WorldWideScience

Sample records for neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

  1. Superradiance kinetics of a. gamma. -ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.V.

    1977-04-01

    An analysis is made of the kinetics of a single-pass mirror-free ..gamma..-ray laser. The conditions governing the operation of this laser are obtained. The possibility of Dicke superradiance in the ..gamma..-ray range is estimated. The analysis is carried out for single-mode emission from a system of two-level nuclei.

  2. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  3. Generation of laser Compton gamma-rays using Compact ERL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Nagai, Ryoji; Hayakawa, Takehito; Mori, Michiaki; Seya, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive isotope-specific assay system using nuclear resonance fluorescence has been developed at JAEA. In this system, intense, mono-energetic laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma-rays are generated by combining an energy recovery linac (ERL) and laser enhancement cavity. As technical development for such an intense gamma-ray source, we demonstrated generation of LCS gamma-rays using Compact ERL (supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) developed in collaboration with KEK. We also measured X-ray fluorescence for elements near iron region by using mono-energetic LCS gamma-rays. In this presentation, we will show results of the experiment and future plan. (author)

  4. Laser Compton Scattering Gamma Ray Induced Photo-Trasmutation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Dazhi

    2004-01-01

    High brightness beams of gamma rays produced with laser Compton scattering have the potential to realize photo-transmutation through (γ,n) reaction, implying an efficient method to dispose long-lived fission products. Preliminary investigations have been carried out in understanding the feasibility of development of a transmutation facility to repose nuclear waste. A laser Compton scattering experimental setup based on a storage ring started to generate gamma-ray beams for studying the coupling of gamma photons and nuclear giant resonance. This paper demonstrates the dependency of nuclear transmutation efficiency on target dimensions and gamma ray features. 197Au sample was adopted in our experiment, and experimental results correspond to the theoretical estimations.

  5. The resolution of gamma-ray laser dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesov, Roman

    2000-03-01

    The resolution of the gamma-ray laser dilemma is found. As is well-known [1], this dilemma which for four decades prevailed over all the researches on gamma-ray lasers, states that incoherent pump required to produce a population inversion would unavoidable destroy the conditions of the Mossbauer and Borrmann effects which are crucial for realization of the net gain. The suppression of the resonant absorption (which was predicted in [2]) at the operating nuclear transition by means of coherent laser driving of the adjacent electronic transition reduces the requirement for incoherent pump (and accordingly heating of the active sample) by orders of magnitude. This allows to pump active nuclei in the host lattice without destroying the conditions of both Mossbauer and Borrmann effects. Moreover it allows to pump resonantly at the operating transition that increases the efficiency of the incoherent pump and suggests a new pass for solution of gamma-ray laser problem. [1] Baldwin GC, Solem JC. Rev. Mod. Phys., 69(4), 1085 (1997) [2] Kocharovskaya O, Kolesov R, Rostovtsev Yu, PRL, 82(18), 3593 (1999)

  6. Nuclear structure considerations for gamma-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strottman, D.; Arthur, E.D.; Madland, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Presented are initial results in our investigation of the nuclear physics issues of gamma-ray lasers. These include the questions of what is known from existing experimental data, where does one optimally search for nuclei displaying simultaneously both closely lying levels and nuclear isomerism, and which theoretical models does one employ for systematic searches for candidate nuclei and for calculation of detailed candidate level properties

  7. Temporal measurement of MeV pulsed gamma-ray using a diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Weng, Xiufeng; Zhang, Zhongbing; Xie, Haoyu; Li, Chunhua; Ruan, Jinlu; Xu, Qing

    2018-03-01

    A single-shot temporal measurement of pulsed gamma ray using a diode laser has been carried out with the MeV gamma beams at "Qiangguang-I" facility. The gamma-ray temporal profile is encoded to the power of a diode laser by the carrier variation in laser cavity. We analyze the dynamic process of carriers induced by gamma rays and derive a sensitivity expression for the detector based on a diode laser. It shows that the sensitivity is determined by both the gain of resonant cavity and the efficiency of gamma-ray deposition in the diode laser. And the efficiency of depositing gamma-ray is estimated with Monte Carlo methods. The experimental results demonstrate that the detection method with diode lasers can be used for the temporal profile measurement of a MeV pulsed gamma ray source. The relative gamma-ray sensitivity of the detector is estimated at about 1 . 27 × 10-22 Ccm2 from the experimental results, which agrees with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray sources using ultrahigh power lasers (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Hojbota, Calin; Jeon, Jong Ho; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seong Ku; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Pathak, Vishwa B.; Pae, Ki Hong; Sebban, Stéphane; Tissandier, Fabien; Gautier, Julien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Malka, Victor; Nam, Chang Hee

    2017-05-01

    Short-pulse x-ray/gamma-ray sources have become indispensable light sources for investigating material science, bio technology, and photo-nuclear physics. In past decades, rapid advancement of high intensity laser technology led extensive progresses in the field of radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions - x-ray lasers, betatron radiation and Compton gamma-rays. Ever since the installation of a 100-TW laser in 2006, we have pursued the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiations, such as x-ray lasers, relativistic high-order harmonics, betatron radiation and all-optical Compton gamma-rays. With the construction of two PW Ti:Sapphire laser beamlines having peak powers of 1.0 PW and 1.5 PW in 2010 and 2012, respectively [1], we have investigated the generation of multi-GeV electron beams [2] and MeV betatron radiations. We plan to carry out the Compton backscattering to generate MeV gamma-rays from the interaction of a GeV electron beam and a PW laser beam. Here, we present the recent progress in the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiation sources based on laser plasma interactions and the plan for developing Compton gamma-ray sources driven by the PW lasers. In addition, we will present the applications of laser-plasma x-ray lasers to x-ray holography and coherent diffraction imaging. [references] 1. J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. J. Yu, T. M. Jeong, and J. Lee, Opt. Lett. 35, 3021 (2010). 2. H. T. Kim, K. H. Pae, H. J. Cha, I J. Kim, T. J. Yu, J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. M. Jeong, J. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165002 (2013).

  9. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  10. NRF Based Nondestructive Inspection System for SNM by Using Laser-Compton-Backscattering Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgaki, H.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.

    2015-10-01

    A non-destructive inspection system for special nuclear materials (SNMs) hidden in a sea cargo has been developed. The system consists of a fast screening system using neutron generated by inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device and an isotope identification system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements with laser Compton backscattering (LCS) gamma-rays has been developed. The neutron flux of 108 n/sec has been achieved by the IEC in static mode. We have developed a modified neutron reactor noise analysis method to detect fission neutron in a short time. The LCS gamma-rays has been generated by using a small racetrack microtoron accelerator and an intense sub-nano second laser colliding head-on to the electron beam. The gamma-ray flux has been achieved more than 105 photons/s. The NRF gamma-rays will be measured using LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detector array whose performance has been measured by NRF experiment of U-235 in HIGS facility. The whole inspection system has been designed to satisfy a demand from the sea port.

  11. Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Froula, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hartemann, F. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-04-13

    We propose to demonstrate a novel x-ray and gamma-ray light source based on laser-plasma electron acceleration and Compton scattering at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. This will provide a new versatile and compact light source capability at the laboratory with very broad scientific applications that are of interest to many disciplines. The source’s synchronization with the seed laser system at a femtosecond time scale (i-e, at which chemical reactions occur) will allow scientists to perform pump-probe experiments with x-ray and gamma-ray beams. Across the laboratory, this will be a new tool for nuclear science, high energy density physics, chemistry, biology, or weapons studies.

  12. Status and issues in 1990 for the development of a gamma-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.B.; Davanloo, F.; Taylor, K.N.; Sinor, T.W.; Carroll, J.J.; Byrd, M.J.; Hong, C.; Richmond, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    At the nuclear level the storage of energy can approach tera-Joules (10 12 J) per liter for thousands of years. However, any plan to use such a resource for a gamma-ray laser poses problems of a broad interdisciplinary nature requiring the fusion of concepts taken from relatively unrelated fields of physics. The authors research group has described several means through which this energy might be coupled to the radiation fields with cross sections for stimulated emission that could reach 10 -17 cm 2 . The nuclear analog of the ruby laser embodies the simplest of the concepts for a gamma-ray laser and the greatest rate of advance has occurred in this direction. Major milestones and recent achievements will be reported

  13. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  14. The laser calibration system for the STACEE ground-based gamma ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the laser system used for calibration monitoring of components of the STACEE detector. STACEE is a ground based gamma ray detector which uses the heliostats of a solar power facility to collect and focus Cherenkov light onto a system of secondary optics and photomultiplier tubes. To monitor the gain and check the linearity and timing properties of the phototubes and associated electronics, a system based on a dye laser, neutral density filters and optical fibres has been developed. In this paper we describe the system and present some results from initial tests made with it.

  15. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  16. Nondestructive Inspection System for Special Nuclear Material Using Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion Neutrons and Laser Compton Scattering Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgaki, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Misawa, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.; Fujimoto, S.

    2017-07-01

    A Neutron/Gamma-ray combined inspection system for hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs) in cargo containers has been developed under a program of Japan Science and Technology Agency in Japan. This inspection system consists of an active neutron-detection system for fast screening and a laser Compton backscattering gamma-ray source in coupling with nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) method for precise inspection. The inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device has been adopted as a neutron source and two neutron-detection methods, delayed neutron noise analysis method and high-energy neutron-detection method, have been developed to realize the fast screening system. The prototype system has been constructed and tested in the Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University. For the generation of the laser Compton backscattering gamma-ray beam, a race track microtron accelerator has been used to reduce the size of the system. For the NRF measurement, an array of LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors has been adopted to realize a low-cost detection system. The prototype of the gamma-ray system has been demonstrated in the Kansai Photon Science Institute, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. By using numerical simulations based on the data taken from these prototype systems and the inspection-flow, the system designed by this program can detect 1 kg of highly enriched 235U (HEU) hidden in an empty 20-ft container within several minutes.

  17. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Ho, E-mail: jhjeon07@ibs.re.kr; Nakajima, Kazuhisa, E-mail: naka115@dia-net.ne.jp; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Yoo, Byung Ju; Shin, Kang Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Choi, Il Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Yong Joo [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Hun; Jo, Sung Ha [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hojbota, Calin; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  18. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Ho, E-mail: jhjeon07@ibs.re.kr; Nakajima, Kazuhisa, E-mail: naka115@dia-net.ne.jp; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Choi, Il Woo [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, GIST, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Cho, Byoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1–10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  19. Gamma ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  20. X-band RF Photoinjector for Laser Compton X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gibson, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barty, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-06

    Extremely bright narrow bandwidth gamma-ray sources are expanding the application of accelerator technology and light sources in new directions. An X-band test station has been commissioned at LLNL to develop multi-bunch electron beams. This multi-bunch mode will have stringent requirements for the electron bunch properties including low emittance and energy spread, but across multiple bunches. The test station is a unique facility featuring a 200 MV/m 5.59 cell X-band photogun powered by a SLAC XL4 klystron driven by a Scandinova solid-state modulator. This paper focuses on its current status including the generation and initial characterization of first electron beam. Design and installation of the inverse-Compton scattering interaction region and upgrade paths will be discussed along with future applications.

  1. Gamma ray beam transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imasaki, K.; Li, D.; Miyamoto, S.; Amano, S.; Motizuki, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed a new approach to nuclear transmutation by a gamma ray beam of Compton scattered laser photon. We obtained 20 MeV gamma ray in this way to obtain transmutation rates with the giant resonance of 1 97Au and 1 29Iodine. The rate of the transmutation agreed with the theoretical calculation. Experiments on energy spectrum of positron, electron and neutron from targets were performed for the energy balance and design of the system scheme. The reaction rate was about 1.5∼4% for appropriate photon energies and neutron production rate was up to 4% in the measurements. We had stored laser photon more than 5000 times in a small cavity which implied for a significant improvement of system efficiency. Using these technologies, we have designed an actual transmutation system for 1 29Iodine which has a 16 million year's activity. In my presentation, I will address the properties of this scheme, experiments results and transmutation system for iodine transmutation

  2. Passive amplification of a fiber laser in a Fabry-Perot cavity: application to gamma-ray production by Compton backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaye, F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the critical points of the International Linear Collider (ILC) is the polarized positrons source. Without going through further explanation on the physical process of polarized positrons production, we point out that they are produced when circularly polarized gamma rays interact with mater. Thus, the critical point is the circularly polarized gamma-ray source. A technical solution for this source is the Compton backscattering and in the end, this thesis takes place in the framework for the design of a high average power laser systems enslaved to Fabry-Perot cavities for polarized gamma-ray production by Compton backscattering. In the first part, we present this thesis context, the Compton backscattering principle and the choice for an optical architecture based on a fiber laser and a Fabry-Perot cavity. We finish by enumerating several possible applications for Compton backscattering which shows that the work presented here might benefits from technology transfer through others research fields. In the second part, we present the different fiber laser architecture studied as well as the results obtained. In the third part, we remind the operating principle of a Fabry-Perot cavity and present the one used for our experiment as well as its specificities. In the fourth part, we address the Compton backscattering experiment which enables us to present the joint utilization of a fiber laser and a Fabry-Perot cavity in a particles accelerator to generate gamma rays for the first time to our knowledge. This experiment took place in the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The experimental apparatus as well as the results obtained are thus presented. In the end, we summarize the results presented in this manuscript and propose different evolution possibilities for the system in a general conclusion. (author)

  3. Gamma ray interaction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Gamma ray detection in the energy region above 1 keV involves measurements of the energy exchange or energy loss between the gamma ray and the mass of the detector. In most cases of interest, it is the kinetic energy imparted to charged particles by the gamma ray which is lost in the detector and measured in order to obtain spectral knowledge between the incident gamma ray photon and the direction of the secondary particles contains important energy information. The interaction gamma ray removal processes in matter are considered. This interaction removal process is characterized by the fact that each gamma ray is removed individually from the incident beam. The number of photons removed in this manner is proportional to the thickness of matter traversed

  4. Optically controlled laser-plasma electron accelerator for compact gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2018-02-01

    Generating quasi-monochromatic, femtosecond γ-ray pulses via Thomson scattering (TS) demands exceptional electron beam (e-beam) quality, such as percent-scale energy spread and five-dimensional brightness over 1016 A m-2. We show that near-GeV e-beams with these metrics can be accelerated in a cavity of electron density, driven with an incoherent stack of Joule-scale laser pulses through a mm-size, dense plasma (n 0 ˜ 1019 cm-3). Changing the time delay, frequency difference, and energy ratio of the stack components controls the e-beam phase space on the femtosecond scale, while the modest energy of the optical driver helps afford kHz-scale repetition rate at manageable average power. Blue-shifting one stack component by a considerable fraction of the carrier frequency makes the stack immune to self-compression. This, in turn, minimizes uncontrolled variation in the cavity shape, suppressing continuous injection of ambient plasma electrons, preserving a single, ultra-bright electron bunch. In addition, weak focusing of the trailing component of the stack induces periodic injection, generating, in a single shot, a train of bunches with controllable energy spacing and femtosecond synchronization. These designer e-beams, inaccessible to conventional acceleration methods, generate, via TS, gigawatt γ-ray pulses (or multi-color pulse trains) with the mean energy in the range of interest for nuclear photonics (4-16 MeV), containing over 106 photons within a microsteradian-scale observation cone.

  5. Gamma-ray triangles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez-Gehler, Sergio; Molinaro, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new type of gamma-ray spectral feature, which we denominate gamma-ray triangle. This spectral feature arises in scenarios where dark matter self-annihilates via a chiral interaction into two Dirac fermions, which subsequently decay in flight into another fermion and a photon...

  6. Gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, R.

    1984-01-01

    The book reviews the development of gamma ray astronomy over the past twenty five years. A large section of the book is devoted to the problems of background radiation and the design of detectors. Gamma rays from the sun, the galactic disc, the galaxy, and extra galactic sources; are also discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Basics of Gamma Ray Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinnett, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venkataraman, Ram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-13

    The objective of this training is to explain the origin of x-rays and gamma rays, gamma ray interactions with matter, detectors and electronics used in gamma ray-spectrometry, and features of a gamma-ray spectrum for nuclear material that is safeguarded.

  8. Hypernuclear gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M.

    1985-01-01

    The observation of hypernuclear ..gamma.. rays pprovides a method of determining the spin dependence of the ..lambda..-nucleon interaction with a sensitivity not approachable by other means in the forseeable future. The transitions of primary interest are those between states that differ only in the orientation of the spin of the ..lambda.. particle with respect to the angular momentum of the nuclear core. The effective ..lambda..-nucleon interaction can be specified by a small number of ..gamma..-ray measurements. A program of experiments directed at this goal is in progress at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This paper reviews the status of the subject with emphasis on the recent experiment to measure ground state doublet splittings using germanium ..gamma..-ray detectors.

  9. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  10. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  11. Gamma ray calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosauer, P.J.; Flaherty, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is in the field of gamma ray inspection devices for tubular products and the like employing an improved calibrating block which prevents the sensing system from being overloaded when no tubular product is present, and also provides the operator with a means for visually detecting the presence of wall thicknesses which are less than a required minimum. (author)

  12. Chemist's gamma-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, I.; Kraus, R.; Klein, R.; Lee, D.; Fowler, M.M.

    1977-06-01

    An edited listing of gamma-ray information has been prepared. Prominent gamma rays originating from nuclides with half lives long enough to be seen in radiochemical experiments are included. Information is ordered by nuclide in one section and by energy in a second section. This shorter listing facilitates identification of nuclides responsible for gamma rays observed in experiments

  13. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  14. Design Study for Direction Variable Compton Scattering Gamma Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, T.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Choi, Y. W.; Kinjo, R.; Yoshida, K.; Konstantin, T.; Kimura, N.; Ishida, K.; Imon, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimahashi, K.; Komai, T.; Okumura, K.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Ohgaki, H.

    2013-03-01

    A monochromatic gamma ray beam is attractive for isotope-specific material/medical imaging or non-destructive inspection. A laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma ray source which is based on the backward Compton scattering of laser light on high-energy electrons can generate energy variable quasi-monochromatic gamma ray. Due to the principle of the LCS gamma ray, the direction of the gamma beam is limited to the direction of the high-energy electrons. Then the target object is placed on the beam axis, and is usually moved if spatial scanning is required. In this work, we proposed an electron beam transport system consisting of four bending magnets which can stick the collision point and control the electron beam direction, and a laser system consisting of a spheroidal mirror and a parabolic mirror which can also stick the collision point. Then the collision point can be placed on one focus of the spheroid. Thus gamma ray direction and collision angle between the electron beam and the laser beam can be easily controlled. As the results, travelling direction of the LCS gamma ray can be controlled under the limitation of the beam transport system, energy of the gamma ray can be controlled by controlling incident angle of the colliding beams, and energy spread can be controlled by changing the divergence of the laser beam.

  15. Lunar based gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymes, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy represents the study of the universe on the basis of the electromagnetic radiation with the highest energy. Gamma ray astronomy provides a crucial tool for the understanding of astronomical phenomena, taking into account nucleosynthesis in supernovae, black holes, active galaxies, quasars, the sources of cosmic rays, neutron stars, and matter-antimatter annihilation. Difficulties concerning the conduction of studies by gamma ray astronomy are related to the necessity to perform such studies far from earth because the atmosphere is a source of gamma rays. Studies involving the use of gamma ray instruments in earth orbit have been conducted, and more gamma ray astronomy observations are planned for the future. Imperfections of studies conducted in low earth orbit could be overcome by estalishing an observatory on the moon which represents a satellite orbiting at 60 earth radii. Details concerning such an observatory are discussed. 5 references

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  17. Gamma-ray generation from laser-driven electron resonant acceleration: In the non-QED and the QED regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, B.; Chang, H. X.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; He, X. T.

    2017-12-01

    Electron acceleration and γ-ray emission by circularly polarized laser pulses interacting with near-critical-density plasmas are systematically investigated for both the non-quantum-electrodynamic (non-QED) and QED regimes. In the non-QED regime, since electron density in the plasma channel is small and the self-generated electromagnetic fields are weak, only a few electrons can achieve the resonant acceleration, leading to weak γ-ray emission. However, when it comes to the QED regime, the radiation recoil force significantly affects the electron dynamics, which helps in not only the trapping of electrons, but also the relaxing of the condition for electrons to hit the resonance with laser fields, resulting in the formation of an ultradense helical electron bunch under resonant acceleration in the plasma channel. Therefore, an intense γ-ray pulse with unprecedented flux can be generated. Theoretical analysis and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to compare the dynamics in two different regimes.

  18. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical composition of a planet can be inferred from the gamma rays escaping from its surface and can be used to study its origin and evolution. The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The major sources of these gamma-ray lines are the decay of natural radionuclides, reactions induced by energetic galactic-cosmic-ray particles, capture of low energy neutrons, and solar-proton-induced radioactivities. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 30 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 288 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes have been used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with results from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed

  19. Catalogue of gamma rays from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, L.P.; Andersson, P.

    1983-10-01

    A catalogue of almost 11000 gamma rays is presented. The gamma rays are sorted by energy. In addition to the gamma-ray intensity per 100 decays of the parent, the decay half-life and associated gamma rays are given. All data are from a computer processing of a recent ENSDF file. (author)

  20. Positronium Annihilation Gamma Ray Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    traveling positron plasma that compresses the pulse to a sub- nanosecond time width, and a 2 Tesla magnet around the target further compresses the...lived interactions between positronium atoms. Target chamber gate valve Source gate valve cryo pumps Trap Accumulator gate valve Buncher Figure 4...plasma that compresses the pulse to a sub-nanosecond time width, and a 2 Tesla magnet around the target further compresses the beam spatially. This

  1. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  2. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  3. Gamma rays for pedestrians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear gamma radiation does not have many of the properties taken for granted in atomic or molecular radiation and necessary for lasers. The basic science and technology underlying these differences and the proposed methods of overcoming difficulties resulting from them are not properly understood. Considerable illumination in this interdisciplinary problem could be provided by some back-of-the-envelope calculations and simple experimental surveys by small groups of students and postdocs with an elementary knowledge of the nuclear and solid state physics which is evidently not familiar these days to laser physicists. 3 refs

  4. Equipment for x- and gamma ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following topics related to the equipment for x - and gamma ray radiography are discussed in this chapter. The topics are x-ray source for Industrial Radiography: properties of x-ray, generation of x-ray, mechanism of x-ray production, x-ray equipment, power supply, distribution of x-ray intensity along the tube: gamma ray source for Industrial Radiography: properties of gamma rays, gamma ray sources, gamma ray projectors on cameras, source changing. Care of Radiographic Equipments: Merits and Demerits of x and Gamma Rays

  5. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  6. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  7. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  8. Airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its role as collector and disseminator of information on nuclear techniques has long had an interest in gamma ray spectrometer methods and has published a number of Technical Reports on various aspects of the subject. At an Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna in November 1986 to review appropriate activities the IAEA could take following the Chernobyl accident, it was recommended that preparation begin on a new Technical Report on airborne gamma ray spectrometer surveying, taking into account the use of the technique for environmental monitoring as well as for nuclear emergency response requirements. Shortly thereafter the IAEA became the lead organization in the Radioelement Geochemical Mapping section of the International Geological Correlation Programme/United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Project on International Geochemical Mapping. These two factors led to the preparation of the present Technical Report. 18 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  10. Gamma rays control coding moths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarris, L.

    Gamma rays are being tested as a means of controlling codling moths, Cydia pomonella (L.), under fruit storage conditions where fumigation will not work. Preliminary tests have shown that gamma radiation kills all exposed codling moth larvae, including larvae in the dormant stage. There is no carryover of radiation in the fruit and minimal effect on the fruit. Gamma irradiation of food is considered safe for human consumption at doses of 1 kilogray (10 kilorads) or less.

  11. CAMAC gamma ray scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Pratt, J.C.; Shunk, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    A flexible gamma-ray scanning system, based on a LeCroy 3500 multichannel analyzer and CAMAC modules, is described. The system is designed for making simultaneous passive and active scans of objects of interest to nuclear safeguards. The scanner is a stepping-motor-driven carriage; the detectors, a bismuth-germanate scintillator and a high-purity germanium detector. A total of sixteen peaks in the two detector-produced spectra can be integrated simultaneously, and any scan can be viewed during data acquisition. For active scanning, the 2615-keV gamma-ray line from a 232 U source and the 4439-keV gamma-ray line from 9 Be(α,n) 12 C were selected. The system can be easily reconfigured to accommodate up to seven detectors because it is based on CAMAC modules and FORTRAN. The system is designed for field use and is easily transported. Examples of passive and active scans are presented

  12. Space instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    The decade of the 1990s has witnessed a renaissance in the field of gamma-ray astronomy. The seminal event was the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in April 1991. There have been a flood of major discoveries from CGRO including breakthroughs in gamma-ray bursts, annihilation radiation, and blazars. The Italian SAX satellite was launched in April 1996. Although not primarily a gamma-ray mission, it has added a new dimension to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Along with these new discoveries a firm groundwork has been laid for missions and new technology development that should maintain a healthy and vigorous field throughout most of the next decade. These include the ESA INTEGRAL mission (INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, to be launched in mid-2001) and the NASA GLAST mission (Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope) with a likely launch in the middle of the next decade. These two missions will extend the observational capabilities well beyond those of CGRO. New technologies (to gamma-ray astronomy), such as cooled germanium detectors, silicon strip detectors, and CdTe detectors are planned for these new missions. Additional promising new technologies such as CdZnTe strip detectors, scintillator fibers, and a gamma-ray lens for future gamma-ray astronomy missions are under development in laboratories around the world

  13. Coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors is often the technique of choice in an environmental radioactivity laboratory. When measuring environmental samples associated activities are usually low so an important parameter that describes the performance of the spectrometer...... for a nuclide of interest is the minimum detectable activity (MDA). There are many ways for lowering the MDAs in gamma spectrometry. Recently, developments of fast and compact digital acquisition systems have led to growing number of multiple HPGe detector spectrometers. In these applications all detected...

  14. Cosmology from gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouri, Athina; Basilakos, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    In this study we propose to use Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) as standard candles in order to constrain the expansion history of the universe up to redshifts of z ∼ 6. In particular, we utilize the 69 GRB dataset recently compiled by Cardone et al. (2009). Performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent supernovae type Ia (SNIa) data and the GRBs we can put constraints on the main cosmological parameters (Ω m , w). However, the use of the current GRBs to trace the Hubble relation, as an alternative to the traditionally used SNIa, can not break the degeneracy between the Ω m and the dark energy equation of state parameter.

  15. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  16. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  17. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  18. Intercomparison of gamma ray analysis software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The IAEA undertook an intercomparison exercise to review available software for gamma ray spectra analysis. This document describes the methods used in the intercomparison exercise, characterizes the software packages reviewed and presents the results obtained. Only direct results are given without any recommendation for a particular software or method for gamma ray spectra analysis

  19. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  20. Development status of monochromatic gamma-rays for nondestructive isotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajima, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Seya, Michio

    2011-01-01

    We have proposed an application of energy-tunable mono-energetic gamma-rays to nondestructive isotope measurements. We have launched a 3-year research program to develop technologies for generation of a high-brilliance gamma-ray via laser Compton scattering and its application to the nondestructive isotope measurements. The program is supported by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan. We are conducting R and D's on an energy-recovery electron linac for high-brilliance gamma-ray generation, improvement of laser-electron collision apparatus, and establishment of Monte Carlo simulation code to calculate interaction of mono-energetic gamma-rays with material, and so on. We report the status of the R and D program. (author)

  1. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  2. Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,α), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,#betta#) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide

  3. Processing of gamma-ray spectrometric logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umiastowski, K.; Dumesnil, P.

    1984-10-01

    CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) has developped a gamma-ray spectrometric tool, containing an analog-to-digital converter. This new tool permits to perform very precise uranium logs (natural gamma-ray spectrometry), neutron activation logs and litho-density logs (gamma-gamma spectrometric logs). Specific processing methods were developped to treate the particular problems of down-hole gamma-ray spectrometry. Extraction of the characteristic gamma-ray peak, even if they are superposed on the background radiation of very high intensity, is possible. This processing methode enables also to obtain geological informations contained in the continuous background of the spectrum. Computer programs are written in high level language for SIRIUS (VICTOR) and APOLLO computers. Exemples of uranium and neutron activation logs treatment are presented [fr

  4. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  5. Gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, Daniela; Roth, Csaba; Ghinescu, Alecse

    2010-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well established nuclear technique, suited to investigate the microstructural or elemental composition and can be applied to studies of a large variety of samples. The work with large samples involves, beside the development of large irradiation devices with well know neutron field characteristics, the knowledge of perturbing phenomena and adequate evaluation of correction factors like: neutron self shielding, extended source correction, gamma ray auto absorption. The objective of the works presented in this paper is to validate an appropriate methodology for gamma ray auto absorption correction evaluation for large inhomogeneous samples. For this purpose a benchmark experiment has been defined - a simple gamma ray transmission experiment, easy to be reproduced. The gamma ray attenuation in pottery samples has been measured and computed using MCNP5 code. The results show a good agreement between the computed and measured values, proving that the proposed methodology is able to evaluate the correction factors. (authors)

  6. Neutron detection gamma ray sensitivity criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Mace, Emily K.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2011-01-01

    The shortage of 3 He has triggered the search for effective alternative neutron detection technologies for national security and safeguards applications. Any new detection technology must satisfy two basic criteria: (1) it must meet a neutron detection efficiency requirement, and (2) it must be insensitive to gamma-ray interference at a prescribed level, while still meeting the neutron detection requirement. It is the purpose of this paper to define measureable gamma ray sensitivity criteria for neutron detectors. Quantitative requirements are specified for: intrinsic gamma ray detection efficiency and gamma ray absolute rejection. The gamma absolute rejection ratio for neutrons (GARRn) is defined, and it is proposed that the requirement for neutron detection be 0.9 3 He based neutron detector is provided showing that this technology can meet the stated requirements. Results from tests of some alternative technologies are also reported.

  7. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  8. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  9. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  10. A tuneable ultra-compact high-power, ultra-short pulsed, bright gamma-ray source based on bremsstrahlung radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Vieux, G.; Issac, R. C.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M. P.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [University of Strathclyde, Physics Department, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Maneuski, D.; Shea, V. O. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Lemos, N. R. C.; Bendoyro, R. A.; Dias, J. M. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1049-001, Lisbon (Portugal); Rajeev, P. P.; Foster, P. [Central Laser Facility, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bourgeois, N.; Ibbotson, T. P. A. [Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-03-15

    The laser driven plasma wakefield accelerator is a very compact source of high energy electrons. When the quasi-monoenergetic beam from these accelerators passes through dense material, high energy bremsstrahlung photons are emitted in a collimated beam with high flux. We show how a source based on this emission process can produce more than 10{sup 9} photons per pulse with a mean energy of 10 MeV. We present experimental results that show the feasibility of this method of producing high energy photons and compare the experimental results with GEANT4 Montecarlo simulations, which also give the scaling required to evaluate its suitability as method to produce radioisotopes via photo-nuclear reactions or for imaging applications.

  11. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are acc...

  12. Generation of energy-tunable and ultra-short-pulse gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering in an electron storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Y.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Takashima, Y.; Soda, K.; Katoh, M.

    2011-10-01

    Inverse Compton-scattered gamma rays of tunable energy were generated by changing the collision angle between a laser and an electron beam of fixed energy at the electron storage ring, UVSOR-II. Analytic expressions were derived for energy and intensity of the gamma rays. The measured energy and intensity of the gamma rays agreed with the theoretical values, and the pulse width was calculated to be a few ps, under experimental conditions. It was shown that ultra-short gamma ray pulses with a pulse width of 150 fs can be generated by optimizing the size of the laser spot.

  13. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  14. Librarian driven analysis of gamma ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashov, V.; Petersone, I.

    2002-01-01

    For a set of a priori given radionuclides extracted from a general nuclide data library, the authors use median estimates of the gamma-peak areas and estimates of their errors to produce a list of possible radionuclides matching gamma ray line(s). The identification of a given radionuclide is obtained by searching for a match with the energy information of a database. This procedure is performed in an interactive graphic mode by markers that superimpose, on the spectral data, the energy information and yields provided by a general gamma ray data library. This library of experimental data includes approximately 17,000 gamma ray energy lines related to 756 known gamma emitter radionuclides listed by the ICRP. (author)

  15. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Current interest in gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 100 GeV comes from the identification of Cygnus X-3 and other X-ray binaries as sources. In addition there are reports of emission from radio pulsars and a variety of other objects. The statistical significance of many of the observations is not high and many reported effects await confirmation, but there are a sufficient number of independent reports that very high energy gamma-ray astronomy must now be considered to have an observational basis. The observations are summarized with particular emphasis on those reported since 1980. The techniques used - the detection of small air showers using the secondary photons and particles at ground level - are unusual and are described. Future prospects for the field are discussed in relation to new ground-based experiments, satellite gamma-ray studies and proposed neutrino astronomy experiments. (orig.) With 296 refs

  16. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1980-04-01

    Relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays were evaluated for 16 nuclides, 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 133 Ba, 139 Ce, sup(180m)Hf, 198 Au, 203 Hg and 207 Bi. For most of these nuclides disintegration rates can be determined by means of β-γ or X-γ coincidence method. Since decay schemes of these nuclides are established, intensities per decay of strong gamma rays were accurately evaluated by using weak beta-ray branching ratios, relative gamma-ray intensities and internal conversion coefficients. Half-lives of the nuclides were also evaluated. Use of the nuclides, therefore, are recommended for precision intensity calibration of the detectors. (author)

  17. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  18. Gamma-ray surveys in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report is intended to provide newcomers to uranium exploration with an up-to-date statement of the principal factors to be considered in planning and using gamma-ray surveys. Since the report incorporates the results of recent research, and since its preparation was influenced by the cumulative experience of its contributors, it should also be useful to those who already have some knowledge of radioactivity surveys and methods. The intention is that the information and explanations given in the report will make it possible for gamma-ray surveys to be used in the most efficient way for a given exploration task

  19. Gamma-ray standards for detector calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1985-10-01

    The proceeedings are reported of a Consultants' Meeting on Gamma-ray Standards for Detector Calibration, held at the CEN, Grenoble in France, from 30-31 May 1985. The meeting provided a forum to assess the requirements for a suitable file to be used internationally for the calibration of X- and gamma-ray detectors. A provisional list of nuclides was drawn up, and an initial assessment of the status of the required data was agreed to be performed by the participants before the end of 1985. (author)

  20. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  1. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  2. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  3. Found: A Galaxy's Missing Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Recent reanalysis of data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has resulted in the first detection of high-energy gamma rays emitted from a nearby galaxy. This discovery reveals more about how supernovae interact with their environments.Colliding Supernova RemnantAfter a stellar explosion, the supernovas ejecta expand, eventually encountering the ambient interstellar medium. According to models, this generates a strong shock, and a fraction of the kinetic energy of the ejecta is transferred into cosmic rays high-energy radiation composed primarily of protons and atomic nuclei. Much is still unknown about this process, however. One open question is: what fraction of the supernovas explosion power goes into accelerating these cosmic rays?In theory, one way to answer this is by looking for gamma rays. In a starburst galaxy, the collision of the supernova-accelerated cosmic rays with the dense interstellar medium is predicted to produce high-energy gamma rays. That radiation should then escape the galaxy and be visible to us.Pass 8 to the RescueObservational tests of this model, however, have beenstumped by Arp 220. This nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy is the product of a galaxy merger ~700 million years ago that fueled a frenzy of starbirth. Due to its dusty interior and extreme levels of star formation, Arp 220 has long been predicted to emit the gamma rays produced by supernova-accelerated cosmic rays. But though weve looked, gamma-ray emission has never been detected from this galaxy until now.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Fang-Kun Peng (Nanjing University) reprocessed 7.5 years of Fermi observations using the new Pass 8 analysis software. The resulting increase in resolution revealed the first detection of GeV emission from Arp 220!Acceleration EfficiencyGamma-ray luminosity vs. total infrared luminosity for LAT-detected star-forming galaxies and Seyferts. Arp 220s luminosities are consistent with the scaling relation. [Peng et al. 2016

  4. Coakial gamma ray detector and method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harchol, M.

    1977-01-01

    A coaxial gamma ray detector is fabricated using intrinsic Ge semiconductor material in a geometry whereby full depletion of electrical carriers is prevented within a small region proximate the point of electrical contact thereby allowing greater biasing potentials across the detector and, consequently, providing reduced electronic noise and increased energy resolution

  5. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts; radio astronomy. ... Even though radio band is the least explored of the afterglow spectrum, it has played an important role in the progress of GRB physics, specifically in confirming the hypothesized relativistic effects. ... Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum 695 547, India.

  6. Effects of Shielding on Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-13

    The interaction of gamma rays with matter results in an effect we call attenuation (i.e. ‘shielding’). Attenuation can dramatically alter the appearance of a spectrum. Attenuating materials may actually create features in a spectrum via x-ray fluorescence

  7. Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-Hin T. Tam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, the data obtained using the Large Area Telescope (LAT aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided new insights on high-energy processes in globular clusters, particularly those involving compact objects such as MilliSecond Pulsars (MSPs. Gamma-ray emission in the 100 MeV to 10 GeV range has been detected from more than a dozen globular clusters in our galaxy, including 47 Tucanae and Terzan 5. Based on a sample of known gammaray globular clusters, the empirical relations between gamma-ray luminosity and properties of globular clusters such as their stellar encounter rate, metallicity, and possible optical and infrared photon energy densities, have been derived. The measured gamma-ray spectra are generally described by a power law with a cut-off at a few gigaelectronvolts. Together with the detection of pulsed γ-rays from two MSPs in two different globular clusters, such spectral signature lends support to the hypothesis that γ-rays from globular clusters represent collective curvature emission from magnetospheres of MSPs in the clusters. Alternative models, involving Inverse-Compton (IC emission of relativistic electrons that are accelerated close to MSPs or pulsar wind nebula shocks, have also been suggested. Observations at >100 GeV by using Fermi/LAT and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S.-II, MAGIC-II, VERITAS, and CTA will help to settle some questions unanswered by current data.

