Edsjö, Anders; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Overgaard, Niels Chr

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths. For diagnosis, predicting the outcome of the disease, and for assessing potential new biomarkers, pathologists and researchers routinely analyze histological samples. Morphological and molecular information may be integrated by aligning microscopic histological images in a multiplex fashion. This process is usually time-consuming and results in intra- and inter-user variability. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using modern image analysis methods for automated alignment of microscopic images from differently stained adjacent paraffin sections from prostatic tissue specimens. Tissue samples, obtained from biopsy or radical prostatectomy, were sectioned and stained with either hematoxylin & eosin (H&E), immunohistochemistry for p63 and AMACR or Time Resolved Fluorescence (TRF) for androgen receptor (AR). Image pairs were aligned allowing for translation, rotation and scaling. The registration was performed automatically by first detecting landmarks in both images, using the scale invariant image transform (SIFT), followed by the well-known RANSAC protocol for finding point correspondences and finally aligned by Procrustes fit. The Registration results were evaluated using both visual and quantitative criteria as defined in the text. Three experiments were carried out. First, images of consecutive tissue sections stained with H&E and p63/AMACR were successfully aligned in 85 of 88 cases (96.6%). The failures occurred in 3 out of 13 cores with highly aggressive cancer (Gleason score ≥ 8). Second, TRF and H&E image pairs were aligned correctly in 103 out of 106 cases (97%). The third experiment considered the alignment of image pairs with the same staining (H&E) coming from a stack of 4 sections. The success rate for alignment dropped from 93.8% in adjacent sections to 22% for sections furthest away. The proposed method is both reliable and fast and therefore well suited

  20. Health effects of Chernobyl: newer perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Usha

    1996-01-01

    On the 26th of April 1986, the 4th unit of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the former Soviet Union exploded, following a scheduled but not-well-planned testing of a turbo-generator prior to a shutdown of the reactor. This led to a release of large amounts of radioactive material into the atmosphere, resulting in a cloud not only over in the Soviet Union, but due to prevailing meteorological condition, over the Eastern Europe as well. Over the past ten years, a large number of agencies in the areas of human health and hygiene, agriculture and veterinary sciences in addition to those involved in radiation protection and radiation safety have studied the impact of the accident. These studies were also extended to evaluate and mitigate the consequences. The accident has been a warning, and has provided lessons in mitigating the consequences of any industrial accident. Newer perspectives have emerged in the area of early diagnosis and treatment of the acute effects of radiation. Research in the areas of genetics, molecular biology and radiation biology will contribute to better medical care in future. (author). 3 tabs

  1. The role of multi modality imaging in selecting patients and guiding lead placement for the delivery of cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Jonathan M; Claridge, Simon; Jackson, Tom; Sieniewicz, Ben; Porter, Bradley; Webb, Jessica; Rajani, Ronak; Kapetanakis, Stamatis; Carr-White, Gerald; Rinaldi, Christopher A

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective pacemaker delivered treatment for selected patients with heart failure with the target of restoring electro-mechanical synchrony. Imaging techniques using echocardiography have as yet failed to find a metric of dyssynchrony to predict CRT response. Current guidelines are thus unchanged in recommending prolonged QRS duration, severe systolic function and refractory heart failure symptoms as criteria for CRT implantation. Evolving strain imaging techniques in 3D echocardiography, cardiac MRI and CT may however, overcome limitations of older methods and yield more powerful CRT response predictors. Areas covered: In this review, we firstly discuss the use of multi modality cardiac imaging in the selection of patients for CRT implantation and predicting the response to CRT. Secondly we examine the clinical evidence on avoiding areas of myocardial scar, targeting areas of dyssynchrony and in doing so, achieving the optimal positioning of the left ventricular lead to deliver CRT. Finally, we present the latest clinical studies which are integrating both clinical and imaging data with X-rays during the implantation in order to improve the accuracy of LV lead placement. Expert commentary: Image integration and fusion of datasets with live X-Ray angiography to guide procedures in real time is now a reality for some implanting centers. Such hybrid facilities will enable users to interact with images, allowing measurement, annotation and manipulation with instantaneous visualization on the catheter laboratory monitor. Such advances will serve as an invaluable adjunct for implanting physicians to accurately deliver pacemaker leads into the optimal position to deliver CRT.

  2. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronooh, Pegah [Dental School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibafar, Ali Reza [TABA Medical Imaging Center, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima [Oral Pathology Department, Babol Dental School, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  3. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronoosh, Pegah; Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-12-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  4. Imaging findings in a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: a survey using advanced modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronooh, Pegah; Shakibafar, Ali Reza; Houshyar, Maneli; Nafarzade, Shima

    2011-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multi-systemic disease which is characterized by multiple keratocysts in the jaws, calcification of falx cerebri, and basal cell carcinomas. We report a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 23-year-old man with emphasis on image findings of keratocyctic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) on panoramic radiograph, computed tomography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and Ultrasonography (US). In this case, pericoronal lesions were mostly orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) concerning the MR and US study, which tended to recur less. The aim of this report was to clarify the characteristic imaging features of the syndrome-related keratocysts that can be used to differentiate KCOT from OOC. Also, our findings suggested that the recurrence rate of KCOTs might be predicted based on their association to teeth.

  5. Selective imaging modalities after first pyelonephritis failed to identify significant urological anomalies, despite normal antenatal ultrasounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mola, Gylli; Wenger, Therese Ramstad; Salomonsson, Petra

    2017-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the consequences of applying different imaging guidelines for urological anomalies after first pyelonephritis in children with normal routine antenatal ultrasounds. METHODS: The cohort comprised 472 children treated for their first culture-positive pyelonephritis and investig......AIM: We investigated the consequences of applying different imaging guidelines for urological anomalies after first pyelonephritis in children with normal routine antenatal ultrasounds. METHODS: The cohort comprised 472 children treated for their first culture-positive pyelonephritis...... identified all patients initially treated with surgery and avoided 65 scintigraphies. CONCLUSION: Dilated VUR was the dominant anomaly in a cohort with first time pyelonephritis and normal antenatal ultrasound. The optimal imaging strategy after pyelonephritis must be identified....

  6. Non-traumatic acute abdomen in the adult: a critical review of imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buitrago-Tellez, C.; Boos, S.; Heinemann, F.; Wenz, W.

    1992-01-01

    Two different series collected at the University Hospital of Freiburg are presented as a basis for the critical appraisal of available imaging tests and their correlation with anatomic pain sites. The first series comprises 284 patients of non-traumatic acute abdomen admitted to the emergency department during 1990. The radiological approach revealed an increased use of immediate ultrasound (58%) followed by plain film radiography (53%), contrast studies (15%), and computed tomography (9.8%). Five groups of entities were identified according to the diagnostic imaging procedure prior to surgery. In a second series, the clinical presentation, the distribution and the efficacy of imaging studies for the confirmation of acute mesenteric ischemia were evaluated in 55 patients over a period of 14 years. A reduced mortality rate emphasizes the value of early and agressive diagnosis and angiographic management. (orig.)

  7. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Dual-Modality Glyco-Nanoparticles for Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available d-Glucosamine (DG was conjugated to a core-cross linked polymeric micelle (CCPM system equipped with both a near-infrared fluorophore (NIRF and a gamma emitter (111In. The resultant nano-scale tumor-targeting imaging tracer, 111In-DG-NIRF-CCPM, selectively accumulated in a human epithelial carcinoma A-431 xenograft model in mice. At 24 hrs post injection, the tumor uptake was 2.62 ± 0.80 % of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g. Tumors were clearly delineated in both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and optical imaging. The results suggest that the prepared imaging tracer is a promising agent for tumor diagnosis.

  8. High Definition Confocal Imaging Modalities for the Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrand, Dominique; Fradette, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Optimal imaging methods are necessary in order to perform a detailed characterization of thick tissue samples from either native or engineered tissues. Tissue-engineered substitutes are featuring increasing complexity including multiple cell types and capillary-like networks. Therefore, technical approaches allowing the visualization of the inner structural organization and cellular composition of tissues are needed. This chapter describes an optical clearing technique which facilitates the detailed characterization of whole-mount samples from skin and adipose tissues (ex vivo tissues and in vitro tissue-engineered substitutes) when combined with spectral confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis on image renderings.

  9. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Dawn of A New Imaging Modality in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Paul, Renji K; George, Merin; Anitha, J; Khanna, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Today, we are in a world of innovations, and there are various diagnostics aids that help to take a decision regarding treatment in a well-planned way. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been a vital tool for imaging diagnostic tool in orthodontics. This article reviews case reports during orthodontic treatment and importance of CBCT during the treatment evaluation. PMID:26225116

  10. A Bayesian Spatial Model to Predict Disease Status Using Imaging Data From Various Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiong Xue

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Relating disease status to imaging data stands to increase the clinical significance of neuroimaging studies. Many neurological and psychiatric disorders involve complex, systems-level alterations that manifest in functional and structural properties of the brain and possibly other clinical and biologic measures. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model to predict disease status, which is able to incorporate information from both functional and structural brain imaging scans. We consider a two-stage whole brain parcellation, partitioning the brain into 282 subregions, and our model accounts for correlations between voxels from different brain regions defined by the parcellations. Our approach models the imaging data and uses posterior predictive probabilities to perform prediction. The estimates of our model parameters are based on samples drawn from the joint posterior distribution using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods. We evaluate our method by examining the prediction accuracy rates based on leave-one-out cross validation, and we employ an importance sampling strategy to reduce the computation time. We conduct both whole-brain and voxel-level prediction and identify the brain regions that are highly associated with the disease based on the voxel-level prediction results. We apply our model to multimodal brain imaging data from a study of Parkinson's disease. We achieve extremely high accuracy, in general, and our model identifies key regions contributing to accurate prediction including caudate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus as well as several sensory system regions.

  11. STIM with energy loss contrast: An imaging modality unique to MeV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, H.W.; Schofield, R.M.S.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) through measurement of energy loss of individual ions is a quantitative imaging technique with several unique capabilities. The uniqueness derives conjointly from the large penetration with small scattering of MeV ions in low-Z specimens, from the simple relationship between energy loss and projected or areal density, and from the almost 100% efficiency with which one obtains pixel data from individual ions. Since contrast is in energy loss and not in numbers of events, the statistics of energy loss straggling affects the image but the statistics of counting does not. Small scattering makes it possible to observe details within transparent specimens. High efficiency makes it possible to collect large data sets for computed tomography, stereo, or high-definition imaging with a small radiation dose. High efficiency allows one to minimize aberrations by use of small apertures, to achieve good precision in the determination of areal density, or even to image live biological specimens in air since only one or a few ions per pixel are required. This paper includes a bibliography on STIM with MeV ions, it discusses the accuracy that one can achieve in the areal density coloring of a pixel with data from one or a few ions, and it supplements that review with recent examples from the Melbourne and the Eugene microprobes. (orig.)

  12. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for pancreatic neoplasms without hematoxylin and eosin stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youting; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hong; Hong, Zhipeng; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples is the standard approach in histopathology for imaging and diagnosing cancer. Recent reports have shown that multiphoton microscopy (MPM) provides better sample interface with single-cell resolution, which enhances traditional H&E staining and offers a powerful diagnostic tool with potential applications in oncology. The purpose of this study was to further expand the versatility of MPM by establishing the optical parameters required for imaging unstained histological sections of pancreatic neoplasms, thereby providing an efficient and environmentally sustainable alternative to H&E staining while improving the accuracy of pancreatic cancer diagnoses. We found that the high-resolution MPM images clearly distinguish between the structure of normal pancreatic tissues compared with pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections, and discernable differences in tissue architecture and cell morphology between normal versus tumorigenic cells led to enhanced optical diagnosis of cancerous tissue. Moreover, quantitative assessment of the cytomorphological features visualized from MPM images showed significant differences in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios of pancreatic neoplasms compared with normal pancreas, as well as further distinguished pancreatic malignant tumors from benign tumors. These results indicate that the MPM could potentially serve as an optical tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms in unstained histological sections.

  13. Automatic generation of boundary conditions using demons nonrigid image registration for use in 3-D modality-independent elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pheiffer, Thomas S; Ou, Jao J; Ong, Rowena E; Miga, Michael I

    2011-09-01

    Modality-independent elastography (MIE) is a method of elastography that reconstructs the elastic properties of tissue using images acquired under different loading conditions and a biomechanical model. Boundary conditions are a critical input to the algorithm and are often determined by time-consuming point correspondence methods requiring manual user input. This study presents a novel method of automatically generating boundary conditions by nonrigidly registering two image sets with a demons diffusion-based registration algorithm. The use of this method was successfully performed in silico using magnetic resonance and X-ray-computed tomography image data with known boundary conditions. These preliminary results produced boundary conditions with an accuracy of up to 80% compared to the known conditions. Demons-based boundary conditions were utilized within a 3-D MIE reconstruction to determine an elasticity contrast ratio between tumor and normal tissue. Two phantom experiments were then conducted to further test the accuracy of the demons boundary conditions and the MIE reconstruction arising from the use of these conditions. Preliminary results show a reasonable characterization of the material properties on this first attempt and a significant improvement in the automation level and viability of the method.

  14. High-frequency 3D echodentographic imaging modality for early assessment of periodontal diseases: in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound in dentistry is still an open growing area of research. Currently, there is a lack of imaging modalities to accurately predict minute structures and defects in the jawbone. In particular, the inability of 2D radiographic images to detect bony periodontal defects resulted from infection of the periodontium. This study investigates the feasibility of high frequency ultrasound to reconstruct high resolution 3D surface images of human jawbone. Methods: A dentate and non-dentate mandibles were used in this study. The system employs high frequency single-element ultrasound focused transducers (15-30 MHz) for scanning. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high precision two-dimensional stage positioning system of +/-1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate and quantitative measurements of the mandible in vitro. Radio frequency (RF) signals are acquired laterally 44-45.5 μm apart for each frame. Different frames are reconstructed 500 μm apart for the 3D reconstruction. Signal processing algorithms are applied on the received ultrasound signals for filtering, focusing, and envelope detection before frame reconstruction. Furthermore, an edge detection technique is adopted to detect the bone surface in each frame. Finally, all edges are combined together in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. Major anatomical landmarks on the resultant images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles to show the efficacy of the system. Comparison were also made with conventional 2D radiographs to show the superiority of the ultrasound imaging system in diagnosing small defects in the lateral, axial and elevation planes of space. Results: The landmarks on all ultrasound images matched with those on the mandible, indicating the efficacy of the system in detecting small structures in human jaw bones. Comparison with conventional 2D radiographic images of the same mandible showed superiority of

  15. Study on the diagnosis and mechanism of hemispatial neglect using different imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Lele; Yin Yafu; Li Yaming

    2013-01-01

    Hemispatial neglect is a kind of cognitive impairment characterized by failure to report, respond or orient to stimuli presented in ipsi- or contra-lateral space after brain injury, which cannot be attributed to sensory or motor defects. Although there are various diagnosis and assessment methods, none is regarded as standard. The paper and pencil test is commonly used in routine clinical workup. The mechanism is controversial and the most accepted opinion is due to visuospatial attention defect. Imaging study focuses on exploring the functional regions leading to the hemispatial neglect. As functional imaging, SPECT and PET have capability to evaluate the perfusion, glucose metabolism and cellular vitality, which have been found increasingly useful and applicable clinically in the field of diagnosis for cognitive impairment diseases. They are likely to have potential for contribution in the study of hemispatial neglect. (authors)

  16. Multi-modality imaging findings of huge intrachoroidal cavitation and myopic peripapillary sinkhole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yutong; Ma, Xiaoli; Hua, Rui

    2018-02-02

    Peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation was described as the presence of an asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, yellow-orange, peripapillary lesion at the inferior border of the myopic conus in eyes with high myopia. A 66-year-old myopic Chinese man was enrolled and his multi-color imaging examination showed a well-circumscribed, caesious, peripapillary lesion coalesced with the optic nerve head vertically rotated and obliquely tilted, together with an inferotemporal sinkhole in the myopic conus. The optical coherence tomography images showed an intrachoroidal hyporeflective space, schisis, an intracavitary septum located below the retinal pigment epithelium and inserted beneath the optic nerve head, as well as a sinkhole between the peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitation and the vitreous space. Both myopic colobomas and sinkhole in myopic conus may contribute the coalescence of intrachoroidal cavitation with optic nerve head. These qualitative and quantitative new findings will be beneficial for understanding its pathomorphological mechanism, and the impact on optic nerve tissue of myopic patients.

  17. Recent Inferior Myocardial Infarction Complicated with a Right Ventricular Thrombus Detected by Three Cardiac Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Toshiki; Imaeda, Syohei; Hashimoto, Kenji; Ryuzaki, Toshinobu; Saito, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tabei, Ryota; Kodaira, Masaki; Hase, Manabu; Numasawa, Yohei

    2018-03-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman diagnosed with recent inferior myocardial infarction complicated with right ventricular infarction and a right ventricular thrombus. Three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging clearly detected a thrombus. We consider cases with a recent right ventricular infarction to require assessment for thrombus formations in the right ventricle. Fortunately, vigorous anticoagulation therapy resolved the thrombi in both the right ventricle and right coronary artery.

  18. Exploring Multi-Modal and Structured Representation Learning for Visual Image and Video Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dan

    2018-01-01

    As the explosive growth of the visual data, it is particularly important to develop intelligent visual understanding techniques for dealing with a large amount of data. Many efforts have been made in recent years to build highly effective and large-scale visual processing algorithms and systems. One of the core aspects in the research line is how to learn robust representations to better describe the data. In this thesis we study the problem of visual image and video understanding and specifi...

  19. Multi-modality Imaging: Bird's eye view from the 2015 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J; Lloyd, Steven G; Chaudhry, Farooq A; AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-04-01

    Multiple novel studies were presented at the 2015 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions which was considered a successful conference at many levels. In this review, we will summarize key studies in nuclear cardiology, cardiac magnetic resonance, echocardiography, and cardiac computed tomography that were presented at the Sessions. We hope that this bird's eye view will keep readers updated on the newest imaging studies presented at the meeting whether or not they were able to attend the meeting.

  20. Correlation of the findings of thallium-201 chloride scans with those of other imaging modalities and histology following therapy in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostakoglu, L.; Panicek, D.M.; Divgi, C.R.; Botet, J.; Healy, J.; Larson, S.M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    We performed a prospective study to evaluate the imaging potential of thallium-201 as compared with other imaging modalities in differentiating residual/recurrent tumors from post-therapy changes in patients with musculoskeletal sarcomas. 201 Tl scans, magnetic resonance imaging (17), X-ray computed tomography (6) or contrast angiography (6) studies in 29 patients previously treated for musculoskeletal sarcomas were correlated with either histopathologic findings (26 patients) or 2-year clinical follow-up (three patients). All imaging studies were acquired within 2 weeks. Ratios of 201 Tl tumor uptake to the contralateral (28 patients) or adjacent region of interest were calculated. When qualitative interpretation was in doubt, only those cases with a ratio of 1.5 or more were considered suggestive of recurrent or residual viable tumor tissue. Residual or recurrent tumor tissue was verified in 21 patients by biopsy. All had true-positive 201 Tl scans while the other imaging modalities were true-positive in 20 and equivocal in one. In eight patients, there was no evidence of viable tumor tissue as proven by biopsy in five and long-term clinical follow-up in three. 201 Tl scan was false-positive (ratio 1.5) in one patient and true-negative in seven while the other imaging modalities had four false-positives. The average 201 Tl ratios were 3.8 ± 1.1 in the true-positive cases and 1.3 ± 0.3 in the true-negative cases. The percentage sensitivities, specificities, and accuracy for 201 Tl were 100%, 87.5%, and 96.5% versus 95%, 50%, and 82.7% respectively for other imaging modalities. These results indicate that 201 Tl scintigraphy is more accurate than other imaging modalities in differentiating residual/recurrent musculoskeletal sarcomas from post-therapy changes. (orig.)

  1. Multi-modality imaging review of congenital abnormalities of kidney and upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Kumar, Devendra; Khanna, Maneesh; Al Heidous, Mahmoud; Sheikh, Adnan; Virmani, Vivek; Palaniappan, Yegu

    2016-02-28

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include a wide range of abnormalities ranging from asymptomatic ectopic kidneys to life threatening renal agenesis (bilateral). Many of them are detected in the antenatal or immediate postnatal with a significant proportion identified in the adult population with varying degree of severity. CAKUT can be classified on embryological basis in to abnormalities in the renal parenchymal development, aberrant embryonic migration and abnormalities of the collecting system. Renal parenchymal abnormalities include multi cystic dysplastic kidneys, renal hypoplasia, number (agenesis or supernumerary), shape and cystic renal diseases. Aberrant embryonic migration encompasses abnormal location and fusion anomalies. Collecting system abnormalities include duplex kidneys and Pelvi ureteric junction obstruction. Ultrasonography (US) is typically the first imaging performed as it is easily available, non-invasive and radiation free used both antenatally and postnatally. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to confirm the ultrasound detected abnormality, detection of complex malformations, demonstration of collecting system and vascular anatomy and more importantly for early detection of complications like renal calculi, infection and malignancies. As CAKUT are one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease, it is important for the radiologists to be familiar with the varying imaging appearances of CAKUT on US, CT and MRI, thereby helping in prompt diagnosis and optimal management.

  2. Synthesis of polymer-lipid nanoparticles for image-guided delivery of dual modality therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J; Kim, YongTae; Gianella, Anita; van Rooy, Inge; Priem, Bram; Labarre, Matthew P; Ozcan, Canturk; Cormode, David P; Petrov, Artiom; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2013-09-18

    For advanced treatment of diseases such as cancer, multicomponent, multifunctional nanoparticles hold great promise. In the current study we report the synthesis of a complex nanoparticle (NP) system with dual drug loading as well as diagnostic properties. To that aim we present a methodology where chemically modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) polymer is formulated into a polymer-lipid NP that contains a cytotoxic drug doxorubicin (DOX) in the polymeric core and an anti-angiogenic drug sorafenib (SRF) in the lipidic corona. The NP core also contains gold nanocrystals (AuNCs) for imaging purposes and cyclodextrin molecules to maximize the DOX encapsulation in the NP core. In addition, a near-infrared (NIR) Cy7 dye was incorporated in the coating. To fabricate the NP we used a microfluidics-based technique that offers unique NP synthesis conditions, which allowed for encapsulation and fine-tuning of optimal ratios of all the NP components. NP phantoms could be visualized with computed tomography (CT) and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging. We observed timed release of the encapsulated drugs, with fast release of the corona drug SRF and delayed release of a core drug DOX. In tumor bearing mice intravenously administered NPs were found to accumulate at the tumor site by fluorescence imaging.

  3. WE-AB-BRA-06: 4DCT-Ventilation: A Novel Imaging Modality for Thoracic Surgical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Y; Jackson, M; Schubert, L; Jones, B; Mitchell, J; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M; Castillo, R; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard-of-care imaging used to evaluate lung cancer patients for surgical resection is nuclear-medicine ventilation. Surgeons use nuclear-medicine images along with pulmonary function tests (PFT) to calculate percent predicted postoperative (%PPO) PFT values by estimating the amount of functioning lung that would be lost with surgery. 4DCT-ventilation is an emerging imaging modality developed in radiation oncology that uses 4DCT data to calculate lung ventilation maps. We perform the first retrospective study to assess the use of 4DCT-ventilation for pre-operative surgical evaluation. The purpose of this work was to compare %PPO-PFT values calculated with 4DCT-ventilation and nuclear-medicine imaging. Methods: 16 lung cancer patients retrospectively reviewed had undergone 4DCTs, nuclear-medicine imaging, and had Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1) acquired as part of a standard PFT. For each patient, 4DCT data sets, spatial registration, and a density-change based model were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation maps. Both 4DCT and nuclear-medicine images were used to calculate %PPO-FEV1 using %PPO-FEV1=pre-operative FEV1*(1-fraction of total ventilation of resected lung). Fraction of ventilation resected was calculated assuming lobectomy and pneumonectomy. The %PPO-FEV1 values were compared between the 4DCT-ventilation-based calculations and the nuclear-medicine-based calculations using correlation coefficients and average differences. Results: The correlation between %PPO-FEV1 values calculated with 4DCT-ventilation and nuclear-medicine were 0.81 (p<0.01) and 0.99 (p<0.01) for pneumonectomy and lobectomy respectively. The average difference between the 4DCT-ventilation based and the nuclear-medicine-based %PPO-FEV1 values were small, 4.1±8.5% and 2.9±3.0% for pneumonectomy and lobectomy respectively. Conclusion: The high correlation results provide a strong rationale for a clinical trial translating 4DCT-ventilation to the surgical

  4. Imaging brain activity during seizures in freely behaving rats using a miniature multi-modal imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Iliya; Koletar, Margaret M; Ringuette, Dene; Gad, Raanan; Jeffrey, Melanie; Carlen, Peter L; Stefanovic, Bojana; Levi, Ofer

    2016-09-01

    We report on a miniature label-free imaging system for monitoring brain blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in awake, freely behaving rats. The device, weighing 15 grams, enables imaging in a ∼ 2 × 2 mm field of view with 4.4 μm lateral resolution and 1 - 8 Hz temporal sampling rate. The imaging is performed through a chronically-implanted cranial window that remains optically clear between 2 to > 6 weeks after the craniotomy. This imaging method is well suited for longitudinal studies of chronic models of brain diseases and disorders. In this work, it is applied to monitoring neurovascular coupling during drug-induced absence-like seizures 6 weeks following the craniotomy.

  5. Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles for magnetic resonance/near-infrared fluorescence dual-modal imaging of brain gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Shao, Chen; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zihao; Qu, Yanming; Gu, Wei; Yu, Chunjiang; Ye, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection of tumors. Herein, we prepared the PEG-Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles (MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs) with magnetic resonance (MR) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging modalities. The applicability of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe for the detection of brain gliomas was investigated. In vivo MR contrast enhancement of the MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 nanoprobe in the tumor region was demonstrated. Meanwhile, whole-body NIRF imaging of glioma bearing nude mouse exhibited distinct tumor localization upon injection of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs. Moreover, ex vivo CLSM imaging of the brain slice hosting glioma indicated the preferential accumulation of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs in the glioma region. Our results therefore demonstrated the potential of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe in improving the diagnostic efficacy by simultaneously providing anatomical information from deep inside the body and more sensitive information at the cellular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Accuracy of diagnostic imaging modalities for peripheral post-traumatic osteomyelitis - a systematic review of the recent literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govaert, Geertje A. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery, Subdivision of Trauma Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Trauma Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); IJpma, Frank F.; Reininga, Inge H. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery, Subdivision of Trauma Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); McNally, Martin [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Bone Infection Unit, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); McNally, Eugene [Oxford Musculoskeletal Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Glaudemans, Andor W. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    Post-traumatic osteomyelitis (PTO) is difficult to diagnose and there is no consensus on the best imaging strategy. The aim of this study is to present a systematic review of the recent literature on diagnostic imaging of PTO. A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases of the last 16 years (2000-2016) was performed. Studies that evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), three-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS), white blood cell (WBC) or antigranulocyte antibody (AGA) scintigraphy, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and plain computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing PTO were considered for inclusion. The review was conducted using the PRISMA statement and QUADAS-2 criteria. The literature search identified 3358 original records, of which 10 articles could be included in this review. Four of these studies had a comparative design which made it possible to report the results of, in total, 17 patient series. WBC (or AGA) scintigraphy and FDG-PET exhibit good accuracy for diagnosing PTO (sensitivity ranged from 50-100%, specificity ranged from 40-97% versus 83-100% and 51%-100%, respectively). The accuracy of both modalities improved when a hybrid imaging technique (SPECT/CT and FDG-PET/CT) was performed. For FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity ranged between 86 and 94% and specificity between 76 and 100%. For WBC scintigraphy + SPECT/CT, this is 100% and 89-97%, respectively. Based on the best available evidence of the last 16 years, both WBC (or AGA) scintigraphy combined with SPECT/CT or FDG-PET combined with CT have the best diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing peripheral PTO. (orig.)

  7. Multi-modal neuroimaging in premanifest and early Huntington's disease: 18 month longitudinal data from the IMAGE-HD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Domínguez D

    Full Text Available IMAGE-HD is an Australian based multi-modal longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study in premanifest and early symptomatic Huntington's disease (pre-HD and symp-HD, respectively. In this investigation we sought to determine the sensitivity of imaging methods to detect macrostructural (volume and microstructural (diffusivity longitudinal change in HD. We used a 3T MRI scanner to acquire T1 and diffusion weighted images at baseline and 18 months in 31 pre-HD, 31 symp-HD and 29 controls. Volume was measured across the whole brain, and volume and diffusion measures were ascertained for caudate and putamen. We observed a range of significant volumetric and, for the first time, diffusion changes over 18 months in both pre-HD and symp-HD, relative to controls, detectable at the brain-wide level (volume change in grey and white matter and in caudate and putamen (volume and diffusivity change. Importantly, longitudinal volume change in the caudate was the only measure that discriminated between groups across all stages of disease: far from diagnosis (>15 years, close to diagnosis (<15 years and after diagnosis. Of the two diffusion metrics (mean diffusivity, MD; fractional anisotropy, FA, only longitudinal FA change was sensitive to group differences, but only after diagnosis. These findings further confirm caudate atrophy as one of the most sensitive and early biomarkers of neurodegeneration in HD. They also highlight that different tissue properties have varying schedules in their ability to discriminate between groups along disease progression and may therefore inform biomarker selection for future therapeutic interventions.