  8. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... CGRO2, HETE3, Swift4 and Fermi5 have increased the number of GRB detections to several thousands. GRBs are non-recurring events, hinting at underlying catas- trophic phenomena. The gamma-ray flash typically lasts for a few seconds to a few minutes, and in some rare cases to thousands of seconds.

  9. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  10. HAWC observatory catches first gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías Villegas, Gabriela

    2013-06-01

    The world's largest and most modern gamma-ray observatory has carried out its first successful observations. Located inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in the Mexican state of Puebla, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is a collaboration between 26 Mexican and US institutions.

  11. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  12. Gamma Ray Signatures of Neutrons From a Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, G. S.; Smith, D. M.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F.; Kamogawa, M.; Cummer, S. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Wang, D.; Stock, M.; Kawasaki, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Following a lightning strike to a wind turbine in Japan, we have observed a large burst of neutrons lasting 100 ms with a ground fluence of 1,000 n cm-2, thousands of times greater than the peak neutron flux associated with the largest ground level solar particle event ever observed. This is the first detection of an unequivocal signature of neutrons from a terrestrial gamma ray flash, consisting of a 2.223 MeV gamma-ray spectral line from a neutron-capture on hydrogen reaction occurring in our detector, and is shown to be consistent with the production of 1012-1013 photoneutrons from a downward terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) at 1.0 km, with a gamma ray brightness typical of upward TGFs observed by satellites.

  13. Interstellar medium structure and content and gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, F.

    1982-05-01

    A general description of gamma-ray astronomy is presented with special emphasis on the study of diffuse gamma-ray emission. This is followed by a collection of reflections and observations on the structure and the gas and dust content of the local interstellar medium. Results of gamma-ray observations on the local interstellar medium are given. The last part is devoted to the whole of the galactic gamma-ray emission and its interpretation [fr

  14. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, J.; Wenzel, W.; Hudec, R.; Moskalenko, E. I.; Metlov, V.; Chernych, N. S.; Getman, V. S.; Ziener, Rainer; Birkle, K.; Bade, N.

    1994-01-01

    Details on the project to search for serendipitous time correlated optical photographic observations of Gamma Ray Bursters (GRB's) are presented. The ongoing photographic observations at nine observatories are used to look for plates which were exposed simultaneously with a gamma ray burst detected by the gamma ray instrument team (BATSE) and contain the burst position. The results for the first two years of the gamma ray instrument team operation are presented.

  15. Applications of Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A short, convenient computer program based on the Monte Carlo method that was developed to generate simulated gamma-ray spectra has been found to have useful applications in research and teaching. In research, we use it to predict spectra in neutron activation analysis (NAA), particularly in prompt gamma-ray NAA (PGNAA). In teaching, it is used to illustrate the dependence of detector response functions on the nature of gamma-ray interactions, the incident gamma-ray energy, and detector geometry

  16. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts during the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run and Implications for the Origin of GRB 150906B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dalya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Galiana, A. Fernandez; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kaermer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath Hoareau, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Szolgyen, A.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Hurley, K.; Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Rau, A.; Sanin, A. B.; Svinkin, D. S.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with gamma-ray bursts detected during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We find no evidence of a GW signal for any of the 41 gamma-ray bursts for which LIGO

  17. Natural background gamma-ray spectrum. List of gamma-rays ordered in energy from natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu [Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan); Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke

    1998-03-01

    A quick index to {gamma}-rays and X-rays from natural radionuclides is presented. In the list, {gamma}-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. The list also contains {gamma}-rays from radioactive nuclides produced in a germanium detector and its surrounding materials by interaction with cosmic neutrons, as well as direct {gamma}-rays from interaction with the neutrons. Artificial radioactive nuclides emitting {gamma}-rays with same or near energy value as that of the natural {gamma}-rays and X-rays are also listed. In appendix, {gamma}-ray spectra from a rock, uranium ore, thorium, monazite and uraninite and also background spectra obtained with germanium detectors placed in iron or lead shield have been given. The list is designed for use in {gamma}-ray spectroscopy under the conditions of highly natural background, such as in-situ environmental radiation monitoring or low-level activity measurements, with a germanium detector. (author)

  18. Astrophysical constraints from gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Roland; Prantzos, Nikos; Ballmoos, Peter von

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray lines from cosmic sources provide unique isotopic information, since they originate from energy level transitions in the atomic nucleus. Gamma-ray telescopes explored this astronomical window in the past three decades, detecting radioactive isotopes that have been ejected in interstellar space by cosmic nucleosynthesis events and nuclei that have been excited through collisions with energetic particles. Astronomical gamma-ray telescopes feature standard detectors of nuclear physics, but have to be surrounded by effective shields against local instrumental background, and need special detector and/or mask arrangements to collect imaging information. Due to exceptionally-low signal/noise ratios, progress in the field has been slow compared with other wavelengths. Despite the difficulties, this young field of astronomy is well established now, in particular due to advances made by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 90ies. The most important achievements so far concern: short-lived radioactivities that have been detected in a couple of supernovae ( 56 Co and 57 Co in SN1987A, 44 Ti in Cas A), the diffuse glow of long-lived 26 Al that has been mapped along the entire plane of the Galaxy, several excited nuclei that have been detected in solar flares, and, last but not least, positron annihilation that has been observed in the inner Galaxy since the 70ies. High-resolution spectroscopy is now being performed: since 2002, ESAs INTEGRAL and NASAs RHESSI, two space-based gamma-ray telescopes with Ge detectors, are in operation. Recent results include: imaging and line shape measurements of e - -e + annihilation emission from the Galactic bulge, which can hardly be accounted for by conventional sources of positrons; 26 Al emission and line width measurement from the inner Galaxy and from the Cygnus region, which can constrain the properties of the interstellar medium; and a diffuse 60 Fe gamma-ray line emission which appears rather weak, in view of current

  19. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  20. Gamma-Ray Background Variability in Mobile Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, Timothy John

    . This is accomplished by making many hours of background measurements with a truck-mounted system, which utilizes high-purity germanium detectors for spectroscopy and sodium iodide detectors for coded aperture imaging. This system also utilizes various peripheral sensors, such as panoramic cameras, laser ranging systems, global positioning systems, and a weather station to provide context for the gamma-ray data. About three hundred hours of data were taken in the San Francisco Bay Area, covering a wide variety of environments that might be encountered in operational scenarios. These measurements were used in a source injection study to evaluate the sensitivity of different algorithms (imaging and spectroscopy) and hardware (sodium iodide and high-purity germanium detectors). These measurements confirm that background distributions in large, mobile detector systems are dominated by systematic, not statistical variations, and both spectroscopy and imaging were found to substantially reduce this variability. Spectroscopy performed better than the coded aperture for the given scintillator array (one square meter of sodium iodide) for a variety of sources and geometries. By modeling the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the background, the data can be sampled to simulate the performance of a detector array of arbitrary size and resolution. With a larger array or lower resolution detectors, however imaging was better able to compensate for background variability.

  1. Testing of a gamma ray imaging system at Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Daniel A.; Barber, H. Bradford; Grim, Gary P.; Clark, David D.; Danly, Christopher R.; Aragonez, Robert; Griego, Jeffrey; Fatherley, Valerie; Fastje, Daivd

    2013-09-01

    Successful images of hard x-rays were taken at the OMEGA Laser at the Laboratory for Laser energetics ant he University of Rochester. This facility served as a surrogate for the National Ignition Facility for which this system was designed. Eleven plastic shells filled with 3He pellets were imploded producing soft and hard x-rays. As the system was designed to image 4.44MeV gammas the hard x-rays were of particular interest. These bremsstrahlung x-rays were emitted for the outer plastic shell and imaged using the gamma ray imaging system 13 meters away. A number of filtering arrangements were used to do transmission radiography of the source providing spectrum information. A 200-micron pinhole aperture was used to image the source. These shots provide information critical in characterizing the performance of the system

  2. Ginga Gamma-Ray Burst Line Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project is the statistical evaluation of the occurrence of spectral lines in the gamma-ray burst spectra detected by the Ginga burst detector, and the comparison of the Ginga results to the BATSE observations. Two significant line features were detected in the Ginga bursts, but thus far none have been detected in the bursts BATSE detected. These line features may indicate the presence of strong magnetic fields in bursts, and therefore are important physical diagnostics of the conditions in the plasma which radiates the observed gamma-rays. The issue is whether there is a discrepancy between the Ginga and BATSE results; the potential discrepancy must be evaluated statistically. Even if BATSE line detections are announced, the statistical methodology we have developed can be used to estimate the rate at which different types of spectral features occur.

  3. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  4. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Erik; Groen, Oeyvind

    1999-01-01

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  5. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  6. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  7. Cosmological Time Dilation in Gamma Ray Bursts?

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. (1994) report that the temporal structure of faint gamma ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  8. The cannonball model of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    The cannonball model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is incredibly more successful than the standard blast-wave models (SM) of GRBs, which suffer from profound inadequacies and limited predictive power. The CB model is falsifiable in its hypothesis and results. Its predictions are summarized in simple analytical expressions, derived, in fair approximations, from first principles. It provides a good description on a universal basis of the properties of long-duration GRBs and of their afterglows (AGs).

  9. Gamma ray induced mutants in Colocasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, K.; Jos, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are selected treatments with 250 r, 500 r and 1000 r gamma rays Colocasia mutants with changes in morphological and yield characters. Results from a preliminary yield trial of four mutants with its control variety C 9 are presented. The mutant's characteristics are (i) erect and narrow leaf (ii) cup shaped leaf, dwarf, matures within 120 days against 180 days in control (iii) narrow and thicker leaves, colour of lamina chalky and pale green (iv) vigorous

  10. Evaluation of gamma-ray intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasukazu; Inoue, Hikaru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Yosei.

    1978-03-01

    Results of literature survey and evaluation of relative intensities and intensities per decay of gamma rays are presented. Evaluations were made for 22 Na, 24 Na, 46 Sc, 48 Sc, 48 V, 54 Mn, 57 Co, 60 Co, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 95 Nb, 95 Zr, sup(108m)Ag, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 144 Pr, 203 Hg, and 207 Bi. For eight of the nuclides, the half-lives were also evaluated. (auth.)

  11. Gamma rays from the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemen, J.B.G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes new gamma-ray views on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium. The author describes the COS-B data base and the pre-launch and in-flight calibration data used for all analyses. Diffuse galactic gamma radiation (> 50 MeV) may be either a result of cosmic-ray-matter interactions, or of the cosmic-ray electrons with the interstellar radiation field (mainly at optical and infrared wavelengths), through the inverse-Compton process. A detailed comparison between the gamma-ray observations of the large complex of interstellar clouds in Orion and Monoceros and the CO and HI surveys of this region is given. It gives insight into the cloud penetration of cosmic rays and in the relation between CO detections and molecular hydrogen column densities. Next, the radial distribution of gamma rays in the Galaxy is studied, as well as the galactic centre (more precisely, the central 400 pc), which contains a large concentration of CO molecules. The H 2 /CO abundance and the cosmic-ray density in the galactic centre are discussed and compared to the findings for the galactic disk. In various analyses in this thesis a likelihood-ratio method is applied for parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. A general description of this method is added as an appendix. (Auth.)

  12. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  13. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  14. Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

  15. Catalog of gamma-rays unplaced in radioactive decay schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke.

    1991-03-01

    A catalog is made for gamma-rays emitted in decay of radioactive nuclides but not placed in their decay schemes. It consists of two tables. In Table 1, the number of these unplaced gamma-ray components by a nuclide is given together with the fraction of total intensity of these gamma-rays to that of all observed gamma-rays. In Table 2, the unplaced gamma-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. Each line of this table contains the gamma-ray energy, intensity, nuclide identification, and energies and intensities of the most prominent gamma-rays from the decay of the radionuclides. This catalog is a compilation from Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, of at February 1990. (author)

  16. Diagnosing ICF gamma-ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Y H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Evoy, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, C S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoffman, N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, S H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dauffy, L [LLNL; Stoeffl, W [LLNL; Malone, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, M I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cox, B C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tunnel, T W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, E K [NSTEC/SB; Ali, Z A [NSREC/LIVERMORE; Horsfield, C J [AWE; Rubery, M [AWE

    2010-01-01

    Gamma rays produced in an ICF environment open up a host of physics opportunities we are just beginning to explore. A branch of the DT fusion reaction, with a branching ratio on the order of 2e-5 {gamma}/n, produces 16.7 MeV {gamma}-rays. These {gamma}-rays provide a direct measure of fusion reaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Reaction-rate history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental quantities that will be used to optimize ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) that convert fusion {gamma}-rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. Demonstrated absolute timing calibrations allow bang time measurements with accuracy better than 30 ps. System impulse response better than 95 ps fwhm have been made possible by the combination of low temporal dispersion GCDs, ultra-fast microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and high-bandwidth Mach Zehnder fiber optic data links and digitizers, resulting in burn width measurement accuracy better than 10ps. Inherent variable energy-thresholding capability allows use of GCDs as {gamma}-ray spectrometers to explore other interesting nuclear processes. Recent measurements of the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C(n,n{prime}) {gamma}-rays produced as 14.1 MeV DT fusion neutrons pass through plastic capsules is paving the way for a new CH ablator areal density measurement. Insertion of various neutron target materials near target chamber center (TCC) producing secondary, neutron-induced {gamma}y-rays are being used to study other nuclear interactions and as in-situ sources to calibrate detector response and DT branching ratio. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics, based on the GCD concept, are now being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth

  17. List of strong gamma-rays emitted from radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke.

    1992-03-01

    This is a compilation of intense gamma-rays, with energy value greater than 1 keV, emitted from decay of radioactive nuclides. These gamma-rays are three strongest of gamma-rays originating from each radionuclide. These gamma-rays are listed in the order of increasing energy. The table contains the energy and the intensity of the gamma-rays, the parent nuclide, the decay mode and the half-life of the parent nuclide and the total number of gamma-rays originating from the nuclide, and is also accompanied with energies and intensities of other two of the three gamma-rays in the same row. The list can be used as a quick guide to identify radionuclides in gamma-ray spectrometry. An annex contains the list of radionuclides having no measured gamma-ray intensities, together with energy values of the gamma-rays. The numerical values given in the list are taken from the values adopted in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory, as of February 1991. The list has also been prepared on a floppy diskette. (author)

  18. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 μm) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  19. Principles and techniques of gamma ray tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claxton, K.T.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive tracer techniques provide a very sensitive means of studying physical and chemical processes in a whole variety of different media. Some of the techniques and principles of radioactive tracers and their application to practical engineering systems are discussed. Information which has been found useful in the design of high temperature liquid sodium facilities employing radio-tracers, is presented. The report deals solely with the use of gamma-emitting species as the tracer. These find particular application for in-situ studies on engineering systems where the highly penetrating properties of gamma rays are needed for detection through strongly absorbent media such as stainless steel pepe walls. (author)

  20. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Analysis Software GDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanabongse, P.

    1998-01-01

    The developmental work on computer software for gamma-ray spectrum analysis has been completed as a software package version 1.02 named GDA, which is an acronym for Gamma-spectrum Deconvolution and Analysis. The software package consists of three 3.5-inch diskettes for setup and a user's manual. GDA software can be installed for using on a personal computer with Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0 operating system. A computer maybe the type of 80486 CPU with 8 megabytes of memory

  1. Very high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    It is apparent that very high gamma-ray astronomy, at the very end of the electromagnetic spectrum, is just at the threshold of becoming an important channel of astronomical information. The author discusses how, to fully develop, it requires telescopes with improved minimum flux sensitivity; development of techniques that characterize the nature of the primary; more overlapping observations to remove any question of the reality of the detected phenomenon; more consistency in the application of statistics among experimenters and more openness about methods used; development of models that will predict the phenomenon to be expected rather than explain what has been observed; and more accurate calibrations to determine absolute fluxes and energies

  2. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  3. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Whipple Observatory's atmospheric Cerenkov camera has detected TeV radiation from four galactic sources: the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-3, Hercules X-1, and 4U0115+63. Recent simulations encourage the view that unwanted cosmic-ray background showers may be suppressed by a large factor. Emphasis in the coming year will be on determining optimum selection criteria for enhancing gamma-ray signals and in developing a prototype camera with finer angular resolution as a first step towards implementation of the HERCULES concept

  4. Comptonization of gamma rays by cold electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yueming; Ross, R.R.; Mccray, R.

    1991-01-01

    An analytic method is developed for calculating the emergent spectrum of gamma-rays and X-rays scattered in a homogeneous medium with low-temperature electrons. The Klein-Nishina corrections of the scattering cross section and absorption processes are taken in account. The wavelength relaxation and the spatial diffusion problems are solved separately, and the emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the evolution function of the spectrum in an infinite medium with the photon luminosity resulting from the spatial diffusion in a finite sphere. The analytic results are compared with that of Monte Carlo calculations and it is concluded that the analytic result is quite accurate. 9 refs

  5. Gamma-ray burster counterparts - Radio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.; Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.

    1989-01-01

    Many observers and theorists have suggested that gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) are related to highly magnetized rotating, neutron stars, in which case an analogy with pulsars implies that GRBs would be prodigious emitters of polarized radio emission during quiescence. The paper reports on a survey conducted with the Very Large Array radio telescope of 10 small GRB error regions for quiescent radio emission at wavelengths of 2, 6, and 20 cm. The sensitivity of the survey varied from 0.1 to 0.8 mJy. The observations did indeed reveal four radio sources inside the GRB error regions. 27 refs

  6. SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY-BRIGHT BLAZARS WITH OPTICAL POLARIZATION AND GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Kawabata, Miho; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Ohsugi, Takashi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Schinzel, Frank K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Moritani, Yuki [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Yamanaka, Masayuki, E-mail: itoh@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: itoh@hp.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); and others

    2016-12-10

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei that emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies, and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition, and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between 2008 July and 2014 December to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), this result implies a systematic difference in the intrinsic alignment of magnetic fields in parsec-scale relativistic jets between different types of blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars vs. BL Lacs) and consequently between different types of radio galaxies (FR I versus FR II).

  7. Collimatorless imaging of gamma rays with help of gamma-ray tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2001-01-01

    In many gamma-ray detector systems that are built for imaging purposes Compton scattered photons are suppressed as much as possible. However, the information from photons that scattered inside a detector system can be used to reconstruct the tracks of the photons with help of gamma-ray tracking. Estimates of the incident directions of the photons can be made and an image can be created. Examples of potential applications for this technique are the use as a gamma-camera in medical imaging (e.g. SPECT) or as a detector for PET. Due to the omission of collimators, much higher detection efficiencies can be achieved, reducing the doses required for an image. A gamma-ray tracking method, called backtracking, has been developed for nuclear spectroscopy. The method tracks gamma-rays originating from a point source in the center of a spherical detector system consisting of position-sensitive germanium detectors. This method can also be used as a tracking technique for imaging of an unknown source distribution. With he...

  8. Lingering Problems in Gamma-Ray Observations of GRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Although observations of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in other wavelengths have transformed the field, the gamma-ray region of the spectrum remains important. This talk will summarize a number of unresolved issues specific to gamma-ray observations. For example, the apparent narrowness of the distribution of peak energy is difficult to explain either as an intrinsic characteristic of bursts or as a selection effect. There have also been controversial claims for anisotropy in subgroups of bursts.

  9. Sensitivity of Gamma-Ray Detectors to Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the largest gamma-ray detector to date, EGRET, does not have useful polarization sensitivity. We have explored here some improved approaches to analyzing gamma-ray pair production events, leading to important gains in sensitivity to polarization. The performance of the next generation gamma-ray instrument GLAST is investigated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the complete detector.

  10. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  11. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1990-02-01

    Our scientific goal is to discover and study by means of gamma-ray astronomy those regions of the universe where particles are accelerated to extreme energies. The atmospheric Cherenkov technique provides a unique and potentially sensitive window in the region of 10 11 to approximately 10 14 eV for this purpose. The Whipple Observatory Collaboration is currently engaged in the development of a Cherenkov camera which has the ultimate capability of distinguishing gamma-ray showers from the numerous cosmic-ray background showers by imaging the Cherenkov light from each shower. We have recently demonstrated the potential of the imaging technique with our 18 sigma detection of TeV photons from the Crab Nebula using a camera of 10 elements, pixel spacing 0.25 degrees. This detection represents a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity compared to a non-imaging detector. The next step in the development of the detector is to obtain a second large reflector, similar to the present 10 meter instrument, for stereoscopic viewing of showers. This project, named GRANITE, is now approved by DOE. With GRANITE it should be possible to probe more deeply in space by a factor of 7, and to fully investigate the possibility of new physics which has been suggested by reports of anomalous radiation from Hercules X-1. 18 refs

  12. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts Have Millisecond Variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Katharine C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Fenimore, E. E.

    2000-01-01

    We have performed searches for isolated flares and for steady flickering in the initial ∼1 s of gamma-ray burst light curves on the microsecond to millisecond timescales. Two bursts among our sample of 20 revealed four isolated flares with timescales from 256 to 2048 μs. A wavelet analysis for our sample showed low-level flickering for all bursts on timescales from 256 μs to 33 ms, with the majority of bursts containing rise times faster than 4 ms and 30% having rise times faster than 1 ms. These results show that millisecond variability is common in classical bursts and not some exceptional activity by a possibly separate class of bursts. These fast rise times can be used to place the following severe limits on burst models. (1) The characteristic thickness of the energy generation region must be less than 1200 km along the line of sight. (2) The angular size of the gamma-ray emission region as subtended from the central source must be less than 42''. (3) The expanding ejecta must have a range of Lorentz factors along a radius line with a dispersion of less than roughly 2%. (4) Within the external shock scenario, the characteristic dimension of the impacted cloud must be smaller than 16 AU on average. (5) Within the collimated jet scenario, the collimation angle must be smaller than 42''. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society

  14. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  15. Inelastic cross sections from gamma-ray measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Measurements of gamma rays following neutron induced reactions have been studied with the Germanium Array for Neutron-induced Excitations (GEANIE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for many years. Gamma-ray excitation functions and coincidence studies provide insight into nuclear reaction mechanisms as well as expanding our knowledge of energy levels and gamma-rays. Samples studied with Ge detectors at LANSCE range from Be to Pu. Fe, Cr and Ti have been considered for use as reference cross sections. An overview of the measurements and efforts to create a reliable neutron-induced gamma-ray reference cross section will be presented.

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac

    2009-01-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  17. A new processing technique for airborne gamma-ray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can be proce......The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can...... be processed in different ways aiming at getting new information that cannot be directly extracted from the original spectra....

  18. Determination of gamma-ray-induced displacement rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Doran, D.G.; Roberts, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    To define the gamma-ray component of the radiation field in light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) environments, gamma-ray spectrometry experiments were conducted in the low power PV mockup at the poolside critical assembly (PCA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Gamma-ray displacement rates can be calculated directly from absolute electron spectra observed with the Janus probe gamma-ray spectrometry. Gamma-ray displacement results are presented for the 1/4-T, 1/2-T, and 3/4-T locations of the 12/13 and 4/12 simulated surveillance capsule (SSC) configurations. In addition, the gamma-ray displacement rate at the SSC location was inferred using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) gamma-ray dosimetry results obtained in the 4/12 SSC configuration at the PCA. Compared with neutron-induced displacement rates, the calculated gamma-ray-induced displacement rates are small at all these LWR-PV locations. The ratio of gamma-ray-induced to neutron-induced displacement rates never exceeds roughly 5 X 10 -3

  19. Gamma-ray spectral calculations for uranium borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Evans, M.L.; Jain, M.

    1980-06-01

    Gamma-ray transport calculations were performed to determine the energy distribution of gamma rays inside a borehole introduced into an infinite medium. The gamma rays from the naturally occurring radioactive isotopes of potassium, thorium, and uranium were uniformly distributed in a sandstone formation (having a porosity of 0.30 and a saturation of 1.0) surrounding the borehole. A sonde was placed coaxially inside the borehole. Parametric studies were done to determine how the borehole radius, borehole fluid, and borehole casing influence the gamma-ray flux inside the sonde

  20. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  1. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Dainotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism responsible for the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs is still a debated issue. The prompt phase-related GRB correlations can allow discriminating among the most plausible theoretical models explaining this emission. We present an overview of the observational two-parameter correlations, their physical interpretations, and their use as redshift estimators and possibly as cosmological tools. The nowadays challenge is to make GRBs, the farthest stellar-scaled objects observed (up to redshift z=9.4, standard candles through well established and robust correlations. However, GRBs spanning several orders of magnitude in their energetics are far from being standard candles. We describe the advances in the prompt correlation research in the past decades, with particular focus paid to the discoveries in the last 20 years.

  2. Gamma-Rays from Galactic Compact Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2007-04-01

    Recent discoveries have revealed many sources of TeV photons in our Mikly Way galaxy powered by compact objects, either neutron stars or black holes. These objects must be powerful particle accelerators, some with peak energies of at least 100 TeV, and may be neutrino, as well as photon, sources. Future TeV observations will enable us to address key questions concerning particle acceleration by compact objects including the fraction of energy which accreting black holes channel into relativstic jet production, whether the compact object jets are leptonic or hadronic, and the mechanism by which pulsar winds accelerate relativistic particles. We report on work done related to compact Galactic objects in preparation of a White Paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy requested by the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society.

  3. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  4. The High Altitude Gamma Ray Observatory, HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Volcano Sierra Negra in Puebla, Mexico was selected to host HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov), a unique obervatory of wide field of view (2π sr) capable of observing the sky continously at energies from 0.5 TeV to 100 TeV. HAWC is an array of 300 large water tanks (7.3 m diameter × 5 m depth) at an altitude of 4100 m. a. s. l. Each tank is instrumented with three upward-looking photomultipliers tubes. The full array will be capable of observing the most energetic gamma rays from the most violent events in the universe. HAWC will be 15 times more sensitive than its predecesor, Milagro. We present HAWC, the scientific case and capabilities.

  5. Gamma-ray Cherenkov-transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aginian, M. A.; Ispirian, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.

    2013-10-01

    The spectral and angular distributions as well as the total number of photons of gamma-ray Cherenkov-transition radiation (GCTR) produced by charged particles in the photon energy region {}\\sim(0.8\\text{-}2)\\ \\text{MeV} are calculated. For this purpose we used the experimental results of the recent discovery according to which in the above-mentioned region the measured refractive index of silicon as well as the theoretically calculated refractive index of gold are greater than 1. Using the results of the carried out numerical calculations an experimental arrangement is discussed for the observation and experimental study of the GCTR. As our results show the GCTR photon yield is about one order of magnitude higher than the background bremsstrahlung yield. Some applications of GCTR, in particular, for comparatively easy search of new materials with refractive index n(\\omega )>1 , are proposed.

  6. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  7. Dosimetry for terrestrial gamma-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, S.A.; Dickson, H.W.; Kerr, G.D.; Miah, M.F.K.; Perdue, P.T.

    1975-01-01

    Dose rates from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs in soils of the Oak Ridge area have been determined from in situ and core sample measurements. Information on soil composition, density, and moisture content and on the distribution of cesium in the soil was obtained from the core samples. Measurements of radionuclide concentrations in the samples were made with a 4 x 4 in. NaI detector. Gamma-ray spectroscopy using a lithium-drifted germanium (GeLi) detector has been applied to the determination of radionuclide concentrations in soil and the associated gamma dose rates above the earth plane. An unshielded GeLi detector placed about 1 m above the earth detects gamma radiation from an area of about 100 m 2 . The equipment and data processing procedure are briefly described

  8. Nuclear gamma ray lines from supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, J.O.D.

    1980-01-01

    From theoretical considerations of the behaviour of gamma ray line fluxes occurring after a supernova explosion, the 1.156 and 0.847 MeV lines are seen to be the most likely to be observed. The 1.156 MeV line has been previously observed by other investigators. Observations of the 0.847 MeV line, and 1.332, 1.173 and 0.059 MeV lines using a Ge(Li) telescope aboard a stratospheric balloon which was flown in Brazil in 1977 are reported. The observation using a NaI(Tl) detector of a line in the energy interval 1.5 - 1.6 MeV, which may be due to 0 18 (p,p') 0 18 sup (*) reaction is also reported. (Author) [pt

  9. Operating experience with gamma ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.; Ouwerkerk, T.

    1980-01-01

    The experience of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) with radioisotopes dates back to the mid-1940s when radium was marketed for medical purposes. Cobalt-60 came on the scene in 1949 and within a few years a thriving business in cancer teletherapy machines and research irradiators was developed. AECL's first full-scale cobalt-60 gamma ray sterilizer for medical products was installed in 1964. AECL now has over 50 plants and 30 million curies in service around the world. Sixteen years of design experience in cobalt-60 sources, radiation shielding, safety interlock systems, and source pass mechanisms have made gamma irradiators safe, reliable, and easy to operate. This proven technology is being applied in promising new fields such as sludge treatment and food preservation. Cesium-137 is expected to be extensively utilized as the gamma radiation source for these applications

  10. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  11. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  12. X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Radiation Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is a semiconductor radiation detector for detecting X-ray and / or gamma-ray radiation. The detector comprises a converter element for converting incident X-ray and gamma-ray photons into electron-hole pairs, at least one cathode, a plurality of detector electrodes arranged with a pitch...

  13. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...

  14. Gamma Ray Tomographic Scan Method for Large Scale Industrial Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Ho; Jung, Sung Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Park, Jang Geun

    2011-01-01

    The gamma ray tomography systems have been used to investigate a chemical process for last decade. There have been many cases of gamma ray tomography for laboratory scale work but not many cases for industrial scale work. Non-tomographic equipment with gamma-ray sources is often used in process diagnosis. Gamma radiography, gamma column scanning and the radioisotope tracer technique are examples of gamma ray application in industries. In spite of many outdoor non-gamma ray tomographic equipment, the most of gamma ray tomographic systems still remained as indoor equipment. But, as the gamma tomography has developed, the demand on gamma tomography for real scale plants also increased. To develop the industrial scale system, we introduced the gamma-ray tomographic system with fixed detectors and rotating source. The general system configuration is similar to 4 th generation geometry. But the main effort has been made to actualize the instant installation of the system for real scale industrial plant. This work would be a first attempt to apply the 4th generation industrial gamma tomographic scanning by experimental method. The individual 0.5-inch NaI detector was used for gamma ray detection by configuring circular shape around industrial plant. This tomographic scan method can reduce mechanical complexity and require a much smaller space than a conventional CT. Those properties make it easy to get measurement data for a real scale plant

  15. Gamma ray irradiation for sludge solubilization and biological nitrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Myunjoo; Park, Chulhwan

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of gamma ray irradiation on the solubilization of waste sewage sludge. The recovery of an organic carbon source from sewage sludge by gamma ray irradiation was also studied. The gamma ray irradiation showed effective sludge solubilization efficiencies. Both soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5 ) increased by gamma ray irradiation. The feasibility of the solubilized sludge carbon source for a biological nitrogen removal was also investigated. A modified continuous bioreactor (MLE process) for a denitrification was operated for 20 days by using synthetic wastewater. It can be concluded that the gamma ray irradiation was useful for the solubilization of sludge and the recovery of carbon source from the waste sewage sludge for biological nitrogen removal. - Research highlights: → This study was conducted to investigate the effects of gamma ray irradiation on the solubilization of waste sewagesludge. → The recovery of an organic carbon source from sewage sludge by gamma ray irradiation was also studied. → It can be concluded that the gamma ray irradiation was useful for the solubilization of sludge and the recovery of carbon source from the waste sewage sludge for biological nitrogen removal.

  16. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Content, Robert; Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope...

  17. Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.; Killian, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a module for use with a gamma-ray spectroscopy system. The system includes a gamma-ray detector for detecting gamma-ray events and producing a signal representing the gamma-ray events, a converter responsive to the detector and capable of converting the signal to a spectrum, a storage memory responsive to the converter and capable of storing the spectrum at address locations in memory, and a pulser capable of injecting pulses into the signal produced by the detector. The module comprises: means for generating a logic pulse for controlling the pulser, the controlling means adapted for coupling to the pulser; means for generating separation of events logic to isolate the components of a combined gamma-ray---pulse spectrum, the separation of events logic means adapted for coupling to the converter and the storage memory with the capability of storing pulses at address locations in the storage memory separate from the gamma-ray events; means for receiving an imitating signal from the converter to generate a plurality of operations by the module; means for tracking variations in a gamma-ray---pulse spectrum brought on by external parameter changes; and means for interfacing with commercially developed gamma-ray spectrometry equipment

  18. X and gamma ray backgroud observations in Antarctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanthi, U.B.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric X amd gamma rays are products of complex electromagnetic interation between charged particles and atmospheric constituents. The latitudinal dependence of the cosmic rays secondaries, auroral and South Atlantic Anomaly phenomena produce flux variations, especially the later temporal flux variations. We propose to discuss these variations in relevance to balloon flight observations of X and gamma ray atmospheric background at polar latitudes. (author) [pt

  19. Effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation and ethyl methane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to study the effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the high concentration thidiazuron (TDZ) produced buds. In vitro buds were irradiated with different gamma-ray doses. Akihime cultivar ('Akihime') was irradiated with the doses of 0, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 Gy while 'DNKW001 accession' ...

  20. Extragalactic Gamma Ray Excess from Coma Supercluster Direction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... galactic diffuse gamma ray intensity or to consider the contribution of other extragalactic structures while surveying a specific portion of the sky. More precise analysis of EGRET data however, makes it possible to estimate the diffuse gamma ray in Coma supercluster (i.e., Coma\\A1367 supercluster) direction with a value of ...

  1. Observational techniques of gamma rays astronomy in low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.M. da.

    1982-02-01

    Due to the absorption of great part of the gamma-ray spectrum of cosmic origin, by the earth's atmosphere at heights above 20Km, gamma-ray astronomy achieved its full development only after the advent of the space age. Ballons and satellites are the space vehicles which have been used to transport gamma-ray telescopes to observational heights in the atmosphere, or out of it. The results of these experiments can determine the sources, the energy spectra and the intensities of the cosmic gamma-rays, and provide other important information of astrophysical interest. The detection of gamma-rays of cosmic origin is very difficult. The observational techniques used in gamma-ray astronomy are dependent on the energy range of the gamma-rays which one desires to detect. The most common telescopes of low energy gamma-ray astronomy (50KeV - 20MeV) use NaI(Tl) scintillators, or germanium diodes, as principal detectors, surrounded by an active shield (anticoincidence) of organic or inorganic scintillators. (Author) [pt

  2. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackermann, M.; et al., [Unknown; van der Horst, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected

  3. A GE + BAF2 COMPOSITE GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRASZNAHORKAY, A; BACELAR, J; BALANDA, A; BUDA, A

    1992-01-01

    The design of a new gamma-ray spectrometer for detection of high energy photons in the 10-20 MeV region with high resolution and efficiency is presented. Tests with a prototype of the Ge + BaF2 composite gamma-ray spectrometer are discussed. The measured energy resolution and efficiency of the

  4. Activation of wine bentonite with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranov, N.; Antonov, M.

    1997-01-01

    The action of gamma rays on wine bentonite as well as influence of its adsorption and technologic qualities on the composition and stability of wines against protein darkening and precipitation has been studied. The experiments were carried out with wine bentonite produced in the firm Bentonite and irradiated with doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 MR. White and red wines have been treated with irradiated bentonite under laboratory conditions at 1.0 g/dm 3 . All samples are treated at the same conditions. The flocculation rate of the sediment was determined visually. Samples have been taken 24 h later from the cleared wine layers. The following parameters have been determined: clarification, filtration rate, phenolic compounds, calcium, colour intensity, total extracted substances, etc. The volume of the sediment has been determined also. The control samples have been taken from the same unirradiated wines. The results showed better and faster clarification in on the third, the 20th and the 24th hours with using of gamma-irradiated at doses 0.8 and 1.0 MR. The sediment was the most compact and its volume - the smallest compared to the samples treated with bentonite irradiated with doses of 0.6 and 0.4 MR. This ensures a faster clarification and better filtration of treated wines. The bentonite activated with doses of 0.8 and 1.0 MR adsorbs the phenolic compounds and the complex protein-phenolic molecules better. In the same time it adsorbs less extracted substances compared to untreated bentonite and so preserves all organoleptic properties of wine. The irradiated bentonite adsorbs less the monomers of anthocyan compounds which ensures brighter natural colour of wine. The gamma-rays activation consolidates calcium in the crystal lattice of bentonite particles and in this way eliminates the formation of crystal precipitates

  5. Gamma ray induced somatic mutations in rose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Budwood of 32 rose cultivars (Rosa spp.) was exposed to 3-4 krad of gamma rays and eyes were grafted on Rosa indica var. odorata root stock. Radiosensitivity with respect to sprouting, survival and plant height, and mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and dose of gamma rays. Somatic mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimera in 21 cultivars. The size of the mutant sector varied from a narrow streak on a petal to a whole flower and from a portion of a branch to an entire branch. 14 mutants were detected in M 1 V 1 , four in M 1 V 2 and three in M 1 V 3 . Maximum number of mutations was detected following 3 krad treatment. Eyes from mutant branches were grafted again on root stock and non-chimeric mutants were aimed at by vegetative propagation. Mutants from 11 cultivars only could be isolated in pure form. Isolation of non-chimeric mutants sometimes is difficult due to weak growth of a mutant branch. In such a case, all normal looking branches are removed to force a better growth of the mutant branch. It is advisable to maintain irradiated plants at least for four years with drastic pruning in each year. Nine mutants viz. 'Sharada', 'Sukumari', 'Tangerine Contempo', 'Yellow Contempo', 'Pink Contempo', 'Striped Contempo', 'Twinkle', 'Curio' and 'Light Pink Prize' have already been released as new cultivars for commercialization [ref. MBNL No. 23 and 31] and others are being multiplied and assessed. The mutation spectrum appears to be wider for the cultivars 'Contempo' and 'Imperator'. Pigment composition of the original variety is relevant for the kind of flower colour mutations that can be induced

  6. Polarization measurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

  7. Gamma ray irradiation for sludge solubilization and biological nitrogen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Myunjoo; Park, Chulhwan

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of gamma ray irradiation on the solubilization of waste sewage sludge. The recovery of an organic carbon source from sewage sludge by gamma ray irradiation was also studied. The gamma ray irradiation showed effective sludge solubilization efficiencies. Both soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5) increased by gamma ray irradiation. The feasibility of the solubilized sludge carbon source for a biological nitrogen removal was also investigated. A modified continuous bioreactor (MLE process) for a denitrification was operated for 20 days by using synthetic wastewater. It can be concluded that the gamma ray irradiation was useful for the solubilization of sludge and the recovery of carbon source from the waste sewage sludge for biological nitrogen removal.

  8. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  9. Compton-dragged Gamma-Ray Bursts Associated with Supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati; Ghisellini; Celotti; Rees

    2000-01-20

    It is proposed that the gamma-ray photons that characterize the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts are produced through the Compton-drag process, which is caused by the interaction of a relativistic fireball with a very dense soft photon bath. If gamma-ray bursts are indeed associated with supernovae, then the exploding star can provide enough soft photons for radiative drag to be effective. This model accounts for the basic properties of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the overall energetics, the peak frequency of the spectrum, and the fast variability, with an efficiency that can exceed 50%. In this scenario, there is no need for particle acceleration in relativistic collisionless shocks. Furthermore, although the Poynting flux may be important in accelerating the outflow, no magnetic field is required in the gamma-ray production. The drag also naturally limits the relativistic expansion of the fireball to Gamma less, similar104.

  10. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  11. Gamma-Ray imaging for nuclear security and safety: Towards 3-D gamma-ray vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Kai; Barnowksi, Ross; Haefner, Andrew; Joshi, Tenzing H. Y.; Pavlovsky, Ryan; Quiter, Brian J.

    2018-01-01

    The development of portable gamma-ray imaging instruments in combination with the recent advances in sensor and related computer vision technologies enable unprecedented capabilities in the detection, localization, and mapping of radiological and nuclear materials in complex environments relevant for nuclear security and safety. Though multi-modal imaging has been established in medicine and biomedical imaging for some time, the potential of multi-modal data fusion for radiological localization and mapping problems in complex indoor and outdoor environments remains to be explored in detail. In contrast to the well-defined settings in medical or biological imaging associated with small field-of-view and well-constrained extension of the radiation field, in many radiological search and mapping scenarios, the radiation fields are not constrained and objects and sources are not necessarily known prior to the measurement. The ability to fuse radiological with contextual or scene data in three dimensions, in analog to radiological and functional imaging with anatomical fusion in medicine, provides new capabilities enhancing image clarity, context, quantitative estimates, and visualization of the data products. We have developed new means to register and fuse gamma-ray imaging with contextual data from portable or moving platforms. These developments enhance detection and mapping capabilities as well as provide unprecedented visualization of complex radiation fields, moving us one step closer to the realization of gamma-ray vision in three dimensions.

  12. Development of the precise measurement method for gamma-ray energy of neutron induced radioactive nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishikawa, Toshiaki; Uemura, Jitsuya

    1998-01-01

    Goal of the research is to develop a new energy calibration method to perform precise measurement of photon energy by gamma-ray spectrometry. Here, we regard reference standard energies to be those of photon of radioactive isotopes measured basing on a laser wavelength of 86 Kr (606 nm) together with energy-wavelength conversion factor E λ = 1.239 842 44 x 10 -6 eV m ±0.03 ppm (CODATA 1986). As such the reference standard we use 192 Ir isotope. Deviation of photon energy values between data obtained by photon spectrometry, i.e., the decay gamma-ray analysis and the prompt gamma-ray analysis with Ge or Ge(Li) detectors, and those obtained by crystal diffraction spectrometry, has led that the 'conventional' method of energy calibration for the photon spectrometry is not adequate to the precise energy assignment. A 'new' method has solved this problem by introducing the concept of an instrument function, which is the transfer function between an input signal-shape function and an output (measured) signal-shape function, as summarized in reference 1. Present status of photon energy values has been examined for the nuclear-decay gamma-rays, the nuclear excitation gamma-rays and the mesonic-atom X-rays. At the previous stage of research we evaluated that a commonly-used internal standard method, mainly used for activation analysis study, was inadequate for the precise measurement of photon energy, so far as we use base subtraction method. In the present study, we examined the cause of the inadequacy of a base-subtraction method for obtaining the photopeak line shape for the precise energy measurement. (author)

  13. Characteristics of the telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Rolfe, J.; Johansson, A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray telescope selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  14. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  15. History of gamma-ray telescopes and astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkau, Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy is devoted to study nuclear and elementary particle astrophysics and astronomical objects under extreme conditions of gravitational and electromagnetic forces, and temperature. Because signals from gamma rays below 1 TeV cannot be recorded on ground, observations from space are required. The photoelectric effect is dominant discovery of gamma rays from the galactic plane with its successor OSO-3 in 1968. The first solar flare gamma ray lines were seen with OSO-7 in 1972. In the 1980’s, the Solar Maximum Mission observed a multitude of solar gamma ray phenomena for 9 years. Quite unexpectedly, gamma ray bursts were detected by the Vela-satellites in 1967. It was 30 years later, that the extragalactic nature of the gamma ray burst phenomenon was finally established by the Beppo-Sax satellite. Better telescopes were becoming available, by using spark chambers to record pair production at photon energies >30 MeV, and later by Compton telescopes for the 1-10 MeV range. In 1972, SAS-2 began to observe the Milky Way in high energy gamma rays, but, unfortunately, for a very brief observation time only due to a failure of tape recorders. COS-B from 1975 until 1982 with its wire spark chamber, and energy measurement by a total absorption counter, produced the first sky map, recording galactic continuum emission, mainly from interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar matter, and point sources (pulsars and unidentified objects). An integrated attempt at observing the gamma ray sky was launched with the Compton Observatory in 1991 which stayed in orbit for 9 years. This large shuttle-launched satellite carried a wire spark chamber “Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope” EGRET for energies >30 MeV which included a large Cesium Iodide crystal spectrometer, a “Compton Telescope” COMPTEL for the energy range 1-30 MeV, the gamma ray “Burst and Transient Source Experiment” BATSE, and the “Oriented Scintillation-Spectrometer Experiment” OSSE

  16. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, H W; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Kim, Y H; McEvoy, A; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; Batha, S; Schmitt, M; Wilson, D C; Langenbrunner, J R; Malone, R; Kaufman, M I; Cox, B C; Frogget, B; Tunnell, T W; Miller, E K; Ali, Z A; Stoeffl, W; Horsfield, C J

    2010-01-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ∼6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 10 13 -10 17 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 10 16 -10 20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution

  17. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Batha, S.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Malone, R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Cox, B. C.; Frogget, B.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.; Tunnell, T. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

    2010-08-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ~6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 1013-1017 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 1016-1020 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution for the

  18. Guidelines for radioelement mapping using gamma ray spectrometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the report is to provide an up-to-date review on the use of gamma ray spectrometry for radioelement mapping and, where appropriate, provide guidelines on the correct application of the method. It is a useful training guide for those new to the method. It gives a broad coverage of all aspects of the gamma ray method and provides a comprehensive list of references. The report gives an overview of the theoretical background to radioactivity and the gamma ray spectrometric method followed by a review of the application of the method to mapping the radiation environment. A brief outline is presented of the principles of radioactivity, the interaction of gamma rays with matter, instrumentation applied to the measurement of gamma rays, and the quantities and units in contemporary use in gamma ray spectrometry. This is followed by a review of the fundamentals of gamma ray spectrometry, and its application to ground and airborne mapping. Covered are also all aspects of the calibration and data processing procedures required for estimating the ground concentrations of the radioelements. The procedures required for the recovery of older survey data are also presented as well as an overview of data presentation and integration for mapping applications

  19. Evaluation of effective dose equivalent from environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose equivalents for environmental gamma rays were calculated using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods accounting rigorously the environmental gamma ray fields. It was suggested that body weight is the dominant factor to determine organ doses. The weight function expressing organ doses was introduced. Using this function, the variation in organ doses due to several physical factors were investigated. A detector having gamma-ray response similar to that of human bodies has been developed using a NaI(Tl) scintillator. (author)

  20. Unresolved Blazar Component of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Venters, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present new theoretical estimates of the relative contribution of unresolved blazars and star forming galaxies to the extragalactic gamma-ray background and discuss constraints on the contributions from other possible components. We find that the Fermi data do not rule out a scenario in which the extragalactic gamma-ray background is dominated by emission from unresolved blazars. The spectrum of unresolved FSRQs, when accounting for the energy dependent effects of source confusion, could be consistent with the combined spectrum of the low energy EGRET extragalactic gamma-ray background measurements and the Fermi-LAT measurements above 200 MeV.

  1. The Multiwavelength View of Gamma-Ray Loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Tonia

    2011-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) encodes much information about the high-energy processes in the universe. Of the extragalactic sources sources resolved by the Fermi-LAT, blazars comprise the class of gamma-ray emitters with the largest number of identified members. Unresolved blazars are expected to contribute significantly to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray emission. However, blazars are also broadband emitters (from radio to TeV energies), and as such the multiwavelength study of blazars can provide insight into the high-energy processes of the universe.

  2. The muon content of gamma-ray showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a calculation of the expected number of muons in gamma ray initiated and cosmic ray initiated air showers using a realistic model of hadronic collisions in an effort to understand the available experimental results and to assess the feasibility of using the muon content of showers as a veto to reject cosmic ray initiated showers in ultra-high energy gamma ray astronomy are reported. The possibility of observing very-high energy gamma-ray sources by detecting narrow angle anisotropies in the high energy muon background radiation are considered.

  3. DESIGN OF A GAMMA-RAY SOURCE BASED ON INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING AT THE FAST SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Jacobson, B. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-10

    A watt-level average-power gamma-ray source is currently under development at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility. The source is based on the Inverse Compton Scattering of a high-brightness 300-MeV beam against a high-power laser beam circulating in an optical cavity. The back scattered gamma rays are expected to have photon energies up to 1.5 MeV. This paper discusses the optimization of the source, its performances, and the main challenges ahead.

  4. Development of a Watt-level gamma-ray source based on high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-07-01

    A high-brilliance (~1022 photon s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 /0.1%) gamma-ray source experiment is currently being planned at Fermilab (Eγ≃1.1 MeV). The source implements a high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering by colliding electron bunches formed in a ~300-MeV superconducting linac with a high-intensity laser pulse. This paper describes the design rationale along with some of technical challenges associated to producing high-repetition-rate collision. The expected performances of the gamma-ray source are also presented.

  5. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Matteson, J.; Ford, L.; Schaefer, B.; Teegarden, B.; Cline, T.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1992-01-01

    BATSE's Spectral Detectors provide a series of high resolution spectra over the duration of a gamma-ray burst; fits to these spectra show the evolution of the continuum as the burst progresses. The burst continuum can usually be fit by the spectral form AE sup alpha exp(-E/kT) from around 25 keV to more than 3 MeV, with varying trends in the value and evolution of the spectral parameters. As a result of limited statistics for E greater than 1 - 2 MeV in the individual spectra, a high energy power law is not required. Only long duration strong bursts can be studied by fitting a series of spectra, and therefore our conclusions concern only this class of burst. The bursts we analyzed tend to be characterized by a hard-to-soft trend both for individual intensity spikes and for the burst as a whole: the hardness leads the count rate in spectra which resolve the temporal variations, while the hardness of successive spikes decreases. We also summarize the performance of the Spectral Detectors and the development of analysis tools to date.

  6. Sensitivity of HAWC to gamma ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Ignacio; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    HAWC is a ground based very high-energy gamma ray detector under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. Higher altitude, improved design and a larger physical size used to reject CR background, make HAWC 10-20 times more sensitive than its predecessor Milagro. HAWC's large field of view, ~2sr, and over 90% duty cycle make it ideal to search for GRBs. We review the sensitivity of HAWC to GRBs with two independent data acquisition systems. We show that some of the brightest GRBs observed by Fermi LAT (e.g. GRB 090510) could result in >5 σ observation by HAWC. The observations (or limits) of GRBs by HAWC will provide information on the high-energy spectra of GRBs. The high-energy spectra will teach us about extra galactic background light, the Lorentz boost factor of the jets tha power GRBs and/or particle acceleration models of GRBs. Finally we present limits on > 10 GeV emission from GRB 111016B, recently studied with HAWC's engineering array VAMOS.

  7. Gamma ray induced mutants in Coleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, K.; Jos, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The germplasm collection of Chinese potato (Coleus parviflorus Benth) contains almost no variation for yield contributing traits. The crop does not produce seeds. Treatment of underground tubers with 1 kR, 2 kR, 3 kR and 4 kR gamma rays resulted in 50 morphologically different mutants which are maintained as mutant clones. In the M 1 V 1 generation, suspected mutant sprouts, were carefully removed and grown separately. The most interesting mutant types are the following: (i) erect mutant with spoon shaped light green leaves, 30 cm long inflorescences against 20 cm in the control, cylindrical tubers measuring ca. 7.0 cm long and 3 cm girth against 4 cm and 2.5 cm in the control (ii) early mutants 1 and 2, one having less leaf serration, the other having light green small leaves and dwarf type (iii) fleshy leaf mutant, dark green, thick and smooth leaves. Control plants spread almost in 1 m 2 area and bear tubers from the nodes of branches. In the early mutants tuber formation is mainly restricted to the base of the plant, which makes harvest easier. The crop usually matures within 150 - 160 days, the early mutants are ready for harvest 100 days after planting. As the mutants are less spreading, the yield could be increased by closer spacing

  8. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy: the effects of hydrogen absorption cross-section of the gamma-ray spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapides, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopy of planet surfaces is one of several possible methods that are useful in determining the elemental composition of planet surfaces from orbiting spacecraft. This has been demonstrated on the Apollos 15 and 16 missions as well as the Soviet Mars-5 mission. Planetary gamma-ray emission is primarily the result of natural radioactive decay and cosmic-ray and solar-flare-induced nuclear reactions. Secondary neutron reactions play a large role in the more intense gamma-ray emission. The technique provides information on the elemental composition of the top few tens of centimeters of the planet surface. Varying concentrations of hydrogen and compositional variations that alter the macroscopic thermal-neutron absorption cross section have a significant effect on the neutron flux in the planet surface and therefore also on the gamma-ray emission from the surface. These effects have been systematically studied for a wide range of possible planetary compositions that include Mercury, the moon, Mars, the comets, and the asteroids. The problem of the Martian atmosphere was also investigated. The results of these calculations, in which both surface neutron fluxes and gamma-ray emission fluxes were determined, were used to develop general procedures for obtaining planet compositions from the gamma-ray spectrum. Several changes have been suggested for reanalyzing the Apollos 15 and 16 gamma-ray results. In addition, procedures have been suggested that can be applied to neutron-gamma techniques in mineral and oil exploration

  9. Pulsed Gamma-Ray Emission From Short-Period Pulsars: Predicted Gamma-Ray Pulsar PSR1951+32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K. S.; Ding, K. Y. Winnis

    1995-03-01

    We studied the gamma-ray emission mechanisms from pulsars with period, P, between 4.6 times 10(-2) B12(2/5) s and 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) theta alpha (-5/4) s in terms of outermagnetospheric gap model. We found that the spectra of all known gamma -ray pulsars can be fitted by two free parameters, namely, alpha r_L, the mean distance to the outergap, and sin theta , the mean pitch angle of the secondary e(+/-) pairs. Gamma-rays from those pulsars with P 432, 724) which is confirmed by the recent GRO result.

  10. On the energetics and number of gamma-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Charles D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    We examine a nearly aligned pulsar model with polar cap acceleration in order to explain the energetics and number of the known gamma-ray pulsars. In this model, the efficiency of converting spin-down luminosity to gamma-ray luminosity increases with decreasing spin-down luminosity, a trend recently emphasized by Ulmer. The predicted gamma-ray flux is proportional to dot P(exp 3/4)/P(exp 5/4) d(exp 2), where P is the period, dot P is the period derivative, and d is the distance to the pulsar. For initial spin periods between approximately equals 10 and 30 ms and neutron star polar magnetic fields between approximately equals 1 and 4 TG, this model accounts for the number and age distribution of the five pulsars which have been observed to emit gamma rays at energies greater than 100 MeV. Implications for pulsar studies are considered.

  11. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  12. Public List of LAT-Detected Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The following is a compilation of all publicly-announced gamma-ray pulsars detected using the Fermi LAT. Each of the detections has been vetted by the LAT team,...

  13. Handheld dual thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Burger, Arnold; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Tupitsyn, Yevgeniy

    2017-05-02

    A combined thermal neutron detector and gamma-ray spectrometer system, including: a first detection medium including a lithium chalcopyrite crystal operable for detecting neutrons; a gamma ray shielding material disposed adjacent to the first detection medium; a second detection medium including one of a doped metal halide, an elpasolite, and a high Z semiconductor scintillator crystal operable for detecting gamma rays; a neutron shielding material disposed adjacent to the second detection medium; and a photodetector coupled to the second detection medium also operable for detecting the gamma rays; wherein the first detection medium and the second detection medium do not overlap in an orthogonal plane to a radiation flux. Optionally, the first detection medium includes a .sup.6LiInSe.sub.2 crystal. Optionally, the second detection medium includes a SrI.sub.2(Eu) scintillation crystal.

  14. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  15. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J.M.; Grenier, I.A.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Tibaldo, L.

    2011-01-01

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10 15 electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 * 10 -2 parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory. (authors)

  16. Gamma-Ray Instrument for Polarimetry, Spectroscopy and Imaging (GIPSI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kroeger, R. A; Johnson, W. N; Kinzer, R. L; Kurfess, J. D; Inderhees, S. E; Phlips, B. F; Graham, B. L

    1996-01-01

    .... Gamma-ray polarimetry in the energy band around 60-300 keV is an interesting area of high energy astrophysics where observations have not been possible with the technologies employed in current and past space missions...

  17. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  18. Saccharification of gamma-ray and alkali pretreated lignocellulosics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, A.; Choudhury, N.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymic saccharification of gamma ray and alkali pretreated sawdust, rice straw, and sugar cane bagasse showed higher release of reducing sugar from pretreated substrates. By gamma ray treatment alone (500 kGy) reducing sugar release of 2.8, 9.2, and 10 g/l was obtained from 7.5% (w/v) sawdust, rice straw, and bagasse and the same substrates showed reducing sugar release of 4.2, 30, and 20 g/l respectively when treated with alkali (0.1 g/g). Combination of gamma ray with alkali treatment further increased the reducing sugar release to 10.2, 33, and 36 g/l from sawdust, rice straw, and bagasse respectively. The effects of gamma ray and alkali treatment on saccharification varied with the nature of the substrate

  19. Some deficiencies and solutions in gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmeier, W.

    1998-01-01

    A number of problems in high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry as well as some deficiencies of existing computer programs for the quantitative evaluation of spectra are discussed and some practical solutions are proposed. (author)

  20. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Van Belle, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Hard Gamma Ray Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James M.; Marscher, Alan M.

    1996-01-01

    We have completed the study to search for hard gamma ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253. Since supernovae are thought to provide the hard gamma ray emission from the Milky Way, starburst galaxies, with their extraordinarily high supernova rates, are prime targets to search for hard gamma ray emission. We conducted a careful search for hard gamma ray emission from NGC 253 using the archival data from the EGRET experiment aboard the CGRO. Because this starburst galaxy happens to lie near the South Galactic Pole, the Galactic gamma ray background is minimal. We found no significant hard gamma ray signal toward NGC 253, although a marginal signal of about 1.5 sigma was found. Because of the low Galactic background, we obtained a very sensitive upper limit to the emission of greater than 100 MeV gamma-rays of 8 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm s. Since we expected to detect hard gamma ray emission, we investigated the theory of gamma ray production in a dense molecular medium. We used a leaky-box model to simulate diffusive transport in a starburst region. Since starburst galaxies have high infrared radiation fields, we included the effects of self-Compton scattering, which are usually ignored. By modelling the expected gamma-ray and synchrotron spectra from NGC 253, we find that roughly 5 - 15% of the energy from supernovae is transferred to cosmic rays in the starburst. This result is consistent with supernova acceleration models, and is somewhat larger than the value derived for the Galaxy (3 - 10%). Our calculations match the EGRET and radio data very well with a supernova rate of 0.08/ yr, a magnetic field B approx. greater than 5 x 10(exp -5) G, a density n approx. less than 100/sq cm, a photon density U(sub ph) approx. 200 eV/sq cm, and an escape time scale tau(sub 0) approx. less than 10 Myr. The models also suggest that NGC 253 should be detectable with only a factor of 2 - 3 improvement in sensitivity. Our results are consistent with the standard picture

  2. Upgrade of the JET gamma-ray cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Anghel, M.; Constantin, M.; David, E.; Craciunescu, T.; Falie, D.; Pantea, A.; Tiseanu, I.; Kiptily, V.; Prior, P.; Edlington, T.; Griph, S.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Loughlin, M.; Popovichev, S.; Riccardo, V; Syme, B.; Thompson, V.; Lengar, I.; Murari, A.; Bonheure, G.; Le Guern, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The JET gamma-ray camera diagnostics have already provided valuable information on the gamma-ray imaging of fast ion in JET plasmas. The applicability of gamma-ray imaging to high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium JET discharges is strongly dependent on the fulfilment of rather strict requirements for the characterisation of the neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. These requirements have to be satisfied within very stringent boundary conditions for the design, such as the requirement of minimum impact on the co-existing neutron camera diagnostics. The JET Gamma-Ray Cameras (GRC) upgrade project deals with these issues with particular emphasis on the design of appropriate neutron/gamma-ray filters ('neutron attenuators'). Several design versions have been developed and evaluated for the JET GRC neutron attenuators at the conceptual design level. The main design parameter was the neutron attenuation factor. The two design solutions, that have been finally chosen and developed at the level of scheme design, consist of: a) one quasi-crescent shaped neutron attenuator (for the horizontal camera) and b) two quasi-trapezoid shaped neutron attenuators (for the vertical one). The second design solution has different attenuation lengths: a short version, to be used together with the horizontal attenuator for deuterium discharges, and a long version to be used for high performance deuterium and DT discharges. Various neutron-attenuating materials have been considered (lithium hydride with natural isotopic composition and 6 Li enriched, light and heavy water, polyethylene). Pure light water was finally chosen as the attenuating material for the JET gamma-ray cameras. The neutron attenuators will be steered in and out of the detector line-of-sight by means of an electro-pneumatic steering and control system. The MCNP code was used for neutron and gamma ray transport in order to evaluate the effect of the neutron attenuators on the neutron field of the

  3. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  4. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results o...... the SIGMA telescope field of view are reviewed....

  5. Catalogue of gamma rays from radionuclides ordered by nuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, L.P.; Andersson, P.; Sheppard, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    A catalogue of about 28500 gamma-ray energies from 2338 radionuclides is presented. The nuclides are listed in order of increasing (A,Z) of the daughter nuclide. In addition the gamma-ray intensity per 100 decays of the parent (if known) and the decay half-life are given. All data are from a computer processing of a recent ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) file. (authors)

  6. Significant gamma-ray lines from dark matter annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerr, Michael [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Fileviez Perez, Pavel; Smirnov, Juri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray lines from dark matter annihilation are commonly seen as a ''smoking gun'' for the particle nature of dark matter. However, in many dark matter models the continuum background from tree-level annihilations makes such a line invisible. I present two simple extensions of the Standard Model where the continuum contributions are suppressed and the gamma-ray lines are easily visible over the continuum background.

  7. Population Studies of Radio and Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K; Gonthier, Peter; Coltisor, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are one of the most promising candidates for at least some of the 40-50 EGRET unidentified gamma-ray sources that lie near the Galactic plane. Since the end of the EGRO mission, the more sensitive Parkes Multibeam radio survey has detected mere than two dozen new radio pulsars in or near unidentified EGRET sources, many of which are young and energetic. These results raise an important question about the nature of radio quiescence in gamma-ray pulsars: is the non-detection of radio emission a matter of beaming or of sensitivity? The answer is very dependent on the geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We present results of a population synthesis of pulsars in the Galaxy, including for the first time the full geometry of the radio and gamma-ray beams. We use a recent empirically derived model of the radio emission and luminosity, and a gamma-ray emission geometry and luminosity derived theoretically from pair cascades in the polar slot gap. The simulation includes characteristics of eight radio surveys of the Princeton catalog plus the Parkes MB survey. Our results indicate that EGRET was capable of detecting several dozen pulsars as point sources, with the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars increasing significantly to about ten to one when the Parkes Survey is included. Polar cap models thus predict that many of the unidentified EGRET sources could be radio-loud gamma- ray pulsars, previously undetected as radio pulsars due to distance, large dispersion and lack of sensitivity. If true, this would make gamma-ray telescopes a potentially more sensitive tool for detecting distant young neutron stars in the Galactic plane.

  8. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  9. Technical Aspect on Procedure of Gamma-Ray Pipeline Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasif Mohd Zain; Ainul Mardhiah Terry; Norman Shah Dahing

    2015-01-01

    The main problems happen in industrial pipelines are deposit build-up, blockage, corrosion and erosion. These effects will give a constraint in transporting refined products to process or production points and cause a major problem in production. One of the techniques to inspect the problem is using gamma-ray pipe scans. The principle of the technique is gamma-ray absorption technique. In this paper describes on the technical aspect to perform the pipe inspection in laboratory work. (author)

  10. Statistical evaluation of gamma-ray line observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Chupp, E. L.; Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.; Ryan, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The statistical reliability of reported positive observations of solar and cosmic gamma-ray lines has been evaluated. The relative probability that each measurement is due to a real source rather than to an accidental fluctuation in the background has been determined, and it is found that the results are statistically compelling in only a small fraction of the reported observations. At present, extreme caution must be exercised in drawing astrophysical conclusions from reports of the detection of cosmic gamma-ray lines.

  11. Physics and astrophysics with gamma-ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    In the past few years gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age. A modern suite of telescopes is now scanning the sky over both hemispheres and over six orders of magnitude in energy. At {approx}TeV energies, only a handful of sources were known a decade ago, but the current generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) has increased this number to nearly one hundred. With a large field of view and duty cycle, the Tibet and Milagro air shower detectors have demonstrated the promise of the direct particle detection technique for TeV gamma rays. At {approx}GeV energies, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has increased the number of known sources by nearly an order of magnitude in its first year of operation. New classes of sources that were previously theorized to be gamma-ray emitters have now been confirmed observationally. Moreover, there have been surprise discoveries of GeV gamma-ray emission from source classes for which no theory predicted it was possible. In addition to elucidating the processes of high-energy astrophysics, gamma-ray telescopes are making essential contributions to fundamental physics topics including quantum gravity, gravitational waves, and dark matter. I summarize the current census of astrophysical gamma-ray sources, highlight some recent discoveries relevant to fundamental physics, and describe the synergetic connections between gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy. This is a brief overview intended in particular for particle physicists and neutrino astronomers, based on a presentation at the Neutrino 2010 conference in Athens, Greece. I focus in particular on results from Fermi (which was launched soon after Neutrino 2008), and conclude with a description of the next generation of instruments, namely HAWC and the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  12. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  13. Gamma-ray effect on sweet potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, O.; Ciofu, R.; Stroia, L.; Ghering, A.; Ferdes, M.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents the results on modification occurred in biochemical properties of sweet potato (Ipomea batatus L.) after gamma irradiation. Two varieties, named Victoria Ianb (a white variety) and Portocaliu (a red variety), were selected and acclimatized for the agrometeorological conditions of Romania. The samples consist of roots from both usual and experimental crops. They were irradiated in batch, one week after harvesting, with a ICPR Co-60 gamma-ray source by approx. 370 TBq, dose range 100-500 Gy, dose rate 100±5 Gy/hour, dose uniformity ±5%, temperature 10 o C, 80±5% relative humidity (rh). The irradiation doses received were checked using the Fricke ferrous sulphate dosimeter procedure. The roots were kept two months at relative darkness, 6-11 o C, 60-75% rh and analyzed from time to time (initial, 5, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days). The following parameters are analyzed by conventional methods: total and reducing sugars (in De equivalent, %, on dry weight basis), starch content and the activities of sugar metabolizing enzymes. The red variety had a better behaviour towards irradiation that the white one. The sugar contents (both total and reducing), as well as starch, varied more in the white variety. The sugar metabolizing enzyme activities were influenced by both irradiation and storage conditions. Their activities were maximal at 200 and 300 Gy, and decreased significantly at higher doses. The activities also decreased in time, their variations being higher at lower doses (100 and 200 Gy). The results showed no significant influence of gamma irradiation on storage life. The modifications induced in sugar contents and enzyme activities had maximal effects at 200-300 Gy. (author)

  14. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M. S.; Roberts, O.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Stanbro, M.; Cramer, E.; Mailyan, B. G.; McBreen, S.; Connaughton, V.; Grove, J. E.; Chekhtman, A.; Holzworth, R.

    2017-12-01

    The revised Second Fermi GBM TGF catalog includes data on 4144 TGFs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor through 2016 July 31. The catalog includes 686 bright TGFs there were detected in orbit and 4135 TGFs that were discovered by ground analysis of GBM data (the two samples overlap). Thirty of the events may have been detected as electrons and positrons rather than gamma-rays: Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs). We also provide results from correlating the GBM TGFs with VLF radio detections of the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). TGFs with WWLLN associations have their localization uncertainties improved from 800 to 10 km, making it possible to identify specific thunderstorms responsible for the TGFs and opening up new types of scientific investigations. There are 1544 TGFs with WWLLN associations; maps are provided for these and the other TGFs of the catalog. The data tables of the catalog are available for use by the scientific community at the Fermi Science Support Center, at https://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/gbm/tgf/.

  15. CENTRAL ENGINE MEMORY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs

  16. CENTRAL ENGINE MEMORY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucá (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang.grb@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  17. Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, I.V.

    2008-03-25

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

  18. Self-powered neutron and gamma-ray flux detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Shields, R.B.; Lynch, G.F.; Cuttler, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of self-powered neutron detector was developed which is sensitive to both the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes. The emitter comprises two parts. The central emitter core is made of materials that generate high-energy electrons on exposure to neutrons. The outer layer acts as a gamma-ray/electron converter, and since it has a higher atomic number and higher back-scattering coefficient than the collector, increases the net outflow or emmission of electrons. The collector, which is around the emitter outer layer, is insulated from the outer layer electrically with dielectric insulation formed from compressed metal-oxide powder. The fraction of electrons given off by the emitter that is reflected back by the collector is less than the fraction of electrons emitted by the collector that is reflected back by the emitter. The thickness of the outer layer needed to achieve this result is very small. A detector of this design responds to external reactor gamma-rays as well as to neutron capture gamma-rays from the collector. The emitter core is either nickel, iron or titanium, or alloys based on these metals. The outer layer is made of platinum, tantalum, osmium, molybdenum or cerium. The detector is particularly useful for monitoring neutron and gamma ray flux intensities in nuclear reactor cores in which the neutron and gamma ray flux intensities are closely proportional, are unltimately related to the fission rate, and are used as measurements of nuclear reactor power. (DN)

  19. Spatial distribution of reflected gamma rays by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehouani, A.; Merzouki, A.; Boutadghart, F.; Ghassoun, J.

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, the reflection of gamma rays of the walls and metals constitutes an unknown origin of radiation. These reflected gamma rays must be estimated and determined. This study concerns reflected gamma rays on metal slabs. We evaluated the spatial distribution of the reflected gamma rays spectra by using the Monte Carlo method. An appropriate estimator for the double differential albedo is used to determine the energy spectra and the angular distribution of reflected gamma rays by slabs of iron and aluminium. We took into the account the principal interactions of gamma rays with matter: photoelectric, coherent scattering (Rayleigh), incoherent scattering (Compton) and pair creation. The Klein-Nishina differential cross section was used to select direction and energy of scattered photons after each Compton scattering. The obtained spectra show peaks at 0.511 * MeV for higher source energy. The Results are in good agreement with those obtained by the TRIPOLI code [J.C. Nimal et al., TRIPOLI02: Programme de Monte Carlo Polycinsetique a Trois dimensions, CEA Rapport, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique.

  20. Gamma-ray emission from internal shocks in novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Dubus, G.; Jean, P.; Tatischeff, V.; Dosne, C.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Gamma-ray emission at energies ≥100 MeV has been detected from nine novae using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), and can be explained by particle acceleration at shocks in these systems. Eight out of these nine objects are classical novae in which interaction of the ejecta with a tenuous circumbinary material is not expected to generate detectable gamma-ray emission. Aim. We examine whether particle acceleration at internal shocks can account for the gamma-ray emission from these novae. The shocks result from the interaction of a fast wind radiatively-driven by nuclear burning on the white dwarf with material ejected in the initial runaway stage of the nova outburst. Methods: We present a one-dimensional model for the dynamics of a forward and reverse shock system in a nova ejecta, and for the associated time-dependent particle acceleration and high-energy gamma-ray emission. Non-thermal proton and electron spectra are calculated by solving a time-dependent transport equation for particle injection, acceleration, losses, and escape from the shock region. The predicted emission is compared to LAT observations of V407 Cyg, V1324 Sco, V959 Mon, V339 Del, V1369 Cen, and V5668 Sgr. Results: The ≥100 MeV gamma-ray emission arises predominantly from particles accelerated up to 100 GeV at the reverse shock and undergoing hadronic interactions in the dense cooling layer downstream of the shock. The emission rises within days after the onset of the wind, quickly reaches a maximum, and its subsequent decrease reflects mostly the time evolution of the wind properties. Comparison to gamma-ray data points to a typical scenario where an ejecta of mass 10-5-10-4 M⊙ expands in a homologous way with a maximum velocity of 1000-2000 km s-1, followed within a day by a wind with a velocity problem are degenerate and/or poorly constrained except for the wind velocity, the relatively low values of which result in the majority of best-fit models having gamma-ray spectra

  1. Search of gamma-rays Bremsstrahlung mirror reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, F.K.; Miminov, A.T.; Skvortsov, V.V.; Safarov, A.N.; Ikramov, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Total external reflection of soft X-rays is widely used in many X-ray optic systems. At the same time in the wavelength range of gamma rays the corresponding total external reflection on macroscopic smooth surface hasn't been surely verified yet. Samarkand microtron MT-22S with 330 meter flying distance was used for a search experiment of detecting gamma-ray total external reflection. Measured slip angles (i.e. angles between incident ray and reflector surface) are negligible and don't exceed tens of micro-radian. And it is a complicated problem to get required characteristics of collimating, reflecting and detecting gamma rays. The experimental setup was described earlier. Here we report experimental results of very small-angle Bremsstrahlung scattering only in comparison with results of computer simulation by Monte-Carlo method. It is continuous energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung gamma rays (described by Shift formula) that is the first characteristic property of the experiment. And it is air in the way of gamma rays that is the second one. Continuous energy spectrum provides a use of some range of reflector inclinations (but bounded above) that satisfy the conditions of the total reflection for a corresponding part of gamma ray beam. As for air it absorbs gamma rays on their long way to detectors lowering the ratio of searching effect to background. Horizontal belt type Bremsstrahlung beam was collimated for the experiment. So the beam's horizontal acceptance was relatively wide (∼ 34 mrad). A collimator with gap heights of 100, 50 and 20 μ limited the beam in vertical that results in beam vertical divergences of 125, 62 and 25 μrad, correspondingly. The gap height of 100 μ used for positioning procedure, and the ones of 50 and 20 μ used for measurements. No separate peak of reflected gamma rays was observed at the experiment. However when vertical profiles measured at the reflector inclinations of 0 and 40 μrad are compared one can see gamma

  2. Prospects for future very high-energy gamma-ray sky survey: Impact of secondary gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Kalashev, Oleg E.; Kusenko, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Very high-energy gamma-ray measurements of distant blazars can be well explained by secondary gamma rays emitted by cascades induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The secondary gamma rays will enable one to detect a large number of blazars with future ground based gamma-ray telescopes such as Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). We show that the secondary emission process will allow CTA to detect 100, 130, 150, 87, and 8 blazars above 30 GeV, 100 GeV, 300 GeV, 1 TeV, and 10 TeV, respectively, up to z~8 assuming the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) strength B=10-17 G and an unbiased all sky survey with 0.5 h exposure at each field of view, where total observing time is ~540 h. These numbers will be 79, 96, 110, 63, and 6 up to z~5 in the case of B=10-15 G. This large statistics of sources will be a clear evidence of the secondary gamma-ray scenarios and a new key to studying the IGMF statistically. We also find that a wider and shallower survey is favored to detect more and higher redshift sources even if we take into account secondary gamma rays.