  8. Mesoporous composite nanoparticles for dual-modality ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging and synergistic chemo-/thermotherapy against deep tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nan Zhang,1 Ronghui Wang,2 Junnian Hao,1 Yang Yang,1 Hongmi Zou,3 Zhigang Wang1 1Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2Department of Ultrasound, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is a promising and noninvasive treatment for solid tumors, which has been explored for potential clinical applications. However, the clinical applications of HIFU for large and deep tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are severely limited by unsatisfactory imaging guidance, long therapeutic times, and damage to normal tissue around the tumor due to the high power applied. In this study, we developed doxorubicin/perfluorohexane-encapsulated hollow mesoporous Prussian blue nanoparticles (HMPBs-DOX/PFH as theranostic agents, which can effectively guide HIFU therapy and enhance its therapeutic effects in combination with chemotherapy, by decreasing the cavitation threshold. We investigated the effects of this agent on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we showed a highly efficient HIFU therapeutic effect against HCC tumors, as well as controlled drug release, owing to the phase-transitional performance of the PFH. We therefore conclude that HMPB-DOX/PFH is a safe and efficient nanoplatform, which holds significant promise for cancer theranostics against deep tumors in clinical settings. Keywords: high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU, hollow mesoporous Prussian blue nanoplatforms, hepatocellular carcinoma, dual-modality imaging, synergistic chemo-/thermotherapy, theranostics

  9. Efficiency of Imaging Modalities in Male Breast Disease: Can Ultrasound Give Additional Information for Assessment of Gynecomastia Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıca, Özgür; Kahraman, A Nedim; Öztürk, Enis; Teke, Memik

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present mammography and ultrasound findings of male breast lesions and to investigate the ability of diagnostic modalities in estimating the evolution of gynecomastia. Sixty-nine male patients who admitted to Taksim and Bakirkoy Education and Research Hospitals and underwent mammography (MG) and ultrasonography (US) imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Duration of symptoms and mammographic types of gynecomastia according to Appelbaum's classifications were evaluated, besides the sonographic findings in mammographic types of gynecomastia. The distribution of 69 cases were as follows: gynecomastia 47 (68.11%), pseudogynecomastia 6 (8.69%) primary breast carcinoma 7 (10.14%), metastatic carcinoma 1 (1.4%), epidermal inclusion cyst 2 (2.8%), abscess 2 (2.8%), lipoma 2 (2.8%), pyogenic granuloma 1 (1.4%), and granulomatous lobular mastitis 1 (1.4%). Gynecomastia patients who had symptoms less than 1 year had nodular gynecomastia (34.6%) as opposed to dendritic gynecomastia (61.5%) (p<0.01) based on mammography results according to Appelbaum's classifications. In patients having symptoms for 1 to 2 years, diffuse gynecomastia (70%) had a higher rate than the dendritic type (20%). Patients having the symptoms more than 2 years had diffuse gynecomastia (57.1%) while 42.9% had dendritic gynecomastia (p<0.001). With sonographic examination patients who had symptoms less than 1 year had higher rates of dendritic gynecomastia (92.3%) than noduler type (1.9 %). Patients having symptoms for 1 to 2 years had more dentritic gynecomastia (70%) than diffuse type (30%). Patients having symptoms more than 2 years had diffuse gynecomastia (57.1%) comparable to dendritic gynecomastia (42.9 %). Diagnostic imaging modalities are efficient tools for estimation of gynecomastia evolution as well as the diagnosis of other male breast diseases. There seems to be an incongruity between duration of clinical complaints and diagnostic imaging classification of

  10. Evaluation of selective arterial embolization effect by chitosan micro-hydrogels in hindlimb sarcoma rodent models using various imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai Kyoung; Kwon, Jeong Il; Na, Kyung Sook [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-09-15

    Embolization is mainly used to reduce the size of locally advanced tumors. In this study, selective arterial catheterization with chitosan micro-hydrogels (CMH) into the femoral artery was performed and the therapeutic effect was validated using different imaging methods. Male SD rats (n = 18, 6 weeks old) were randomly assigned into three groups: Group 1 as control, Group 2 without any ligation of distal femoral artery, and Group 3 with temporary ligation of the distal femoral artery. RR1022 sarcoma cell lines were inoculated into thigh muscle. After 1 week, CMH was injected into the proximal femoral artery. Different imaging modalities were performed during a 3-week follow-up. The tumor size was significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in both Group 2 and Group 3 (P < 0.001) after selective arterial embolization therapy. 18F-FDG-PET/CT revealed decreased intensity of 18F-FDG uptake in tumors. The accumulation status of 125I-CMH near the tumor was verified by gamma camera. Appropriate selective arterial embolization therapy with CMH was.

  11. An approach to demonstrating cost-effectiveness of diagnostic imaging modalities in Australia illustrated by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a framework in which the cost-effectiveness of new imaging technologies could be evaluated using data from other countries, while assessing the impact that any differences between the study populations and Australia may have upon the results. Publications reporting the cost-effectiveness or therapeutic impact of positron emission tomography (PET) were re-worked using Australian cost structures. PET was assigned a cost of $950. The effects of potential differences between the populations studied and the Australian population were evaluated by applying sensitivity analysis to those publications that describe decision tree methodology. The parameters included in the sensitivity analysis were disease prevalence and specificity of PET. The Australian cost savings per patient examined by PET were $505.50-$912.41 for investigation of solitary pulmonary nodules, $34.65-$360.03 for lung cancer staging, $550.08 for axillary staging of breast cancer, $230.75-$2301.27 for assessment of recurrent colorectal cancer and $300.24-$2069.65 for assessment of myocardial viability. Significant differences in disease prevalence and PET specificity could occur while the cost-effectiveness of PET was preserved. Decision tree sensitivity analysis can demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic imaging modalities in Australia and provides indications that PET is cost-effective for a range of clinical indications. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Mixing of multi-modal images for conformational radiotherapy: application to patient re positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassal, P.

    1998-01-01

    This study shows a procedure of patient re positioning by comparative evaluation between the position of the patient and the theoretical expected position of the patient; the stagger between the two information gives the error of installation in translation and rotation. A correction is calculated and applied to the treatment environment (position and orientation of the patient, position and orientation of the irradiation source). The control system allows to determine the precise position of the tumor volume. The echography allows to determine the position of an organ.The surface captor is used to localize the tumors of the face or of the brain, with the respect to the face, the acquisition and the treatment of information take only few minutes. The X rays imager is applied for the localization of bones structures. (N.C.)

  13. Integration of XNAT/PACS, DICOM, and research software for automated multi-modal image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yurui; Burns, Scott S.; Lauzon, Carolyn B.; Fong, Andrew E.; James, Terry A.; Lubar, Joel F.; Thatcher, Robert W.; Twillie, David A.; Wirt, Michael D.; Zola, Marc A.; Logan, Bret W.; Anderson, Adam W.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly important public health concern. While there are several promising avenues of intervention, clinical assessments are relatively coarse and comparative quantitative analysis is an emerging field. Imaging data provide potentially useful information for evaluating TBI across functional, structural, and microstructural phenotypes. Integration and management of disparate data types are major obstacles. In a multi-institution collaboration, we are collecting electroencephalogy (EEG), structural MRI, diffusion tensor MRI (DTI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from a large cohort of US Army service members exposed to mild or moderate TBI who are undergoing experimental treatment. We have constructed a robust informatics backbone for this project centered on the DICOM standard and eXtensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT) server. Herein, we discuss (1) optimization of data transmission, validation and storage, (2) quality assurance and workflow management, and (3) integration of high performance computing with research software.

  14. Active and Passive Optical Imaging Modality for Unobtrusive Cardiorespiratory Monitoring and Facial Expression Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Vladimir; Blanik, Nikolai; Blazek, Claudia R; Paul, Michael; Pereira, Carina; Koeny, Marcus; Venema, Boudewijn; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Because of their obvious advantages, active and passive optoelectronic sensor concepts are being investigated by biomedical research groups worldwide, particularly their camera-based variants. Such methods work noninvasively and contactless, and they provide spatially resolved parameter detection. We present 2 techniques: the active photoplethysmography imaging (PPGI) method for detecting dermal blood perfusion dynamics and the passive infrared thermography imaging (IRTI) method for detecting skin temperature distribution. PPGI is an enhancement of classical pulse oximetry. Approved algorithms from pulse oximetry for the detection of heart rate, heart rate variability, blood pressure-dependent pulse wave velocity, pulse waveform-related stress/pain indicators, respiration rate, respiratory variability, and vasomotional activity can easily be adapted to PPGI. Although the IRTI method primarily records temperature distribution of the observed object, information on respiration rate and respiratory variability can also be derived by analyzing temperature change over time, for example, in the nasal region, or through respiratory movement. Combined with current research areas and novel biomedical engineering applications (eg, telemedicine, tele-emergency, and telemedical diagnostics), PPGI and IRTI may offer new data for diagnostic purposes, including assessment of peripheral arterial and venous oxygen saturation (as well as their differences). Moreover, facial expressions and stress and/or pain-related variables can be derived, for example, during anesthesia, in the recovery room/intensive care unit and during daily activities. The main advantages of both monitoring methods are unobtrusive data acquisition and the possibility to assess vital variables for different body regions. These methods supplement each other to enable long-term monitoring of physiological effects and of effects with special local characteristics. They also offer diagnostic advantages for

  15. Comparison study of four imaging modalities in diagnosis of primary synovial osteochondromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xulin; Qu Jianli; Li Shuling; Zhang Guowei; Zhang Guanghui; Li Ping; Lu Ning

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of X-ray, CT, MRI, and ultrasound in primary synovial osteochondromatosis (PSO). Methods: The imaging data of X-ray, CT, MRI, and ultrasound of 42 patients with 44 knees with PSO proved by surgery and pathology were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results: The Plain X-ray demonstrated 197 calcific nodules in 28 joints, 96 ossific nodules in 24 joints, and 5 mixed type nodules in 3 joints. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 36 joints (81.8%, 36/44) were diagnosed correctly by X-ray. The CT showed 8 big cartilaginous nodules in 5 joints, 255 calcific nodules in 30 joints, 146 ossific nodules in 28 joints, and 16 mixed type nodules in 7 joints. Twenty-four knees underwent volume rendering technique reconstruction which displayed the quantity, size, shape, and position of non-cartilaginous nodules clearly. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 40 joints (90.9%, 40/44) were diagnosed correctly by CT. The MRI demonstrated 8 big cartilaginous nodules in 5 joints, 70 small cartilaginous nodules in 4 joints, 248 calcific nodules in 29 joints, 146 ossific nodules in 28 joints, and 16 mixed type nodules in 7 joints. All nodules displayed low signal in DWI and there was no enhancement. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 43 joints (97.7%, 43/44) were diagnosed correctly by MRI. The ultrasound showed 8 big cartilaginous nodules in 5 joints, 70 small cartilaginous nodules in 4 joints, 232 calcific nodules in 30 joints, 142 ossific nodules in 28 joints, and 16 mixed type nodules in 7 joints. Compared with the data of surgery and pathology, 43 joints (97.7%, 43/44) were diagnosed correctly by ultrasound. Conclusions: The Less common manifestations of the PSO require multimodality imaging to make the diagnosis. Multimodalities (X-ray, CT, MRI and ultrasound) are particularly useful in fully characterising PSO and to allow for appropriate clinical planning. (authors)

  16. Role of correlative diagnostic imaging modalities in the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, S.; Fouda, M.; El-awadi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Para thyroidectomy with bilateral neck exploration is the classic surgical approach to control primary hyperparathyroidism. Various imaging techniques have been used to detect and localize abnormal parathyroid tissue in order to modify surgical interference, to shorten operating and recovery time and to benefit from a cost- effective analysis. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of technetium-99m sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy (MIBI) in localizing parathyroid diseases and the effect of correlative studies in the improvement of overall lesion detection. The study included 136 patients with proven primary hyperparathyroidism. There were 30 men (22%) and 106 women (78%), their age ranged from 12 to 70 years (mean 38 ±14 year). underwent preoperative localization procedure. All patients, prior to successful para thyroidectomy, were subjected MIBI scan. Additional investigations were carried out included neck ultrasonography (US) in 92 patients (67.7%), computed tomography (CT) in 36 patients (27.9%) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 6 patients (4.4%). The results were compared with operative and histological findings. Solitary parathyroid adenoma was found in 115 patients (84.6%), 3 patients had double adenomas (2.2%) and 18 patients had parathyroid hyperplasia (13.2%). Sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) were 91.2% and 100% for MIBI, 85.2% and 94.9% for US, 83.3% and 93.7% for CT and 83.3% and 100% for MRI. Non-significant difference in sensitivity was observed between US, CT or MRI, whereas MIBI sensitivity was significantly higher than the other localizing techniques (P<0.05). The combination of MIBI and US improved the overall sensitivity (93.1%), but the combination of MIBI with either CT or MRI did not improve the overall detection. The sensitivity of MIBI scintigraphy was higher than that of US, CT and MRI. Its higher sensitivity and good positive predictive value suggests that a strategy of initial testing using Tc-99

  17. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  18. Monitoring the spatiotemporal activities of miRNAs in small animal models using molecular imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-03-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  19. Validating Bioluminescence Imaging as a High-Throughput, Quantitative Modality for Assessing Tumor Burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zain Paroo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a highly sensitive tool for visualizing tumors, neoplastic development, metastatic spread, and response to therapy. Although BLI has engendered much excitement due to its apparent simplicity and ease of implementation, few rigorous studies have been presented to validate the measurements. Here, we characterize the nature of bioluminescence output from mice bearing subcutaneous luciferase-expressing tumors over a 4-week period. Following intraperitoneal or direct intratumoral administration of luciferin substrate, there was a highly dynamic kinetic profile of light emission. Although bioluminescence was subject to variability, strong correlations (r > .8, p < .001 between caliper measured tumor volumes and peak light signal, area under light signal curve and light emission at specific time points were determined. Moreover, the profile of tumor growth, as monitored with bioluminescence, closely resembled that for caliper measurements. The study shows that despite the dynamic and variable nature of bioluminescence, where appropriate experimental precautions are taken, single time point BLI may be useful for noninvasive, high-throughput, quantitative assessment of tumor burden.

  20. Articulatory mediation of speech perception: a causal analysis of multi-modal imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, David W; Segawa, Jennifer A

    2009-02-01

    The inherent confound between the organization of articulation and the acoustic-phonetic structure of the speech signal makes it exceptionally difficult to evaluate the competing claims of motor and acoustic-phonetic accounts of how listeners recognize coarticulated speech. Here we use Granger causation analyzes of high spatiotemporal resolution neural activation data derived from the integration of magnetic resonance imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography, to examine the role of lexical and articulatory mediation in listeners' ability to use phonetic context to compensate for place assimilation. Listeners heard two-word phrases such as pen pad and then saw two pictures, from which they had to select the one that depicted the phrase. Assimilation, lexical competitor environment and the phonological validity of assimilation context were all manipulated. Behavioral data showed an effect of context on the interpretation of assimilated segments. Analysis of 40 Hz gamma phase locking patterns identified a large distributed neural network including 16 distinct regions of interest (ROIs) spanning portions of both hemispheres in the first 200 ms of post-assimilation context. Granger analyzes of individual conditions showed differing patterns of causal interaction between ROIs during this interval, with hypothesized lexical and articulatory structures and pathways driving phonetic activation in the posterior superior temporal gyrus in assimilation conditions, but not in phonetically unambiguous conditions. These results lend strong support for the motor theory of speech perception, and clarify the role of lexical mediation in the phonetic processing of assimilated speech.

  1. Is magnetic resonance imaging a viable alternative to ultrasound as the primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of paediatric appendicitis? A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunmefun, G.; Hardy, M.; Boynes, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention in paediatric patients. Ultrasound is generally the diagnostic imaging modality of choice, followed by CT, where paediatric appendicitis is suspected. However, high operator dependency and diagnostic restrictions related to anatomical and clinical presentation may limit consistency of application. This paper explores whether MRI is a viable alternative to ultrasound as the primary imaging modality. Method: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. A search of Medline, Cinahl, PubMed Central and Google Scholar was undertaken supplemented by a review of reference lists, author searching and review of NICE evidence base for existing guidelines. Included studies were assessed for bias using the QUADAS-2 quality assessment tool and data were extracted systematically using a purposefully designed electronic data extraction proforma. Results: Seven studies were included in final review. The age range of participants extended from 0 to 19 years. Only one study with a patient age range of 0–14 used sedation. Sensitivity estimates from the included studies ranged from 92% to 100% while specificity ranged from 89% to 100%. A significant variation in the number and type of sequences was noted between the studies. Conclusion: MRI offers high sensitivity and specificity comparable to contrast enhanced CT and greater than ultrasound as reported in the literature. Where accessibility is not a restriction, MRI is a viable alternative to ultrasound in the assessment and diagnosis of paediatric appendicitis. Clinical practice recommendations have been provided to facilitate the translation of evidence into practice. - Highlights: • MRI may be used as the primary imaging tool to investigate paediatric appendicitis. • Gadolinium is not necessary for MRI evaluation of appendicitis in children. • Sedation for MRI evaluation of appendicitis is not required

  2. Educational response in South Korea to recent advances in imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Dal Gwan

    1986-01-01

    Along with the development of new equipment, the progress made in diagnostics utilizing X-ray images has made both qualitative and quantitative analyses possible. Accordingly, the need is being felt for scientific-technological stance to explore new avenues of development through combined use of various apparatus in the interests of improving the absolute quality of our technology. To do so, extention of the school system to 4 years would be essential, but this may have to be modified to better suit the reality of the individual countries involved. As the education of physicians is being carried on by physicians, so should the leadership in the education of radiological technologists remain in the hands of radiological technologists remain in the hands of radiological technologists. Testing technology and clinical services may be the areas where education based on experience may be effective, and productivity of education may be enhanced through emphasis on reverence for human life and love for fellow human beings, so that the overall efforts may be more oriented to cultivation of ability rather than to the success in the national examinations. The post graduate education must lack nothing in re-equipping radiological technologists with basic technology and scientific knowledge. In order to strike a balance between cultivation of reverence for human life on the one hand and development of scientific knowledge and technological expertise on the other in this age of highly developed science and technology, close ties among radiological technologists within smaller units of organization and spirit of mutual cooperation must be emphasized, and greater emphasis may be in order on making information science and total imagenology appear more affractive to the students by effectively linking basic sciences to applied sciences, and to this end, communication and team work among different academic organizations must be actively pursued

  3. Tissue mimicking materials for a multi-imaging modality prostate phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Unal, Orhan; Vigen, Karl K.; Frank, Gary R.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2001-01-01

    Materials that simultaneously mimic soft tissue in vivo for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), and computed tomography (CT) for use in a prostate phantom have been developed. Prostate and muscle mimicking materials contain water, agarose, lipid particles, protein, Cu ++ , EDTA, glass beads, and thimerosal (preservative). Fat was mimicked with safflower oil suffusing a random mesh (network) of polyurethane. Phantom material properties were measured at 22 deg. C. (22 deg. C is a typical room temperature at which phantoms are used.) The values of material properties should match, as well as possible, the values for tissues at body temperature, 37 deg. C. For MRI, the primary properties of interest are T1 and T2 relaxations times, for US they are the attenuation coefficient, propagation speed, and backscatter, and for CT, the x-ray attenuation. Considering the large number of parameters to be mimicked, rather good agreement was found with actual tissue values obtained from the literature. Using published values for prostate parenchyma, T1 and T2 at 37 deg. C and 40 MHz are estimated to be about 1100 and 98 ms, respectively. The CT number for in vivo prostate is estimated to be 45 HU (Hounsfield units). The prostate mimicking material has a T1 of 937 ms and a T2 of 88 ms at 22 deg. C and 40 MHz; the propagation speed and attenuation coefficient slope are 1540 m/s and 0.36 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, and the CT number of tissue mimicking prostate is 43 HU. Tissue mimicking (TM) muscle differs from TM prostate in the amount of dry weight agarose, Cu ++ , EDTA, and the quality and quantity of glass beads. The 18 μm glass beads used in TM muscle increase US backscatter and US attenuation; the presence of the beads also has some effect on T1 but no effect on T2. The composition of tissue-mimicking materials developed is such that different versions can be placed in direct contact with one another in a phantom with no long term change in US, MRI, or CT

  4. Identification, diagnostic assistance and planning methods that use multi-modality imaging for prostate cancer focal therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makni, Nasr

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer among men. In In the last decade, new diagnosis procedures and treatment options have been developed and made possible thanks to the recent progress in prostate imaging modalities. The newest challenges in this field are to detect the smallest tumors and to treat locally to minimise the treatment morbidity. In this thesis, we introduce a set of automatic image processing methods for the guidance and assistance of diagnosis and treatment, in laser-based prostate cancer focal therapies. In the first part of this work, segmentation and computer-aided detection algorithms have been developed for the enhancement of image-based diagnosis of prostate cancer. First, we propose a novel approach that combines Markov Random Fields framework with an Active Shape Model, in order to extract three dimensional outlines of the gland from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data. Second, prostate's MRI volume is segmented into peripheral and central zones: we introduce a method that explores features of multispectral MRI, and is based on belief functions and the modelling of an a priori knowledge as an additional source of information. Finally, computer-aided detection of prostate's peripheral zone tumors is investigated by experimenting novel texture features based on fractal geometry-based. These parameters, extracted from morphological MRI, were tested using both supervised and unsupervised classification methods. The results of these different approaches were studied and compared. The second part of this work addresses the guidance of laser-based focal ablation of prostate tumors. A novel non rigid registration method is introduced for fusion of pre-operative MRI and planning data, and per-operative ultrasound imaging. We test and evaluate our algorithms using simulated data and physical phantoms, which enable comparison to ground truth. Patients' data, combined to expert interpretation, are also used in the

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared to conventional imaging modalities in pediatric primary bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Stege, Claudia; Kaspers, Gertjan [VU Medical Centre, Divisions of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Oncology, Sydney (Australia); Onikul, Ella [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Medical Imaging, Sydney (Australia); Graf, Nicole [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Pathology, Sydney (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Imaging, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-04-15

    F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is useful in adults with primary bone tumors. Limited published data exist in children. To compare hybrid FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with conventional imaging (CI) modalities in detecting malignant lesions, predicting response to chemotherapy and diagnosing physeal involvement in pediatric primary bone tumors. Retrospective analysis of PET/CT and CI reports with histopathology or follow-up > 6 months as reference standard. Response parameters and physeal involvement at diagnosis were compared to histopathology. A total of 314 lesions were detected in 86 scans. Excluding lung lesions, PET/CT had higher sensitivity and specificity than CI (83%, 98% and 78%, 97%, respectively). In lung lesions, PET/CT had higher specificity than CI (96% compared to 87%) but lower sensitivity (80% compared to 93%). Higher initial SUV{sub max} and greater SUV{sub max} reduction on PET/CT after chemotherapy predicted a good response. Change in tumor size on MRI did not predict response. Both PET/CT and MRI were very sensitive but of low specificity in predicting physeal tumor involvement. PET/CT appears more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood primary bone tumors, excluding lung lesions. It seems better than MRI at predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. (orig.)

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT compared to conventional imaging modalities in pediatric primary bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, Kevin; Stege, Claudia; Kaspers, Gertjan; Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Onikul, Ella; Graf, Nicole; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2012-01-01

    F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is useful in adults with primary bone tumors. Limited published data exist in children. To compare hybrid FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with conventional imaging (CI) modalities in detecting malignant lesions, predicting response to chemotherapy and diagnosing physeal involvement in pediatric primary bone tumors. Retrospective analysis of PET/CT and CI reports with histopathology or follow-up > 6 months as reference standard. Response parameters and physeal involvement at diagnosis were compared to histopathology. A total of 314 lesions were detected in 86 scans. Excluding lung lesions, PET/CT had higher sensitivity and specificity than CI (83%, 98% and 78%, 97%, respectively). In lung lesions, PET/CT had higher specificity than CI (96% compared to 87%) but lower sensitivity (80% compared to 93%). Higher initial SUV max and greater SUV max reduction on PET/CT after chemotherapy predicted a good response. Change in tumor size on MRI did not predict response. Both PET/CT and MRI were very sensitive but of low specificity in predicting physeal tumor involvement. PET/CT appears more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood primary bone tumors, excluding lung lesions. It seems better than MRI at predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. (orig.)

  7. 18F-FDG PET as a single imaging modality in pediatric neuroblastoma. Comparison with abdomen CT and bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Jung; Hwang, Hee Sung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) as a single imaging agent in neuroblastoma in comparison with other imaging modalities. A total of 30 patients with pathologically proven neuroblastoma who underwent FDG PET for staging were enrolled. Diagnostic performance of FDG PET and abdomen CT was compared in detecting soft tissue lesions. FDG PET and bone scintigraphy (BS) were compared in bone metastases. Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of primary or recurrent lesions was calculated for quantitative analysis. Tumor FDG uptake was detected in 29 of 30 patients with primary neuroblastoma. On initial FDG PET, SUVmax of primary lesions were lower in early stage (I-II) than in late stage (III-IV) (3.03 vs. 5.45, respectively, p=0.019). FDG PET was superior to CT scan in detecting distant lymph nodes (23 vs. 18 from 23 lymph nodes). FDG PET showed higher accuracy to identify bone metastases than BS both on patient-based analyses (100 vs. 94.4% in sensitivity, 100 vs. 77.8% in specificity), and on lesion-based analyses (FDG PET: 203 lesions, BS: 86 lesions). Sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET to detect recurrence were 87.5% and 93.8, respectively. FDG PET was superior to CT in detecting distant LN metastasis and to BS in detecting skeletal metastasis in neuroblastoma. BS might be eliminated in the evaluation of neuroblastoma when FDG PET is performed. (author)

  8. Three-dimensional rotational angiography fused with multimodal imaging modalities for targeted endomyocardial injections in the ischaemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Dieter Frans; Nuyens, Dieter; De Buck, Stijn; Claus, Piet; Gheysens, Olivier; Koole, Michel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vanden Driessche, Nina; Janssens, Laurens; Ector, Joris; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan; Heidbuchel, Hein; Janssens, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    Biological therapies for ischaemic heart disease require efficient, safe, and affordable intramyocardial delivery. Integration of multiple imaging modalities within the fluoroscopy framework can provide valuable information to guide these procedures. We compared an anatomo-electric method (LARCA) with a non-fluoroscopic electromechanical mapping system (NOGA(®)). LARCA integrates selective three-dimensional-rotational angiograms with biplane fluoroscopy. To identify the infarct region, we studied LARCA-fusion with pre-procedural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dedicated CT, or (18)F-FDG-PET/CT. We induced myocardial infarction in 20 pigs by 90-min LAD occlusion. Six weeks later, we compared peri-infarct delivery accuracy of coloured fluospheres using sequential NOGA(®)- and LARCA-MRI-guided vs. LARCA-CT- and LARCA-(18)F-FDG-PET/CT-guided intramyocardial injections. MRI after 6 weeks revealed significant left ventricular (LV) functional impairment and remodelling (LVEF 31 ± 3%, LVEDV 178 ± 15 mL, infarct size 17 ± 2% LV mass). During NOGA(®)-procedures, three of five animals required DC-shock for major ventricular arrhythmias vs. one of ten during LARCA-procedures. Online procedure time was shorter for LARCA than NOGA(®) (77 ± 6 vs. 130 ± 3 min, P integration allowed closer approximation of the targeted border zone than LARCA-PET (4.0 ± 0.5 mm vs. 6.2 ± 0.6 mm, P technology for cardiac biological therapies. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A sharp image or a sharp knife: norms for the modality-exclusivity of 774 concept-property items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dantzig, Saskia; Cowell, Rosemary A; Zeelenberg, René; Pecher, Diane

    2011-03-01

    According to recent embodied cognition theories, mental concepts are represented by modality-specific sensory-motor systems. Much of the evidence for modality-specificity in conceptual processing comes from the property-verification task. When applying this and other tasks, it is important to select items based on their modality-exclusivity. We collected modality ratings for a set of 387 properties, each of which was paired with two different concepts, yielding a total of 774 concept-property items. For each item, participants rated the degree to which the property could be experienced through five perceptual modalities (vision, audition, touch, smell, and taste). Based on these ratings, we computed a measure of modality exclusivity, the degree to which a property is perceived exclusively through one sensory modality. In this paper, we briefly sketch the theoretical background of conceptual knowledge, discuss the use of the property-verification task in cognitive research, provide our norms and statistics, and validate the norms in a memory experiment. We conclude that our norms are important for researchers studying modality-specific effects in conceptual processing.