  3. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Di Mitri, S., E-mail: simone.dimitri@elettra.eu [Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Pellegrini, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Penn, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. The same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10–20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10–15 eV range, in a ~4×22 m{sup 2} footprint system.

  4. Gamma rays application in veterinary immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulkhanov, R.U.; Butaev, M.K.; Mirzaev, B.Sh.; Ryasnyanskiy, I.V.; Yuldashev, R.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The process based on stimulated action of ionized radiation, change of quality of agricultural goods and row materials, biocides including bactericide action of ionized radiation are among the methods of radiation biotechnology, which can be applied in agriculture. We used the bactericide action of ionized radiation in technological process for creation of fundamentally new preparation possessed by by immunogenic properties and named as 'radio vaccine'. This term is well known and frequently used in scientific papers in the field of applied radiobiology. It is well known that physical (thermal) and chemical actions are used for preparation of vaccine for veterinary. It was noted that this process resulted in destruction of antigenic structure of bacteria cells, with are responsible for immunity creation. The possibility of virulence reduction at constant immunogenic properties of microorganism and keeping its antigenic structure can be achieved by using ionized radiation as one of the factor, which influences on bacteria. Taking into account the necessity of vaccine improvement and increase of quantity of associated vaccine one of the most important problems of veterinary science and particle is creation of vaccines of new generation which are characterized by the ability to form immunity against several diseases of agricultural animals. As a result of many-years investigations using gamma rays radiations in UzSRIV (laboratory of radiobiology) the radiation biotechnology of vaccine preparation was developed. These vaccines are necessary for practical application. Radiation biotechnology allows to prepare high-effective mono-, associated and polyvalent radio vaccines against widespread infection diseases of agricultural animals especially cubs (calves, lambs, young pigs). On the basis of developed radiation biotechnology there were prepared the following vaccines: 'Associated radio vaccine against colibacteriosis and salmonellosis of small horned cattle

  5. A terrestrial gamma ray flash observed from an aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Lowell, A. W.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Rassoul, H.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Shao, X.-M.; Ho, C.; Hamlin, T.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Heckman, S.

    2011-10-01

    On 21 August 2009, the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, detected a brief burst of gamma rays while flying aboard a Gulfstream V jet near two active thunderstorm cells. The duration and spectral characteristics of the event are consistent with the terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) seen by instruments in low Earth orbit. A long-duration, complex +IC flash was taking place in the nearer cell at the same time, at a distance of ˜10 km from the plane. The sferics that are probably associated with this flash extended over 54 ms and included several ULF pulses corresponding to charge moment changes of up to 30 C km, this value being in the lower half of the range of sferics associated with TGFs seen from space. Monte Carlo simulations of gamma ray propagation in the Earth's atmosphere show that a TGF of normal intensity would, at this distance, have produced a gamma ray signal in ADELE of approximately the size and spectrum that was actually observed. We conclude that this was the first detection of a TGF from an aircraft. We show that because of the distance, ADELE's directional and spectral capabilities could not strongly constrain the source altitude of the TGF but that such constraints would be possible for TGFs detected at closer range.

  6. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  7. Continued Development of a Soft Gamma-Ray Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter

    We propose to continue our development of a concept for a soft gamma-ray (E > 100 keV) concentrator using thin-film multilayer structures. Alternating layers of low- and high-density materials will channel soft gamma-ray photons via total external reflection. A suitable arrangement of bent structures will then concentrate the incident radiation to a point. Gamma-ray optics made in this way offer the potential for soft gamma-ray telescopes with focal lengths of less than 10 m, removing the need for formation flying spacecraft and opening the field up to balloon-borne instruments. Under previous APRA funding we have been investigating methods for efficiently producing such multilayer structures and modeling their performance. We now propose to pursue magnetron sputtering (MS) techniques to quickly produce structures with the required smoothness and thickness, to measure their channeling efficiency and compare with calculations, and to design a "lens" with optimized bandpass and throughput and predict its scientific performance. If successful, this work will confirm that this innovative optics concept is suitable for a balloon-born soft gamma-ray telescope with unprecedented sensitivity.

  8. Gamma-ray pulsars: Emission zones and viewing geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1995-01-01

    There are now a half-dozen young pulsars detected in high-energy photons by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), showing a variety of emission efficiencies and pulse profiles. We present here a calculation of the pattern of high-energy emission on the sky in a model which posits gamma-ray production by charge-depleted gaps in the outer magnetosphere. This model accounts for the radio to gamma-ray pulse offsets of the known pulsars, as well as the shape of the high-energy pulse profiles. We also show that about one-third of emitting young radio pulsars will not be detected due to beaming effects, while approximately 2.5 times the number of radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars will be viewed only high energies. Finally we compute the polarization angle variation and find that the previously misunderstood optical polarization sweep of the Crab pulsar arises naturally in this picture. These results strongly support an outer magnetosphere location for the gamma-ray emission.

  9. Gamma ray induced chromophore modification of softwood thermomechanical pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, S.; Daneault, C.; Viel, C.; Lepine, F.

    1992-01-01

    This study focuses on bleaching a softwood (black spruce, balsam fur) thermomechanical pulp with gamma rays. Gamma rays are known for their enormous penetrating power, along with their ionizing properties. They can generate highly energetic radicals capable of oxidizing lignin chromophores. The authors studied the influence of isopropyl alcohol, sodium borohydride, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, nitrogen dioxide and water along with gamma ray irradiation of the pulps. The authors measured the optimal dose and dose rate, along with the influence of the radical scavengers like oxygen on the bleaching effect of gamma irradiated pulps. They observe various degrees of bleaching of these pulps. Evidence relates this bleaching to the generation of perhydroxyl anions upon irradiation of water. Also, they were able to pinpoint the influence of the dose rate on the rate of formation and disappearance of these perhydroxyl anions and their influence on bleaching kinetics. Stability toward photoyellowing, and photoyellowing's kinetic of papers from these pulps was also studied

  10. Calibration and control modules for gamma-ray borehole loggers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    A calibration pad for quantitative evaluation of gamma-ray logs, developed and constructed by CNEA is described. The facility is composed of a set of mineralized modules with which it is intended to reproduce the natural variable conditions found in boreholes drilled for uranium mineral exploration, such as the ore concentration, rock's density and porosity, water content, etc. The facility is able to operate under different radiometric models, as follow: 1) gross-count gamma-ray models; 2) gamma-spectrometer models; 3) neutronic-fission models, and 4) models for determination of magnetic susceptibility, density, neutron-neutron, etc. The gathered information allows the adequate quantitative radiometric evaluation of the ore bodies crossed by exploration holes, and also allows the correlation of gamma-ray logs obtained by different logger-equipments. The paper includes the description of the project development and the standards established for the facility's operation. (M.E.L.) [es

  11. Miniature gamma-ray camera for tumor localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, J.C.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Cross, E.

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this LDRD project was to develop technology for a miniature gamma-ray camera for use in nuclear medicine. The camera will meet a need of the medical community for an improved means to image radio-pharmaceuticals in the body. In addition, this technology-with only slight modifications-should prove useful in applications requiring the monitoring and verification of special nuclear materials (SNMs). Utilization of the good energy resolution of mercuric iodide and cadmium zinc telluride detectors provides a means for rejecting scattered gamma-rays and improving the isotopic selectivity in gamma-ray images. The first year of this project involved fabrication and testing of a monolithic mercuric iodide and cadmium zinc telluride detector arrays and appropriate collimators/apertures. The second year of the program involved integration of the front-end detector module, pulse processing electronics, computer, software, and display

  12. Detection of gamma rays from a starburst galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L-M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Paz Arribas, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2009-11-20

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of approximately 10(15) electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays--tracers of such cosmic rays--from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0(stat) +/- 2.8(sys)) x 10(-13) cm(-2) s(-1), implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy.

  13. A hard X ray and soft gamma ray telescope spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.I.; Trombka, J.I.; Schmadebeck, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A telescope spectrometer in the hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray region from 30 keV to 200 keV can provide significant information in investigations related to solar physics and planetary science. The present study is concerned with the preliminary design of such an instrument, taking into account a use of the Low Intensity X-ray Imaging Scope (Lixiscope). In the design of the considered telescope spectrometer, attention would have to be given to three major components, including the X-ray and gamma-ray input optics, an imaging detector-spectrometer, and an output processor. The preliminary results provided by the present study indicate that, in principle, a complete hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescope imaging spectrometer system using the Lixiscope is feasible. However, much work remains to be done with respect to the optimization and improvement of the system for future flight applications

  14. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    with the local interstellar gas and radiation, as well as an almost uniformly distributed component that is generally believed to originate outside the Galaxy. Through a careful study and removal of the Galactic diffuse emission, the flux, spectrum, and uniformity of the extragalactic emission are deduced....... The analysis indicates that the extragalactic emission is well described by a power-law photon spectrum with an index of -(2.10 +/- 0.03) in the 30 MeV to 100 GeV energy range. No large-scale spatial anisotropy or changes in the energy spectrum are observed in the deduced extragalactic emission. The most......The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions...

  15. Miniature gamma-ray camera for tumor localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, J.C.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Cross, E. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this LDRD project was to develop technology for a miniature gamma-ray camera for use in nuclear medicine. The camera will meet a need of the medical community for an improved means to image radio-pharmaceuticals in the body. In addition, this technology-with only slight modifications-should prove useful in applications requiring the monitoring and verification of special nuclear materials (SNMs). Utilization of the good energy resolution of mercuric iodide and cadmium zinc telluride detectors provides a means for rejecting scattered gamma-rays and improving the isotopic selectivity in gamma-ray images. The first year of this project involved fabrication and testing of a monolithic mercuric iodide and cadmium zinc telluride detector arrays and appropriate collimators/apertures. The second year of the program involved integration of the front-end detector module, pulse processing electronics, computer, software, and display.

  16. Mechanisms and sites for astrophysical gamma ray line production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    The production of gamma ray lines and estimates of line fluxes resulting from nuclear deexcitations, positron annihilation, and electron capture at various astrophysical sites are discussed. Supernova and nova explosions synthesize long-lived radioactive isotopes and eject them into space where they produce observable gamma ray lines by decaying into excited levels of daughter nuclei or by emitting positrons. Energetic charged particles in the interstellar medium, in supernova remants, in solar or stellar flares, and possibly in the vicinity of compact objects, produce gamma-ray lines by inelastic collisions which either excite nuclear levels or produce positrons and neutrons. Energetic particles can result from acceleration in time-varying magnetic fields (solar flares) or from gravitational accretion onto neutron stars and black holes. Electromagnetic processes in the strong magnetic fields of pulsars can produce positron-electron pairs, with line emission resulting from positron annihilation. Deexcitations of quantized states in strong magnetic fields can also produce lines.

  17. Gamma ray polarimetry using a position sensitive germanium detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kroeger, R A; Kurfess, J D; Phlips, B F

    1999-01-01

    Imaging gamma-ray detectors make sensitive polarimeters in the Compton energy regime by measuring the scatter direction of gamma rays. The principle is to capitalize on the angular dependence of the Compton scattering cross section to polarized gamma rays and measure the distribution of scatter directions within the detector. This technique is effective in a double-sided germanium detector between roughly 50 keV and 1 MeV. This paper reviews device characteristics important to the optimization of a Compton polarimeter, and summarizes measurements we have made using a device with a 5x5 cm active area, 1 cm thickness, and strip-electrodes on a 2 mm pitch.

  18. Gamma-ray spectrometry applied to down-hole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumesnil, P.; Umiastowsky, K.

    1983-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry permits to improve the accuracy of natural gamma, gamma-gamma and neutron-gamma geophysical measurements. The probe developed at Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay allows down-hole gamma-ray spectrometry. Among others, this probe can be applied to the uranium content determination by selective natural gamma method, down-hole determination of the ash content in the coal by gamma-gamma selective method and elemental analysis by neutron-gamma method. For the calibration and an exact interpretation of the measurements it is important to know the gamma-ray and neutron characteristics of the different kinds of rocks considered as probabilistic variables

  19. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166 degrees C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen

  20. On response operator in semiconductor gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krnac, S.; Povinec, P.

    1995-01-01

    Some results of the scaling confirmation factor analysis (SCFA) application in semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometry presented in this contribution points out to a new ground for evaluation the gamma-ray spectra. This whole-spectrum processing approach considerably increases detection sensitivity, especially, if significant interferences being present in the measured spectrum. Precision of the SCFA method is determined by choice of a sufficient number of suitable calibration gamma-ray sources in the energy region of interest, by setting up an acceptable latent hypothesis and by chosen experimental quantification of spectra. The SCFA method is very advantageous to use, for instance, in ultra low-level gamma-spectrometry where counting rates in full energy peaks are extremely low as compared with background interferences. It enables to increase of the sensitivity by the 5-10 times in comparison with the traditional full energy peak net area method (J.K.). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  1. Effect of neutron and gamma-ray irradiation on the transmittance power of glasses and glues

    CERN Document Server

    Beigveder, J M; Barcala, JM; Calvo, E; Fernández, M G; Ferrando, A; Figueroa, C F; Fuentes, J; Genova, I; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Molinero, A; Oller, J C; Pérez, G; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz, J A

    2002-01-01

    LHC, working at the expected nominal luminosity, will induce an extremely high irradiation in the CMS experiment. The CMS alignment system uses optical elements to build the laser beams paths. Optical properties of basic components such as glasses and glues may result affected and their transmission power may degrade significantly. We have proceeded to a first test of various glasses and glues and identified some of them that can stand up to 150 kGy of gamma-rays plus 5 multiplied by 10**1**4 neutrons/cm**2.

  2. A new array for the study of ultra high energy gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, G.; Lambert, A.; Ogden, P. A.; Patel, M.; Ferrett, J. C.; Reid, R. J. O.; Watson, A. A.; West, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and operation of a 32 x 1 10 to the 15th power sq m array of scintillation detectors for the detection of 10 to the 15th power eV cosmic rays is described with an expected angular resolution of 1 deg, thus improving the present signal/background ratio for gamma ray sources. Data are recorded on a hybrid CAMAC, an in-house system which uses a laser and Pockel-Cell arrangement to routinely calibrate the timing stability of the detectors.

  3. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  4. Population Synthesis of Radio & Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Sara; Gonthier, P. L.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of known gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the Galactic disk has risen substantially thanks to confirmed detections by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). We have developed a new population synthesis of gamma-ray and radio MSPs in the galaxy which uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to explore the large and small worlds of the model parameter space and allows for comparisons of the simulated and detected MSP distributions. The simulation employs empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent upon the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. Parameters associated with the birth distributions are also free to vary. The computer code adjusts the magnitudes of the model luminosities to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of ten radio surveys, thus normalizing the simulation and predicting the MSP birth rates in the Galaxy. Computing many Markov chains leads to preferred sets of model parameters that are further explored through two statistical methods. Marginalized plots define confidence regions in the model parameter space using maximum likelihood methods. A secondary set of confidence regions is determined in parallel using Kuiper statistics calculated from comparisons of cumulative distributions. These two techniques provide feedback to affirm the results and to check for consistency. Radio flux and dispersion measure constraints have been imposed on the simulated gamma-ray distributions in order to reproduce realistic detection conditions. The simulated and detected distributions agree well for both sets of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics, as evidenced by our various comparisons.

  5. Simulating Gamma-Ray Emission in Star-forming Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfrommer, Christoph [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Pakmor, Rüdiger; Simpson, Christine M.; Springel, Volker, E-mail: cpfrommer@aip.de [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    Star-forming galaxies emit GeV and TeV gamma-rays that are thought to originate from hadronic interactions of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei with the interstellar medium. To understand the emission, we have used the moving-mesh code Arepo to perform magnetohydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations with self-consistent CR physics. Our galaxy models exhibit a first burst of star formation that injects CRs at supernovae. Once CRs have sufficiently accumulated in our Milky Way–like galaxy, their buoyancy force overcomes the magnetic tension of the toroidal disk field. As field lines open up, they enable anisotropically diffusing CRs to escape into the halo and to accelerate a bubble-like, CR-dominated outflow. However, these bubbles are invisible in our simulated gamma-ray maps of hadronic pion-decay and secondary inverse-Compton emission because of low gas density in the outflows. By adopting a phenomenological relation between star formation rate (SFR) and far-infrared emission and assuming that gamma-rays mainly originate from decaying pions, our simulated galaxies can reproduce the observed tight relation between far-infrared and gamma-ray emission, independent of whether we account for anisotropic CR diffusion. This demonstrates that uncertainties in modeling active CR transport processes only play a minor role in predicting gamma-ray emission from galaxies. We find that in starbursts, most of the CR energy is “calorimetrically” lost to hadronic interactions. In contrast, the gamma-ray emission deviates from this calorimetric property at low SFRs due to adiabatic losses, which cannot be identified in traditional one-zone models.

  6. Precision Gamma-Ray Branching Ratios for Long-Lived Radioactive Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonchev, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    Many properties of the high-energy-density environments in nuclear weapons tests, advanced laser-fusion experiments, the interior of stars, and other astrophysical bodies must be inferred from the resulting long-lived radioactive nuclei that are produced. These radioactive nuclei are most easily and sensitively identified by studying the characteristic gamma rays emitted during decay. Measuring a number of decays via detection of the characteristic gamma-rays emitted during the gamma-decay (the gamma-ray branching ratio) of the long-lived fission products is one of the most straightforward and reliable ways to determine the number of fissions that occurred in a nuclear weapon test. The fission products 147Nd, 144Ce, 156Eu, and certain other long-lived isotopes play a crucial role in science-based stockpile stewardship, however, the large uncertainties (about 8%) on the branching ratios measured for these isotopes are currently limiting the usefulness of the existing data [1,2]. We performed highly accurate gamma-ray branching-ratio measurements for a group of high-atomic-number rare earth isotopes to greatly improve the precision and reliability with which the fission yield and reaction products in high-energy-density environments can be determined. We have developed techniques that take advantage of new radioactive-beam facilities, such as DOE's CARIBU located at Argonne National Laboratory, to produce radioactive samples and perform decay spectroscopy measurements. The absolute gamma-ray branching ratios for 147Nd and 144Ce are reduced <2% precision. In addition, high-energy monoenergetic neutron beams from the FN Tandem accelerator in TUNL at Duke University was used to produce 167Tm using the 169Tm(n,3n) reaction. Fourtime improved branching ratio of 167Tm is used now to measure reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons from a burning DT capsule at NIF [10]. This represents the

  7. Feasibility study of gamma-ray medical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyassin, Abdalmajeid M.; Maqsoud, Hamza A.; Mashat, Ahmad M.; Al-Mohr, Al-Sayed; Abdulwajid, Subhan

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using gamma-ray radiography in medical imaging. We will show that gamma-ray medical radiography has the potential to provide alternative diagnostic medical information to X-ray radiography. Approximately one Ci Am-241 radioactive source which emits mono-energetic 59.5 keV gamma rays was used. Several factors that influence the feasibility of this study were tested. They were the radiation source uniformity, image uniformity, and image quality parameters such as contrast, noise, and spatial resolution. In addition, several gamma-ray and X-ray images were acquired using humanoid phantoms. These images were recorded on computed radiography image receptors and displayed on a standard monitor. Visual assessments of these images were then conducted. The Am-241 radioactive source provided relatively uniform radiation exposure and images. Image noise and image contrast were mainly dependent on the exposure time and source size, whereas spatial resolution was dependent on source size and magnification factor. The gamma-ray humanoid phantom images were of lower quality than the X-ray images mainly due to the low radioactivity used and not enough exposure time. Nevertheless, the gamma-ray images displayed most of the main structures contained in the humanoid phantoms. Higher exposure rates and thus lower exposure times were estimated for different pure Am-241 source sizes that are hypothesized to provide high quality images similar to X-ray images. For instance, a 10 mm source size of pure Am-241 with 7 s exposure time should produce images similar in contrast and noise to X-ray images. This research paves the way for the production and usage of a highly radioactive Am-241 source with the potential to lead to the feasibility of acceptable quality medical gamma-ray radiography. - Highlights: ► Characterized the performance of gamma-ray radiography. ► Displayed medical images of humanoid phantoms using gamma radiography. ► Am-241

  8. A new type gamma-ray spectrum monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng Bo; Zhou Jian Bin; Zhang Zhi Ming; Tong Yun Fu

    2002-01-01

    This new radiation monitoring system can be used to monitor the radiation of building materials and the radiation of atmosphere, to explore and evaluate rock for building in the field, and this system can be used to monitor the gamma irradiation near the nuclear establishments in the average situation and in the serious situation of the radiation incident have happened. The control core of this monitoring system is SCM-AT89C52, and gamma-ray sensing head consists of scintillator phi 50 mm x 50 mm NaI(Tl) and PMT GDB44. This system can be used to measure the whole gamma-ray spectrum of 256 channels

  9. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system

  10. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  11. The rarity of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Lowell, A. W.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first search for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) from altitudes where they are thought to be produced. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of gamma-ray detectors, was flown near the tops of Florida thunderstorms in August/September 2009. The plane passed within 10 km horizontal distance of 1213 lightning discharges and only once detected a TGF. If these discharges had produced TGFs of the same intensity as those seen from space, ever...

  12. $\\gamma$-Ray Pulsars: Emission Zones and Viewing Geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Roger W.; Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a half dozen young pulsars detected in high energy photons by the Compton GRO, showing a variety of emission efficiencies and pulse profiles. We present here a calculation of the pattern of high energy emission on the sky in a model which posits $\\gamma$-ray production by charge depleted gaps in the outer magnetosphere. This model accounts for the radio to $\\gamma$-ray pulse offsets of the known pulsars, as well as the shape of the high energy pulse profiles. We also show that $...

  13. Understanding soft gamma-ray repeaters in the context of the extragalactic radio pulsar origin of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Marco

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) may be neutron stars undergoing structural adjustments that produce transient gamma-ray events. A unified scenario is proposed in which young radio pulsars are responsible for SGRs and classical GRB sources. The radiative emission associated with a pulsar 'glitch' is seen as a GRB or an SGR event depending on the direction of our line of sight. Burst spectra, energetics, and statistics of GRBs and SGRs are discussed. It is shown that classical GRB spectra arise from Compton upscattering by charges accelerated along the viewing direction and SGR burst spectra are due to the thermalization of Alfven wave energy away from this direction. If crustal adjustments occur within the first 50,000 years of a pulsar's lifetime, the model predicts two SGR sources within the galaxy, in agreement with current observations.

  14. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  15. Prompt gamma-rays from thermal-neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.; Leavitt, R.A.; Harrison, D.A.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    This document describes format and contents of a nuclear data library on magnetic tape which lists prompt gamma rays from thermal-neutron capture evaluated by M.A. Lone et al. The magnetic tape is available, costfree, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  16. Plutonium isotopic measurements by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.X.; Lemming, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive technique is described for calculating plutonium-238, plutonium-240, plutonium-241 and americium-241 relative to plutonium-239 from measured peak areas in the high resolution gamma-ray spectra of solid plutonium samples. Gamma-ray attenuation effects were minimized by selecting sets of neighboring peaks in the spectrum whose components are due to the different isotopes. Since the detector efficiencies are approximately the same for adjacent peaks, the accuracy of the isotopic ratios is dependent on the half-lives, branching intensities, and measured peak areas. The data presented describe the results obtained by analyzing gamma-ray spectra in the energy region from 120 to 700 keV. Most of the data analyzed were obtained from plutonium material containing 6 percent plutonium-240. Sample weights varied from 0.25 g to approximately 1.2 kg. The methods were also applied to plutonium samples containing up to 23 percent plutonium-240 with weights of 0.25 to 200 g. Results obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared to chemical analyses of aliquots taken from the bulk samples

  17. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and 1332 keV, ...

  18. Dose Rate Determination from Airborne Gamma-ray Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The standard method for determination of ground level dose rates from airborne gamma-ray is the integral count rate which for a constant flying altitude is assumed proportional to the dose rate. The method gives reasonably results for natural radioactivity which almost always has the same energy...

  19. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    didates for dark matter search due to their high mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. One of the most favored dark matter candidates is the lightest neutralino. (neutral χ particle) as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard. Model (MSSM). In this study, we model the gamma ray emission from dark matter annihilation coming ...

  20. Calculation of Dose Gamma Ray Build up Factor in Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gamma ray buildup factor was calculated by analyzing the narrow- beam and broad-beam geometry equations using Taylor's formula for isotropic sources and homogeneous materials. The buildup factor was programmed using MATLAB software to operate with any radiation energy (E), atomic number (Z) and the ...

  1. Extragalactic Gamma Ray Excess from Coma Supercluster Direction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1984) did a review on γ rays from galaxy clusters; they claimed that a significant γ ray signal from galaxy clusters from a distance of about. 590 Mpc is detectable. They also mentioned that the intensity of extragalactic gamma rays above 35 MeV is ...

  2. Japanese VLBI Network Observations of a Gamma-Ray Narrow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We made simultaneous single-dish and VLBI observations of a gamma-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy 1H 0323+342. We found significant flux variation at 8 GHz on a ... Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582, Japan. The Institute of Space and Astronautical ...

  3. Observations of gamma-ray emission in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, D.J.; Chupp, E.L.; Suri, A.N.; Reppin, C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews the observations of gamma-ray emission made from the OSO-7 satellite in connection with two solar flares in early August 1972. The details of the measurements and a preliminary interpretation of some of the observed features are given. (U.S.)

  4. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...

  5. Statistical Properties of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/joaa/035/03/0267-0270 ... A statistical analysis of gamma-ray burst host galaxies is presented and a clear metallicity-stellar mass relation is found in our sample. A trend that a more massive host galaxy tends to have a higher star-formation rate is also found.

  6. Gamma-Ray Astronomy with the Hawc Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a wide field-of-view gamma-ray detector, sensitive to primary energies between 50 GeV and 100 TeV. The array is being built at an altitude of 4,100 m on the Sierra Negra volcano in Puebla, Mexico. With a duty cycle close to 100% and a daily coverage of 8 sr of the sky above it, HAWC is ideally suited to detect bright transient events at TeV energies such as gamma-ray bursts or flares from active galactic nuclei. The array will provide an unbiased survey of gamma-ray sources at energies above 100 GeV and probe the origins of astrophysical photon emission at the highest energies. The modular design of HAWC made it possible to start data taking in September 2012 with a partial array. Operation continues while the number of water Cherenkov detectors is growing, which allowed a smooth transition to full scientific operation with 111 detectors in August 2013. The completion of the full array with 300 detectors is planned for the summer of 2014. In these proceedings, we will give an overview of the status and performance of the HAWC observatory and discuss observation strategies for various gamma-ray phenomena.

  7. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greiner, J.; Mannheim, K.; Aharonian, F.; Ajello, M.; Balasz, L.G.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellazzini, R.; Bishop, S.; Bisnovatij-Kogan, G.; Boggs, S.; Bykov, A.; DiCocco, G.; Diehl, R.; Elsässer, D.; Foley, S.; Fransson, C.; Gehrels, N.; Hanlon, L.; Hartmann, D.; Hermsen, W.; Hillebrandt, W.; Hudec, R.; Iyudin, A.; Jose, Jordi; Kadler, M.; Kanbach, G.; Klamra, W.; Kiener, J.; Klose, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kuiper, L.M.; Kylafis, N.; Labanti, C.; Langanke, K.; Langer, N.; Larsson, S.; Leibundgut, B.; Laux, U.; Longo, F.; Maeda, K.; Marcinkowski, R.; Marisaldi, M.; McBreen, B.; McBreen, S.; Meszaros, A.; Nomoto, K.; Pearce, M.; Peer, A.; Pian, E.; Prantzos, N.; Raffelt, G.; Reimer, O.; Rhode, W.; Ryde, F.; Schmidt, C.; Silk, J.; Shustov, B.; Strong, A.; Tanvir, N.; Thielemann, F.K.; Tibolla, O.; Tierney, D.; Trümper, J.; Varshalovich, D.A.; Wilms, J.; Wrochna, G.; Zdziarski, A.; Zoglauer, A.

    2012-01-01

    We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range (COMPTEL, INTEGRAL; see Fig. 1). These gamma-ray observations will be complemented by

  8. Neutron-stimulated gamma ray analysis of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter will discuss methods to use gamma rays to measure elements in soil. In regard to land management, there is a need to develop a non-destructive, non-contact, in-situ method of determining soil elements distributed in a soil volume or on soil surface. A unique method having all of above ...

  9. Airborne Gamma-Ray Survey in Latvia 1995/96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Based on Airborne Gamma-Ray Spectrometry measurements performed with the Danish AGS equipment in 1995 and 1996 maps of the natural radioactivity have been produdced for selected areas in Latvia. The calibration of the quipment have been improved by comparisons with soil sample measurements....

  10. Gamma-ray spectra from the age of the dinosaurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy has been tested as a technique for assisting in the excavation of paleontological sites in the Morrison Formation of western New Mexico. Excavation of these sites is difficult, owing to remoteness and to environmental concerns that militate against wholesale removal of overburden. Various researchers have used remote-sensing techniques to attempt to locate sub-surface bone near known, exposed fossils, thereby to confine excavation to areas where success in finding bone is most likely. Bones accumulate uranium from surrounding rock during fossilization; accordingly, in-situ gamma-ray spectroscopy might serve to locate bone, by detecting the 609- and 1764-keV gamma rays from uranium daughters. Because of the high uranium content of fossils in the Morrison Formation, calculations suggest the feasibility of locating bone despite the presence of several cm of rock and soil overburden. Investigations at several sites with fossils of large sauropods have revealed increased count rates for the key gamma rays near exposed bone, possibly implying the presence of additional fossils beneath the surface of the ground. However, attempts to use spectroscopy inside shafts drilled into possible fossil-bearing rock have been less successful. Results are presented and prospects for additional work discussed

  11. Gamma rays spotlight a dark horse for dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Seife, C

    2004-01-01

    "Do mysterious gamma rays emanating from the center of the galaxy hold the secret to the missing matter in the universe? A team of physicists suggests that they might. The controversial finding also shows how little is known about most of the mass in the cosmos"(1/2 page)

  12. On the extragalactic origin of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.; Teller, E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory to explain the origin of extragalactic gamma ray bursts is presented. Collisions of black dwarf and neutron stars with a subsequent fragmentation of the dwarf producing relativistic particle accelerations toward the neutron star and a resulting turbulent flow of material at the neutron star surface is postulated

  13. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabici, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration operating at expanding supernova remnant shells is by far the most popular model for the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Despite the general consensus received by the model, an unambiguous and conclusive proof of the supernova remnant hypothesis is still missing. In this context, the recent developments in gamma ray astronomy provide us with precious insights into the problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays, since production of gamma rays is expected both during the acceleration of cosmic rays at supernova remnant shocks and during their subsequent propagation in the interstellar medium. In particular, the recent detection of a number of supernova remnants at TeV energies nicely fits with the model, but it still does not constitute a conclusive proof of it, mainly due to the difficulty of disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the observed gamma ray emission. The main goal of my research is to search for an unambiguous and conclusive observational test for proving (or disproving) the idea that supernova remnants are the sources of galactic cosmic rays with energies up to (at least) the cosmic ray knee. Our present comprehension of the mechanisms of particle acceleration at shocks and of the propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields encourages beliefs that such a conclusive test might come from future observations of supernova remnants and of the Galaxy in the almost unexplored domain of multi-TeV gamma rays. (author)

  14. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  15. An optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Torre, F.; Rios M, C.; Ruvalcaba A, M. G.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L.

    2010-10-01

    This work aims to obtain an optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectroscopy by means of Genie 2000 (Canberra). Twenty different analysis sequences were customized using different peak area percentages and different algorithms for: 1) peak finding, and 2) peak area determination, and with or without the use of a library -based on evaluated nuclear data- of common gamma-ray emitters in environmental samples. The use of an optimum analysis sequence with certified nuclear information avoids the problems originated by the significant variations in out-of-date nuclear parameters of commercial software libraries. Interference-free gamma ray energies with absolute emission probabilities greater than 3.75% were included in the customized library. The gamma-ray spectroscopy system (based on a Ge Re-3522 Canberra detector) was calibrated both in energy and shape by means of the IAEA-2002 reference spectra for software intercomparison. To test the performance of the analysis sequences, the IAEA-2002 reference spectrum was used. The z-score and the reduced χ 2 criteria were used to determine the optimum analysis sequence. The results show an appreciable variation in the peak area determinations and their corresponding uncertainties. Particularly, the combination of second derivative peak locate with simple peak area integration algorithms provides the greater accuracy. Lower accuracy comes from the combination of library directed peak locate algorithm and Genie's Gamma-M peak area determination. (Author)

  16. Gamma-ray excess and the minimal dark matter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, Michael; Fileviez Perez, Pavel; Smirnov, Juri

    2015-10-01

    We point out that the gamma-ray excesses in the galactic center and in the dwarf galaxy Reticulum II can both be well explained within the simplest dark matter model. We find that the corresponding region of parameter space will be tested by direct and indirect dark matter searches in the near future.

  17. Is dark matter visible by galactic gamma rays?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The EGRET excess in the diffuse galactic gamma ray data above 1 GeV shows all features expected from dark matter WIMP annihilation: (a) It is present and has the same spectrum in all sky directions, not just in the galactic plane. (b) The intensity of the excess shows the 1/r2 profile expected for a flat rotation ...

  18. Is dark matter visible by galactic gamma rays?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The EGRET excess in the diffuse galactic gamma ray data above 1 GeV shows all features expected from dark matter WIMP annihilation: (a) It is present and has the same spectrum in all sky directions, not just in the galactic plane. (b) The intensity of the excess shows the 1/2 profile expected for a flat rotation curve outside ...

  19. Constraining axion by polarized prompt emission from gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of invisible axion. The axionic induced dichroism of gamma rays at different energies should cause a misalignment of the polarization plane for higher energy events relative to that one for lower energies events resulting in the loss of statistics needed to form a pattern of the polarization signal to be recognized in a detector. According to this, any evidence of polarized gamma rays coming from an object with extended magnetic field could be interpreted as a constraint on the existence of the invisible axion for a certain parameter range. Based on reports of polarized MeV emission detected in several GRBs we derive a constraint on the axion-photon coupling. This constraint $\\g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the axion mass $m_a=10^{-3} {\\rm eV}$ is competitive with the sensitivi...

  20. Search for infrared counterparts of gamma-ray bursters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.; Cline, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    The result of two searches for infrared counterparts of Gamma-ray Bursters (GRB's) is reported. The first search was made using data from the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and covered 23 positions. The second search was made with the Kitt Peak 1.5 m telescope and covered 3 positions. In neither of these two searches was any infrared candidate detected

  1. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  2. Structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The conference included papers on ..gamma..-ray pulsars, galactic diffuse flux and surveys, radio surveys of external galaxies, galactic distribution of pulsars, and galactic gamma emission. Galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy is discussed. New and unpublished material is included. (JFP)

  3. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron spectrum as a function of electron energy for three different values of Mχ annihilating into b¯b final state. the annihilation cross sections are obtained from Ackermann et al. (2014). The DM annihilation takes place predominantly through some combination of the final states b¯b, tt, W. +. W. − or ZZ. The gamma ray ...

  4. Determination of gamma ray attenuation coefficients of Al–4% Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Gamma ray attenuation coefficients of metal matrix composites have been investigated. For this purpose, the linear attenuation coefficients of composites containing boron carbide (B4C) at different rates have been measured using a gamma spectrometer that contains a NaI(Tl) detector and MCA at 662, 1173 and.

  5. An optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Torre, F.; Rios M, C.; Ruvalcaba A, M. G.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L., E-mail: fta777@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Centro Regional de Estudis Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work aims to obtain an optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectroscopy by means of Genie 2000 (Canberra). Twenty different analysis sequences were customized using different peak area percentages and different algorithms for: 1) peak finding, and 2) peak area determination, and with or without the use of a library -based on evaluated nuclear data- of common gamma-ray emitters in environmental samples. The use of an optimum analysis sequence with certified nuclear information avoids the problems originated by the significant variations in out-of-date nuclear parameters of commercial software libraries. Interference-free gamma ray energies with absolute emission probabilities greater than 3.75% were included in the customized library. The gamma-ray spectroscopy system (based on a Ge Re-3522 Canberra detector) was calibrated both in energy and shape by means of the IAEA-2002 reference spectra for software intercomparison. To test the performance of the analysis sequences, the IAEA-2002 reference spectrum was used. The z-score and the reduced {chi}{sup 2} criteria were used to determine the optimum analysis sequence. The results show an appreciable variation in the peak area determinations and their corresponding uncertainties. Particularly, the combination of second derivative peak locate with simple peak area integration algorithms provides the greater accuracy. Lower accuracy comes from the combination of library directed peak locate algorithm and Genie's Gamma-M peak area determination. (Author)

  6. Identification of peaks in multidimensional coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhac, Miroslav E-mail: fyzimiro@savba.sk; Kliman, Jan; Matousek, Vladislav; Veselsky, Martin; Turzo, Ivan

    2000-03-21

    In the paper a new algorithm to find peaks in two, three and multidimensional spectra, measured in large multidetector {gamma}-ray arrays, is derived. Given the dimension m, the algorithm is selective to m-fold coincidence peaks. It is insensitive to intersections of lower-fold coincidences, hereinafter called ridges.

  7. Reducing Statistical Noise in Airborne Gamma-Ray Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens; Grasty, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    By using the Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition (NASVD) technique it is possible to reconstruct the measured airborne gamma-ray spectra with a noise content that is significant smaller than the noise contained in the original measured spectra. The method can be used for improving the out...... the output of the data processing for example mapping of Th, U, and K distribution....

  8. Determination of the shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korun, M.; Vodenik, B.; Zorko, B.

    2014-01-01

    A method for determining the shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers is described. The shielding factors are expressed by decomposing the peaked background of the spectrometer into contributions of the detector, spectrometer shield and ambient radiation to the spectrometer background. The dimensions of the sample and its mass-attenuation coefficient are taken into account using a simple model. For six spectrometers, with contributions to the background quantified, the shielding factors were determined for the background based on the thorium decay series and the radon daughters. For a water sample with a diameter of 9 cm and a thickness of 4 cm and the nuclides of the thorium decay series that are in the spectrometer shields, the values of the shielding factors lie in the interval 0.95–1.00. For a spectrometer exhibiting the diffusion of radon into the shielding material, the values of the shielding factors for the same sample for gamma-rays from the radon daughters lie in the interval 0.88–1.00. - Highlights: • A model is described to assess shielding factors for gamma-ray spectrometers. • The background due to the detector, shield and ambient radiation must be known. • The sample attenuation, its dimensions and distance from the crystal are considered. • Shielding factors for gamma-rays from the 232 Th and 226 Ra decay chains are assessed. • For a water sample with a mass of 0.25 kg, shielding factors above 0.88 are obtained

  9. Gamma ray line production from cosmic ray spallation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Letaw, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The gamma ray line intensities due to cosmic ray spallation reactions in clouds, the galactic disk and accreting binary pulsars are calculated. With the most favorable plausible assumptions, only a few lines may be detectable to the level of 0.0000001 per sq. cm per sec. The intensities are compared with those generated in nuclear excitation reactions.

  10. Wide Energy Range Gamma-Ray Calibration Source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, M.; Granja, C. H.; Janout, Z.; Králik, M.; Krejčí, F.; Owens, A.; Pospíšil, S.; Quarati, F.; Šolc, J.; Vobecký, Miloslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, Nov (2011), s. 1-12 ISSN 1748-0221 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : prompt gamma-rays * gamma spectroscopy * detector calibration * thermal neutron capture Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.869, year: 2011

  11. AIRGAMMA, External Gamma-Ray Exposure from Radioactive Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Iijima, Tshinori

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: AIRGAMMA calculates quickly the external exposure to gamma rays from a radioactive cloud. 2 - Method of solution: The external exposure is calculated by interpolating the normalized doses providing on the basis of the Gaussian plume model. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Memory requirement is 30 Kbytes

  12. Application of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Park, Kwang Won; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Baek, Sung Ryel [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This technical report is written for the promotion to utilization of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis facility to be installed in HANARO reactor. It is described for a practical aspects including experiment and equipments, methodology, current status of the research and development and its applications. 102 refs., 32 figs., 25 tabs. (Author)

  13. Muon spectrum in air showers initiated by gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, S. A.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic representation for the invariant cross-section for the production of charged pions in gamma P interactions was derived by using the available cross-sections. Using this the abundance of muons in a gamma ray initiated air shower is calculated.

  14. A search for Gamma Ray Burst Neutrinos in AMANDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvoort, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    To date, no neutrinos with energies in or above the GeV range have been identified from astrophysical objects. The aim of the two analyses described in this dissertation is to observe high-energy muon neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). GRBs are distant sources, which were discovered by

  15. Which massive stars are gamma-ray burst progenitors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, J.; Langer, N.; Yoon, S.C.; Heger, A.

    2005-01-01

    The collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts requires three essential ingredients: a massive core, removal of the hydrogen envelope, and enough angular momentum in the core. We study current massive star evolution models of solar metallicity to determine which massive star physics is capable of

  16. Massive binary systems as Gamma-ray burst progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, J.

    2006-01-01

    The collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts requires three essential ingredients: a massive core, removal of the hydrogen envelope, and enough angular momentum in the core. We study current massive star evolution models of solar metallicity to determine which massive star physics is capable of

  17. gamma-ray tracking in germanium the backtracking method

    CERN Document Server

    Marel, J V D

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a European TMR network project the concept for a gamma-ray tracking array is being developed for nuclear physics spectroscopy in the energy range of approx 10 keV up to several MeV. The tracking array will consist of a large number of position-sensitive germanium detectors in a spherical geometry around a target. Due to the high segmentation, a Compton scattered gamma-ray will deposit energy in several different segments. A method has been developed to reconstruct the tracks of multiple coincident gamma-rays and to find their initial energies. By starting from the final point the track can be reconstructed backwards to the origin with the help of the photoelectric and Compton cross-sections and the Compton scatter formula. Every reconstructed track is given a figure of merit, thus allowing suppression of wrongly reconstructed tracks and gamma-rays that have scattered out of the detector system. This so-called backtracking method has been tested on simulated events in a shell-like geometry ...

  18. Constraints on relativity violations from gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelecký, V Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2013-05-17

    Tiny violations of the Lorentz symmetry of relativity and the associated discrete CPT symmetry could emerge in a consistent theory of quantum gravity such as string theory. Recent evidence for linear polarization in gamma-ray bursts improves existing sensitivities to Lorentz and CPT violation involving photons by factors ranging from ten to a million.

  19. Gamma-ray burst investigation via polarimetry and spectroscopy (GRIPS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greiner, J.; Iyudin, A.; Kanbach, G.; Zoglauer, A.; Diehl, R.; Ryde, F.; Hartmann, D.; Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; Hudec, René

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2009), s. 91-120 ISSN 0922-6435 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : compton and pair creation telescope * gamma-ray * nucleosynthesis Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.444, year: 2009

  20. Program DEIMOS32 for gamma-ray spectra evalution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frána, Jaroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 257, č. 3 (2003), s. 583-587 ISSN 0236-5731. [International Conference Ko-users Workshop /3./. Bruges, 23.09.2001-28.09.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : gamma-ray spectra * software Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2003

  1. Solar System Gamma Ray observations using Fermi-LAT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giglietto, N.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an international space mission dedicated to the study of the high-energy gamma rays from the Universe. The main instrument aboard Fermi is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), a pair conversion telescope equipped with the state-of-the art in gamma-ray detectors technology, and operating at energies >30 MeV. During first two months of data taking, Fermi has detected high-energy gamma rays from the quiet Sun and the Moon. This emission is produced by interactions of cosmic rays; by nucleons with the solar and lunar surface, and electrons with solar photons in the heliosphere. While the Moon was detected by EGRET on CGRO with low statistics, Fermi provides high-sensitivity measurements on a daily basis allowing both short- and long-term variability to be studied. Since Galactic cosmic rays are at their maximum flux at solar minimum we expect that the quiescent solar and lunar emission to be a maximum during the period covered by this report. Fermi is the only mission capable of monitoring the Sun at energies above several hundred MeV over the full 24th solar cycle. We present first analysis showing images of Moon and the quiet emission of the solar disk, giving a description of the analysis tools used.

  2. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greiner, J.; Mannheim, K.; Hudec, René; Mészáros, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2012), s. 551-582 ISSN 0922-6435 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : compton and pair creation telescope * gamma-ray bursts * nucleosynthesis Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2012

  3. Cosmic gamma-ray background from dark matter annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2007-01-01

    High-energy photons from pair annihilation of dark matter particles contribute to the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) observed in a wide energy range. The precise shape of the energy spectrum of CGB depends on the nature of dark matter particles. In order to discriminate between the signals from dark matter annihilation and other astrophysical sources, however, the information from the energy spectrum of CGB may not be sufficient. We show that dark matter annihilation not only contributes to the mean CGB intensity, but also produces a characteristic anisotropy, which provides a powerful tool for testing the origins of the observed CGB. We show that the expected sensitivity of future gamma-ray detectors such as GLAST should allow us to measure the angular power spectrum of CGB anisotropy, if dark matter particles are supersymmetric neutralinos and they account for most of the observed mean intensity. As the intensity of photons from annihilation is proportional to the density squared, we show that the predicted shape of the angular power spectrum of gamma rays from dark matter annihilation is different from that due to other astrophysical sources such as blazars, whose intensity is linearly proportional to density. Therefore, the angular power spectrum of the CGB provides a 'smoking-gun' signature of gamma rays from dark matter annihilation

  4. Japanese VLBI Network Observations of a Gamma-Ray Narrow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    craft resulted in the identification of a few hundreds of gamma-ray emitted Active. Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). Most of them were categorized as blazars, suggesting a .... Orienti, M., D'Ammando, F., Giroletti, M., for the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, 2012. arXiv:1205.0402. Osterbrock, D. E., Pogge, R. W. 1985, Astrophys. J. 297, 166.

  5. Brilliant GeV gamma-ray flash from inverse Compton scattering in the QED regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z.; Hu, R. H.; Lu, H. Y.; Yu, J. Q.; Wang, D. H.; Fu, E. G.; Chen, C. E.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.

    2018-04-01

    An all-optical scheme is proposed for studying laser plasma based incoherent photon emission from inverse Compton scattering in the quantum electrodynamic regime. A theoretical model is presented to explain the coupling effects among radiation reaction trapping, the self-generated magnetic field and the spiral attractor in phase space, which guarantees the transfer of energy and angular momentum from electromagnetic fields to particles. Taking advantage of a prospective ∼ 1023 W cm‑2 laser facility, 3D particle-in-cell simulations show a gamma-ray flash with unprecedented multi-petawatt power and brightness of 1.7 × 1023 photons s‑1 mm‑2 mrad‑2/0.1% bandwidth (at 1 GeV). These results bode well for new research directions in particle physics and laboratory astrophysics exploring laser plasma interactions.

  6. Planetary Geochemistry Using Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detector (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth, The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asterOIds, comets and the satellites of the outer planets, Gamma-Ray Spectrometers have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially in the case of Mars Odyssey, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars, Neutron detectors have also been placed onboard orbital missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and Lunar Prospector to measure the hydrogen content of the surface of the moon, The DAN in situ experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory not only includes neutron detectors, but also has its own neutron generator, However, no one has ever combined the three into one instrument PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine subsurface elemental composition without drilling. We are testing PNG-GRAND at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 m x 1 m granite structure in an empty field, We will present data from the operation of PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a known sample in a geometry that is identical to that which can be achieved on a planetary surface. We will also compare the material composition results inferred from our experiments to both an independent laboratory elemental composition analysis and MCNPX computer modeling results,

  7. Gamma-ray dosimetry errors with thermoluminescent dose meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, C.L.; Homann, S.G.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma-ray dosimetry errors can occur when thermoluminescence dose meters (TLDs) are irradiated in thin-walled containers. An over-response has been observed for LiF TLDs, irradiated by an isotropic source, of approximately 25% for 24 Na; 20% for 60 Co, and 2% for 137 Cs. The over-response for CaF 2 TLDs was found to be less than the over-response of LiF TLDs. Under-response errors can occur for TLDs in thin-walled containers irradiated under narrow-beam geometry conditions because electron equilibrium is not established, but this error is well known and is not discussed in this paper. The observed over-response is attributable to electrons originating in the radiation source holder and the surrounding air that are scattered into the TLD material. This over-response is less pronounced for 137 Cs gamma rays because few scattered electrons have sufficient energy to penetrate the TLD; however, for higher energy gamma rays, more electrons can panetrate the TLD, resulting in a greater dose. This effect will also be observed with any dose meter that has a small sensitive volume surrounded by a thin wall. The over-response of a dosimetry film in its paper wrapping was measured to be approximately 25% for 60 Co gamma rays and 3% for 137 Cs gamma rays, although this would rarely introduce an error since film dose meters are usually irradiated in a thick-walled badge. This paper presents the measured over-responses of various TLD chips for several exposure conditions and experimental results which demonstrate the cause of the over-response. (author)

  8. Fermi Discovery of Gamma-Ray Emission from NGC 1275

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Asano, K.; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /SISSA, Trieste /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    We report the discovery of high-energy (E > 100 MeV) {gamma}-ray emission from NGC 1275, a giant elliptical galaxy lying at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, based on observations made with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The positional center of the {gamma}-ray source is only {approx}3{prime} away from the NGC 1275 nucleus, well within the 95% LAT error circle of {approx}5{prime}. The spatial distribution of {gamma}-ray photons is consistent with a point source. The average flux and power-law photon index measured with the LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2008 December 5 are F{sub {gamma}} = (2.10 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -7} ph (>100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and {Gamma} = 2.17 {+-} 0.05, respectively. The measurements are statistically consistent with constant flux during the four-month LAT observing period. Previous EGRET observations gave an upper limit of F{sub {gamma}} < 3.72 x 10{sup -8} ph (>100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} to the {gamma}-ray flux from NGC 1275. This indicates that the source is variable on timescales of years to decades, and therefore restricts the fraction of emission that can be produced in extended regions of the galaxy cluster. Contemporaneous and historical radio observations are also reported. The broadband spectrum of NGC 1275 is modeled with a simple one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model and a model with a decelerating jet flow.

  9. ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 AND V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ODY MARS GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER 5 AND data set is a table of neutron data from the NS sub-system of the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer that have been...

  10. Analysis of coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra using advanced background elimination, unfolding and fitting algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhac, M. E-mail: fyzimiro@savba.skfyzimiro@flnr.jinr.ru; Matousek, V. E-mail: matousek@savba.sk; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.L.; Jandel, M

    2003-04-21

    The efficient algorithms to analyze multiparameter {gamma}-ray spectra are presented. They allow to search for peaks, to separate peaks from background, to improve the resolution and to fit 1-, 2-, 3-parameter {gamma}-ray spectra.

  11. MESSENGER E/V/H GRNS 5 GAMMA RAY SPECTROMETER DAP V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== The GRS experiment is a gamma-ray spectrometer designed to observe spectra of gamma rays emitted from Mercury's surface in the energy range from...

  12. The x-/gamma-ray camera ECLAIRs for the gamma-ray burst mission SVOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, O.; Nasser, G.; Atteia, J.-.; Cordier, B.; Mandrou, P.; Barret, D.; Triou, H.; Pons, R.; Amoros, C.; Bordon, S.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Götz, D.; Gros, A.; Houret, B.; Lachaud, C.; Lacombe, K.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Schanne, S.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present ECLAIRs, the Gamma-ray burst (GRB) trigger camera to fly on-board the Chinese-French mission SVOM. ECLAIRs is a wide-field (~ 2 sr) coded mask camera with a mask transparency of 40% and a 1024 cm2 detection plane coupled to a data processing unit, so-called UGTS, which is in charge of locating GRBs in near real time thanks to image and rate triggers. We present the instrument science requirements and how the design of ECLAIRs has been optimized to increase its sensitivity to high-redshift GRBs and low-luminosity GRBs in the local Universe, by having a low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The total spectral coverage ranges from 4 to 150 keV. ECLAIRs is expected to detect ~ 200 GRBs of all types during the nominal 3 year mission lifetime. To reach a 4 keV low-energy threshold, the ECLAIRs detection plane is paved with 6400 4 × 4 mm2 and 1 mm-thick Schottky CdTe detectors. The detectors are grouped by 32, in 8×4 matrices read by a low-noise ASIC, forming elementary modules called XRDPIX. In this paper, we also present our current efforts to investigate the performance of these modules with their front-end electronics when illuminated by charged particles and/or photons using radioactive sources. All measurements are made in different instrument configurations in vacuum and with a nominal in-flight detector temperature of -20°C. This work will enable us to choose the in-flight configuration that will make the best compromise between the science performance and the in-flight operability of ECLAIRs. We will show some highlights of this work.

  13. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Across 6 Decades of Energy: Synergy between Fermi, IACTs, and HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C. Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Gamma Ray Observatories, Gamma-Ray Astrophysics, GeV TeV Sky Survey, Galaxy, Galactic Plane, Source Distribution, The gamma-ray sky is currently well-monitored with good survey coverage. Many instruments from different waveband/messenger (X rays, gamma rays, neutrinos, gravitational waves) available for simultaneous observations. Both wide-field and pointing instruments in development and coming online in the next decade LIGO

  14. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Arimoto, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellardi, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogaert, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, D.; Busetto, G.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Celotti, A.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; DeKlotz, M.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Edmonds, Y.; Evans, P. A.; Fabiani, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Finke, J.; Fishman, G.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Haller, G.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; Hoover, A.; Hughes, R. E.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kavelaars, A.; Kawai, N.; Kelly, H.; Kennea, J.; Kerr, M.; Kippen, R. M.; Knoedlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lavalley, C.; Lee, B.; Lee, S. -H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lichti, G. G.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Meszaros, P.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mirizzi, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nelson, D.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Perri, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Raino, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rando, R.; Rapposelli, E.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Segal, K. N.; Sgro, C.; Shimokawabe, T.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Starck, J. -L.; Stecker, F. W.; Steinle, H.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tenze, A.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Turri, M.; Tuvi, S.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vigiani, L.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Williams, D. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gamma-ray energy. In

  15. The pulsar contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Kanbach, G.; Hunter, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    There is active interest in the extent to which unresolved gamma-ray pulsars contribute to the Galactic diffuse emission, and in whether unresolved gamma-ray pulsars could be responsible for the excess of diffuse Galactic emission above 1 GeV that has been observed by EGRET. The diffuse gamma-ray...

  16. Gamma ray induced fruit quality variations in banana variety Nendran (Musa Paradasiaca L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha Devi, D.S.; Nayer, N.K.

    1992-01-01

    Gamma ray induced fruit quality variation was envisaged to analyse the direct effect of Co 60 gamma rays in banana variety Nendran. Fruit quality analysis showed that the total soluble solids and acidity decreased and total sugar and sugar acid ratio increased with increase in dose of gamma ray exposures. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  17. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    5 August 2004 A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed... Gamma ray burst model hi-res Size hi-res: 22 KB Credits: CXC/M. Weiss Artist impression of a low-energy gamma-ray burst This illustration describes a model for a gamma-ray burst, like the one detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 (GRB 031203). A jet of high-energy particles from a rapidly rotating black hole interacts with surrounding matter. Observations with Integral on 3 December 2003 and data on its afterglow, collected afterwards with XMM-Newton, Chandra and the Very Large Array telescope, show that GRB 031203 radiated only a fraction of the energy of normal gamma-ray bursts. Like supernovae, gamma-ray bursts are thought to be produced by the collapse of the core of a massive star. However, while the process leading to supernovae is relatively well understood, astronomers still do not know what happens when a core collapses to form a black hole. The discovery of 'under-energetic' gamma-ray bursts, like GRB 031203, should provide valuable clues as to links between supernovae, black holes and gamma-ray bursts. Lo-res JPG (22 Kb) Hi-res TIFF (5800 Kb) Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays that can last from less than a second to a few minutes and occur at random positions in the sky. A large fraction of them is thought to result when a black hole is created from a dying star in a distant galaxy. Astronomers believe that a hot disc surrounding the black hole, made of gas and matter falling onto it, somehow emits an energetic beam parallel to the axis of rotation. According to the simplest picture, all GRBs

  18. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  19. CALET UPPER LIMITS ON X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY COUNTERPARTS OF GW151226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G. [University of Florence, Via Sansone, 1, I-50019 Sesto, Fiorentino (Italy); Akaike, Y. [Universities Space Research Association, 7178 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Asano, K. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Asaoka, Y. [JEM Mission Operations and Integration Center, Human Spaceflight Technology Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S.; Brogi, P.; Felice, V. Di [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Piazza dei Caprettari, 70, I-00186 Rome (Italy); Binns, W. R.; Buckley, J. H. [Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 (United States); Cannady, N.; Cherry, M. L.; Guzik, T. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Checchia, C.; Collazuol, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Ebisawa, K.; Fuke, H., E-mail: nakahira@crab.riken.jp, E-mail: yoichi.asaoka@aoni.waseda.jp, E-mail: tsakamoto@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); and others

    2016-09-20

    We present upper limits in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) gravitational-wave event GW151226 derived from the CALorimetric Electron Telescope ( CALET ) observation. The main instrument of CALET , CALorimeter (CAL), observes gamma-rays from ∼1 GeV up to 10 TeV with a field of view of ∼2 sr. The CALET gamma-ray burst monitor (CGBM) views ∼3 sr and ∼2 π sr of the sky in the 7 keV–1 MeV and the 40 keV–20 MeV bands, respectively, by using two different scintillator-based instruments. The CGBM covered 32.5% and 49.1% of the GW151226 sky localization probability in the 7 keV–1 MeV and 40 keV–20 MeV bands respectively. We place a 90% upper limit of 2 × 10{sup −7} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} in the 1–100 GeV band where CAL reaches 15% of the integrated LIGO probability (∼1.1 sr). The CGBM 7 σ upper limits are 1.0 × 10{sup −6} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} (7–500 keV) and 1.8 × 10{sup −6} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} (50–1000 keV) for a 1 s exposure. Those upper limits correspond to the luminosity of 3–5 × 10{sup 49} erg s{sup −1}, which is significantly lower than typical short GRBs.

  20. Statistical properties of the time histories of cosmic gamma-ray bursts detected by the BATSE experiment of the Compton gamma-ray observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdeev, Roald

    1995-01-01

    The main scientific objectives of the project were: (1) Calculation of average time history for different subsets of BATSE gamma-ray bursts; (2) Comparison of averaged parameters and averaged time history for different Burst And Transient Source Experiments (BASTE) Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB's) sets; (3) Comparison of results obtained with BATSE data with those obtained with APEX experiment at PHOBOS mission; and (4) Use the results of (1)-(3) to compare current models of gamma-ray bursts sources.

  1. ARIES segmented gamma-ray scanner user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, R.S.; Sheppard, G.A.; Schneider, C.M.

    1998-04-16

    The segmented gamma-ray scatter (SGS) designated as Win{_}SGS at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility has been installed and is intended for use in quantifying the radioisotope content of DOE-STD-3013-96 equivalent containers. The SGS features new software written in C and a new user interface that runs under Microsoft Windows{trademark}. The operation of the ARIES Segmented Gamma-ray Scanner is documented in this manual. It covers user instructions as well as hardware and software details. Additional information is found in the documentation for the commercially available components and modules that compose the SGS. The objective of the ARIES project is to demonstrate technology to dismantle plutonium pits from excess nuclear weapons, convert the plutonium to a metal ingot or an oxide powder, package the metal or oxide, and verify the contents of the package by nondestructive assay.

  2. Porosity measurement of amorphous materials by gamma ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poettker, Walmir Eno

    2000-01-01

    In this work it is presented the measurement of the total porosity of TRe soil, Sandstone Berea rocks and porous ceramics samples. For the determination of the total porosity, the Arquimedes method (conventional) and the gamma ray transmission methodology were employed. The porosity measurement using the gamma methodology has a significant advantage respect to the conventional method due to the fast and non-destructive determination, and also for supplying results with a greater characterization in small scales, in relation to the heterogeneity of the porosity. The conventional methodology presents good results only for homogeneous samples. The experimental set up for the gamma ray transmission technique consisted of a 241 Am source (59,53 keV), a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector, collimators, a XYZ, micrometric table and standard gamma spectrometry electronics connected to a multichannel analyser. (author)

  3. On the source-detector efficienices for gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, M.I.; Salem, M.; Selim, Y.S.

    2005-01-01

    Gamma rays have a wide spread range of applications in different fields of science. The identification of gamma spectrum with high accuracy is one of them. This can be done using semiconductor and cylindrical scintillation detectors. This has been achieved by the way of trace the interaction of gamma rays in the detector and the resulting deposition energy within.In this work, following our previous works, straightforward mathematical expressions are used to calculate the total and full energy peak efficiencies for gamma detectors with different dimensions using sources with different shapes (point and disk sources) emitting photon with energies from few keV up to some MeV. Where the predominant reaction is the Compton scattering and other absorptions through the detector are consider. Also the detector's efficiency is calculated with high accuracy. The computed data found good agreement with previous treatments

  4. Neutron and Gamma Ray Pulse Shape Discrimination with Polyvinyltoluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Stave, Jean A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this was research effort was to test the ability of two poly vinyltoluene research samples to produce recordable, distinguishable signals in response to gamma rays and neutrons. Pulse shape discrimination was performed to identify if the signal was generated by a gamma ray or a neutron. A standard figure of merit for pulse shape discrimination was used to quantify the gamma-neutron pulse separation. Measurements were made with gamma and neutron sources with and without shielding. The best figure of merit obtained was 1.77; this figure of merit was achieved with the first sample in response to an un-moderated 252Cf source shielded with 5.08 cm of lead.

  5. Gamma ray detector for solar maximum mission (SMM) of NASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, W.; Brichzin, K.; Sach, E.

    1981-06-01

    For NASA's Project Solar Maximum Mission-SMM (launch 14.2.80) a Gamma Ray Detector was developed, manufactured and tested to measure solar high energetic Gamma rays and Neutron fluxes within the energy range 10-160 MeV, 4,43 MeV amd 2,23 MeV. The main components of the sensor are 7 NaI crystals 3 x 3 and a CsI crystal 30 cm diameter x 7,5 cm. The rejection of charged particles is done by two plasitc scintillators and 4 CsI-shields. From the beginning of the mission the experiment is working fully successfull. (orig.) [de

  6. A mobile gamma ray spectrometer system for nuclear hazard mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Smethurst, M A

    2000-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway has developed a system for mobile gamma ray spectrometer surveying suitable for use in nuclear emergencies where potentially dangerous radioactive materials have been released into the environment. The measuring system has been designed for use with different kinds of transportation platforms. These include fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters and vans. The choice of transportation platform depends on the nature of the nuclear emergency. Widespread fallout from a distant source can be mapped quickly from the air while local sources of radiation can be delineated by a car-borne system. The measuring system processes gamma ray spectra in real time. The operator of the system is therefore able to guide surveying in accordance with meaningful data values and immediately report these values to decision making The operator is presented with a number of different displays suited to different kinds of nuclear emergencies that lead to more efficient surveying. Real time processing of data m...

  7. Borehole Logging for Uranium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvborg, Leif; Nyegaard, P.; Christiansen, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium-iodide, and the photo......The resources in a large syngenetic deposit of low-grade uranium (U) ore with thorium at Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, were evaluated by spectrometric gamma-ray logging of 23 boreholes, 46 mm in diameter and 200 m deep. The borehole probe's detector contained 22 cm3 of sodium...... of the spectrometer system were determined by calculating the average number of U and thorium (Th) counts per meter of borehole and comparing these with the U-Th concentrations in 1-m sections of analyzed drill core. The sensitivity and the background count rate in the uranium window varied appreciably from one hole...

  8. Cosmology and the Subgroups of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mészáros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Both short and intermediate gamma-ray bursts are distributed anisotropically in the sky (Mészáros, A. et al. ApJ, 539, 98 (2000, Vavrek, R. et al. MNRAS, 391, 1 741 (2008. Hence, in the redshift range, where these bursts take place, the cosmological principle is in doubt. It has already been noted that short bursts should be mainly at redshifts smaller than one (Mészáros, A. et al. Gamma-ray burst: Sixth Huntsville Symp., AIP, Vol. 1 133, 483 (2009; Mészáros, A. et al. Baltic Astron., 18, 293 (2009. Here we show that intermediate bursts should be at redshifts up to three.

  9. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Tueller, Jack

    2007-01-01

    There is a great synergy between the Swift and INTEGRAL missions. Swift provides wide-field hard x-ray monitoring and sensitive x-ray and UV/optical observations. INTEGRAL provides optical through gamma-ray coverage with emphasis on hard xray imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. For hard x-ray survey studies, the BAT and IBIS instruments are complementary with BAT covering the full sky every day and IBIS scanning the galactic plane. For GRBs, Swift follows up bursts detected by INTEGRAL. X-ray and optical observations give arcsecond positions and afterglow lightcurves. For IGR sources, X-ray observations identify counterparts. The joint BAT and IBIS survey data are giving the most complete picture of the hard x-ray sky ever obtained. This talk will review Swift capabilities and discuss joint observations that are taking place and planned

  10. Grafting study of polysulfone polymeric membranes by gamma ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado Filho, Acacio A.M.; Gomes, Ailton de S.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation-induced grafting of styrene poli sulfone films were investigated by simultaneous method in solution using gamma-ray from a radio nuclide 60 Co source. The gamma-ray energy of high intensity induced breaking of chemical bonds leading to free radical formation. The radical start a conventional polymerization sequence comparable with that obtained with a chemical catalyst acting as initiator. The effects of grafting conditions such as irradiation total dose, dose rate and addition of cross linking agent, were studied by means of morphology analysis, thermal degradation and crystallinity. After the grafting reaction, the membranes were submitted to an exhaustive extraction with solvent to remove the polystyrene homopolymer formed. The degree of grafting (DOG) was analyzed by percentage of weight increase. As a result, the reaction always follows the same pattern: DOG increases rapidly initially whilst propagation is the main reaction, then more slowly as termination becomes more frequent. (author)

  11. Orbital Normalization of MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. A.; Peplowski, P. N.; Evans, L. G.; Hamara, D. K.; Boynton, W. V.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) measures energy spectra of gamma rays emanating from the surface of Mercury. Analysis of these spectra provides elemental abundances of surface material. The MESSENGER mission necessarily provides some data normalization challenges for GRS analysis. So as to keep the spacecraft cool while orbiting the dayside of the planet, the orbits are highly eccentric, with altitudes varying from 200-500 km to ~ 15,000 km. A small fraction of time is spent at the low altitudes where gamma-ray signals are largest, requiring a large number of orbits to yield sufficient counting statistics for elemental analysis. Also, the sunshade must always shield the spacecraft from the Sun, which causes the orientation of the GRS often to be far from nadir-pointing, so the detector efficiency and attenuation of gamma rays from the planet must be known for a wide range of off-nadir orientations. An efficiency/attenuation map for the expected ranges of orientations and energies was constructed in a ground calibration experiment for a limited range of orientations using a nuclear reactor and radioisotope sources, and those results were extended to other orientations by radiation transport computations using as input a computer-aided design model of the spacecraft and its composition. This normalization has allowed abundance determinations of elements K, Th, and U from radioisotopes of these elements in the Mercury regolith during the first quarter of the year-long mission. These results provide constraints on models of Mercury's chemical and thermal evolution. The normalization of gamma-ray spectra for surface elements not having radioisotopes is considerably more complex; these gamma rays come from neutron inelastic-scatter and capture reactions in the regolith, where the neutrons are generated by cosmic ray impact onto the planet. A radiation transport computation was performed to generate the expected count rates in the neutron-generated gamma-ray

  12. Active galactic nuclei horizons from the gamma-ray perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew M.

    2017-08-01

    Recent results in the field of high energy active galactic nuclei (AGN) astrophysics, benefiting from improvements to gamma-ray instruments and observational strategies, have revealed a surprising wealth of unexpected phenomena. These developments have been brought about both through observational efforts to discover new very high energy gamma-ray emitters, as well as from further in-depth observations of previously detected and well studied objects. I here focus specifically on the discovery of repeated temporal structures observed in AGN lightcurves, and new hard spectral components within the spectral energy distributions of other AGN systems. The challenges that these new features place on the modeling of the sources are highlighted, along with some reflections on what these results tell us about the underlying nature of the emission processes at play.

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts and Their Links With Supernovae and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism is the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  14. Gamma ray constraints on flavor violating asymmetric dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, I.; Panci, P.; Sannino, F.

    2012-01-01

    We show how cosmic gamma rays can be used to constrain models of asymmetric Dark Matter decaying into lepton pairs by violating flavor. First of all we require the models to explain the anomalies in the charged cosmic rays measured by PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S.; performing combined fits we...... determine the allowed values of the Dark Matter mass and lifetime. For these models, we then determine the constraints coming from the measurement of the isotropic gamma-ray background by Fermi for a complete set of lepton flavor violating primary modes and over a range of DM masses from 100 GeV to 10 Te......V. We find that the Fermi constraints rule out the flavor violating asymmetric Dark Matter interpretation of the charged cosmic ray anomalies....

  15. Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-29

    These are slides on special nuclear material gamma-ray signatures for reachback analysts for an LSS Spectroscopy course. The closing thoughts for this presentation are the following: SNM materials have definite spectral signatures that should be readily recognizable to analysts in both bare and shielded configurations. One can estimate burnup of plutonium using certain pairs of peaks that are a few keV apart. In most cases, one cannot reliably estimate uranium enrichment in an analogous way to the estimation of plutonium burnup. The origin of the most intense peaks from some SNM items may be indirect and from ‘associated nuclides.' Indirect SNM signatures sometimes have commonalities with the natural gamma-ray background.

  16. Morphological studies of gamma-ray sources with IACT arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrogi, L.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray telescope to perform morphological studies of celestial gamma-ray sources is investigated. With this aim, general analytical expressions for the instrument response are derived and simulations of isolated source are used as a benchmark to understand the telescope performance. The morphology is represented assuming an ideal Gaussian point spread function (PSF) and a non-Gaussian PSF with extended tails. The response of the telescope is also tested in case of complex environments. In particular, the effect of locating the source (i) nearby a second one and (ii) on top of a diffuse halo-type object is investigated. The first scenario is particularly interesting in the framework of Galactic objects, where the presence of more than one single source in the same field of view (FoV) is expected. The latter represents a relevant study in the contest of extended extra-galactic sources surrounding AGNs.

  17. X-ray and gamma ray waveguide, cavity and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vali, V.; Krogstad, R.S.; Willard, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    An x-ray and gamma ray waveguide, cavity, and method for directing electromagnetic radiation of the x-ray, gamma ray, and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths are described. A hollow fiber is used as the waveguide and is manufactured from a material having an index of refraction less than unity for these wavelengths. The internal diameter of the hollow fiber waveguide and the radius of curvature for the waveguide are selectively predetermined in light of the wavelength of the transmitted radiation to minimize losses. The electromagnetic radiation is obtained from any suitable source ad upon introduction into the waveguide is transmitted along a curvilinear path. The waveguide may be formed as a closed loop to create a cavity or may be used to direct the electromagnetic radiation to a utilization site

  18. ARIES segmented gamma-ray scanner user manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, R.S.; Sheppard, G.A.; Schneider, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    The segmented gamma-ray scatter (SGS) designated as Win SGS at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility has been installed and is intended for use in quantifying the radioisotope content of DOE-STD-3013-96 equivalent containers. The SGS features new software written in C and a new user interface that runs under Microsoft Windows trademark. The operation of the ARIES Segmented Gamma-ray Scanner is documented in this manual. It covers user instructions as well as hardware and software details. Additional information is found in the documentation for the commercially available components and modules that compose the SGS. The objective of the ARIES project is to demonstrate technology to dismantle plutonium pits from excess nuclear weapons, convert the plutonium to a metal ingot or an oxide powder, package the metal or oxide, and verify the contents of the package by nondestructive assay

  19. Polarized Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Kobayashi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available I review how polarization signals have been discussed in the research field of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs. I mainly discuss two subjects in which polarimetry enables us to study the nature of relativistic jets. (1 Jet breaks: Gamma-ray bursts are produced in ultra-relativistic jets. Due to the relativistic beaming effect, the emission can be modeled in a spherical model at early times. However, as the jet gradually slows down, we begin to see the edge of the jet together with polarized signals at some point. (2 Optical flash: later time afterglow is known to be insensitive to the properties of the original ejecta from the GRB central engine. However, a short-lived, reverse shock emission would enable us to study the nature of of GRB jets. I also briefly discuss the recent detection of optical circular polarization in GRB afterglow.

  20. Gamma rays from the annihilation of singlet scalar dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2009-03-01

    We consider an extension of the Standard Model by a singlet scalar that accounts for the dark matter of the Universe. Within this model we compute the expected gamma ray flux from the annihilation of dark matter particles in a consistent way. To do so, an updated analysis of the parameter space of the model is first presented. By enforcing the relic density constraint from the very beginning, the viable parameter space gets reduced to just two variables: the singlet mass and the higgs mass. Current direct detection constraints are then found to require a singlet mass larger than 50 GeV. Finally, we compute the gamma ray flux and annihilation cross section and show that a large fraction of the viable parameter space lies within the sensitivity of Fermi-GLAST.

  1. Determination of gamma ray shielding parameters of rocks and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Shamsan S.; Gaikwad, Dhammajyot K.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2018-03-01

    Gamma shielding parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Neff) have been measured and calculated for rocks and concrete in the energy range 122-1330 keV. The measurements have been carried out at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275, 1330 keV gamma ray energies using a gamma spectrometer includes a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and MCA card. The atomic and electronic cross sections have also been investigated. Experimental and calculated (WinXCom) values were compared, and good agreement has been observed within the experimental error. The obtained results showed that feldspathic basalt, compact basalt, volcanic rock, dolerite and pink granite are more efficient than the sandstone and concrete for gamma ray shielding applications.

  2. Advances in continuous gamma-ray spectrometry and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; McNeece, J.P.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1984-07-01

    Recent advances and applications in continuous Compton recoil gamma-ray spectrometry are described. Applications of continuous gamma-ray spectrometry are presented for: (1) Characterization of light water reactor (LWR) pressures vessel (PV) environments. (2) Assessment of fuel distributions for Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor recovery. (3) Measurement of LWR-PV-neutron exposure. The latest improvements attained with the Janus probe, a special in-situ configuration of Si(Li) detectors, are presented. The status of current efforts to extend the domain of applicability of this method beyond 3 MeV is discussed with emphasis on recent work carried out with Si(Li) detectors of much larger volume

  3. Gamma-ray bursts, a puzzle being resolved

    CERN Multimedia

    Piran, T

    1999-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), short and intense bursts of Gamma-Rays, have puzzled astrophysicists since their accidental discovery in the seventies. BATSE, launched in 1991, has established the cosmological origin of GRBs and has shown that they involve energies much higher than previously expected, corresponding to the most powerful explosions known in the Universe. The fireball model, which has been developed during the last ten years, explains most of the observed features of GRBs . According to this model, GRBs are produced in internal collisions of ejected matter flowing at ultra-relativistic energy. This ultra-relativistic motion reaches Lorentz factors of order 100 or more, higher than seen elsewhere in the Universe. The GRB afterglow was discovered in 1997. It was predicted by this model and it takes place when this relativistic flow is slowed down by the surrounding material. This model was confirmed recently with the discovery last January of the predicted prompt optical emission from GRB 990123. Unfort...