  10. A sharp image or a sharp knife: Norms for the modality-exclusivity of 774 concept-property items

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Dantzig (Saskia); R.A. Cowell (Rosemary A.); R. Zeelenberg (René); D. Pecher (Diane)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAccording to recent embodied cognition theories, mental concepts are represented by modality-specific sensory-motor systems. Much of the evidence for modality-specificity in conceptual processing comes from the property-verification task. When applying this and other tasks, it is

  11. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  12. The increased use of computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography as the sole imaging modalities prior to infrainguinal bypass has had no effect on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Bing; Damle, Rachelle N; Flahive, Julie; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Stone, David H; Patel, Virendra I; Schanzer, Andres; Baril, Donald T

    2015-08-01

    Angiography remains the gold standard imaging modality before infrainguinal bypass. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have emerged as noninvasive alternatives for preoperative imaging. We sought to examine contemporary trends in the utilization of CTA and MRA as isolated imaging modalities before infrainguinal bypass and to compare outcomes following infrainguinal bypass in patients who underwent CTA or MRA versus those who underwent conventional arteriography. Patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass within the Vascular Study Group of New England were identified (2003-2012). Patients were stratified by preoperative imaging modality: CTA/MRA alone or conventional angiography. Trends in utilization of these modalities were examined and demographics of these groups were compared. Primary end points included primary patency, secondary patency, and major adverse limb events (MALE) at 1 year as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to evaluate the effect of imaging modality on primary patency, secondary patency, and MALE after adjusting for confounders. In 3123 infrainguinal bypasses, CTA/MRA alone was used in 462 cases (15%) and angiography was used in 2661 cases (85%). Use of CTA/MRA alone increased over time, with 52 (11%) bypasses performed between 2003 and 2005, 189 (41%) bypasses performed between 2006 and 2009, and 221 (48%) bypasses performed between 2010 and 2012 (P < 0.001). Patients with CTA/MRA alone, compared with patients with angiography, more frequently underwent bypass for claudication (33% vs. 26%, P = 0.001) or acute limb ischemia (13% vs. 5%, P < 0.0001), more frequently had prosthetic conduits (39% vs. 30%, P = 0.001), and less frequently had tibial/pedal targets (32% vs. 40%, P = 0.002). After adjusting for these and other confounders, multivariable analysis demonstrated that the use of CTA/MRA alone was not associated with a significant

  13. Magnetic tomography - newer picture techniques and perspectives for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjesdal, Kjell-Inge; Smith, Hans-Joergen

    2000-01-01

    Background: From the very introduction of MRI into medicine, the modality has presented the user a long list of theoretical tissue contrast parameters. The development of MRI has been aimed at turning these theoretical possibilities into practical options. Material and method: We give an overview of the new MRI techniques and perspectives for the future based on literature search and our own experience. Results: Today, the modality offers state-of-the-art anatomical details as well as visualisation of several functional parameters such as perfusion, diffusion, blood oxygen saturation and tissue temperature. In the near future, MRI may provide absolute quantification of regional perfusion and rate of oxygen consumption in a clinical setting. New vascular and gastrointestinal contrast media will further increase the sensitivity and specificity of MRI. A continuous increase in imaging speed has made MRI capable of providing adequate ''fluoroscopic'' guidance during interventional procedures and real-time diagnostic imaging is only few years ahead. Interpretation: The spread of MRI installations will increase as a result of increasing demand for the best and least harmful diagnostic procedure. The main challenge to the MRI community will be to exploit the vast diagnostic possibilities

  14. Imaging of Herniated Discs of the Cervical Spine: Inter-Modality Differences between 64-Slice Multidetector CT and 1.5-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ji Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To assess inter-modality variability when evaluating cervical intervertebral disc herniation using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed cervical spine 1.5-T MRI and 64-slice MDCT data on C2-3 though C6-7 of 51 patients in the context of intervertebral disc herniation. Interobserver and inter-modality agreements were expressed as unweighted kappa values. Weighted kappa statistics were used to assess the extents of agreement in terms of the number of involved segments (NIS) in disc herniation and epicenter measurements collected using MDCT and MRI. The interobserver agreement rates upon evaluation of disc morphology by the three radiologists were in fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.39-0.53 for MDCT images; k = 0.45-0.56 for MRIs). When the disc morphology was categorized into two and four grades, the inter-modality agreement rates were moderate (k-value, 0.59) and substantial (k-value, 0.66), respectively. The inter-modality agreements for evaluations of the NIS (k-value, 0.78) and the epicenter (k-value, 0.79) were substantial. Also, the interobserver agreements for the NIS (CT; k-value, 0.85 and MRI; k-value, 0.88) and epicenter (CT; k-value, 0.74 and MRI; k-value, 0.70) evaluations by two readers were substantial. MDCT tended to underestimate the extent of herniated disc lesions compared with MRI. Multidetector-row computed tomography and MRI showed a moderate-to-substantial degree of inter-modality agreement for the assessment of herniated cervical discs. MDCT images have a tendency to underestimate the anterior/posterior extent of the herniated disc compared with MRI.

  15. In vivo tumor-targeted dual-modal fluorescence/CT imaging using a nanoprobe co-loaded with an aggregation-induced emission dye and gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jimei; Li, Chan; Zhang, Xu; Huo, Shuaidong; Jin, Shubin; An, Fei-Fei; Wang, Xiaodan; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, C I; Duan, Guiyun; Guo, Fengguang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Hao, Jifu; Wang, Paul C; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    As an intensely studied computed tomography (CT) contrast agent, gold nanoparticle has been suggested to be combined with fluorescence imaging modality to offset the low sensitivity of CT. However, the strong quenching of gold nanoparticle on fluorescent dyes requires complicated design and shielding to overcome. Herein, we report a unique nanoprobe (M-NPAPF-Au) co-loading an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) red dye and gold nanoparticles into DSPE-PEG(2000) micelles for dual-modal fluorescence/CT imaging. The nanoprobe was prepared based on a facile method of "one-pot ultrasonic emulsification". Surprisingly, in the micelles system, fluorescence dye (NPAPF) efficiently overcame the strong fluorescence quenching of shielding-free gold nanoparticles and retained the crucial AIE feature. In vivo studies demonstrated the nanoprobe had superior tumor-targeting ability, excellent fluorescence and CT imaging effects. The totality of present studies clearly indicates the significant potential application of M-NPAPF-Au as a dual-modal non-invasive fluorescence/X-ray CT nanoprobe for in vivo tumor-targeted imaging and diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Symbol Digit Modalities Test adaptation for Magnetic Resonance Imaging environment: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P H R; Spedo, C T; Barreira, A A; Leoni, R F

    2018-02-01

    The Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) is widely used for cognitive evaluation of information processing speed (IPS), required in many cognitive operations. Despite being unspecific for different neurological disorders, it is sensitive to assess impaired performance related to stroke, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. However, in addition to evaluate the presence and severity of IPS impairment, it is of interest to determine the localization and integration of brain regions responsible for the functions assessed by the SDMT. To review the studies that adapted the SDMT to the magnetic resonance environment and obtain the brain areas associated with the performance of the task in healthy subjects with a meta-analysis. A systematic review was performed using ten studies published between 1990 and 2017, and selected from four databases. All studies included participants of both genders and age between 18 and 50 years, used Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and SDMT adaptation and reported brain regions associated with the task. Six of them also reported the region coordinates in a standard space, so they were included in a meta-analysis. Activation Likelihood Estimation algorithm, with significance for p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons, was used to identify areas that are robustly related to the performance of the SDMT. The areas predominantly reported in the studies of our meta-analysis were regions of the frontoparietal attentional network and occipital cortex, as well as cuneus, precuneus, and cerebellum. Individually all regions that survived the statistical threshold are consistent with what is expected after reviewing prospective studies. The present study allowed the identification of brain areas activated during the performance of the SDMT in healthy subjects, and therefore it will help understanding the differences in brain activation by this task in clinical populations. Moreover, it may guide future

  17. Perspectives on How Human Simultaneous Multi-Modal Imaging Adds Directionality to Spread Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Julia Neitzel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous animal research suggests that the spread of pathological agents in Alzheimer’s disease (AD follows the direction of signaling pathways. Specifically, tau pathology has been suggested to propagate in an infection-like mode along axons, from transentorhinal cortices to medial temporal lobe cortices and consequently to other cortical regions, while amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology seems to spread in an activity-dependent manner among and from isocortical regions into limbic and then subcortical regions. These directed connectivity-based spread models, however, have not been tested directly in AD patients due to the lack of an in vivo method to identify directed connectivity in humans. Recently, a new method—metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM—has been developed and validated in healthy participants that uses simultaneous FDG-PET and resting-state fMRI data acquisition to identify directed intrinsic effective connectivity (EC. To this end, postsynaptic energy consumption (FDG-PET is used to identify regions with afferent input from other functionally connected brain regions (resting-state fMRI. Here, we discuss how this multi-modal imaging approach allows quantitative, whole-brain mapping of signaling direction in AD patients, thereby pointing out some of the advantages it offers compared to other EC methods (i.e., Granger causality, dynamic causal modeling, Bayesian networks. Most importantly, MCM provides the basis on which models of pathology spread, derived from animal studies, can be tested in AD patients. In particular, future work should investigate whether tau and Aβ in humans propagate along the trajectories of directed connectivity in order to advance our understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms causing disease progression.

  18. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles function as a long-term, multi-modal imaging label for non-invasive tracking of implanted progenitor cells.

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    Christina A Pacak

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles to function as a long-term tracking label for multi-modal imaging of implanted engineered tissues containing muscle-derived progenitor cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT. SPIO-labeled primary myoblasts were embedded in fibrin sealant and imaged to obtain intensity data by MRI or radio-opacity information by μCT. Each imaging modality displayed a detection gradient that matched increasing SPIO concentrations. Labeled cells were then incorporated in fibrin sealant, injected into the atrioventricular groove of rat hearts, and imaged in vivo and ex vivo for up to 1 year. Transplanted cells were identified in intact animals and isolated hearts using both imaging modalities. MRI was better able to detect minuscule amounts of SPIO nanoparticles, while μCT more precisely identified the location of heavily-labeled cells. Histological analyses confirmed that iron oxide particles were confined to viable, skeletal muscle-derived cells in the implant at the expected location based on MRI and μCT. These analyses showed no evidence of phagocytosis of labeled cells by macrophages or release of nanoparticles from transplanted cells. In conclusion, we established that SPIO nanoparticles function as a sensitive and specific long-term label for MRI and μCT, respectively. Our findings will enable investigators interested in regenerative therapies to non-invasively and serially acquire complementary, high-resolution images of transplanted cells for one year using a single label.

  19. JJ1017 committee report: image examination order codes--standardized codes for imaging modality, region, and direction with local expansion: an extension of DICOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Kuranishi, Makoto; Sukenobu, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tani, Shigeki; Sakusabe, Takaya; Nakajima, Takashi; Morimura, Shinya; Kabata, Shun

    2002-06-01

    The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) standard includes parts regarding nonimage data information, such as image study ordering data and performed procedure data, and is used for sharing information between HIS/RIS and modality systems, which is essential for IHE. To bring such parts of the DICOM standard into force in Japan, a joint committee of JIRA and JAHIS established the JJ1017 management guideline, specifying, for example, which items are legally required in Japan, while remaining optional in the DICOM standard. In Japan, the contents of orders from referring physicians for radiographic examinations include details of the examination. Such details are not used typically by referring physicians requesting radiographic examinations in the United States, because radiologists in the United States often determine the examination protocol. The DICOM standard has code tables for examination type, region, and direction for image examination orders. However, this investigation found that it does not include items that are detailed sufficiently for use in Japan, because of the above-mentioned reason. To overcome these drawbacks, we have generated the JJ1017 code for these 3 codes for use based on the JJ1017 guidelines. This report introduces the JJ1017 code. These codes (the study type codes in particular) must be expandable to keep up with technical advances in equipment. Expansion has 2 directions: width for covering more categories and depth for specifying the information in more detail (finer categories). The JJ1017 code takes these requirements into consideration and clearly distinguishes between the stem part as the common term and the expansion. The stem part of the JJ1017 code partially utilizes the DICOM codes to remain in line with the DICOM standard. This work is an example of how local requirements can be met by using the DICOM standard and extending it.

  20. Two Phase Non-Rigid Multi-Modal Image Registration Using Weber Local Descriptor-Based Similarity Metrics and Normalized Mutual Information

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    Feng Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-rigid multi-modal image registration plays an important role in medical image processing and analysis. Existing image registration methods based on similarity metrics such as mutual information (MI and sum of squared differences (SSD cannot achieve either high registration accuracy or high registration efficiency. To address this problem, we propose a novel two phase non-rigid multi-modal image registration method by combining Weber local descriptor (WLD based similarity metrics with the normalized mutual information (NMI using the diffeomorphic free-form deformation (FFD model. The first phase aims at recovering the large deformation component using the WLD based non-local SSD (wldNSSD or weighted structural similarity (wldWSSIM. Based on the output of the former phase, the second phase is focused on getting accurate transformation parameters related to the small deformation using the NMI. Extensive experiments on T1, T2 and PD weighted MR images demonstrate that the proposed wldNSSD-NMI or wldWSSIM-NMI method outperforms the registration methods based on the NMI, the conditional mutual information (CMI, the SSD on entropy images (ESSD and the ESSD-NMI in terms of registration accuracy and computation efficiency.

  1. The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE high performance computing infrastructure: applications in neuroscience and neuroinformatics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojtek James eGoscinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE is a national imaging and visualisation facility established by Monash University, the Australian Synchrotron, the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO, and the Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing (VPAC, with funding from the National Computational Infrastructure and the Victorian Government. The MASSIVE facility provides hardware, software and expertise to drive research in the biomedical sciences, particularly advanced brain imaging research using synchrotron x-ray and infrared imaging, functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, x-ray computer tomography (CT, electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The development of MASSIVE has been based on best practice in system integration methodologies, frameworks, and architectures. The facility has: (i integrated multiple different neuroimaging analysis software components, (ii enabled cross-platform and cross-modality integration of neuroinformatics tools, and (iii brought together neuroimaging databases and analysis workflows. MASSIVE is now operational as a nationally distributed and integrated facility for neuroinfomatics and brain imaging research.

  2. Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modality Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Dual-Therapy with Magnetic Porphyrin-Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yu-Hao; Chen, Yang; Wang, Man-Man; Wang, Xue-Sheng; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-03-01

    Phototherapy shows some unique advantages in clinical application, such as remote controllability, improved selectivity, and low bio-toxicity, than chemotherapy. In order to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy, imaging-guided therapy seems particularly important because it integrates visible information to speculate the distribution and metabolism of the probe. Here we prepare biocompatible core-shell nanocomposites for dual-modality imaging-guided photothermal and photodynamic dual-therapy by the in situ growth of porphyrin-metal organic framework (PMOF) on Fe3O4@C core. Fe3O4@C core was used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) agent. The optical properties of porphyrin were well remained in PMOF, and PMOF was therefore selected for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence and MR dual-modality imaging-guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy was confirmed with tumour-bearing mice as model. The high tumour accumulation of Fe3O4@C@PMOF and controllable light excitation at the tumour site achieved efficient cancer therapy, but low toxicity was observed to the normal tissues. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4@C@PMOF was a promising dual-imaging guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy platform for tumour diagnosis and treatment with low cytotoxicity and negligible in vivo toxicity.

  3. In Vivo Dual-Modality Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Lymph Node Mapping with Good Biocompatibility Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

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    Yonghua Zhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs with impressive enhanced T1 contrast ability show great promise in biomedical diagnosis. Herein, we developed a dual-modality imaging agent system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG-coated manganese oxide NPs conjugated with organic dye (Cy7.5, which functions as a fluorescence imaging (FI agent as well as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI imaging agent. The formed Mn3O4@PEG-Cy7.5 NPs with the size of ~10 nm exhibit good colloidal stability in different physiological media. Serial FI and MRI studies that non-invasively assessed the bio-distribution pattern and the feasibility for in vivo dual-modality imaging-guided lymph node mapping have been investigated. In addition, histological and biochemical analyses exhibited low toxicity even at a dose of 20 mg/kg in vivo. Since Mn3O4@PEG-Cy7.5 NPs exhibited desirable properties as imaging agents and good biocompatibility, this work offers a robust, safe, and accurate diagnostic platform based on manganese oxide NPs for tumor metastasis diagnosis.

  4. Newer techniques for intravascular and intraoperative neurointerventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashida, R.T.; Halbach, V.V.; Hieshima, G.B.; Yang, P.

    1987-01-01

    A videotape demonstrating newer techniques used in intravascular and intraoperative embolization procedures will be presented. The authors discuss the use of some of the newer embolic agents, real-time digital subtraction angiography, roadmapping techniques, and the use of microcatheters and steerable micro guide wires, which has greatly facilitated neurovascullar embolization procedures and enhanced patient safety. A number of actual intraoperative and intravascular cases will be shown demonstrating treatment of vascular malformations of the brain and spinal cord, carotid cavernous sinus fistulas, aneurysms and dural arteriovenous malformations. The indications for treatment, patient selection, technical preparation and newer methodologies and approaches to complex vascular lesions of the brain and spinal cord are discussed in detail

  5. A fuzzy feature fusion method for auto-segmentation of gliomas with multi-modality diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance images in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Wang, Ping; Sun, Ranran; Yang, Chengwen; Zhang, Ning; Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2018-02-19

    The diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide functional information about tumour and enable more sensitive detection of the tumour extent. We aimed to develop a fuzzy feature fusion method for auto-segmentation of gliomas in radiotherapy planning using multi-parametric functional MR images including apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). For each functional modality, one histogram-based fuzzy model was created to transform image volume into a fuzzy feature space. Based on the fuzzy fusion result of the three fuzzy feature spaces, regions with high possibility belonging to tumour were generated automatically. The auto-segmentations of tumour in structural MR images were added in final auto-segmented gross tumour volume (GTV). For evaluation, one radiation oncologist delineated GTVs for nine patients with all modalities. Comparisons between manually delineated and auto-segmented GTVs showed that, the mean volume difference was 8.69% (±5.62%); the mean Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.88 (±0.02); the mean sensitivity and specificity of auto-segmentation was 0.87 (±0.04) and 0.98 (±0.01) respectively. High accuracy and efficiency can be achieved with the new method, which shows potential of utilizing functional multi-parametric MR images for target definition in precision radiation treatment planning for patients with gliomas.

  6. Solitary pulmonary nodules: meta-analytic comparison of cross-sectional imaging modalities for diagnosis of malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Paul; Dwamena, Ben A; Kelly, Aine Marie; Carlos, Ruth C

    2008-03-01

    To perform a meta-analysis to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), and technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) depreotide single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). Data sources were studies published in PubMed between January 1990 and December 2005. The selected investigations were comparative and noncomparative diagnostic cohort studies to examine the operating characteristics of the four imaging modalities for evaluation of SPNs, involving at least 10 enrolled participants with histologic confirmation and having sufficient data to calculate contingency tables. A random coefficient binary regression model with disease probability conditioned on test results was used to summarize test performance and construct summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, diagnostic odds ratios, and areas under the ROC curve were calculated. Forty-four studies--10 dynamic CT, six dynamic MR, 22 FDG PET, and seven (99m)Tc-depreotide SPECT--met the inclusion criteria. (One study was included in both the FDG PET and SPECT groups.) Sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, negative predictive values, diagnostic odds ratios, and areas under the ROC curve were, respectively, 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88, 0.97), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.97), 0.80 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.86), 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.98), 39.91 (95% CI: 1.21, 81.04), and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.97) for dynamic CT; 0.94 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.97), 0.79 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.86), 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.89), 0.93 (95% CI: 0.90, 0.96), 60.59 (95% CI: 5.56, 115.62), and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.98) for dynamic MR; 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.98), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.88), 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.93), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.94), 97.31 (95% CI: 6.26, 188.37), and 0

  7. Clinical applications of choroidal imaging technologies

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    Jay Chhablani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroid supplies the major blood supply to the eye, especially the outer retinal structures. Its understanding has significantly improved with the advent of advanced imaging modalities such as enhanced depth imaging technique and the newer swept source optical coherence tomography. Recent literature reports the findings of choroidal changes, quantitative as well as qualitative, in various chorioretinal disorders. This review article describes applications of choroidal imaging in the management of common diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, high myopia, central serous chorioretinopathy, chorioretinal inflammatory diseases, and tumors. This article briefly discusses future directions in choroidal imaging including angiography.

  8. Diagnostic role of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for early and atypical bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Liang; Li, Qian; Cao, Lin; Jiang, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The bone metastasis appeared early before the bone imaging for most of the above patients. (99)Tc(m)-MDP ((99)Tc(m) marked methylene diphosphonate) bone imaging could diagnosis the bone metastasis with highly sensitivity, but with lower specificity. The aim of this study is to explore the diagnostic value of (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging for the early period atypical bone metastases. 15 to 30 mCi (99)Tc(m)-MDP was intravenously injected to the 34 malignant patients diagnosed as doubtful early bone metastases. SPECT, CT and SPECT/CT images were captured and analyzed consequently. For the patients diagnosed as early period atypical bone metastases by SPECT/CT, combining the SPECT/CT and MRI together as the SPECT/MRI integrated image. The obtained SPECT/MRI image was analyzed and compared with the pathogenic results of patients. The results indicated that 34 early period doubtful metastatic focus, including 34 SPECT positive focus, 17 focus without special changes by using CT method, 11 bone metastases focus by using SPECT/CT method, 23 doubtful bone metastases focus, 8 doubtful bone metastases focus, 14 doubtful bone metastases focus and 2 focus without clear image. Totally, SPECT/CT combined with SPECT/MRI method diagnosed 30 bone metastatic focus and 4 doubtfully metastatic focus. In conclusion, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT/CT combined SPECT/MRI Multi modality imaging shows a higher diagnostic value for the early period bone metastases, which also enhances the diagnostic accuracy rate.

  9. First-in-human study of PET and optical dual-modality image-guided surgery in glioblastoma using 68Ga-IRDye800CW-BBN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deling; Zhang, Jingjing; Chi, Chongwei; Xiao, Xiong; Wang, Junmei; Lang, Lixin; Ali, Iqbal; Niu, Gang; Zhang, Liwei; Tian, Jie; Ji, Nan; Zhu, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2018-01-01

    Purpose : Despite the use of fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS), maximum safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a major challenge. It has restricted surgeons between preoperative diagnosis and intraoperative treatment. Currently, an integrated approach combining preoperative assessment with intraoperative guidance would be a significant step in this direction. Experimental design : We developed a novel 68 Ga-IRDye800CW-BBN PET/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dual-modality imaging probe targeting gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in GBM. The preclinical in vivo tumor imaging and FGS were first evaluated using an orthotopic U87MG glioma xenograft model. Subsequently, the first-in-human prospective cohort study (NCT 02910804) of GBM patients were conducted with preoperative PET assessment and intraoperative FGS. Results : The orthotopic tumors in mice could be precisely resected using the near-infrared intraoperative system. Translational cohort research in 14 GBM patients demonstrated an excellent correlation between preoperative positive PET uptake and intraoperative NIRF signal. The tumor fluorescence signals were significantly higher than those from adjacent brain tissue in vivo and ex vivo (p dual-modality imaging technique is feasible for integrated pre- and intraoperative targeted imaging via the same molecular receptor and improved intraoperative GBM visualization and maximum safe resection.

  10. Contrast-enhanced [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Avani; Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Pawaskar, Alok Suresh; Shelley, Simon; Elangovan, Indirani; Jain, Hasmukh; Pandey, Somnath; Kalal, Shilpa; Amalachandran, Jaykanth

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the advantages of contrast enhanced F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-contrast enhanced CT [CECT]) when used as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin (MUO). A total of 243 patients with fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy proven MUO were included in this prospective study. Patients who were thoroughly evaluated for primary or primary tumor was detected by any other investigation were excluded from the analysis. Totally, 163 patients with pathological diagnosis of malignancy but no apparent sites of the primary tumor were finally selected for analysis. The site of probable primary malignancy suggested by PET-CECT was confirmed by biopsy/follow-up. PET-CECT suggested probable site of primary in 128/163 (78.52%) patients. In 30/35 remaining patients, primary tumor was not detected even after extensive work-up. In 5 patients, where PET-CECT was negative, primary was found on further extensive investigations or follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the study were 95.76%, 66.67%, 88.28% and 85.71% respectively. F-18 FDG PET-CECT aptly serves the purpose of initial imaging modality owing to high sensitivity, negative and positive predictive value. PET-CECT not only surveys the whole body for the primary malignancy but also stages the disease accurately. Use of contrast improves the diagnostic utility of modality as well as help in staging of the primary tumor. Although benefits of using PET-CECT as initial diagnostic modality are obvious from this study, there is a need for a larger study comparing conventional methods for diagnosing primary in patients with MUO versus PET-CECT

  11. Contrast-enhanced [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Avani; Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Pawaskar, Alok Suresh; Shelley, Simon; Elangovan, Indirani; Jain, Hasmukh; Pandey, Somnath; Kalal, Shilpa; Amalachandran, Jaykanth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the advantages of contrast enhanced F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-contrast enhanced CT [CECT]) when used as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin (MUO). A total of 243 patients with fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy proven MUO were included in this prospective study. Patients who were thoroughly evaluated for primary or primary tumor was detected by any other investigation were excluded from the analysis. Totally, 163 patients with pathological diagnosis of malignancy but no apparent sites of the primary tumor were finally selected for analysis. The site of probable primary malignancy suggested by PET-CECT was confirmed by biopsy/follow-up. PET-CECT suggested probable site of primary in 128/163 (78.52%) patients. In 30/35 remaining patients, primary tumor was not detected even after extensive work-up. In 5 patients, where PET-CECT was negative, primary was found on further extensive investigations or follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the study were 95.76%, 66.67%, 88.28% and 85.71% respectively. F-18 FDG PET-CECT aptly serves the purpose of initial imaging modality owing to high sensitivity, negative and positive predictive value. PET-CECT not only surveys the whole body for the primary malignancy but also stages the disease accurately. Use of contrast improves the diagnostic utility of modality as well as help in staging of the primary tumor. Although benefits of using PET-CECT as initial diagnostic modality are obvious from this study, there is a need for a larger study comparing conventional methods for diagnosing primary in patients with MUO versus PET-CECT.

  12. Feasibility of CBCT-based target and normal structure delineation in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Multi-observer and image multi-modality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Poetter, Richard; Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: In-room cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging and adaptive treatment strategies are promising methods to decrease target volumes and to spare organs at risk. The aim of this work was to analyze the inter-observer contouring uncertainties of target volumes and organs at risks (oars) in localized prostate cancer radiotherapy using CBCT images. Furthermore, CBCT contouring was benchmarked against other image modalities (CT, MR) and the influence of subjective image quality perception on inter-observer variability was assessed. Methods and materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were selected. Seven radiation oncologists contoured target volumes and oars on CT, MRI and CBCT. Volumes, coefficient of variation (COV), conformity index (cigen), and coordinates of center-of-mass (COM) were calculated for each patient and image modality. Reliability analysis was performed for the support of the reported findings. Subjective perception of image quality was assessed via a ten-scored visual analog scale (VAS). Results: The median volume for prostate was larger on CT compared to MRI and CBCT images. The inter-observer variation for prostate was larger on CBCT (CIgen = 0.57 ± 0.09, 0.61 reliability) compared to CT (CIgen = 0.72 ± 0.07, 0.83 reliability) and MRI (CIgen = 0.66 ± 0.12, 0.87 reliability). On all image modalities values of the intra-observer reliability coefficient (0.97 for CT, 0.99 for MR and 0.94 for CBCT) indicated high reproducibility of results. For all patients the root mean square (RMS) of the inter-observer standard deviation (σ) of the COM was largest on CBCT with σ(x) = 0.4 mm, σ(y) = 1.1 mm, and σ(z) = 1.7 mm. The concordance in delineating OARs was much stronger than for target volumes, with average CIgen > 0.70 for rectum and CIgen > 0.80 for bladder. Positive correlations between CIgen and VAS score of the image quality were observed for the prostate, seminal vesicles and rectum. Conclusions: Inter-observer variability for target

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for oncology: status and newer trends- an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, N.; Prabhakar, G.

    1997-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals have provided a powerful means in the diagnosis and follow up of cancer patients. Radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer and palliation of metastatic bone pain are in extensive use. Newer agents are on the anvil for more efficacious diagnosis and therapy. This article gives an overview of the status and trends in this context. (author)

  14. Newer Root Canal Irrigants in Horizon: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Jaju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium hypochloride is the most commonly used endodontic irrigant, despite limitations. None of the presently available root canal irrigants satisfy the requirements of ideal root canal irrigant. Newer root canal irrigants are studied for potential replacement of sodium hypochloride. This article reviews the potential irrigants with their advantages and limitations with their future in endodontic irrigation.

  15. Reducing radiation exposure in an electrophysiology lab with introduction of newer fluoroscopic technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munish Sharma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluoroscopic devices exposes patients and operators to harmful effects of ionizing radiation in an electrophysiology (EP lab. We sought to know if the newer fluoroscopic technology (Allura Clarity installed in a hybrid EP helps to reduce prescribed radiation dose. We performed radiation dose analysis of 90 patients who underwent various procedures in the EP lab at a community teaching hospital after the introduction of newer fluoroscopic technology in June of 2016.Watchman device insertion, radiofrequency ablation procedures, permanent pacemaker (PPM/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD placement and battery changes were included in the study to compare radiation exposure during different procedures performed commonly in an EP lab. In all cases of watchman device placement, radiofrequency ablation procedures, PPM/ICD placement and battery changes, there was a statistically significant difference (<0.05 in radiation dose exposure. Significant reduction in radiation exposure during various procedures performed in an EP lab was achieved with aid of newer fluoroscopic technology and better image detection technology.

  16. One-pot synthesis of polyamines improved magnetism and fluorescence Fe3O4-carbon dots hybrid NPs for dual modal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xudong; Guo, Yali; Iqbal, Anam; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Chen, Shizhen; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Yunhuang

    2016-04-07

    A one-step hydrothermal method was developed to fabricate Fe3O4-carbon dots (Fe3O4-CDs) magnetic-fluorescent hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). Ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) was used as a cheap and nontoxic iron precursor and as the carbon source. Moreover, triethylenetetramine (TETA) was used to improve the adhesive strength of CDs on Fe3O4 and the fluorescence intensity of CDs. The prepared water-soluble hybrid NPs not only exhibit excellent superparamagnetic properties (Ms = 56.8 emu g(-1)), but also demonstrate excitation-independent photoluminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion at 445 nm. Moreover, the prepared water-soluble Fe3O4-CDs hybrid NPs have a dual modal imaging ability for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging.