  4. Strategies for Studying the Sources of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.; Norris, J. P.; Hurley, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) has rapidly evolved in recent years with the discovery of their cosmological nature and with BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE and the IPN enabling a wide variety of associated . afterglow measurements. Multiwavelength observations ranging through the radio, optical, soft and hard x-ray, and gamma-ray regimes have exploded the field of GRB interpretation. Also, the Amanda, Milagro and LIGO experiments can search for related neutrino, cosmic-ray photon, and gravitational radiation events, even with the delayed alerts, such as from the IPN. The infrared region, where the optical emissions from sources at the extreme distances may be shifted, will become important but is undersubscribed. The soon-to-be launched Swift mission will greatly broaden the GRB discipline, and a strategy for associated ground-based measurements is outlined. The need for the improved global distribution of all instruments, in particular, robotic infrared detectors, is cited.

  5. Gamma rays from the annihilation of singlet scalar dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    We consider an extension of the Standard Model by a singlet scalar that accounts for the dark matter of the Universe. Within this model we compute the expected gamma ray flux from the annihilation of dark matter particles in a consistent way. To do so, an updated analysis of the parameter space of the model is first presented. By enforcing the relic density constraint from the very beginning, the viable parameter space gets reduced to just two variables: the singlet mass and the higgs mass. Current direct detection constraints are then found to require a singlet mass larger than 50 GeV. Finally, we compute the gamma ray flux and annihilation cross section and show that a large fraction of the viable parameter space lies within the sensitivity of Fermi-GLAST

  6. Simulating Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes using SWORD (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, C.; Grove, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mattson, K.; Polaski, D.; Jackson, L.

    2013-12-01

    We report on simulations of the relativistic feedback discharges involved with the production of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). The simulations were conducted using Geant4 using the SoftWare for the Optimization of Radiation Detectors (SWORD) framework. SWORD provides a graphical interface for setting up simulations in select high-energy radiation transport engines. Using Geant4, we determine avalanche length, the energy spectrum of the electrons and gamma-rays as they leave the field region, and the feedback factor describing the degree to which the production of energetic particles is self-sustaining. We validate our simulations against previous work in order to determine the reliability of our results. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  7. Organization of a multichannel analyzer for gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, Genevieve

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the software organization of a medium scale multichannel analyzer for qualitative and quantitative measurements of the gamma rays emitted by radioactive samples. The first part reminds basis of radioactivity, principle of gamma ray detection, and data processing used for interpretation of a nuclear spectrum. The second part describes first the general organization of the software and then gives some details on interactivity, multidetector capabilites, and integration of complex algorithms for peak search and nuclide identification;problems encountered during the design phase are mentioned and solutions are given. Basic ideas are presented for further developments, such as expert system which should improve interpretation of the results. This present software has been integrated in a manufactured multichannel analyzer named 'POLYGAM NU416'. [fr

  8. A low background gamma ray spectrometer with anticosmic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Quoc Hung; Vo Hong Hai; Tran Kim Tuyet; Ho Lai Tuan

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a gamma ray spectrometer protected by a lead shield (Model 747E Canberra lead shield) and an active shield made of an 80 cm x 80 cm x 3 cm plastic scintillator plate in anticoincidence on top of the lead shield. The detector used as low background gamma-spectrometer is a high purity Germanium crystal of model GC2018 Canberra. The background count rate currently achieved (30-2400 keV) is 1.27 cps without anticoincidence. The level of background suppression obtained from the active protection is 0.80 overall and about 0.43 for the 511 keV gamma line. The gamma ray spectrometer is installed and operated in the Nuclear Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Science, Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam National University. (author)

  9. Method and apparatus for neutron induced gamma ray logging for lithology identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, D.W.; Culver, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The patent describes a neutron-gamma well logging technique which can distinguish between sandstone and limestone formations irrespective of water salinity in the formation. The formation surrounding a borehole is irradiated by fast neutrons and the resulting gamma rays are counted. The gamma rays are converted to electrical signals in three distinct steps; the first two signals result from gamma rays associated with calcium content of the formation and the third signal from gamma rays associated with silicon content. Gamma rays resulting from irradiation of calcium are counted at two non-contiguous energy bands. (O.T.)

  10. An Ordinary Short Gamma-Ray Burst with Extraordinary Implications: Fermi -GBM Detection of GRB 170817A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, A.; Roberts, O. J.; Connaughton, V. [Science and Technology Institute, Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Veres, P.; Briggs, M. S.; Hamburg, R.; Preece, R. D.; Poolakkil, S. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Burns, E.; Racusin, J.; Canton, T. Dal [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Hui, C. M.; Littenberg, T. [Astrophysics Office, ST12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Christensen, N.; Broida, J. [Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, MN 55057 (United States); Siellez, K. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Blackburn, L., E-mail: Adam.M.Goldstein@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2017-10-20

    On 2017 August 17 at 12:41:06 UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected and triggered on the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A. Approximately 1.7 s prior to this GRB, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory triggered on a binary compact merger candidate associated with the GRB. This is the first unambiguous coincident observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from a single astrophysical source and marks the start of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We report the GBM observations and analysis of this ordinary short GRB, which extraordinarily confirms that at least some short GRBs are produced by binary compact mergers.

  11. An Ordinary Short Gamma-Ray Burst with Extraordinary Implications: Fermi-GBM Detection of GRB 170817A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A.; Veres, P.; Burns, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Hamburg, R.; Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Preece, R. D.; Poolakkil, S.; Roberts, O. J.; Hui, C. M.; Connaughton, V.; Racusin, J.; von Kienlin, A.; Dal Canton, T.; Christensen, N.; Littenberg, T.; Siellez, K.; Blackburn, L.; Broida, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W. H.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Stanbro, M.

    2017-10-01

    On 2017 August 17 at 12:41:06 UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected and triggered on the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A. Approximately 1.7 s prior to this GRB, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory triggered on a binary compact merger candidate associated with the GRB. This is the first unambiguous coincident observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from a single astrophysical source and marks the start of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We report the GBM observations and analysis of this ordinary short GRB, which extraordinarily confirms that at least some short GRBs are produced by binary compact mergers.

  12. Is there cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. report that the temporal structure of faint gamma-ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  13. Hot News from the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huentemeyer, Petra

    2014-03-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) TeV Gamma-Ray Observatory is currently under construction at a site about two hours' drive east of Puebla, Mexico on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l.). HAWC is unique among TeV gamma-ray instruments in that it can observe large portions of the sky simultaneously, and covers half the sky every 24 hours. Therefore, the detector is particularly well-suited to measure extended and large-scale structures in the sky such as diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission and large- and small-scale anisotropies. Discoveries of other extended unidentified objects at TeV energies, for example collocated with the ``Fermi Bubbles,'' and the observation of transient phenomena such as GRBs, are also possible. The construction of HAWC funded through NSF, DoE, and CONACyT, is expected to be complete by Fall 2014. Data are already being collected during construction with an increasingly sensitive detector allowing for synchronous observations with instruments at other wavebands like the Fermi Space Telescope. Analysis of the data set reveals significant anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays, both on small (below 10s of degrees) and large angular scales. A number of gamma-ray hot spots are also observed along the Galactic plane and the data have been searched for high-energy emission from GRBs detected at lower energies. I will present first results and scientific potential of the experiment. We acknowledge the support from: US National Science Foundation (NSF); US Department of Energy Office of High-Energy Physics; The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program of Los Alamos National Laboratory; CONACyT, Mexico; Red de Física de Altas Energás, Mexico; DGAPA-UNAM, Mexico; and the University of Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation.

  14. Operations manual for the megachannel gamma-ray coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.

    1977-01-01

    To aid in the study of nuclear structures, a megachannel pulse-height coincidence analysis system on a PDP-8 computer was constructed. The system digitizes the energies of coincident gamma-rays and stores the resultant information on a moving-head disk. The system uses a minicomputer to sort and store gamma-gamma coincident information on line. The megachannel system and how to use it are described

  15. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  16. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  17. Induction of mutation, through gamma rays, in sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.A.S.; Matsuoka, S.; Ruschel, R.

    1984-01-01

    Variety buds Co-740 of sugar cane were irradiated with gamma rays 60 Co at 0.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 7.0 kR to study changes in the obtained progeny. Evaluation of the germination capacity, height of plants and morphological changes were studied in the different treatments. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Gamma-ray-line astronomy: the case of 26Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prantzos, N.

    1986-07-01

    The recent detection of the 1.8 MeV line in the galactic plane, attributed to the decay of ∼ 3 Solar mass of radioactive 26 Al, brought closer together the disciplines of gamma-ray Astronomy and Nuclear Astrophysics. A review is presented here of the possible production mechanisms and sites of 26 Al in the Galaxy, with an emphasis on the role of massive, mass losing stars

  19. Resonant production of $\\gamma$ rays in jolted cold neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic shock waves passing through colliding cold neutron stars can cause repetitive superconducting phase transitions in which the proton condensate relaxes to its equilibrium value via coherent oscillations. As a result, a resonant non-thermal production of gamma rays in the MeV energy range with power up to 10^(52) erg/s can take place during the short period of time before the nuclear matter is heated by the shock waves.

  20. Gamma-Ray interaction probabilities for some liquid scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Torano Martinez, E.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1989-01-01

    Interaction probabilities for 17 gamma-Ray energies between 1 and 1.000 KeV have been computed and tabulated. The tables may be applied to the case of cylindrical vials with radius 1,25 cm and volumes 5, 10 and 15 ml. Toluene, Toluene/Alcohol, Dioxane-Naftalene, PCS, INSTAGEL and HISAFE II scintillators are considered. Graphical results for 10 ml are also given. (Author)

  1. Neutron star mergers and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Under the support of grant NAG 5-1904, we have carried out research on several topics related to gamma-ray bursts (GRB's). In our proposal, we stated that we would study three topics: (1) fireball evolution; (2) neutron star mergers; and (3) statistics of bursts. We have completed a significant amount of work in each of these areas. Resulting papers from this work are presented.

  2. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  3. Simulation of scintillating fiber gamma ray detectors for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, R.C.; Fenyves, E.J.; Antich, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on plastic scintillating fibers which have been shown to be effective for high spatial and time resolution of gamma rays. They may be expected to significantly improve the resolution of current medical imaging systems such as PET and SPECT. Monte Carlo simulation of imaging systems using these detectors, provides a means to optimize their performance in this application, as well as demonstrate their resolution and efficiency. Monte Carlo results are presented for PET and SPECT systems constructed using these detectors

  4. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  5. Gamma-ray boxes from axion-mediated dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Gehler, Sergio López; Pato, Miguel; Lee, Hyun Min; Park, Wan-Il

    2013-01-01

    We compute the gamma-ray output of axion-mediated dark matter and derive the corresponding constraints set by recent data. In such scenarios the dark matter candidate is a Dirac fermion that pair-annihilates into axions and/or scalars. Provided that the axion decays (at least partly) into photons, these models naturally give rise to a box-shaped gamma-ray spectrum that may present two distinct phenomenological behaviours: a narrow box, resembling a line at half the dark matter mass, or a wide box, spanning an extensive energy range up to the dark matter mass. Remarkably, we find that in both cases a sizable gamma-ray flux is predicted for a thermal relic without fine-tuning the model parameters nor invoking boost factors. This large output is in line with recent Fermi-LAT observations towards the galactic centre region and is on the verge of being excluded. We then make use of the Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. data to derive robust, model-independent upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section for the narrow and wide box scenarios. H.E.S.S. constraints, in particular, turn out to match the ones from Fermi-LAT at hundreds of GeV and extend to multi-TeV masses. Future Čerenkov telescopes will likely probe gamma-ray boxes from thermal dark matter relics in the whole multi-TeV range, a region hardly accessible to direct detection, collider searches and other indirect detection strategies

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts The Brightest Explosions in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Vedrenne, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery was first announced in 1973, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been among the most fascination objects in the universe. While the initial mystery has gone, the fascination continues, sustained by the close connection linking GRBs with some of the most fundamental topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Both authors have been active in GRB observations for over two decades and have produced an outstanding account on both the history and the perspectives of GRB research.

  7. Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Johanna

    2011-01-15

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

  8. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  9. Gamma-ray identification of nuclear weapon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosnell, T. B.; Hall, J. M.; Jam, C. L.; Knapp, D. A.; Koenig, Z. M.; Luke, S. J.; Pohl, B. A.; Schach Wittenau, A. von; Wolford, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    There has been an accelerating national interest in countering nuclear smuggling. This has caused a corresponding expansion of interest in the use of gamma-ray spectrometers for checkpoint monitoring, nuclear search, and within networks of nuclear and collateral sensors. All of these are fieldable instruments--ranging from large, fixed portal monitors to hand-held and remote monitoring equipment. For operational reasons, detectors with widely varying energy resolution and detection efficiency will be employed. In many instances, such instruments must be sensitive to weak signals, always capable of recognizing the gamma-ray signatures from nuclear weapons materials (NWM), often largely insensitive to spectral alteration by radiation transport through intervening materials, capable of real-time implementation, and able to discriminate against signals from commonly encountered legitimate gamma-ray sources, such as radiopharmaceuticals. Several decades of experience in classified programs have shown that all of these properties are not easily achieved and successful approaches were of limited scope--such as the detection of plutonium only. This project was originally planned as a two-year LDRD-ER. Since funding for 1997 was not sustained, this is a report of the first year's progress

  10. Neutron diagnostics using compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S. P.; Kang, B. S. [Lab. Of Radiation Convergence Science, Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. S.; Cheon, M. S.; Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Various neutron diagnostic systems such as a fission chamber, stilbene spectrometers, and a neutron activation system (NAS) have been installed at KSTAR for more accurate detection of neutron flux. Among the systems, the NAS is the most reliable and robust tool, and the measurement data of it generally are to be used for calibration of other systems. The Compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer which can suppress the expected background, noise signal and Compton scattering was used to measure the gamma-rays of neutron activated samples. In this study, the encapsulated indium samples which are installed and irradiated by the neutrons released from the nuclear fusion reactions in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) was used and measured using Compton suppressed gamma-ray spectrometer to minimize the measurement error. From the experimental results, the statistical error was decreased by Compton suppression system. the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the Compton suppressed system is estimated to be about 2.3 %, and the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the non-suppressed system was estimated to be about 4.9 %. It was found that the system can reduce the measurement error effectively. It is confirmed that this system can be applied to ITER TBM and future nuclear fusion devices.

  11. Gamma ray lines: what will they tell us about SUSY?

    CERN Document Server

    Yaguna, Carlos E

    2009-01-01

    Neutralino dark matter can be indirectly detected by observing the gamma ray lines from the annihilation processes XX-->gg and XX-->gZ. In this paper we study the implications that the observation of these two lines could have for the determination of the supersymmetric parameter space. Within the minimal supergravity framework, we find that, independently of the dark matter distribution in the Galaxy, such observations by themselves would allow to differentiate between the coannihilation region, the funnel region, and the focus point region. As a result, several restrictions on the msugra parameters can be derived. Within a more general MSSM scenario, we show that the observation of gamma-ray lines might be used to discriminate between a bino-, a wino-, and a higgsino-like neutralino, with important consequences for cosmology and for models of supersymmetry breaking. The detection of the gamma ray lines, therefore, will not only provide an unmistakable signature of dark matter, it will also open a new road t...

  12. First Results from the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesa Greus, Francisco; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a TeV gamma-ray detector located at an altitude of 4100 meters on the northern slope of the Sierra Negra volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The detector will consist of 300 water Cherenkov detectors spread on a 22,000 square meter area, and is expected to be fully constructed by the end of 2014. Thanks to its large field-of-view, good angular resolution and >90% duty cycle, HAWC will allow us to study the Galactic sources at high energies (100 GeV - 100 TeV), diffuse gamma-ray emission, and transient emissions from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. The detector started its continuous operation in August 2013 with a fraction of the array, and its size has been increasing since then. The first results of the experiment, with almost one year of data from the partial array, are reviewed in this proceedings.

  13. Thermal-neutron capture gamma-rays. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1997-05-01

    The energy and photon intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal-neutron capture are presented in ascending order of gamma energy. All those gamma-rays with intensity of ≥ 2% of the strongest transition are included. The two strongest transitions seen for the target nuclide are indicated in each case. Where the target nuclide mass number is indicated as nat the natural target was used. The gamma energies given are in keV. The gamma intensities given are relative to 100 for the strongest transition. All data for A > 44 are taken from Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (4/97), a computer file of evaluated nuclear structure data maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, on behalf of the Nuclear Structure and Decay and Decay Data network, coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. These data are published in Nuclear Data Sheets, Academic Press, San Diego, CA. The data for A ≤ 44 is taken from ''Prompt Gamma Rays from Thermal-Neutron Capture,'' M.A. Lone, R.A. Leavitt, D.A. Harrison, Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 26, 511 (1981)

  14. Recent improvements in plutonium gamma-ray analysis using MGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Gunnink, R.

    1992-06-01

    MGA is a gamma-ray spectrum analysis program for determining relative plutonium isotopic abundances. It can determine plutonium isotopic abundances better than 1% using a high-resolution, low-energy, planar germanium detector and measurement times ten minutes or less. We have modified MGA to allow determination of absolute plutonium isotopic abundances in solutions. With calibration of a detector using a known solution concentration in a well-defined sample geometry, plutonium solution concentrations can be determined. MGA can include analysis of a second spectrum of the high-energy spectrum to include determination of fission product abundances relative to total plutonium. For the high-energy gamma-ray measurements we have devised a new hardware configuration, so that both the low- and high-energy gamma-ray detectors are mounted in a single cryostat thereby reducing weight and volume of the detector systems. We describe the detector configuration, and the performance of the MGA program for determining plutonium concentrations in solutions and fission product abundances

  15. Gamma Ray Bursts and the Birth of Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Black holes have been predicted since the 1940's from solutions of Einstein's general relativity field equation. There is strong evidence of their existence from astronomical observations, but their origin has remained an open question of great interest. Gamma-ray bursts may the clue. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and appear to be the birth cries of black holes. The Swift and Fermi missions are two powerful NASA observatories currently in orbit that are discovering how gamma-ray bursts work. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are tremendously luminous and are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. One Swift burst at z=8.3 is the most distant object known in the universe. The talk will present the latest gamma-ray burst results from Swift and Fermi and will highlight what they are teaching us about black holes and jet outflows.

  16. Cellular Stress to Low Gamma-ray Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Letechipia de Leon, C.; Guzman Enriquez, L. J.; Garcia-Talavera, M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low gamma ray intensity upon Hsp 70 expression in human lymphocytes. the heat shock proteins (Hsp) family, are a group of proteins present in all living organism, therefore there are highly conserved and are related to adaptation and evolution. At cellular level these proteins acts as chaperones correcting denatured proteins. when a stress agent, such heavy metals, UV, heat, etc. is affecting a cell a response to this aggression is triggered through overexpression of Hsp. Several studies has been carried out in which the cellular effect are observed, mostly of these studies uses large doses, but very few studies are related with low doses. Blood of healthy volunteers was obtained and the lymphocytes were isolated by ficoll-histopaque gradient. Experimental lots were irradiated in a ''137Cs gamma-ray. Hsp70 expression was found since 0.5 cGy, indicating a threshold to very low doses of gamma rays. (Author) 27 refs

  17. Recent advances in gamma-ray log interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czubek, J.A.; Zorski, T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a recently developed method of quantitative interpretation of gamma-ray logs. The whole rock space is divided into a set of parallel elementary layers of equal thickness perpendicular to the borehole. The ore grade q is determined for each elementary layer from known gamma-ray log deflections. Gamma-ray logs performed by the continuous ratemeter, point by point, or by continuous digital measurements are discussed. Such parameters as logging velocity, ratemeter time constant, apparatus dead time, borehole radius, detector length, rock density and/or rock absorption coefficient for gamma radiation and different borehole conditions (drilling fluid, casing tubes, etc.) are taken into account. The influence of the rock porosity and its mineralogical density on the calibration factor is discussed. The entire solution of the problem is presented in analytical form and therefore its practical application is very simple. Some details connected with the accuracy of this method of interpretation as well as the field example are also discussed. The tables of all numerical coefficients needed for practical application of this method of interpretation are included in the paper. (author)

  18. Short Hard Gamma Ray Bursts And Their Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    Long duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) are produced by highly- relativistic jets ejected in core-collapse supernova explosions. The origin of short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) has not been established. They may be produced by highly relativistic jets ejected in various processes: mergers of compact stellar objects; large-mass accretion episodes onto compact stars in close binaries or onto intermediate-mass black holes in dense stellar regions; phase transition of compact stars. Natural environments of such events are the dense cores of globular clusters, superstar clusters and young supernova remnants. We have used the cannonball model of GRBs to analyze all Swift SHBs with a well-sampled X-ray afterglow. We show that their prompt gamma-ray emission can be explained by inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of the progenitor's glory light, and their extended soft emission component by ICS of high density light or synchrotron radiation (SR) in a high density interstellar medium within the cl...

  19. Constraining decaying dark matter with Fermi LAT gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Günter; Weniger, Christoph; Maccione, Luca; Redondo, Javier

    2010-01-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton off low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. The aim of this paper is providing a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the Fermi LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV. We provide a set of universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model produce the desired constraints. Our response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs such as the electron propagation in the galaxy, the dark matter profile, the gamma-ray fluxes of known origin, and the Fermi LAT data. We study the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. To this end we also take into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. We find that with the available data decaying dark matter cannot be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess

  20. Photoneutron spectroscopy using monoenergetic gamma rays for bulk explosives detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFee, J.E.; Faust, A.A.; Pastor, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    To date, the most successful nuclear methods to confirm the presence of bulk explosives have been radiative thermal neutron capture (thermal neutron activation) and prompt radiative emission following inelastic fast neutron scattering (fast neutron analysis). This paper proposes an alternative: photoneutron spectroscopy using monoenergetic gamma rays. If monoenergetic gamma rays whose energies exceed the threshold for neutron production are incident on a given isotope, the emitted neutrons have a spectrum consisting of one or more discrete energies and the spectrum can be used as a fingerprint to identify the isotope. A prototype compact gamma-ray generator is proposed as a suitable source and a commercially available 3 He ionization chamber is proposed as a suitable spectrometer. Advantages of the method with respect to the previously mentioned ones may include simpler spectra and low inherent natural neutron background. Its drawbacks include a present lack of suitable commercially available photon sources, induced neutron backgrounds and low detection rates. This paper describes the method, including kinematics, sources, detectors and geometries. Simulations using a modified Geant4 Monte Carlo modelling code are described and results are presented to support feasibility. Further experiments are recommended

  1. Gamma-ray lines from radiative dark matter decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David; Weniger, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The decay of dark matter particles which are coupled predominantly to charged leptons has been proposed as a possible origin of excess high-energy positrons and electrons observed by cosmic-ray telescopes PAMELA and Fermi LAT. Even though the dark matter itself is electrically neutral, the tree-level decay of dark matter into charged lepton pairs will generically induce radiative two-body decays of dark matter at the quantum level. Using an effective theory of leptophilic dark matter decay, we calculate the rates of radiative two-body decays for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles. Due to the absence of astrophysical sources of monochromatic gamma rays, the observation of a line in the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum would constitute a strong indication of a particle physics origin of these photons. We estimate the intensity of the gamma-ray line that may be present in the energy range of a few TeV if the dark matter decay interpretation of the leptonic cosmic-ray anomalies is correct and comment on observational prospects of present and future Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes, in particular the CTA

  2. Time evolution of gamma rays from supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Daniele; Zandanel, Fabio; Cristofari, Pierre; Gabici, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    We present a systematic phenomenological study focused on the time evolution of the non-thermal radiation - from radio waves to gamma rays - emitted by typical supernova remnants via hadronic and leptonic mechanisms, for two classes of progenitors: thermonuclear and core-collapse. To this aim, we develop a numerical tool designed to model the evolution of the cosmic ray spectrum inside a supernova remnant, and compute the associated multi-wavelength emission. We demonstrate the potential of this tool in the context of future population studies based on large collection of high-energy gamma-ray data. We discuss and explore the relevant parameter space involved in the problem, and focus in particular on their impact on the maximum energy of accelerated particles, in order to study the effectiveness and duration of the PeVatron phase. We outline the crucial role of the ambient medium through which the shock propagates during the remnant evolution. In particular, we point out the role of dense clumps in creating a significant hardening in the hadronic gamma-ray spectrum.

  3. Towards a complete theory of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon; Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are notorious for their diversity. Yet, they have a series of common features. The typical energy of their $\\gamma$ rays is a fraction of an MeV. The energy distributions are well described by a ``Band spectrum'', with ``peak energies'' spanning a surprisingly narrow range. The time structure of a GRB consists of pulses, superimposed or not, rising and decreasing fast. The number of photons in a pulse, the pulses' widths and their total energy vary within broad but given ranges. Within a pulse, the energy spectrum softens with increasing time. The duration of a pulse decreases at higher energies and its peak intensity shifts to earlier time. Many other correlations between pairs of GRB observables have been identified. Last (and based on one measured event!) the $\\gamma$-ray polarization is very large. A satisfactory theory of GRBs should naturally and very simply explain, among others, all these facts. We show that the "cannonball" (CB) model does it. In the CB model the process leadi...

  4. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. sensitive narrow-field X-ray and uv/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the longstanding mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  5. A gamma-ray spectrometer system for fusion applications

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Kaschuck, Y A; Martin-Solis, J R; Portnov, D V

    2002-01-01

    A NaI scintillator spectrometer system for the measurement of gamma-ray spectra in tokamak discharges has been developed and installed on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Two NaI scintillators are viewing the plasma at two different angles with respect to the equatorial plane. The main features of the spectrometer system (energy range: 0.3-23 MeV) and of the unfolding technique used to restore physical spectra from the pulse-height distributions are described: a method of solution with regularisation for matrix equations of large size, allowing to process count distributions with significant statistical noise, has been developed. A dedicated software, portable to any platform, has been written both for the acquisition and the analysis of the spectra. The typical gamma-ray spectra recorded in hydrogen and deuterium discharges, also with additional heating, are presented and discussed; two components have been observed: (a) thick-target Bremsstrahlung gamma-rays produced by runaway electrons hitting the Inconel po...

  6. EVIDENCE FOR GAMMA-RAY JETS IN THE MILKY WAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Meng; Finkbeiner, Douglas P., E-mail: mengsu@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Although accretion onto supermassive black holes in other galaxies is seen to produce powerful jets in X-ray and radio, no convincing detection has ever been made of a kpc-scale jet in the Milky Way. The recently discovered pair of 10 kpc tall gamma-ray bubbles in our Galaxy may be signs of earlier jet activity from the central black hole. In this paper, we identify a gamma-ray cocoon feature in the southern bubble, a jet-like feature along the cocoon's axis of symmetry, and another directly opposite the Galactic center in the north. Both the cocoon and jet-like feature have a hard spectrum with spectral index {approx} - 2 from 1 to 100 GeV, with a cocoon total luminosity of (5.5 {+-} 0.45) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} and luminosity of the jet-like feature of (1.8 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} at 1-100 GeV. If confirmed, these jets are the first resolved gamma-ray jets ever seen.

  7. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Bissaldi, E. [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bouvier, A., E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  8. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bouvier, A.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model

  9. Applications Using High Flux LCS gamma-ray Beams: Nuclear Security and Contributions to Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear nonproliferation and security are an important issue for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Many countries now collaborate together for preventing serious accidents from nuclear terrorism. Detection of hidden long-lived radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides in a non-destructive manner is useful for nuclear safeguards and management of nuclear wastes as well as nuclear security. After introducing the present situation concerning the nuclear nonproliferation and security in Japan, we plan to show the present activities of JAEA to detect the hidden nuclear materials by means of the nuclear resonance fluorescence with energy-tunable, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by Laser Compton Scattering (LCS) with an electron beam. The energy recovery linac (ERL) machine is now under development with the KEK-JAEA collaboration for realizing the new generation of gamma-ray sources. The detection technologies of nuclear materials are currently developed using the existing electron beam facilities at Duke University and at NewSubaru. These developments in Japan will contribute to the nuclear security program in Japan and to the assay of melted nuclear fuels in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants.

  10. Application for plasma diagnostics with D(α, γ)6Li gamma-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kentaro; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Taniike, Akira; Kitamura, Akira

    2006-01-01

    The gamma ray measurement from fusion plasma is one of the important techniques to clarify fast ion properties in plasma. Some observation of the gamma-ray in JET plasma was reported. 12 C(d, pγ) 13 C and 9 Be(α, nγ) 12 C reactions on the JET observation are mainly recommended as the actual prospective nuclear reaction on the gamma-ray measurement. However, it is thought that the gamma-ray observation by means of these reactions significantly depends on the conditioning (i.e. densities of the beryllium and carbon in plasma). Therefore, it is also important to examine the availabilities concerning the methods of gamma ray. We have tried to measure the 2.18 MeV gamma ray of D(α, γ) 6 Li reaction and the properties of the another gamma ray emission by MeV-He ++ beam irradiation experiment. (author)

  11. Comments on nuclear physics for gamma-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1985-10-01

    Estimates are presented of the probability of finding a closely spaced pair of levels, one member of which is an isomer, in the rare earth and actinide nuclei. A discussion of the typical electromagnetic transition strengths expected between such pairs is given. Present and future experimental techniques are described, including the possible development of particle detectors with greatly improved resolution. 17 refs., 1 tab

  12. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Zverev, V G; Galper, A M; Arkhangelskaya, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Yurkin, Yu T; Bakaldin, A V; Suchkov, S I; Topchiev, N P; Dalkarov, O D

    2016-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work. (paper)

  13. Cosmic Forensics Confirms Gamma-Ray Burst And Supernova Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists announced today that they have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to confirm that a gamma-ray burst was connected to the death of a massive star. This result is an important step in understanding the origin of gamma-ray bursts, the most violent events in the present-day universe. "If a gamma-ray burst were a crime, then we now have strong circumstantial evidence that a supernova explosion was at the scene," said Nathaniel Butler of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, lead author of a paper presented today at the meeting of the High Energy Division of the American Astronomical Society. Chandra was able to obtain an unusually long observation (approximately 21 hours) of the afterglow of GRB 020813 (so named because the High-Energy Transient Explorer, HETE, discovered it on August 13, 2002.) A grating spectrometer aboard Chandra revealed an overabundance of elements characteristically dispersed in a supernova explosion. Narrow lines, or bumps, due to silicon and sulfur ions (atoms stripped of most of their electrons) were clearly identified in the X-ray spectrum of GRB 020813. "Our observation of GRB 020813 supports two of the most important features of the popular supra-nova model for gamma-ray bursts," said Butler. "An extremely massive star likely exploded less than two months prior to the gamma-ray burst, and the radiation from the gamma-ray burst was beamed into a narrow cone." An analysis of the data showed that the ions were moving away from the site of the gamma-ray burst at a tenth the speed of light, probably as part of a shell of matter ejected in the supernova explosion. The line features were observed to be sharply peaked, indicating that they were coming from a narrow region of the expanding shell. This implies that only a small fraction of the shell was illuminated by the gamma-ray burst, as would be expected if the burst was beamed into a narrow cone. The observed duration of the afterglow suggests a delay of about 60 days

  14. Designing a Gamma-Ray Telescope on a Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Major space-based observatories are imperative in astronomy, but they take a long time to plan, build, and launch and they arent cheap. A new study examines an interesting compromise: a low-cost, space-based gamma-ray detector that we could use while we wait for the next big observatory to launch.Coverage and sensitivity of past and future missions for the X-ray to gamma-ray energy range (click for a better look!). The only past mission to explore the 1 MeV region was COMPTEL, on board CGRO. e-ASTROGAM is a proposed future space mission that would explore this range. [Lucchetta et al. 2017]A Gap in CoverageIn the last few decades, weve significantly expanded our X-ray and gamma-ray viewof the sky. One part of the electromagnetic spectrum remains poorly explored, however: the approximate transition point between X-rays and gamma rays near 1 MeV.Space-based gamma-ray telescopes have been proposed for the future to better explore this energy range. But these major observatories have costs of around half a billion Euros and will take roughly a decade to build and launch. Is there a way to get eyes on this energy range sooner?Scaling Down with CubeSatA team of scientists led by Giulio Lucchetta (University of Padova and INFN Padova, Italy) has proposed an intriguing solution for the more immediate future: a nano-satellite telescope based on the CubeSat standard.Structure of the proposed gamma-ray detector, in a 2U CubeSat design. [Lucchetta et al. 2017]A CubeSat is a miniaturized satellite design that can be easily deployed in space, either from the International Space Station or by hitching a ride as a secondary payload on a large rocket. The size of a CubeSat is a standardized unit of measurement: a single CubeSat unit, or 1U, is a mere 10x10x10 cm and a maximum of 1.33 kg in weight.The gamma-ray telescope proposed by Lucchetta and collaborators would use a 2U standard for the instrument, so the instrument would be only 10x10x20 cm in size! The design for the

  15. NRAO Teams With NASA Gamma-Ray Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is teaming with NASA's upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to allow astronomers to use both the orbiting facility and ground-based radio telescopes to maximize their scientific payoff. Under the new, streamlined process, astronomers can compete for coordinated observing time and support from both GLAST and NRAO's radio telescopes. GLAST satellite Artist's rendering of the GLAST spacecraft in orbit above the Earth. CREDIT: General Dynamics C4 Systems Click on Image for Larger File Images of NRAO Telescopes Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope Very Long Baseline Array Very Large Array Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array GLAST is scheduled for launch no earlier than December 14. It will perform a survey of the entire sky at gamma-ray wavelengths every 3 hours using its primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). NRAO operates the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico, the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The NRAO is a research facility of the National Science Foundation (NSF). "Coordinated gamma-ray and radio observations of celestial objects will greatly enhance the ability to fully understand those objects. Astronomy today requires such multiwavelength studies, and this agreement paves the way for exciting, cutting-edge research," said Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. GLAST will be vastly more capable than previous gamma-ray satellites, and will carry an instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor, specifically designed to detect gamma-ray bursts. GLAST observers will study objects such as active galaxies, pulsars, and supernova remnants, which are also readily studied with radio telescopes. By working together, NASA's GLAST mission and NSF's NRAO facilities can study flares from blazars over the widest possible range of energies, which is crucial to understanding how black holes, notorious for drawing matter in, can

  16. Probing Intrinsic Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xilong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-11-01

    Progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts are thought to be neutron stars coalescing with their companion black hole or neutron star, which are one of the main gravitational wave sources. We have devised a Bayesian framework for combining gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave information that allows us to probe short gamma-ray burst luminosities. We show that combined short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave observations not only improve progenitor distance and inclination angle estimates, they also allow the isotropic luminosities of short gamma-ray bursts to be determined without the need for host galaxy or light-curve information. We characterize our approach by simulating 1000 joint short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave detections by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We show that ˜90 % of the simulations have uncertainties on short gamma-ray burst isotropic luminosity estimates that are within a factor of two of the ideal scenario, where the distance is known exactly. Therefore, isotropic luminosities can be confidently determined for short gamma-ray bursts observed jointly with gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Planned enhancements to Advanced LIGO will extend its range and likely produce several joint detections of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. Third-generation gravitational wave detectors will allow for isotropic luminosity estimates for the majority of the short gamma-ray burst population within a redshift of z ˜1 .

  17. Gamma-ray multiplicity distribution in ternary fission of {sup 252}Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, M [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kliman, J [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Krupa, L [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Morhac, M [Department of Nuclear Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, Bratislava (Slovakia); Hamilton, J H [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Kormicki, J [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Ramayya, A V [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Hwang, J K [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Luo, Y X [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Fong, D [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Gore, P [Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Akopian, G M Ter; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Rodin, A M; Fomichev, A S; Popeko, G S; Daniel, A V [Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Rasmussen, J O; Macchiavelli, A O [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stoyer, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Donangelo, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cole, J D [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2002-12-01

    From multiparameter data obtained at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the integral characteristics of the prompt {gamma}-ray emission were extracted for tripartition of {sup 252}Cf with He, Be and C being the third light charged particle. We used multifold {gamma}-ray coincidence spectra for the determination of {gamma}-ray multiplicities assuming a Gaussian distribution for {gamma}-ray multiplicity. The multiplicity distribution characteristics, i.e. mean multiplicity and its dispersion were obtained by minimizing with respect to the calculated values of probabilities of multifold {gamma}-ray coincidences using a combinatoric method. Comparison with the known experimental data from binary fission was made. Further, we investigated dependencies of the mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity on the kinetic energy of the light charged particle. The mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity for He ternary fission is found to increase rapidly with increasing kinetic energy of He in the region less than 11 MeV and then decrease slowly with increasing kinetic energy of He. The anomalous behaviour of {gamma}-ray emission is discussed. The mean {gamma}-ray multiplicity was determined for the first time for Be and C ternary fission. For Be, the {gamma}-ray multiplicity as a function of kinetic energy was obtained as well.