  17. Synthesis, radiosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of 18F-Bodipy-C16/triglyceride as a dual modal imaging agent for brown adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Paulus

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue research is in the focus in the field of endocrinology. We designed a dual-modal fluorescent/PET fatty acid based tracer on commercially available Bodipy-C16, which can be synthesized to its corresponding triglyceride and which combines the benefits of fluorescent and PET imaging.Bodipy-C16 was coupled to 1,3-diolein resulting in Bodipy-triglyceride. Bodipy-C16 and Bodipy-triglyceride compounds were radiolabeled with 18F using an 18F/19F exchange reaction to yield a dual-modal imaging molecule. Uptake of radiolabeled and non-labeled Bodipy-C16 and Bodipy-triglyceride was analyzed by fluorescence imaging and radioactive uptake in cultured adipocytes derived from human brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue.Bodipy-C16 and Bodipy-triglyceride were successfully radiolabeled and Bodipy-C16 showed high shelf life and blood plasma stability (99% from 0-4 h. The uptake of Bodipy-C16 increased over time in cultured adipocytes, which was further enhanced after beta-adrenergic stimulation with norepinephrine. The uptake of Bodipy-C16 was inhibited by oleic acid and CD36 inhibitor sulfosuccinimidyl-oleate. The poor solubility of Bodipy-triglyceride did not allow stability or in vitro experiments.The new developed dual modal fatty acid based tracers Bodipy-C16 and Bodipy-triglyceride showed promising results to stimulate further in vivo evaluation and will help to understand brown adipose tissues role in whole body energy expenditure.

  18. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory, and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage

  19. Use of the functional imaging modalities, f MRI r CBV and PET FDG, alters radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning in patients with malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzek, M.; Pardo, F.S.; Busierre, M.; Lev, M.; Fischman, A.; Denny, N.; Hanser, B.; Rosen, B.R.; Smith, A.; Aronen, H.

    1995-01-01

    Background: Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar r CBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. Methods: In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor target volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning. Fourteen patients were planned using 3-D radiation therapy treatment planning, either with or without inclusion of data on functional imaging. All patients received proton beam, as well as megavoltage x-ray radiation therapy, with the ratio of photon:proton optimized to the individual clinical case at hand. Both PET FDG and f MRI scans were obtained postoperatively pre-radiation, during radiation therapy, one month following completion of radiation therapy, and at three month follow-up intervals. Dose volume histograms were constructed in order to assess dose optimization, not only with respect to tumor, but also with respect to normal tissue tolerance (e.g., motor strip, dominant speech area, brainstem, optic nerves). Results: In 5 of 14 cases, functional imaging modalities, as compared with conventional MRI and CT, contributed additional information that was useful in radiation therapy treatment planning. In general, both fMRI rCBV and PET FDG uptake decreased during the course of radiation therapy. In 1 patient, however, fMRI r

  20. Development of a dual-modality, dual-view smartphone-based imaging system for oral cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthoff, Ross D.; Song, Bofan; Birur, Praveen; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Sunny, Sumsum; Suresh, Amritha; Patrick, Sanjana; Anbarani, Afarin; Spires, Oliver; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Liang, Rongguang

    2018-02-01

    Oral cancer is a rising health issue in many low and middle income countries (LMIC). Proposed is an implementation of autofluorescence imaging (AFI) and white light imaging (WLI) on a smartphone platform providing inexpensive early detection of cancerous conditions in the oral cavity. Interchangeable modules allow both whole mouth imaging for an overview of the patients' oral health and an intraoral imaging probe for localized information. Custom electronics synchronize image capture and external LED operation for the excitation of tissue fluorescence. A custom Android application captures images and an image processing algorithm provides likelihood estimates of cancerous conditions. Finally, all data can be uploaded to a cloud server where a convolutional neural network classifies the images and a remote specialist can provide diagnosis and triage instructions.

  1. Clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI as a single-step imaging modality in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yen-Ming, Tsang; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2018-03-03

    Both head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) play a crucial role in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, we sought to prospectively investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI for primary staging of NPC patients. We examined 113 patients with histologically confirmed NPC who underwent pretreatment, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI and PET/CT for primary tumor staging. The images obtained with the different imaging modalities were interpreted independently and compared with each other. PET/MRI increased the accuracy of head and neck MRI for assessment of primary tumor extent in four patients via addition of FDG uptake information to increase the conspicuity of morphologically subtle lesions. PET/MR images were more discernible than PET/CT images for mapping tumor extension, especially intracranial invasion. Regarding the N staging assessment, the sensitivity of PET/MRI (99.5%) was higher than that of head and neck MRI (94.2%) and PET/CT (90.9%). PET/MRI was particularly useful for distinguishing retropharyngeal nodal metastasis from adjacent nasopharyngeal tumors. For distant metastasis evaluation, PET/MRI exhibited a similar sensitivity (90% vs. 86.7% vs. 83.3%), but higher positive predictive value (93.1% vs. 78.8% vs. 83.3%) than whole-body MRI and PET/CT, respectively. For tumor staging of NPC, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI was more accurate than head and neck MRI and PET/CT, and may serve as a single-step staging modality.

  2. Multifunctional BaYbF5: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo tri-modal upconversion optical, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yi, Zhigao; Xue, Zhenluan; Zeng, Songjun; Liu, Hongrong

    2017-06-01

    Development of high-quality upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with combination of the merits of multiple molecular imaging techniques, such as, upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, could significantly improve the accuracy of biological diagnosis. In this work, multifunctional BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er (50:2mol%) UCNPs were synthesized via a solvothermal method using oleic acid (OA) as surface ligands (denoted as OA-UCNPs). The OA-UCNPs were further treated by diluted HCl to form ligand-free UCNPs (LF-UCNPs) for later bioimaging applications. The cytotoxicity assay in HeLa cells shows low cell toxicity of these LF-UCNPs. Owing to the efficient UCL of BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er, the LF-UCNPs were successfully used as luminescent bioprobe in UCL bioimaging. And, X-ray CT imaging reveals that BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er UCNPs can act as potential contrast agents for detection of the liver and spleen in the live mice owing to the high-Z elements (e.g., Ba, Yb, and Gd) in host matrix. Moreover, with the addition of Gd, the as-designed UCNPs exhibit additional positive contrast enhancement in T 1 -weighted MR imaging. These findings demonstrate that BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er UCNPs are potential candidates for tri-modal imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of Barrett's esophagus: Screening to newer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Thoguluva Chandrasekar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Barrett's esophagus is a premalignant condition of the esophagus in which the squamous epithelium of the lower end of the esophagus is replaced with columnar epithelium. Since the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is on the rise, the major gastroenterology societies have come up with their recommendations for screening and surveillance. Specific factors like obesity, white race, age over 50 years, early age of onset of GERD, smoking and hiatal hernia have been identified as increasing the risk of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis requires both endoscopic identification of columnar-lined mucosa and histological confirmation with biopsy. Most medical societies recommend screening people with GERD and other risk factors with endoscopy, but other alternatives employing less invasive methods are currently being studied. Surveillance strategies vary depending on the endoscopic findings and the Seattle biopsy protocol with random 4-quadrant sampling is recommended. Biomarkers have shown promising results, but more studies are needed in the future. White light endoscopy is the standard practice, but other advanced imaging modalities have shown variable results and hence more studies are awaited for further validation. Endoscopic eradication techniques, including both resection and ablation, have shown good but variable results for treating dysplastic lesions confined to the mucosa. Resection procedures to remove visible lesions followed by ablation of the dysplastic mucosa have shown the best results with higher eradication rates and lower recurrence rates. Surgical management is reserved for lesions with sub-mucosal invasion and lymph node spread with increased risk of metastasis.

  4. Femtosecond laser nanosurgery of sub-cellular structures in HeLa cells by employing Third Harmonic Generation imaging modality as diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tserevelakis, George J; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Resan, Bojan; Brunner, Felix; Gavgiotaki, Evagelia; Weingarten, Kurt; Filippidis, George

    2012-02-01

    Femtosecond laser assisted nanosurgery of microscopic biological specimens is a relatively new technique which allows the selective disruption of sub-cellular structures without causing any undesirable damage to the surrounding regions. The targeted structures have to be stained in order to be clearly visualized for the nanosurgery procedure. However, the validation of the final nanosurgery result is difficult, since the targeted structure could be simply photobleached rather than selectively destroyed. This fact comprises a main drawback of this technique. In our study we employed a multimodal system which integrates non-linear imaging modalities with nanosurgery capabilities, for the selective disruption of sub-cellular structures in HeLa cancer cells. Third Harmonic Generation (THG) imaging modality was used as a tool for the identification of structures that were subjected to nanosurgery experiments. No staining of the biological samples was required, since THG is an intrinsic property of matter. Furthermore, cells' viability after nanosurgery processing was verified via Two Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF) measurements. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A stereotactic method for the three-dimensional registration of multi-modality biologic images in animals: NMR, PET, histology, and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Ballon, D.; Hu, Y.C.; Ruan, S.; Chui, C.; Tulipano, P.K.; Erdi, A.; Koutcher, J.; Zakian, K.; Urano, M.; Zanzonico, P.; Mattis, C.; Dyke, J.; Chen, Y.; Harrington, P.; O'Donoghue, J.A.; Ling, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and then validate a stereotactic fiduciary marker system for tumor xenografts in rodents which could be used to co-register magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), PET, tissue histology, autoradiography, and measurements from physiologic probes. A Teflon TM fiduciary template has been designed which allows the precise insertion of small hollow Teflon rods (0.71 mm diameter) into a tumor. These rods can be visualized by MRI and PET as well as by histology and autoradiography on tissue sections. The methodology has been applied and tested on a rigid phantom, on tissue phantom material, and finally on tumor bearing mice. Image registration has been performed between the MRI and PET images for the rigid Teflon phantom and among MRI, digitized microscopy images of tissue histology, and autoradiograms for both tissue phantom and tumor-bearing mice. A registration accuracy, expressed as the average Euclidean distance between the centers of three fiduciary markers among the registered image sets, of 0.2±0.06 mm was achieved between MRI and microPET image sets of a rigid Teflon phantom. The fiduciary template allows digitized tissue sections to be co-registered with three-dimensional MRI images with an average accuracy of 0.21 and 0.25 mm for the tissue phantoms and tumor xenografts, respectively. Between histology and autoradiograms, it was 0.19 and 0.21 mm for tissue phantoms and tumor xenografts, respectively. The fiduciary marker system provides a coordinate system with which to correlate information from multiple image types, on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with sub-millimeter accuracy--even among imaging modalities with widely disparate spatial resolution and in the absence of identifiable anatomic landmarks

  6. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases.

  7. Usefulness of breast-specific gamma imaging as an adjunct modality in breast cancer patients with dense breast. A comparative study with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bom Sahn

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adjunctive benefits of breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) versus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in breast cancer patients with dense breasts. This study included a total of 66 patients (44.1±8.2 years) with dense breasts (breast density >50%) and already biopsy-confirmed breast cancer. All of the patients underwent BSGI and MRI as part of an adjunct modality before the initial therapy. Of 66 patients, the 97 undetermined breast lesions were newly detected and correlated with the biopsy results. Twenty-six of the 97 breast lesions proved to be malignant tumors (invasive ductal cancer, n=16; ductal carcinoma in situ, n=6; mixed or other malignancies, n=4); the remaining 71 lesions were diagnosed as benign tumors. The sensitivity and specificity of BSGI were 88.8% (confidence interval (CI), 69.8-97.6%) and 90.1% (CI, 80.7-95.9%), respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 92.3% (CI, 74.9-99.1%) and 39.4% (CI, 28.0-51.7%), respectively (p<0.0001). MRI detected 43 false-positive breast lesions, 37 (86.0%) of which were correctly diagnosed as benign lesions using BSGI. In 12 malignant lesions <1 cm, the sensitivities of BSGI and MR imaging were 83.3% (CI, 51.6-97.9%) and 91.7% (CI, 61.5-99.8%), respectively. BSGI showed an equivocal sensitivity and a high specificity compared to MRI in the diagnosis of breast lesions. In addition, BSGI had a good sensitivity in discriminating breast cancers ≤1 cm. The results of this study suggest that BSGI could play a crucial role as an adjunctive imaging modality which can be used to evaluate breast cancer patients with dense breasts. (author)

  8. STTARR: a radiation treatment and multi-modal imaging facility for fast tracking novel agent development in small animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, Ivan; McKee, Trevor; Jaffray, David; Hill, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Small animal models play a pivotal role in the pipeline development of novel agents and strategies in personalized cancer therapy. The Spatio-Temporal Targeting and Amplification of Radiation Response Program (STTARR) consists of an animal imaging and precision radiation facility designed to provide innovative biologic imaging and targeted radiation treatment strategies in small animals. The design is to mirror the imaging and radiation treatment facility in a modern cancer center. The STTARR features imaging equipment of small animal scale including CT, MRI, PET, SPECT, Optical devices as well as image guided irradiators. The fleet of imaging and irradiation equipment provides a platform for identification of biological targets of the specific molecular pathways that influence both tumor progression and a patient's response to radiation therapy. Examples will be given in the utilization of the imaging facilities for development in novel approaches in cancer therapy including a PET-FAZA study for hypoxia measurement in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. In addition, the cone-beam image guided small animal irradiator developed at our institute will also be described. The animal platform (couch) provides motion in 3 dimensions to position the animal to the isocentre of the beam. A pair of rotational arms supporting the X-ray/detector pair enables acquisition of cone-beam images of the animal which give rise to image guided precision of 0.5 mm. The irradiation energy ranges from 50 to 225 kVp at a dose rate from 10-400 cGy/min. The gantry is able to direct X-ray beam of different directions to give conformal radiation treatment to the animal. A dedicated treatment planning system is able to perform treatment planning and provide commonly used clinical metrics in the animal treatment plan. Examples will be given to highlight the use of the image guided irradiator for research of drug/irradiation regimen in animal models. (author)

  9. Prospective, longitudinal, multi-modal functional imaging for radical chemo-IMRT treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: the INSIGHT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, Liam; Panek, Rafal; McQuaid, Dualta; Dunlop, Alex; Schmidt, Maria; Riddell, Angela; Koh, Dow-Mu; Doran, Simon; Murray, Iain; Du, Yong; Chua, Sue; Hansen, Vibeke; Wong, Kee H.; Dean, Jamie; Gulliford, Sarah; Bhide, Shreerang; Leach, Martin O.; Nutting, Christopher; Harrington, Kevin; Newbold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Radical chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) is an effective organ-sparing treatment option for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Despite advances in treatment for LAHNC, a significant minority of these patients continue to fail to achieve complete response with standard CRT. By constructing a multi-modality functional imaging (FI) predictive biomarker for CRT outcome for patients with LAHNC we hope to be able to reliably identify those patients at high risk of failing standard CRT. Such a biomarker would in future enable CRT to be tailored to the specific biological characteristics of each patients’ tumour, potentially leading to improved treatment outcomes. The INSIGHT study is a single-centre, prospective, longitudinal multi-modality imaging study using functional MRI and FDG-PET/CT for patients with LAHNC squamous cell carcinomas receiving radical CRT. Two cohorts of patients are being recruited: one treated with, and another treated without, induction chemotherapy. All patients receive radical intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Patients undergo functional imaging before, during and 3 months after completion of radiotherapy, as well as at the time of relapse, should that occur within the first two years after treatment. Serum samples are collected from patients at the same time points as the FI scans for analysis of a panel of serum markers of tumour hypoxia. The primary aim of the INSIGHT study is to acquire a prospective multi-parametric longitudinal data set comprising functional MRI, FDG PET/CT, and serum biomarker data from patients with LAHNC undergoing primary radical CRT. This data set will be used to construct a predictive imaging biomarker for outcome after CRT for LAHNC. This predictive imaging biomarker will be used in future studies of functional imaging based treatment stratification for patients with LAHNC. Additional objectives are: defining the reproducibility of FI parameters; determining robust

  10. Development of a multi-scale and multi-modality imaging system to characterize tumours and their microenvironment in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouffiac, Valérie; Ser-Leroux, Karine; Dugon, Emilie; Leguerney, Ingrid; Polrot, Mélanie; Robin, Sandra; Salomé-Desnoulez, Sophie; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Sebrié, Catherine; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution imaging of tumor development is possible through dorsal skinfold chamber implantable on mice model. However, current intravital imaging systems are weakly tolerated along time by mice and do not allow multimodality imaging. Our project aims to develop a new chamber for: 1- long-term micro/macroscopic visualization of tumor (vascular and cellular compartments) and tissue microenvironment; and 2- multimodality imaging (photonic, MRI and sonography). Our new experimental device was patented in March 2014 and was primarily assessed on 75 mouse engrafted with 4T1-Luc tumor cell line, and validated in confocal and multiphoton imaging after staining the mice vasculature using Dextran 155KDa-TRITC or Dextran 2000kDa-FITC. Simultaneously, a universal stage was designed for optimal removal of respiratory and cardiac artifacts during microscopy assays. Experimental results from optical, ultrasound (Bmode and pulse subtraction mode) and MRI imaging (anatomic sequences) showed that our patented design, unlike commercial devices, improves longitudinal monitoring over several weeks (35 days on average against 12 for the commercial chamber) and allows for a better characterization of the early and late tissue alterations due to tumour development. We also demonstrated the compatibility for multimodality imaging and the increase of mice survival was by a factor of 2.9, with our new skinfold chamber. Current developments include: 1- defining new procedures for multi-labelling of cells and tissue (screening of fluorescent molecules and imaging protocols); 2- developing ultrasound and MRI imaging procedures with specific probes; 3- correlating optical/ultrasound/MRI data for a complete mapping of tumour development and microenvironment.

  11. Smart human serum albumin-indocyanine green nanoparticles generated by programmed assembly for dual-modal imaging-guided cancer synergistic phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zonghai; Hu, Dehong; Zheng, Mingbin; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Huilong; Gao, Duyang; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Zhang, Pengfei; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-12-23

    Phototherapy, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT), is a light-activated local treatment modality that is under intensive preclinical and clinical investigations for cancer. To enhance the treatment efficiency of phototherapy and reduce the light-associated side effects, it is highly desirable to improve drug accumulation and precision guided phototherapy for efficient conversion of the absorbed light energy to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and local hyperthermia. In the present study, a programmed assembly strategy was developed for the preparation of human serum albumin (HSA)-indocyanine green (ICG) nanoparticles (HSA-ICG NPs) by intermolecular disulfide conjugations. This study indicated that HSA-ICG NPs had a high accumulation with tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 36.12±5.12 at 24 h and a long-term retention with more than 7 days in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice, where the tumor and its margin, normal tissue were clearly identified via ICG-based in vivo near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-modal imaging and spectrum-resolved technology. Meanwhile, HSA-ICG NPs efficiently induced ROS and local hyperthermia simultaneously for synergetic PDT/PTT treatments under a single NIR laser irradiation. After an intravenous injection of HSA-ICG NPs followed by imaging-guided precision phototherapy (808 nm, 0.8 W/cm2 for 5 min), the tumor was completely suppressed, no tumor recurrence and treatments-induced toxicity were observed. The results suggest that HSA-ICG NPs generated by programmed assembly as smart theranostic nanoplatforms are highly potential for imaging-guided cancer phototherapy with PDT/PTT synergistic effects.

  12. An albumin-based theranostic nano-agent for dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy to inhibit lymphatic metastasis of cancer post surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liang, Chao; Wang, Xin; He, Jingkang; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-11-01

    A large variety of cancers are associated with a high incidence of lymph node metastasis, which leads to a high risk of cancer death. Herein, we demonstrate that multimodal imaging guided photothermal therapy can inhibit tumor metastasis after surgery by burning the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) with metastatic tumor cells. A near-infrared dye, IR825, is absorbed onto human serum albumin (HSA), which is covalently linked with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) molecules to chelate gadolinium. The formed HSA-Gd-IR825 nanocomplex exhibits strong fluorescence together with high near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and in the mean time could serve as a T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In vivo bi-modal fluorescence and MR imaging uncovers that HSA-Gd-IR825 after being injected into the primary tumor would quickly migrate into tumor-associated SLNs through lymphatic circulation. Utilizing the strong NIR absorbance of HSA-Gd-IR825, SLNs with metastatic cancer cells can be effectively ablated under exposure to a NIR laser. Such treatment when combined with surgery to remove the primary tumor offers remarkable therapeutic outcomes in greatly inhibiting further metastatic spread of cancer cells and prolonging animal survival. Our work presents an albumin-based theranostic nano-probe with functions of multimodal imaging and photothermal therapy, together with a 'photothermal ablation assisted surgery' strategy, promising for future clinical cancer treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proceedings of Joint International Symposium on the role of noninvasive imaging modalities in clinical decision making of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, I.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains ten papers on the use of noninvasive imaging in clinical diagnosis and decision making. Topics include a cost analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in medical technology, diagnostic uses of MRI in chronic coronary artery disease, clinical applications of cine computed tomography, the use of PET as a clinical tool, and the use of echocardiography in coronary artery disease. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  14. Detection of cervical lymph node metastasis in head and neck cancer patients with clinically N0 neck—a meta-analysis comparing different imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Li-Jen; Lo, Wu-Chia; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Wang, Chi-Te; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2012-01-01

    How to properly manage clinically negative neck of head and neck cancer patients is a controversial topic. Research is now directed toward finding a method sensitive enough to bring the risk of occult metastases below 20%. The aim of this review was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of different imaging modalities, including CT, MRI, PET and US, in clinically N0 head and neck cancer patients. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, PubMed and the Cochrane Database were searched for relevant original articles published up to May 2011. Inclusion criteria were as follows: articles were reported in English; CT, MRI, PET or US were performed to identify cervical metastases in clinically N0 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; and data were sufficient for the calculation of true-positive or false-negative values. A bivariate random effect model was used to obtain pooled sensitivity and specificity. The positive and negative test probability of neck metastasis was generated based on Bayesian theory and collected data for different pre-test possibilities. Of the 168 identified relevant articles, 7 studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria for CT, 6 studies for MRI, 11 studies for PET and 8 studies for US. There was no difference in sensitivity and specificity among these imaging modalities, except CT was superior to US in specificity. The pooled estimates for sensitivity were 52% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39% ~ 65%), 65% (34 ~ 87%) 66% (47 ~ 80%), and 66% (45 ~ 77%), on a per-neck basis for CT, MRI, PET and US, respectively. The pooled estimates for specificity were 93% (87% ~ 97%), 81% (64 ~ 91%), 87% (77 ~ 93%), and 78% (71 ~ 83%) for CT, MRI, PET and US, respectively. With pre-examination nodal metastasis probabilities set at 10%, 20% and 30%, the post-exam probabilities of positive nodal metastasis rates were 47%, 66% and 77% for CT; 27%, 46% and 59% for MRI; 36%, 56% and 69% for PET; and 25%, 42% and 56% for US, respectively. Negative nodal metastasis

  15. The Use of Newer High Translucency Zirconia in Aesthetic Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zishan Dangra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of anterior tooth causes aesthetic and functional disharmony. Although no restorative material can approach the appearance of intact tooth enamel, glass ceramic, at the increased risk of brittle fracture, can mimic original tooth color better than the other restorative options. The newest zirconia material comes with unparalleled individualization in aesthetics and optimal physical properties. One of the basic principles of tooth preparation is conservation of tooth structure. This clinical report describes the replacement of maxillary and mandibular incisor with latest generation zirconia adhesive fixed partial denture. The authors have achieved unmatched aesthetics with newer high translucency zirconia.

  16. Shift in imaging modalities of the spine through 25 years and its impact on patient ionizing radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgen, Lars [Department of Radiology, Hospital of Buskerud, Dronning gaten 28, 3004 Drammen (Norway)]. E-mail: lars.borgen@sb-hf.no; Ostensen, Harald [Diagnostic Imaging and Laboratory Technology, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, CH-1211 Geneva 27 (Switzerland); Stranden, Erling [Buskerud University College, Konggate 51, 3019 Drammen (Norway); Olerud, Hilde Marie [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 55, 1332 Osteras (Norway); Gudmundsen, Tor Erik [Department of Radiology, Hospital of Buskerud, Dronning gaten 28, 3004 Drammen (Norway); Buskerud University College, Konggate 51, 3019 Drammen (Norway)

    2006-10-15

    Study design: Retrospective. Objective: To explore the shift in modalities when diagnosing the spine in the years 1979-2003. To see how this shift, together with a radiation protective policy, have influenced on the ionizing radiation doses. Summary of background data: The shift from CT/myelography to MR when diagnosing the spine is well known. To what extent this has changed the radiation doses has to our knowledge not yet been published. Methods: Activity reports from a department of radiology have been reviewed. Relevant radiation doses estimates have been obtained from the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Results: MRI was introduced in 1992 and has been used increasingly since then. Conventional X-ray to the spine has been practically unchanged. Myelography and CT decreased markedly after the introduction of MRI. The total number of examinations of the spine has increased, but the radiation doses given have decreased since 1993. Conclusions: The introduction of MRI together with a radiation protective policy have reduced the ionizing radiation doses given to this population, in spite of an increase in the total number of examinations of the spine.

  17. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with 99m Tc-MDP, DMSA, and 18 F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, 99m Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined 99 mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and 18 F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug

  18. Contrast-enhanced Spectral Mammography: Modality-Specific Artifacts and Other Factors Which May Interfere with Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimani, Chandni; Li, Luna; Liao, Lydia; Roth, Robyn G; Tinney, Elizabeth; Germaine, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) uses full field digital mammography with the added benefit of intravenous contrast administration to significantly reduce false-positive and false-negative results and improve specificity while maintaining high sensitivity. For CESM to fulfill its purpose, one should be aware of possible artifacts and other factors which may interfere with image quality, and attention should be taken to minimize these factors. This pictorial demonstration will depict types of artifacts detected and other factors that interfere with image acquisition in our practice since CESM implementation. Many of the artifacts and other factors we have encountered while using CESM have simple solutions to resolve them. The illustrated artifacts and other factors interfering with image quality will serve as a useful reference to anyone using CESM. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  20. Initial in vitro and in vivo assessment of Au@DTDTPA-RGD nanoparticles for Gd-MRI and 68Ga-PET dual modality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoukalas, Charalmpos [National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' (Greece); Laurent, Gautier; Jiménez Sánchez, Gloria [Université de Franche-Comté, Institut UTINAM (France); Tsotakos, Theodoros [National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' (Greece); Bazzi, Rana [Université de Franche-Comté, Institut UTINAM (France); Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos [Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens (Greece); Moulopoulos, Lia; Koutoulidis, Vasilis [Department of Radiology, Areteion Hospital, University of Athens Medical School (Greece); Paravatou-Petsotas, Maria; Xanthopoulos, Stavros [National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' (Greece); Roux, Stephane [Université de Franche-Comté, Institut UTINAM (France); Bouziotis, Penelope [National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Gadolinium chelate coated gold nanoparticles (Au@DTDTPA) can be applied as contrast agents for both in vivo X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, our aim was to radiolabel and evaluate this gold nanoparticle with Ga-68, in order to produce a dual modality PET/MRI imaging probe. For a typical preparation of 68Ga-labeled nanoparticles, the Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles (Au@DTDTPA/Au@DTDTPA-RGD) were mixed with ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5 and 40 MBq of 68Ga eluate. The mixture was then incubated for 45 min at 65 ÅãC. Radiochemical purity was determined by ITLC. In vitro stability of both radiolabeled species was assessed in saline and serum. In vitro cell binding experiments were performed on integrin ανβ3 receptor-positive U87MG cancer cells. Non-specific Au@DTDTPA was used for comparison. Ex vivo biodistribution studies and in vivo PET and MRI imaging studies in U87MG tumor-bearing SCID mice followed. The Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles were labeled with Gallium-68 at high radiochemical yield (>95%) and were stable at RT, and in the presence of serum, for up to 3 h. The cell binding assay on U87MG glioma cells proved that 68Ga-cRGD-Au@DTDTPA had specific recognition for these cells. Biodistribution studies in U87MG tumor-bearing SCID mice showed that the tumor to muscle ratio increased from 1 to 2 h p.i. (3,71 ± 0.22 and 4,69 ± 0.09 respectively), showing a clear differentiation between the affected and the non-affected tissue. The acquired PET and MRI images were in accordance to the ex vivo biodistribution results. The preliminary results of this study warrant the need for further development of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles radiolabeled with Ga-68, as possible dual-modality PET/MRI imaging agents.

  1. Initial in vitro and in vivo assessment of Au@DTDTPA-RGD nanoparticles for Gd-MRI and 68Ga-PET dual modality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoukalas, Charalmpos; Laurent, Gautier; Jiménez Sánchez, Gloria; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Bazzi, Rana; Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Moulopoulos, Lia; Koutoulidis, Vasilis; Paravatou-Petsotas, Maria; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Roux, Stephane; Bouziotis, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium chelate coated gold nanoparticles (Au@DTDTPA) can be applied as contrast agents for both in vivo X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, our aim was to radiolabel and evaluate this gold nanoparticle with Ga-68, in order to produce a dual modality PET/MRI imaging probe. For a typical preparation of 68Ga-labeled nanoparticles, the Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles (Au@DTDTPA/Au@DTDTPA-RGD) were mixed with ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5 and 40 MBq of 68Ga eluate. The mixture was then incubated for 45 min at 65 ÅãC. Radiochemical purity was determined by ITLC. In vitro stability of both radiolabeled species was assessed in saline and serum. In vitro cell binding experiments were performed on integrin ανβ3 receptor-positive U87MG cancer cells. Non-specific Au@DTDTPA was used for comparison. Ex vivo biodistribution studies and in vivo PET and MRI imaging studies in U87MG tumor-bearing SCID mice followed. The Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles were labeled with Gallium-68 at high radiochemical yield (>95%) and were stable at RT, and in the presence of serum, for up to 3 h. The cell binding assay on U87MG glioma cells proved that 68Ga-cRGD-Au@DTDTPA had specific recognition for these cells. Biodistribution studies in U87MG tumor-bearing SCID mice showed that the tumor to muscle ratio increased from 1 to 2 h p.i. (3,71 ± 0.22 and 4,69 ± 0.09 respectively), showing a clear differentiation between the affected and the non-affected tissue. The acquired PET and MRI images were in accordance to the ex vivo biodistribution results. The preliminary results of this study warrant the need for further development of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles radiolabeled with Ga-68, as possible dual-modality PET/MRI imaging agents.

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Imaging Modalities and Injection Techniques for the Diagnosis of Femoroacetabular Impingement/Labral Tear: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian; Goode, Adam P; Cook, Chad E; Weir, Adam; Hölmich, Per

    2017-09-01

    Diagnosing femoroacetabular impingement/acetabular labral tear (FAI/ALT) and subsequently making a decision regarding surgery are based primarily on diagnostic imaging and intra-articular hip joint injection techniques of unknown accuracy. Summarize and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of various imaging modalities and injection techniques relevant to hip FAI/ALT. Systematic review with meta-analysis. A computer-assisted literature search was conducted of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases using keywords related to diagnostic accuracy of hip joint pathologic changes. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were used for the search and reporting phases of the study. Quality assessment of bias and applicability was conducted using the Quality of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tool. Random effects models were used to summarize sensitivities (SN), specificities (SP), likelihood ratios (+LR and -LR), diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), and respective confidence intervals (CI). The search strategy and assessment for risk of bias revealed 25 articles scoring above 10/14 on the items of the QUADAS. Four studies investigated FAI, and the data were not pooled. Twenty articles on ALT qualified for meta-analysis. Pretest probability of ALT in the studies in this review was 81% (72%-88%), while the pretest probability of FAI diagnosis was 74% (95% CI, 51%-91%). The meta-analysis showed that computed tomography arthrography (CTA) demonstrated the strongest overall diagnostic accuracy: pooled SN 0.91 (95% CI, 0.83-0.96); SP 0.89 (95% CI, 0.74-0.97); +LR 6.28 (95% CI, 2.78-14.21); -LR 0.11 (95% CI, 0.06-0.21); and DOR 64.38 (95% CI, 19.17-216.21). High pretest probability of disease was demonstrated. Positive imaging findings increased the probability that a labral tear existed by a minimal to small degree with the use of magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiogram (MRI/MRA) and ultrasound (US

  3. A novel triple-modality reporter gene for whole-body fluorescent, bioluminescent, and nuclear noninvasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, Vladimir; Vider, Jelena; Shavrin, Aleksander; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Tourkova, Vilia; Doubrovin, Michael; Serganova, Inna; Beresten, Tatiana; Ivanova, Anna; Blasberg, Ronald; Balatoni, Julius; Bornmann, William; Gelovani Tjuvajev, Juri

    2004-01-01

    Two genetic reporter systems were developed for multimodality reporter gene imaging of different molecular-genetic processes using fluorescence, bioluminescence (BLI), and nuclear imaging techniques. The eGFP cDNA was fused at the N-terminus with HSV1-tk cDNA bearing a nuclear export signal from MAPKK (NES-HSV1-tk) or with truncation at the N-terminus of the first 45 amino acids (Δ45HSV1-tk) and with firefly luciferase at the C-terminus. A single fusion protein with three functional subunits is formed following transcription and translation from a single open reading frame. The NES-TGL (NES-TGL) or Δ45HSV1-tk/GFP/luciferase (Δ45-TGL) triple-fusion gene cDNAs were cloned into a MoMLV-based retrovirus, which was used for transduction of U87 human glioma cells. The integrity, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and enzymatic activity of the TGL reporter proteins were assessed in vitro. The predicted molecular weight of the fusion proteins (130 kDa) was confirmed by western blot. The U87-NES-TGL and U87-Δ45-TGL cells had cytoplasmic green fluorescence. The in vitro BLI was 7- and 13-fold higher in U87-NES-TGL and U87-Δ45-TGL cells compared to nontransduced control cells. The Ki of 14 C-FIAU was 0.49±0.02, 0.51±0.03, and 0.003±0.001 ml/min/g in U87-NES-TGL, U87-Δ45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells, respectively. Multimodality in vivo imaging studies were performed in nu/nu mice bearing multiple s.c. xenografts established from U87-NES-TGL, U87-Δ45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells. BLI was performed after administration of d-luciferin (150 mg/kg i.v.). Gamma camera or PET imaging was conducted at 2 h after i.v. administration of [ 131 I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal) or [ 124 I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal), respectively. Whole-body fluorescence imaging was performed in parallel with the BLI and radiotracer imaging studies. In vivo BLI and gamma camera imaging showed specific localization of luminescence and radioactivity to the TGL transduced xenografts with background levels of activity

  4. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and histology of vascular function in xenografts using macromolecular contrast agent hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-GdF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jennifer H E; McPhee, Kelly C; Moosvi, Firas; Saatchi, Katayoun; Häfeli, Urs O; Minchinton, Andrew I; Reinsberg, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are in development as blood pool markers for MRI. HPG-GdF is a 583 kDa hyperbranched polyglycerol doubly tagged with Gd and Alexa 647 nm dye, making it both MR and histologically visible. In this study we examined the location of HPG-GdF in whole-tumor xenograft sections matched to in vivo DCE-MR images of both HPG-GdF and Gadovist. Despite its large size, we have shown that HPG-GdF extravasates from some tumor vessels and accumulates over time, but does not distribute beyond a few cell diameters from vessels. Fractional plasma volume (fPV) and apparent permeability-surface area product (aPS) parameters were derived from the MR concentration-time curves of HPG-GdF. Non-viable necrotic tumor tissue was excluded from the analysis by applying a novel bolus arrival time (BAT) algorithm to all voxels. aPS derived from HPG-GdF was the only MR parameter to identify a difference in vascular function between HCT116 and HT29 colorectal tumors. This study is the first to relate low and high molecular weight contrast agents with matched whole-tumor histological sections. These detailed comparisons identified tumor regions that appear distinct from each other using the HPG-GdF biomarkers related to perfusion and vessel leakiness, while Gadovist-imaged parameter measures in the same regions were unable to detect variation in vascular function. We have established HPG-GdF as a biocompatible multi-modal high molecular weight contrast agent with application for examining vascular function in both MR and histological modalities. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. MMX-I: A data-processing software for multi-modal X-ray imaging and tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamaschi, A; Medjoubi, K; Somogyi, A; Messaoudi, C; Marco, S

    2017-01-01

    Scanning hard X-ray imaging allows simultaneous acquisition of multimodal information, including X-ray fluorescence, absorption, phase and dark-field contrasts, providing structural and chemical details of the samples. Combining these scanning techniques with the infrastructure developed for fast data acquisition at Synchrotron Soleil permits to perform multimodal imaging and tomography during routine user experiments at the Nanoscopium beamline. A main challenge of such imaging techniques is the online processing and analysis of the generated very large volume (several hundreds of Giga Bytes) multimodal data-sets. This is especially important for the wide user community foreseen at the user oriented Nanoscopium beamline (e.g. from the fields of Biology, Life Sciences, Geology, Geobiology), having no experience in such data-handling. MMX-I is a new multi-platform open-source freeware for the processing and reconstruction of scanning multi-technique X-ray imaging and tomographic datasets. The MMX-I project aims to offer, both expert users and beginners, the possibility of processing and analysing raw data, either on-site or off-site. Therefore we have developed a multi-platform (Mac, Windows and Linux 64bit) data processing tool, which is easy to install, comprehensive, intuitive, extendable and user-friendly. MMX-I is now routinely used by the Nanoscopium user community and has demonstrated its performance in treating big data. (paper)

  6. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto; Toma, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  7. MMX-I: A data-processing software for multi-modal X-ray imaging and tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Medjoubi, K.; Messaoudi, C.; Marco, S.; Somogyi, A.

    2017-06-01

    Scanning hard X-ray imaging allows simultaneous acquisition of multimodal information, including X-ray fluorescence, absorption, phase and dark-field contrasts, providing structural and chemical details of the samples. Combining these scanning techniques with the infrastructure developed for fast data acquisition at Synchrotron Soleil permits to perform multimodal imaging and tomography during routine user experiments at the Nanoscopium beamline. A main challenge of such imaging techniques is the online processing and analysis of the generated very large volume (several hundreds of Giga Bytes) multimodal data-sets. This is especially important for the wide user community foreseen at the user oriented Nanoscopium beamline (e.g. from the fields of Biology, Life Sciences, Geology, Geobiology), having no experience in such data-handling. MMX-I is a new multi-platform open-source freeware for the processing and reconstruction of scanning multi-technique X-ray imaging and tomographic datasets. The MMX-I project aims to offer, both expert users and beginners, the possibility of processing and analysing raw data, either on-site or off-site. Therefore we have developed a multi-platform (Mac, Windows and Linux 64bit) data processing tool, which is easy to install, comprehensive, intuitive, extendable and user-friendly. MMX-I is now routinely used by the Nanoscopium user community and has demonstrated its performance in treating big data.

  8. Fluoroscopic-guided radiofrequency ablation of the basivertebral nerve: application and analysis with multiple imaging modalities in an ovine model (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Jeffrey A.; Eskey, Cliff J.; Attawia, Mohammed; Patel, Samit J.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Pellegrino, Richard; Sutton, Jeffrey; Crombie, John; Paul, B. T.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2005-04-01

    Pathologic involvement of the basivertebral nerve, an intraosseous vertebral nerve found in humans and most mammalian species, may play a role in some forms of back pain. This study was designed to assess the feasibility and effects of the percutaneous delivery of radiofrequency (RF) energy to thermally ablate the basivertebral nerve in the lumbar vertebrae of mature sheep. Using fluoroscopic guidance, a RF bipolar device was placed and a thermal dose delivered to lumbar vertebral bodies in sheep. Post-treatment assessment included multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and computed tomography (CT). These data were analyzed and correlated to histopathology and morphometry findings to describe the cellular and boney structural changes resulting from the treatment. Imaging modalities MRI and CT can be implemented to non-invasively describe treatment region and volume, marrow cellular effects, and bone density alterations immediately following RF treatment and during convalescence. Such imaging can be utilized to assess treatment effects and refine the thermal dose to vertebral body volume ratio used in treatment planning. This information will be used to improve the therapeutic ratio and develop a treatment protocol for human applications.

  9. A Robust and Accurate Two-Step Auto-Labeling Conditional Iterative Closest Points (TACICP Algorithm for Three-Dimensional Multi-Modal Carotid Image Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengkai Guo

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is among the leading causes of death and disability. Combining information from multi-modal vascular images is an effective and efficient way to diagnose and monitor atherosclerosis, in which image registration is a key technique. In this paper a feature-based registration algorithm, Two-step Auto-labeling Conditional Iterative Closed Points (TACICP algorithm, is proposed to align three-dimensional carotid image datasets from ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance (MR. Based on 2D segmented contours, a coarse-to-fine strategy is employed with two steps: rigid initialization step and non-rigid refinement step. Conditional Iterative Closest Points (CICP algorithm is given in rigid initialization step to obtain the robust rigid transformation and label configurations. Then the labels and CICP algorithm with non-rigid thin-plate-spline (TPS transformation model is introduced to solve non-rigid carotid deformation between different body positions. The results demonstrate that proposed TACICP algorithm has achieved an average registration error of less than 0.2mm with no failure case, which is superior to the state-of-the-art feature-based methods.

  10. The risk assessment of Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ nanocomposites as dual-modal nanoprobes for magnetic and fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Long; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Cunjing; Xie, Fukang; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Our group has synthesized Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ nanocomposites as magnetic/fluorescence imaging successfully in the previous study, which exhibit good uniformity and monodispersibility with a mean size of 7.4 nm. However, their systematic risk assessment remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ was assessed on the basis of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was evaluated by monitoring the product of reactive oxygen species (ROS), clusters of differentiation (CD) markers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Balb/c mice. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ and gadodiamide which are used commonly in clinical. Few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of the liver, heart, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, and tumor under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. In addition, our products reveal good T_1-weighted contrast enhancement of xenografted murine tumor. Therefore, the above results may contribute to the effective application of Gd_2O_3:Yb"3"+/Er"3"+ as molecular imaging contrast agents and dual-modal nanoprobes for cancer detection.

  11. The role of red blood cell scintigraphy in the multiple-modality imaging diagnosis of a rare case of diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cason

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Angiomas are one of the most common primary tumors of the liver. Diffuse hepatic angiomatosis, however, is quite rare and usually observed in pediatric patients. We report a rare case of diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis in a 33-year-old woman. Case report: The patient presented with abdominal pain and a palpable upper abdominal mass. Abdominal CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings suggested diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis, but this finding was not confirmed by subsequent contrast-enhanced abdominal ultrasonography (US. The patient then underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeling of red blood cells (RBC. This examination revealed increased uptake of labeled erythrocytes in several of the hepatic lesions corresponding to CT and RM findings, thereby confirming the clinical hypothesis of diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis. Discussion: RBC scintigraphy with SPECT/CT can facilitate the comparison of other crosssectional imaging methods such as CT and MRI. This case highlights the importance of a multiple-modality approach in the imaging diagnosis of this condition.

  12. pH-Responsive Tumor-Targetable Theranostic Nanovectors Based on Core Crosslinked (CCL Micelles with Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance (MR Dual Imaging Modalities and Drug Delivery Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel theranostic nanovectors is of particular interest in treating formidable diseases (e.g., cancers. Herein, we report a new tumor-targetable theranostic agent based on core crosslinked (CCL micelles, possessing tumor targetable moieties and fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR dual imaging modalities. An azide-terminated diblock copolymer, N3-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA, was synthesized via consecutive atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, where OEGMA, DPA, and GMA are oligo(ethylene glycolmethyl ether methacrylate, 2-(diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate, and glycidyl methacrylate, respectively. The resulting diblock copolymer was further functionalized with DOTA(Gd (DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetrakisacetic acid or benzaldehyde moieties via copper(I-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC chemistry, resulting in the formation of DOTA(Gd-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA and benzaldehyde-POEGMA-b-P(DPA-co-GMA copolymers. The resultant block copolymers co-assembled into mixed micelles at neutral pH in the presence of tetrakis[4-(2-mercaptoethoxyphenyl]ethylene (TPE-4SH, which underwent spontaneous crosslinking reactions with GMA residues embedded within the micellar cores, simultaneously switching on TPE fluorescence due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation. Moreover, camptothecin (CPT was encapsulated into the crosslinked cores at neutral pH, and tumor-targeting pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP, sequence: AEQNPIYWARYADWLFTTPLLLLDLALLVDADEGTCG moieties were attached to the coronas through the Schiff base chemistry, yielding a theranostic nanovector with fluorescence and MR dual imaging modalities and tumor-targeting capability. The nanovectors can be efficiently taken up by A549 cells, as monitored by TPE fluorescence. After internalization, intracellular acidic pH triggered the release of loaded CPT, killing cancer cells in a selective manner. On the other hand, the nanovectors labeled with DOTA

  13. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP, DMSA, and {sup 18}F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined {sup 99}mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and {sup 18}F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug.

  14. Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain; Bildgebungsmodalitaeten und Therapieoptionen bei Patienten mit akutem Flankenschmerz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, A.; Grosse, C. [Universitaet Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit ist die Eroerterung der bildgebenden Verfahren zur Abklaerung von Patienten mit akutem Flankenschmerz und Verdacht auf Urolithiasis und die Rolle dieser Verfahren im Therapiemanagement von Steinpatienten. (orig.)

  15. Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets, Complementary/Innovative Treatment, and Therapeutic Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Lung Cancer (PI and co-PI: Renata Pasqualini , Ph.D., Wadih Arap, M.D., Ph.D.) The studies outlined in this proposal...with Drs. Pasqualini , Arap, and Wistuba. The IHC staining of lung cancer TMAs (390 cases) has been completed. We are working with investigators to...Project 3, R. Pasqualini ). This project was completed and a manuscript is in preparation by Dr. Pasqualini’s lab. b) Molecular abnormalities

  16. Multifunctional polypyrrole@fe3o4 nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and in vivo photothermal cancer therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Qiwei; Wang, Qian; Yao, Kexin; Teng, Baiyang; Zhang, Jizhe; Yang, Shiping; Han, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4 crystals are produced in situ on preformed polypyrrole (PPY) nanoparticles by rationally converting the residual Fe species in the synthetic system. The obtained PPY@Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles exhibit good photostability and biocompatibility, and they can be used as multifunctional probes for MRI, thermal imaging, and photothermal ablation of cancer cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Multifunctional polypyrrole@fe3o4 nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and in vivo photothermal cancer therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Qiwei

    2013-11-27

    Magnetic Fe3O4 crystals are produced in situ on preformed polypyrrole (PPY) nanoparticles by rationally converting the residual Fe species in the synthetic system. The obtained PPY@Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles exhibit good photostability and biocompatibility, and they can be used as multifunctional probes for MRI, thermal imaging, and photothermal ablation of cancer cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N., E-mail: nwen1@hfhs.org; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Brand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P. [Varian Medical System, Täfernstrasse 7, Dättwil AG 5405 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  19. Integration of multi-modality imaging for accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannoglou, George D.; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.; Sianos, George; Tsikaderis, Dimitrios; Matakos, Antonis; Koutkias, Vassilios; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Maglaveras, Nicos; Parcharidis, George E.; Louridas, George E.

    2006-01-01

    In conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of human coronary arteries, IVUS images are arranged linearly generating a straight vessel volume. However, with this approach real vessel curvature is neglected. To overcome this limitation an imaging method was developed based on integration of IVUS and biplane coronary angiography (BCA). In 17 coronary arteries from nine patients, IVUS and BCA were performed. From each angiographic projection, a single end-diastolic frame was selected and in each frame the IVUS catheter was interactively detected for the extraction of 3D catheter path. Ultrasound data was obtained with a sheath-based catheter and recorded on S-VHS videotape. S-VHS data was digitized and lumen and media-adventitia contours were semi-automatically detected in end-diastolic IVUS images. Each pair of contours was aligned perpendicularly to the catheter path and rotated in space by implementing an algorithm based on Frenet-Serret rules. Lumen and media-adventitia contours were interpolated through generation of intermediate contours creating a real 3D lumen and vessel volume, respectively. The absolute orientation of the reconstructed lumen was determined by back-projecting it onto both angiographic planes and comparing the projected lumen with the actual angiographic lumen. In conclusion, our method is capable of performing rapid and accurate 3D reconstruction of human coronary arteries in vivo. This technique can be utilized for reliable plaque morphometric, geometrical and hemodynamic analyses

  20. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, N.; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J.; Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  1. Mixing of multi-modal images for conformational radiotherapy: application to patient re positioning; Fusion d`images multi-modales pour la radiotherapie conformationnelle: application au repositionnement du patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassal, P

    1998-06-29

    This study shows a procedure of patient re positioning by comparative evaluation between the position of the patient and the theoretical expected position of the patient; the stagger between the two information gives the error of installation in translation and rotation. A correction is calculated and applied to the treatment environment (position and orientation of the patient, position and orientation of the irradiation source). The control system allows to determine the precise position of the tumor volume. The echography allows to determine the position of an organ.The surface captor is used to localize the tumors of the face or of the brain, with the respect to the face, the acquisition and the treatment of information take only few minutes. The X rays imager is applied for the localization of bones structures. (N.C.)

  2. Automatic Quantification of Tumour Hypoxia From Multi-Modal Microscopy Images Using Weakly-Supervised Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Gustavo; Peng, Tingying; Bayer, Christine; Navab, Nassir

    2017-07-01

    In recently published clinical trial results, hypoxia-modified therapies have shown to provide more positive outcomes to cancer patients, compared with standard cancer treatments. The development and validation of these hypoxia-modified therapies depend on an effective way of measuring tumor hypoxia, but a standardized measurement is currently unavailable in clinical practice. Different types of manual measurements have been proposed in clinical research, but in this paper we focus on a recently published approach that quantifies the number and proportion of hypoxic regions using high resolution (immuno-)fluorescence (IF) and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained images of a histological specimen of a tumor. We introduce new machine learning-based methodologies to automate this measurement, where the main challenge is the fact that the clinical annotations available for training the proposed methodologies consist of the total number of normoxic, chronically hypoxic, and acutely hypoxic regions without any indication of their location in the image. Therefore, this represents a weakly-supervised structured output classification problem, where training is based on a high-order loss function formed by the norm of the difference between the manual and estimated annotations mentioned above. We propose four methodologies to solve this problem: 1) a naive method that uses a majority classifier applied on the nodes of a fixed grid placed over the input images; 2) a baseline method based on a structured output learning formulation that relies on a fixed grid placed over the input images; 3) an extension to this baseline based on a latent structured output learning formulation that uses a graph that is flexible in terms of the amount and positions of nodes; and 4) a pixel-wise labeling based on a fully-convolutional neural network. Using a data set of 89 weakly annotated pairs of IF and HE images from eight tumors, we show that the quantitative results of methods (3) and (4

  3. Experimental modal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.

    2006-12-15

    This technical report concerns the basic theory and principles for experimental modal analysis. The sections within the report are: Output-only modal analysis software, general digital analysis, basics of structural dynamics and modal analysis and system identification. (au)

  4. Newer trace elements measured by RNNA and AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Very recently, special attention has been made on a few more trace elements in foodstuff as newer essential for animal and human health in certain ranges of concentration or intakes. These traces are namely: Aluminium, Nickel, Vanadium and Tin. A1 and Ni have been measured by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and two latter ones measured by Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis in some references laboratories. Here also scandium was analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis as well. These measurements were made for the most of Iranian diets and other participant countries' diets in frame of coordinated research project led by International Atomic Energy Agency period of 1986-1994, but practically it took more years. Here in this work the daily dietary intakes of aforesaid trace elements are given and discussed while the results of other 20 more nutritionally important trace elements were appeared somewhere else

  5. Current Controversies in Newer Therapies to Treat Birth Asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Wintermark

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in monitoring technology and knowledge of fetal and neonatal pathophysiology, neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE remains one of the main causes of severe adverse neurological outcome in children. Until recently, there were no therapies other than supportive measures. Over the past several years, mild hypothermia has been proven to be safe to treat HIE. Unfortunately, this neuroprotective strategy seems efficient in preventing brain injury in some asphyxiated newborns, but not in all of them. Thus, there is increasing interest to rapidly understand how to refine hypothermia therapy and add neuroprotective or neurorestorative strategies. Several promising newer treatments to treat birth asphyxia and prevent its devastating neurological consequences are currently being tested. In this paper, the physiopathology behind HIE, the currently available treatment, the potential alternatives, and the next steps before implementation of these other treatments are reviewed.

  6. A smart upconversion-based light-triggered polymer for synergetic chemo-photodynamic therapy and dual-modal MR/UCL imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Zhao, Feifei; Lim, Kok Hwa; Xi, Hongwei; Su, Xiangjie; Yao, Hanchun; Zhou, Jie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a novel nanocomposite to achieve effective therapy and live surveillance of tumor tissue. In this study, fullerene (C 60 ) with iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles and upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) was loaded into N-succinyl-N'-4-(2-nitrobenzyloxy)-succinyl-chitosan micelles (SNSC) with good biocompatibility. In addition, hydrophobic anticancer drug docetaxel (DTX) was also loaded into the nanocomposites. The experiments conducted in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that C 60 /Fe 3 O 4 -UCNPs@DTX@SNSC can act synergistically to kill tumor cells by releasing chemotherapy drugs at specific target site as well as generating reactive oxygen using 980nm. In addition, it can also be used for non-invasive deep magnetic resonance and upconversion fluorescence dual-mode imaging. The results indicated that this system provided an efficient method to surmount the drawback of UV or visible light-responsive polymeric systems for controlled drug release and generated reactive oxygen in deep tissues and ultimately realized the integration of dual-modal imaging and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chitosan-Gated Magnetic-Responsive Nanocarrier for Dual-Modal Optical Imaging, Switchable Drug Release, and Synergistic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Mu, Qingxin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Revia, Richard [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Wang, Kui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Zhou, Xuezhe [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Pauzauskie, Peter J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhou, Shuiqin [Department of Chemistry, The College of Staten Island, City University of New York, Staten Island NY 10314 USA; Zhang, Miqin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-01-25

    In this study, we present a multifunctional yet structurally simple nanocarrier that has a high drug loading capacity, releases drug in response to onset of an AC magnetic field, and can serve as a long-term imaging contrast agent and effectively kills cancer cells by synergistic action. This nanocarrier (HMMC-NC) has a spherical shell structure with a center cavity of 80 nm in diameter. The shell is comprised of two layers: an inner layer of magnetite that exhibits superparamagnetism and an outer layer of mesoporous carbon embedded with carbon dots that exhibit photoluminescence property. Thus in addition to being a drug carrier, HMMC-NC is also a contrast agent for bioimaging. The switchable drug release is enabled by the chitosan molecules attached on the nanocarrier as the switching material which turns on or off the drug release in response to the application or withdrawal of an AC magnetic field.

  8. Engineering iodine-doped carbon dots as dual-modal probes for fluorescence and X-ray CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Miaomiao Zhang,1,* Huixiang Ju,2,* Li Zhang,1,* Mingzhong Sun,2 Zhongwei Zhou,2 Zhenyu Dai,3 Lirong Zhang,1 Aihua Gong,1 Chaoyao Wu,1 Fengyi Du1 1School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Radiology Department, Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT is the most commonly used imaging technique for noninvasive diagnosis of disease. In order to improve tissue specificity and prevent adverse effects, we report the design and synthesis of iodine-doped carbon dots (I-doped CDs as efficient CT contrast agents and fluorescence probe by a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization process. The as-prepared I-doped CDs are monodispersed spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ~2.7 nm with favorable dispersibility and colloidal stability in water. The aqueous solution of I-doped CDs showed wavelength-dependent excitation and stable photoluminescence similar to traditional carbon quantum dots. Importantly, I-doped CDs displayed superior X-ray attenuation properties in vitro and excellent biocompatibility. After intravenous injection, I-doped CDs were distributed throughout the body and excreted by renal clearance. These findings validated that I-doped CDs with high X-ray attenuation potency and favorable photoluminescence show great promise for biomedical research and disease diagnosis. Keywords: carbon dots, contrast agents, iodine-doped, CT imaging

  9. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  10. A fully automated multi-modal computer aided diagnosis approach to coronary calcium scoring of MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-03-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. However, it can be difficult for a human observer to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the feasibility and requirement for an automated scoring method to reduce the subjectivity and reproducibility error inherent with manual clinical calcium scoring.