  18. Probing Intrinsic Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xilong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-11-03

    Progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts are thought to be neutron stars coalescing with their companion black hole or neutron star, which are one of the main gravitational wave sources. We have devised a Bayesian framework for combining gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave information that allows us to probe short gamma-ray burst luminosities. We show that combined short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave observations not only improve progenitor distance and inclination angle estimates, they also allow the isotropic luminosities of short gamma-ray bursts to be determined without the need for host galaxy or light-curve information. We characterize our approach by simulating 1000 joint short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave detections by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We show that ∼90% of the simulations have uncertainties on short gamma-ray burst isotropic luminosity estimates that are within a factor of two of the ideal scenario, where the distance is known exactly. Therefore, isotropic luminosities can be confidently determined for short gamma-ray bursts observed jointly with gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Planned enhancements to Advanced LIGO will extend its range and likely produce several joint detections of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. Third-generation gravitational wave detectors will allow for isotropic luminosity estimates for the majority of the short gamma-ray burst population within a redshift of z∼1.

  19. Proceeding of the workshop on gamma-ray spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, photon and RI beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Masumi; Sugita, Michiaki; Hayakawa, Takehito [eds.

    1998-03-01

    Three time since 1992, we have held the symposia entitled `Joint Spectroscopy Experiments Utilizing JAERI Tandem-Booster Accelerator` at the Tokai Research Establishment. In the symposia, we have mainly discussed the plans of experiments to be done in this joint program. The joint program started in 1994. Several experiments have been made since and some new results have already come up. This symposium `Gamma-ray Spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, Photon and RI beams` was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. Because this symposium is the first occasion after the program started, the first purpose of the symposium is to present and discuss the experimental results so far obtained using the JAERI Tandem-Booster. The second purpose of the symposium is to discuss new possibilities of gamma-ray spectroscopy using new resources such as RI-beam and Photon-beam. The participants from RIKEN, Tohoku University and JAERI Neutron Science Research Center presented the future plans of experiments with RI-beam at each facility. Compared with these nuclear beams, photon beam provides a completely new tool for the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, which is achieved by inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electron and laser beams. The 23 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Gamma-ray mirror technology for NDA of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descalle, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruz-Armendariz, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alameda, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brejnholt, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soufli, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robinson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dreyer, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pivovaroff, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ziock, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chichester, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Direct measurements of gamma rays emitted by fissile material have been proposed as an alternative to measurements of the gamma rays from fission products. From a safeguards applications perspective, direct detection of uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) K-shell fluorescence emission lines and specific lines from some of their isotopes could lead to improved shipper-receiver difference or input accountability at the start of Pu reprocessing. However, these measurements are difficult to implement when the spent fuel is in the line-of-sight of the detector, as the detector is exposed to high rates dominated by fission product emissions. To overcome the combination of high rates and high background, grazing incidence multilayer mirrors have been proposed as a solution to selectively reflect U and Pu hard X-ray and soft gamma rays in the 90 to 420 keV energy into a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector shielded from the direct line-of-sight of spent fuel. Several groups demonstrated that K-shell fluorescence lines of U and Pu in spent fuel could be detected with Ge detectors. In the field of hard X-ray optics the performance of reflective multilayer coated reflective optics was demonstrated up to 645 keV at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Initial measurements conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with sealed sources and scoping experiments conducted at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) with spent nuclear fuel further demonstrated the pass-band properties of multilayer mirrors for reflecting specific emission lines into 1D and 2D HPGe detectors, respectively.

  1. Extragalactic origin of gamma-ray bursts. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.; Teller, E.

    1984-01-01

    Detectors of gamma-rays carried by satellites and later by high-flying balloons showed the existence of events lasting from fifteen milliseconds to about a hundred seconds, arriving from all directions in space. A few hundred events have been observed in a little more than a decade. The energy of gamma-rays range from a few kilovolts to millions of volts. Recent evidence indicates that considerable energy may be carried at least in some cases even above 10 MeV. But the bulk of the energy appeared to be emitted between 100 and 200 keV. The observed intensities range between 10 -3 and 10 -7 ergs/cm 2 . The simple facts about intensity distribution are compatible with two extreme assumptions but exclude intermediate hypotheses. Either the events occur in our own galaxy in a region smaller than the thickness of the galaxy or they are of extragalactic origin and come from distant galaxies. Practically all attempted explanations have made the former explanation which requires that a mass of approximately 10 20 grams impinges on a neutron star (assuming a near to 100% conversion of gravitational energy available on the surface of the neutron star or 10 20 ergs/gram into gamma-rays which, of course, is unrealistic). In case of an extragalactic origin, the neutron star must attract and convert, as we shall see, about 2 x 10 30 grams or 10 -3 of the solar mass. It is perhaps the size of such events which deterred a detailed discussion of this alternative. Montgomery Johnson and I have tried to assume these big collisions, explore the consequences, and I shall talk about this extragalactic hypothesis

  2. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.; Cole, Richard; Walton, David M.; Winter, Berend; Pedersen, Kristian; Hjorth, Jens; Andersen, Michael; Hornstrup, Allan; den Herder, Jan-Willem A.; Piro, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope is a 0.7-m F/1 with a very small instrument box containing 3 instruments: a slitless spectrograph with a resolution of 20, a multi-imager giving images of a field in 4 bands simultaneously, and a cross-dispersed Échelle spectrograph giving a resolution of 1000. The wavelength range is 0.5 μm to 1.7 μm. All instruments fit together in a box of 80 mm x 80 mm x 200 mm. The low resolution spectrograph uses a very compact design including a special triplet. It contains only spherical surfaces except for one tilted cylindrical surface to disperse the light. To reduce the need for a high precision pointing, an Advanced Image Slicer was added in front of the high resolution spectrograph. This spectrograph uses a simple design with only one mirror for the collimator and another for the camera. The Imager contains dichroics to separate the bandwidths and glass thicknesses to compensate the differences in path length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism.

  3. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  4. A neutron counter based on measurement of prompt gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B; Zlatin, T.; Manor, O.; Dubinsky, S.; German, U.

    2004-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter based on measurement of prompt gamma rays is composed of three main elements: a moderator of the fast neutrons, a converter which transforms the thermal neutrons into gamma rays (mostly by (n, γ) reaction), and the detector of gamma rays. Chung and co-workers studied the possibility to use a Germanium detector to measure the neutron dose equivalent rate in a mixed neutron-gamma field. They reported that both thermal and fast neutron doses could be evaluated by measuring the photo-peaks at 596 keV and 691 keV due to the reactions 72 Ge(n th , γ) and 73 Ge(n f , n' γ) respectively. Chao and Niu used a Ge detector covered with moderating material. Fast neutrons were moderated in a polyethylene cylinder and then captured in the germanium crystal, where they created the 596 keV γ photons, that were counted by the same Ge crystal. Another approach was taken by Ghanbari and Mohageghi, who used 10 B loaded polyethylene as moderator and converter. They measured the 478 keV photons, which are emitted from the excited state of the 7 Li produced by the 10 B (n, γ) 7 Li reaction. In all those studies, where converters were either Ge or 10 B, relatively low energy photons were produced and measured, which are in the range of high background. There are converters that can produce high energy (in the range from 4 MeV to 7 MeV), but the efficiency of the detectors in this energy range is very low. An optimal energy range considering the two contradicting requirements of low background and high counting efficiency is estimated to be over 1 MeV, up to about 2.5 MeV. The purpose of the present work was to find an improved combination of converter-detector system with maximum efficiency and signal to noise ratio

  5. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  6. Optimum filter-based discrimination of neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, Moslem; Prenosil, Vaclav; Cvachovec, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    An optimum filter-based method for discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in a mixed radiation field is presented. The existing filter-based implementations of discriminators require sample pulse responses in advance of the experiment run to build the filter coefficients, which makes them less practical. Our novel technique creates the coefficients during the experiment and improves their quality gradually. Applied to several sets of mixed neutron and photon signals obtained through different digitizers using stilbene scintillator, this approach is analyzed and its discrimination quality is measured. (authors)

  7. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  8. Study for Gamma Ray Spectra of Cascading Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassim, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Relative intensity to the single peaks and true sum peaks to the elements of cascading decay of gamma-rays as 60 Co and 88 Y have been measured for different point source-detector distances by using 3 * 3 N al(Tl) detector into two different methods. These methods give a good information to distinguish between single and true sum peaks especially in analysis a complex pulse height spectrum ; where the relative intensity for true sum peak varies with source - detector distance while it is independent for single peak. The results of two the methods are in fair agreement

  9. Single-Crystal Bismuth Iodide Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    band gap of 1.730 ± 0.005 eV.52-53 Jellison eta/. used two- modulator generalized ellipsometry to determine ordinary and extraordinary band gaps of 1.991...quality is not comparable to the commercial CdTe and CZT crystals. While the material was observed to be sensitive to radiation (alphas, gamma-rays, and...simulation of CdTe vertical Bridgman growth," J. Cryst. Growth, 173 [3-4] 352-366 (1997). 50 16.A. Bachran, P. Reinshaus, and W. Seifert, "Influence

  10. Effect of spirit irradiation with 60Co gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwardys, S.

    1975-01-01

    A few sorts of spirit were irradiated with a dose of 1 or 5 Mrad of 60 Co gamma-rays. Then the chemical composition of spirits was investigated. It was found that as a result of irradiation the content of acids, esters, acetal aldehydes and methanol increases, while the strength of higher alcohols decreases slightly. The changes of compounds content in particular spirits are dependent on radiation doses and chemical composition before irradiation. It was also discovered that spirit irradiation causes decrease or even disappearance of characteristic - for given spirits - maxima of UV absorption. (Z.M.)

  11. Estimation of radiation doses in TGFs and gamma ray glows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestin, S. J.; Pincon, J. L.; Trompier, F.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity [e.g., Briggs et al., JGR, 118, 3805, 2013]. TGFs are associated with initial propagation stages of intracloud lightning, which represent the most frequent type of lightning discharges [e.g., Cummer et al., GRL, 42, 7792, 2015, and references therein]. TGFs are known to be produced inside common thunderclouds [e.g., Splitt et al., JGR, 115, A00E38, 2010; Chronis et al., B. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 97, 639, 2016] typically at altitudes ranging from 10 to 14 km [e.g., Cummer et al., GRL, 41, 8586, 2014]. The global TGF occurrence rate is estimated to be 400,000 per year concerning TGFs detectable by Fermi-GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) [Briggs et al., 2013], but detailed analysis of satellite measurements [Østgaard et al., JGR, 117, A03327, 2012] and theoretical studies [Celestin et al., JGR, 120, 10712, 2015] suggest that it cannot be excluded that TGFs represent a part of a regular process taking place during the propagation of lightning discharges. In addition to TGFs, another type of high-energy emissions has been observed inside thunderstorms from balloons [e.g., Eack et al., 101, 29637, 1996] and airplanes [e.g., McCarthy and Parks, 12, 393, 1985; Kelley et al., Nat. Commun., 6, 7845, 2015]. Referred to as gamma ray glows, these events correspond to significant elevations of the background radiation over long time scales that can be abruptly terminated with the occurrence of a lightning discharge. Kelley et al. [2015] estimate that a proportion larger than 8% of electrified storms produce glows. Dwyer et al. [JGR, 115, D09206, 2010] have estimated that if an aircraft were to find itself in the source electron beam giving rise to a TGF, passengers and crews might receive effective radiation doses above the regulatory limit depending on the beam diameter and Tavani et al. [Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1127, 2013

  12. Gamma ray observatory dynamics simulator in Ada (GRODY)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This experiment involved the parallel development of dynamics simulators for the Gamma Ray Observatory in both FORTRAN and Ada for the purpose of evaluating the applicability of Ada to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's flight dynamics environment. The experiment successfully demonstrated that Ada is a viable, valuable technology for use in this environment. In addition to building a simulator, the Ada team evaluated training approaches, developed an Ada methodology appropriate to the flight dynamics environment, and established a baseline for evaluating future Ada projects

  13. The high energy gamma ray spectrometer at VECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, Srijit; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T.K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ray, A.; Banerjee, S.R.; De, A.

    2007-01-01

    A large BaF 2 detector array along with its dedicated CAMAC electronics and VME based data acquisition system has been designed, constructed and installed successfully at VECC, Kolkata for studying high energy γ-rays (>8 MeV). The basic detector properties were studied exhaustively. Complete GEANT3 Monte Carlo simulations were performed to optimize the detector design and also to generate the response function. The detector system has been used successfully to measure high energy photons from real life experiments. Here, the complete description of this high energy gamma ray spectrometer along with its in-beam performance will be described. (author)

  14. Gamma-rays Associated with Nearby Thunderstorms at Ground Level

    OpenAIRE

    Ringuette, Rebecca; Cherry, Michael L.; Granger, Douglas; Guzik, T. Gregory; Stewart, Michael; Wefel, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA) is an array of NaI scintillators located at rooftop level on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. From July 2010 through March 2014, TETRA has detected 28 millisecond-duration bursts of gamma-rays at energies 50 keV - 2 MeV associated with nearby (< 8 km) thunderstorms. The ability to observe ground-level Terrestrial Gamma Flashes from close to the source allows a unique analysis of the storm cells produci...

  15. Status of gamma-ray heating characterization in LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1975-11-01

    Efforts to define gamma-ray heating in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) environments have been surveyed. Emphasis is placed on both current practice for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and future needs of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Experimental and theoretical work are included in this preliminary survey for both high and low power environments. Current ''state-of-the-art'' accuracies and limitations are assessed. On this basis, it is concluded that a broad and sustained effort be initiated to meet requested FFTF goal accuracies. To this end, recommendations are advanced for improving the current status of gamma heating characterization and temperature measurements in LMFBR

  16. Thermoluminescence of Simulated Interstellar Matter after Gamma-ray Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Koike, C.; Okada, M.; Chihara, H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar matter is known to be strongly irradiated by radiation and several types of cosmic ray particles. Simulated interstellar matter, such as forsterite $\\rm Mg_{2}SiO_{4}$, enstatite $\\rm MgSiO_{3}$ and magnesite $\\rm MgCO_{3}$ has been irradiated with the $\\rm ^{60}Co$ gamma-rays in liquid nitrogen, and also irradiated with fast neutrons at 10 K and 70 K by making use of the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL. Maximum fast neutron dose is $10^{...

  17. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on metakaolin based sodium geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertin, D., E-mail: david.lambertin@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Boher, C. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Dannoux-Papin, A. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LCFI, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Galliez, K.; Rooses, A.; Frizon, F. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2013-11-15

    Effects of gamma irradiation on metakaolin based Na-geopolymer have been investigated by external irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a gamma irradiator with {sup 60}Co sources up to 1000 kGy. Various Na-geopolymer with three H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios have been studied in terms of hydrogen radiolytic yield. The results show that hydrogen production increases linearly with water content. Gamma irradiation effects on Na-geopolymer microstructure have been investigated with porosity measurements and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. A change of pore size distribution and a structural relaxation have been found after gamma ray irradiation.

  18. Conference on physics from large {gamma}-ray detector arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The conference on {open_quotes}Physics from Large {gamma}-ray Detector Arrays{close_quotes} is a continuation of the series of conferences that have been organized every two years by the North American Heavy-ion Laboratories. The aim of the conference this year was to encourage discussion of the physics that can be studied with such large arrays. This volume is the collected proceedings from this conference. It discusses properties of nuclear states which can be created in heavy-ion reactions, and which can be observed via such detector systems.

  19. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets...

  20. GRIPS-Gamma-Ray burst Investigation via Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, J.

    2008-01-01

    The primary scientific goal of the GRIPS mission [1] is to revolutionize our understanding of the early universe using γ-ray bursts. We propose a new generation gamma-ray observatory capable of unprecedented spectroscopy over a wide range of γ-ray energies (200 keV-50 MeV) and of polarimetry (200-1000 keV). Secondary goals achievable by this mission include direct measurements of supernova interiors through γ-rays from radioactive decays, nuclear astrophysics with massive stars and novae, and studies of particle acceleration near compact stars, interstellar shocks, and clusters of galaxies

  1. High-revolution gamma-ray imaging from the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, William A.

    1990-01-01

    An observatory is suggested for exploiting unique lunar features to perform sensitive, subarcsecond cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray imaging. The observatory would be built in an evolutionary manner and would eventually include several different position-sensitive detector systems which together would cover a broad energy range and address a wide variety of astrophysical problems. High angular resolution would be obtained by using a mobile crane on the flat lunar mare regions to move a coded aperture mask for source tracking with detector/mask separations of up to 5 kilometers.

  2. Code system BCG for gamma-ray skyshine calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryufuku, Hiroshi; Numakunai, Takao; Miyasaka, Shun-ichi; Minami, Kazuyoshi.

    1979-03-01

    A code system BCG has been developed for calculating conveniently and efficiently gamma-ray skyshine doses using the transport calculation codes ANISN and DOT and the point-kernel calculation codes G-33 and SPAN. To simplify the input forms to the system, the forms for these codes are unified, twelve geometric patterns are introduced to give material regions, and standard data are available as a library. To treat complex arrangements of source and shield, it is further possible to use successively the code such that the results from one code may be used as input data to the same or other code. (author)

  3. Gamma-ray bursts and the sociology of science

    CERN Document Server

    De Rujula, Alvaro

    2003-01-01

    I discuss what we have learned about Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by studying their `afterglows', and how these are interpreted in the generally-accepted `fireball' model of GRBs, as well as in the generally-unaccepted `cannonball' model of the same phenomena. The interpretation of GRBs is a good example around which to frame a discussion of the different approaches to science found in various fields, such as high-energy physics (HEP), high-energy astrophysics, or even the deciphering of ancient languages. I use this example to draw conclusions on `post-academic' science, and on the current status of European HEP.

  4. Observations of Supernovae Associated with Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volnova, Alina; Pozanenko, Alexei; Pruzhinskaya, Maria; Blinnikov, Sergei; Mazaeva, Elena; Inasaridze, Raguli; Ayvazyan, Vova; Inasaridze, Gulnazi; Reva, Inna; Burkhonov, Otabek; Ehgamberdiev, Shukhrat; Kvaratskhelia, Otari; Rumyantsev, Vasilij; Krugly, Yuri; Klunko, Evgeny; Molotov, Igor

    In this paper, we present an overview of the observational properties of supernovae (SNe) associated with long-duration gamma- ray bursts (GRBs). We summarise the statistics of GRB-SNe physical properties and consider different modelling methods. We report the results of the numerical modelling of the GRB 130702A/SN 2013dx multicolour light curve using a spherically symmetrical multi-group radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We have obtained main bolometric parameters of the SN and compare our results with those of analytical modelling.

  5. Carborne gamma-ray spectrometry. Calibration and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aage, H.K.; Korsbech, U.; Bargholz, K.; Hovgaard, J.

    2006-01-01

    Calibration of carborne gamma-ray spectrometry systems for 137 Cs is carried out with a source successively placed at 791 positions within an area of 34 mx62 m. A computer model supplements the measurements. Hereby a sensitivity map for a surface contamination is generated as well as line and area sensitivities. Another model converts surface sensitivity to sensitivity for a deep contamination. Use of the sensitivity map for a non-homogeneous distribution of 137 Cs is demonstrated. Applications of line sensitivities for special tasks are discussed

  6. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...... on the aircraft. By using simple assumptions on the build-up of contamination it has been possible to separate the signals from contamination and from plume. The analysis further showed that even a detector/spectrometer with low energy resolution is able to identify a contamination with iodine....

  7. Neutron and gamma ray scattering measurements for subsurface geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D V

    1990-10-05

    Developed for the oil industry, well logging instrumentation based on electrical, acoustic, and nuclear measurements has been providing information about the localization and evaluation of hydrocarbon-bearing strata for petroleum geologists and engineers since 1927. This method of exploring properties of the earth's crust without taking physical samples is attracting a growing audience of geologists and geophysicists because of recent developments that permit nondestructive measurements of subsurface geochemistry. A combination of nuclear measurement techniques, which use gamma ray and neutron sources, can provide detailed information on rock composition of interest to both industry and academia.

  8. Phenomenology of Dark Matter from radio to gamma ray frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmann, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Multiwavelength astronomical observations have been proven to be of crucial relevance in understanding the most fundamental questions in physics. One of the biggest mysteries of nature is the existence of a (still) unidentified type of matter that makes up most of the material universe. Although little is known about its nature, it is very likely that this exotic Dark Matter (DM) is made of so-called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). In this thesis we investigate which strategies can best address the fundamental question: What is Dark Matter? Specifically, by following the ''WIMP'' paradigm as our guiding principle, we comprehensively discuss the phenomenology of prospective ''indirect'' detection scenarios of such WIMPs. Special consideration is given to extraterrestrial gamma rays and radio waves produced around the center of the Milky Way. In light of two recently highly debated claims of WIMP Dark Matter discovery, namely the 130 GeV gamma-ray line and the GeV gamma-ray excess, we invoke our methods to confront those hypotheses. In addition our study contains antiparticle cosmic-ray (antiproton and positron) data analyses. The phenomenology for indirect DM detection with these ''messengers'' is briefly discussed as well. By exploiting the high degree of symmetry of typical annihilating 2-WIMP initial states, we are able to employ a very powerful tool in theoretical particle physics: the generalized optical theorem. This theorem relates the amplitude of loop-suppressed processes, such as the 130 GeV line if interpreted as product of WIMP annihilations, with tree-level process which are constrained in the same way as with the GeV excess. Unprecedentedly reported analytical computations of partial-wave (and helicity) cross sections with general applicability are calculated and applied. The possibility that a non-trivial effect in the particle model for DM might enhance the strength of a gamma-ray

  9. A computer program for automatic gamma-ray spectra analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromura, Kazuyuki

    1975-01-01

    A computer program for automatic analysis of gamma-ray spectra obtained with a Ge(Li) detector is presented. The program includes a method by comparing the successive values of experimental data for the automatic peak finding and method of leastsquares for the peak fitting. The peak shape in the fitting routine is a 'modified Gaussian', which consists of two different Gaussians with the same height joined at the centroid. A quadratic form is chosen as a function representing the background. A maximum of four peaks can be treated in the fitting routine by the program. Some improvements in question are described. (auth.)

  10. Exploding superstars understanding supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mazure, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The exceptional cosmic history and the fabulous destinies of exploding stars – supernovae and gamma-ray bursters – are highly fertile areas of research and are also very special tools to further our understanding of the universe. In this book, cosmologists Dr Alain Mazure and Dr Stéphane Basa throw light on the assemblage of facts, hypotheses and cosmological conclusions and show how these ‘beacons’ illuminate their immediate surroundings and allow us to study the vast cosmos, like searchlights revealing the matter comprising our universe.

  11. Observe gamma rays to find out how the universe works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia, R.

    2015-01-01

    Each hemisphere of the Earth will host one of the two venues of the future network of telescopes Cherenkov (cta, Cherenkov telescope array) designed with the aim of covering all outer space and in stereo, a technique that allows us to reconstruct efficiently the properties of spatial events. Thanks to telescopes with which will be equipped with - greater sensitivity than the current - will be possible to study in detail one of the most powerful radiation of the Universe, gamma rays. Spain has been chosen to host the North Observatory on roque of the boys, on the island of Palma, facilities that will be form das by 20 telescopes. (Author)

  12. Development of new iraqi wheat varieties induced by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.F.; Al-Janabi, K.K.; Al-Maaroof, E.M.; Al-Aubaidi, M.O.; Mahmoud, A.H.; Al-Janabi, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study agronomic traits of three wheat mutants induced by gamma rays and compared with their origin 'Saber Beg' during M 8 - M 11 generations. These mutants showed a moderate resistance to leaf rust and lodging, while the origin was susceptible. Also, these mutants surpassed their origin in seed weight of 100 spikes, weight of 1000 kernels and protein yield per unit area. Chemical and physical analyses of mutant flours indicated that it could be used for bread making successfully.2 fig.,4 tab

  13. Visual gamma-ray analysis. VIPF program (WINDOW 95)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    VIsual Peak Fitting (VIPF) program for the analysis of gamma radiation peaks from Ge detectors which works on WINDOWS 95 as an operating system has been developed. Gamma-ray peaks are simulated as Gauss function with 1st- or 2nd-order polynomial function for the background spectrum. Any function can be further added to for parameter fitting. The VIPF program can be obtained through internet by down-loading: http://w3.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~yamada. Details of the program procedure, explanation of the fitting function to be used and peak search routine, and manuals of the code are given. (Ohno, S.)

  14. Computer code for qualitative analysis of gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yule, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    Computer code QLN1 provides complete analysis of gamma-ray spectra observed with Ge(Li) detectors and is used at both the National Bureau of Standards and the Environmental Protection Agency. It locates peaks, resolves multiplets, identifies component radioisotopes, and computes quantitative results. The qualitative-analysis (or component identification) algorithms feature thorough, self-correcting steps which provide accurate isotope identification in spite of errors in peak centroids, energy calibration, and other typical problems. The qualitative-analysis algorithm is described in this paper

  15. GHostS - gamma-ray burst host studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savaglio, S.; Greiner, J.; Yoldas, A.K. [Max-Planck Inst. for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching (Germany); Budavari, T. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore (United States); Glazebrook, K. [Swinburne Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Le Borgne, D. [CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Le Floc' h, E. [Inst. for Astronomy, Honolulu, HI (United States); Chen, H.W. [Univ. of Chicago (United States)

    2007-06-15

    GHostS is the largest public data-base on gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and is accessible at the URL http://www.grbhosts.org. Started in 2005, it currently contains photometric and spectroscopic information on 39 GRB hosts, almost 2/5 of the total number of GRBs with measured redshift. It will continue to grow, together with the unstoppable data flow from the observatories all over the world, every time a new event is discovered. Among other features, GHostS uses the Virtual Observatory resources. (orig.)

  16. GHostS Gamma-Ray Burst Host Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaglio, Sandra; Budavári, Tamás; Glazebrook, Karl; Le Borgne, Damien; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Greiner, Jochen; Yoldas, Aybuk Küpcü

    2007-06-01

    GHostS is the largest public data-base on gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galax-ies and is accessible at the URL http://www.grbhosts.org. Started in 2005, it currently contains photometric and spectroscopic information on 39 GRB hosts, almost 2/5 of the total number of GRBs with measured redshift. It will continue to grow, together with the unstoppable data flow from the obser-vatories all over the world, every time a new event is discovered. Among other features, GHostS uses the Virtual Observatory resources.

  17. GHostS - gamma-ray burst host studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savaglio, S.; Greiner, J.; Yoldas, A.K.; Budavari, T.; Glazebrook, K.; Le Borgne, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Chen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    GHostS is the largest public data-base on gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and is accessible at the URL http://www.grbhosts.org. Started in 2005, it currently contains photometric and spectroscopic information on 39 GRB hosts, almost 2/5 of the total number of GRBs with measured redshift. It will continue to grow, together with the unstoppable data flow from the observatories all over the world, every time a new event is discovered. Among other features, GHostS uses the Virtual Observatory resources. (orig.)

  18. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Many kinds of coated or impregnated reflecting papers change color or become colored by large radiation doses. Such papers or “labels” do not generally supply dosimetry information, but may give useful inventory information, namely a visual indication of whether or not an industrial product......, and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain...

  19. Tetraploid induction by gamma-ray irradiation in mulberry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, K.; Nakajima, K.

    1982-01-01

    Vigorously growing mulberry trees were exposed to 5 kR of gamma rays at the rate of 0.2 kR/h and 5 kR/h and successively pruned three times in two growing seasons. The frequency of tetraploids induced was much higher than that of mutations, though almost all of them were cytochimeras. By tracing a process of the formation of cytochimeras it is inferred that a mutation is a unicellular event, with radiation treatment on materials in a multicellular constitution such as shoot apices resulting in the formation of chimeras, periclinal and mericlinal chimeras. (author)

  20. Calculation of gamma ray exposure rates from uranium ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.; Wilson, O.J.

    1980-02-01

    The planning of operations associated with uranium mines often requires that estimates be made of the exposure rates from various ore bodies. A straight-forward method of calculating the exposure rate from an arbitrarily shaped body is presented. Parameters for the calculation are evaluated under the assumption of secular equilibrium of uranium with its daughters and that the uranium is uniformly distributed throughout an average soil mixture. The spectral distribution of the emitted gamma rays and the effect of air attenuation are discussed. Worked examples are given of typical situations encountered in uranium mines

  1. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  2. Remote planetary geochemical exploration with the NEAR X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trombka, J.I.; Boynton, W.V.; Brueckner, J.; Squyres, S.; Clark, P.E.; Starr, R.; Evans, L.G.; Floyd, S.R.; McClanahan, T.P.; Goldsten, J.; Mcnutt, R.; Schweitzer, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) instrument onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft will map asteroid 433 Eros in the 0.2 keV to 10 MeV energy region. Measurements of the discrete line X-ray and gamma-ray emissions in this energy domain can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative elemental composition maps of the asteroid surface. The NEAR X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) was turned on for the first time during the week of 7 April 1996. Rendezvous with Eros 433 is expected during December 1998. Observations of solar X-ray spectra during both quiescent and active periods have been made. A gamma-ray transient detection system has been implemented and about three gamma-ray transient events a week have been observed which are associated with either gamma-ray bursts or solar flares

  3. Elemental mapping of the moon using gamma rays: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    The energies and intensities of gamma rays From a planetary surface can be used to infer the elemental composition of an object with no or a thin atmosphere. The Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers in 1972 and 1973 produced many of the results for the distribution of elements in the Moon that are now generally well accepted. Lunar Prospector in 1998 and 1999 globally mapped the Moon with gamma rays and neutrons. Both missions used spectrometers with poor energy resolution (∼8-10%). The Japanese plan to send a high-resolution germanium gamma-ray spectrometer to the Moon in about 2004 on their SELENE mission. However, little has been done since the 1970s on the models used to unfold planetary gamma-ray spectra. More work needs to be done on understanding what to expect in future gamma-ray spectra and how to unfold such data.

  4. Gamma Rays from the Inner Milky Way: Dark Matter or Point Sources?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Studies of data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope have revealed bright gamma-ray emission from the central regions of our galaxy, with a spatial and spectral profile consistent with annihilating dark matter. I will present a new model-independent analysis that suggests that rather than originating from dark matter, the GeV excess may arise from a surprising new population of as-yet-unresolved gamma-ray point sources in the heart of the Milky Way.

  5. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; De León, C. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Solares, H. A. Ayala [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Rosales, M. Bonilla; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico); De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC collaboration; and others

    2015-02-20

    The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.

  6. Recent progress in single sided gamma-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoe, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    The use of scattered radiation for radiography has many potential advantages over conventional projection techniques: For high energy photons the scattering process strongly dominates all other processes. The intensity of scattered radiation is due directly to the electron density and highly insensitive to chemical composition. Finally, the use of scattered radiation allows the investigator to position the radiation source-on-the same side of the object as the detector. In this paper I will present some recent results of a set of measurements made with our uncollimated Compton backscattering tomography apparatus. This technique uses the Compton energy shift of scattered gamma rays to determine the scattering site. By measuring the spectrum of these scattered gamma rays it is then possible to determine the electron density of the object being investigated. I will give a brief description of the apparatus and present the results of numerous measurements made on a brass phantom with voids placed at various depths. These results imply that for this crude apparatus occlusions as small as one cubic millimeter may be located to an accuracy of about one millimeter at depths of about 15 millimeters in solid brass.

  7. High Energy Gamma-rays from FR I Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, M

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to Hubble and Chandra telescopes, some of the large scale jets in extragalactic radio sources are now being observed at optical and X-ray frequencies. For the FR I objects the synchrotron nature of this emission is surely established, although a lot of uncertainties--connected for example with the particle acceleration processes involved--remain. In this paper we study production of high energy gamma-rays in FR I kiloparsec-scale jets by inverse-Compton emission of the synchrotron-emitting electrons. We consider different origin of seed photons contributing to the inverse-Compton scattering, including nuclear jet radiation as well as ambient, stellar and circumstellar emission of the host galaxies. We discuss how future detections or non-detections of the evaluated gamma-ray fluxes can provide constraints on the unknown large scale jet parameters, i.e. the magnetic field intensity and the jet Doppler factor. For the nearby sources Centaurus A and M 87, we find measurable fluxes of TeV photons resulting...

  8. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A. E-mail: laaterre@net.ipen.br; Zeituni, C.A.; Perrotta, J.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da

    2000-08-11

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  9. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.; Perrotta, J.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da

    2000-01-01

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits

  10. Egg weight and gamma-rays effects. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shebaita, M.K.; Ezzat, I.E.; Kamar, G.A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of egg weight from Egyptian Fayoumi breed were used in this study. The first group ranged in weight from 36-43 grams (group A) and the second group ranged from 44-50 grams (group B). Each egg weight group was divided to 6 exposure treatments to 60 Co gamma rays (non-irradiated, 150 rads, 300 rads, 450 rads, 600 rads and 750 rads). The data showed that embryonic mortality was 75% higher in irradiated treatments compared with the non-irradiated, and 50% of the mortality occurred during the first 5 days after the exposure. Moreover, mortality was 18% higher in group A than in group B. However, the abnormality was 6.4% in group A and 10.8% in group B. A delay in hatching time was observed and the hatching percent decreased due to the exposure to gamma rays. The relationship between hatching % (Y) and the dose level (X) was Y = 86.6 esup(-0.00041x) in group A and Y = 85.5 esup(-0.00028x) in group B. On the other hand, the hatching weight in irradiated treatments was higher (P [de

  11. Evaluation of flat panel PMT for gamma ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, R.; Cinti, M.N.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, C.; Trotta, G.; Montani, L.; Ridolfi, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Scafe, R.; Belcari, N.; Del Guerra, A.

    2003-01-01

    The first position sensitive PMT, Hamamatsu R2486, developed in 1985, represented a strong technological advance for gamma-ray imaging. Hamamatsu H8500 Flat Panel PMT is the last generation position sensitive PMT: extremely compact with 2 in. active area. Its main features are: minimum peripheral dead zone (1 mm) and height of 12 mm. It was designed to be assembled in array to cover large detection area. It can represent a technical revolution for many applications in the field of gamma-ray imaging as for example nuclear medicine. This tube is based on metal channel dynode for charge multiplication and 8x8 anodes for charge collection and position calculation. In this paper we present a preliminary evaluation of the imaging performances addressed to nuclear medicine application. To this aim we have taken into account two different electronic readouts: resistive chain with Anger Camera principle and multianode readout. Flat panel PMT was coupled to CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) scintillation arrays. The results were also compared with the first generation PSPMT

  12. Gamma-Ray Peak Integration: Accuracy and Precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy of singlet gamma-ray peak areas obtained by a peak analysis program is immaterial. If the same algorithm is used for sample measurement as for calibration and if the peak shapes are similar, then biases in the integration method cancel. Reproducibility is the only important issue. Even the uncertainty of the areas computed by the program is trivial because the true standard uncertainty can be experimentally assessed by repeated measurements of the same source. Reproducible peak integration was important in a recent standard reference material certification task. The primary tool used for spectrum analysis was SUM, a National Institute of Standards and Technology interactive program to sum peaks and subtract a linear background, using the same channels to integrate all 20 spectra. For comparison, this work examines other peak integration programs. Unlike some published comparisons of peak performance in which synthetic spectra were used, this experiment used spectra collected for a real (though exacting) analytical project, analyzed by conventional software used in routine ways. Because both components of the 559- to 564-keV doublet are from 76 As, they were integrated together with SUM. The other programs, however, deconvoluted the peaks. A sensitive test of the fitting algorithm is the ratio of reported peak areas. In almost all the cases, this ratio was much more variable than expected from the reported uncertainties reported by the program. Other comparisons to be reported indicate that peak integration is still an imperfect tool in the analysis of gamma-ray spectra

  13. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray burst fireballs, revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmer, Svenja; Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2012-06-08

    We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the recomputation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years.

  14. Some aspects of ultra high energy gamma ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jager, O.C.

    1983-11-01

    A short review of ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray astronomy (10 11 14 eV) as well as a description of a planned experiment to be erected at Potchefstroom is given in the introduction. This experiment will be the first and only one in the Southern Hemisphere and as such may play an important role in this new field of astronomy and astrophysics. In the first part the necessary infrastructure for astronomical observations of known celestial objects is developed. This embodies the special physical, mechanical and astronomical constraints in this type of astronomy, such as the definition of the various astronomical coordinate systems and transformations between them, the effect of precession and nutation on the source position etc. This leads to automatic observation schedules for the various applicable techniques of observation. In the second part the various effects which may influence the arrival time of a gamma ray at the telescope is investigated. It is found that dispersion and relativistic effects are negligible, given the special type of analysis used in this low counting rate system. The classic Doppler effect due to the motion of Earth as well as the configuration of the telescope does have a major effect and must be taken into consideration when analysing the data. A simple method, depending only on the movement of Earth around the sun, is developed to simplify the identification of pulsars at the planned observatory where computing facilities are limited

  15. The rarity of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Hazelton, B. J.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Martinez-McKinney, G. F. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Lowell, A. W.; Kelley, N. A.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Ulrich, W.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Cramer, E.; Rassoul, H. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Blakeslee, R. J.

    2011-04-01

    We report on the first search for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) from altitudes where they are thought to be produced. The Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of gamma-ray detectors, was flown near the tops of Florida thunderstorms in August/September 2009. The plane passed within 10 km horizontal distance of 1213 lightning discharges and only once detected a TGF. If these discharges had produced TGFs of the same intensity as those seen from space, every one should have been seen by ADELE. Separate and significant nondetections are established for intracloud lightning, negative cloud-to-ground lightning, and narrow bipolar events. We conclude that TGFs are not a primary triggering mechanism for lightning. We estimate the TGF-to-flash ratio to be on the order of 10-2 to 10-3 and show that TGF intensities cannot follow the well-known power-law distribution seen in earthquakes and solar flares, due to our limits on the presence of faint events.