  11. Robotic-Assisted Fluorescence Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping Using Multi-Modal Image-Guidance in an Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Michael A.; Stroup, Sean P.; Cand, Zhengtao Qin; Hoh, Carl; Hall, David J.; Vera, David R.; Kane, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate PET/CT pre-operative imaging and intraoperative detection of a fluorescent-labeled receptor-targeted radiopharmaceutical in a prostate cancer animal model. Methods Three male Beagle dogs underwent an intra-prostatic injection of fluorescent-tagged tilmanocept radio-labeled with both gallium-68 and technetium-99m. One hour after injection a pelvic PET/CT scan was performed for pre-operative sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping. Definition of SLN was a standardized uptake value (SUV) that exceeded 5% of the lymph node with the highest SUV. Thirty-six hours later we performed robotic-assisted SLN dissection using a fluorescence-capable camera system. Fluorescent lymph nodes were clipped, the abdomen was opened, and the pelvic and retroperitoneal nodes were excised. All excised nodal packets were assayed by in vitro nuclear counting and reported as percent-of-injected dose. Results Pre-operative PET/CT imaging identified a median of three sentinel lymph nodes per animal. All sentinel lymph nodes (100%) identified by the PET/CT were fluorescent during robotic-assisted lymph node dissection. Of all fluorescent nodes visualized by the camera system, 83% (10/12) satisfied the 5%-rule defined by the PET/CT scan. The two lymph nodes that did not qualify accumulated less than 0.002% of the injected dose. Conclusions Fluorescent-labeled tilmanocept has optimal logistical properties to obtain pre-operative PET/CT and subsequent real-time intraoperative confirmation during robotic-assisted sentinel lymph node dissection. PMID:25139676

  12. Imaging of the optic disk in caring for patients with glaucoma: ophthalmoscopy and photography remain the gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, George L; Reddy, Swathi C

    2014-01-01

    Optic disk imaging is integral to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with glaucoma. We discuss the various forms of imaging the optic nerve, including ophthalmoscopy, photography, and newer imaging modalities, including optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT), and scanning laser polarimetry (GDx), specifically highlighting their benefits and disadvantages. We argue that ophthalmoscopy and photography remain the gold standard of imaging due to portability, ease of interpretation, and the presence of a large database of images for comparison. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TU-AB-BRA-06: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): An MRI Compatible Externally and Internally Deformable Lung Motion Phantom for Multi-Modality IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabouri, P; Sawant, A [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Arai, T [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has become an attractive tool for tumor motion management. Current MR-compatible phantoms are only capable of reproducing translational motion. This study describes the construction and validation of a more realistic, MRI-compatible lung phantom that is deformable internally as well as externally. We demonstrate a radiotherapy application of this phantom by validating the geometric accuracy of the open-source deformable image registration software NiftyReg (UCL, UK). Methods: The outer shell of a commercially-available dynamic breathing torso phantom was filled with natural latex foam with eleven water tubes. A rigid foam cut-out served as the diaphragm. A high-precision programmable, in-house, MRI-compatible motion platform was used to drive the diaphragm. The phantom was imaged on a 3T scanner (Philips, Ingenia). Twenty seven tumor traces previously recorded from lung cancer patients were programmed into the phantom and 2D+t image sequences were acquired using a sparse-sampling sequence k-t BLAST (accn=3, resolution=0.66×0.66×5mm3; acquisition-time=110ms/slice). The geometric fidelity of the MRI-derived trajectories was validated against those obtained via fluoroscopy using the on board kV imager on a Truebeam linac. NiftyReg was used to perform frame by frame deformable image registration. The location of each marker predicted by using NiftyReg was compared with the values calculated by intensity-based segmentation on each frame. Results: In all cases, MR trajectories were within 1 mm of corresponding fluoroscopy trajectories. RMSE between centroid positions obtained from segmentation with those obtained by NiftyReg varies from 0.1 to 0.21 mm in the SI direction and 0.08 to 0.13 mm in the LR direction showing the high accuracy of deformable registration. Conclusion: We have successfully designed and demonstrated a phantom that can accurately reproduce deformable motion under a variety of imaging modalities including MRI, CT and x-ray fluodoscopy

  14. The impact of different imaging modalities of 67Ga scintigraphy on the image quality and the ability in detection of lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiuqin; Li Wenchan; Zhang Jianfei; Yao Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 67 Ga scintigraphy is an important method in detection of active sarcoidosis. The aim of this research was to study the influence of planar and tomography. with and without CT attenuation correction (AC and NAC), on 67 Ga images on the image quality and the ability in detection of lesions. Methods: Thirty one patients (13 male, 18 female, age range: 33-87 years)with sarcoidosis underwent 67 Ga planar and tomographic scans. AC and NAC.The imaging quality and the ability in detection of hyper-radioactive lymph nodes in lung hilar and mediastinal(1esion) among the planar, AC and NAC images were compared. The paired t-test and χ 2 -test were used for data analysis with SPSS 10.0 software. Results: From planar, NAC to AC, the image quality was better and better in proper order (χ 2 = 25.88, P 67 Ga tomographic scintigraphy can impmve the ability in detection of hyperradioactive lung hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes compared with planar image does. CT AC for 67 Ga tomography can improve the tomographic imaging quality. (authors)

  15. Engineering iodine-doped carbon dots as dual-modal probes for fluorescence and X-ray CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Ju, Huixiang; Zhang, Li; Sun, Mingzhong; Zhou, Zhongwei; Dai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lirong; Gong, Aihua; Wu, Chaoyao; Du, Fengyi

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is the most commonly used imaging technique for noninvasive diagnosis of disease. In order to improve tissue specificity and prevent adverse effects, we report the design and synthesis of iodine-doped carbon dots (I-doped CDs) as efficient CT contrast agents and fluorescence probe by a facile bottom-up hydrothermal carbonization process. The as-prepared I-doped CDs are monodispersed spherical nanoparticles (a diameter of ~2.7 nm) with favorable dispersibility and colloidal stability in water. The aqueous solution of I-doped CDs showed wavelength-dependent excitation and stable photoluminescence similar to traditional carbon quantum dots. Importantly, I-doped CDs displayed superior X-ray attenuation properties in vitro and excellent biocompatibility. After intravenous injection, I-doped CDs were distributed throughout the body and excreted by renal clearance. These findings validated that I-doped CDs with high X-ray attenuation potency and favorable photoluminescence show great promise for biomedical research and disease diagnosis.

  16. Ten-year technical and clinical outcomes in TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus II infrainguinal C/D lesions using duplex ultrasound arterial mapping as the sole imaging modality for critical lower limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate duplex ultrasound arterial mapping (DUAM) as the sole imaging modality when planning for bypass surgery (BS) and endovascular revascularization (EvR) in patients with critical limb ischemia for TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C\\/D infrainguinal lesions.

  17. SU-E-J-85: The Effect of Different Imaging Modalities On the Delineation of the True Spinal Cord for Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, L; Brodin, P; Mani, K; Lee, A; Garg, M; Tome, W; Kalnicki, S [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT allows the delivery of high dose radiation treatments to localized tumors while minimizing dose to surrounding tissues. Due to the large doses delivered, accurate contouring of organs at risk is essential. In this study, differences between the true spinal cord as seen using MRI and CT myelogram (CTM) have been assessed in patients with spinal metastases treated using SBRT. Methods: Ten patients were identified that have both a CTM and a MRI. Using rigid registration tools, the MRI was fused to the CTM. The thecal sac and true cord were contoured using each imaging modality. Images were exported and analyzed for similarity by computing the Dice similarity coefficient and the modified Hausdorff distance (greatest distance from a point in one set to the closest point in the other set). Results: The Dice coefficient was calculated for the thecal sac (0.81 ±0.06) and true cord (0.63 ±0.13). These two measures are correlated; however, some points show a low true cord overlap despite a high overlap for the thecal sac. The Hausdorff distance for structure comparisons was also calculated. For thecal sac structures, the average value, 1.6mm (±1.1), indicates good overlap. For true cord comparison, the average value, 0.3mm (±0.16), indicates very good overlap. The minimum Hausdorff distance between the true cord and thecal sac was on average 1.6mm (±0.9) Conclusion: The true cord position as seen in MRI and CTM is fairly constant, although care should be taken as large differences can be seen in individual patients. Avoidning the true cord in spine SBRT is critical, so the ability to visualize the true cord before performing SBRT to the vertebrae is essential. Here, CT myelogram appears an excellent, robust option, that can be obtained the day of treatment planning and is unaffected by uncertainties in image fusion.

  18. Preoperative Lateralization Modalities for Cushing Disease: Is Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Cavernous Sinus Sampling More Predictive of Intraoperative Findings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai; Yedinak, Chris; Ozpinar, Alp; Anderson, Jim; Dogan, Aclan; Delashaw, Johnny; Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objective To analyze whether cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) are consistent with intraoperative findings in Cushing disease (CD) patients. Design Retrospective outcomes study. Setting Oregon Health & Science University; 2006 and 2013. Participants A total of 37 CD patients with preoperative dMRI and CSS to confirm central adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) hypersecretion. Patients were 78% female; mean age was 41 years (at diagnosis), and all had a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Main Outcome Measures Correlations among patient characteristics, dMRI measurements, CSS results, and intraoperative findings. Results All CSS indicated presence of CD. Eight of 37 patients had no identifiable tumor on dMRI. Three of 37 patients had no tumor at surgery. dMRI tumor size was inversely correlated with age (rs = - 0.4; p = 0.01) and directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.3; p < 0.05). Preoperative dMRI was directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.5; p < 0.002). CSS lateralization showed no correlation with intraoperative findings (rs = 0.145; p = 0.40) or lateralization observed on preoperative dMRI (rs = 0.17; p = 0.29). Postoperative remission rate was 68%. Conclusion dMRI localization was most consistent with intraoperative findings; CSS results were less reliable. Results suggest that small ACTH-secreting tumors continue to pose a challenge to reliable preoperative localization.

  19. Association between power law coefficients of the anatomical noise power spectrum and lesion detectability in breast imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a parameter extracted from a power function fit to the anatomical noise power spectrum, β, may be predictive of breast mass lesion detectability in x-ray based medical images of the breast. In this investigation, the value of β was compared with a number of other more widely used parameters, in order to determine the relationship between β and these other parameters. This study made use of breast CT data sets, acquired on two breast CT systems developed in our laboratory. A total of 185 breast data sets in 183 women were used, and only the unaffected breast was used (where no lesion was suspected). The anatomical noise power spectrum computed from two-dimensional region of interests (ROIs), was fit to a power function (NPS(f) = α f-β), and the exponent parameter (β) was determined using log/log linear regression. Breast density for each of the volume data sets was characterized in previous work. The breast CT data sets analyzed in this study were part of a previous study which evaluated the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance using simulated spherical lesions and a pre-whitened matched filter computer observer. This ROC information was used to compute the detectability index as well as the sensitivity at 95% specificity. The fractal dimension was computed from the same ROIs which were used for the assessment of β. The value of β was compared to breast density, detectability index, sensitivity, and fractal dimension, and the slope of these relationships was investigated to assess statistical significance from zero slope. A statistically significant non-zero slope was considered to be a positive association in this investigation. All comparisons between β and breast density, detectability index, sensitivity at 95% specificity, and fractal dimension demonstrated statistically significant association with p performance. Specifically, lower values of β were associated with lower breast density

  20. Meditations on Metaphysical Modality

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, Edmund Lindsay James

    2011-01-01

    Although metaphysical modality has been much discussed and exploited by philosophers, its precise nature is often left unanalysed and obscure. This dissertation marks an attempt to understand it better. After examining modality in general, the specific topic is introduced through consideration of the views of Kripke and Lewis. Comparisons are then made with logical, scientific and conceptual modalities. Finally, it is argued that metaphysical modality is that variety of modality which is alet...

  1. Highlights lecture EANM 2016: ''Embracing molecular imaging and multi-modal imaging: a smart move for nuclear medicine towards personalized medicine''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Cancer Imaging Centre, Department of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [Hotel Dieu University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Nantes (France); CRCINA, Inserm U1232, Nantes (France); ICO Cancer Center, Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Herblain (France)

    2017-08-15

    The 2016 EANM Congress took place in Barcelona, Spain, from 15 to 19 October under the leadership of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. With more than 6,000 participants, this congress was the most important European event in nuclear medicine, bringing together a multidisciplinary community involved in the different fields of nuclear medicine. There were over 600 oral and 1,200 poster or e-Poster presentations with an overwhelming focus on development and application of imaging for personalized care, which is timely for the community. Beyond FDG PET, major highlights included progress in the use of PSMA and SSTR receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and associated theranostics in oncology. Innovations in radiopharmaceuticals for imaging pathologies of the brain and cardiovascular system, as well as infection and inflammation, were also highlighted. In the areas of physics and instrumentation, multimodality imaging and radiomics were highlighted as promising areas of research. (orig.)

  2. Highlights lecture EANM 2016: "Embracing molecular imaging and multi-modal imaging: a smart move for nuclear medicine towards personalized medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboagye, Eric O; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2017-08-01

    The 2016 EANM Congress took place in Barcelona, Spain, from 15 to 19 October under the leadership of Prof. Wim Oyen, chair of the EANM Scientific Committee. With more than 6,000 participants, this congress was the most important European event in nuclear medicine, bringing together a multidisciplinary community involved in the different fields of nuclear medicine. There were over 600 oral and 1,200 poster or e-Poster presentations with an overwhelming focus on development and application of imaging for personalized care, which is timely for the community. Beyond FDG PET, major highlights included progress in the use of PSMA and SSTR receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and associated theranostics in oncology. Innovations in radiopharmaceuticals for imaging pathologies of the brain and cardiovascular system, as well as infection and inflammation, were also highlighted. In the areas of physics and instrumentation, multimodality imaging and radiomics were highlighted as promising areas of research.

  3. Newer Demographic Development of the Settlement of Murter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Podgorelec

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Murter is the largest settlement on the same-named island and also in the entire Šibenik archipelago. As opposed to most of the settlements on the island, its population was less involved in earlier emigration flows, whereas newer emigration began to effect Murter only after the sixties. The effect of the depopulation period is visible in the changes of the age-sex structure, where can be seen primarily in ageing of the population and a disproportion in the sex ratio. Yet it can be confirmed that the settlement of Murter has not such an unfavourable demographic situation as do most Dalmatian islands. A slightly falling birth rate can be noticed, as well as a slight increase in the death rate. The demographic perspective of this population is relatively favourable (due to an expected development of tourism, development of agriculture and trades, nautical infrastructures etc., if addition emigration factors will not come into play. Based on a multiple-criteria evaluation of developmental levels, the island of Murter, primarily due to the central position of the settlement Murter, is ranked 11th out of 47 Croatian islands. The reason is that all higher ranked islands also have a significantly larger area.

  4. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  5. Identification of Nasal Bone Fractures on Conventional Radiography and Facial CT: Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy in Different Imaging Modalities and Analysis of Interobserver Reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Lee, Yoo Jin

    2013-01-01

    There has been no study to compare the diagnostic accuracy of an experienced radiologist with a trainee in nasal bone fracture. To compare the diagnostic accuracy between conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) for the identification of nasal bone fractures and to evaluate the interobserver reliability between a staff radiologist and a trainee. A total of 108 patients who underwent conventional radiography and CT after acute nasal trauma were included in this retrospective study. Two readers, a staff radiologist and a second-year resident, independently assessed the results of the imaging studies. Of the 108 patients, the presence of a nasal bone fracture was confirmed in 88 (81.5%) patients. The number of non-depressed fractures was higher than the number of depressed fractures. In nine (10.2%) patients, nasal bone fractures were only identified on conventional radiography, including three depressed and six non-depressed fractures. CT was more accurate as compared to conventional radiography for the identification of nasal bone fractures as determined by both readers (P <0.05), all diagnostic indices of an experienced radiologist were similar to or higher than those of a trainee, and κ statistics showed moderate agreement between the two diagnostic tools for both readers. There was no statistical difference in the assessment of interobserver reliability for both imaging modalities in the identification of nasal bone fractures. For the identification of nasal bone fractures, CT was significantly superior to conventional radiography. Although a staff radiologist showed better values in the identification of nasal bone fracture and differentiation between depressed and non-depressed fractures than a trainee, there was no statistically significant difference in the interpretation of conventional radiography and CT between a radiologist and a trainee

  6. Operational Modal Analysis Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Palle

    of modal parameters of practical interest - including the mode shape scaling factor - with a high degree of accuracy. It is also argued that the operational technology offers the user a number of advantages over traditional modal testing. The operational modal technology allows the user to perform a modal......In this paper the basic principles in operational modal testing and analysis are presented and discussed. A brief review of the techniques for operational modal testing and identification is presented, and it is argued, that there is now a wide range of techniques for effective identification...

  7. Idiopathic Non-Cirrhotic Intrahepatic Portal Hypertension (NCIPH)—Newer Insights into Pathogenesis and Emerging Newer Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ashish; Elias, Joshua E.; Eapen, Chundamannil E.; Ramakrishna, Banumathi; Elias, Elwyn

    2014-01-01

    Chronic microangiopathy of portal venules results in idiopathic non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH). Recent data suggest a role for vasoactive factors of portal venous origin in the pathogenesis of this ‘pure’ vasculopathy of the liver. Enteropathies (often silent), are an important ‘driver’ of this disease. NCIPH is under-recognized and often mis-labeled as cryptogenic cirrhosis. Liver biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of NCIPH. In these patients, with advancing disease and increased porto-systemic shunting, the portal venous vasoactive factors bypass the liver filter and contribute to the development of pulmonary vascular endothelial disorders—porto-pulmonary hypertension and hepato-pulmonary syndrome as well as mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis. Prognosis in NCIPH patients is determined by presence, recognition and management of associated disorders. With better understanding of the pathogenesis of NCIPH, newer treatment options are being explored. Imbalance in ADAMTS 13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13): vWF (von-Willebrand factor) ratio is documented in NCIPH patients and may have a pathogenic role. Therapeutic interventions to correct this imbalance may prove to be important in the management of NCIPH. PMID:25755567

  8. Using magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose nondisplaced fractures of the second phalanx in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podadera, J M; Bell, R J; Dart, A J

    2010-11-01

    Two horses presented with a history of severe lameness that was localised to the area around the second phalanx (P2) of one forelimb. Radiographs of the second phalanx of both horses were unremarkable, apart from some smooth periosteal new bone production on the dorsum of P2. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a non-displaced fracture of P2 in both horses. One horse was euthanased because of a poor prognosis for racing, but the second horse was treated conservatively and salvaged for breeding. Magnetic resonance imaging is a newer imaging modality in horses and may be useful in diagnosing cases of obscure lameness.

  9. Modal Logics and Definability

    OpenAIRE

    Kuusisto, Antti

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, research into the mathematical foundations of modal logic has become increasingly popular. One of the main reasons for this is the fact that modal logic seems to adapt well to the requirements of a wide range of different fields of application. This paper is a summary of some of the author’s contributions to the understanding of modal definability theory.

  10. DICOM versus HL7 for modality interfacing

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterwijk, Herman

    1998-01-01

    Digital modalities such as CT, MRI, Ultrasound and Computerized Radiography systems, generating softcopy images to be used by a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), need to identify the images properly in order to retrieve and manage them. In many cases, a technologist re-enters patient demographic and study related information at the modality, even although it is usually already present somewhere in the hospital Information System (IS). In order to achieve a higher level of eff...

  11. A phase I feasibility study of multi-modality imaging assessing rapid expansion of marrow fat and decreased bone mineral density in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Susanta K; Arentsen, Luke; Sueblinvong, Thanasak; Brown, Keenan; Bolan, Pat; Ghebre, Rahel G; Downs, Levi; Shanley, Ryan; Hansen, Karen E; Minenko, Anne G; Takhashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Zhang, Yan; Geller, Melissa; Reynolds, Margaret; Lee, Chung K; Blaes, Anne H; Allen, Sharon; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Le, Chap; Froelich, Jerry; Rosen, Clifford; Yee, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Cancer survivors are at an increased risk for fractures, but lack of effective and economical biomarkers limits quantitative assessments of marrow fat (MF), bone mineral density (BMD) and their relation in response to cytotoxic cancer treatment. We report dual energy CT (DECT) imaging, commonly used for cancer diagnosis, treatment and surveillance, as a novel biomarker of MF and BMD. We validated DECT in pre-clinical and phase I clinical trials and verified with water-fat MRI (WF-MRI), quantitative CT (QCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Basis material composition framework was validated using water and small-chain alcohols simulating different components of bone marrow. Histologic validation was achieved by measuring percent adipocyte in the cadaver vertebrae and compared with DECT and WF-MRI. For a phase I trial, sixteen patients with gynecologic malignancies (treated with oophorectomy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy) underwent DECT, QCT, WF-MRI and DXA before and 12months after treatment. BMD and MF percent and distribution were quantified in the lumbar vertebrae and the right femoral neck. Measured precision (3mg/cm(3)) was sufficient to distinguish test solutions. Adiposity in cadaver bone histology was highly correlated with MF measured using DECT and WF-MRI (r=0.80 and 0.77, respectively). In the clinical trial, DECT showed high overall correlation (r=0.77, 95% CI: 0.69, 0.83) with WF-MRI. MF increased significantly after treatment (p<0.002). Chemotherapy and radiation caused greater increases in MF than oophorectomy (p<0.032). L4 BMD decreased 14% by DECT, 20% by QCT, but only 5% by DXA (p<0.002 for all). At baseline, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between MF and BMD which was dramatically attenuated after treatment. Our study demonstrated that DECT, similar to WF-MRI, can accurately measure marrow adiposity. Both imaging modalities show rapid increase in MF following cancer treatment. Our results suggest that MF and

  12. The Modal Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giluano Torrengo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Space and time are two obvious candidates as dimensions of reality. Yet, are they the only two dimensions of reality? Famously, David Lewis maintained the doctrine of ―modal realism‖, the thesis that possible worlds exist and are entities as concrete as the actual world that we live in. In this paper, I will explore the idea that modality can be construed as a dimension along with space and time. However, although Lewis‘ modal realism is the main source of inspiration for this construal of modality, I will argue that something else is required for having a modal dimension.

  13. The Risk of Specific Congenital Anomalies in Relation to Newer Antiepileptic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Josta; Garne, Ester; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T.W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More information is needed about possible associations between the newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the first trimester of pregnancy and specific congenital anomalies of the fetus. OBJECTIVES: We performed a literature review to find signals for potential associations between newer...... studies with pregnancies exposed to newer AEDs and detailed information on congenital anomalies. The congenital anomalies in the studies were classified according to the congenital anomaly subgroups of European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT). We compared the prevalence of specific...... and were not supported by other studies. No signals were found for the other newer AEDs, or the information was too limited to provide such a signal. CONCLUSION: In terms of associations between monotherapy with a newer AED in the first trimester of pregnancy and a specific congenital anomaly, the signals...

  14. Multifunctional BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo tri-modal upconversion optical, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yi, Zhigao; Xue, Zhenluan; Zeng, Songjun, E-mail: songjunz@hunnu.edu.cn; Liu, Hongrong, E-mail: hrliu@hunnu.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Development of high-quality upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with combination of the merits of multiple molecular imaging techniques, such as, upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, could significantly improve the accuracy of biological diagnosis. In this work, multifunctional BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er (50:2 mol%) UCNPs were synthesized via a solvothermal method using oleic acid (OA) as surface ligands (denoted as OA-UCNPs). The OA-UCNPs were further treated by diluted HCl to form ligand-free UCNPs (LF-UCNPs) for later bioimaging applications. The cytotoxicity assay in HeLa cells shows low cell toxicity of these LF-UCNPs. Owing to the efficient UCL of BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er, the LF-UCNPs were successfully used as luminescent bioprobe in UCL bioimaging. And, X-ray CT imaging reveals that BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er UCNPs can act as potential contrast agents for detection of the liver and spleen in the live mice owing to the high-Z elements (e.g., Ba, Yb, and Gd) in host matrix. Moreover, with the addition of Gd, the as-designed UCNPs exhibit additional positive contrast enhancement in T{sub 1}-weighted MR imaging. These findings demonstrate that BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er UCNPs are potential candidates for tri-modal imaging. - Graphical abstract: Multifunctional BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles with efficient upconversion emission, high absorption coefficient, predominant paramagnetic behavior, and low biological toxicity were demonstrated for tri-modality in vivo UCL, CT and MR imaging. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The multifunctional UCNPs with high monodispersity were synthesized. • The UCNPs present large r{sub 1} value and binary CT contrast agents. • These UCNPs were demonstrated as optimal probes for tri-modal bioimaging.

  15. Comparison between newer local anesthetics for myofascial pain syndrome management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaralidou, A Th; Amaniti, E N; Maidatsi, P G; Gorgias, N K; Vasilakos, D F

    2007-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes are characterized by the presence of painful loci within muscles, tendons or ligaments, called trigger points. Infiltration of these points with local anesthetics is often used as a treatment modality. The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate 0.25% levobupivacaine and 0.25% ropivacaine for trigger point injection regarding pain on injection, treatment efficacy and duration of symptoms remission. Sixty-eight patients, suffering from myofascial pain syndromes, were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for trigger-point injection. After completion of the procedure, patients were asked to rate pain during injection and efficacy of the treatment, based on immediate relief. Two weeks later, they were asked about the duration of this relief. Statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups with respect to pain during injection, efficacy of the treatment and duration of pain relief. The two local anesthetics seem to be equally effective for trigger point infiltration. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  16. Advances in Modal Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modal logic is a subject with ancient roots in the western logical tradition. Up until the last few generations, it was pursued mainly as a branch of philosophy. But in recent years, the subject has taken new directions with connections to topics in computer science and mathematics. This volume...... is the proceedings of the conference of record in its fi eld, Advances in Modal Logic. Its contributions are state-of-the-art papers. The topics include decidability and complexity results for specifi c modal logics, proof theory of modal logic, logics for reasoning about time and space, provability logic, dynamic...... epistemic logic, and the logic of evidence....

  17. What is the most accurate whole-body imaging modality for assessment of local and distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis. Imaging for recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, Monique; Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Rutten, Iris J.G.; Cappendijk, Vincent C.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Beets, Geerard L.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, CT and MRI as whole-body imaging modalities for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who have a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease, based on clinical findings or rise in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A meta-analysis was undertaken. PubMed and Embase were searched for studies on the accuracy of whole-body imaging for patients with suspected local and/or distant recurrence of their CRC. Additionally, studies had to have included at least 20 patients with CRC and 2 x 2 contingency tables had to be provided or derivable. Articles evaluating only local recurrence or liver metastasis were excluded. Summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed from the data on sensitivity and specificity of individual studies and pooled estimates of diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) were calculated. To test for heterogeneity the Cochran Q test was used. Fourteen observational studies were included which evaluated PET, PET/CT, CT and/or MRI. Study results were available in 12 studies for PET, in 5 studies for CT, in 5 studies for PET/CT and in 1 study for MRI. AUCs for PET, PET/CT and CT were 0.94 (0.90-0.97), 0.94 (0.87-0.98) and 0.83 (0.72-0.90), respectively. In patient based analyses PET/CT had a higher diagnostic performance than PET with an AUC of 0.95 (0.89-0.97) for PET/CT vs 0.92 (0.86-0.96) for PET. Both whole-body PET and PET/CT are very accurate for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in CRC patients with a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease. CT has the lowest diagnostic performance. This difference is probably mainly due to the lower accuracy of CT for detection of extrahepatic metastases (including local recurrence). For clinical practice PET/CT might be the modality of choice when evaluating patients with a (high

  18. Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy with BF2-chelated Tetraaryl-Azadipyrromethene agents: a multi-modality molecular imaging approach to therapeutic assessment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, A T

    2009-11-03

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality for a range of diseases including cancer. The BF(2)-chelated tetraaryl-azadipyrromethenes (ADPMs) are an emerging class of non-porphyrin PDT agent, which have previously shown excellent photochemical and photophysical properties for therapeutic application. Herein, in vivo efficacy and mechanism of action studies have been completed for the lead agent, ADMP06.

  19. 45 CFR 170.455 - Testing and certification to newer versions of certain standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Temporary Certification Program for HIT § 170.455 Testing and certification to newer versions of certain standards. (a) ONC-ATCBs...

  20. Abdominal Organ Location, Morphology, and Rib Coverage for the 5(th), 50(th), and 95(th) Percentile Males and Females in the Supine and Seated Posture using Multi-Modality Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ashley R; Gayzik, F Scott; Moreno, Daniel P; Martin, R Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D

    The purpose of this study was to use data from a multi-modality image set of males and females representing the 5(th), 50(th), and 95(th) percentile (n=6) to examine abdominal organ location, morphology, and rib coverage variations between supine and seated postures. Medical images were acquired from volunteers in three image modalities including Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and upright MRI (uMRI). A manual and semi-automated segmentation method was used to acquire data and a registration technique was employed to conduct a comparative analysis between abdominal organs (liver, spleen, and kidneys) in both postures. Location of abdominal organs, defined by center of gravity movement, varied between postures and was found to be significant (p=0.002 to p=0.04) in multiple directions for each organ. In addition, morphology changes, including compression and expansion, were seen in each organ as a result of postural changes. Rib coverage, defined as the projected area of the ribs onto the abdominal organs, was measured in frontal, lateral, and posterior projections, and also varied between postures. A significant change in rib coverage between postures was measured for the spleen and right kidney (p=0.03 and p=0.02). The results indicate that posture affects the location, morphology and rib coverage area of abdominal organs and these implications should be noted in computational modeling efforts focused on a seated posture.

  1. Modal logics are coalgebraic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirstea, C.; Kurz, A.; Pattinson, D.; Schröder, L.; Venema, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Applications of modal logics are abundant in computer science, and a large number of structurally different modal logics have been successfully employed in a diverse spectrum of application contexts. Coalgebraic semantics, on the other hand, provides a uniform and encompassing view on the large

  2. Newer antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of status epilepticus: impact on prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaques, Léonore; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2012-05-01

    Newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are increasingly prescribed and seem to have a comparable efficacy as the classical AEDs; however, their impact on status epilepticus (SE) prognosis has received little attention. In our prospective SE database (2006-2010), we assessed the use of older versus newer AEDs (levetiracetam, pregabalin, topiramate, lacosamide) over time and its relationship to outcome (return to clinical baseline conditions, new handicap, or death). Newer AEDs were used more often toward the end of the study period (42% of episodes versus 30%). After adjustment for SE etiology, SE severity score, and number of compounds needed to terminate SE, newer AEDs were independently related to a reduced likelihood of return to baseline (p<0.001) but not to increased mortality. These findings seem in line with recent findings on refractory epilepsy. Also, in view of the higher price of the newer AEDs, well-designed, prospective assessments analyzing the impact of newer AEDs on efficacy and tolerability in patients with SE appear mandatory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal modal preferential consequence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available beyond the basic (propositional) KLM postulates, thereby making use of the additional expressivity provided by modal logic. In particular, we show that the additional constraints we impose on the preferential semantics ensure that the rule...

  4. Supervised Cross-Modal Factor Analysis for Multiple Modal Data Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingbin

    2015-10-09

    In this paper we study the problem of learning from multiple modal data for purpose of document classification. In this problem, each document is composed two different modals of data, i.e., An image and a text. Cross-modal factor analysis (CFA) has been proposed to project the two different modals of data to a shared data space, so that the classification of a image or a text can be performed directly in this space. A disadvantage of CFA is that it has ignored the supervision information. In this paper, we improve CFA by incorporating the supervision information to represent and classify both image and text modals of documents. We project both image and text data to a shared data space by factor analysis, and then train a class label predictor in the shared space to use the class label information. The factor analysis parameter and the predictor parameter are learned jointly by solving one single objective function. With this objective function, we minimize the distance between the projections of image and text of the same document, and the classification error of the projection measured by hinge loss function. The objective function is optimized by an alternate optimization strategy in an iterative algorithm. Experiments in two different multiple modal document data sets show the advantage of the proposed algorithm over other CFA methods.