  16. Galactic-Centre Gamma Rays in CMSSM Dark Matter Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Spanos, Vassilis C

    2011-01-01

    We study the production of gamma rays via LSP annihilations in the core of the Galaxy as a possible experimental signature of the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM), in which supersymmetry-breaking parameters are assumed to be universal at the GUT scale, assuming also that the LSP is the lightest neutralino chi. The part of the CMSSM parameter space that is compatible with the measured astrophysical density of cold dark matter is known to include a stau_1 - chi coannihilation strip, a focus-point strip where chi has an enhanced Higgsino component, and a funnel at large tanb where the annihilation rate is enhanced by the poles of nearby heavy MSSM Higgs bosons, A/H. We calculate the total annihilation rates, the fractions of annihilations into different Standard Model final states and the resulting fluxes of gamma rays for CMSSM scenarios along these strips. We observe that typical annihilation rates are much smaller in the coannihilation strip for tanb = 10 than along t...

  17. Detecting polarized gamma-rays by pair production

    CERN Document Server

    De Paola, G O

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a GEANT Monte Carlo code was used to design an outline of the geometry and to simulate the performance of a high energy (10 MeV-10 GeV) gamma-ray detector (Monte Carlo simulation of the ARGO. Nuclear Instruments and Methods A 342, 302-307). It was shown that the incident direction and energy of the incoming photons can be determined from the tracks of the produced electrons-positron pairs. A natural follow-up problem is to study whether this system can be used to detect linearly polarized gamma-rays. In principle, this can be done by measuring the azimuthal distribution of the produced pairs since the cross-section has a dependence with the vector polarization direction. In this work we first determine the azimuthal angular distribution from the differential cross-section for pair production. We then show that the azimuthal distribution of the produced pairs has a very simple angular dependence and can be approximated very accurately by cross-section for coplanar events. Finally, we use the simplifi...

  18. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of gamma rays in mungbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, R.D.S.; Singh, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Dry seeds (moisture, 9 per cent) of mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) variety PS 16 were treated with ten doses of gamma rays ( 60 Co) ranging from 10 to 100 kR. Plant survival and pollen fertility in X 1 , and, chlorophyll mutation frequency and mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency were studied in X 2 generation. The plant survival and pollen fertility were reduced gradually with increasing dose. The chlorophyll mutation frequency increased in a linear fashion upto medium doses and was erratic at higher doses. The chlorophyll mutation spectrum included albina xantha, chlorina, virescence, viridis and maculata. Mutagenic effectiveness decreased with increase dose except at 60 kR. Mutagenic efficiency increased upto to 30 kR and thereafter it decreased. The decreasing trend of mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency at increased dose of gamma rays revealed that the biological damage (survival and pollen fertility) increased with increase dose at the faster rate than increase in rate of mutations induced. (author). 8 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Variable gamma-ray sky at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2013-01-01

    We search for the long-term variability of the gamma-ray sky in the energy range E > 1 GeV with 168 weeks of the gamma-ray telescope Fermi-LAT data. We perform a full sky blind search for regions with variable flux looking for deviations from uniformity. We bin the sky into 12288 pixels using the HEALPix package and use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to compare weekly photon counts in each pixel with the constant flux hypothesis. The weekly exposure of Fermi-LAT for each pixel is calculated with the Fermi-LAT tools. We consider flux variations in a pixel significant if the statistical probability of uniformity is less than 4 × 10 −6 , which corresponds to 0.05 false detections in the whole set. We identified 117 variable sources, 27 of which have not been reported variable before. The sources with previously unidentified variability contain 25 active galactic nuclei (AGN) belonging to the blazar class (11 BL Lacs and 14 FSRQs), one AGN of an uncertain type, and one pulsar PSR J0633+1746 (Geminga).

  20. Observation on gamma ray induced viable mutations in vegetable cowpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanasundaram, M.; Thamburaj, S.; Natarajan, S.

    2001-01-01

    Two cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) varieties 'Pusa Komal' and 'Co 2' were irradiated with gamma rays at 200, 300, 400 and 500 Gy. After mutagenic treatment, M 1 generation was raised. Ten M 1 plants in each treatment and in the control were advanced to M 2 generation. The M 2 seedling progenies were examined for viable mutants. In a population of 3,199 and 3,538 plants in Pusa Komal and Co 2 respectively, a total number of 140 mutants were observed for variation in cotyledonary leaves in the early stage of growth to abberants possessing modified plant structure, leaf morphology, pod size, pod color and seed coat color. In the progeny of Pusa Komal variety, the percentage of viable mutation was the highest at 300 Gy while in Co 2, at 500 Gy. Mutants for plant habit have also been reported in greengram. The data on mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency are given. In Pusa Komal, the effectiveness for viable mutation ranged from 4.22 to 12.45 and in Co 2 ranged from 6.60 to 13.35. The effectiveness and efficiency were decreased with increased doses of gamma rays as was also noted for mungbean

  1. Gamma-ray irradiation of ohmic MEMS switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, John J.; Lampen, James L.; Taylor, Edward W.

    2012-10-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) switches are becoming important building blocks for a variety of military and commercial applications including switch matrices, phase shifters, electronically scanned antennas, switched filters, Automatic Test Equipment, instrumentation, cell phones and smart antennas. Low power consumption, large ratio of off-impedance to on-impedance, extreme linearity, low mass, small volume and the ability to be integrated with other electronics makes MEMS switches an attractive alternative to other mechanical and solid-state switches for a variety of space applications. Radant MEMS, Inc. has developed an electrostatically actuated broadband ohmic microswitch that has applications from DC through the microwave region. Despite the extensive earth based testing, little is known about the performance and reliability of these devices in space environments. To help fill this void, we have irradiated our commercial-off-the-shelf SPST, DC to 40 GHz MEMS switches with gamma-rays as an initial step to assessing static impact on RF performance. Results of Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation of the MEMS switches at photon energies ≥ 1.0 MeV to a total dose of ~ 118 krad(Si) did not show a statistically significant post-irradiation change in measured broadband, RF insertion loss, insertion phase, return loss and isolation.

  2. Tandem collimators for the JET tangential gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, Sorin; Balshaw, Nick; Blanchard, Patrick; Craciunescu, Teddy; Croft, David; Curuia, Marian; Edlington, Trevor; Kiptily, Vasily; Murari, Andrea; Prior, Phil; Sanders, Steven; Syme, Brian; Zoita, Vasile

    2011-01-01

    The tangential gamma-ray spectrometer (TGRS) of the JET tokamak fusion facility is an important diagnostics for investigating the fast particle evolution. A well defined field of view for the TGRS diagnostics is essential for its proper operation and this is to be determined by a rather complex system of collimators and shields both for the neutron and gamma radiations. A conceptual design for this system has been carried out with the main design target set to maximize the signal-to-background ratio at the spectrometer detector, the ratio being defined in terms of the plasma emitted gamma radiation and the gamma-ray background. As a first phase of the TGRS diagnostics upgrade a set of two tandem collimators has been designed with the aim of determining a quasi-tangential field of view through JET tokamak plasmas. A modular design of the tandem system has been developed in order to allow for the construction of different configurations for deuterium and deuterium-tritium discharges. The internal structure of the collimators consists of nuclear grade lead and high density polyethylene slabs arranged in an optimized pattern. The performance of a simplified geometry of the tandem collimator configuration has been evaluated by neutron and photon transport calculations and the numerical results show that the design parameters can be attained.

  3. Effects of Goldstone bosons on gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Huitzu; Ng, Kin-Wang, E-mail: huitzu2@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: nkw@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, 128 Sec. 2, Academia Rd., Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosion events in the universe. An amount of gravitational energy of the order of the rest-mass energy of the Sun is released from a small region within a short time. This should lead to the formation of a fireball of temperature in the MeV range, consisting of electrons/positrons, photons, and a small fraction of baryons. We exploit the potential of GRB fireballs for being a laboratory for testing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, where we find that Weinberg's Higgs portal model serves as a good candidate for this purpose. Due to the resonance effects, the Goldstone bosons can be rapidly produced by electron-positron annihilation process in the initial fireballs of the gamma-ray bursts. On the other hand, the mean free path of the Goldstone bosons is larger than the size of the GRB initial fireballs, so they are not coupled to the GRB's relativistic flow and can lead to significant energy loss. Using generic values for the GRB initial fireball energy, temperature, radius, expansion rate, and baryon number density, we find that the GRB bounds on the parameters of Weinberg's Higgs portal model are indeed competitive to current laboratory constraints.

  4. Regularity of high energy photon events from gamma ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2018-01-01

    The effect of Quantum Gravity (QG) may bring a tiny light speed variation as v(E)=c(1‑E/ELV), where E is the photon energy and ELV is a Lorentz violation scale. A remarkable regularity was suggested in previous studies to look for the light speed variation from high energy photon events of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). We provide a general analysis on the data of 25 bright GRBs observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST). Such method allows a completed scan over all possibilities in a more clean and impartial way without any bias compared to previous intuitive analysis. The results show that with the increase in the intrinsic energies of photons, such regularity truly emerges and gradually becomes significant. For photons with intrinsic energies higher than 40 GeV, the regularity exists at a significance of 3–5 σ with ELV=3.6× 1017 GeV determined by the GRB data.

  5. Components of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Venters, Tonia M.

    2011-01-01

    We present new theoretical estimates of the relative contributions of unresolved blazars and star-forming galaxies to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) and discuss constraints on the contributions from alternative mechanisms such as dark matter annihilation and truly diffuse gamma-ray production. We find that the Fermi source count data do not rule out a scenario in which the EGB is dominated by emission from unresolved blazars, though unresolved star-forming galaxies may also contribute significantly to the background, within order-of-magnitude uncertainties. In addition, we find that the spectrum of the unresolved star-forming galaxy contribution cannot explain the EGB spectrum found by EGRET at energies between 50 and 200 MeV, whereas the spectrum of unresolved flat spectrum radio quasars, when accounting for the energy-dependent effects of source confusion, could be consistent with the combined spectrum of the low-energy EGRET EGB measurements and the Fermi-Large Area Telescope EGB measurements.

  6. GAMMA RAYS FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SN 2014J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Grebenev, S. [Space Research Institute (IKI), Profsouznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Isern, J. [Institut for Space Sciences (ICE-CSIC/IEEC), E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Bikmaev, I. [Kazan Federal University (KFU), Kremlevskaya Strasse, 18, Kazan (Russian Federation); Bravo, E. [E.T.S.A.V., Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Carrer Pere Serra 1-15, E-08173 Sant Cugat del Valles (Spain); Chugai, N. [Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 48 Pyatnitskaya Street, 119017, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jean, P.; Knödlseder, J. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Lebrun, F. [APC, Univ Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Obs de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Kuulkers, E. [European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA/ESAC), Science Operations Department, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-10

    The whole set of INTEGRAL observations of Type Ia supernova SN 2014J, covering the period 19–162 days after the explosion, has been analyzed. For spectral fitting the data are split into early and late periods covering days 19–35 and 50–162, respectively, optimized for {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co lines. As expected for the early period, much of the gamma-ray signal is confined to energies below ∼200 keV, while for the late period it is strongest above 400 keV. In particular, in the late period, {sup 56}Co lines at 847 and 1248 keV are detected at 4.7σ and 4.3σ, respectively. The light curves in several representative energy bands are calculated for the entire period. The resulting spectra and light curves are compared with a subset of models. We confirm our previous finding that the gamma-ray data are broadly consistent with the expectations for canonical one-dimensional models, such as delayed detonation or deflagration models for a near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. Late optical spectra (day 136 after the explosion) show rather symmetric Co and Fe line profiles, suggesting that, unless the viewing angle is special, the distribution of radioactive elements is symmetric in the ejecta.

  7. Searches for Particle Dark Matter with gamma-rays.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution I review the present status and discuss some prospects for indirect detection of dark matter with gamma-rays. Thanks to the Fermi Large Area Telescope, searches in gamma-rays have reached sensitivities that allow to probe the most interesting parameter space of the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) paradigm. This gain in sensitivity is naturally accompanied by a number of detection claims or indications, the most recent being the claim of a line feature at a dark matter particle mass of ∼ 130 GeV at the Galactic Centre, a claim which requires confirmation from the Fermi-LAT collaboration and other experiments, for example HESS II or the planned Gamma-400 satellite. Predictions for the next generation air Cherenkov telescope, Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), together with forecasts on future Fermi-LAT constraints arrive at the exciting possibility that the cosmological benchmark cross-section could be probed from masses of a few GeV to a few TeV. Consequently, non-detection wou...

  8. Gamma-Ray Doses Affected on Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, E.M; Tarrad, M.M.; Abd El-Daem, G.A.N.A.

    2013-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted at the experimental from, Nuclear Research Center at Inshas. Atomic Energy Authority (AEA) at Egypt during 2011– 2012 growing seasons on alfalfa genotype. The aim of this investigation to evaluate the effect of different gamma ray doses (100-300 Gy) on the alfalfa yield and related traits. Seeds lots of alfalfa genotype were subjected to five gamma ray treatments (100,150,200,250 and 300 Gray). Over all cuts, the dose treatment 300 Gy increased the majority of studied traits i.e., plant height, No. of shoots/plant, fresh weight/plant, fresh yield/Fadden and dry weight yield/fed. The results observed indicated that. In addition, dose of 200 and 250 Gy increased No. of leaves /plant, No. of shoots/plant, stem diameter and fresh weight /plant. However, the plant dry weight was decreased by all doses used and over all cuts, but the dose of 100 and 150 Gy increased leaves /stem ratio. Meanwhile, the later cuts were more affected by irradiation treatments than the earlier ones. In general, the low doses had negative effects on yield traits, but, the relatively high doses exhibited an increase in yield traits

  9. Constraining decaying dark matter with FERMI-LAT gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccione, L.

    2011-01-01

    High energy electron sand positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton of low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. We will describe a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the FERMI-LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV, by exploiting universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model, produce the desired constraint. The response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs. Here is discussed the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and FERMI LAT, also taking into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. With the available data decaying dark matter can not be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess.

  10. Determination of the measurement threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2017-03-01

    In gamma-ray spectrometry the measurement threshold describes the lover boundary of the interval of peak areas originating in the response of the spectrometer to gamma-rays from the sample measured. In this sense it presents a generalization of the net indication corresponding to the decision threshold, which is the measurement threshold at the quantity value zero for a predetermined probability for making errors of the first kind. Measurement thresholds were determined for peaks appearing in the spectra of radon daughters 214 Pb and 214 Bi by measuring the spectrum 35 times under repeatable conditions. For the calculation of the measurement threshold the probability for detection of the peaks and the mean relative uncertainty of the peak area were used. The relative measurement thresholds, the ratios between the measurement threshold and the mean peak area uncertainty, were determined for 54 peaks where the probability for detection varied between some percent and about 95% and the relative peak area uncertainty between 30% and 80%. The relative measurement thresholds vary considerably from peak to peak, although the nominal value of the sensitivity parameter defining the sensitivity for locating peaks was equal for all peaks. At the value of the sensitivity parameter used, the peak analysis does not locate peaks corresponding to the decision threshold with the probability in excess of 50%. This implies that peaks in the spectrum may not be located, although the true value of the measurand exceeds the decision threshold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  12. Examination for analysis of minerals by means of dual energy gamma-ray transmission techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Iwao; Muto, Toshio; Kitsutaka, Raita.

    1996-01-01

    For application of dual energy gamma-ray transmission techniques to practical mineral grade analysis, some problems including selection of gamma-ray energies, influence of sample thickness and main causes of errors in measurement have been examined. The relationships between the R-values (the ratio of mass attenuation coefficients for low and high energy gamma-rays) and the effective atomic numbers for various samples (e.g., iron ore, coal and coke, limestone, minerals and gem stones) were determined using different energy combinations of gamma-rays from 152 Eu. On the basis of the experimental results, the optimum conditions for analysis of minerals were discussed. (author)

  13. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given

  14. Multiplicity correlation between neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from SNM and non-SNM sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The challenge in detection and identification of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) is to discriminate between the time-correlated neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from SNM and those originating from non-correlated or differently-correlated environmental non-SNM sources. Time-correlated neutron and gamma-ray bursts can be generated by penetrating components of cosmic radiation. The characteristic features or attributes of correlated signatures can be revealed by analyzing the joint probability density functions (JPDFs) of various parameters of neutrons and gamma-rays. Monte Carlo simulations of SNM and cosmic-ray (non-SNM) sources of neutrons and gamma-rays are performed. For both SNM and non-SNM sources, energy-lifetime JPDF of neutrons, energy-lifetime JPDF of gamma-rays, and JPDFs of neutron-gamma-ray multiplicity are evaluated. Mean values, standard deviations, covariance and correlation are estimated. It is found that the number (multiplicity) of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from an SNM source is moderately correlated (∼0.48). The multiplicity of neutrons and gamma-rays generated by cosmic-ray showers at sea level is only weakly correlated (∼-0.046). The exploitation of neutron-gamma-ray multiplicity correlation in detectors can provide a tool to discriminate non-SNM sources.

  15. Passive Gamma-Ray Emission for Underwater Sediment-Disturbance Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    ER D C/ CR RE L SR -1 7- 3 Passive Gamma-Ray Emission for Underwater Sediment-Disturbance Detection Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h...visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CRREL SR-17-3 July 2017 Passive Gamma-Ray Emission for Underwater...sodium iodide gamma-ray detector to collect in situ gamma-ray spectra of two soils submerged in water. Study results indicate that naturally occurring

  16. A Monte Carlo modeling alternative for the API Gamma Ray Calibration Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galford, J E

    2017-04-01

    The gamma ray pit at the API Calibration Facility, located on the University of Houston campus, defines the API unit for natural gamma ray logs used throughout the petroleum logging industry. Future use of the facility is uncertain. An alternative method is proposed to preserve the gamma ray API unit definition as an industry standard by using Monte Carlo modeling to obtain accurate counting rate-to-API unit conversion factors for gross-counting and spectral gamma ray tool designs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Compact sources as the origin of the soft gamma-ray emission of the Milky Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebrun, F.; Terrier, R.; Bazzano, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Milky Way is known to be an abundant source of gamma-ray photons(1), now determined to be mainly diffuse in nature and resulting from interstellar processes(2). In the soft gamma-ray domain, point sources are expected to dominate, but the lack of sensitive high-resolution observations did...... the origin of the soft gamma-rays is therefore necessary to determine the dominant particle acceleration processes and to gain insights into the physical and chemical equilibrium of the interstellar medium(7). Here we report observations in the soft gamma-ray domain that reveal numerous compact sources. We...

  18. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  19. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Clearest-Ever Evidence from VLT Spectra of Powerful Event Summary A very bright burst of gamma-rays was observed on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE-II) , in a sky region within the constellation Leo. Within 90 min, a new, very bright light source (the "optical afterglow") was detected in the same direction by means of a 40-inch telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (Australia) and also in Japan. The gamma-ray burst was designated GRB 030329 , according to the date. And within 24 hours, a first, very detailed spectrum of this new object was obtained by the UVES high-dispersion spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It allowed to determine the distance as about 2,650 million light-years (redshift 0.1685). Continued observations with the FORS1 and FORS2 multi-mode instruments on the VLT during the following month allowed an international team of astronomers [1] to document in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the optical afterglow of this gamma-ray burst . Their detailed report appears in the June 19 issue of the research journal "Nature". The spectra show the gradual and clear emergence of a supernova spectrum of the most energetic class known, a "hypernova" . This is caused by the explosion of a very heavy star - presumably over 25 times heavier than the Sun. The measured expansion velocity (in excess of 30,000 km/sec) and the total energy released were exceptionally high, even within the elect hypernova class. From a comparison with more nearby hypernovae, the astronomers are able to fix with good accuracy the moment of the stellar explosion. It turns out to be within an interval of plus/minus two days of the gamma-ray burst. This unique conclusion provides compelling evidence that the two events are directly connected. These observations therefore indicate a common physical process behind the hypernova explosion and the associated emission of strong gamma-ray

  20. Hipparcos pinpoints an amazing gamma-ray clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Following a preliminary report at a symposium on Hipparcos results in Venice in May, the full story of the pinpointing of Geminga is told in a paper to be published in Astronomy and Astrophysics in January 1998. Patrizia Caraveo of the Istituto di Fisica Cosmica in Milan is the lead author, and other astronomers in Milan, Turin, Garching, Copenhagen and Noordwijk contributed to this aspect of the work (see footnote). The result made it possible to to use the observation of gamma-ray pulses to time the rotation of Geminga with extreme accuracy, as described in a paper by John Mattox of Boston University, Jules Halpern of Columbia University, and Patrizia Caraveo. It is due to appear in the Astrophysical Journal in February 1998, and is already accessible on the Internet. Geminga is a unique object: a highly compressed, spinning neutron star which does not emit radio beeps like the well-known pulsars. Yet it is a powerful source of pulsating gamma-rays and X-rays. Geminga is probably the prototype of millions of radio-silent neutron stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, so far unrecognized. "We needed Hipparcos to finish a long and complicated task of tracking down Geminga," Patrizia Caraveo comments. "Never was so faint an object pinpointed so precisely. Now we can say that we have more exact knowledge on the position of Geminga than of any other 'classical' neutron star -- even the famous Crab pulsar." Closing in on Geminga When first observed in a systematic way by COS-B, Geminga's place in the sky was known only to within half a degree -- an uncertainty in position as wide as the Moon. X-ray observations by other satellites narrowed the field and led to the detection of Geminga by visible light, as an extremely faint star. Last year, the same Milan-based Italian team was able to determine the distance of Geminga at 500 light-years, by a succession of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (see ESA Information Note 04-96). The next task was precisely to situate a

  1. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laros, J.G.; Hurley, K.C.; Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Briggs, M.S.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M.L.; Fishman, G.J.; Meegan, C.A.; Cline, T.L.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Between the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) launch in 1991 April and the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) demise in 1992 October, concurrent coverage by CGRO, PVO, and Ulysses was obtained for several hundred gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the PVO and Ulysses thresholds, 37 were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to ∼2 degree accuracy by the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), and three were also localized by COMPTEL. We computed arrival-time error boxes, whose larger dimensions range from about 2' to several degrees and whose smaller dimensions are in the arcminute range. Twelve have areas less than 10 arcmin 2 , and only four have areas greater than 1 deg 2 . The area of the smallest box is 0.44 arcmin 2 . We find that the overall BATSE localization accuracy for these events is consistent with the most recent stated uncertainties. This work indicates that the ROSAT soft X-ray source found within a preliminary IPN error box for GB920501 (Trig 1576) (Hurley et al.) is less likely to be the GRB counterpart than previously reported. copyright copyright 1998. The American Astronomical Society

  2. A comparative study for the correction of random gamma ray summing effect in HPGe - detector based gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, M.U.

    2007-01-01

    Random coincidence summing of gamma rays is a potential source of errors in gamma ray spectrometry. The effect has a little significance at low counting rates but becomes increasingly important at high counting rates. Careful corrections are required to avoid the introduction of errors in quantitative based measurements. Several correction methods have been proposed. The most common is the pulser method that requires a precision Pulse Generator in the electronic circuitry to provide reference peak. In this work, a comparative study has been carried out both by using pulser method and utilizing radioactive source based method. This study makes the use of 137 Cs radionuclide as a fixed source and the 241 Am as a varied source. The dead time of the system has been varied and the acquisition of the spectra at each position yielded the resulted peak areas with pulsed pile up losses. The linear regression of the data has been carried out. The study has resulted in establishing a consistent factor that can be used as the characteristic of the detector and thereby removes the need of the calibrated or precise Pulse Generator. (author)

  3. GRO: Black hole models for gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1995-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has established that the distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) is isotropic but is bound radially. This finding suggests that the bursts are either cosmological or they originate from an extended Galactic halo. The implied luminosities and the observed variability of the GRB's on time scales as short as one millisecond suggest that they originate from compact objects. We are presently studying black hole models for GRB's. Any such model must produce a non-thermal photon spectrum to agree with the observed properties. For a wide range of burst parameters the assumed bursting source consists of a non-thermal electron-positron-photon plasma of very high density. It seems possible to produce such a plasma in accretion onto black holes. In our on-going work, we are developing the kinetic theory for a non-equilibrium pair plasma. The main new features of our work are as follows: (1) We do not assume the presence of a thermal electron bath. (2) Non-thermal, high-energy pairs are allowed to have an arbitrary concentration and energy distribution. (3) There is no soft photon source in our model; initially all the photons in the plasma are either energetic X-rays or gamma-rays. (4) The initial energy distribution of the pairs as well as photons is arbitrary. (5) We collect the analytical expressions for the kinetic kernels for all relevant processes. And (6) we present a different approach to finding the time-evolution of pair and photon spectra, which is a combination of the kinetic-theory and the non-linear Monte-Carlo schemes. We have developed many Monte-Carlo programs to model various process, to take into account the time evolution, and to incorporate various physical effects which are unique to non-thermal plasmas. The hydrodynamics of fireballs in GRB's was studied before. Applying results from kinetic theory will improve our understanding of these systems.

  4. Regional radiometric map of Syria, using gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissa, M.; Al-Hent, R.; Nasser, R.

    2005-01-01

    The regional radiometric gamma-ray spectrometry map of Syria, scaled 1/1000000, for surficial concentration of the total radioactivity (Ur), eU, eTh and %K was completely achieved after normalizing the airborne and carbon data sets to match each other. It worthy notice that, the anomalies found to be closely related to either phosphate and/or glauconite deposits. It is worth mentioning that throughout the survey work many scattered occurrences of secondary uranium mineralization were found as spots in some formations and phosphate rocks. Where this phenomena attributes to chemical and physical disseminating instead of accumulating the radioelements. So, that leads to a weak expectation for usual surface uranium deposits where attributed to the oxidizing condition. Then this expectation remains, as an open question requires answering through planning to subsurface prospecting. (Author)

  5. The ionization of gamma-ray burst environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D. L.; Hartmann, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    If a gamma-ray burst (GRB) occurs in a neutral medium, ionizing radiation associated with the burst will flash-photoionize a region surrounding the source. Detection of the line emission from this ionized region can constrain the flux of ionizing radiation accompanying the GRB and the density and ionization state of the environment surrounding the burst source. If the medium is sufficiently dense then the ionized region will recombine and fade on human timescales, aiding in the detection of the burst location and further constraining the density of the medium. However, dust within the dense medium may attenuate the line flux; the burst is unlikely to melt the dust along the line-of-sight. Astronomically interesting flux limits can be established by observations with reasonable integration times on a major telescope (e.g., 3 meter or larger).

  6. BATSE spectroscopy catalog of bright gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Fantasia, Stephan F.; Palmer, David; Cline, Thomas L.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegar, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive results on the spectra of 30 bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs) as observed by the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The data selection was strict in including only spectra that are of high reliability for continuum shape studies. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog presents fluences, model fits (for five spectral models for three energy ranges), and photon spectra in a standard manner for each burst. Complete information is provided to describe the data selection and analysis procedures. The catalog results are also presented in electronic format (from the Compton Observatory Science Support Center) and CD-ROM format (AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 2). These electronic formats also present the count spectra and detector response matrices so as to allow for independent study and fitting by researchers outside the BATSE Team. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog complements the catalog from BATSE Large Area Detector (LAD) data by Fishman et al. (1994).

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometer onboard Chang'E-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T., E-mail: matao@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Key Laboratory of dark matter and space astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Chang, J.; Zhang, N.; Jian, W.; Cai, M.S.; Gong, Y.Z.; Tang, H.S.; Zhang, R.J.; Wang, N.S.; Yu, M.; Mao, J.P.; Hu, Y.M. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Key Laboratory of dark matter and space astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Xu, A.A.; Zhu, M.H. [MACAU University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai Long, Taipa, Macau (China)

    2013-10-21

    Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) is included in the payload of Chinese second lunar mission Chang'E-2 that has been launched in October 2010. Specific objectives of the GRS are to map abundance of O, Si, Fe, Ti, U, Th, K, and, perhaps, Mg, Al, and Ca, to depth of about 20 cm. The energy resolution and detection efficiency were improved compared with Chang'E-1 GRS. We will describe the design of GRS, which used LaBr{sub 3} for its main detector, and present its performance in this paper. Moreover, the initial result of Chang'E-2 GRS is reported.

  8. Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements and simulations for uranium mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchais T.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AREVA Mines and the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache are collaborating to improve the sensitivity and precision of uranium concentration evaluation by means of gamma measurements. This paper reports gamma-ray spectra, recorded with a high-purity coaxial germanium detector, on standard cement blocks with increasing uranium content, and the corresponding MCNP simulations. The detailed MCNP model of the detector and experimental setup has been validated by calculation vs. experiment comparisons. An optimization of the detector MCNP model is presented in this paper, as well as a comparison of different nuclear data libraries to explain missing or exceeding peaks in the simulation. Energy shifts observed between the fluorescence X-rays produced by MCNP and atomic data are also investigated. The qualified numerical model will be used in further studies to develop new gamma spectroscopy approaches aiming at reducing acquisition times, especially for ore samples with low uranium content.

  9. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    or location has been irradiated to high doses. Among labels available worldwide, a few are suitable for indicating absorbed dose regions of slightly less than 104 Gy (monitoring high dose ranges (i.e., sterilization dose levels of > 104 Gy or > 1 Mrad), and in some cases......, and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain...... permit somewhat more precise discrimination of dose levels, and may sometimes be useful for monitoring differences in local dose distributions or area monitoring of radiation damage probabilities around particle accelerators or large radionuclide sources....

  10. Gamma ray constraints on flavor violating asymmetric dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, Isabella; Panci, Paolo; Sannino, Francesco, E-mail: masina@fe.infn.it, E-mail: panci@cp3-origins.net, E-mail: sannino@cp3.dias.sdu.dk [CP3-Origins and DIAS, Southern Denmark University, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2012-12-01

    We show how cosmic gamma rays can be used to constrain models of asymmetric Dark Matter decaying into lepton pairs by violating flavor. First of all we require the models to explain the anomalies in the charged cosmic rays measured by PAMELA, Fermi and HESS performing combined fits we determine the allowed values of the Dark Matter mass and lifetime. For these models, we then determine the constraints coming from the measurement of the isotropic γ-ray background by Fermi for a complete set of lepton flavor violating primary modes and over a range of DM masses from 100 GeV to 10 TeV. We find that the Fermi constraints rule out the flavor violating asymmetric Dark Matter interpretation of the charged cosmic ray anomalies.

  11. Terrestrial gamma-ray flash production by lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Brant E.

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are brief flashes of gamma-rays originating in the Earth's atmosphere and observed by satellites. First observed in 1994 by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, TGFs consist of one or more ˜1 ms pulses of gamma-rays with a total fluence of ˜1/cm2, typically observed when the satellite is near active thunderstorms. TGFs have subsequently been observed by other satellites to have a very hard spectrum (harder than dN/d E ∝ 1/ E ) that extends from below 25 keV to above 20 MeV. When good lightning data exists, TGFs are closely associated with measurable lightning discharge. Such discharges are typically observed to occur within 300 km of the sub-satellite point and within several milliseconds of the TGF observation. The production of these intense energetic bursts of photons is the puzzle addressed herein. The presence of high-energy photons implies a source of bremsstrahlung, while bremsstrahlung implies a source of energetic electrons. As TGFs are associated with lightning, fields produced by lightning are naturally suggested to accelerate these electrons. Initial ideas about TGF production involved electric fields high above thunderstorms as suggested by upper atmospheric lightning research and the extreme energies required for lower-altitude sources. These fields, produced either quasi-statically by charges in the cloud and ionosphere or dynamically by radiation from lightning strokes, can indeed drive TGF production, but the requirements on the source lightning are too extreme and therefore not common enough to account for all existing observations. In this work, studies of satellite data, the physics of energetic electron and photon production, and consideration of lightning physics motivate a new mechanism for TGF production by lightning current pulses. This mechanism is then developed and used to make testable predictions. TGF data from satellite observations are compared

  12. PROBING EXTRAGALACTIC DUST THROUGH NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, S. L.; Li Aigen

    2010-01-01

    The quantities and wavelength dependencies of the dust extinction along the lines of sight toward 33 nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with redshifts z V derived from the Drude approach is generally larger by a factor of ∼2-5 than that inferred by assuming a SMC-type template extinction law. Consistent with previous studies, the extinction-to-gas ratio is mostly smaller than that of the MW, and does not seem to correlate with the shape of the extinction curve. It is shown that the standard silicate-graphite interstellar grain model closely reproduces the extinction curves of all 33 GRBs host galaxies. For these 33 bursts at z < 2, we find no evidence for the evolution of the dust extinction, dust sizes, and relative abundances of silicate to graphite on redshifts.

  13. In-Flight Observation of Gamma Ray Glows by ILDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; van Deursen, A. P. J.; Marisaldi, M.; Ursi, A.; de Boer, A. I.; Bardet, M.; Allasia, C.; Boissin, J.-F.; Flourens, F.; Østgaard, N.

    2017-12-01

    An Airbus A340 aircraft flew over Northern Australia with the In-Flight Lightning Damage Assessment System (ILDAS) installed onboard. A long-duration gamma ray emission was detected. The most intense emission was observed at 12 km altitude and lasted for 20 s. Its intensity was 20 times the background counts, and it was abruptly terminated by a distant lightning flash. In this work we reconstruct the aircraft path and event timeline. The glow-terminating flash triggered a discharge from the aircraft wing that was recorded by a video camera operating onboard. Another count rate increase was observed 6 min later and lasted for 30 s. The lightning activity as reported by ground networks in this region was analyzed. The measured spectra characteristics of the emission were estimated.

  14. Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhua; Zhang Chuanfei; Hu Mengchun; Peng Taiping; Wang Zhentong; Tang Dengpan; Zhao Guangjun

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray relative energy response of Ce: YAG crystal, which is important for pulsed γ-ray measurement, was studied in this work.The Ce: YAG crystal, which was developed at Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, was aligned point by point with γ-rays scattered from an industrial 60 Co line source. The γ-ray relative energy response was calculated using the mass attenuation coefficient. The results show that the numerical calculation method of γ-ray relative energy response is reliable, and the experimental method with multi-energy point γ-ray by Compton scattering is also feasible, that can be used for checking up correctness of the numerical calculation results. (authors)

  15. Digital gamma-ray spectroscopy based on FPGA technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bolic, M

    2002-01-01

    A digital pulse processing system convenient for high rate gamma-ray spectroscopy with NaI(Tl) detectors has been designed. The new programmable logic device has been used for implementation of dedicated high-speed pulse processor, as the central part of the system. The processor is capable to operate at the speed of fast ADC, preserving maximum throughput of the system. Special care has been taken to reduce the distortion of energy spectrum caused by pile-up at high-count rates. The developed system is highly flexible, and the parameters of its operation can be changed in software. The performance of the system was tested for high counting rate of 400000 s sup - sup 1.

  16. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisaldi, M; Argan, A; Ursi, A; Gjesteland, T; Fuschino, F; Labanti, C; Galli, M; Tavani, M; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; D'Amico, F; Østgaard, N; Mereghetti, S; Campana, R; Cattaneo, P W; Bulgarelli, A; Colafrancesco, S; Dietrich, S; Longo, F; Gianotti, F; Giommi, P; Rappoldi, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A

    2015-11-16

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km 2 /yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  17. Ultrahigh energy gamma rays: carriers of cosmological information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonian, F.A.; Atoyan, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Observational data being the basis of contemporary cosmological models are not numerous: Hubble law of redshift for galaxies, element abundances, and observation of cosmic microwave background radiation (MBR). The significance of MBR discovery predicted in the Big-Band model is particularly stressed. Radio astronomical measurements give an information on MBR only near the Earth. Experimental confirmation of evolution of MBR, i.e., its probing in remote epochs, might obviously present a direct verification of the hypothesis of hot expanding Universe. The carriers of similar cosmological information should be particles which, firstly, effectively interact with MBR, and secondly, make it possible to identify unambiguously the epoch of interaction. A possibility to verify a number of cosmological hypotheses by searching the cutoffs in spectra of ultrahigh energy gamma-rays (UHEGR) from extragalactic sources is discussed

  18. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  19. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry for decommissioning: anywhere, anytime, anything

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attas, M.; Bialas, E. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The recent development of extended-source modeling software for portable gamma-ray spectrometers has been a boon to large nuclear projects in the field. This paper reports AECL's experience with such instruments during the first phase of decommissioning the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (now Whiteshell Laboratories). They have been used for routine measurements of soil cores, for estimates of radionuclide content of waste packages, for surveys of potentially contaminated terrain adjacent to a waste storage facility, and for scans of drums containing likely-clean material. The instruments have been found to be sufficiently sensitive and almost as accurate as laboratory spectrometers using reference sources and calibrated counting geometries. (author)

  20. Black Holes in Gamma Ray Bursts and Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Remo; Argüelles, C. R.; Fraga, B. M. O.; Geralico, A.; Quevedo, H.; Rueda, J. A.; Siutsou, I.

    2013-09-01

    Current research marks a clear success in identifying the moment of formation of a Black Hole of 10M⊙, with the emission of a Gamma Ray Burst. This explains in terms of the 'Blackholic Energy' the source of the energy of these astrophysical systems. Their energetics up to 1054 erg, make them detectable all over our Universe. Concurrently a new problematic has been arising related to: (a) The evidence of Dark Matter in galactic halos; (b) The origin of the Super Massive Black Holes in active galactic nuclei and Quasars and (c) The purported existence of a Black Hole in the Center of our Galaxy. These three aspects of this new problematic have been traditionally approached independently. We propose an unified approach to all three of them based on a system of massive self-gravitating neutrinos in General Relativity. Perspectives of future research are presented.