  5. Radiomic biomarkers from PET/CT multi-modality fusion images for the prediction of immunotherapy response in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Qi, Jin; Lu, Hong; Schabath, Matthew; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Tunali, Ilke; Gillies, Robert James

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: Investigate the ability of using complementary information provided by the fusion of PET/CT images to predict immunotherapy response in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: We collected 64 patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC treated with anti PD-1 checkpoint blockade. Using PET/CT images, fused images were created following multiple methodologies, resulting in up to 7 different images for the tumor region. Quantitative image features were extracted from the primary image (PET/CT) and the fused images, which included 195 from primary images and 1235 features from the fusion images. Three clinical characteristics were also analyzed. We then used support vector machine (SVM) classification models to identify discriminant features that predict immunotherapy response at baseline. Results: A SVM built with 87 fusion features and 13 primary PET/CT features on validation dataset had an accuracy and area under the ROC curve (AUROC) of 87.5% and 0.82, respectively, compared to a model built with 113 original PET/CT features on validation dataset 78.12% and 0.68. Conclusion: The fusion features shows better ability to predict immunotherapy response prediction compared to individual image features.

  6. Toward predicate approaches to modality

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    In this volume, the author investigates and argues for, a particular answer to the question: What is the right way to logically analyze modalities from natural language within formal languages? The answer is: by formalizing modal expressions in terms of predicates. But, as in the case of truth, the most intuitive modal principles lead to paradox once the modal notions are conceived as predicates. The book discusses the philosophical interpretation of these modal paradoxes and argues that any satisfactory approach to modality will have to face the paradoxes independently of the grammatical category of the modal notion. By systematizing modal principles with respect to their joint consistency and inconsistency, Stern provides an overview of the options and limitations of the predicate approach to modality that may serve as a useful starting point for future work on predicate approaches to modality. Stern also develops a general strategy for constructing philosophically attractive theories of modal notions conce...

  7. The modal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The term ''Modal Study'' refers to a research program conducted for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the level of protection provided by NRC-certified packages during the shipment of spent nuclear fuel form U.S. power reactors. The objective of the study was to examine the response of the packages to actual highway and railway accident conditions. The Modal Study results show that NRC-certified spent fuel casks would perform their safety functions under severe, actual accident conditions. The study also explains how NRC's cask design conditions, which are expressed in engineering terms, relate to actual accident conditions, with which the public is more familiar. The Modal Study, along with other transportation studies, physical testing of casks, and the spent fuel shipment safety record confirm the view that casks provide a high level of public safety during spent fuel transport

  8. Imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, James; Hadden, William J; Laurence, Jerome M; Lam, Vincent; Yuen, Lawrence; Janssen, Anna; Pleass, Henry

    2017-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer, primarily pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), accounts for 2.4% of cancer diagnoses and 5.8% of cancer death annually. Early diagnoses can improve 5-year survival in PDAC. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy values for MRI, CT, PET&PET/CT, EUS and transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) in the diagnosis of PDAC. A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies reporting sensitivity, specificity and/or diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PDAC with MRI, CT, PET, EUS or TAUS. Proportional meta-analysis was performed for each modality. A total of 5399 patients, 3567 with PDAC, from 52 studies were included. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 93% (95% CI=88-96), 89% (95% CI=82-94) and 90% (95% CI=86-94) for MRI; 90% (95% CI=87-93), 87% (95% CI=79-93) and 89% (95% CI=85-93) for CT; 89% (95% CI=85-93), 70% (95% CI=54-84) and 84% (95% CI=79-89) for PET; 91% (95% CI=87-94), 86% (95% CI=81-91) and 89% (95% CI=87-92) for EUS; and 88% (95% CI=86-90), 94% (95% CI=87-98) and 91% (95% C=87-93) for TAUS. This review concludes all modalities, except for PET, are equivalent within 95% confidence intervals for the diagnosis of PDAC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Parametric modal transition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beneš, Nikola; Křetínský, Jan; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2011-01-01

    Modal transition systems (MTS) is a well-studied specification formalism of reactive systems supporting a step-wise refinement methodology. Despite its many advantages, the formalism as well as its currently known extensions are incapable of expressing some practically needed aspects in the refin......Modal transition systems (MTS) is a well-studied specification formalism of reactive systems supporting a step-wise refinement methodology. Despite its many advantages, the formalism as well as its currently known extensions are incapable of expressing some practically needed aspects...

  10. Combined SPECT/CT improves detection of initial bone invasion and determination of resection margins in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck compared to conventional imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Munich (Germany); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-Kiefer und Gesichtschirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Schuster, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Chlebowski, A.; Kesting, M.; Bissinger, O.; Weitz, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Munich (Germany); Lange, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Munich (Germany); Scheidhauer, K.; Schwaiger, M.; Dinges, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Knowledge of the presence and extent of bone infiltration is crucial for planning the resection of potential bone-infiltrating squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). Routinely, plain-film radiography, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for preoperative staging, but they show relatively high rates of false-positive and false-negative findings. Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-bisphosphonate has the ability to show increased metabolic bone activity. If combined with anatomical imaging (e.g. (SPECT)/CT), it facilitates the precise localization of malignant bone lesions. The aim of this study was to analyse the indications and advantages of SPECT/CT compared with standard imaging modalities and histology with regard to specificity and sensitivity A longitudinally evaluated group of 30 patients with biopsy-proven HNSCC adjacent to the mandible underwent {sup 99m}Tc-bisphosphonate SPECT/CT, MRI, MSCT and conventional radiography before partial or rim resection of the mandible was performed. Bone infiltration was first evaluated with plain films, MSCT and MRI. In a second reading, SPECT/CT data were taken into account. The results (region and certainty of bone invasion) were evaluated among the different imaging modalities and finally compared with histological specimens from surgical resection as the standard of reference. For a better evaluation of the hybrid property of SPECT/CT, a retrospectively evaluated group of 20 additional patients with tumour locations similar to those of the longitudinally examined SPECT/CT group underwent SPECT, MSCT and MRI. To assess the influence of dental foci on the specificity of the imaging modalities, all patients were separated into two subgroups depending on the presence or absence of teeth in the area of potential tumour-bone contact. Histologically proven bone infiltration was found in 17 patients (57 %) when analysed by conventional imaging modalities. SPECT/CT data

  11. Combined SPECT/CT improves detection of initial bone invasion and determination of resection margins in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck compared to conventional imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolk, A.; Schuster, T.; Chlebowski, A.; Kesting, M.; Bissinger, O.; Weitz, J.; Lange, P.; Scheidhauer, K.; Schwaiger, M.; Dinges, J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the presence and extent of bone infiltration is crucial for planning the resection of potential bone-infiltrating squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). Routinely, plain-film radiography, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for preoperative staging, but they show relatively high rates of false-positive and false-negative findings. Scintigraphy with 99m Tc-bisphosphonate has the ability to show increased metabolic bone activity. If combined with anatomical imaging (e.g. (SPECT)/CT), it facilitates the precise localization of malignant bone lesions. The aim of this study was to analyse the indications and advantages of SPECT/CT compared with standard imaging modalities and histology with regard to specificity and sensitivity A longitudinally evaluated group of 30 patients with biopsy-proven HNSCC adjacent to the mandible underwent 99m Tc-bisphosphonate SPECT/CT, MRI, MSCT and conventional radiography before partial or rim resection of the mandible was performed. Bone infiltration was first evaluated with plain films, MSCT and MRI. In a second reading, SPECT/CT data were taken into account. The results (region and certainty of bone invasion) were evaluated among the different imaging modalities and finally compared with histological specimens from surgical resection as the standard of reference. For a better evaluation of the hybrid property of SPECT/CT, a retrospectively evaluated group of 20 additional patients with tumour locations similar to those of the longitudinally examined SPECT/CT group underwent SPECT, MSCT and MRI. To assess the influence of dental foci on the specificity of the imaging modalities, all patients were separated into two subgroups depending on the presence or absence of teeth in the area of potential tumour-bone contact. Histologically proven bone infiltration was found in 17 patients (57 %) when analysed by conventional imaging modalities. SPECT/CT data revealed

  12. Computer-based image analysis in radiological diagnostics and image-guided therapy: 3D-Reconstruction, contrast medium dynamics, surface analysis, radiation therapy and multi-modal image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beier, J.

    2001-01-01

    This book deals with substantial subjects of postprocessing and analysis of radiological image data, a particular emphasis was put on pulmonary themes. For a multitude of purposes the developed methods and procedures can directly be transferred to other non-pulmonary applications. The work presented here is structured in 14 chapters, each describing a selected complex of research. The chapter order reflects the sequence of the processing steps starting from artefact reduction, segmentation, visualization, analysis, therapy planning and image fusion up to multimedia archiving. In particular, this includes virtual endoscopy with three different scene viewers (Chap. 6), visualizations of the lung disease bronchiectasis (Chap. 7), surface structure analysis of pulmonary tumors (Chap. 8), quantification of contrast medium dynamics from temporal 2D and 3D image sequences (Chap. 9) as well as multimodality image fusion of arbitrary tomographical data using several visualization techniques (Chap. 12). Thus, the software systems presented cover the majority of image processing applications necessary in radiology and were entirely developed, implemented and validated in the clinical routine of a university medical school. (orig.) [de

  13. Supervised Cross-Modal Factor Analysis for Multiple Modal Data Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingbin; Zhou, Yihua; Duan, Kanghong; Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Bensmail, Halima

    2015-01-01

    . In this paper, we improve CFA by incorporating the supervision information to represent and classify both image and text modals of documents. We project both image and text data to a shared data space by factor analysis, and then train a class label predictor

  14. Dual-modality optical and positron emission tomography imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor vasculature using quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-01-01

    To date, the in vivo imaging of quantum dots (QDs) has been mostly qualitative or semiquantitative. The development of a dual-function positron emission tomography (PET)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe might allow the accurate assessment of the tumor-targeting efficacy of QDs. An amine-functionalized QD was conjugated with VEGF protein and DOTA chelator for VEGFR-targeted PET/NIRF imaging after 64 Cu-labeling. The targeting efficacy of this dual functional probe was evaluated in vitro and in vivo through cell-binding assay, cell staining, in vivo optical/PET imaging, ex vivo optical/PET imaging, and histology. The DOTA-QD-VEGF exhibited VEGFR-specific binding in both cell-binding assay and cell staining experiment. Both NIR fluorescence imaging and microPET showed VEGFR-specific delivery of conjugated DOTA-QD-VEGF nanoparticle and prominent reticuloendothelial system uptake. The U87MG tumor uptake of 64 Cu-labeled DOTA-QD was less than one percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g), significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-labeled DOTA-QD-VEGF (1.52±0.6%ID/g, 2.81±0.3%ID/g, 3.84± 0.4%ID/g, and 4.16±0.5%ID/g at 1,4,16, and 24 h post injection, respectively; n=3). Good correlation was also observed between the results measured by ex vivo PET and NIRF organ imaging. Histologic examination revealed that DOTA-QD-VEGF primarily targets the tumor vasculature through a VEGF-VEGFR interaction. We have successfully developed a QD-based nanoprobe for dual PET and NIRF imaging of tumor VEGFR expression. The success of this bifunctional imaging approach may render higher degree of accuracy for the quantitative targeted NIRF imaging in deep tissue. (orig.)

  15. Marginal leakage of two newer glass-ionomer-based sealant materials assessed using micro-CT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Fan, M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test newer glass-ionomer-based materials as sealant materials. One glass-ionomer sealant was light-cured to obtain an early setting reaction. The null-hypothesis tested was: there is no difference in marginal leakage of sealants produced with high-viscosity glass-ionomer, with and

  16. Older and Newer Media: Patterns of Use and Effects on Adolescents' Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jane D.; Bobkowski, Piotr S.

    2011-01-01

    The past decade's research on the use and effects of older (television, music, movies, magazines) and newer media (the Internet, cell phones, social networking) on adolescents' health and well-being is reviewed. A portrait of patterns of use of the media is provided and then the predictors and effects of those patterns on adolescents' mental…

  17. Mirror image extradural hematoma in elderly population: management strategy with surgical bilateral or unilateral evacuation or conservative treatment modality with literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta; Yada Rajpur; Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael; Agrawal Amit

    2017-01-01

    Extradural hematomas (EDH) represent one of common imaging findings in cases sustaining traumatic brain injury. Bilateral extradural haematoma is considered rare and even rarer in elder people male. Bilateral extradural hematoma is usually acute, and generally associated with severe traumatic head injury. Mirror-image extradural hematomas (MEDH) constitute a special type of bilateral extradural hamatomas, which is placed anatomically symmetrically on both the sides of the intracranial compart...

  18. IMPACT: Imaging and Molecular Markers for Patients with Lung Cancer: Approaches with Molecular Targets, Complementary/Innovative Treatments, and Therapeutic Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    imaging, MRI and CT scan in vivo imaging, and/or heat deposition for NIR photo-therapy. The identification of vascular markers targeted by...studies, as a prelude to potential clinical trials, is to secure a large source of the drug from our pharmaceutical counterparts. Therefore, from the...beginning of this project, we tried to identify agents that target FGF receptor signaling and are under development in pharmaceutical companies. We had

  19. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging in the acute and sub-acute phase of mild traumatic brain injury: can we see the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Arnold; Kovacs, Noemi; Perlaki, Gabor; Orsi, Gergely; Aradi, Mihaly; Komaromy, Hedvig; Ezer, Erzsebet; Bukovics, Peter; Farkas, Orsolya; Janszky, Jozsef; Doczi, Tamas; Buki, Andras; Schwarcz, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were shown to be able to detect the subtle structural consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The objective of this study was to investigate the acute structural alterations and recovery after mTBI, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to reveal axonal pathology, volumetric analysis, and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to detect microhemorrhage. Fourteen patients with mTBI who had computed tomography with negative results underwent MRI within 3 days and 1 month after injury. High resolution T1-weighted imaging, DTI, and SWI, were performed at both time points. A control group of 14 matched volunteers were also examined following the same imaging protocol and time interval. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) were performed on DTI data to reveal group differences. T1-weighted images were fed into Freesurfer volumetric analysis. TBSS showed fractional anisotropy (FA) to be significantly (corrected ptime points when performing MRI studies on patients with mTBI.

  20. FY1995 development of a endoscopic surgical system utilizing multi-modal functional images; 1995 nendo tashu kino gazo wo mochiiru teishinshu naishikyo shujutsu system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an endoscope system for neurosurgery that can provide not only conventional endoscopic images but also ultraviolet-visible spectra, fluorescence spectra, near infrared spectra, and ultra-soundimages of tissue aiming for real-time identification of pathological tissue. The system also incorporates surgical manipulator and devices such as micro forceps and laser surgical instruments for endoscopic image guided surgery. Surgical Manipulator should be a high performance and easy to operate surgical instrument as well as conventional surgical tools such as scissors and knife. Since living tissue deforms during surgical operation, pre-operative three dimensional information for registration of pathological tissue should be modified based on information obtained during surgery. Thus surgical manipulator should be operated under guidance of surgeon's observation. Consequently, surgical manipulator should have various types of imaging and measurement devices such as an endoscope and an ultrasound imaging probe at its end effectors. Based on this concept, a prototype of a new multi channel surgical manipulator system CM cube (CM3, Computer aided Micro Multichannel Manipulator) that has various types of imaging and measurement devices such as ultra-violet-visible camera for spectroscopic measurement, ultra-sound imaging probe, three dimensional endoscope, together with micro surgical instruments and laser surgical systems has been developed. Its performance was evaluated through in vitro/in vivo experiments and clinical application. (NEDO)

  1. Dual-Modality Breast Tomosynthesis1

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Mark B.; Judy, Patricia G.; Gunn, Spencer; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    Pilot clinical evaluation of this dual-modality tomosynthesis system suggests that it is a feasible and accurate method with which to detect and diagnose breast cancer and that specificity and positive predictive value can be improved by adding molecular breast imaging tomosynthesis to x-ray tomosynthesis.

  2. Tense, aspect, and modality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.; Pfau, R.; Steinbach, M.; Woll, B.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-linguistically, the grammatical categories tense, aspect, and modality - when they are overtly expressed - are generally realized by free morphemes (such as adverbials and auxiliaries) or by bound inflectional markers. The discussion in this chapter will make clear that this generalization

  3. A Modality Called 'Negation'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berto, F.

    2015-01-01

    I propose a comprehensive account of negation as a modal operator, vindicating a moderate logical pluralism. Negation is taken as a quantifier on worlds, restricted by an accessibility relation encoding the basic concept of compatibility. This latter captures the core meaning of the operator. While

  4. A Hybrid Technique for De-Noising Multi-Modality Medical Images by Employing Cuckoo’s Search with Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaisar Javaid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available De-noising of the medical images is very difficult task. To improve the overall visual representation we need to apply a contrast enhancement techniques, this representation provide the physicians and clinicians a good and recovered diagnosis results. Various de-noising and contrast enhancements methods are develops. However, some of the methods are not good in providing the better results with accuracy and efficiency. In our paper we de-noise and enhance the medical images without any loss of information. We uses the curvelet transform in combination with ridglet transform along with CS (Cuckoo Search algorithm. The curvlet transform adapt and represents the sparse pixel informations with all edges. The edges play very important role in understanding of the images. Curvlet transform computes the edges very efficiently where the wavelets are failed. We used the CS to optimize the de-noising coefficients without loss of structural and morphological information. Our designed method would be accurate and efficient in de-noising the medical images. Our method attempts to remove the multiplicative and additive noises. Our proposed method is proved to be an efficient and reliable in removing all kind of noises from the medical images. Result indicates that our proposed approach is better than other approaches in removing impulse, Gaussian, and speckle noises.

  5. Novel Cs-Based Upconversion Nanoparticles as Dual-Modal CT and UCL Imaging Agents for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxin; Li, Luoyuan; Guo, Quanwei; Wang, Lu; Liu, Dongdong; Wei, Ziwei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide-based contrast agents have attracted increasing attention for their unique properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics. To date, many of these agents have been studied extensively in cells and small animal models. However, performance of these theranostic nanoparticles requires further improvement. In this study, a novel CsLu2F7:Yb,Er,Tm-based visual therapeutic platform was developed for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy. Due to the presence of the heavy alkali metal Cesium (Cs) in host lattice, the nanoplatform can provide a higher resolution X-ray CT imaging than many other reported lanthanide-based CT contrast agents. Furthermore, by using the targeted RGD motif, chemotherapy drug alpha-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), and photothermal coupling agent ICG, this nanoplatform simultaneously provides multifunctional imaging and targeted synergistic therapy. To demonstrate the theranostic performance of this novel nanoplatform in vivo, visual diagnosis in the small animal model was realized by UCL/CT imaging which was further integrated with targeted chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. These results provided evidence for the successful construction of a novel lanthanide-based nanoplatform coupled with multimodal imaging diagnosis and potential application in synergistic cancer theranostics.

  6. Development of in vivo imaging modalities for experimental oncology; Developpement de modalites d'imagerie in vivo pour l'oncologie experimentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesnel, S.

    2010-12-10

    Small animal imaging is more and more used in pharmacology to identify and to characterize the activities of new antitumor agents. The first part of my work consisted in the development of new tools to improve the quantitation in bioluminescence. A method, based on spectral characteristics of emitted photons, has been established to correct tissue absorption. The second, using methods of image restoration had for objective to correct tissue scattering to increase the resolution. In a second part, I developed in vivo models of bioluminescent tumors (intracranial glioblastoma, a large cell anaplastic lymphoma and a metastatic neuroblastoma) using the imaging methods described previously. These studies allowed the characterization of the activity of a new antitumor agent. The aim of the last part was to develop imaging probes. The first, a monoclonal antibody antiCD45 labeled with a fluoro chrome allowed the detection of human leukemic cells implanted in the mice using fluorescence imaging. The second was developed to predict the uptake of a antitumor agent, a spermine-podophyllotoxin conjugate, in tumor cells via the polyamine transport system. The synthesized probe is a spermine conjugated to a HYNIC group to bind a radioisotope: the Technetium-99m and to realize a scintigraphic examination. The results showed the feasibility of a preclinical use of this probe. So, at this end of this thesis, the developed methods of bioluminescent signal processing are available to improve the use of optical imaging in pharmacology. Of course, supplementary studies are necessary to define precisely in which context these corrections will be the most appropriate. (author)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  9. Stimulus Modality and Smoking Behavior: Moderating Role of Implicit Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeh, Valentine C; Mefoh, Philip

    2015-07-20

    This study investigated whether stimulus modality influences smoking behavior among smokers in South Eastern Nigeria and also whether implicit attitudes moderate the relationship between stimulus modality and smoking behavior. 60 undergraduate students of University of Nigeria, Nsukka were used. Participants were individually administered the IAT task as a measure of implicit attitude toward smoking and randomly assigned into either image condition that paired images of cigarette with aversive images of potential health consequences or text condition that paired images of cigarette with aversive texts of potential health consequences. A one- predictor and one-moderator binary logistic analysis indicates that stimulus modality significantly predicts smoking behavior (p = smoke with greater probability than the text condition. The interaction between stimulus modality and IAT scores was also significant (p = attitudes towards smoking. The finding shows the urgent need to introduce the use of aversive images of potential health consequences on cigarette packs in Nigeria.

  10. Controllable synthesis of a novel magnetic core-shell nanoparticle for dual-modal imaging and pH-responsive drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Yingxi; Li, Liu; Li, Ling; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, novel magnetic core-shell nanoparticles Fe3O4@La-BTC/GO have been synthesized by the layer-by-layer self-assembly (LBL) method and further modified by attachment of amino-modified PEG chains. The nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by x-ray diffraction, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The core-shell structure was shown to be controlled by the LBL method. The drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) within the Fe3O4@La-BTC/GO-PEG nanoparticles with different numbers of deposited layers was investigated. It was found that DOX loading increased with increasing number of metal organic framework coating layers, indicating that the drug loading can be controlled through the controllable LBL method. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that the Fe3O4@La-BTC/GO-PEG nanoparticles were biocompatible. The DOX was released rapidly at pH 3.8 and pH 5.8, but at pH 7.4 the rate and extent of release was greatly attenuated. The nanoparticles therefore demonstrate an excellent pH-triggered drug release. In addition, the particles could be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence optical imaging (FOI). A clear dose-dependent contrast enhancement in T 2-weighted MR images and fluorescence images indicate the potential of these nanoparticles as dual-mode MRI/FOI contrast agents.

  11. Fiber-optic system for dual-modality imaging of glucose probes 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG in atherosclerotic plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raiyan T Zaman

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a progressive inflammatory condition that underlies coronary artery disease (CAD-the leading cause of death in the United States. Thus, the ultimate goal of this research is to advance our understanding of human CAD by improving the characterization of metabolically active vulnerable plaques within the coronary arteries using a novel catheter-based imaging system. The aims of this study include (1 developing a novel fiber-optic imaging system with a scintillator to detect both 18F and fluorescent glucose probes, and (2 validating the system on ex vivo murine plaques.A novel design implements a flexible fiber-optic catheter consisting of both a radio-luminescence and a fluorescence imaging system to detect radionuclide 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG and the fluorescent analog 6-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino-6-Deoxyglucose (6-NBDG, respectively. Murine macrophage-rich atherosclerotic carotid plaques were imaged ex vivo after intravenous delivery of 18F-FDG or 6-NBDG. Confirmatory optical imaging by IVIS-200 and autoradiography were also performed.Our fiber-optic imaging system successfully visualized both 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG probes in atherosclerotic plaques. For 18F-FDG, the ligated left carotid arteries (LCs exhibited 4.9-fold higher radioluminescence signal intensity compared to the non-ligated right carotid arteries (RCs (2.6 × 10(4 ± 1.4 × 10(3 vs. 5.4 × 10(3 ± 1.3 × 10(3 A.U., P = 0.008. Similarly, for 6-NBDG, the ligated LCs emitted 4.3-fold brighter fluorescent signals than the control RCs (1.6 × 10(2 ± 2.7 × 10(1 vs. 3.8 × 10(1 ± 5.9 A.U., P = 0.002. The higher uptake of both 18F-FDG and 6-NBDG in ligated LCs were confirmed with the IVIS-200 system. Autoradiography further verified the higher uptake of 18F-FDG by the LCs.This novel fiber-optic imaging system was sensitive to both radionuclide and fluorescent glucose probes taken up by murine atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, 6-NBDG is a

  12. Comparison of imaging modalities and source-localization algorithms in locating the induced activity during deep brain stimulation of the STN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Singh, A; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Schmidt, G; Muthuraman, M

    2016-08-01

    One of the most commonly used therapy to treat patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Identifying the most optimal target area for the placement of the DBS electrodes have become one of the intensive research area. In this study, the first aim is to investigate the capabilities of different source-analysis techniques in detecting deep sources located at the sub-cortical level and validating it using the a-priori information about the location of the source, that is, the STN. Secondly, we aim at an investigation of whether EEG or MEG is best suited in mapping the DBS-induced brain activity. To do this, simultaneous EEG and MEG measurement were used to record the DBS-induced electromagnetic potentials and fields. The boundary-element method (BEM) have been used to solve the forward problem. The position of the DBS electrodes was then estimated using the dipole (moving, rotating, and fixed MUSIC), and current-density-reconstruction (CDR) (minimum-norm and sLORETA) approaches. The source-localization results from the dipole approaches demonstrated that the fixed MUSIC algorithm best localizes deep focal sources, whereas the moving dipole detects not only the region of interest but also neighboring regions that are affected by stimulating the STN. The results from the CDR approaches validated the capability of sLORETA in detecting the STN compared to minimum-norm. Moreover, the source-localization results using the EEG modality outperformed that of the MEG by locating the DBS-induced activity in the STN.

  13. Real-time sonoelastography compared to magnetic resonance imaging using four different modalities at 3.0 T in the detection of prostate cancer: strength and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Alexandre E; Heinzelbecker, Julia; Weiß, Christel; Frühbauer, Dominik; Weidner, Anja M; Kirchner, Matthias; Stroebel, Philipp; Schoenberg, Stephan O; Dinter, Dietmar J

    2013-05-01

    To compare the results of RTE with four different modalities at 3.0 T using endorectal and body phased array coil in the detection of PC. Between May 2009 and July 2010, 50 patients with biopsy proven PC scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP) were examined. All patients underwent RTE of the prostate and 3.0 T endorectal MRI. The investigators were unaware of the clinical data and of each others results. RTE detected PC in 46 (92%) and MRI in 42 (84%) of the patients. Depending on the analysis sensitivity was 44.1-58.9% for RTE and 36.7-43.1% for MRI. Specificity was 83.0-74.8% for RTE and 85.9-79.8% for MRI. Sensitivity was significantly higher for RTE (16-sectors: p=0.0348; 8-sectors: p=0.0002) and showed better results in the dorsal (RTE: 51.9%; MRT: 37.7%) and apical to middle (RTE: 66.7%-80.0%; MRI: 41.7%-60.0%) parts of the prostate. MRI showed better results in the base (MRI: 19.4%; RTE: 14.9%) and transitional zone (TZ) (MRI: 34.7%; RTE: 29.6%). Concerning capsular involvement the results were comparable with sensitivity and specificity of RTE being 79.2% and 80.0% compared to 80.8% and 70.0% of MRI. Concerning sensitivity RTE showed advantages in apical and middle parts whereas MRI may provide advantages in the glands' base and TZ. Both RTE and MRI have limitations particularly in basal and ventral parts. Most of the undetected tumours were of low tumour volume and Gleason Score. Considering capsular involvement both techniques showed comparable results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Specifying the brain anatomy underlying temporo-parietal junction activations for theory of mind: A review using probabilistic atlases from different imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurz, Matthias; Tholen, Matthias G; Perner, Josef; Mars, Rogier B; Sallet, Jerome

    2017-09-01

    In this quantitative review, we specified the anatomical basis of brain activity reported in the Temporo-Parietal Junction (TPJ) in Theory of Mind (ToM) research. Using probabilistic brain atlases, we labeled TPJ peak coordinates reported in the literature. This was carried out for four different atlas modalities: (i) gyral-parcellation, (ii) sulco-gyral parcellation, (iii) cytoarchitectonic parcellation and (iv) connectivity-based parcellation. In addition, our review distinguished between two ToM task types (false belief and social animations) and a nonsocial task (attention reorienting). We estimated the mean probabilities of activation for each atlas label, and found that for all three task types part of TPJ activations fell into the same areas: (i) Angular Gyrus (AG) and Lateral Occpital Cortex (LOC) in terms of a gyral atlas, (ii) AG and Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS) in terms of a sulco-gyral atlas, (iii) areas PGa and PGp in terms of cytoarchitecture and (iv) area TPJp in terms of a connectivity-based parcellation atlas. Beside these commonalities, we also found that individual task types showed preferential activation for particular labels. Main findings for the right hemisphere were preferential activation for false belief tasks in AG/PGa, and in Supramarginal Gyrus (SMG)/PFm for attention reorienting. Social animations showed strongest selective activation in the left hemisphere, specifically in left Middle Temporal Gyrus (MTG). We discuss how our results (i.e., identified atlas structures) can provide a new reference for describing future findings, with the aim to integrate different labels and terminologies used for studying brain activity around the TPJ. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4788-4805, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The risk assessment of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} nanocomposites as dual-modal nanoprobes for magnetic and fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Long [Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine (China); Tian, Xiumei [Guangzhou Medical University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); Liu, Jun [Guangdong Ocean University, School of Electronics and Information Technology (China); Zheng, Cunjing; Xie, Fukang, E-mail: frankxie2000@yahoo.com [Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine (China); Li, Li, E-mail: li2@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center (China)

    2017-02-15

    Our group has synthesized Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} nanocomposites as magnetic/fluorescence imaging successfully in the previous study, which exhibit good uniformity and monodispersibility with a mean size of 7.4 nm. However, their systematic risk assessment remains unknown. In this article, the in vitro biocompatibility of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} was assessed on the basis of cell viability and apoptosis. In vivo immunotoxicity was evaluated by monitoring the product of reactive oxygen species (ROS), clusters of differentiation (CD) markers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Balb/c mice. No significant differences were found in cell viability, apoptosis, and immunotoxicity between our Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} and gadodiamide which are used commonly in clinical. Few nanoprobes were localized in the phagosomes of the liver, heart, lung, spleen, kidney, brain, and tumor under the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. In addition, our products reveal good T{sub 1}-weighted contrast enhancement of xenografted murine tumor. Therefore, the above results may contribute to the effective application of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} as molecular imaging contrast agents and dual-modal nanoprobes for cancer detection.

  16. High-Resolution C-Arm CT and Metal Artifact Reduction Software: A Novel Imaging Modality for Analyzing Aneurysms Treated with Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, I; Kambayashi, Y; Ikemura, A; Abe, Y; Kan, I; Mohamed, A; Dahmani, C; Suzuki, T; Ishibashi, T; Takao, H; Urashima, M; Murayama, Y

    2016-02-01

    Combination of high-resolution C-arm CT and novel metal artifact reduction software may contribute to the assessment of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel Metal Artifact Reduction prototype software combined with the currently available high spatial-resolution C-arm CT prototype implementation by using an experimental aneurysm model treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. Eight experimental aneurysms were created in 6 swine. Coil embolization of each aneurysm was performed by using a stent-assisted technique. High-resolution C-arm CT with intra-arterial contrast injection was performed immediately after the treatment. The obtained images were processed with Metal Artifact Reduction. Five neurointerventional specialists reviewed the image quality before and after Metal Artifact Reduction. Observational and quantitative analyses (via image analysis software) were performed. Every aneurysm was successfully created and treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. Before Metal Artifact Reduction, coil loops protruding through the stent lumen were not visualized due to the prominent metal artifacts produced by the coils. These became visible after Metal Artifact Reduction processing. Contrast filling in the residual aneurysm was also visualized after Metal Artifact Reduction in every aneurysm. Both the observational (P software. The combination of high-resolution C-arm CT and Metal Artifact Reduction enables differentiation of the coil mass, stent, and contrast material on the same image by significantly reducing the metal artifacts produced by the platinum coils. This novel image technique may improve the assessment of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Modal Logics with Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areces, Carlos; Hoffmann, Guillaume; Denis, Alexandre

    We present a modal language that includes explicit operators to count the number of elements that a model might include in the extension of a formula, and we discuss how this logic has been previously investigated under different guises. We show that the language is related to graded modalities and to hybrid logics. We illustrate a possible application of the language to the treatment of plural objects and queries in natural language. We investigate the expressive power of this logic via bisimulations, discuss the complexity of its satisfiability problem, define a new reasoning task that retrieves the cardinality bound of the extension of a given input formula, and provide an algorithm to solve it.

  18. Constructions, pragmatics and modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fortin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper rejects the commonplace view that the semantics of certain modal deverbal adjectives (MDAs, which have traditionally been assumed to be non-compositional, require complex lexical or syntactic encoding (cf. e.g. Riehemann 1994 and 1998, Booij 2007 and 2010a. Instead, it shows that productive MDA formation is semantically compositional, and that the prima facie idiosyncratic meanings are, in fact, conversational implicatures.

  19. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Sijing; Lu, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-08-18

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic.

  20. Sub-10 nm Fe3O4@Cu2-xS core-shell nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Qiwei

    2013-06-12

    Photothermal nanomaterials have recently attracted significant research interest due to their potential applications in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the development of small-sized photothermal nanomaterials with high thermal stability remains a formidable challenge. Here, we report the rational design and synthesis of ultrasmall (<10 nm) Fe3O 4@Cu2-xS core-shell nanoparticles, which offer both high photothermal stability and superparamagnetic properties. Specifically, these core-shell nanoparticles have proven effective as probes for T 2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and infrared thermal imaging because of their strong absorption at the near-infrared region centered around 960 nm. Importantly, the photothermal effect of the nanoparticles can be precisely controlled by varying the Cu content in the core-shell structure. Furthermore, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer cells using these multifunctional nanoparticles. The results should provide improved understanding of synergistic effect resulting from the integration of magnetism with photothermal phenomenon, important for developing multimode nanoparticle probes for biomedical applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Sub-10 nm Fe3O4@Cu2-xS core-shell nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Qiwei; Hu, Junqing; Zhu, Yihan; Zou, Rujia; Chen, Zhigang; Yang, Shiping; Li, Runwei; Su, Qianqian; Han, Yu; Liu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-01

    Photothermal nanomaterials have recently attracted significant research interest due to their potential applications in biological imaging and therapeutics. However, the development of small-sized photothermal nanomaterials with high thermal stability remains a formidable challenge. Here, we report the rational design and synthesis of ultrasmall (<10 nm) Fe3O 4@Cu2-xS core-shell nanoparticles, which offer both high photothermal stability and superparamagnetic properties. Specifically, these core-shell nanoparticles have proven effective as probes for T 2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and infrared thermal imaging because of their strong absorption at the near-infrared region centered around 960 nm. Importantly, the photothermal effect of the nanoparticles can be precisely controlled by varying the Cu content in the core-shell structure. Furthermore, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer cells using these multifunctional nanoparticles. The results should provide improved understanding of synergistic effect resulting from the integration of magnetism with photothermal phenomenon, important for developing multimode nanoparticle probes for biomedical applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Preferential reasoning for modal logics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Modal logic is the foundation for a versatile and well-established class of knowledge representation formalisms in artificial intelligence. Enriching modal logics with non-monotonic reasoning capabilities such as preferential reasoning as developed...

  3. pH-Responsive, Self-Sacrificial Nanotheranostic Agent for Potential In Vivo and In Vitro Dual Modal MRI/CT Imaging, Real-Time, and In Situ Monitoring of Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ludan; Wang, Jinlong; Dai, Zhichao; Hu, Zunfu; Chen, Xue; Qi, Yafei; Zheng, Xiuwen; Yu, Dexin

    2017-02-15

    Multifunctional nanotheranostic agents have been highly commended due to the application to image-guided cancer therapy. Herein, based on the chemically disordered face centered cubic (fcc) FePt nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO), we develop a pH-responsive FePt-based multifunctional theranostic agent for potential in vivo and in vitro dual modal MRI/CT imaging and in situ cancer inhibition. The fcc-FePt will release highly active Fe ions due to the low pH in tumor cells, which would catalyze H 2 O 2 decomposition into reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the cells and further induce cancer cell apoptosis. Conjugated with folic acid (FA), the iron platinum-dimercaptosuccinnic acid/PEGylated graphene oxide-folic acid (FePt-DMSA/GO-PEG-FA) composite nanoassemblies (FePt/GO CNs) could effectively target and show significant toxicity to FA receptor-positive tumor cells, but no obvious toxicity to FA receptor-negative normal cells, which was evaluated by WST-1 assay. The FePt-based multifunctional nanoparticles allow real-time monitoring of Fe release by T 2 -weighted MRI, and the selective contrast enhancement in CT could be estimated in vivo after injection. The results showed that FePt-based NPs displayed excellent biocompatibility and favorable MRI/CT imaging ability in vivo and in vitro. Meanwhile, the decomposition of FePt will dramatically decrease the T 2 -weighted MRI signal and increase the ROS signal, which enables real-time and in situ visualized monitoring of Fe release in tumor cells. In addition, the self-sacrificial decomposition of fcc-FePt will be propitious to the self-clearance of the as-prepared FePt-based nanocomposite in vivo. Therefore, the FePt/GO CNs could serve as a potential multifunctional theranostic nanoplatform of MRI/CT imaging guided cancer diagnosis and therapy in the clinic.

  4. Motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping in basal cell carcinoma using optical imaging modalities: initial feasibility study using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M.; Richardson, T. J.; Craythorne, E.; Mallipeddi, R.; Coleman, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    A system has been developed to assess the feasibility of using motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the clinic using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system consists of a commercial OCT imaging system (the VivoSight 1500, MDL Ltd., Orpington, UK), which has been adapted to incorporate a webcam and a single-sensor electromagnetic positional tracking module (the Flock of Birds, Ascension Technology Corp, Vermont, USA). A supporting software interface has also been developed which allows positional data to be captured and projected onto a 2D dermoscopic image in real-time. Initial results using a stationary test phantom are encouraging, with maximum errors in the projected map in the order of 1-2mm. Initial clinical results were poor due to motion artefact, despite attempts to stabilise the patient. However, the authors present several suggested modifications that are expected to reduce the effects of motion artefact and improve the overall accuracy and clinical usability of the system.

  5. Multifunctional hydroxyapatite/Na(Y/Gd)F4:Yb3+,Er3+ composite fibers for drug delivery and dual modal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Liu, Hui; Sun, Shufen; Li, Xuejiao; Zhou, Yanmin; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2014-02-04

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) composite fibers functionalized with up-conversion (UC) luminescent and magnetic Na(Y/Gd)F4:Yb(3+),Er(3+) nanocrystals (NCs) have been fabricated via electrospinning. After transferring hydrophobic oleic acid-capped Na(Y/Gd)F4:Yb(3+),Er(3+) NCs into aqueous solution, these water-dispersible NCs were dispersed into precursor electrospun solution containing CTAB. Na(Y/Gd)F4:Yb(3+),Er(3+)@HAp composite fibers were fabricated by the high temperature treatment of the electrospun Na(Y/Gd)F4:Yb(3+),Er(3+) NCs decorated precursor fibers. The biocompatibility test on MC 3T3-E1 cells using MTT assay shows that the HAp composite fibers have negligible cytotoxity, which reveals the HAp composite fibers could be a drug carrier for drug delivery. Because the contrast brightening is enhanced at increased concentrations of Gd(3+), the HAp composite fibers can serve as T1 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. In addition, the composites uptaken by MC 3T3-E1 cells present the UC luminescent emission of Er(3+) under the excitation of a 980 nm near-infrared laser. The above findings reveal Na(Y/Gd)F4:Yb(3+),Er(3+)@HAp composite fibers have potential applications in drug storage/release and magnetic resonance/UC luminescence imaging.

  6. Mirror image extradural hematoma in elderly population: management strategy with surgical bilateral or unilateral evacuation or conservative treatment modality with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extradural hematomas (EDH represent one of common imaging findings in cases sustaining traumatic brain injury. Bilateral extradural haematoma is considered rare and even rarer in elder people male. Bilateral extradural hematoma is usually acute, and generally associated with severe traumatic head injury. Mirror-image extradural hematomas (MEDH constitute a special type of bilateral extradural hamatomas, which is placed anatomically symmetrically on both the sides of the intracranial compartment, requires prompt diagnosis and emergent surgical intervention as it carry high mortality if evacuation of hematoma is not carried out expeditely. The mortality rate still remains higher in comparison to unilateral single extradural hematomas. The postoperative outcome depends on preoperative neurological status, total volume of blood, accurate diagnosis and prompt shifting to neurosurgical facility, expatiation of surgical procedure, pre- hospital care. Authors report a case of a - 65-year-old man who presented with acute simultaneous bilateral extradural haematomas following road traffic accident, underwent bilateral trephine craniotomy and simultaneous evacuation on both side led to good recovery.

  7. Folic acid-conjugated GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} Nanoprobe for folate receptor-targeted optical and magnetic resonance bi-modal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xianzhu [Jiangxi Normal University, College of Life Science, Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Protection and Utilization of Subtropical Plant Resources of Jiangxi Province (China); Zhang, Xiaoying; Wu, Yanli, E-mail: Wanny118@126.com [Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (China)

    2016-11-15

    Both fluorescent and magnetic nanoprobes have great potential applications for diagnostics and therapy. In the present work, a folic acid-conjugated and silica-modified GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+} (GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}-FA) dual nanoprobe was strategically designed and synthesized for the targeted dual-modality optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging via a facile aqueous method. Their structural, optical, and magnetic properties were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-Vis), photoluminescence (PL), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). These results indicated that GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}-FA were uniform monodisperse core-shell structured nanorods (NRs) with an average length of ~200 nm and an average width of ~25 nm. The paramagnetic property of the synthesized GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}-FA NRs was confirmed with its linear hysteresis plot (M-H). In addition, the NRs displayed an obvious T{sub 1}-weighted effect and thus it could potentially serve as a T{sub 1}-positive contrast agent. The NRs emitted green lights due to the {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 5} transition of the Tb{sup 3+}. The in vitro assays with NCI-H460 lung cancer cells and human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells indicated that the GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}-FA nanoprobe could specifically bind the cells bearing folate receptors (FR). The MTT assay of the NRs revealed that its cytotoxicity was very low. Further in vivo MRI experiments distinctively depict enhanced anatomical features in a xenograft tumor. These results suggest that the GdPO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2}-FA NPs have excellent imaging and cell-targeting abilities for the folate receptor-targeted dual-modality optical and MR imaging and can be potentially used as the nanoprobe for bioimaging.

  8. A graphene quantum dot@Fe3O4@SiO2 based nanoprobe for drug delivery sensing and dual-modal fluorescence and MRI imaging in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoqian; Chan, Chunyu; Shi, Jingyu; Tsang, Ming-Kiu; Pan, Yi; Cheng, Changming; Gerile, Oudeng; Yang, Mo

    2017-06-15

    A novel graphene quantum dot (GQD)@Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 based nanoprobe was reported for targeted drug delivery, sensing, dual-modal imaging and therapy. Carboxyl-terminated GQD (C-GQD) was firstly conjugated with Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 and then functionalized with cancer targeting molecule folic acid (FA). DOX drug molecules were then loaded on GQD surface of Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @GQD-FA nanoprobe via pi-pi stacking, which resulted in Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @GQD-FA/DOX conjugates based on a FRET mechanism with GQD as donor molecules and DOX as acceptor molecules. Meanwhile, we successfully performed in vitro MRI and fluorescence imaging of living Hela cells and monitored intracellular drug release process using this Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @GQD-FA/DOX nanoprobe. Cell viability study demonstrated the low cytotoxicity of Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @GQD-FA nanocarrier and the enhanced therapeutic efficacy of Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 @GQD-FA/DOX nanoprobe for cancer cells. This luminomagnetic nanoprobe will be a potential platform for cancer accurate diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-loaded Co-Cu doped manganese ferrite nanorods as a new dual-modal simultaneous contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and nanocarrier for drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Pour, Sajjad; Shaterian, Hamid Reza; Afradi, Mojgan; Yazdani-Elah-Abadi, Afshin

    2017-09-01

    We synthesized Co0.25Cu0.25Mn0.5Fe2O4@CMC (CCMFe2O4@CMC) nanorods as a new dual-modal simultaneous for magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and nanocarrier for drug delivery system. Impact of CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods were investigated on the longitudinal (T1), transverse (T2) and transverse (T2∗) relaxation times for in vitro MRI contrast agent in water and also for drug delivery system, L-dopa was coated on CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods and then in vitro drug release test was carried out at three PHs values and different temperatures. In vitro MR imaging demonstrated that r2 value of CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods is 138.33 mM-1 s-1, CCMFe2O4@CMC is useful as T2 contrast agent relative to other T2 contrast agants. In vitro drug release test shows the amount of released L-dopa from CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods at medium with pH = 1.2 is more than pH = 5.3 and 7.4.

  10. Which supplementary imaging modality should be used for breast ultrasonography? Comparison of the diagnostic performance of elastography and computer-aided diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Si Eun; Moon, Ji Eun Ho; Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Jung Hyun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic performance of grayscale ultrasonography (US), US elastography, and US computer-aided diagnosis (US-CAD) in the differential diagnosis of breast masses. A total of 193 breast masses in 175 consecutive women (mean age, 46.4 years) from June to August 2015 were included. US and elastography images were obtained and recorded. A US-CAD system was applied to the grayscale sonograms, which were automatically analyzed and visualized in order to generate a final assessment. The final assessments of breast masses were based on the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories, while elasticity scores were assigned using a 5-point scoring system. The diagnostic performance of grayscale US, elastography, and US-CAD was calculated and compared. Of the 193 breast masses, 120 (62.2%) were benign and 73 (37.8%) were malignant. Breast masses had significantly higher rates of malignancy in BI-RADS categories 4c and 5, elastography patterns 4 and 5, and when the US-CAD assessment was possibly malignant (all P<0.001). Elastography had higher specificity (40.8%, P=0.042) than grayscale US. US-CAD showed the highest specificity (67.5%), positive predictive value (PPV) (61.4%), accuracy (74.1%), and area under the curve (AUC) (0.762, all P<0.05) among the three diagnostic tools. US-CAD had higher values for specificity, PPV, accuracy, and AUC than grayscale US or elastography. Computer-based analysis based on the morphologic features of US may be very useful in improving the diagnostic performance of breast US.

  11. Advances of operational modal identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.

    2001-01-01

    Operational modal analysis has shown many advantages compared to the traditional one. In this paper, the development of ambient modal identification in time domain is summarized. The mathematical models for modal identification have been presented as unified framework for time domain (TD) System realization algorithms, such as polyrefence (PRCE), extended Ibrahim time domain (EITD) and eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA), etc., and recently developed Stochastic subspace technique (SST). The latest technique named as frequency domain decomposition (FDD) is introduced for operational modal identification, which has many advantages as a frequency domain (FD) technique. Applications of the operational modal analysis in civil and mechanical engineering have shown the success and accuracy of the advanced operational modal identification algorithms- FDD and SST techniques. The major issues of TD and FD operational modal identification are also discussed. (author)

  12. Is Synthesizing MRI Contrast Useful for Inter-modality Analysis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Konukoglu, Ender; Zikic, Darko

    2013-01-01

    Availability of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) databases opens up the opportunity to synthesize different MRI contrasts without actually acquiring the images. In theory such synthetic images have the potential to reduce the amount of acquisitions to perform certain analyses. However...

  13. On modal cross-coupling in the asymptotic modal limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Dean; Dowell, Earl

    2018-03-01

    The conditions under which significant modal cross-coupling occurs in dynamical systems responding to high-frequency, broadband forcing that excites many modes is studied. The modal overlap factor plays a key role in the analysis of these systems as the modal density (the ratio of number of modes to the frequency bandwidth) becomes large. The modal overlap factor is effectively the ratio of the width of a resonant peak (the damping ratio times the resonant frequency) to the average frequency interval between resonant peaks (or rather, the inverse of the modal density). It is shown that this parameter largely determines whether substantial modal cross-coupling occurs in a given system's response. Here, two prototypical systems are considered. The first is a simple rectangular plate whose significant modal cross-coupling is the exception rather than the norm. The second is a pair of rectangular plates attached at a point where significant modal cross-coupling is more likely to occur. We show that, for certain cases of modal density and damping, non-negligible cross coupling occurs in both systems. Under similar circumstances, the constraint force between the two plates in the latter system becomes broadband. The implications of this for using Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) in multi-component systems are discussed.

  14. Breast Cancer Screening, Mammography, and Other Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, James V

    2016-12-01

    This article is an overview of the modalities available for breast cancer screening. The modalities discussed include digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, breast ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical breast examination. There is a review of pertinent randomized controlled trials, studies and meta-analyses which contributed to the evolution of screening guidelines. Ultimately, 5 major medical organizations formulated the current screening guidelines in the United States. The lack of consensus in these guidelines represents an ongoing controversy about the optimal timing and method for breast cancer screening in women. For mammography screening, the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon is explained which corresponds with recommended clinical management. The presentation and discussion of the data in this article are designed to help the clinician individualize breast cancer screening for each patient.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging for Diagnosis of Puerperal Breast Abscess After Polyacrylamide Hydrogel Augmentation Mammoplasty: Compared with Other Conventional Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihua; Long, Miaomiao; Wang, Junping; Liu, Ning; Ge, Xihong; Hu, Zhandong; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Puerperal breast abscess after polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) augmentation mammoplasty can induce breast auto-inflation resulting in serious consequences. Mammography, ultrasound, and conventional MRI are poor at detecting related PAAG abnormality histologically. We evaluated the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the quantitative analysis of puerperal PAAG abscess after augmentation mammoplasty. This was a retrospective study, and a waiver for informed consent was granted. Sixteen puerperal women with breast discomfort underwent conventional breast non-enhanced MRI and axial DWI using a 3T MR scanner. Qualitative analysis of the signal intensity on DWI and conventional sequences was performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the affected and contralateral normal PAAG cysts were measured quantitatively. Paired t test was used to evaluate whether there was significant difference. Both affected and normal PAAG cysts showed equal signal intensity on conventional T1WI and fat saturation T2WI, which were not helpful in detecting puerperal PAAG abscess. However, the affected PAAG cysts had a significantly decreased ADC value of 1.477 ± 0.332 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s and showed obvious hypo-intensity on the ADC map and increased signal intensity on DWI compared with the ADC value of 2.775 ± 0.233 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s of the contralateral normal PAAG cysts. DWI and quantitative measurement of ADC values are of great value for the diagnosis of puerperal PAAG abscess. Standardized MRI should be suggested to these puerperal women with breast discomfort or just for the purpose of check up. DWI should be selected as the essential MRI sequence.

  16. A Transgenic Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This "Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse" system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent...

  17. Assessment of [18F]-fluoroacetate PET/CT as a tumor-imaging modality. Preclinical study in healthy volunteers and clinical evaluation in patients with liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Kenji; Hatano, Etsuro; Nishii, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    appropriate for oncologic imaging. Tumor 18 F-FACE uptake was positive in four patients with HCC and CCC, but the uptake pattern was similar to 18 F-FDG. Further evaluation was needed. (author)

  18. Adverse drug reaction monitoring of newer oral anti diabetic drugs – a pharmacovigilance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Bhattacharjee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor and evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs of newer oral anti-diabetic drugs in type II diabetics by spontaneous/solicited ADR monitoring.Material and methods: Two hundred and thirty two diabetic patients on newer oral antidiabetic drugs were evaluated prospectively in a cross-sectional study over a period of eighteen months. All patients were followed up for ADRs which were evaluated for incidence, frequency, severity and causality. ADR severity was graded according to University of Virginia Health System Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting program criteria and causality assessment was done using WHO-UMC scale.Results: 190 out of 232 patients (42 patients lost to follow up were evaluated. ADRs were observed in 34 cases (17.9%. Most common ADRs were gastrointestinal (44.2% followed by musculoskeletal (17.6%, metabolic (14.7%, infections (5.9% and others (17.6%. The maximal frequency of ADRs was seen with sitagliptin (6.4% followed by vildagliptin(3.8%, saxagliptin(2.7%, saroglitazar(2.1%, linagliptin(1.6%, canagliflozin(1.6%. 25(73.5%, 8(23.5% and 1(3% ADRs were mild, moderate and severe respectively. 24(70% ADRs were classified as possible, 9(27% probable and 1(3% unlikely on causality assessment. Conclusion: Newer oral antidiabetic drugs like gliptins and SGLT-2 inhibitors have potential to cause ADRs. Gastro-intestinal, musculoskeletal, metabolic were most common ADRs. Active pharmacovigilance should be carried out for risk identification and management. 

  19. Does the Primary Imaging Modality-Computed Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Influence Stroke Physicians' Certainty on Whether or Not to Give Thrombolysis to Randomized Acute Stroke Patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Anders; Rodgers, Helen

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Door-to-needle time of 20 minutes to stroke patients with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv-tPA) is feasible when computed tomography (CT) is used as first-line of brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment is more time-consuming but superior in detect......BACKGROUND: Door-to-needle time of 20 minutes to stroke patients with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv-tPA) is feasible when computed tomography (CT) is used as first-line of brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment is more time-consuming but superior...

  20. Integration of Multi-Modal Biomedical Data to Predict Cancer Grade and Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, John H; Hoffman, Ryan; Kothari, Sonal; Wu, Po-Yen; Wang, May D

    2016-02-01

    The Big Data era in Biomedical research has resulted in large-cohort data repositories such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). These repositories routinely contain hundreds of matched patient samples for genomic, proteomic, imaging, and clinical data modalities, enabling holistic and multi-modal integrative analysis of human disease. Using TCGA renal and ovarian cancer data, we conducted a novel investigation of multi-modal data integration by combining histopathological image and RNA-seq data. We compared the performances of two integrative prediction methods: majority vote and stacked generalization. Results indicate that integration of multiple data modalities improves prediction of cancer grade and outcome. Specifically, stacked generalization, a method that integrates multiple data modalities to produce a single prediction result, outperforms both single-data-modality prediction and majority vote. Moreover, stacked generalization reveals the contribution of each data modality (and specific features within each data modality) to the final prediction result and may provide biological insights to explain prediction performance.

  1. Metaphysical Modality, Modality of Predicate and the Theory of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l nabavi

    2010-05-01

    This paper discusses the historical overview of the metaphysical modality firstly and then shows that the theory of "Decisive Necessity” is true and justified in a model of modal logic with equivalent accessibility relation and homogeneous possible world view (fixed domain.

  2. Effectiveness and Safety of Newer Antidiabetic Medications for Ramadan Fasting Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Mudher Mikhael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia is the most common side effects for most glucose-lowering therapies. It constitutes a serious risk that faces diabetic patients who fast during Ramadan (the 9th month in the Islamic calendar. New glucose-lowering classes like dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA, and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2 inhibitors are efficacious in controlling blood glucose level with less tendency to induce hypoglycemia and thus may constitute a good choice for diabetic patients during Ramadan. This study reviews the safety and efficacy of newer glucose-lowering therapies during Ramadan. This study was accomplished through a careful literature search about studies that assess the benefit and side effects of these new glucose-lowering therapies during Ramadan during September 2015. Vildagliptin, sitagliptin, liraglutide, exenatide, and dapagliflozin were the only studied glucose-lowering therapies. All of the studied newer glucose-lowering therapies except dapagliflozin were associated with reduced risk to induce hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal upset was common with the usage of liraglutide while increased thirst sensation was common with dapagliflozin. In conclusion DPP-4 inhibitors such as vildagliptin and sitagliptin may form a suitable glucose-lowering therapy option for Ramadan fasting patients.

  3. Effect of walking speed and placement position interactions in determining the accuracy of various newer pedometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonil Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Older types of pedometers had varied levels of accuracy, which ranged from 0% to 45%. In addition, to obtain accurate results, it was also necessary to position them in a certain way. By contrast, newer models can be placed anywhere on the body; however, their accuracy is unknown when they are placed at different body sites. We determined the accuracy of various newer pedometers under controlled laboratory and free walking conditions. A total of 40 participants, who varied widely in age and body mass index, were recruited for the study. The numbers of steps recorded using five different pedometers placed at the waist, the chest, in a pocket, and on an armband were compared against those counted with a hand tally counter. With the exception of one, all the pedometers were accurate at moderate walking speeds, irrespective of their placement on the body. However, the accuracy tended to decrease at slower and faster walking speeds, especially when the pedometers were worn in the pockets or kept in the purse (p < 0.05. In conclusion, most pedometers examined were accurate when they were placed at the waist, chest, and armband irrespective of the walking speed or terrain. However, some pedometers had reduced accuracy when they were kept in a pocket or placed in a purse, especially at a slower and faster walking speeds.

  4. Pseudofolliculitis barbae: review and update on new treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Zuazaga, Jorge

    2003-07-01

    Pseudofolliculits barbae, PFB, is a common cutaneous disease encountered frequently in medical practice. PFB represents a chronic inflammatory condition of the hair follicle caused by ingrown hairs producing an inflammatory foreign body reaction. The pathogenesis of PFB is multifactorial. Factors such as hair type and direction of hair growth play a role in the initial inflammatory reaction. In the armed forces, PFB represents a real challenge for both the physician and the patient. The combat environment, with the recent threat of biological and chemical weapons, requires the servicemen to be clean-shaven for appropriate gas mask fitting around the face. This article will review the etiology, pathogenesis, classification, and newer treatment modalities in the management of PFB.

  5. Effects on image quality of a 2D antiscatter grid in x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis: Initial experience using the dual modality (x-ray and molecular) breast tomosynthesis scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Tushita, E-mail: tp3rn@virginia.edu [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Peppard, Heather [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Williams, Mark B. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Radiation scattered from the breast in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) causes image degradation, including loss of contrast between cancerous and background tissue. Unlike in 2-dimensional (2D) mammography, an antiscatter grid cannot readily be used in DBT because changing alignment between the tube and detector during the scan would result in unacceptable loss of primary radiation. However, in the dual modality breast tomosynthesis (DMT) scanner, which combines DBT and molecular breast tomosynthesis, the tube and detector rotate around a common axis, thereby maintaining a fixed tube-detector alignment. This C-arm geometry raises the possibility of using a 2D (cellular) focused antiscatter grid. The purpose of this study is to assess change in image quality when using an antiscatter grid in the DBT portion of a DMT scan under conditions of fixed radiation dose. Methods: Two 2D focused prototype grids with 80 cm focal length were tested, one stack-laminated from copper (Cu) and one cast from a tungsten-polymer (W-poly). They were reciprocated using a motion scheme designed to maximize transmission of primary x-ray photons. Grid-in and grid-out scatter-to-primar